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Sample records for stimulation dbs electrodes

  1. The ethics of deep brain stimulation (DBS).

    PubMed

    Unterrainer, Marcus; Oduncu, Fuat S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an invasive technique designed to stimulate certain deep brain regions for therapeutic purposes and is currently used mainly in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. However, DBS is also used increasingly for other experimental applications, such as the treatment of psychiatric disorders (e.g. severe depression), weight reduction. Apart from its therapeutic potential, DBS can cause severe adverse effects, some that might also have a significant impact on the patient's personality and autonomy by the external stimulation of DBS which effects lie beyond the individual's control and free will. The article's purpose is to outline the procedures of DBS currently used in therapeutic and experimental applications and to discuss the ethical concerns regarding this procedure. It will address the clinical benefit-risk-ratio, the particular ethics of research in this field, and the ethical issues raised by affecting a patient's or an individual's personality and autonomous behaviour. Moreover, a potential ethical guideline, the Ulysses contract is discussed for the field of clinical application as well as the question of responsibility. PMID:25597042

  2. Temperature control at DBS electrodes using a heat sink: experimentally validated FEM model of DBS lead architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwassif, Maged M.; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. The extent of temperature increases around DBS electrodes during normal operation (joule heating and increased metabolic activity) or coupling with an external source (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging) remains poorly understood and methods to mitigate temperature increases are being actively investigated. We developed a heat transfer finite element method (FEM) simulation of DBS incorporating the realistic architecture of Medtronic 3389 leads. The temperature changes were analyzed considering different electrode configurations, stimulation protocols and tissue properties. The heat-transfer model results were then validated using micro-thermocouple measurements during DBS lead stimulation in a saline bath. FEM results indicate that lead design (materials and geometry) may have a central role in controlling temperature rise by conducting heat. We show how modifying lead design can effectively control temperature increases. The robustness of this heat-sink approach over complimentary heat-mitigation technologies follows from several features: (1) it is insensitive to the mechanisms of heating (e.g. nature of magnetic coupling); (2) it does not interfere with device efficacy; and (3) can be practically implemented in a broad range of implanted devices without modifying the normal device operations or the implant procedure.

  3. A critical reflection on the technological development of deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    PubMed Central

    Ineichen, Christian; Glannon, Walter; Temel, Yasin; Baumann, Christian R.; Sürücü, Oguzkan

    2014-01-01

    Since the translational research findings of Benabid and colleagues which partly led to their seminal paper regarding the treatment of mainly tremor-dominant Parkinson patients through thalamic high-frequency-stimulation (HFS) in 1987, we still struggle with identifying a satisfactory mechanistic explanation of the underlying principles of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Furthermore, the technological advance of DBS devices (electrodes and implantable pulse generators, IPG’s) has shown a distinct lack of dynamic progression. In light of this we argue that it is time to leave the paleolithic age and enter hellenistic times: the device-manufacturing industry and the medical community together should put more emphasis on advancing the technology rather than resting on their laurels. PMID:25278864

  4. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) attentional effects parallel those of l-dopa treatment.

    PubMed

    Brusa, L; Pierantozzi, M; Peppe, A; Altibrandi, M G; Giacomini, P; Mazzone, P; Stanzione, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim of our study was to investigate the different effects on attentional capacity of deep brain stimulation DBS (STN or GPi) and of l-dopa in PD patients. Patients were evaluated on-DBS/off-l-dopa, on-l-dopa/off-DBS, on-l-dopa/on-DBS and off-l-dopa/off-DBS. Our results indicate that DBS effects on attentional functions parallel those of l-dopa. A site independent (both STN and GPi) worsening of verbal fluency was observed, possibly connected to the stimulus effect on the cortico-subcortical-cortical loop. PMID:11716137

  5. In vivo impedance spectroscopy of deep brain stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempka, Scott F.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Matthew D.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a powerful clinical technology, but a systematic characterization of the electrical interactions between the electrode and the brain is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the in vivo changes in the DBS electrode impedance that occur after implantation and during clinically relevant stimulation. Clinical DBS devices typically apply high-frequency voltage-controlled stimulation, and as a result, the injected current is directly regulated by the impedance of the electrode-tissue interface. We monitored the impedance of scaled-down clinical DBS electrodes implanted in the thalamus and subthalamic nucleus of a rhesus macaque using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements ranging from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz. To further characterize our measurements, equivalent circuit models of the electrode-tissue interface were used to quantify the role of various interface components in producing the observed electrode impedance. Following implantation, the DBS electrode impedance increased and a semicircular arc was observed in the high-frequency range of the EIS measurements, commonly referred to as the tissue component of the impedance. Clinically relevant stimulation produced a rapid decrease in electrode impedance with extensive changes in the tissue component. These post-operative and stimulation-induced changes in impedance could play an important role in the observed functional effects of voltage-controlled DBS and should be considered during clinical stimulation parameter selection and chronic animal research studies.

  6. SaBer DBS: a fully programmable, rechargeable, bilateral, charge-balanced preclinical microstimulator for long-term neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Samuel G.; Porr, Bernd; Riddell, John; Winter, Christine; Grace, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    To effectively study the mechanisms by which deep brain stimulation (DBS) produces its therapeutic benefit and to evaluate new therapeutic indications, it is vital to administer DBS over an extended period of time in awake, freely behaving animals. To date multiple preclinical stimulators have been designed and described. However, these stimulators have failed to incorporate some of the design criteria necessary to provide a system analogous to those used clinically. Here we define these design criteria and propose an improved and complete preclinical DBS system. This system is fully programmable in frequency, pulse-width and current amplitude, has a rechargeable battery and delivers biphasic, charge-balanced output to two independent electrodes. The system has been optimized for either implantation or for use externally via attachment to rodent jackets. PMID:23305773

  7. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) at the interface of neurology and psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nolan R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging interventional therapy for well-screened patients with specific treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric diseases. Some neuropsychiatric conditions, such as Parkinson disease, have available and reasonable guideline and efficacy data, while other conditions, such as major depressive disorder and Tourette syndrome, have more limited, but promising results. This review summarizes both the efficacy and the neuroanatomical targets for DBS in four common neuropsychiatric conditions: Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, major depressive disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Based on emerging new research, we summarize novel approaches to optimization of stimulation for each neuropsychiatric disease and we review the potential positive and negative effects that may be observed following DBS. Finally, we summarize the likely future innovations in the field of electrical neural-network modulation. PMID:24177464

  8. Choosing electrodes for deep brain stimulation experiments--electrochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, Jan; Habel, Beate; Schreiber, Ute; van Rienen, Ursula; Strauss, Ulf; Gimsa, Ulrike

    2005-03-30

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapy of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). Commercially available electrodes for animal models of Parkinson's disease vary in geometry and material. We characterized such electrodes and found a drift in their properties within minutes and up to about 60 h after immersion in cell culture medium, both with and without a stimulation signal. Electrode properties could largely be restored by proteolytic treatment for platinum/iridium electrodes but not for stainless steel ones. Short-term drift and irreversible aging could be followed by impedance measurements. Aging was accompanied by metal corrosion and erosion of the plastic insulation. For both materials, the degradation rates depended on the current density at the electrode surfaces. Fourier analysis of the DBS pulse (60 micros, repetition rate 130 Hz) revealed harmonic frequencies spanning a band of more than three decades, with significant harmonics up to the MHz range. The band is located in a window imposed by electrode processes and capacitive cell membrane bridging at the low and high frequency ends, respectively. Even though electrode processes are reduced at higher frequencies they only vanish above 1 MHz and cannot be avoided. Therefore, the use of inert electrode materials is of special importance. The neurotoxicity of iron makes avoiding stainless steel electrodes imperative. Future developments need to avoid the use of corrosive materials and current density hot spots at the electrode surface, and to reduce low frequency components in the DBS pulses in order to diminish electrode processes. PMID:15698665

  9. Carbon nanotube yarns for deep brain stimulation electrode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changqing; Li, Luming; Hao, Hongwei

    2011-12-01

    A new form of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode was proposed that was made of carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). Electrode interface properties were examined using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). The CNTY electrode interface exhibited large charge storage capacity (CSC) of 12.3 mC/cm(2) which increased to 98.6 mC/cm(2) after acid treatment, compared with 5.0 mC/cm(2) of Pt-Ir. Impedance spectrum of both untreated and treated CNTY electrodes showed that finite diffusion process occurred at the interface due to their porous structure and charge was delivered through capacitive mechanism. To evaluate stability electrical stimulus was exerted for up to 72 h and CV and EIS results of CNTY electrodes revealed little alteration. Therefore CNTY could make a good electrode material for DBS. PMID:21859605

  10. Influences of interpolation error, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface on models of electric fields produced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Howell, Bryan; Naik, Sagar; Grill, Warren M

    2014-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, but the fundamental mechanisms by which DBS has its effects remain unknown. Computational models can provide insights into the mechanisms of DBS, but to be useful, the models must have sufficient detail to predict accurately the electric fields produced by DBS. We used a finite-element method model of the Medtronic 3387 electrode array, coupled to cable models of myelinated axons, to quantify how interpolation errors, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface affect calculation of electrical potentials and stimulation thresholds for populations of model nerve fibers. Convergence of the potentials was not a sufficient criterion for ensuring the same degree of accuracy in subsequent determination of stimulation thresholds, because the accuracy of the stimulation thresholds depended on the order of the elements. Simplifying the 3387 electrode array by ignoring the inactive contacts and extending the terminated end of the shaft had position-dependent effects on the potentials and excitation thresholds, and these simplifications may impact correlations between DBS parameters and clinical outcomes. When the current density in the bulk tissue is uniform, the effect of the electrode-tissue interface impedance could be approximated by filtering the potentials calculated with a static lumped electrical equivalent circuit. Further, for typical DBS parameters during voltage-regulated stimulation, it was valid to approximate the electrode as an ideal polarized electrode with a nonlinear capacitance. Validation of these computational considerations enables accurate modeling of the electric field produced by DBS. PMID:24448594

  11. Influences of Interpolation Error, Electrode Geometry, and the Electrode-Tissue Interface on Models of Electric Fields Produced by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Bryan; Naik, Sagar; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, but the fundamental mechanisms by which DBS has its effects remain unknown. Computational models can provide insights into the mechanisms of DBS, but to be useful, the models must have sufficient detail to predict accurately the electric fields produced by DBS. We used a finite element method model of the Medtronic 3387 electrode array, coupled to cable models of myelinated axons, to quantify how interpolation errors, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface affect calculation of electrical potentials and stimulation thresholds for populations of model nerve fibers. Convergence of the potentials was not a sufficient criterion for ensuring the same degree of accuracy in subsequent determination of stimulation thresholds, because the accuracy of the stimulation thresholds depended on the order of the elements. Simplifying the 3387 electrode array by ignoring the inactive contacts and extending the terminated end of the shaft had position dependent effects on the potentials and excitation thresholds, and these simplifications may impact correlations between DBS parameters and clinical outcomes. When the current density in the bulk tissue is uniform, the effect of the electrode-tissue interface impedance could be approximated by filtering the potentials calculated with a static lumped electrical equivalent circuit. Further, for typical DBS parameters during voltage-regulated stimulation, it was valid to approximate the electrode as an ideal polarized electrode with a nonlinear capacitance. Validation of these computational considerations enables accurate modeling of the electric field produced by DBS. PMID:24448594

  12. Pathological Alterations and Stress Responses near DBS Electrodes after MRI Scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T: An In Vivo Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Li, Shao-Wu; Liu, Huan-Guang; Li, Jun-Ju; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathological alterations and the stress responses around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T. Materials and Methods DBS devices were stereotactically implanted into the brains of New Zealand rabbits, targeting the left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami, while on the right side, a puncture passage pointing to the same target was made. MRI scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T were performed using transmit/receive head coils. The pathological alterations of the surrounding tissue were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The levels of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP-70), Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) and Caspase-3 were determined by western-blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to assess the stress responses near the DBS electrodes. Results H&E staining and TEM showed that the injury around the DBS electrodes was featured by a central puncture passage with gradually weakened injurious alterations. Comparisons of the injury across the groups manifested similar pathological alterations near the DBS electrodes in each group. Moreover, western-blotting and QPCR assay showed that the level of HSP-70 was not elevated by MRI scans (p>0.05), and the levels of NeuN and Caspase-3 were equal in each group, regardless of the field strengths applied (p>0.05). Conclusions Based on these findings, it is reasonable to conclude that in this study the MRI scans at multiple levels failed to induce additional tissue injury around the DBS electrodes. These preliminary data furthered our understanding of MRI-related DBS heating and encouraged revisions of the current MRI guidelines for patients with DBS devices. PMID:24988329

  13. CranialVault and its CRAVE tools: a clinical computer assistance system for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Pierre-François; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Li, Rui; Remple, Michael S.; Kao, Chris; Neimat, Joseph S.; Konrad, Peter E.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods have been developed to assist surgeons at various stages of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. These include construction of anatomical atlases, functional databases, and electrophysiological atlases and maps. But, a complete system that can be integrated into the clinical workflow has not been developed. In this paper we present a system designed to assist physicians in pre-operative target planning, intra-operative target refinement and implantation, and post-operative DBS lead programming. The purpose of this system is to centralize the data acquired a the various stages of the procedure, reduce the amount of time needed at each stage of the therapy, and maximize the efficiency of the entire process. The system consists of a central repository (CranialVault), of a suite of software modules called CRAVE (CRAnialVault Explorer) that permit data entry and data visualization at each stage of the therapy, and of a series of algorithms that permit the automatic processing of the data. The central repository contains image data for more than 400 patients with the related pre-operative plans and position of the final implants and about 10,550 electrophysiological data points (micro-electrode recordings or responses to stimulations) recorded from 222 of these patients. The system has reached the stage of a clinical prototype that is being evaluated clinically at our institution. A preliminary quantitative validation of the planning component of the system performed on 80 patients who underwent the procedure between January 2009 and December 2009 shows that the system provides both timely and valuable information. PMID:20732828

  14. Shorter pulse generator longevity and more frequent stimulator adjustments with pallidal DBS for dystonia versus other movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Pawan V.; Almeida, Leonardo; Smelser, Luke B.; Huang, He; Guthrie, Barton L.; Walker, Harrison C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation has become a routine therapy for movement disorders, but it is relatively invasive and costly. Although stimulation intensity relates to battery longevity, less is known about how diagnosis and stimulation target contribute to this clinical outcome. Here we evaluate battery longevity in movement disorders patients who were treated at a tertiary referral center. Objective: To compare single channel pulse generator longevity in patients with movement disorders. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, we evaluated 470 consecutive Soletra implants for routine care. Battery longevity was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analyses, and group comparisons were performed with the log rank mean test. The frequency of clinic encounters for ongoing care was evaluated across diagnoses with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: The mean pulse generator longevity was 44.9±1.4 months. Pallidal DBS for dystonia was associated with shorter battery longevity than subthalamic and thalamic DBS for Parkinson's disease and essential tremor (28.1±2.1 versus 47.1±1.8 and 47.8±2.6 months, respectively, mean ± standard error, p<0.001), and dystonia patients required more frequent clinic visits for routine care (F=6.0, p=0.003). Pallidal DBS for Parkinson's disease and thalamic DBS for cerebellar outflow tremor were associated with shorter battery longevity, as well (35.3±4.6 and 26.4±4.3 months, respectively). Conclusions: Pallidal DBS for dystonia was associated with shorter battery longevity and more frequent stimulator adjustments versus DBS for Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. Characteristics of the stimulation target and disease pathophysiology both likely contribute to battery longevity in patients with movement disorders. PMID:24548586

  15. Microelectrode Guided Implantation of Electrodes into the Subthalamic Nucleus of Rats for Long-term Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fluri, Felix; Bieber, Micheal; Volkmann, Jens; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a widely used and effective therapy for several neurologic disorders, such as idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dystonia or tremor. DBS is based on the delivery of electrical stimuli to specific deep anatomic structures of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of DBS remain enigmatic. This has led to an interest in investigating the impact of DBS in animal models, especially in rats. As DBS is a long-term therapy, research should be focused on molecular-genetic changes of neural circuits that occur several weeks after DBS. Long-term DBS in rats is challenging because the rats move around in their cage, which causes problems in keeping in place the wire leading from the head of the animal to the stimulator. Furthermore, target structures for stimulation in the rat brain are small and therefore electrodes cannot easily be placed at the required position. Thus, a set-up for long-lasting stimulation of rats using platinum/iridium electrodes with an impedance of about 1 M? was developed for this study. An electrode with these specifications allows for not only adequate stimulation but also recording of deep brain structures to identify the target area for DBS. In our set-up, an electrode with a plug for the wire was embedded in dental cement with four anchoring screws secured onto the skull. The wire from the plug to the stimulator was protected by a stainless-steel spring. A swivel was connected to the circuit to prevent the wire from becoming tangled. Overall, this stimulation set-up offers a high degree of free mobility for the rat and enables the head plug, as well as the wire connection between the plug and the stimulator, to retain long-lasting strength. PMID:26485522

  16. Evaluation of high-perimeter electrode designs for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, complications including infections and mis-programing following surgical replacement of the battery-powered implantable pulse generator adversely impact the safety profile of this therapy. We sought to decrease power consumption and extend battery life by modifying the electrode geometry to increase stimulation efficiency. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether electrode contact perimeter or area had a greater effect on increasing stimulation efficiency. Approach. Finite-element method (FEM) models of eight prototype electrode designs were used to calculate the electrode access resistance, and the FEM models were coupled with cable models of passing axons to quantify stimulation efficiency. We also measured in vitro the electrical properties of the prototype electrode designs and measured in vivo the stimulation efficiency following acute implantation in anesthetized cats. Main results. Area had a greater effect than perimeter on altering the electrode access resistance; electrode (access or dynamic) resistance alone did not predict stimulation efficiency because efficiency was dependent on the shape of the potential distribution in the tissue; and, quantitative assessment of stimulation efficiency required consideration of the effects of the electrode-tissue interface impedance. Significance. These results advance understanding of the features of electrode geometry that are important for designing the next generation of efficient DBS electrodes.

  17. Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus reduces the severity of parkinsonian

    E-print Network

    Dorval II, Alan D. "Chuck"

    symptoms in persons whose Parkinson's disease has become medically refractory. For DBS to be effective of parkinsonian motor symptoms, but the therapeutic mechanisms are not understood. We hypothesize that clinically the pathological patterns of GPi activity is the mechanism by which DBS treats parkinsonian motor symptoms. I

  18. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Stein, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Pin (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Dellinger, Jennifer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  19. Design and in vivo evaluation of more efficient and selective deep brain stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Bryan; Huynh, Brian; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, the efficiency and selectivity of DBS can be improved. Our objective was to design electrode geometries that increased the efficiency and selectivity of DBS. Approach. We coupled computational models of electrodes in brain tissue with cable models of axons of passage (AOPs), terminating axons (TAs), and local neurons (LNs); we used engineering optimization to design electrodes for stimulating these neural elements; and the model predictions were tested in vivo. Main results. Compared with the standard electrode used in the Medtronic Model 3387 and 3389 arrays, model-optimized electrodes consumed 45-84% less power. Similar gains in selectivity were evident with the optimized electrodes: 50% of parallel AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of perpendicular AOPs from 44 to 48% with the standard electrode to 0-14% with bipolar designs; 50% of perpendicular AOPs could be activated while reducing activation of parallel AOPs from 53 to 55% with the standard electrode to 1-5% with an array of cathodes; and, 50% of TAs could be activated while reducing activation of AOPs from 43 to 100% with the standard electrode to 2-15% with a distal anode. In vivo, both the geometry and polarity of the electrode had a profound impact on the efficiency and selectivity of stimulation. Significance. Model-based design is a powerful tool that can be used to improve the efficiency and selectivity of DBS electrodes.

  20. Analysis of electrodes' placement and deformation in deep brain stimulation from medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Maroua; Lalys, Florent; Maumet, Camille; Haegelen, Claire; Jannin, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to reduce the motor symptoms such as rigidity or bradykinesia, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) has emerged as prime target of DBS in idiopathic PD. However, DBS surgery is a difficult procedure requiring the exact positioning of electrodes in the pre-operative selected targets. This positioning is usually planned using patients' pre-operative images, along with digital atlases, assuming that electrode's trajectory is linear. However, it has been demonstrated that anatomical brain deformations induce electrode's deformations resulting in errors in the intra-operative targeting stage. In order to meet the need of a higher degree of placement accuracy and to help constructing a computer-aided-placement tool, we studied the electrodes' deformation in regards to patients' clinical data (i.e., sex, mean PD duration and brain atrophy index). Firstly, we presented an automatic algorithm for the segmentation of electrode's axis from post-operative CT images, which aims to localize the electrodes' stimulated contacts. To assess our method, we applied our algorithm on 25 patients who had undergone bilateral STNDBS. We found a placement error of 0.91+/-0.38 mm. Then, from the segmented axis, we quantitatively analyzed the electrodes' curvature and correlated it with patients' clinical data. We found a positive significant correlation between mean curvature index of the electrode and brain atrophy index for male patients and between mean curvature index of the electrode and mean PD duration for female patients. These results help understanding DBS electrode' deformations and would help ensuring better anticipation of electrodes' placement.

  1. Localization of deep brain stimulation electrodes via metal artifacts in CT images.

    PubMed

    Motevakel, Amir; Medvedev, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    In Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), the location of implanted electrodes in the brain has direct influence on the therapeutic effect of the treatment. This work deals with estimating the position of the implanted DBS electrodes from the images registered by X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. A technique named junction method that takes advantage of the streak artifacts created by the metal parts of the electrodes in CT images is proposed for this purpose. To start with, the brain image is extracted by defining a brain mask. Next, the edges are intensified by applying a Gaussian convolution operator followed by a measure of the second derivative of the image along all directions in the image plane. Criteria of adjacency and length are applied to the lines detected by the Hough transform to distinguish between tracks of streak artifacts and the brain structure. At some points, straight lines are distorted by noise. To handle this issue, all lines that fit same line equation are merged. The horizontal line connecting the two DBS electrodes (one in each cerebral hemisphere) is called electrode line. To specify the electrodes position, intersections of the electrode line with every other line are marked. Finally, to obtain the vertical position estimate, the above algorithm is applied to the image stack. PMID:25570143

  2. Analysis of deep brain stimulation electrode characteristics for neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Closed-loop deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems have the potential to optimize treatment of movement disorders by enabling automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters based on a feedback signal. Evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the DBS electrode may serve as suitable closed-loop control signals. The objective of this study was to understand better the factors that influence ECAP and LFP recording, including the physical presence of the electrode, the geometrical dimensions of the electrode, and changes in the composition of the peri-electrode space across recording conditions. Approach. Coupled volume conductor-neuron models were used to calculate single-unit activity as well as ECAP responses and LFP activity from a population of model thalamic neurons. Main results. Comparing ECAPs and LFPs measured with and without the presence of the highly conductive recording contacts, we found that the presence of these contacts had a negligible effect on the magnitude of single-unit recordings, ECAPs (7% RMS difference between waveforms), and LFPs (5% change in signal magnitude). Spatial averaging across the contact surface decreased the ECAP magnitude in a phase-dependent manner (74% RMS difference), resulting from a differential effect of the contact on the contribution from nearby or distant elements, and decreased the LFP magnitude (25% change). Reductions in the electrode diameter or recording contact length increased signal energy and increased spatial sensitivity of single neuron recordings. Moreover, smaller diameter electrodes (500 µm) were more selective for recording from local cells over passing axons, with the opposite true for larger diameters (1500 µm). Changes in electrode dimensions had phase-dependent effects on ECAP characteristics, and generally had small effects on the LFP magnitude. ECAP signal energy and LFP magnitude decreased with tighter contact spacing (100 µm), compared to the original dimensions (1500 µm), with the opposite effect on the ECAP at longer contact-to-contact distances (2000 µm). Finally, acute edema reduced the single neuron and population ECAP signal energy, as well as LFP magnitude, and glial encapsulation had the opposite effect, after accounting for loss of cells in the peri-electrode space. Significance. This study determined recording conditions and electrode designs that influence ECAP and LFP recording fidelity.

  3. Electrical stimulation and electrode properties. Part 2: pure metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Matthew; Baylor, Kelly; Netherton, Brett L; Stecker, Mark M

    2010-12-01

    Electrical stimulation can cause significant damage to clinical electrodes as well as patient injury. In this study, the effects of stimulation on pure metal electrodes were investigated without the complexities introduced by the multiple elements that make up the clinical electrode. As with the clinical electrodes, there was significant decomposition of pure stainless steel anodes with no associated significant changes in the cathodes when stimulation employed long pulse durations. Effects of stimulation were greater when the anode and cathode were closer under constant voltage stimulation but were distance independent under constant current stimulation. High ionic content of the solution also increased the degree of damage to the anode as did the presence of chloride in the solution. Electrode composition also influenced the amount damage to the anode. Platinum and platinum-iridium electrodes showed no damage with any stimulus while stainless steel showed the lowest resistance to corrosion for direct current (DC) stimulation. Tungsten electrodes behaved very differently than stainless steel, decomposing with pulse stimulation and resisting decomposition during DC stimulation because of the formation of surface protective layers. Because platinum was able to maintain high levels of current over time, prolonged stimulation produced dramatic increases in the temperature of the solution; however, even short periods of stimulation were sufficient to produce dramatic changes in pH in the neighborhood of the electrode. PMID:21313789

  4. Intraoperative MRI for optimizing electrode placement for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Pan, Longsheng; Song, Huifang; Xu, Xin; Xu, Bainan; Yu, Xinguang; Ling, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The degree of clinical improvement achieved by deep brain stimulation (DBS) is largely dependent on the accuracy of lead placement. This study reports on the evaluation of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for adjusting deviated electrodes to the accurate anatomical position during DBS surgery and acute intracranial changes. METHODS Two hundred and six DBS electrodes were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 110 patients with Parkinson disease. All patients underwent iMRI after implantation to define the accuracy of lead placement. Fifty-six DBS electrode positions in 35 patients deviated from the center of the STN, according to the result of the initial postplacement iMRI scans. Thus, we adjusted the electrode positions for placement in the center of the STN and verified this by means of second or third iMRI scans. Recording was performed in adjusted parameters in the x-, y-, and z-axes. RESULTS Fifty-six (27%) of 206 DBS electrodes were adjusted as guided by iMRI. Electrode position was adjusted on the basis of iMRI 62 times. The sum of target coordinate adjustment was -0.5 mm in the x-axis, -4 mm in the y-axis, and 15.5 mm in the z-axis; the total of distance adjustment was 74.5 mm in the x-axis, 88 mm in the y-axis, and 42.5 mm in the z-axis. After adjustment with the help of iMRI, all electrodes were located in the center of the STN. Intraoperative MRI revealed 2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages in 2 patients, brain shift in all patients, and leads penetrating the lateral ventricle in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS The iMRI technique can guide surgeons as they adjust deviated electrodes to improve the accuracy of implanting the electrodes into the correct anatomical position. The iMRI technique can also immediately demonstrate acute changes such as hemorrhage and brain shift during DBS surgery. PMID:26274983

  5. Selection of the optimal microelectrode during DBS surgery in Parkinson's patients

    E-print Network

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Selection of the optimal microelectrode during DBS surgery in Parkinson's patients Konrad Abstract. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is effective treatment of Parkinson: Parkinson's Disease, DBS, STN, Wavelet, Filtering, PCA, FFT, Spike detection, Spike discrimination, Spike

  6. Three-dimensional localization of cortical electrodes in deep brain stimulation surgery from intraoperative fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Michael J; Kondylis, Efstathios D; Alhourani, Ahmad; Wozny, Thomas A; Lipski, Witold J; Crammond, Donald J; Richardson, R Mark

    2016-01-15

    Electrophysiological recordings from subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) electrodes implanted temporarily during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries offer a unique opportunity to record cortical activity for research purposes. The optimal utilization of this important research method relies on accurate and robust localization of ECoG electrodes, and intraoperative fluoroscopy is often the only imaging modality available to visualize electrode locations. However, the localization of a three-dimensional electrode position using a two-dimensional fluoroscopic image is problematic due to the lost dimension orthogonal to the fluoroscopic image, a parallax distortion implicit to fluoroscopy, and variability of visible skull contour among fluoroscopic images. Here, we present a method to project electrodes visible on the fluoroscopic image onto a reconstructed cortical surface by leveraging numerous common landmarks to translate, rotate, and scale coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstructed surfaces in order to recreate the coordinate framework in which the fluoroscopic image was acquired, while accounting for parallax distortion. Validation of this approach demonstrated high precision with an average total Euclidian distance between three independent reviewers of 1.65±0.68mm across 8 patients and 82 electrodes. Spatial accuracy was confirmed by correspondence between recorded neural activity over sensorimotor cortex during hand movement. This semi-automated interface reliably estimates the location of temporarily implanted subdural ECoG electrodes visible on intraoperative fluoroscopy to a cortical surface. PMID:26520771

  7. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes. PMID:26193273

  8. DBS-relevant electric fields increase hydraulic conductivity of in vitro endothelial monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Quintero, S. V.; Datta, A.; Amaya, R.; Elwassif, M.; Bikson, M.; Tarbell, J. M.

    2010-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) achieves therapeutic outcome through generation of electric fields (EF) in the vicinity of energized electrodes. Targeted brain regions are highly vascularized, and it remains unknown if DBS electric fields modulate blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, either through electroporation of individual endothelial cells or electro-permeation of barrier tight junctions. In our study, we calculated the intensities of EF generated around energized Medtronic 3387 and 3389 DBS leads by using a finite element model. Then we designed a novel stimulation system to study the effects of such fields with DBS-relevant waveforms and intensities on bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers, which were used as a basic analog for the blood-brain barrier endothelium. Following 5 min of stimulation, we observed a transient increase in endothelial hydraulic conductivity (Lp) that could be related to the disruption of the tight junctions (TJ) between cells, as suggested by zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein staining. This 'electro-permeation' occurred in the absence of cell death or single cell electroporation, as indicated by propidium iodide staining and cytosolic calcein uptake. Our in vitro results, using uniform fields and BAEC monolayers, thus suggest that electro-permeation of the BBB may occur at electric field intensities below those inducing electroporation and within intensities generated near DBS electrodes. Further studies are necessary to address potential BBB disruption during clinical studies, with safety and efficacy implications.

  9. Feedback control of electrode offset voltage during functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun-Uk; Song, Kang-Il; Shon, Ahnsei; Han, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Hwang, Dosik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Choi, Kuiwon; Youn, Inchan

    2013-08-15

    Control of the electrode offset voltage is an important issue related to the processes of functional electrical stimulation because excess charge accumulation over time damages both the tissue and the electrodes. This paper proposes a new feedback control scheme to regulate the electrode offset voltage to a predetermined reference value. The electrode offset voltage was continuously monitored using a sample-and-hold (S/H) circuit during stimulation and non-stimulation periods. The stimulation current was subsequently adjusted using a proportional-integral (PI) controller to minimise the error between the reference value and the electrode offset voltage. During the stimulation period, the electrode offset voltage was maintained through the S/H circuit, and the PI controller did not affect the amplitude of the stimulation current. In contrast, during the non-stimulation period, the electrode offset voltage was sampled through the S/H circuit and rapidly regulated through the PI controller. The experimental results obtained using a nerve cuff electrode showed that the electrode offset voltage was successfully controlled in terms of the performance specifications, such as the steady- and transient-state responses and the constraint of the controller output. Therefore, the proposed control scheme can potentially be used in various nerve stimulation devices and applications requiring control of the electrode offset voltage. PMID:23685268

  10. Effect of Vim thalamic DBS in Parkinson's disease on F wave duration.

    PubMed

    Pakarian, Pooya; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Shahzadi, Sohrab

    2004-09-01

    F waves were recorded from abductor hallucis muscle in eight Parkinsonian patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes surgically implanted in their Vim thalamic nucleus in two conditions of DBS ON and OFF. Patients with relatively anteriorly located electrodes exhibited a significant reduction in F wave duration and also in the UPDRS rigidity score of the corresponding foot when the DBS was ON. In contrast, patients with relatively posteriorly located electrodes exhibited no significant difference in F wave duration in the two DBS ON and OFF conditions. The rigidity UPDRS score in the corresponding foot diminished very little in the latter group. Both groups had great improvement in their tremor at rest UPDRS score in that foot when the DBS was ON. Vim surgery is generally accepted to affect tremor mechanisms. However, surgical intervention in anterior parts of Vim has been reported to affect rigidity mechanisms. This correspondence of these two symptoms of rigidity and tremor with the two locations of anterior and relatively posterior Vim may indicate the contribution of mechanisms of rigidity, but not tremor, in enhancement of F wave duration and hyper excitability of spinal motoneuron. PMID:15337258

  11. Deep brain stimulation for refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mandat, Tomasz; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Koziara, Henryk; Nauman, Pawe?

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a method of treatment utilized to control medically refractory epilepsy (RE). Patients with medically refractory epilepsy who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatment or surgical resection of the epileptic focus and those who do not qualify for surgery could benefit from DBS. The most frequently used stereotactic targets for DBS are the anterior thalamic nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, central-medial thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum. The DBS is believed to be an effective method of treatment for various types of epilepsy among adults and adolescents. Side effects may be associated with implantation of electrodes and with the stimulation itself. An increasing number of publications and growing interest in DBS application for RE may result in standardization of the qualification and treatment protocol for RE with DBS. PMID:23185188

  12. Subject-specific computational modeling of DBS in the PPTg area

    PubMed Central

    Zitella, Laura M.; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Yager, Paul; Hudson, Heather M.; Brintz, Katelynn; Duchin, Yuval; Harel, Noam; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed to alleviate medically intractable gait difficulties associated with Parkinson's disease. Clinical trials have shown somewhat variable outcomes, stemming in part from surgical targeting variability, modulating fiber pathways implicated in side effects, and a general lack of mechanistic understanding of DBS in this brain region. Subject-specific computational models of DBS are a promising tool to investigate the underlying therapy and side effects. In this study, a parkinsonian rhesus macaque was implanted unilaterally with an 8-contact DBS lead in the PPTg region. Fiber tracts adjacent to PPTg, including the oculomotor nerve, central tegmental tract, and superior cerebellar peduncle, were reconstructed from a combination of pre-implant 7T MRI, post-implant CT, and post-mortem histology. These structures were populated with axon models and coupled with a finite element model simulating the voltage distribution in the surrounding neural tissue during stimulation. This study introduces two empirical approaches to evaluate model parameters. First, incremental monopolar cathodic stimulation (20 Hz, 90 ?s pulse width) was evaluated for each electrode, during which a right eyelid flutter was observed at the proximal four contacts (?1.0 to ?1.4 mA). These current amplitudes followed closely with model predicted activation of the oculomotor nerve when assuming an anisotropic conduction medium. Second, PET imaging was collected OFF-DBS and twice during DBS (two different contacts), which supported the model predicted activation of the central tegmental tract and superior cerebellar peduncle. Together, subject-specific models provide a framework to more precisely predict pathways modulated by DBS. PMID:26236229

  13. Penetrating multichannel stimulation and recording electrodes in auditory prosthesis research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David J

    2008-08-01

    Microelectrode arrays offer the auditory systems physiologists many opportunities through a number of electrode technologies. In particular, silicon substrate electrode arrays offer a large design space including choice of layout plan, range of surface areas for active sites, a choice of site materials and high spatial resolution. Further, most designs can double as recording and stimulation electrodes in the same preparation. Scala tympani auditory prosthesis research has been aided by mapping electrodes in the cortex and the inferior colliculus to assess the CNS responses to peripheral stimulation. More recently silicon stimulation electrodes placed in the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus and the inferior colliculus have advanced the exploration of alternative stimulation sites for auditory prostheses. Multiplication of results from experimental effort by simultaneously stimulating several locations, or by acquiring several streams of data synchronized to the same stimulation event, is a commonly sought after advantage. Examples of inherently multichannel functions which are not possible with single electrode sites include (1) current steering resulting in more focused stimulation, (2) improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for recording when noise and/or neural signals appear on more than one site and (3) current source density (CSD) measurements. Still more powerful are methods that exploit closely-spaced recording and stimulation sites to improve detailed interrogation of the surrounding neural domain. Here, we discuss thin-film recording/stimulation arrays on silicon substrates. These electrode arrays have been shown to be valuable because of their precision coupled with reproducibility in an ever expanding design space. The shape of the electrode substrate can be customized to accommodate use in cortical, deep and peripheral neural structures while flexible cables, fluid delivery and novel coatings have been added to broaden their application. The use of iridium oxide as the neural interface site material has increased the efficiency of charge transfer for stimulation and lowered impedance for recording electrodes. PMID:18343062

  14. Differential effects of deep brain stimulation on verbal fluency.

    PubMed

    Ehlen, Felicitas; Schoenecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-07-01

    We aimed at gaining insights into principles of subcortical lexical processing. Therefore, effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in different target structures on verbal fluency (VF) were tested. VF was assessed with active vs. inactivated DBS in 13 and 14 patients with DBS in the vicinity of the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and, respectively, of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Results were correlated to electrode localizations in postoperative MRI, and compared to those of 12 age-matched healthy controls. Patients' VF performance was generally below normal. However, while activation of DBS in the vicinity of VIM provoked marked VF decline, it induced subtle phonemic VF enhancement in the vicinity of STN. The effects correlated with electrode localizations in left hemispheric stimulation sites. The results show distinct dependencies of VF on DBS in the vicinity of VIM vs. STN. Particular risks for deterioration occur in patients with relatively ventromedial thalamic electrodes. PMID:24815947

  15. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  16. Analysis of fractal electrodes for efficient neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Elahi, Behzad; Molina, Alberto; Mosig, Juan R.; Pollo, Claudio; Chen, Robert; Graham, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Planar electrodes are increasingly used in therapeutic neural stimulation techniques such as functional electrical stimulation, epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS), and cortical stimulation. Recently, optimized electrode geometries have been shown to increase the efficiency of neural stimulation by increasing the variation of current density on the electrode surface. In the present work, a new family of modified fractal electrode geometries is developed to enhance the efficiency of neural stimulation. It is shown that a promising approach in increasing the neural activation function is to increase the “edginess” of the electrode surface, a concept that is explained and quantified by fractal mathematics. Rigorous finite element simulations were performed to compute electric potential produced by proposed modified fractal geometries. The activation of 256 model axons positioned around the electrodes was then quantified, showing that modified fractal geometries required a 22% less input power while maintaining the same level of neural activation. Preliminary in vivo experiments investigating muscle evoked potentials due to median nerve stimulation showed encouraging results, supporting the feasibility of increasing neural stimulation efficiency using modified fractal geometries. PMID:23874290

  17. Computational modeling of an endovascular approach to deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Connolly, Allison T.; Bajwa, Jawad A.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy currently relies on a transcranial neurosurgical technique to implant one or more electrode leads into the brain parenchyma. In this study, we used computational modeling to investigate the feasibility of using an endovascular approach to target DBS therapy. Approach. Image-based anatomical reconstructions of the human brain and vasculature were used to identify 17 established and hypothesized anatomical targets of DBS, of which five were found adjacent to a vein or artery with intraluminal diameter ?1 mm. Two of these targets, the fornix and subgenual cingulate white matter (SgCwm) tracts, were further investigated using a computational modeling framework that combined segmented volumes of the vascularized brain, finite element models of the tissue voltage during DBS, and multi-compartment axon models to predict the direct electrophysiological effects of endovascular DBS. Main results. The models showed that: (1) a ring-electrode conforming to the vessel wall was more efficient at neural activation than a guidewire design, (2) increasing the length of a ring-electrode had minimal effect on neural activation thresholds, (3) large variability in neural activation occurred with suboptimal placement of a ring-electrode along the targeted vessel, and (4) activation thresholds for the fornix and SgCwm tracts were comparable for endovascular and stereotactic DBS, though endovascular DBS was able to produce significantly larger contralateral activation for a unilateral implantation. Significance. Together, these results suggest that endovascular DBS can serve as a complementary approach to stereotactic DBS in select cases.

  18. Neurotrophin-eluting hydrogel coatings for neural stimulating electrodes.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jessica O; Cogan, Stuart F; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2007-05-01

    Improved sensory and motor prostheses for the central nervous system will require large numbers of electrodes with low electrical thresholds for neural excitation. With the eventual goal of reducing stimulation thresholds, we have investigated the use of biodegradable, neurotrophin-eluting hydrogels (i.e., poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid), PEGPLA) as a means of attracting neurites to the surface of stimulating electrodes. PEGPLA hydrogels with release rates ranging from 1.5 to 3 weeks were synthesized. These hydrogels were applied to multielectrode arrays with sputtered iridium oxide charge-injection sites. The coatings had little impact on the iridium oxide electrochemical properties, including charge storage capacity, impedance, and voltage transients during current pulsing. Additionally, we quantitatively examined the ability of neurotrophin-eluting, PEGPLA hydrogels to promote neurite extension in vitro using a PC12 cell culture model. Hydrogels released neurotrophin (nerve growth factor, NGF) for at least 1 week, with neurite extension near that of an NGF positive control and much higher than extension seen from sham, bovine serum albumin-releasing boluses, and a negative control. These results show that neurotrophin-eluting hydrogels can be applied to multielectrode arrays, and suggest a method to improve neuron-electrode proximity, which could result in lowered electrical stimulation thresholds. Reduced thresholds support the creation of smaller electrode structures and high density electrode prostheses, greatly enhancing prosthesis control and function. PMID:17041927

  19. Non-rectangular waveforms for neural stimulation with practical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Tie, Yanmei

    2013-01-01

    Historically the rectangular pulse waveform has been the choice for neural stimulation. The strength–duration curve is thus defined for rectangular pulses. Not much attention has been paid to alternative waveforms to determine if the pulse shape has an effect on the strength–duration relation. Similarly the charge injection capacity of neural electrodes has also been measured with rectangular pulses. In this study we questioned if non-rectangular waveforms can generate a stronger stimulation effect, when applied through practical electrodes, by minimizing the neural activation threshold and maximizing the charge injection capacity of the electrode. First, the activation threshold parameters were studied with seven different pulse shapes using computer simulations of a local membrane model. These waveforms were rectangular, linear increase and decrease, exponential increase and decrease, Gaussian, and sinusoidal. The chronaxie time was found to be longer with all the non-rectangular pulses and some provided more energy efficient stimulation than the rectangular waveform. Second, the charge injection capacity of titanium nitride microelectrodes was measured experimentally for the same waveforms. Linearly decreasing ramp provided the best charge injection for all pulse widths tested from 0.02 to 0.5 ms. Finally, the most efficient waveform that maximized the charge injection capacity of the electrode while providing the lowest threshold charge for neural activation was searched. Linear and exponential decrease, and Gaussian waveforms were found to be the most efficient pulse shapes. PMID:17873425

  20. Parkinson’s disease DBS: what, when, who and why? The time has come to tailor DBS targets

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been proven to be an effective therapy for medication-refractory symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. As the evidence base continues to evolve, many important issues have surfaced, including: what operation should be performed (brain target[s], unilateral vs bilateral, simultaneous vs staged); when to operate (how early is too early to intervene?), who should be operated on (disease duration, age, symptom profiles and the use of the interdisciplinary screening team); and finally, why to operate (the rationale of surgery vs medication/apomorphine pumps/duodopa pumps/stem cell trials/gene therapy trials). We will address each of these critical issues, as well make the argument that a tailored approach to DBS and DBS targeting will best serve each potential candidate. We will review the multiple peer-reviewed studies and we will emphasize the recently available data from randomized DBS studies. We will argue that moving away from a single DBS target (e.g., subthalamic nucleus DBS) and a single approach to DBS methodology (e.g., bilateral simultaneous operations) is a reasonable next step for the Parkinson’s disease community. Following careful interdisciplinary DBS screening, a physician–patient discussion has the potential to establish a patient-centered and symptom-specific outcome for each potential DBS candidate. The interdisciplinary DBS team can function together to formulate and to consider an optimal and tailored approach. A tailored approach will allow for the consideration of the complex and numerous variables that may contribute to a positive or negative overall DBS outcome. We will review and provide expert commentary on a potential interdisciplinary approach to selecting unilateral or alternatively bilateral subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus DBS. Our approach is aimed to maximize benefit(s) and minimize risk(s) in order to best tailor therapy for an individual patient. PMID:21384698

  1. Parkinson’s disease DBS: what, when, who and why? The time has come to tailor DBS targets.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been proven to be an effective therapy for medication refractory symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As the evidence base continues to evolve, many important issues have surfaced, including: what operation should be performed (brain target[s],unilateral vs bilateral, simultaneous vs staged); when to operate (how early is too early to intervene?), who should be operated on (disease duration, age, symptom profiles and the use of the interdisciplinary screening team); and finally, why to operate (the rationale of surgery vs medication/apomorphine pumps/duodopa pumps/stem cell trials/gene therapy trials). We will address each of these critical issues, as well make the argument that a tailored approach to DBS and DBS targeting will best serve each potential candidate. We will review the multiple peer reviewed studies and we will emphasize the recently available data from randomized DBS studies.We will argue that moving away from a single DBS target (e.g., subthalamic nucleus DBS) and a single approach to DBS methodology (e.g., bilateral simultaneous operations) is a reasonable next step for the Parkinson's disease community. Following careful interdisciplinary DBS screening, a physician-patient discussion has the potential to establish a patient-centered and symptom-specific outcome for each potential DBS candidate. The interdisciplinary DBS team can function together to formulate and to consider an optimal and tailored approach. A tailored approach will allow for the consideration of the complex and numerous variables that may contribute to a positive or negative overall DBS outcome. We will review and provide expert commentary on a potential interdisciplinary approach to selecting unilateral or alternatively bilateral subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus DBS. Our approach is aimed to maximize benefit(s) and minimize risk(s) in order to best tailor therapy for an individual patient. PMID:21384698

  2. Pulse-clamp technique for single neuron stimulation electrode characterization.

    PubMed

    van Ooyen, Andre; Zagolla, Volker G; Ulrich, Christian; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturized electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high target selectivity during stimulation in single neuron networks, while significant charge transfer is still demanded. A reliable test method is required to evaluate charge injection capability for high resolution neural stimulation applications that demand both a large amount of charge injection and a small electrode size. A circuit designed for the pulse-clamp technique was employed to characterize the electrode charge-storage capability of microelectrodes of sizes smaller than 300 microm in diameter. The circuit allows different electrodes and surface modifications to be quickly and accurately compared. Pulse-clamp measurements are performed on planar microelectrodes in 154 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution with 400 micros long pulses at charges up to 40 nC. The pulse-clamp and cyclic voltammetry results of sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) electrodes of different sizes show charge losses of less than 3% and a superior reversible charge injection capability compared to platinum microelectrodes of the same size, even at higher charge density levels. PMID:19964763

  3. Regional Personalized Electrodes to Select Transcranial Current Stimulation Target

    PubMed Central

    Tecchio, Franca; Cancelli, A.; Cottone, C.; Tomasevic, L.; Devigus, B.; Zito, G.; Ercolani, Matilde; Carducci, F.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Personalizing transcranial stimulations promises to enhance beneficial effects for individual patients. Objective: To stimulate specific cortical regions by developing a procedure to bend and position custom shaped electrodes; to probe the effects on cortical excitability produced when the properly customized electrode is targeting different cortical areas. Method: An ad hoc neuronavigation procedure was developed to accurately shape and place the personalized electrodes on the basis of individual brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) on bilateral primary motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) cortices. The transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) protocol published by Feurra et al. (2011b) was used to test the effects on cortical excitability of the personalized electrode when targeting S1 or M1. Results: Neuronal excitability as evaluated by tACS was different when targeting M1 or S1, with the General Estimating Equation model indicating a clear tCS Effect (p?stimulating electrode. Significance: Through multimodal brain investigations continuous efforts in understanding the neuronal changes related to specific neurological or psychiatric diseases become more relevant as our ability to build the compensating interventions improves. An important step forward on this path is the ability to target the specific cortical area of interest, as shown in the present pilot work. PMID:23626529

  4. Electrochemical and Electrophysiological Performance of Platinum Electrodes Within the Ninety-Nine-Electrode Stimulating Nerve Cuff.

    PubMed

    Pe?lin, Polona; Mehle, Andraž; Karpe, Blaž; Rozman, Janez

    2015-10-01

    The trend in neural prostheses using selective nerve stimulation for electrical stimulation therapies is headed toward single-part systems having a large number of working electrodes (WEs), each of which selectively stimulate neural tissue or record neural response (NR). The present article reviews the electrochemical and electrophysiological performance of platinum WE within a ninety-nine-electrode spiral cuff for selective nerve stimulation and recording of peripheral nerves, with a focus on the vagus nerve (VN). The electrochemical properties of the WE were studied in vitro using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The equivalent circuit model (ECM) of the interface between the WE and neural tissue was extracted from the EIS data and simulated in the time domain using a preset current stimulus. Electrophysiological performance of in-space and fiber-type highly selective vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was tested using an isolated segment of a porcine VN and carotid artery as a reference. A quasitrapezoidal current-controlled pulse (stimulus) was applied to the VN or arterial segment using an appointed group of three electrodes (triplet). The triplet and stimulus were configured to predominantly stimulate B-fibers and minimize the stimulation of A-fibers. The EIS results revealed capacitive charge transfer predominance, which is a highly desirable property. Electrophysiological performance testing indicated the potential existence of certain parameters and waveforms of the stimulus for which the contribution of the A-fibers to the NR decreased slightly and that of the B-fibers increased slightly. Findings show that the design of the stimulating electrodes, based on the EIS and ECM results, could act as a useful tool for nerve cuff development. PMID:26471140

  5. Access resistance of stimulation electrodes as a function of electrode proximity to the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdi, Joseph A.; Minnikanti, Saugandhika; Peixoto, Nathalia; Agrawal, Anant; Cohen, Ethan D.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Epiretinal prostheses seek to effectively stimulate the retina by positioning electrode arrays close to its surface so current pulses generate narrow retinal electric fields. Our objective was to evaluate the use of the electrical impedance of insulated platinum electrodes as a measure of the proximity of insulated platinum electrodes to the inner surface of the retina. Approach. We examined the impedance of platinum disk electrodes, 0.25 mm in diameter, insulated with two widths (0.8 and 1.6 mm outer diameter) of transparent fluoropolymer in a rabbit retinal eyecup preparation. Optical coherence tomography measured the electrode’s proximity to the retinal surface which was correlated with changes in the voltage waveform at the electrode. Electrode impedance changes during retinal deformation were also studied. Main results. When the 1.6 mm diameter insulated electrodes advanced towards the retinal surface from 1000 ?m, their voltage step at current pulse onset increased, reflecting an access resistance increase of 3880 ± 630 ?, with the 50% midpoint averaging 30 ?m, while thin 0.8 mm insulated electrode advancement showed an access resistance increase 50% midpoint averaging 16 ?m. Using impedance spectroscopy, electrode-retina proximity differences were seen in the 1.6 mm insulated electrode impedance modulus between 1 and 100 kHz and the waveform phase angle at 0.3-10 kHz, while thin 0.8 mm insulated electrode advancement produced smaller impedance modulus changes with retinal proximity between 3 and 100 kHz. These impedance changes with retinal proximity may reflect different sized zones of eye wall being coupled in series with the insulated platinum electrode. Significance. The proximity of stimulus electrodes to neural tissue in fluid-filled spaces can be estimated from access resistance changes in the stimulus pulse waveform. Because many prosthetic devices allow back telemetry communication of the stimulus electrode waveform, it is possible these series resistance increases observed with retinal proximity could be used as a metric of stimulus electrode placement.

  6. Performance of conducting polymer electrodes for stimulating neuroprosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Hassarati, R. T.; Giraud, B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Chen, S.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Suaning, G. J.; Poole-Warren, L. A.; Lovell, N. H.

    2013-02-01

    Objective. Recent interest in the use of conducting polymers (CPs) for neural stimulation electrodes has been growing; however, concerns remain regarding the stability of coatings under stimulation conditions. These studies examine the factors of the CP and implant environment that affect coating stability. The CP poly(ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is examined in comparison to platinum (Pt), to demonstrate the potential performance of these coatings in neuroprosthetic applications. Approach. PEDOT is coated on Pt microelectrode arrays and assessed in vitro for charge injection limit and long-term stability under stimulation in biologically relevant electrolytes. Physical and electrical stability of coatings following ethylene oxide (ETO) sterilization is established and efficacy of PEDOT as a visual prosthesis bioelectrode is assessed in the feline model. Main results. It was demonstrated that PEDOT reduced the potential excursion at a Pt electrode interface by 72% in biologically relevant solutions. The charge injection limit of PEDOT for material stability was found to be on average 30× larger than Pt when tested in physiological saline and 20× larger than Pt when tested in protein supplemented media. Additionally stability of the coating was confirmed electrically and morphologically following ETO processing. It was demonstrated that PEDOT-coated electrodes had lower potential excursions in vivo and electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) could be detected within the visual cortex. Significance. These studies demonstrate that PEDOT can be produced as a stable electrode coating which can be sterilized and perform effectively and safely in neuroprosthetic applications. Furthermore these findings address the necessity for characterizing in vitro properties of electrodes in biologically relevant milieu which mimic the in vivo environment more closely.

  7. Mechanisms determining safety and performance of brain stimulating electrodes.

    PubMed

    Andre, Dana Lynn; Shanmugasundaram, Balaji; Mason, Jonathan; Drapaca, Corina; Gluckman, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    Electrical current is widely used to interact with or stimulate neural systems. Current transduction from device to tissue is mediated at the electrode-tissue interface by capacitive charge and electrochemistry. This charge-passing-capacity is frequency dependent. While safety parameters have been established for high-frequencies, safety has not been fully determined for novel materials and pulse frequencies significantly lower than 100 Hz. We are explicitly interested in safety parameters and performance of charge passing at low frequencies (<100 Hz) for neural systems. We present a visual study of pH during charge passing for electrodeposited iridium oxide electrodes. Clear reaction-diffusion waves are observed that extend many hundreds of micrometers from the electrode surface. PMID:19964485

  8. Rescue GPi-DBS for a Stroke-associated Hemiballism in a Patient with STN-DBS

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Genko; Maling, Nicholas; Avila-Thompson, Amanda; Zeilman, Pam R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Malaty, Irene A.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemiballism/hemichorea commonly occurs as a result of a lesion in the subthalamic region. Case Report A 38-year-old male with Parkinson’s disease developed intractable hemiballism in his left extremities due to a small lesion that was located adjacent to the right deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead, 10 months after bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS placement. He underwent a right globus pallidus internus (GPi)-DBS lead implantation. GPi-DBS satisfactorily addressed his hemiballism. Discussion This case offered a unique look at basal ganglia physiology in human hemiballism. GPi-DBS is a reasonable therapeutic option for the treatment of medication refractory hemiballism in the setting of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24587970

  9. Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring: a comparison of stimulating electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kartush, J M; Niparko, J K; Bledsoe, S C; Graham, M D; Kemink, J L

    1985-12-01

    Preservation of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma resection may be enhanced by the use of intraoperative electrical stimulation. Although stimulation of the extratemporal facial nerve is an effective and established procedure, anatomic differences of the intradural facial nerve and its microenvironment demand more exacting stimulus protocols. The absence of epineurium may make the intradural nerve more susceptible to mechanical or electrical trauma while intermittent pooling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the cerebellopontine angle may shunt current away from nerve. Four stimulus configurations were examined under varying conditions simulating CSF pooling. The results indicated that: 1. insulation of stimulating electrodes prevents CSF current shunting and allows utilization of a constant current source, and 2. monopolar and bipolar configurations demonstrate significantly different electrical characteristics which may be employed selectively based upon specific clinical goals. PMID:4068872

  10. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond electrodes: optimization towards neural stimulation applications.

    PubMed

    Garrett, David J; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Stacey, Alastair; Fox, Kate; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Diamond is well known to possess many favourable qualities for implantation into living tissue including biocompatibility, biostability, and for some applications hardness. However, conducting diamond has not, to date, been exploited in neural stimulation electrodes due to very low electrochemical double layer capacitance values that have been previously reported. Here we present electrochemical characterization of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond electrodes grown in the presence of nitrogen (N-UNCD) that exhibit charge injection capacity values as high as 163 µC cm(-2) indicating that N-UNCD is a viable material for microelectrode fabrication. Furthermore, we show that the maximum charge injection of N-UNCD can be increased by tailoring growth conditions and by subsequent electrochemical activation. For applications requiring yet higher charge injection, we show that N-UNCD electrodes can be readily metalized with platinum or iridium, further increasing charge injection capacity. Using such materials an implantable neural stimulation device fabricated from a single piece of bio-permanent material becomes feasible. This has significant advantages in terms of the physical stability and hermeticity of a long-term bionic implant. PMID:22156061

  11. Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) for neural stimulation electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D.; Smirnov, Anton; Shire, Douglas B.; Gingerich, Marcus; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) deposited by DC reactive sputtering from an iridium metal target have been characterized in vitro for their potential as neural recording and stimulation electrodes. SIROFs were deposited over gold metallization on flexible multielectrode arrays fabricated on thin (15 µm) polyimide substrates. SIROF thickness and electrode areas of 200–1300 nm and 1960–125600 µm2, respectively, were investigated. The charge-injection capacities of the SIROFs were evaluated in an inorganic interstitial fluid model in response to charge-balanced, cathodal-first current pulses. Charge injection capacities were measured as a function of cathodal pulse width (0.2 – 1 ms) and potential bias in the interpulse period (0.0 to 0.7 V vs. Ag|AgCl). Depending on the pulse parameters and electrode area, charge-injection capacities ranged from 1–9 mC/cm2, comparable with activated iridium oxide films (AIROFs) pulsed under similar conditions. Other parameters relevant to the use of SIROF on nerve electrodes, including the thickness dependence of impedance (0.05–105 Hz) and the current necessary to maintain a bias in the interpulse region were also determined. PMID:17271216

  12. Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ranju; Chawla, Reeta

    2014-01-01

    We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson's disease (PD) with deep brain stimulator (DBS) using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG) normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS. PMID:25024475

  13. A Programmable High-Voltage Compliance Neural Stimulator for Deep Brain Stimulation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Sy-Han; Lo, Yu-Chun; Lee, Nicole; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Tu, Po-Hsun; Yang, Chia-Yen; Lin, James Chang-Chieh; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most effective therapies for movement and other disorders. The DBS neurosurgical procedure involves the implantation of a DBS device and a battery-operated neurotransmitter, which delivers electrical impulses to treatment targets through implanted electrodes. The DBS modulates the neuronal activities in the brain nucleus for improving physiological responses as long as an electric discharge above the stimulation threshold can be achieved. In an effort to improve the performance of an implanted DBS device, the device size, implementation cost, and power efficiency are among the most important DBS device design aspects. This study aims to present preliminary research results of an efficient stimulator, with emphasis on conversion efficiency. The prototype stimulator features high-voltage compliance, implemented with only a standard semiconductor process, without the use of extra masks in the foundry through our proposed circuit structure. The results of animal experiments, including evaluation of evoked responses induced by thalamic electrical stimuli with our fabricated chip, were shown to demonstrate the proof of concept of our design. PMID:26029954

  14. A programmable high-voltage compliance neural stimulator for deep brain stimulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Sy-Han; Lo, Yu-Chun; Lee, Nicole; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Tu, Po-Hsun; Yang, Chia-Yen; Lin, James Chang-Chieh; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most effective therapies for movement and other disorders. The DBS neurosurgical procedure involves the implantation of a DBS device and a battery-operated neurotransmitter, which delivers electrical impulses to treatment targets through implanted electrodes. The DBS modulates the neuronal activities in the brain nucleus for improving physiological responses as long as an electric discharge above the stimulation threshold can be achieved. In an effort to improve the performance of an implanted DBS device, the device size, implementation cost, and power efficiency are among the most important DBS device design aspects. This study aims to present preliminary research results of an efficient stimulator, with emphasis on conversion efficiency. The prototype stimulator features high-voltage compliance, implemented with only a standard semiconductor process, without the use of extra masks in the foundry through our proposed circuit structure. The results of animal experiments, including evaluation of evoked responses induced by thalamic electrical stimuli with our fabricated chip, were shown to demonstrate the proof of concept of our design. PMID:26029954

  15. Different patterns of local field potentials from limbic DBS targets in patients with major depressive and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W-J; Huebl, J; Brücke, C; Gabriëls, L; Bajbouj, M; Merkl, A; Schneider, G-H; Nuttin, B; Brown, P; Kühn, A A

    2014-11-01

    The role of distinct limbic areas in emotion regulation has been largely inferred from neuroimaging studies. Recently, the opportunity for intracranial recordings from limbic areas has arisen in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for neuropsychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we test the hypothesis that distinct temporal patterns of local field potential (LFP) activity in the human limbic system reflect disease state and symptom severity in MDD and OCD patients. To this end, we recorded LFPs via implanted DBS electrodes from the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST area) in 12 patients (5 OCD, 7 MDD) and from the subgenual cingulate cortex in 7 MDD patients (CG25 area). We found a distinct pattern of oscillatory activity with significantly higher ?-power in MDD compared with OCD in the BNST area (broad ?-band 8-14?Hz; P<0.01) and a similar level of ?-activity in the CG25 area as in the BNST area in MDD patients. The mean ?-power correlated with severity of depressive symptoms as assessed by the Beck depression inventory in MDD (n=14, r=0.55, P=0.042) but not with severity of obsessive compulsive symptoms in OCD. Here we show larger ?-band activity in MDD patients compared with OCD recorded from intracranial DBS targets. Our results suggest that ?-activity in the limbic system may be a signature of symptom severity in MDD and may serve as a potential state biomarker for closed loop DBS in MDD. PMID:24514569

  16. Development of very large electrode arrays for epiretinal stimulation (VLARS)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinal implants have been developed to treat blindness causing retinal degenerations such as Retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The retinal stimulators are covering only a small portion of the retina usually in its center. To restore not only central vision but also a useful visual field retinal stimulators need to cover a larger area of the retina. However, large area retinal stimulators are much more difficult to implant into an eye. Some basic questions concerning this challenge should be answered in a series of experiments. Methods Large area retinal stimulators were fabricated as flexible multielectrode arrays (MEAs) using silicon technology with polyimide as the basic material for the substrate. Electrodes were made of gold covered with reactively sputtered iridium oxide. Several prototype designs were considered and implanted into enucleated porcine eyes. The prototype MEAs were also used as recording devices. Results Large area retinal stimulator MEAs were fabricated with a diameter of 12 mm covering a visual angle of 37.6° in a normal sighted human eye. The structures were flexible enough to be implanted in a folded state through an insertion nozzle. The implants could be positioned onto the retinal surface and fixated here using a retinal tack. Recording of spontaneous activity of retinal neurons was possible in vitro using these devices. Conclusions Large flexible MEAs covering a wider area of the retina as current devices could be fabricated using silicon technology with polyimide as a base material. Principal surgical techniques were established to insert such large devices into an eye and the devices could also be used for recording of retinal neural activity. PMID:24502253

  17. Stimulation Stability and Selectivity of Chronically Implanted Multicontact Nerve Cuff Electrodes in the Human Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Katharine H.; Hoyen, Harry A.; Keith, Michael W.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2010-01-01

    Nine spiral nerve cuff electrodes were implanted in two human subjects for up to three years with no adverse functional effects. The objective of this study was to look at the long term nerve and muscle response to stimulation through nerve cuff electrodes. The nerve conduction velocity remained within the clinically accepted range for the entire testing period. The stimulation thresholds stabilized after approximately 20 weeks. The variability in the activation over time was not different from muscle-based electrodes used in implanted functional electrical stimulation systems. Three electrodes had multiple, independent contacts to evaluate selective recruitment of muscles. A single muscle could be selectively activated from each electrode using single-contact stimulation and the selectivity was increased with the use of field steering techniques. The selectivity after three years was consistent with selectivity measured during the implant surgery. Nerve cuff electrodes are effective for chronic muscle activation and multichannel functional electrical stimulation in humans. PMID:19775987

  18. Subthalamic-thalamic DBS in a case with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and severe tremor-A unusual clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    Freund, Hans-Joachim; Barnikol, Utako B; Nolte, Dagmar; Treuer, Harald; Auburger, Georg; Tass, Peter A; Samii, Madjid; Sturm, Volker

    2007-04-15

    This is a single case report of a patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and severe tremor. Whereas disease progression with prevailing ataxia and dysmetria was slow over the first symptomatic 6 years, 6 months prior to operation were characterized by the development of a severe, debilitating postural tremor rendering the patient unable to independently sit, stand, speak, or swallow. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) at a subthalamic-thalamic electrode position almost completely arrested her tremor. The patient regained the functional state prior to her rapid disease progression allowing a restricted range of daily activities. Her condition has remained approximately stable over the two postoperative years to date. In addition to the efficacy of DBS on cerebellar tremor, the results illustrate a remarkable improvement of the patient's general condition and independence. PMID:17265523

  19. The mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation and ideas for the future development.

    PubMed

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used as a treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor for over twenty years, and is a promising treatment for depression and epilepsy. However, the exact mechanisms of action of DBS are still uncertain, although different theories have emerged. This review summarizes the current understanding in this field. Different modalities used to investigate DBS such as electrophysiological, imaging and biochemical studies have revealed different mechanisms of DBS. The mechanisms may also be different depending on the structure targeted, the disease condition or the animal model employed. DBS may inhibit the target neuronal networks but activate the efferent axons. It may suppress pathological rhythms or impose new rhythms associated with beneficial effects, and involves neuronal networks with widespread connections. Different neurotransmitter systems such as dopamine and GABA upregulation are involved in the effects of DBS. There are also technical advances to prolong the battery life and specific targeting based on new electrode designs with multiple contacts which have the ability to steer the current toward a specific direction. There is ongoing work in closed loop or adaptive DBS using neural oscillations to provide the feedback signals. These oscillations need to be better characterized in a wide variety of clinical settings in future studies. Individualization of DBS parameters based on neural oscillations may optimize the clinical benefits of DBS. PMID:26296674

  20. Electrical stimulation with a penetrating optic nerve electrode array elicits visuotopic cortical responses in cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiliang; Yan, Yan; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Chen, Yao; Li, Liming

    2013-06-01

    Objective. A visual prosthesis based on penetrating electrode stimulation within the optic nerve (ON) is a potential way to restore partial functional vision for blind patients. We investigated the retinotopic organization of ON stimulation and its spatial resolution. Approach. A five-electrode array was inserted perpendicularly into the ON or a single electrode was advanced to different depths within the ON (˜1-2 mm behind the eyeball, 13 cats). A sparse noise method was used to map ON electrode position and the visual cortex. Cortical responses were recorded by a 5 × 6 array. The visuotopic correspondence between the retinotopic position of the ON electrode was compared with the visual evoked cortical map and the electrical evoked potentials elicited in response to ON stimulation. Main results. Electrical stimulation with penetrating ON electrodes elicited cortical responses in visuotopographically corresponding areas of the cortex. Stimulation of the temporal side of the ON elicited cortical responses corresponding to the central visual field. The visual field position shifted from the lower to central visual field as the electrode penetrated through the depth of the ON. A spatial resolution of ˜ 2° to 3° within a limited cortical visuotopic representation could be obtained by this approach. Significance. Visuotopic electrical stimulation with a relatively fine spatial resolution can be accomplished using penetrating electrodes implanted at multiple sites and at different depths within the ON just behind the globe. This study also provides useful experimental data for the design of electrode density and the distribution of penetrating ON electrodes for a visual prosthesis.

  1. Novel fingerprinting method characterises the necessary and sufficient structural connectivity from deep brain stimulation electrodes for a successful outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; Boccard, Sandra G. J.; Owen, Sarah L. F.; Cabral, Joana; Deco, Gustavo; Green, Alex L.; Fitzgerald, James J.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a remarkably effective clinical tool, used primarily for movement disorders. DBS relies on precise targeting of specific brain regions to rebalance the oscillatory behaviour of whole-brain neural networks. Traditionally, DBS targeting has been based upon animal models (such as MPTP for Parkinson’s disease) but has also been the result of serendipity during human lesional neurosurgery. There are, however, no good animal models of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, and progress in this area has been slow. In this paper, we use advanced tractography combined with whole-brain anatomical parcellation to provide a rational foundation for identifying the connectivity ‘fingerprint’ of existing, successful DBS targets. This knowledge can then be used pre-surgically and even potentially for the discovery of novel targets. First, using data from our recent case series of cingulate DBS for patients with treatment-resistant chronic pain, we demonstrate how to identify the structural ‘fingerprints’ of existing successful and unsuccessful DBS targets in terms of their connectivity to other brain regions, as defined by the whole-brain anatomical parcellation. Second, we use a number of different strategies to identify the successful fingerprints of structural connectivity across four patients with successful outcomes compared with two patients with unsuccessful outcomes. This fingerprinting method can potentially be used pre-surgically to account for a patient’s individual connectivity and identify the best DBS target. Ultimately, our novel fingerprinting method could be combined with advanced whole-brain computational modelling of the spontaneous dynamics arising from the structural changes in disease, to provide new insights and potentially new targets for hitherto impenetrable neuropsychiatric disorders.

  2. Optimized Multi-Electrode Stimulation Increases Focality and Intensity at Target

    E-print Network

    Parra, Lucas C.

    @ccny.cuny.edu Abstract. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) provides a noninvasive tool to elicit-Electrode Stimulation 2 1. Introduction Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging neurotechnology involving the application of small direct currents to the surface of the scalp to elicit modulation

  3. Improvements in Memory after Medial Septum Stimulation Are Associated with Changes in Hippocampal Cholinergic Activity and Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Sung Eun; Chang, Won Seok; Kim, Sung June; Chang, Jin Woo

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been found to have therapeutic effects in patients with dementia, but DBS mechanisms remain elusive. To provide evidence for the effectiveness of DBS as a treatment for dementia, we performed DBS in a rat model of dementia with intracerebroventricular administration of 192?IgG-saporins. We utilized four groups of rats, group 1, unlesioned control; group 2, cholinergic lesion; group 3, cholinergic lesion plus medial septum (MS) electrode implantation (sham stimulation); group 4, cholinergic lesions plus MS electrode implantation and stimulation. During the probe test in the water maze, performance of the lesion group decreased for measures of time spent and the number of swim crossings over the previous platform location. Interestingly, the stimulation group showed an equivalent performance to the normal group on all measures. And these are partially reversed by the electrode implantation. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus was decreased in lesion and implantation groups, whereas activity in the stimulation group was not different from the normal group. Hippocampal neurogenesis was increased in the stimulation group. Our results revealed that DBS of MS restores spatial memory after damage to cholinergic neurons. This effect is associated with an increase in hippocampal cholinergic activity and neurogenesis. PMID:25101288

  4. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  5. Simulations and visualizations for interpretation of brain microdialysis data during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, Elin; Dizdar, Nil; Zsigmond, Peter; Kullman, Anita; Loyd, Dan; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis of the basal ganglia was used in parallel to deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to patient-specifically simulate and visualize the maximum tissue volume of influence (TVI(max)) for each microdialysis catheter and the electric field generated around each DBS electrode. The finite element method (FEM) was used for the simulations. The method allowed mapping of the anatomical origin of the microdialysis data and the electric stimulation for each patient. It was seen that the sampling and stimulation targets differed among the patients, and the results will therefore be used in the future interpretation of the biochemical data. PMID:23367403

  6. Dynamic Impedance Model of the Skin-Electrode Interface for Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  7. Dynamic impedance model of the skin-electrode interface for transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  8. Flexible Split-Ring Electrode for Insect Flight Biasing Using Multisite Neural Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Tsang, Wei Mong

    We describe a flexible multisite microelectrode for insect flight biasing using neural stimulation. The electrode is made of two layers of polyimide (PI) with gold sandwiched in between in a split-ring geometry. The ...

  9. Spinal cord stimulation with percutaneous and plate electrodes: side effects and quantitative comparisons.

    PubMed

    North, R B; Lanning, A; Hessels, R; Cutchis, P N

    1997-01-15

    Spinal cord stimulation is limited by the uncomfortable side effects experienced by the patient as the amplitude of stimulation is increased. These side effects include local segmental paresthesias or motor responses, which are objectively demonstrable as frequency-following muscle contractions, attributable to dorsal root stimulation. The authors present evidence for another mechanism of stimulation-evoked discomfort, namely recruitment of small fibers in ligamentum flavum, which occurs when electrodes are inserted percutaneously and their contacts are exposed circumferentially; this does not occur with plate electrodes with insulated dorsal surfaces. In a consecutive series of 79 patients with postsurgical lumbar pain syndromes, percutaneous four-contact electrodes were tested at levels from T-8 through T-12. At one or more levels, 46% of patients described paravertebral, nonradiating discomfort, unaccompanied by frequency-following muscle contractions. This was observed most commonly at the T-8 and T-9 levels. The effect was ameliorated in some cases by using multiple cathodes in parallel, which reduced the current density at individual contacts. In 10 of these patients, this side effect interfered with an otherwise successful trial to such a degree that an insulated plate electrode was selected for permanent implantation at the same level as the percutaneous electrode. This eliminated the uncomfortable side effect completely in all patients. Intraoperative testing with the insulated plate electrode inverted (that is, contacts dorsal) reproduced the side effect in the majority of patients, indicating that structures dorsal to the electrode, such as fibers in ligamentum flavum, mediate the effect. Postoperative testing by computerized techniques demonstrated improved coverage of pain by stimulation paresthesias, with lower stimulation power requirements, using the insulated plate electrode. This technical limitation of percutaneous spinal cord stimulation electrodes, which may confound treatment if unrecognized, has been found to have a straightforward solution which indicates the underlying mechanism. PMID:15096024

  10. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms for both intracellular and extracellular current-controlled stimulation conditions. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64% when compared with the standard 100 µs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50% of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10% when compared with the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation.

  11. Brain Stimulation in Neurology and Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Little, Simon; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Feedback control of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease has great potential to improve efficacy, reduce side effects, and decrease the cost of treatment. In this, the timing and intensity of stimulation are titrated according to biomarkers that capture current clinical state. Stimulation may be at standard high frequency or intelligently patterned to directly modify specific pathological rhythms. The search for and validation of appropriate feedback signals are therefore crucial. Signals recorded from the DBS electrode currently appear to be the most promising source of feedback. In particular, beta-frequency band oscillations in the local field potential recorded at the stimulation target may capture variation in bradykinesia and rigidity across patients, but this remains to be confirmed within patients. Biomarkers that reliably reflect other impairments, such as tremor, also need to be established. Finally, whether brain signals are causally important needs to be established before stimulation can be specifically patterned rather than delivered at empirically defined high frequency. PMID:22830645

  12. Electrochemical properties of titanium nitride nerve stimulation electrodes: an in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Meijs, Suzan; Fjorback, Morten; Jensen, Carina; Sørensen, Søren; Rechendorff, Kristian; Rijkhoff, Nico J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo electrochemical behavior of titanium nitride (TiN) nerve stimulation electrodes was compared to their in vitro behavior for a period of 90 days. Ten electrodes were implanted in two Göttingen minipigs. Four of these were used for electrical stimulation and electrochemical measurements. Five electrodes were kept in Ringer's solution at 37.5°C, of which four were used for electrical stimulation and electrochemical measurements. The voltage transients measured in vivo were 13 times greater than in vitro at implantation and they continued to increase with time. The electrochemical properties in vivo and the tissue resistance (Rtissue) followed a similar trend with time. There was no consistent significant difference between the electrochemical properties of the in vivo and in vitro electrodes after the implanted period. The differences between the in vivo and in vitro electrodes during the implanted period show that the evaluation of electrochemical performance of implantable stimulation electrodes cannot be substituted with in vitro measurements. After the implanted period, however, the performance of the in vivo and in vitro electrodes in saline was similar. In addition, the changes observed over time during the post-implantation period regarding the electrochemical properties of the in vivo electrodes and Rtissue were similar, which indicates that these changes are due to the foreign body response to implantation. PMID:26300717

  13. Attracting retinal cells to electrodes for high-resolution stimulation Daniel V. Palanker1,2

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    proximity of cells and electrodes we have developed a technique that prompts migration of retinal cells tissue grew into the pores when membranes were positioned on the sub-retinal side. Histology has with this technique allows for reduction of the stimulation current to 2µA at the 10µm electrode. A 3mm disk array

  14. Hypothalamic Deep Brain Stimulation Reduces Weight Gain in an Obesity-Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Behnke, Eric J.; De Salles, Antonio A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n?=?8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n?=?4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight. PMID:22295102

  15. Hypothalamic deep brain stimulation reduces weight gain in an obesity-animal model.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; Behnke, Eric J; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n?=?8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n?=?4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight. PMID:22295102

  16. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia. PMID:26231574

  17. Selectivity for specific cardiovascular effects of vagal nerve stimulation with a multi-contact electrode cuff.

    PubMed

    Ordelman, Simone C M A; Kornet, Lilian; Cornelussen, Richard; Buschman, Hendrik P J; Veltink, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular system can be influenced by electrically stimulating the vagal nerve. Selectivity for specific cardiac fibers may be limited when stimulating at the cervical level. Our objective was to increase effectiveness and selectivity for cardiovascular effects of vagal nerve stimulation by using local bipolar stimulation in one nerve cross section using a multi-contact cuff instead of less localized stimulation using a tripolar ring electrode. Both types of cuff electrodes were compared with respect to their relative effects on R-R interval (RRI), P-Q interval (PQI), left ventricular contractility (LVC), and left ventricular pressure (P(LV)) in seven pigs. Stimulation using the optimal bipolar configuration on the multi-contact cuff significantly affected RRI, PQI, LVC, and P(LV), whereas stimulation with the ring electrode only significantly affected RRI and PQI. The cardiovascular parameters that could be significantly influenced varied between the bipolar configurations. These novel findings may be relevant for optimizing electrode configurations for clinical cardiac applications of vagal nerve stimulation. PMID:22987542

  18. Automated 3-Dimensional Brain Atlas Fitting to Microelectrode Recordings from Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Luján, J. Luis; Noecker, Angela M.; Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries commonly rely on brain atlases and microelectrode recordings (MER) to help identify the target location for electrode implantation. We present an automated method for optimally fitting a 3-dimensional brain atlas to intraoperative MER and predicting a target DBS electrode location in stereotactic coordinates for the patient. Methods We retrospectively fit a 3-dimensional brain atlas to MER points from 10 DBS surgeries targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We used a constrained optimization algorithm to maximize the MER points correctly fitted (i.e., contained) within the appropriate atlas nuclei. We compared our optimization approach to conventional anterior commissure-posterior commissure (AC/PC) scaling, and to manual fits performed by four experts. A theoretical DBS electrode target location in the dorsal STN was customized to each patient as part of the fitting process and compared to the location of the clinically defined therapeutic stimulation contact. Results The human expert and computer optimization fits achieved significantly better fits than the AC/PC scaling (80, 81, and 41% of correctly fitted MER, respectively). However, the optimization fits were performed in less time than the expert fits and converged to a single solution for each patient, eliminating interexpert variance. Conclusions and Significance DBS therapeutic outcomes are directly related to electrode implantation accuracy. Our automated fitting techniques may aid in the surgical decision-making process by optimally integrating brain atlas and intraoperative neurophysiological data to provide a visual guide for target identification. PMID:19556832

  19. Non-invasive measurement of the input-output properties of peripheral nerve stimulating electrodes.

    PubMed

    Grill, W M; Mortimer, J T

    1996-03-01

    A non-invasive method was developed to determine the input-output (I/O) properties of peripheral nerve stimulating electrodes. An apparatus was fabricated to measure the 3-dimensional (3-D) isometric torque generated at the cat ankle joint by electrical activation of the sciatic nerve. The performance of the apparatus was quantified, and the utility of the method was demonstrated by measuring the recruitment properties of multiple contact nerve cuff electrodes. Torque-twitch waveforms, recruitment curves of peak torque as a function of stimulus current amplitude, and 2-D joint torque vectors were used to analyze the recruitment properties of the cuff. The peak of the twitch torque was an accurate measure of excitation even for muscles having fibers with varying speeds of contraction. The evoked twitch waveforms and torque vectors generated by selective stimulation of individual nerve branches with a hook electrode were compared to those produced by stimulation of the nerve trunk with the cuff electrode. These data allowed determination of the regions of the nerve trunk that were activated by different electrode geometries and stimulus parameters. The positional stability of electrode recruitment properties could be quantified by measuring I/O characteristics at different limb positions. The methods described are useful for characterization of neural stimulating electrodes and for studies of motor system physiology. PMID:8815307

  20. Optimized multi-electrode stimulation increases focality and intensity at target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Su, Yuzhuo; Parra, Lucas C.

    2011-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) provides a non-invasive tool to elicit neuromodulation by delivering current through electrodes placed on the scalp. The present clinical paradigm uses two relatively large electrodes to inject current through the head resulting in electric fields that are broadly distributed over large regions of the brain. In this paper, we present a method that uses multiple small electrodes (i.e. 1.2 cm diameter) and systematically optimize the applied currents to achieve effective and targeted stimulation while ensuring safety of stimulation. We found a fundamental trade-off between achievable intensity (at the target) and focality, and algorithms to optimize both measures are presented. When compared with large pad-electrodes (approximated here by a set of small electrodes covering 25cm2), the proposed approach achieves electric fields which exhibit simultaneously greater focality (80% improvement) and higher target intensity (98% improvement) at cortical targets using the same total current applied. These improvements illustrate the previously unrecognized and non-trivial dependence of the optimal electrode configuration on the desired electric field orientation and the maximum total current (due to safety). Similarly, by exploiting idiosyncratic details of brain anatomy, the optimization approach significantly improves upon prior un-optimized approaches using small electrodes. The analysis also reveals the optimal use of conventional bipolar montages: maximally intense tangential fields are attained with the two electrodes placed at a considerable distance from the target along the direction of the desired field; when radial fields are desired, the maximum-intensity configuration consists of an electrode placed directly over the target with a distant return electrode. To summarize, if a target location and stimulation orientation can be defined by the clinician, then the proposed technique is superior in terms of both focality and intensity as compared to previous solutions and is thus expected to translate into improved patient safety and increased clinical efficacy.

  1. A neurochemical closed-loop controller for deep brain stimulation: toward individualized smart neuromodulation therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, Peter J.; Mallory, Grant W.; Khurram, Obaid U.; Berry, B. Michael; Hachmann, Jan T.; Bieber, Allan J.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Min, Hoon-Ki; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H.; Lujan, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Current strategies for optimizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy involve multiple postoperative visits. During each visit, stimulation parameters are adjusted until desired therapeutic effects are achieved and adverse effects are minimized. However, the efficacy of these therapeutic parameters may decline with time due at least in part to disease progression, interactions between the host environment and the electrode, and lead migration. As such, development of closed-loop control systems that can respond to changing neurochemical environments, tailoring DBS therapy to individual patients, is paramount for improving the therapeutic efficacy of DBS. Evidence obtained using electrophysiology and imaging techniques in both animals and humans suggests that DBS works by modulating neural network activity. Recently, animal studies have shown that stimulation-evoked changes in neurotransmitter release that mirror normal physiology are associated with the therapeutic benefits of DBS. Therefore, to fully understand the neurophysiology of DBS and optimize its efficacy, it may be necessary to look beyond conventional electrophysiological analyses and characterize the neurochemical effects of therapeutic and non-therapeutic stimulation. By combining electrochemical monitoring and mathematical modeling techniques, we can potentially replace the trial-and-error process used in clinical programming with deterministic approaches that help attain optimal and stable neurochemical profiles. In this manuscript, we summarize the current understanding of electrophysiological and electrochemical processing for control of neuromodulation therapies. Additionally, we describe a proof-of-principle closed-loop controller that characterizes DBS-evoked dopamine changes to adjust stimulation parameters in a rodent model of DBS. The work described herein represents the initial steps toward achieving a “smart” neuroprosthetic system for treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25009455

  2. Effects of Anterior Thalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Chronic Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Beatriz; Cavarsan, Clarissa; Miranda, Maisa Ferreira; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Nobrega, José N.; Mello, Luiz E.; Hamani, Clement

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. In rodents, an increase in the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus (SE) has been reported in different animal models but the consequences of delivering stimulation to chronic epileptic animals have not been extensively addressed. We study the effects of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) stimulation at different current intensities in rats rendered epileptic following pilocarpine (Pilo) administration. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were bilaterally implanted with AN electrodes or had sham-surgery. Stimulation was delivered for 6 h/day, 5 days/week at 130 Hz, 90 µsec. and either 100 µA or 500 µA. The frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in animals receiving stimulation was compared to that recorded in the preoperative period and in rats given sham treatment. To investigate the effects of DBS on hippocampal excitability, brain slices from animals receiving AN DBS or sham surgery were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats treated with AN DBS at 100 µA had a 52% non-significant reduction in the frequency of seizures as compared to sham-treated controls and 61% less seizures than at baseline. Animals given DBS at 500 µA had 5.1 times more seizures than controls and a 2.8 fold increase in seizure rate as compared to preoperative values. In non-stimulated controls, the average frequency of seizures before and after surgery remained unaltered. In vitro recordings have shown that slices from animals previously given DBS at 100 µA had a longer latency for the development of epileptiform activity, shorter and smaller DC shifts, and a smaller spike amplitude compared to non-stimulated controls. In contrast, a higher spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given AN DBS at 500 µA. PMID:24892420

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation of Different Pedunculopontine Targets in a Novel Rodent Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed as a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian patients, particularly for symptoms such as gait and postural difficulties refractory to dopaminergic treatments. Several patients have had electrodes implanted aimed at the PPTg, but outcomes have been disappointing, with little evidence that gait and posture are improved. The PPTg is a heterogeneous structure. Consequently, exact target sites in PPTg, possible DBS mechanisms, and potential benefits still need systematic investigation in good animal models. We have investigated the role of PPTg in gait, developed a refined model of parkinsonism including partial loss of the PPTg with bilateral destruction of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons that mimics human pathophysiology, and investigated the effect of DBS at different PPTg locations on gait and posture using a wireless device that lets rats move freely while receiving stimulation. Neither partial nor complete lesions of PPTg caused gait deficits, underlining questions raised previously about the status of PPTg as a motor control structure. The effect of DBS in the refined and standard model of parkinsonism were very different despite minimal behavioral differences in nonstimulation control conditions. Anterior PPTg DBS caused severe episodes of freezing and worsened gait, whereas specific gait parameters were mildly improved by stimulation of posterior PPTg. These results emphasize the critical importance of intra-PPTg DBS location and highlight the need to take PPTg degeneration into consideration when modeling parkinsonian symptoms. They also further implicate a role for PPTg in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. PMID:25810510

  4. Multi-electrode stimulation in somatosensory cortex increases probability of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaaimi, Boubker; Ruiz-Torres, Ricardo; Solla, Sara A.; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) that decode control signals from motor cortex have developed tremendously in the past decade, but virtually all rely exclusively on vision to provide feedback. There is now increasing interest in developing an afferent interface to replace natural somatosensation, much as the cochlear implant has done for the sense of hearing. Preliminary experiments toward a somatosensory neuroprosthesis have mostly addressed the sense of touch, but proprioception, the sense of limb position and movement, is also critical for the control of movement. However, proprioceptive areas of cortex lack the precise somatotopy of tactile areas. We showed previously that there is only a weak tendency for neighboring neurons in area 2 to signal similar directions of hand movement. Consequently, stimulation with the relatively large currents used in many studies is likely to activate a rather heterogeneous set of neurons. Approach. Here, we have compared the effect of single-electrode stimulation at subthreshold levels to the effect of stimulating as many as seven electrodes in combination. Main results. We found a mean enhancement in the sensitivity to the stimulus (d?) of 0.17 for pairs compared to individual electrodes (an increase of roughly 30%), and an increase of 2.5 for groups of seven electrodes (260%). Significance. We propose that a proprioceptive interface made up of several hundred electrodes may yield safer, more effective sensation than a BMI using fewer electrodes and larger currents.

  5. A Lithographically-Patterned, Elastic Multi-electrode Array for Surface Stimulation of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Kathleen W.; Giuly, Richard J.; Guo, Liang; Hochman, Shawn; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01

    A new, scalable process for microfabrication of a silicone-based, elastic multi-electrode array (MEA) is presented. The device is constructed by spinning poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) silicone elastomer onto a glass slide, depositing and patterning gold to construct wires and electrodes, spinning on a second PDMS layer, and then micropatterning the second PDMS layer to expose electrode contacts. The micropatterning of PDMS involves a custom reactive ion etch (RIE) process that preserves the underlying gold thin film. Once completed, the device can be removed from the glass slide for conformal interfacing with neural tissue. Prototype MEAs feature electrodes smaller than those known to be reported on silicone substrate (60 ?m diameter exposed electrode area) and were capable of selectively stimulating the surface of the in vitro isolated spinal cord of the juvenile rat. Stretchable serpentine traces were also incorporated into the functional PDMS-based MEA, and their implementation and testing is described. PMID:17914674

  6. Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Biegon, A.; Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Polat, U.; Biegon, A.

    2009-12-21

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments, the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed 1 or 8 weeks post-implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [(3)H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at 1 as well as 8 weeks post-implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance 2 and 8 weeks post-implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS.

  7. Vertical electric field stimulation of neural cells on porous amorphous carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to stimulate neuronal cell proliferation in presence of external electric field. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm2) and low impedance (3.3 k ? at 1 kHz). When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (<= 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to stimulate neurite outgrowth and viability of nerve cells.

  8. Dependence of Dbl and Dbs Transformation on MEK and NF-?B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Ian P.; Lambert, Que T.; Glaven, Judith A.; Abe, Karon; Rossman, Kent L.; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Trzaskos, James M.; Kay, Robert; Campbell, Sharon L.; Der, Channing J.

    1999-01-01

    Dbs was identified initially as a transforming protein and is a member of the Dbl family of proteins (>20 mammalian members). Here we show that Dbs, like its rat homolog Ost and the closely related Dbl, exhibited guanine nucleotide exchange activity for the Rho family members RhoA and Cdc42, but not Rac1, in vitro. Dbs transforming activity was blocked by specific inhibitors of RhoA and Cdc42 function, demonstrating the importance of these small GTPases in Dbs-mediated growth deregulation. Although Dbs transformation was dependent upon the structural integrity of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, replacement of the PH domain with a membrane localization signal restored transforming activity. Thus, the PH domain of Dbs (but not Dbl) may be important in modulating association with the plasma membrane, where its GTPase substrates reside. Both Dbs and Dbl activate multiple signaling pathways that include activation of the Elk-1, Jun, and NF-?B transcription factors and stimulation of transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter. We found that Elk-1 and NF-?B, but not Jun, activation was necessary for Dbl and Dbs transformation. Finally, we have observed that Dbl and Dbs regulated transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter in a NF-?B-dependent manner. Previous studies have dissociated actin cytoskeletal activity from the transforming potential of RhoA and Cdc42. These observations, when taken together with those of the present study, suggest that altered gene expression, and not actin reorganization, is the critical mediator of Dbl and Rho family protein transformation. PMID:10523665

  9. Visual cortex responses to suprachoroidal electrical stimulation of the retina: effects of electrode return configuration.

    PubMed

    Cicione, Rosemary; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Fallon, James B; Luu, Chi D; Allen, Penny J; Rathbone, Graeme D; Shepherd, Robert K; Williams, Chris E

    2012-06-01

    A clinically effective retinal prosthesis must evoke localized phosphenes in a retinotopic manner in response to stimulation of each of the retinal electrodes, evoke brightness cues over a wide dynamic range and function within safe stimulus limits. The effects of varying return configuration for retinal stimulation are currently unknown. To investigate this, we implanted a flexible, 7 × 12 electrode array into the suprachoroidal space of normally-sighted, anesthetized cats. Multi-unit activity in the primary visual cortex was recorded in response to electrical stimulation using various return configurations: monopolar vitreous (MPV), common ground (CG), hexagonal (HX), monopolar remote (MPR) and bipolar (BP_N). MPV stimulation was found to be the most charge efficient and was most likely to induce cortical activity within safe charge limits. HX and CG stimulation were found to exhibit greater retinal selectivity compared to the MPV return at the expense of lower cortical yield and higher P50 charge levels, while cortical selectivity was unaffected by choice of return. Responses using MPR and widely spaced BP_N configurations were similar to those using the MPV return. These results suggest that choice of return configuration for a retinal prosthesis will be balanced between resolution and stimulation within safe charge limits. PMID:22595310

  10. Effects of subthalamic stimulation on speech of consecutive patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zrinzo, L.; Martinez-Torres, I.; Frost, E.; Pinto, S.; Foltynie, T.; Holl, E.; Petersen, E.; Roughton, M.; Hariz, M.I.; Limousin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Following STN-DBS, speech intelligibility can deteriorate, limiting its beneficial effect. Here we prospectively examined the short- and long-term speech response to STN-DBS in a consecutive series of patients to identify clinical and surgical factors associated with speech change. Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients were assessed before surgery, then 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after STN-DBS in 4 conditions on- and off-medication with on- and off-stimulation using established and validated speech and movement scales. Fifteen of these patients were followed up for 3 years. A control group of 12 patients with PD were followed up for 1 year. Results: Within the surgical group, speech intelligibility significantly deteriorated by an average of 14.2% ± 20.15% off-medication and 16.9% ± 21.8% on-medication 1 year after STN-DBS. The medical group deteriorated by 3.6% ± 5.5% and 4.5% ± 8.8%, respectively. Seven patients showed speech amelioration after surgery. Loudness increased significantly in all tasks with stimulation. A less severe preoperative on-medication motor score was associated with a more favorable speech response to STN-DBS after 1 year. Medially located electrodes on the left STN were associated with a significantly higher risk of speech deterioration than electrodes within the nucleus. There was a strong relationship between high voltage in the left electrode and poor speech outcome at 1 year. Conclusion: The effect of STN-DBS on speech is variable and multifactorial, with most patients exhibiting decline of speech intelligibility. Both medical and surgical issues contribute to deterioration of speech in STN-DBS patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that STN-DBS for PD results in deterioration in speech intelligibility in all combinations of medication and stimulation states at 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year compared to baseline and to control subjects treated with best medical therapy. PMID:21068426

  11. Effects of Vestibular Prosthesis Electrode Implantation and Stimulation on Hearing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/sec, with pulse frequency modulated from 48–222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5–10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ~5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2–14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss, that loss is not likely to be severe. PMID:21195755

  12. Enhanced control of electrochemical response in metallic materials in neural stimulation electrode applications

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, K.G.; Steen, W.M.; Manna, I.

    1996-12-31

    New means have been investigated for the production of electrode devices (stimulation electrodes) which could be implanted in the human body in order to control pain, activate paralysed limbs or provide electrode arrays for cochlear implants for the deaf or for the relief of tinitus. To achieve this ion implantation and laser materials processing techniques were employed. Ir was ion implanted in Ti-6Al-4V alloy and the surface subsequently enriched in the noble metal by dissolution in sulphuric acid. For laser materials processing techniques, investigation has been carried out on the laser cladding and laser alloying of Ir in Ti wire. A particular aim has been the determination of conditions required for the formation of a two phase Ir, Ir-rich, and Ti-rich microstructure which would enable subsequent removal of the non-noble phase to leave a highly porous noble metal with large real surface area and hence improved charge carrying capacity compared with conventional non porous electrodes. Evaluation of the materials produced has been carried out using repetitive cyclic voltammetry, amongst other techniques. For laser alloyed Ir on Ti wire, it has been found that differences in the melting point and density of the materials makes control of the cladding or alloying process difficult. Investigation of laser process parameters for the control of alloying and cladding in this system was carried out and a set of conditions for the successful production of two phase Ir-rich and Ti-rich components in a coating layer with strong metallurgical bonding to the Ti alloy substrate was derived. The laser processed material displays excellent potential for further development in providing stimulation electrodes with the current carrying capacity of Ir but in a form which is malleable and hence capable of formation into smaller electrodes with improved spatial resolution compared with presently employed electrodes.

  13. Evaluation of different stimulation and measurement patterns based on internal electrode: application in cardiac impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Oh, T I; Jin, C; Thiagalingam, A; McEwan, A

    2012-11-01

    The conductivity distribution around the thorax is altered during the cardiac cycle due to the blood perfusion, heart contraction and lung inflation. Previous studies showed that these bio-impedance changes are appropriate for non-invasive cardiac function imaging using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) techniques. However, the spatial resolution is presently low. One of the main obstacles in cardiac imaging at the heart location is the large impedance variation of the lungs by respiration and muscles on the dorsal and posterior side of the body. In critical care units there is a potential to insert an internal electrode inside the esophagus directly behind the heart in the same plane of the external electrodes. The aim of the present study is to evaluate different current stimulation and measurement patterns with both external and internal electrodes. Analysis is performed with planar arrangement of 16 electrodes for a simulated 3D cylindrical tank and pig thorax model. In our study we evaluated current injection patterns consisting of adjacent, diagonal, trigonometric, and radial to the internal electrode. The performance of these arrangements was assessed using quantitative methods based on distinguishability, sensitivity and GREIT (Graz consensus Reconstruction algorithm for Electrical Impedance Tomography). Our evaluation shows that an internal electrode configuration based on the trigonometric injection patterns has better performance and improves pixel intensity of the small conductivity changes related to heart near 1.7 times in reconstructed images and also shows more stability with different levels of added noise. For the internal electrode, when we combined radial or adjacent injection with trigonometric injection pattern, we found an improvement in amplitude response. However, the combination of diagonal with trigonometric injection pattern deteriorated the shape deformation (correlation coefficient r=0.344) more than combination of radial and trigonometric injection (correlation coefficient r=0.836) for the perturbations in the area close to the center of the cylinder. We also find that trigonometric stimulation pattern performance is degraded in a realistic thorax model with anatomical asymmetry. For that reason we recommend using internal electrodes only for voltage measurements and as a reference electrode during trigonometric stimulation patterns in practical measurements. PMID:23017828

  14. Technological Advances in Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ughratdar, Ismail; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2015-01-01

    Functional and stereotactic neurosurgery has always been regarded as a subspecialty based on and driven by technological advances. However until recently, the fundamentals of deep brain stimulation (DBS) hardware and software design had largely remained stagnant since its inception almost three decades ago. Recent improved understanding of disease processes in movement disorders as well clinician and patient demands has resulted in new avenues of development for DBS technology. This review describes new advances both related to hardware and software for neuromodulation. New electrode designs with segmented contacts now enable sophisticated shaping and sculpting of the field of stimulation, potentially allowing multi-target stimulation and avoidance of side effects. To avoid lengthy programming sessions utilising multiple lead contacts, new user-friendly software allows for computational modelling and individualised directed programming. Therapy delivery is being improved with the next generation of smaller profile, longer-lasting, re-chargeable implantable pulse generators (IPGs). These include IPGs capable of delivering constant current stimulation or personalised closed-loop adaptive stimulation. Post-implantation Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has long been an issue which has been partially overcome with 'MRI conditional devices' and has enabled verification of DBS lead location. Surgical technique is considering a shift from frame-based to frameless stereotaxy or greater role for robot assisted implantation. The challenge for these contemporary techniques however, will be in demonstrating equivalent safety and accuracy to conventional methods. We also discuss potential future direction utilising wireless technology allowing for miniaturisation of hardware. PMID:26406128

  15. Optical and electrochemical methods for determining the effective area and charge density of conducting polymer modified electrodes for neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander R; Molino, Paul J; Kapsa, Robert M I; Clark, Graeme M; Paolini, Antonio G; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-01-01

    Neural stimulation is used in the cochlear implant, bionic eye, and deep brain stimulation, which involves implantation of an array of electrodes into a patient's brain. The current passed through the electrodes is used to provide sensory queues or reduce symptoms associated with movement disorders and increasingly for psychological and pain therapies. Poor control of electrode properties can lead to suboptimal performance; however, there are currently no standard methods to assess them, including the electrode area and charge density. Here we demonstrate optical and electrochemical methods for measuring these electrode properties and show the charge density is dependent on electrode geometry. This technique highlights that materials can have widely different charge densities but also large variation in performance. Measurement of charge density from an electroactive area may result in new materials and electrode geometries that improve patient outcomes and reduce side effects. PMID:25495574

  16. Simulating pad-electrodes with high-definition arrays in transcranial electric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, René; Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Research studies on transcranial electric stimulation, including direct current, often use a computational model to provide guidance on the placing of sponge-electrode pads. However, the expertise and computational resources needed for finite element modeling (FEM) make modeling impractical in a clinical setting. Our objective is to make the exploration of different electrode configurations accessible to practitioners. We provide an efficient tool to estimate current distributions for arbitrary pad configurations while obviating the need for complex simulation software. Approach. To efficiently estimate current distributions for arbitrary pad configurations we propose to simulate pads with an array of high-definition (HD) electrodes and use an efficient linear superposition to then quickly evaluate different electrode configurations. Main results. Numerical results on ten different pad configurations on a normal individual show that electric field intensity simulated with the sampled array deviates from the solutions with pads by only 5% and the locations of peak magnitude fields have a 94% overlap when using a dense array of 336 electrodes. Significance. Computationally intensive FEM modeling of the HD array needs to be performed only once, perhaps on a set of standard heads that can be made available to multiple users. The present results confirm that by using these models one can now quickly and accurately explore and select pad-electrode montages to match a particular clinical need.

  17. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation restores functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schweder, Patrick M; Joint, Carole; Hansen, Peter C; Green, Alexander L; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS) are poorly understood. Earlier, high-frequency DBS has been thought to represent a depolarization block of the target area and low-frequency stimulation has been thought to 'drive' neuronal activity. We investigated the long-term effect of low-frequency DBS in a longitudinal imaging study of a patient who received bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. We used the diffusion tensor imaging techniques including probabilistic tractography and topographic mapping to analyze long-term changes in connectivity with low-frequency DBS. Post-DBS connectivity analysis suggested a normalization of pathological pedunculopontine nucleus connectivity with DBS therapy. These findings may help elucidate the mechanisms of DBS, suggesting neuroplasticity involving a reorganization of target connectivity long term. This is the first reported case showing neuroimaging evidence of neuroplasticity after low-frequency DBS. PMID:20926975

  18. Evaluation of Interactive Visualization on Mobile Computing Platforms for Selection of Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Tamm, Georg; Jain, Sanket; Fogal, Thomas; Krüger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant growth in the use of patient-specific models to predict the effects of neuromodulation therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, translating these models from a research environment to the everyday clinical workflow has been a challenge, primarily due to the complexity of the models and the expertise required in specialized visualization software. In this paper, we deploy the interactive visualization system ImageVis3D Mobile, which has been designed for mobile computing devices such as the iPhone or iPad, in an evaluation environment to visualize models of Parkinson's disease patients who received DBS therapy. Selection of DBS settings is a significant clinical challenge that requires repeated revisions to achieve optimal therapeutic response, and is often performed without any visual representation of the stimulation system in the patient. We used ImageVis3D Mobile to provide models to movement disorders clinicians and asked them to use the software to determine: 1) which of the four DBS electrode contacts they would select for therapy; and 2) what stimulation settings they would choose. We compared the stimulation protocol chosen from the software versus the stimulation protocol that was chosen via clinical practice (independent of the study). Lastly, we compared the amount of time required to reach these settings using the software versus the time required through standard practice. We found that the stimulation settings chosen using ImageVis3D Mobile were similar to those used in standard of care, but were selected in drastically less time. We show how our visualization system, available directly at the point of care on a device familiar to the clinician, can be used to guide clinical decision making for selection of DBS settings. In our view, the positive impact of the system could also translate to areas other than DBS. PMID:22450824

  19. Deep brain stimulation for the obsessive-compulsive and Tourette-like symptoms of Kleefstra syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segar, David J; Chodakiewitz, Yosef G; Torabi, Radmehr; Cosgrove, G Rees

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported to have beneficial effects in severe, treatment-refractory cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). In this report, the authors present the first case in which DBS was used to treat the neuropsychiatric symptoms of Kleefstra syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by childhood hypotonia, intellectual disability, distinctive facial features, and myriad psychiatric and behavioral disturbances. A 24-year-old female patient with childhood hypotonia, developmental delay, and diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder, OCD, and TS refractory to medical management underwent the placement of bilateral ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) DBS leads, with clinical improvement. Medical providers and family observed gradual and progressive improvement in the patient's compulsive behaviors, coprolalia, speech, and social interaction. Symptoms recurred when both DBS electrodes failed because of lead fracture and dislodgement, although the clinical benefits were restored by lead replacement. The symptomatic and functional improvements observed in this case of VC/VS DBS for Kleefstra syndrome suggest a novel indication for DBS worthy of further investigation. PMID:26030700

  20. Microthalamotomy effect during Deep Brain Stimulation: Potential Involvement of Adenosine and Glutamate Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Su-Youne; Shon, Young Min; Agnesi, Filippo; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus is widely used in humans to treat essential tremor and tremor dominant Parkinson’s disease. After DBS lead implantation, tremor is often reduced even without electrical stimulation. Often called “microthalamotomy” effect, the exact mechanism is unknown, although it is presumed to be due to micro lesioning. Here, we tested whether microthalamotomy effect may, in fact, be mediated via release of neurotransmitters adenosine and glutamate, using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and amperometry, respectively. Implantation of microelectrodes into the ventrolateral (VL) thalamus of the rat resulted in transient rise in adenosine and glutamate level from mechanical stimulation. Similarly, high frequency stimulation (100 – 130 Hz) of the VL thalamus also resulted in adenosine and glutamate release. These results suggest that glutamate and adenosine release may be an important and unappreciated mechanism whereby mechanical stimulation via electrode implantation procedure may achieve the microthalamotomy effect. PMID:19964296

  1. Non-penetrating round window electrode stimulation for tinnitus therapy followed by cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Gentiana I; Sarnes, Petra; Warnecke, Athanasia; Stöver, Timo; Jäger, Burkard; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Lenarz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    One main theory behind the origin of tinnitus is based on the idea that alterations of the spontaneous electrical activity within the auditory system lead to abnormal firing patterns in the affected nervous structures [1]. A possible therapeutic option is the use of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve for the recovery or at least limitation of the abnormal firing pattern to a level that can be easily tolerated by the patient. The Tinnelec Implant consists of a single non-penetrating stimulation electrode connected to a Neurelec cochlear implant system. As a first feasibility study, before starting implantations in hearing patients, we thought to assess the potential of the Tinnelec stimulation to treat tinnitus in unilateral deaf patients, analysing hereby its effectivity and risks. Three patients suffering from unilateral tinnitus resistant to pharmacological treatment and ipsilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss/deafness were implanted with a Tinnelec system between September 2007 and July 2008, at the ENT Department of Hannover Medical School. The stimulation strategy was chosen to induce alleviation of the tinnitus through suppression, masking and/or habituation and the response of each patient on the treatment was monitored using a visual analogue scale (VAS) on loudness and annoyance of tinnitus, mood of the patient, as well as the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI). All patients had a benefit from the electrical stimulation for their tinnitus (THI-score improvement of 20-70), however, not all participants profited from the Tinnelec system in same way and degree. In one patient, despite good results, the device had to be replaced with a conventional cochlear implant because of Tinnelec-independent increase in hearing loss on the contralateral ear. Additionally, due to the extension of cochlear implant indications, the devices of the other two patients have been meanwhile replaced with a conventional cochlear implant to benefit additionally from hearing improvement. As demonstrated in the present study, sensorineural tinnitus in humans may be suppressed/masked/habituated by electrical stimulation. The main advantage of the Tinnelec implant would be the option to treat patients with normal and usable hearing, stimulating the affected ear with the cochlear non-penetrating stimulation electrode of the device, and extend the treatment in cases of progressive hearing loss by explanation and reimplantation with a penetrating electrode addressing tinnitus as well as the hearing impairment. The present study is the first report on a long-term follow-up on tinnitus patients implanted with Tinnelec. Further clinical studies to implant tinnitus patients with residual or normal hearing on the affected ear are on the way. PMID:25480476

  2. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  3. A Long Term Effects of a New Onset Psychosis after DBS Treated with Quetiapine in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Giulia; Pizzighello, Silvia; Vestri, Alec; Ferri, Giovanni; Toffanin, Tommaso; Follador, Halima; Martinuzzi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation represents a therapeutic option for PD patients. In this paper, we present and discuss a case of acute delirium and psychosis manifesting after DBS in a 58-years-old man affected by Parkinson's Disease. We highlight the importance of an exhaustive psychiatric evaluation in candidates for DBS and we underline the severity and non-reversibility of some adverse events associated with the implantation, suggesting the use of Quetiapine in the management of these effects. Acute psychosis may be listed as a potential severe adverse event associated with DBS, even in patients without a clear cut previous history of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25670958

  4. Articulatory Changes in Vowel Production following STN DBS and Levodopa Intake in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martel Sauvageau, Vincent; Roy, Johanna-Pascale; Cantin, Léo; Prud'Homme, Michel; Langlois, Mélanie; Macoir, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) and levodopa intake on vowel articulation in dysarthric speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Vowel articulation was assessed in seven Quebec French speakers diagnosed with idiopathic PD who underwent STN DBS. Assessments were conducted on- and off-medication, first prior to surgery and then 1 year later. All recordings were made on-stimulation. Vowel articulation was measured using acoustic vowel space and formant centralization ratio. Results. Compared to the period before surgery, vowel articulation was reduced after surgery when patients were off-medication, while it was better on-medication. The impact of levodopa intake on vowel articulation changed with STN DBS: before surgery, levodopa impaired articulation, while it no longer had a negative effect after surgery. Conclusions. These results indicate that while STN DBS could lead to a direct deterioration in articulation, it may indirectly improve it by reducing the levodopa dose required to manage motor symptoms. These findings suggest that, with respect to speech production, STN DBS and levodopa intake cannot be investigated separately because the two are intrinsically linked. Along with motor symptoms, speech production should be considered when optimizing therapeutic management of patients with PD. PMID:26558134

  5. Active books: the design of an implantable stimulator that minimizes cable count using integrated circuits very close to electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Demosthenous, Andreas; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Jiang, Dai; Donaldson, Nick

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated stimulator that can be embedded in implantable electrode books for interfacing with nerve roots at the cauda equina. The Active Book overcomes the limitation of conventional nerve root stimulators which can only support a small number of stimulating electrodes due to cable count restriction through the dura. Instead, a distributed stimulation system with many tripole electrodes can be configured using several Active Books which are addressed sequentially. The stimulator was fabricated in a 0.6-?m high-voltage CMOS process and occupies a silicon area of 4.2 × 6.5 mm(2). The circuit was designed to deliver up to 8 mA stimulus current to tripole electrodes from an 18 V power supply. Input pad count is limited to five (two power and three control lines) hence requiring a specific procedure for downloading stimulation commands to the chip and extracting information from it. Supported commands include adjusting the amplitude of stimulus current, varying the current ratio at the two anodes in each channel, and measuring relative humidity inside the chip package. In addition to stimulation mode, the chip supports quiescent mode, dissipating less than 100 nA current from the power supply. The performance of the stimulator chip was verified with bench tests including measurements using tripoles in saline. PMID:23853144

  6. Selective stimulation of the human femoral nerve with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Polasek, K. H.; Triolo, R. J.; Pinault, G. C. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2010-04-01

    In humans, we tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the femoral nerve trunk can selectively stimulate each muscle the nerve innervates. In a series of intraoperative trials during routine vascular surgeries, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the femoral nerve between the inguinal ligament and the first nerve branching point. The capability of the FINE to selectively recruit muscles innervated by the femoral nerve was assessed with electromyograms (EMGs) of the twitch responses to electrical stimulation. At least four of the six muscles innervated by the femoral nerve were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. Of these, at least one muscle was a hip flexor and at least two were knee extensors. Results from the intraoperative experiments were used to estimate the potential for the electrode to restore knee extension and hip flexion through functional electrical stimulation. Normalized EMGs and biomechanical simulations were used to estimate joint moments and functional efficacy. Estimated knee extension moments exceed the threshold required for the sit-to-stand transition.

  7. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  8. Enhanced tissue integration of implantable electrodes for sensing, and stimulation, via radio frequency glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Laurie M.

    Biopotential electrodes are conductive materials that convert electronic currents to or from ionic currents for sensing, and stimulating specific tissue sites for medical applications. Implanted electrodes become "walled off" by the foreign body tissue reactions producing poorly attached scar capsules dominated by surrounding dense collagenous lamellae and source fibroblasts which are electrically resistive. The conductive interstitial fluid that is typical between an electrode and the resistive capsule allows spurious current paths. The insulating layer increases the distance between the electrode and the target sites and poor attachment often results in electrode migration within the host tissue. This investigation tested the hypothesis that surface-energy modulation of electrodes, via Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Treatment (RFGDT), can improve the performance of tissue-implantable electrodes by reducing the foreign body tissue reaction and enhancing interfacial bonding between the tissue and electrode material. Previously published findings were reproduced in a pilot study of explanted reference grade medical-grade methyl silicone (PDMS) and commercially pure titanium (cpTi) materials and their tissue capsules from 30-day subcutaneous exposures in Balb/C mice. The low-critical surface tension PDMS produced thick, dense, poorly attached scar capsules while the higher-surface-energy commercially pure titanium (cpTi) produced more cellular and strongly attached tissue layers difficult to delaminate from the biomaterial. For the main body of work, cpTi, capacitor-grade Tantalum (Ta), and synthetic heart valve-quality Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) were evaluated, representative of potential high-surface-energy implant electrode materials. Their surface characteristics were determined as-manufactured and after Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Treatment (RFGDT) by Critical Surface Tension (CST) measurement, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). Representative tissue/electrode interfaces were created through subcutaneous implantation and harvest from Balb/C mice after 7, 28 and 56 days. The recovered, formalin preserved conductive implant/tissue specimens were examined by Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) over the range from 0.1 Hz to 100,000 Hz, in Bode plot and Nyquist plot formats. After EIS the implants were extracted from the tissue for surface examination by SEM and the separated tissue capsules were evaluated by histological examination in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained light microscopic thin sections. The differential findings were that the RFGDT PyC and Ta implants had significantly increased interface resistance and capacitance over their sterilized-only controls, correlating with more flattened cellular layers retained on the RFGDT specimens. The cpTi specimens, earlier identified as promoting hard tissue-to-surface integration in dental implants, showed only marginal improvements in soft tissue attachment following RFGDT. These experimental findings were confirmed through equivalent circuit modeling by the conversion from a standard Randles model with constant phase elements, which described the pre-implant materials, to a modified Randles model with additional resistance and capacitance to describe the implants with well-integrated surface coatings. Future work with RFGDT-modified electrode materials must include actual signal acquisition/stimulation trials in implant host tissues, to assess possible improvements in electrical energy-transfer efficiency and battery lifetime extensions.

  9. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The dorsal root ganglion is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach. Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as a result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main results. Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance. This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities.

  10. Charge trapping induced by plasma in alumina electrode surface investigated by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrico, P. F.; Ambrico, M.; Schiavulli, L.; Ligonzo, T.; Augelli, V.

    2009-02-02

    The plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge can fill traps in the alumina that cover the electrode. Trap energies and lifetimes are estimated by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. Comparison with similar results for traps created by other radiation sources clarifies the mechanisms regulating this effect. Alumina's trap energies are approximately 1 eV, and the traps remain active for several days after plasma exposure. These results could be important to keep dielectric barrier discharge plasmas uniform since a trapped charge can be an electron reservoir.

  11. Efficient Search and Fit Methods to Find Nerve Stimulation Parameters for Multi-Contact Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Freeberg, Max J; Schiefer, Matthew A.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently sample EMG recruitment space over a wide range of pulse amplitude (PA) and pulse width (PW). A gradient based search method is developed to find high information areas of a recruitment surface. This search method is first examined in the context of simulated EMG recruitment data and its ability to sample and subsequently fit Gompertz-Function-inspired surfaces to it. The search method is then used to determine parameters when stimulating through an 8 contact flat interface nerve electrode (FINE). The recorded EMG recruitment data are then used to validate the Gompertz surface fitting method as well as the search method. PMID:22256009

  12. Electrodes for high-definition transcutaneous DC stimulation for applications in drug-delivery and electrotherapy, including tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Preet; Bansal, Varun; Patel, Jinal; Ho, Johnson S.; Diaz, Julian; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation is applied in a range of biomedical applications including Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). tDCS is a non-invasive procedure where a weak direct current (<2 mA) is applied across the scalp to modulate brain function. High-Definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) is a technique used to increase the spatial focality of tDCS by passing current across the scalp using <12 mm diameter electrodes. The purpose of this study was to design and optimize “high-definition” electrode-gel parameters for electrode durability, skin safety, and subjective pain. Anode and cathode electrode potential, temperature, pH, and subjective sensation over time were assessed during application of 2 mA direct current, for up to 22 minutes on agar gel or subject forearms. A selection of 5 types of solid-conductors (Ag pellet, Ag/AgCl pellet, Rubber pellet, Ag/AgCl ring, and Ag/AgCl disc) and 7 conductive gels (Signa, Spectra, Tensive, Redux, BioGel, Lectron, and CCNY-4) were investigated. The Ag/AgCl ring in combination with CCNY-4 gel resulted in the most favorable outcomes. Under anode stimulations, electrode potential and temperature rises were generally observed in all electrode-gel combinations except for Ag/AgCl ring and disc electrodes. pH remained constant for all solid-conductors except for both Ag and Rubber pellet electrodes with Signa and CCNY-4 gels. Sensation ratings were independent of stimulation polarity. Ag/AgCl ring electrodes were found to be the most comfortable followed by Ag, Rubber, and Ag/AgCl pellet electrodes across all gels. PMID:20488204

  13. The anteromedial GPi as a new target for deep brain stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish; Evans, Andrew; Bear, Renee E; Velakoulis, Dennis; Bittar, Richard G

    2014-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is now well established in the treatment of intractable movement disorders. Over the past decade the clinical applications have expanded into the realm of psychosurgery, including depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The optimal targets for electrode placement in psychosurgery remain unclear, with numerous anatomical targets reported for the treatment of OCD. We present four patients with Tourette's syndrome and prominent features of OCD who underwent DBS of the anteromedial globus pallidus internus (GPi) to treat their movement disorder. Their pre-operative and post-operative OCD symptoms were compared, and responded dramatically to surgery. On the basis of these results, we propose the anteromedial (limbic) GPi as a potential surgical target for the treatment of OCD, and furnish data supporting its further investigation as a DBS target for the treatment of psychiatric conditions. PMID:24524950

  14. Selective stimulation of the canine hypoglossal nerve using a multi-contact cuff electrode.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Paul B; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M

    2004-04-01

    Electrical activation of the tongue protrusor muscle has been demonstrated as an effective technique for alleviating upper airway (UAW) obstructions and is considered a potential treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Recent studies, however, have shown marked improvements in UAW patency by coactivating the tongue protrudor and retractor muscles. As such, selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve (XII) using a single implantable device presents an attractive approach for treating OSA. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a device, the maximum achievable stimulation selectivity of the Flat Interface Nerve Electrode (FINE) was investigated. The XII nerve of beagles was stimulated with an acutely implanted FINE, while the corresponding neural and muscular responses were recorded and analyzed. The overall performance of the FINE, as depicted by the average of the maximum target-specific selectivity values, S(i), confirmed that high degrees of selectivity can be achieved at both the fascicular and muscular levels: 0.93 +/- 0.03 (n = 5) and 0.88 +/- 0.03 (n = 4), respectively. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of the FINE for selective stimulation of the XII nerve branches and the innervated tongue muscles. PMID:15117024

  15. [Bowstringing as a complication of deep brain stimulation].

    PubMed

    Castro Bouzas, Daniel; Serramito García, Ramón; Relova Quinteiro, José Luis; Castro García, Alfonso; Ares Pensado, Begoña; Sesar Ignacio, Angel; Gelabert-González, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established surgical therapy for intractable movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia. As the number of treated patients has increased rapidly, new sets of problems about complications of DBS have arisen. Bowstringing is defined as abnormal tethering of leads between the pulse generators and stimulating electrode, associated with pain and contracture of the neck over the extension cable. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of advanced Parkinson's disease who had been treated by implantation of a bilateral, subthalamic nucleus, deep brain stimulator. A car accident caused the rupture of the right electrode, which was replaced. Six months after the replacement the patient presented disabling pain and tension in the neck where deep brain extension cables were located. A cervical incision was performed to excise scar tissue. Bowstringing is a rare complication of DBS and although patients sometimes report discomfort and tension in the cervical region, surgical procedures are not normally required. PMID:23246336

  16. Consonant recognition as a function of the number of stimulation channels in the Hybrid short-electrode cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Turner, Christopher W; Karsten, Sue A; Erenberg, Sheryl R; Taylor, Jessica; Gantz, Bruce J

    2012-11-01

    Consonant recognition was measured as a function of the number of stimulation channels for Hybrid short-electrode cochlear implant (CI) users, long-electrode CI users, and normal-hearing (NH) listeners in quiet and background noise. Short-electrode CI subjects were tested with 1-6 channels allocated to a frequency range of 1063-7938 Hz. Long-electrode CI subjects were tested with 1-6, 8, or 22 channels allocated to 188-7938 Hz, or 1-6 or 15 channels from the basal 15 electrodes allocated to 1063-7938 Hz. NH listeners were tested with simulations of each CI group/condition. Despite differences in intracochlear electrode spacing for equivalent channel conditions, all CI subject groups performed similarly at each channel condition and improved up to at least four channels in quiet and noise. All CI subject groups underperformed relative to NH subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that the limited channel benefit seen for CI users may not be due solely to increases in channel interactions as a function of electrode density. Other factors such as pre-operative patient history, location of stimulation in the base versus apex, or a limit on the number of electric channels that can be processed cognitively, may also interact with the effects of electrode contact spacing along the cochlea. PMID:23145621

  17. Reliability of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for upper extremity functional neuromuscular stimulation in adolescents with C5 tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B T; Betz, R R; Mulcahey, M J; Triolo, R J

    1994-09-01

    Chronically indwelling percutaneous intramuscular electrodes were implanted in the upper extremity muscles of five adolescents with C5 or C5-6 tetraplegia in an effort to provide lateral and palmar prehension using the neuroprosthetic system designed by Case Western Reserve University. The responses from 177 electrodes were evaluated at 3-month intervals and included measurements of electrical impedance and an assessment of recruitment properties. Electrode failures were categorized as breakage, an altered stimulated response or adverse sensation during stimulation. Survival probabilities were generated for all electrodes, each muscle group, the volar and dorsal exit sites, intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, and according to the subjects' time postinjury. The overall probability of an electrode surviving to 6 months was 0.75 and the 1 year survival probability was 0.56. Among muscle groups, the finger extensor and thumb adductor electrodes had the highest proportion of failures and the poorest survival likelihoods within the first year after implant. According to the Breslow test, significantly smaller survival chances were predicted for electrodes exiting dorsally and for the newly-injured adolescents (< 1 year postinjury). The cumulative survival likelihoods of this study are smaller than those reported in adult applications using the same electrode design. Factors that may account for the disparate results are discussed. PMID:8085926

  18. Measures to Evaluate the Effects of DBS on Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Weismer, Gary; Yunusova, Yana; Bunton, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate measures of speech production that could be used to document effects of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) on speech performance, especially in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). A small set of evaluative criteria for these measures is presented first, followed by consideration of several speech physiology and speech acoustic measures that have been studied frequently and reported on in the literature on normal speech production, and speech production affected by neuromotor disorders (dysarthria). Each measure is reviewed and evaluated against the evaluative criteria. Embedded within this review and evaluation is a presentation of new data relating speech motions to speech intelligibility measures in speakers with PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and control speakers (CS). These data are used to support the conclusion that at the present time the slope of second formant transitions (F2 slope), an acoustic measure, is well suited to make inferences to speech motion and to predict speech intelligibility. The use of other measures should not be ruled out, however, and we encourage further development of evaluative criteria for speech measures designed to probe the effects of DBS or any treatment with potential effects on speech production and communication skills. PMID:24932066

  19. Selectivity of direct and network-mediated stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells with epi-, sub- and intraretinal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Goetz, Georges; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intra-retinal placement of stimulating electrodes can provide close and stable proximity to target neurons. We assessed improvement in stimulation thresholds and selectivity of the direct and network-mediated retinal stimulation with intraretinal electrodes, compared to epiretinal and subretinal placements. Approach. Stimulation thresholds of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in wild-type rat retina were measured using the patch-clamp technique. Direct and network-mediated responses were discriminated using various synaptic blockers. Main results. Three types of RGC responses were identified: short latency (SL, ? < 5 ms) originating in RGCs, medium latency (ML, 3 < ? < 70 ms) originating in the inner nuclear layer and long latency (LL, ? > 40 ms) originating in photoreceptors. Cathodic epiretinal stimulation exhibited the lowest threshold for direct RGC response and the highest direct selectivity (network/direct thresholds ratio), exceeding a factor of 3 with pulse durations below 0.5 ms. For network-mediated stimulation, the lowest threshold was obtained with anodic pulses in OPL position, and its network selectivity (direct/network thresholds ratio) increased with pulse duration, exceeding a factor of 4 at 10 ms. Latency of all three types of responses decreased with increasing strength of the stimulus. Significance. These results define the optimal range of pulse durations, pulse polarities and electrode placement for the retinal prostheses aiming at direct or network-mediated stimulation of RGCs.

  20. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Tyler, D. J.; Anderson, J. S.; Triolo, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  1. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in a rat model of binge eating.

    PubMed

    Doucette, W T; Khokhar, J Y; Green, A I

    2015-01-01

    Binge eating (BE) is a difficult-to-treat behavior with high relapse rates, thus complicating several disorders including obesity. In this study, we tested the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a rodent model of BE. We hypothesized that BE rats receiving high-frequency DBS in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core would have reduced binge sizes compared with sham stimulation in both a 'chronic BE' model as well as in a 'relapse to chronic BE' model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=18) were implanted with stimulating electrodes in bilateral NAc core, and they received either active stimulation (N=12) or sham stimulation (N=6) for the initial chronic BE experiments. After testing in the chronic BE state, rats did not engage in binge sessions for 1 month, and then resumed binge sessions (relapse to chronic BE) with active or sham stimulation (N=5-7 per group). A significant effect of intervention group was observed on binge size in the chronic BE state, but no significant difference between intervention groups was observed in the relapse to chronic BE experiments. This research, making use of both a chronic BE model as well as a relapse to chronic BE model, provides data supporting the hypothesis that DBS of the NAc core can decrease BE. Further research will be needed to learn how to increase the effect size and decrease deep brain stimulation-treatment outcome variability across the continuum of BE behavior. PMID:26670280

  2. Iridium sputtered at varying pressures and target-substrate-distances evaluated for use as stimulation electrode material.

    PubMed

    Wessling, Boerge; van Ooyen, André; Mokwa, Wilfried; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Iridium was sputtered as the top layer of stimulation electrodes. The coatings were varied in their morphology by adjusting the total deposition pressure and the working distance (WD) of target and substrate. It is shown that the resulting different kinds of morphologies have a strong influence on stimulation characteristics. The combination of high working gas pressure and small WD as well as the combination of medium working gas pressure and larger WD yield the best characteristics on macro-sized test electrodes. PMID:17945769

  3. Does suppression of oscillatory synchronisation mediate some of the therapeutic effects of DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Alexandre; Cagnan, Hayriye; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence for exaggerated oscillatory neuronal synchronisation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, oscillations at around 20 Hz, in the so-called beta frequency band, relate to the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia and rigidity. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can significantly improve these motor impairments. Recent evidence has demonstrated reduction of beta oscillations concurrent with alleviation of PD motor symptoms, raising the possibility that suppression of aberrant activity may mediate the effects of DBS. Here we review the evidence supporting suppression of pathological oscillations during stimulation and discuss how this might underlie the efficacy of DBS. We also consider how beta activity may provide a feedback signal suitable for next generation closed-loop and intelligent stimulators. PMID:22787444

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Condensed from ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What is Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease? Deep brain stimulation (DBS) ...

  5. Neuropsychological and quality of life outcomes 12 months after unilateral thalamic stimulation for essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Fields, J; Troster, A; Woods, S; Higginson, C; Wilkinson, S; Lyons, K; Koller, W; Pahwa, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the one year cognitive, mood state, and quality of life (QoL) outcomes of unilateral thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) for essential tremor (ET). Methods: 40 patients diagnosed with ET completed comprehensive neuropsychological assessments about one month before and three and 12 months after DBS electrode implantation. Data were subjected to multivariate analyses, and significant results were further analysed using univariate techniques. Results: Analyses revealed statistically significant improvements on a cognitive screening measure and in aspects of fine visuomotor and visuoperceptual functions, verbal memory, mood state, and QoL. No group-wise declines in cognition were observed, but more patients showed declines than improvements on language and visual memory tests. Semantic verbal fluency declined significantly in four (10%) of the patients. In these four patients, diminished lexical verbal fluency was present at baseline. Conclusion: Cognitive, mood, and QoL outcomes after one year of DBS for ET are favourable; there were no overall deleterious effects on cognition, and DBS was accompanied by a significant reduction in anxiety and improvements in quality of life. However, preoperative verbal fluency diminution may predispose to further fluency declines after DBS. PMID:12588913

  6. The Electrocorticogram Signal Can Be Modulated With Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in the Hemiparkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lehmkuhle, M. J.; Bhangoo, S. S.; Kipke, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    Electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings of the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)–lesioned parkinsonian rat have shown an increase in the power of cortical ?-band (15–30 Hz) oscillations ipsilateral to the lesion. The power of these oscillations is decreased with dopamine agonist administration. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of an electrode implanted in the subthalamic nucleus alters the power of cortical ? and ? oscillations in 6-OHDA–lesioned animals. These alterations are dependent on stimulation frequency, charge, and amplitude/pulse width. Oscillations were significantly reduced during 200- and 350-Hz stimulation. A minimum charge of 4 nC was required to elicit a reduction in oscillation power. A number of amplitude and pulse width combinations that reached 4 nC were tested; it was found that only the combinations of 33 ?A/120 ?s and 65 ?A/60 ?s significantly reduced cortical oscillations. The reduction in ?/? oscillation power due to deep brain stimulation (DBS) was consistent with a significant reduction in the animals' rotational behavior, a typical symptom of parkinsonism in the rat. A significant shift from high ? to low ? was observed in the peak frequencies of ECoG recordings while animals were at rest versus walking on a treadmill. However, DBS exhibited no differential effect on oscillations between these two states. EEG recordings from rodent models of DBS may provide surrogate information about the neural signatures of Parkinson's disease relative to the efficacy of DBS. PMID:19625533

  7. In vitro extracellular recording and stimulation performance of nanoporous gold-modified multi-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Gook Hwa; Kim, Ah Young; Han, Young Hwan; Chung, Myung-Ae; Jung, Sang-Don

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Nanoporous gold (Au) structures can reduce the impedance and enhance the charge injection capability of multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) used for interfacing neuronal networks. Even though there are various nanoporous Au preparation techniques, fabrication of MEA based on low-cost electro-codeposition of Ag:Au has not been performed. In this work, we have modified a Au MEA via the electro-codeposition of Ag:Au alloy, followed by the chemical etching of Ag, and report on the in vitro extracellular recording and stimulation performance of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA. Approach. Ag:Au alloy was electro-codeposited on a bilayer lift-off resist sputter-deposition passivated Au MEA followed by chemical etching of Ag to form a porous Au structure. Main results. The porous Au structure was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and tunneling electron microscopy and found to have an interconnected nanoporous Au structure. The impedance value of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA is 15.4 ± 0.55 k? at 1 kHz, accompanied by the base noise V rms of 2.4 ± 0.3 ?V. The charge injection limit of the nanoporous Au-modified electrode estimated from voltage transient measurement is approximately 1 mC cm?2, which is comparable to roughened platinum and carbon nanotube electrodes. The charge injection capability of the nanoporous Au-modified MEA was confirmed by observing stimulus-induced spikes at above 0.2 V. The nanoporous Au-modified MEA showed mechanical durability upon ultrasonic treatment for up to an hour. Significance. Electro-codeposition of Ag:Au alloy combined with chemical etching Ag is a low-cost process for fabricating nanoporous Au-modified MEA suitable for establishing the stimulus–response relationship of cultured neuronal networks.

  8. Multichannel DBS halftoning for improved texture quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavuj, Radovan; Pedersen, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to develop a method for multichannel halftoning based on the Direct Binary Search (DBS) algorithm. We integrate specifics and benefits of multichannel printing into the halftoning method in order to further improve texture quality of DBS and to create halftoning that would suit for multichannel printing. Originally, multichannel printing is developed for an extended color gamut, at the same time additional channels can help to improve individual and combined texture of color halftoning. It does so in a similar manner to the introduction of the light colors (diluted inks) in printing. Namely, if one observes Red, Green and Blue inks as the light version of the M+Y, C+Y, C+M combinations, the visibility of the unwanted halftoning textures can be reduced. Analogy can be extent to any number of ink combinations, or Neugebauer Primaries (NPs) as the alternative building blocks. The extended variability of printing spatially distributed NPs could provide many practical solution and improvements in color accuracy, image quality, and could enable spectral printing. This could be done by selection of NPs per dot area location based on the constraint of the desired reproduction. Replacement with brighter NP at the location could induce a color difference where a tradeoff between image quality and color accuracy is created. With multichannel enabled DBS haftoning, we are able to reduce visibility of the textures, to provide better rendering of transitions, especially in mid and dark tones.

  9. Probing the Human Brain with Stimulating Electrodes: The Story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) Experiment on Mary Rafferty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lauren Julius; Almerigi, Jason B.

    2009-01-01

    Roberts Bartholow's 1874 experiment on Mary Rafferty is widely cited as the first demonstration, by direct application of stimulating electrodes, of the motor excitability of the human cerebral cortex. The many accounts of the experiment, however, leave certain questions and details unexamined or unresolved, especially about Bartholow's goals, the…

  10. [Esophageal stimulation of the heart: importance of the artifact inhibition system impulse in the quality of the ECG tracing from the stimulating electrode in the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Prochaczek, F; Galecka, J; Stopczyk, M; Stípal, R

    1991-03-22

    The use of diagnostic possibilities of oesophageal stimulation of the heart depends on obtaining a readable and stable electrocardiogram from the stimulating electrode. The objective of the evaluating the importance of the electronic system eliminating the artefact of the stimulating impulse from the oesophageal tracing was to compare the quality of records obtained by the new and the traditional method. For stimulation an oesophageal cardiostimulator SP-5 manufactured by OBR, TEMED Zabrze was used. The atria and ventricles were stimulated by a fixed frequency and individual timed stimuli. In 58 subjects the tracings of the oesophageal ECG during stimulation of the atria were compared and in 45 subjects during oesophageal stimulation of the ventricles. The quality of the obtained tracings was evaluated by four grades where the first three grades include tracings not suitable for diagnostic interpretation. Contrary to the traditional method, the new method for obtaining tracings made it possible to obtain tracings the quality of which was in all instances suitable for interpretation. The assembled results provide evidence, due to the new system of recording, that there are great opportunities to extend diagnostic possibilities of oesophageal stimulation of the heart. PMID:2032262

  11. Delayed and lasting effects of deep brain stimulation on locomotion in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Modolo, Julien

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variety of motor signs affecting gait, postural stability, and tremor. These symptoms can be improved when electrodes are implanted in deep brain structures and electrical stimulation is delivered chronically at high frequency (>100 Hz). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) onset or cessation affects PD signs with different latencies, and the long-term improvements of symptoms affecting the body axis and those affecting the limbs vary in duration. Interestingly, these effects have not been systematically analyzed and modeled. We compare these timing phenomena in relation to one axial (i.e., locomotion) and one distal (i.e., tremor) signs. We suggest that during DBS, these symptoms are improved by different network mechanisms operating at multiple time scales. Locomotion improvement may involve a delayed plastic reorganization, which takes hours to develop, whereas rest tremor is probably alleviated by an almost instantaneous desynchronization of neural activity in subcortical structures. Even if all PD patients develop both distal and axial symptoms sooner or later, current computational models of locomotion and rest tremor are separate. Furthermore, a few computational models of locomotion focus on PD and none exploring the effect of DBS was found in the literature. We, therefore, discuss a model of a neuronal network during DBS, general enough to explore the subcircuits controlling locomotion and rest tremor simultaneously. This model accounts for synchronization and plasticity, two mechanisms that are believed to underlie the two types of symptoms analyzed. We suggest that a hysteretic effect caused by DBS-induced plasticity and synchronization modulation contributes to the different therapeutic latencies observed. Such a comprehensive, generic computational model of DBS effects, incorporating these timing phenomena, should assist in developing a more efficient, faster, durable treatment of distal and axial signs in PD.

  12. Design, simulation and experimental validation of a novel flexible neural probe for deep brain stimulation and multichannel recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng; Hsu, Jui-Hsiang; He, Xin; Chen, You-Yin; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Chen, Hui-Fen; Tsang, Siny; Shih, Yen-Yu I.

    2012-06-01

    An implantable micromachined neural probe with multichannel electrode arrays for both neural signal recording and electrical stimulation was designed, simulated and experimentally validated for deep brain stimulation (DBS) applications. The developed probe has a rough three-dimensional microstructure on the electrode surface to maximize the electrode-tissue contact area. The flexible, polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were each composed of a long shaft (14.9 mm in length) and 16 electrodes (5 µm thick and with a diameter of 16 µm). The ability of these arrays to record and stimulate specific areas in a rat brain was evaluated. Moreover, we have developed a finite element model (FEM) applied to an electric field to evaluate the volume of tissue activated (VTA) by DBS as a function of the stimulation parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio ranged from 4.4 to 5 over a 50 day recording period, indicating that the laboratory-designed neural probe is reliable and may be used successfully for long-term recordings. The somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) obtained by thalamic stimulations and in vivo electrode-electrolyte interface impedance measurements was stable for 50 days and demonstrated that the neural probe is feasible for long-term stimulation. A strongly linear (positive correlation) relationship was observed among the simulated VTA, the absolute value of the SSEP during the 200 ms post-stimulus period (?SSEP) and c-Fos expression, indicating that the simulated VTA has perfect sensitivity to predict the evoked responses (c-Fos expression). This laboratory-designed neural probe and its FEM simulation represent a simple, functionally effective technique for studying DBS and neural recordings in animal models.

  13. Intraoperative MR-guided DBS implantation for treating PD and ET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Maxwell, Robert E.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    Deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantation is a promising treatment alternative for suppressing the motor tremor symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD) patient. The main objective is to develop a minimally invasive approach using high spatial resolution and soft-tissue contrast MR imaging techniques to guide the surgical placement of DBS. In the MR-guided procedure, the high spatial resolution MR images were obtained intra-operatively and used to target stereotactically a specific deep brain location. The neurosurgery for craniotomy was performed in the front of the magnet outside of the 10 Gauss line. Aided with positional registration assembly for the stereotactic head frame, the target location (VIM or GPi or STN) in deep brain areas was identified and measured from the MR images in reference to the markers in the calibration assembly of the head frame before the burrhole prep. In 20 patients, MR- guided DBS implantations have been performed according to the new methodology. MR-guided DBS implantation at high magnetic field strength has been shown to be feasible and desirable. In addition to the improved outcome, this offers a new surgical approach in which intra-operative visualization is possible during intervention, and any complications such as bleeding can be assessed in situ immediately prior to dural closure.

  14. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  15. Using MDEFT MRI Sequences to Target the GPi in DBS Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Jens; Debove, Ines; Lachenmayer, Lenard; Schüpbach, Michael; Oertel, Markus Florian; Wiest, Roland; Pollo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent advances in different MRI sequences have enabled direct visualization and targeting of the Globus pallidus internus (GPi) for DBS surgery. Modified Driven Equilibrium Fourier Transform (MDEFT) MRI sequences provide high spatial resolution and an excellent contrast of the basal ganglia with low distortion. In this study, we investigate if MDEFT sequences yield accurate and reliable targeting of the GPi and compare direct targeting based on MDEFT sequences with atlas-based targeting. Methods 13 consecutive patients considered for bilateral GPi-DBS for dystonia or PD were included in this study. Preoperative targeting of the GPi was performed visually based on MDEFT sequences as well as by using standard atlas coordinates. Postoperative CT imaging was performed to calculate the location of the implanted leads as well as the active electrode(s). The coordinates of both visual and atlas based targets were compared. The stereotactic coordinates of the lead and active electrode(s) were calculated and projected on the segmented GPi. Results On MDEFT sequences the GPi was well demarcated in most patients. Compared to atlas-based planning the mean target coordinates were located significantly more posterior. Subgroup analysis showed a significant difference in the lateral coordinate between dystonia (LAT = 19.33 ± 0.90) and PD patients (LAT = 20.67 ± 1.69). Projected on the segmented preoperative GPi the active contacts of the DBS electrode in both dystonia and PD patients were located in the inferior and posterior part of the structure corresponding to the motor part of the GPi. Conclusions MDEFT MRI sequences provide high spatial resolution and an excellent contrast enabling precise identification and direct visual targeting of the GPi. Compared to atlas-based targeting, it resulted in a significantly different mean location of our target. Furthermore, we observed a significant variability of the target among the PD and dystonia subpopulation suggesting accurate targeting for each individual patient. PMID:26366574

  16. Quantitative evaluation of parkinsonian rigidity during intra-operative deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yuri; Park, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Won; Ho, Yeji; Jeon, Hyeong-Min; Bang, Min-Jung; Koh, Seong-Beom; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Eom, Gwang-Moon

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at the quantification of fine change in parkinsonian rigidity at the wrist during deep brain stimulation (DBS) using a portable measurement system and objective mechanical measures. The rigidity of fourteen limbs was evaluated during DBS surgery. The resistive torque to imposed movement was measured for every setting where a reduction in rigidity was perceived by a neurologist. Quantitative mechanical measures derived from experimental data included viscoelastic properties, work, impulse and mechanical impedance. Most mechanical measures could discriminate the optimal setting from baseline (electrode at stereotactic initial position without electrical stimulation) and the highest significance was achieved by viscous damping constant (p<0.001). Spearman correlation coefficients between mechanical measures and clinical score for multiple settings (averaged for 14 limbs) were 0.51-0.77 and the best correlation was shown for viscosity (?=0.77 ± 0.22). The results suggest that intraoperative quantification of rigidity during DBS surgery is possible with the suggested system and measures, which would be helpful for the adjustment of electrode position and stimulation parameters. PMID:25226927

  17. Multichannel stimulation of phrenic nerves by epineural electrodes. Clinical experience and future developments.

    PubMed

    Mayr, W; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Holle, J; Lanmüller, H; Thoma, H; Zrunek, M

    1993-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1992, 23 patients with complete ventilatory insufficiency of differing etiologies were treated with an eight channel implant (Medimplant Inc., Vienna) for fatigue free stimulation of both phrenic nerves. Data for 15 patients with high spinal cord lesions (ages: 9-51 years) are summarized: 1) level of lesion: C0, 3 patients; C1/C2, 4; C2/C3, 8; 2) time between incident and implantation: 3-14 months; 3) diaphragm training: 1-22 months; 4) chronic pacing: 5-83 months; 5) tracheostomy closed: 7 patients; 6) living permanently at home: 13 patients; 7) respiratory rate per minute: 12-17; 8) duration of inspiration: 1.0-1.3 sec; 9) tidal volume: 7-20 ml/kg body weight; 10) volume per minute: 121-198 ml/kg body weight; 11) pH: 7.39-7.42; 12) pCO2: 22.9-38.6 mmHg; 13) pO2: 81.2-104.5 mmHg; and 14) died by December 1992, 4 patients. All currently available implants for phrenic pacing need an external power supply and radio control. The authors have developed and tested the first fully implantable device. Features of this implant include an electronic circuit based on the microcontroller MC68HC705C8; surface mounted technology (SMD); eight channels; constant current source adjustable to 5 mA in 256 steps, impulse duration: 100-1000 musec, stimulation frequency: 1-33 Hz; and minimum lifetime: 3 years. The implant is programmed via bidirectional radio transmission using an IBM compatible computer. The dimensions, including battery, eight electrode connectors, and antenna, are 67 x 48 x 13 mm. The implant weights 58 g. This new device may improve patients' safety and quality of life in the near future. PMID:8268634

  18. Adaptive deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Beudel, M.; Brown, P.

    2016-01-01

    Although Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), there are still limitations in terms of effectivity, side-effects and battery consumption. One of the reasons for this may be that not only pathological but also physiological neural activity can be suppressed whilst stimulating. For this reason, adaptive DBS (aDBS), where stimulation is applied according to the level of pathological activity, might be advantageous. Initial studies of aDBS demonstrate effectiveness in PD, but there are still many questions to be answered before aDBS can be applied clinically. Here we discuss the feedback signals and stimulation algorithms involved in adaptive stimulation in PD and sketch a potential road-map towards clinical application. PMID:26411502

  19. Adaptive deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Beudel, M; Brown, P

    2016-01-01

    Although Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), there are still limitations in terms of effectivity, side-effects and battery consumption. One of the reasons for this may be that not only pathological but also physiological neural activity can be suppressed whilst stimulating. For this reason, adaptive DBS (aDBS), where stimulation is applied according to the level of pathological activity, might be advantageous. Initial studies of aDBS demonstrate effectiveness in PD, but there are still many questions to be answered before aDBS can be applied clinically. Here we discuss the feedback signals and stimulation algorithms involved in adaptive stimulation in PD and sketch a potential road-map towards clinical application. PMID:26411502

  20. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic microlesion and stimulation effects in Parkinson's disease: Indications of a principal role of the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Holiga, Štefan; Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Urgošík, Dušan; R?ži?ka, Evžen; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During implantation of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in the target structure, neurosurgeons and neurologists commonly observe a “microlesion effect” (MLE), which occurs well before initiating subthalamic DBS. This phenomenon typically leads to a transitory improvement of motor symptoms of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). Mechanisms behind MLE remain poorly understood. In this work, we exploited the notion of ranking to assess spontaneous brain activity in PD patients examined by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in response to penetration of DBS electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus. In particular, we employed a hypothesis-free method, eigenvector centrality (EC), to reveal motor-communication-hubs of the highest rank and their reorganization following the surgery; providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the direct impact of disrupting the PD motor circuitry in vivo without prior assumptions. Penetration of electrodes was associated with increased EC of functional connectivity in the brainstem. Changes in connectivity were quantitatively related to motor improvement, which further emphasizes the clinical importance of the functional integrity of the brainstem. Surprisingly, MLE and DBS were associated with anatomically different EC maps despite their similar clinical benefit on motor functions. The DBS solely caused an increase in connectivity of the left premotor region suggesting separate pathophysiological mechanisms of both interventions. While the DBS acts at the cortical level suggesting compensatory activation of less affected motor regions, the MLE affects more fundamental circuitry as the dysfunctional brainstem predominates in the beginning of PD. These findings invigorate the overlooked brainstem perspective in the understanding of PD and support the current trend towards its early diagnosis. PMID:26509113

  1. Perceptual changes in place of stimulation with long cochlear implant electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, David M; Mertens, Griet; Punte, Andrea Kleine; Van De Heyning, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Long (31.5?mm) electrode arrays are inserted deeper into the cochlea than the typical 1.25 turn insertion. With these electrode arrays, the apical electrodes are closer to (and possibly extend past) the end of the spiral ganglion. Using multi-dimensional scaling with patients implanted with a 31.5?mm electrode array, the perceptual space between electrodes was measured. The results suggest that deeper insertion increases the range of place pitches, but the perceptual differences between adjacent electrodes become smaller in the apex. PMID:25234918

  2. Metal nanoparticles in DBS card materials modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Frolov, G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years the method of collecting and storing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) on special cellulose membrane (paper) has gained wide popularity. But possible damage of biosamples caused by microorganisms in case of their incomplete drying is a disadvantage of the method. It can be overcome by treating sample-collection membranes with colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles, having antibacterial effect. The team studied antibacterial properties of nonwoven material samples with various coatings (alcohol sols of copper, aluminium, iron, titanium, silver and vanadium nanoparticles). Colloidal solutions of nanoparticles were obtained by means of electroerosion method with further low-temperature plasma condensation. Antibacterial activity of fiberglass and cellulose membrane samples with nanoparticle coatings was studied using B. cereus and plaque bacteria cultures. It was revealed that nanostructured coatings can suppress bacterial activity; in addition they can diffuse from the membrane surface into medium which leads to widening the areas of inhibiting testing cultures’ growth. Thus, membrane materials treatment with alcohol-sols of metal nanoparticles can be seen as promising for conferring antibacterial properties to DBS carriers.

  3. Supporting clinical decision making during deep brain stimulation surgery by means of a stochastic dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. During deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), microelectrode recording (MER) in conjunction with functional stimulation techniques are commonly applied for accurate electrode implantation. However, the development of automatic methods for clinical decision making has to date been characterized by the absence of a robust single-biomarker approach. Moreover, it has only been restricted to the framework of MER without encompassing intraoperative macrostimulation. Here, we propose an integrated series of novel single-biomarker approaches applicable to the entire electrophysiological procedure by means of a stochastic dynamical model. Approach. The methods are applied to MER data pertinent to ten DBS procedures. Considering the presence of measurement noise, we initially employ a multivariate phase synchronization index for automatic delineation of the functional boundaries of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and determination of the acceptable MER trajectories. By introducing the index into a nonlinear stochastic model, appropriately fitted to pre-selected MERs, we simulate the neuronal response to periodic stimuli (130 Hz), and examine the Lyapunov exponent as an indirect indicator of the clinical effectiveness yielded by stimulation at the corresponding sites. Main results. Compared with the gold-standard dataset of annotations made intraoperatively by clinical experts, the STN detection methodology demonstrates a false negative rate of 4.8% and a false positive rate of 0%, across all trajectories. Site eligibility for implantation of the DBS electrode, as implicitly determined through the Lyapunov exponent of the proposed stochastic model, displays a sensitivity of 71.43%. Significance. The suggested comprehensive method exhibits remarkable performance in automatically determining both the acceptable MER trajectories and the optimal stimulation sites, thereby having the potential to accelerate precise target finalization during DBS surgery for PD.

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus preferentially alters the translational profile of striatopallidal neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Visanji, Naomi P.; Kamali Sarvestani, Iman; Creed, Meaghan C.; Shams Shoaei, Zahra; Nobrega, José N.; Hamani, Clement; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the precise neuronal mechanisms of which both at molecular and network levels remain a topic of debate. Here we employ two transgenic mouse lines, combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with bacterial artificial chromosome expression (Bac), to selectively identify changes in translational gene expression in either Drd1a-expressing striatonigral or Drd2-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum following STN-DBS. 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice received either 5 days stimulation via a DBS electrode implanted in the ipsilateral STN or 5 days sham treatment (no stimulation). Striatal polyribosomal RNA was selectively purified from either Drd2 or Drd1a MSNs using the TRAP method and gene expression profiling performed. We identified eight significantly altered genes in Drd2 MSNs (Vps33b, Ppp1r3c, Mapk4, Sorcs2, Neto1, Abca1, Penk1, and Gapdh) and two overlapping genes in Drd1a MSNs (Penk1 and Ppp1r3c) implicated in the molecular mechanisms of STN-DBS. A detailed functional analysis, using a further 728 probes implicated in STN-DBS, suggested an increased ability to receive excitation (mediated by increased dendritic spines, increased calcium influx and enhanced excitatory post synaptic potentials) accompanied by processes that would hamper the initiation of action potentials, transport of neurotransmitters from soma to axon terminals and vesicular release in Drd2-expressing MSNs. Finally, changes in expression of several genes involved in apoptosis as well as cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were also identified. This increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms induced by STN-DBS may reveal novel targets for future non-surgical therapies for PD. PMID:26106299

  5. Estimation of electrode location in a rat motor cortex by laminar analysis of electrophysiology and intracortical electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, A.; Lehmkuhle, M. J.; Gage, G. J.; Marzullo, T. C.; Parikh, H.; Miriani, R. M.; Kipke, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    While the development of microelectrode arrays has enabled access to disparate regions of a cortex for neurorehabilitation, neuroprosthetic and basic neuroscience research, accurate interpretation of the signals and manipulation of the cortical neurons depend upon the anatomical placement of the electrode arrays in a layered cortex. Toward this end, this report compares two in vivo methods for identifying the placement of electrodes in a linear array spaced 100 µm apart based on in situ laminar analysis of (1) ketamine-xylazine-induced field potential oscillations in a rat motor cortex and (2) an intracortical electrical stimulation-induced movement threshold. The first method is based on finding the polarity reversal in laminar oscillations which is reported to appear at the transition between layers IV and V in laminar 'high voltage spindles' of the rat cortical column. Analysis of histological images in our dataset indicates that polarity reversal is detected 150.1 ± 104.2 µm below the start of layer V. The second method compares the intracortical microstimulation currents that elicit a physical movement for anodic versus cathodic stimulation. It is based on the hypothesis that neural elements perpendicular to the electrode surface are preferentially excited by anodic stimulation while cathodic stimulation excites those with a direction component parallel to its surface. With this method, we expect to see a change in the stimulation currents that elicits a movement at the beginning of layer V when comparing anodic versus cathodic stimulation as the upper cortical layers contain neuronal structures that are primarily parallel to the cortical surface and lower layers contain structures that are primarily perpendicular. Using this method, there was a 78.7 ± 68 µm offset in the estimate of the depth of the start of layer V. The polarity reversal method estimates the beginning of layer V within ±90 µm with 95% confidence and the intracortical stimulation method estimates it within ±69.3 µm. We propose that these methods can be used to estimate the in situ location of laminar electrodes implanted in the rat motor cortex.

  6. Foundations of recommender system for STN localization during DBS surgery

    E-print Network

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Foundations of recommender system for STN localization during DBS surgery in Parkinson's patients) treatment of Parkin- son disease, the target of the surgery is the subthalamic nucleus (STN). As STN are used during DBS surgery for its better localization. This paper presents five different analytical

  7. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the appropriate EPFD levels in § 101.105(a)(4)(ii) at any DBS customer of record location. Using EPFD... make a determination of whether its signal level(s) will exceed the EPFD limit at any DBS customer of... developed by the Commission and described in Appendix J of the Memorandum Opinion and Order and...

  8. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the appropriate EPFD levels in § 101.105(a)(4)(ii) at any DBS customer of record location. Using EPFD... make a determination of whether its signal level(s) will exceed the EPFD limit at any DBS customer of... developed by the Commission and described in Appendix J of the Memorandum Opinion and Order and...

  9. Electrode alignment of transverse tripoles using a percutaneous triple-lead approach in spinal cord stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, V.; Buitenweg, J. R.; Holsheimer, J.; Veltink, P.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this modeling study is to determine the influence of electrode alignment of transverse tripoles on the paresthesia coverage of the pain area in spinal cord stimulation, using a percutaneous triple-lead approach. Transverse tripoles, comprising a central cathode and two lateral anodes, were modeled on the low-thoracic vertebral region (T10-T12) using percutaneous triple-lead configurations, with the center lead on the spinal cord midline. The triple leads were oriented both aligned and staggered. In the staggered configuration, the anodes were offset either caudally (caudally staggered) or rostrally (rostrally staggered) with respect to the midline cathode. The transverse tripolar field steering with the aligned and staggered configurations enabled the estimation of dorsal column fiber thresholds (IDC) and dorsal root fiber thresholds (IDR) at various anodal current ratios. IDC and IDR were considerably higher for the aligned transverse tripoles as compared to the staggered transverse tripoles. The aligned transverse tripoles facilitated deeper penetration into the medial dorsal columns (DCs). The staggered transverse tripoles always enabled broad and bilateral DC activation, at the expense of mediolateral steerability. The largest DC recruited area was obtained with the rostrally staggered transverse tripole. Transverse tripolar geometries, using percutaneous leads, allow for selective targeting of either medial or lateral DC fibers, if and only if the transverse tripole is aligned. Steering of anodal currents between the lateral leads of the staggered transverse tripoles cannot target medially confined populations of DC fibers in the spinal cord. An aligned transverse tripolar configuration is strongly recommended, because of its ability to provide more post-operative flexibility than other configurations.

  10. The clinical efficacy of -DOPA and STN-DBS share a common marker: reduced GABA content in the motor thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, A; Fedele, E; Vitek, J; Pierantozzi, M; Galati, S; Marzetti, F; Peppe, A; Bassi, M S; Bernardi, G; Stanzione, P

    2011-01-01

    At odd with traditional views, effective sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS), in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, may increase the discharge rate of the substantia nigra pars reticulata and the internal globus pallidus (GPi), in combination with increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels. How these changes affect the basal ganglia (BG) output to the motor thalamus, the crucial structure conveying motor information to cortex, is critical. Here, we determined the extracellular GABA concentration in the ventral anterior nucleus (VA) during the first delivery of STN-DBS (n=10) or following levodopa (LD) (n=8). Both DBS and subdyskinetic LD reversibly reduced (?30%) VA GABA levels. A significant correlation occurred between clinical score and GABA concentration. By contrast, only STN-DBS increased GPi cGMP levels. Hence, STN-ON and MED-ON involve partially different action mechanisms but share a common target in the VA. These findings suggest that the standard BG circuitry, in PD, needs revision as relief from akinesia may take place, during DBS, even in absence of reduced GPi excitability. However, clinical amelioration requires fast change of thalamic GABA, confirming, in line with the old model, that VA is the core player in determining thalamo-cortical transmission. PMID:21544093

  11. EEG Power Asymmetry and Functional Connectivity as a Marker of Treatment Effectiveness in DBS Surgery for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Quraan, Maher A; Protzner, Andrea B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Giacobbe, Peter; Tang, Chris W; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lozano, Andres M; McAndrews, Mary P

    2014-01-01

    Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been evaluated as an experimental therapy for treatment-resistant depression. Although there have been encouraging results in open-label trials, about half of the patients fail to achieve meaningful benefit. Although progress has been made in understanding the neurobiology of MDD, the ability to characterize differences in brain dynamics between those who do and do not benefit from DBS is lacking. In this study, we investigated EEG resting-state data recorded from 12 patients that have undergone DBS surgery. Of those, six patients were classified as responders to DBS, defined as an improvement of 50% or more on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17). We compared hemispheric frontal theta and parietal alpha power asymmetry and synchronization asymmetry between responders and non-responders. Hemispheric power asymmetry showed statistically significant differences between responders and non-responders with healthy controls showing an asymmetry similar to responders but opposite to non-responders. This asymmetry was characterized by an increase in frontal theta in the right hemisphere relative to the left combined with an increase in parietal alpha in the left hemisphere relative to the right in non-responders compared with responders. Hemispheric mean synchronization asymmetry showed a statistically significant difference between responders and non-responders in the theta band, with healthy controls showing an asymmetry similar to responders but opposite to non-responders. This asymmetry resulted from an increase in frontal synchronization in the right hemisphere relative to the left combined with an increase in parietal synchronization in the left hemisphere relative to the right in non-responders compared with responders. Connectivity diagrams revealed long-range differences in frontal/central-parietal connectivity between the two groups in the theta band. This pattern was observed irrespective of whether EEG data were collected with active DBS or with the DBS stimulation turned off, suggesting stable functional and possibly structural modifications that may be attributed to plasticity. PMID:24285211

  12. Improvement of Electrical Stimulation Protocol for Simultaneous Measurement of Extracellular Potential with On-Chip Multi-Electrode Array System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Fumimasa; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing with a multi-electrode array (MEA) system requires the stable beating of cardiomyocytes for the measurement of the field potential duration (FPD), because different spontaneous beating rates cause different responses of FPD prolongation induced by drugs, and the beating rate change effected by drugs complicates the FPD prolongation assessment. We have developed an on-chip MEA system with electrical stimulation for the measurement of the FPD during the stable beating of human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. Using a conventional bipolar stimulation protocol, we observed such large artifacts in electrical stimulation that we could not estimate the FPD quantitatively. Therefore, we improved the stimulation protocol by using sequential rectangular pulses in which the positive and negative stimulation voltages and number of pulses could be changed flexibly. The balanced voltages and number of pulses for sequential rectangular pulses enabled the recording of small negative artifacts only, which hardly affected the FPD measurement of human-ES-cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. These conditions of electrical stimulation are expected to find applications for the control of constant beating for cardiotoxicity testing.

  13. Possible therapeutic effects of transcutaneous electrical stimulation via concentric ring electrodes

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    DCS), and using electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). TMS applies magnetic fields to the cranium, producing electric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. This innovative

  14. Postmortem volumetric analysis of the nucleus accumbens in male heroin addicts: implications for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulf J; Truebner, Kurt; Schiltz, Kolja; Kuhn, Jens; Mawrin, Christian; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Steiner, Johann

    2015-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is increasingly investigated in neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS requires computer-assisted 3D planning to implant the stimulation electrode precisely. Recently, there has been a debate about the true dimensions of NAc in healthy as well as in mentally ill individuals. Knowing its true dimensions in different neuropsychiatric disorders may improve even more precise targeting of NAc for therapeutic DBS. Volumes of NAc of heroin addicts (n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 12) were calculated by using morphometry of serial whole-brain sections. Total brain volume was larger in the heroin group (mean 1478.85 ± 62.34 vs. mean 1352.38 ± 103.24 cm(3)), as the heroin group was more than 10 years younger (p = 0.001). However, the mean volume of the NAc in heroin addicts was smaller than in controls (0.528 ± 0.166 vs. 0.623 ± 0.196 cm(3); p = 0.019). This group effect did not significantly differ between the hemispheres. When assessed separately, left-hemispheric NAc volume was 15 % lower (p = 0.020), while right-hemispheric NAc volume was 16 % lower (p = 0.047) in the heroin-addicted group compared to controls. Based on these diagnosis-related differences, we believe it is important to further analyze NAc volumes in different psychiatric disorders to further improve precise targeting and electrode placement. PMID:26189034

  15. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in elderly patients – analysis of outcome and complications

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Jan; Haak, Susanne; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion about age limits for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Current indications for DBS are tremor-dominant disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Electrode implantation for DBS with analgesia and sedation makes surgery more comfortable, especially for elderly patients. However, the value of DBS in terms of benefit-risk ratio in this patient population is still uncertain. Methods Bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was performed in a total of 73 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Patients were analyzed retrospectively. For this study they were divided into two age groups: group I (age <65 years, n = 37) and group II (age ? 65 years, n = 36). Examinations were performed preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up intervals for 24 months postoperatively. Age, UPDRS motor score (part III) on/off, Hoehn & Yahr score, Activity of Daily Living (ADL), L-dopa medication, and complications were determined. Results Significant differences were found in overall performance determined as ADL scores (group I: 48/71 points, group II: 41/62 points [preoperatively/6-month postoperatively]) and in the rate of complications (group I: 4 transient psychosis, 4 infections in a total of 8 patients, group II: 2 deaths [unrelated to surgery], 1 intracerebral hemorrhage, 7 transient psychosis, 3 infections, 2 pneumonia in a total of 13 patients), (p < 0.05). Interestingly, changes in UPDRS scores, Hoehn & Yahr scores, and L-dopa medication were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion DBS of the STN is clinically as effective in elderly patients as it is in younger ones. However, a more careful selection and follow-up of the elderly patients are required because elderly patients have a higher risk of surgery-related complications and a higher morbidity rate. PMID:17367531

  16. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakši?, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10??m spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6?MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150?V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560–700?nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers.

  17. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakši?, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10??m spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6?MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150?V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560-700?nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers. PMID:26510889

  18. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakši?, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10??m spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6?MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150?V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560–700?nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers. PMID:26510889

  19. Stability and selectivity of a chronic, multi-contact cuff electrode for sensory stimulation in human amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Daniel W.; Schiefer, Matthew A.; Keith, Michael W.; Anderson, J. Robert; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Stability and selectivity are important when restoring long-term, functional sensory feedback in individuals with limb-loss. Our objective is to demonstrate a chronic, clinical neural stimulation system for providing selective sensory response in two upper-limb amputees. Approach. Multi-contact cuff electrodes were implanted in the median, ulnar, and radial nerves of the upper-limb. Main results. Nerve stimulation produced a selective sensory response on 19 of 20 contacts and 16 of 16 contacts in subjects 1 and 2, respectively. Stimulation elicited multiple, distinct percept areas on the phantom and residual limb. Consistent threshold, impedance, and percept areas have demonstrated that the neural interface is stable for the duration of this on-going, chronic study. Significance. We have achieved selective nerve response from multi-contact cuff electrodes by demonstrating characteristic percept areas and thresholds for each contact. Selective sensory response remains consistent in two upper-limb amputees for 1 and 2 years, the longest multi-contact sensory feedback system to date. Our approach demonstrates selectivity and stability can be achieved through an extraneural interface, which can provide sensory feedback to amputees.

  20. Emotion recognition in Parkinson's disease after subthalamic deep brain stimulation: differential effects of microlesion and STN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marilena; Eleopra, Roberto; Lettieri, Christian; Mondani, Massimo; D'Auria, Stanislao; Belgrado, Enrico; Piani, Antonella; De Simone, Luca; Rinaldo, Sara; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2014-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has acquired a relevant role in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite being a safe procedure, it may expose patients to an increased risk to experience cognitive and emotional difficulties. Impairments in emotion recognition, mediated both by facial and prosodic expressions, have been reported in PD patients treated with such procedure. However, it is still unclear whether the STN per se is responsible for such changes or whether others factors like the microlesion produced by the electrode implantation may also play a role. In this study we evaluated facial emotions discrimination and emotions recognition using both facial and prosodic expressions in 12 patients with PD and 13 matched controls. Patients' were tested in four conditions: before surgery, both in on and off medication, and after surgery, respectively few days after STN implantation before turning stimulator on and few months after with stimulation on. We observed that PD patients were impaired in discriminating and recognizing facial emotions, especially disgust, even before DBS implant. Microlesion caused by surgical procedure was found to influence patients' performance on the discrimination task and recognition of sad facial expression while, after a few months of STN stimulation, impaired disgust recognition was again prominent. No impairment in emotional prosody recognition was observed both before and after surgery. Our study confirms that PD patients may experience a deficit in disgust recognition and provides insight into the differential effect of microlesion and stimulation of STN on several tasks assessing emotion recognition. PMID:24342106

  1. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...levels from its system, under its...provide the following information to the DBS licensee(s): (i) Geographic location (including...transmitting antenna system; (iii) Height...altitude orientation information, and...

  2. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...levels from its system, under its...provide the following information to the DBS licensee(s): (i) Geographic location (including...transmitting antenna system; (iii) Height...altitude orientation information, and...

  3. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...levels from its system, under its...provide the following information to the DBS licensee(s): (i) Geographic location (including...transmitting antenna system; (iii) Height...altitude orientation information, and...

  4. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...levels from its system, under its...provide the following information to the DBS licensee(s): (i) Geographic location (including...transmitting antenna system; (iii) Height...altitude orientation information, and...

  5. 47 CFR 101.1440 - MVDDS protection of DBS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...levels from its system, under its...provide the following information to the DBS licensee(s): (i) Geographic location (including...transmitting antenna system; (iii) Height...altitude orientation information, and...

  6. Hindlimb movement in the cat induced by amplitude-modulated stimulation using extra-spinal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Changfeng; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Wang, Xianchun; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2008-06-01

    Hindlimb movement in the cat induced by electrical stimulation with an amplitude-modulated waveform of the dorsal surface of the L5-S1 spinal cord or the L5-S1 dorsal/ventral roots was investigated before and after acute spinal cord transection at the T13-L1 level. Stimulation of the spinal cord or dorsal/ventral root at the same spinal segment induced similar movements including coordinated multi-joint flexion or extension. The induced movements changed from flexion to extension when the stimulation was moved from rostral (L5) to caudal (S1) spinal segments. Stimulation of a dorsal or ventral root on one side induced only ipsilateral hindlimb movement. However, stimulation on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord along the midline or across the spinal cord induced bilateral movements. The extension induced by stimulation of L7 dorsal root produced the largest ground reaction force that was strong enough to support body weight. Dorsal root stimulation induced a larger ground reaction force than ventral root stimulation and produced a more graded recruitment curve. Stepping at different speeds could be generated by combined stimulation of the rostral (L5) and the caudal (L6/L7) spinal segments with an appropriate timing between the different stimulation channels. Acute transection of the spinal cord did not change the responses indicating that the induced movements did not require the involvement of the supraspinal locomotor centers. The methods and the stimulation strategy developed in this study might be utilized to restore locomotor function after spinal cord injury.

  7. A Multiple Electrode Scheme for Optimal Non-Invasive Electrical Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Parra, Lucas C.

    site is identified by a clinician. I. INTRODUCTION Transcranial direct current stimulation (t 10005 Abstract--Transcranial electrical stimulation involves the de- livery of weak electrical currentsDCS) is an emerg- ing neurotechnology involving the application of small direct currents to the surface

  8. The effects of bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on heart rate variability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang-Du; Shan, Din-E; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2013-07-01

    The beneficial effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on motor symptoms and quality of life in Parkinson's disease (PD) are well known, but little is known of the effects on autonomic function. Diffusion of current during stimulation of the STN may simultaneously involve the motor and nonmotor, limbic and associative areas of the STN. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation affects functions of the autonomic nervous system and, if so, to correlate the effects with the active contacts of electrodes in the STN. Eight PD patients with good motor control and quality of sleep after STN-DBS surgery were recruited. All patients had two days of recordings with portable polysomnography (PSG) (first night with stimulation "on" and second night "off"). From the PSG data, the first sleep cycle of each recording night was defined. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed between the same uninterrupted periods of the two sleep nights. In addition, the optimal electrode positions were defined from postoperative MRI studies, and the coordinates of active contacts were confirmed. HRV spectral analysis showed that only low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) power was significantly activated in the stimulation "on" groups (P = 0.011). There was a significant negative correlation between power change of LF/HF and electrode position lateral to the midcommissural point (? = 0.857, P = 0.007) These results demonstrate that STN-DBS can enhance sympathetic regulation; the autonomic response may be due to electrical signals being distributed to limbic components of the STN or descending sympathetic pathways in the zona incerta. PMID:23381615

  9. Development of the Mayo Investigational Neuromodulation Control System: toward a closed-loop electrochemical feedback system for deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Su-Youne; Kimble, Christopher J.; Kim, Inyong; Paek, Seungleal B.; Kressin, Kenneth R.; Boesche, Joshua B.; Whitlock, Sidney V.; Eaker, Diane R.; Kasasbeh, Aimen; Horne, April E.; Blaha, Charles D.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Object Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices continue to rely on an open-loop system in which stimulation is independent of functional neural feedback. The authors previously proposed that as the foundation of a DBS “smart” device, a closed-loop system based on neurochemical feedback, may have the potential to improve therapeutic outcomes. Alterations in neurochemical release are thought to be linked to the clinical benefit of DBS, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has been shown to be effective for recording these evoked neurochemical changes. However, the combination of FSCV with conventional DBS devices interferes with the recording and identification of the evoked analytes. To integrate neurochemical recording with neurostimulation, the authors developed the Mayo Investigational Neuromodulation Control System (MINCS), a novel, wirelessly controlled stimulation device designed to interface with FSCV performed by their previously described Wireless Instantaneous Neurochemical Concentration Sensing System (WINCS). Methods To test the functionality of these integrated devices, various frequencies of electrical stimulation were applied by MINCS to the medial forebrain bundle of the anesthetized rat, and striatal dopamine release was recorded by WINCS. The parameters for FSCV in the present study consisted of a pyramidal voltage waveform applied to the carbon-fiber microelectrode every 100 msec, ramping between ?0.4 V and +1.5 V with respect to an Ag/AgCl reference electrode at a scan rate of either 400 V/sec or 1000 V/sec. The carbon-fiber microelectrode was held at the baseline potential of ?0.4 V between scans. Results By using MINCS in conjunction with WINCS coordinated through an optic fiber, the authors interleaved intervals of electrical stimulation with FSCV scans and thus obtained artifact-free wireless FSCV recordings. Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle in the anesthetized rat by MINCS elicited striatal dopamine release that was time-locked to stimulation and increased progressively with stimulation frequency. Conclusions Here, the authors report a series of proof-of-principle tests in the rat brain demonstrating MINCS to be a reliable and flexible stimulation device that, when used in conjunction with WINCS, performs wirelessly controlled stimulation concurrent with artifact-free neurochemical recording. These findings suggest that the integration of neurochemical recording with neurostimulation may be a useful first step toward the development of a closed-loop DBS system for human application. PMID:24116724

  10. Accurate CT-MR image registration for deep brain stimulation: a multi-observer evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Derksen, Alexander; Heldmann, Stefan; Hallmann, Marc; Meine, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Since the first clinical interventions in the late 1980s, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has evolved into a very effective treatment option for patients with severe Parkinson's disease. DBS entails the implantation of an electrode that performs high frequency stimulations to a target area deep inside the brain. A very accurate placement of the electrode is a prerequisite for positive therapy outcome. The assessment of the intervention result is of central importance in DBS treatment and involves the registration of pre- and postinterventional scans. In this paper, we present an image processing pipeline for highly accurate registration of postoperative CT to preoperative MR. Our method consists of two steps: a fully automatic pre-alignment using a detection of the skull tip in the CT based on fuzzy connectedness, and an intensity-based rigid registration. The registration uses the Normalized Gradient Fields distance measure in a multilevel Gauss-Newton optimization framework and focuses on a region around the subthalamic nucleus in the MR. The accuracy of our method was extensively evaluated on 20 DBS datasets from clinical routine and compared with manual expert registrations. For each dataset, three independent registrations were available, thus allowing to relate algorithmic with expert performance. Our method achieved an average registration error of 0.95mm in the target region around the subthalamic nucleus as compared to an inter-observer variability of 1.12 mm. Together with the short registration time of about five seconds on average, our method forms a very attractive package that can be considered ready for clinical use.

  11. An inexpensive, charge-balanced rodent deep brain stimulation device: a step-by-step guide to its procurement and construction

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Samuel G.; Lipski, Witold J.; Grace, Anthony A.; Winter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite there being a relatively large number of methods papers which detail specifically the development of stimulation devices, only a small number of reports involve the application of these devices in freely moving animals. To date multiple preclinical neural stimulators have been designed and described but have failed to make an impact on the methods employed by the majority of laboratories studying DBS. Thus, the overwhelming majority of DBS studies are still performed by tethering the subject to an external stimulator. We believe that the low adoption rate of previously described methods is a result of the complexity of replicating and implementing these methods. New Method Here were describe both the design and procurement of a simple and inexpensive stimulator designed to be compatible with commonly used, commercially available electrodes (Plastics 1). Results This system is initially programmable in frequency, pulsewidth and current amplitude, and delivers biphasic, charge-balanced output to two independent electrodes. Comparison with Existing Method(s) It is easy to implement requiring neither subcutaneous implantation or custom-made electrodes and has been optimized for either direct mounting to the head or for use with rodent jackets. Conclusions This device is inexpensive and universally accessible, facilitating high throughput, low cost, long-term rodent deep brain stimulation experiments. PMID:23954265

  12. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  13. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stimulation of the spinal cord has been shown to have great potential for improving function after motor deficits caused by injury or pathological conditions. Using a wide range of animal models, many studies have shown that stimulation applied to the neural networks intrinsic to the spinal cord can result in a dramatic improvement of motor ability, even allowing an animal to step and stand after a complete spinal cord transection. Clinical use of this technology, however, has been slow to develop due to the invasive nature of the implantation procedures, the lack of versatility in conventional stimulation technology, and the difficulty of ascertaining specific sites of stimulation that would provide optimal amelioration of the motor deficits. Moreover, the development of tools available to control precise stimulation chronically via biocompatible electrodes has been limited. In this paper, we outline the development of this technology and its use in the spinal rat model, demonstrating the ability to identify and stimulate specific sites of the spinal cord to produce discrete motor behaviors in spinal rats using this array. Methods We have designed a chronically implantable, rapidly switchable, high-density platinum based multi-electrode array that can be used to stimulate at 1–100 Hz and 1–10 V in both monopolar and bipolar configurations to examine the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of spinal cord epidural stimulation in complete spinal cord transected rats. Results In this paper, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of using high-resolution stimulation parameters in the context of improving motor recovery after a spinal cord injury. We observed that rats whose hindlimbs were paralyzed can stand and step when specific sets of electrodes of the array are stimulated tonically (40 Hz). Distinct patterns of stepping and standing were produced by stimulation of different combinations of electrodes on the array located at specific spinal cord levels and by specific stimulation parameters, i.e., stimulation frequency and intensity, and cathode/anode orientation. The array also was used to assess functional connectivity between the cord dorsum to interneuronal circuits and specific motor pools via evoked potentials induced at 1 Hz stimulation in the absence of any anesthesia. Conclusions Therefore the high density electrode array allows high spatial resolution and the ability to selectively activate different neural pathways within the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord to facilitate standing and stepping in adult spinal rats and provides the capability to evoke motor potentials and thus a means for assessing connectivity between sensory circuits and specific motor pools and muscles. PMID:23336733

  14. Influence of Propofol and Fentanyl on Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of propofol and fentanyl on microelectrode recording (MER) and its clinical applicability during subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We analyzed 8 patients with Parkinson's disease, underwent bilateral STN DBS with MER. Their left sides were done under awake and then their right sides were done with a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl under local anesthesia. The electrode position was evaluated by preoperative MRI and postoperative CT. The clinical outcomes were assessed at six months after surgery. We isolated single unit activities from the left and the right side MERs. There was no significant difference in the mean firing rate between the left side MERs (38.7±16.8 spikes/sec, n=78) and the right side MERs (35.5±17.2 spikes/sec, n=66). The bursting pattern of spikes was more frequently observed in the right STN than in the left STN. All the electrode positions were within the STNs on both sides and the off-time Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III scores at six months after surgery decreased by 67% of the preoperative level. In this study, a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl did not significantly interfere with the MER signals from the STN. The results of this study suggest that propofol and fentanyl can be used for STN DBS in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease improving the overall experience of the patients. Graphical Abstract PMID:25246748

  15. Selectivity of Direct and Network-mediated Stimulation of the Retinal Ganglion Cells with Epi-, Sub- and Intra-Retinal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Goetz, Georges; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intra-retinal placement of stimulating electrodes can provide close and stable proximity to target neurons. We assessed improvement in stimulation thresholds and selectivity of the direct and network-mediated retinal stimulation with intraretinal electrodes, compared to epiretinal and subretinal placements. Approach Stimulation thresholds of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in wild-type rat retina were measured using patch-clamp technique. Direct and network-mediated responses were discriminated using various synaptic blockers. Main results Three types of RGC responses were identified: short latency (SL, ?<5ms) originating in RGCs, medium latency (ML, 340ms) originating in photoreceptors. Cathodic epiretinal stimulation exhibited the lowest threshold for direct RGC response and the highest direct selectivity (network/direct thresholds ratio), exceeding a factor of 3 with pulse durations below 0.5ms. For network-mediated stimulation, the lowest threshold was obtained with anodic pulses in OPL position, and its network selectivity (direct/network thresholds ratio) increased with pulse duration, exceeding a factor of 4 at 10ms. Latency of all three types of responses decreased with increasing strength of the stimulus. Significance These results define optimal range of pulse durations, pulse polarities and electrode placement for the retinal prostheses aiming at direct or network-mediated stimulation of RGCs. PMID:24608166

  16. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe to be recruited to future fMRI experiments performed under the specific conditions defined by our protocol, with no likelihood of confound by inappropriate stimulus delivery. PMID:26061738

  17. Deep brain stimulation and tremor.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kelly E; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2008-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat various tremor disorders for several decades. Medication-resistant, disabling essential tremor (ET) is the most common tremor disorder treated with DBS. The treatment has been consistently reported to result in significant benefit in upper extremity, as well as head and voice tremor, all of which were improved more dramatically with bilateral procedures. These benefits have been demonstrated to be sustained for up to 7 years. DBS has also been shown to be beneficial for the tremor associated with multiple sclerosis and post-traumatic tremor; however, fewer cases have been reported and the benefit is less consistent, less dramatic, and more transient than that seen with ET. The ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus is the most common DBS target for tremor disorders, but more recent studies have demonstrated benefits in tremor from DBS of the subthalamic area, primarily the zona incerta. Surgical complications are relatively uncommon and are generally less frequent than those seen with thalamotomy. Stimulation-related effects are usually mild and resolve with adjustment of stimulation parameters. DBS is thus a relatively safe and effective treatment for tremor disorders, particularly for medication-resistant, disabling ET, but may also have some role in medication-resistant, disabling tremor associated with multiple sclerosis and traumatic head injury. PMID:18394574

  18. The Present Indication and Future of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    SUGIYAMA, Kenji; NOZAKI, Takao; ASAKAWA, Tetsuya; KOIZUMI, Shinichiro; SAITOH, Osamu; NAMBA, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The use of electrical stimulation to treat pain in human disease dates back to ancient Rome or Greece. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) was initially applied for pain treatment in the 1960s, and was later used to treat movement disorders in the 1990s. After recognition of DBS as a therapy for central nervous system (CNS) circuit disorders, DBS use showed drastic increase in terms of adaptability to disease and the patient’s population. More than 100,000 patients have received DBS therapy worldwide. The established indications for DBS are Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia, whereas global indications of DBS expanded to other neuronal diseases or disorders such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy, and tinnitus. DBS is also experimentally used to manage cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette’s syndrome, and eating disorders. The importance of ethics and conflicts surrounding the regulation and freedom of choice associated with the application of DBS therapy for new diseases or disorders is increasing. These debates are centered on the use of DBS to treat new diseases and disorders as well as its potential to enhance ability in normal healthy individuals. Here we present three issues that need to be addressed in the future: (1) elucidation of the mechanisms of DBS, (2) development of new DBS methods, and (3) miniaturization of the DBS system. With the use of DBS, functional neurosurgery entered into the new era that man can manage and control the brain circuit to treat intractable neuronal diseases and disorders. PMID:25925757

  19. The present indication and future of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kenji; Nozaki, Takao; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Saitoh, Osamu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The use of electrical stimulation to treat pain in human disease dates back to ancient Rome or Greece. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) was initially applied for pain treatment in the 1960s, and was later used to treat movement disorders in the 1990s. After recognition of DBS as a therapy for central nervous system (CNS) circuit disorders, DBS use showed drastic increase in terms of adaptability to disease and the patient's population. More than 100,000 patients have received DBS therapy worldwide. The established indications for DBS are Parkinson's disease, tremor, and dystonia, whereas global indications of DBS expanded to other neuronal diseases or disorders such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy, and tinnitus. DBS is also experimentally used to manage cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette's syndrome, and eating disorders. The importance of ethics and conflicts surrounding the regulation and freedom of choice associated with the application of DBS therapy for new diseases or disorders is increasing. These debates are centered on the use of DBS to treat new diseases and disorders as well as its potential to enhance ability in normal healthy individuals. Here we present three issues that need to be addressed in the future: (1) elucidation of the mechanisms of DBS, (2) development of new DBS methods, and (3) miniaturization of the DBS system. With the use of DBS, functional neurosurgery entered into the new era that man can manage and control the brain circuit to treat intractable neuronal diseases and disorders. PMID:25925757

  20. Web-Based Telemonitoring and Delivery of Caregiver Support for Patients With Parkinson Disease After Deep Brain Stimulation: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Elena; Rosa, Manuela; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Rossi, Lorenzo; Bertolasi, Laura; Vogrig, Alberto; Pinciroli, Francesco; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing number of patients, the high costs of management, and the chronic progress of the disease that prevents patients from performing even simple daily activities make Parkinson disease (PD) a complex pathology with a high impact on society. In particular, patients implanted with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes face a highly fragile stabilization period, requiring specific support at home. However, DBS patients are followed usually by untrained personnel (caregivers or family), without specific care pathways and supporting systems. Objective This projects aims to (1) create a reference consensus guideline and a shared requirements set for the homecare and monitoring of DBS patients, (2) define a set of biomarkers that provides alarms to caregivers for continuous home monitoring, and (3) implement an information system architecture allowing communication between health care professionals and caregivers and improving the quality of care for DBS patients. Methods The definitions of the consensus care pathway and of caregiver needs will be obtained by analyzing the current practices for patient follow-up through focus groups and structured interviews involving health care professionals, patients, and caregivers. The results of this analysis will be represented in a formal graphical model of the process of DBS patient care at home. To define the neurophysiological biomarkers to be used to raise alarms during the monitoring process, neurosignals will be acquired from DBS electrodes through a new experimental system that records while DBS is turned ON and transmits signals by radiofrequency. Motor, cognitive, and behavioral protocols will be used to study possible feedback/alarms to be provided by the system. Finally, a set of mobile apps to support the caregiver at home in managing and monitoring the patient will be developed and tested in the community of caregivers that participated in the focus groups. The set of developed apps will be connected to the already existing WebBioBank Web-based platform allowing health care professionals to manage patient electronic health records and neurophysiological signals. New modules in the WebBioBank platform will be implemented to allow integration and data exchange with mobile health apps. Results The results of this project will provide a novel approach to long-term evaluation of patients with chronic, severe conditions in the homecare environment, based on caregiver empowerment and tailored applications developed according to consensus care pathways established by clinicians. Conclusions The creation of a direct communication channel between health care professionals and caregivers can benefit large communities of patients and would represent a scalable experience in integrating data and information coming from a clinical setting to those in home monitoring. PMID:25803512

  1. Performance of DBS-Radio using concatenated coding and equalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevargiz, J.; Bell, D.; Truong, L.; Vaisnys, A.; Suwitra, K.; Henson, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) receiver is being developed for operation in a multipath Rayleigh channel. This receiver uses equalization and concatenated coding, in addition to open loop and closed loop architectures for carrier demodulation and symbol synchronization. Performance test results of this receiver are presented in both AWGN and multipath Rayleigh channels. Simulation results show that the performance of the receiver operating in a multipath Rayleigh channel is significantly improved by using equalization. These results show that fractional-symbol equalization offers a performance advantage over full symbol equalization. Also presented is the base-line performance of the DBS-R receiver using concatenated coding and interleaving.

  2. Dorsolateral subthalamic neuronal activity enhanced by median nerve stimulation characterizes Parkinson's disease during deep brain stimulation with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Tzung; Chuang, Wei-Yi; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Chao, Paul C P; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Hung, Hsiang-Yi; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery under general anesthesia is an alternative option for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few studies are available that report whether neuronal firing can be accurately recorded during this condition. In this study the authors attempted to characterize the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and elucidate the influence of general anesthetics on neurons during DBS surgery in patients with PD. The benefit of median nerve stimulation (MNS) for localization of the dorsolateral subterritory of the STN, which is involved in sensorimotor function, was explored. METHODS Eight patients with PD were anesthetized with desflurane and underwent contralateral MNS at the wrist during microelectrode recording of the STN. The authors analyzed the spiking patterns and power spectral density (PSD) of the background activity along each penetration track and determined the spatial correlation to the target location, estimated mated using standard neurophysiological procedures. RESULTS The dorsolateral STN spiking pattern showed a more prominent bursting pattern without MNS and more oscillation with MNS. In terms of the neural oscillation of the background activity, beta-band oscillation dominated within the sensorimotor STN and showed significantly more PSD during MNS (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Neuronal firing within the STN could be accurately identified and differentiated when patients with PD received general anesthetics. Median nerve stimulation can enhance the neural activity in beta-band oscillations, which can be used as an index to ensure optimal electrode placement via successfully tracked dorsolateral STN topography. PMID:26024004

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications.

    PubMed

    Tekriwal, Anand; Baltuch, Gordon

    2015-12-15

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  4. A Case of Mania following Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Ihtsham U.; Foote, Kelly D.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Ricciuti, Nicola; Ward, Herbert; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Jacobson, Charles E.; Siddiqui, Mustafa S.; Okun, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia is an effective treatment for select movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia. Based on these successes, DBS has been explored as an experimental treatment for medication-resistant neuropsychiatric disease. During a multiyear experience employing DBS to treat patients for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) we encountered several unanticipated stimulation-induced psychiatric side effects. We present a case of a young woman treated for OCD with DBS of the anterior limb of the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens region, who subsequently manifested a manic episode. We aim to discuss the case details, treatment and potential neuroanatomical underpinnings of this response. PMID:20714212

  5. A case of mania following deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Haq, Ihtsham U; Foote, Kelly D; Goodman, Wayne K; Ricciuti, Nicola; Ward, Herbert; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Jacobson, Charles E; Siddiqui, Mustafa S; Okun, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia is an effective treatment for select movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia. Based on these successes, DBS has been explored as an experimental treatment for medication-resistant neuropsychiatric disease. During a multiyear experience employing DBS to treat patients for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) we encountered several unanticipated stimulation-induced psychiatric side effects. We present a case of a young woman treated for OCD with DBS of the anterior limb of the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens region, who subsequently manifested a manic episode. We aim to discuss the case details, treatment and potential neuroanatomical underpinnings of this response. PMID:20714212

  6. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  7. Disruption in proprioception from long-term thalamic deep brain stimulation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Jennifer A.; Herter, Troy M.; Kiss, Zelma H.; Dukelow, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an excellent treatment for tremor and is generally thought to be reversible by turning off stimulation. For tremor, DBS is implanted in the ventrointermedius (Vim) nucleus of the thalamus, a region that relays proprioceptive information for movement sensation (kinaesthesia). Gait disturbances have been observed with bilateral Vim DBS, but the long-term effects on proprioceptive processing are unknown. We aimed to determine whether Vim DBS surgical implantation or stimulation leads to proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb. We assessed two groups of tremor subjects on measures of proprioception (kinaesthesia, position sense) and motor function using a robotic exoskeleton. In the first group (Surgery), we tested patients before and after implantation of Vim DBS, but before DBS was turned on to determine if proprioceptive deficits were inherent to tremor or caused by DBS implantation. In the second group (Stim), we tested subjects with chronically implanted Vim DBS ON and OFF stimulation. Compared to controls, there were no proprioceptive deficits before or after DBS implantation in the Surgery group. Surprisingly, those that received chronic long-term stimulation (LT-stim, 3–10 years) displayed significant proprioceptive deficits ON and OFF stimulation not present in subjects with chronic short-term stimulation (ST-stim, 0.5–2 years). LT-stim had significantly larger variability and reduced workspace area during the position sense assessment. During the kinesthetic assessment, LT-stim made significantly larger directional errors and consistently underestimated the speed of the robot, despite generating normal movement speeds during motor assessment. Chronic long-term Vim DBS may potentially disrupt proprioceptive processing, possibly inducing irreversible plasticity in the Vim nucleus and/or its network connections. Our findings in the upper limb may help explain some of the gait disturbances seen by others following Vim DBS. PMID:25983689

  8. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  9. Astroglial Control of the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Prefrontal Cortex Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Etiévant, A.; Oosterhof, C.; Bétry, C.; Abrial, E.; Novo-Perez, M.; Rovera, R.; Scarna, H.; Devader, C.; Mazella, J.; Wegener, G.; Sánchez, C.; Dkhissi-Benyahya, O.; Gronfier, C.; Coizet, V.; Beaulieu, J.M.; Blier, P.; Lucas, G.; Haddjeri, N.

    2015-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) shows promising efficacy as a therapy for intractable depression, the neurobiological bases underlying its therapeutic action remain largely unknown. The present study was aimed at characterizing the effects of infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL-PFC) DBS on several pre-clinical markers of the antidepressant-like response and at investigating putative non-neuronal mechanism underlying DBS action. We found that DBS induced an antidepressant-like response that was prevented by IL-PFC neuronal lesion and by adenosine A1 receptor antagonists including caffeine. Moreover, high frequency DBS induced a rapid increase of hippocampal mitosis and reversed the effects of stress on hippocampal synaptic metaplasticity. In addition, DBS increased spontaneous IL-PFC low-frequency oscillations and both raphe 5-HT firing activity and synaptogenesis. Unambiguously, a local glial lesion counteracted all these neurobiological effects of DBS. Further in vivo electrophysiological results revealed that this astrocytic modulation of DBS involved adenosine A1 receptors and K+ buffering system. Finally, a glial lesion within the site of stimulation failed to counteract the beneficial effects of low frequency (30 Hz) DBS. It is proposed that an unaltered neuronal–glial system constitutes a major prerequisite to optimize antidepressant DBS efficacy. It is also suggested that decreasing frequency could heighten antidepressant response of partial responders. PMID:26425697

  10. Optimizing deep brain stimulation settings using wearable sensing technology

    E-print Network

    Patel, Shyamal

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder resulting in rigidity, bradykinesia (slowness), tremor and gait disorder. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has been shown to be effective ...

  11. Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Vocal Tremor: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Choudhri, Omar; Sung, C Kwang; DiRenzo, Elizabeth E; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-03-01

    Essential vocal tremor (EVT) is the presence of a tremulous voice that is commonly associated with essential tremor. Patients with EVT often report a necessary increase in vocal effort that significantly worsens with stress and anxiety and can significantly impact quality of life despite optimal medical and behavioral treatment options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an effective therapy for vocal tremor, but very few studies exist in the literature that comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of DBS for specifically addressing EVT. We present a technical report on our multidisciplinary, comprehensive operative methodology for treatment of EVT with frameless, awake deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:26180680

  12. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  13. Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S.; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients. PMID:26090080

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Recent Trends and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    FUKAYA, Chikashi; YAMAMOTO, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has already been performed on more than 120,000 patients worldwide and in more than 7,000 patients in Japan. However, fundamental understanding of DBS effects on the pathological neural circuitry remains insufficient. Recent studies have specifically shown the importance of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loops, which were identified as functionally and anatomically discrete units. Three main circuits exist in the CSTC loops, namely, the motor, associative, and limbic circuits. From these theoretical backgrounds, it is determined that DBS sometimes influences not only motor functions but also the cognitive and affective functions of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The main targets of DBS for PD are subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi). Ventralis intermedius (Vim)-DBS was found to be effective in improving tremor. However, Vim-DBS cannot sufficiently improve akinesia and rigidity. Therefore, Vim-DBS is seldom carried out for the treatment of PD. In this article, we review the present state of DBS, mainly STN-DBS and GPi-DBS, for PD. In the first part of the article, appropriate indications and practical effects established in previous studies are discussed. The findings of previous investigations on the complications caused by the surgical procedure and on the adverse events induced by DBS itself are reviewed. In the second part, we discuss target selection (GPi vs. STN) and the effect of DBS on nonmotor symptoms. In the final part, as issues that should be resolved, the suitable timing of surgery, symptoms unresponsive to DBS such as on-period axial symptoms, and the related postoperative programing of stimulation parameters, are discussed. PMID:25925761

  15. Deep brain stimulation: new directions.

    PubMed

    Ostergard, T; Miller, J P

    2014-12-01

    The role of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of movement disorders is well established, but there has recently been a proliferation of additional indications that have been shown to be amenable to this technology. The combination of innovative approaches to neural interface technology with novel target identification based on previously discovered clinical effects of lesioning procedures has led to a fundamental paradigm for new directions in the application of DBS. The historical use of neurosurgical lesioning procedures in the treatment of psychiatric diseases such as obsessive compulsive disorder provided an initial opportunity to expand the use of DBS. The list is rapidly expanding and now includes major depressive disorder, Tourette's syndrome, addiction disorders, and eating disorders. Keen observations by neurosurgeons using these devices have lead to the incidental discovery of treatments for diseases without previous neurosurgical treatments. These discoveries are breaking new ground in the treatment of disorders of cognition, headache syndromes, disorders of consciousness, and epilepsy. Two features of DBS make it well-suited for treatment of disorders of nervous system function. First, the reversible, non-lesional nature of DBS allows for investigation of new targets without the morbidity of permanent side effects. Second, the programmable nature of DBS allows practitioners to alter stimulation patterns to minimize side effects and potentially improve efficacy through reprogramming. More importantly, proper scientific evaluation of new targets is aided by the ability to turn stimulation on and off with evaluators blinded to the stimulation status. Knowledge of these emerging therapies is important for practitioners, as there are many situations where a single target can effectively treat the symptoms of more than one disease. The intersection of advances in neuromodulation, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and functional neuroanatomy has created an environment rife with new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25418273

  16. Abstract--This work evaluates the effectiveness of a new type of electrode for functional electrical stimulation

    E-print Network

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    such as coughing, bowel movements, laughing, carrying weight, pregnancy, birth delivery and sexual intercourse with this type of electrode: pain, unpleasant sensations, fecal incontinence, vaginal irritation and infection

  17. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus engages the cerebellum for motor function in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Alexander C; O'Connor, Katherine A; Pilitsis, Julie G; Shin, Damian S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in managing motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in well-selected individuals. Recently, research has shown that DBS in the basal ganglia (BG) can alter neural circuits beyond the traditional basal ganglia-thalamus-cortical (BG-TH-CX) loop. For instance, functional imaging showed alterations in cerebellar activity with DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, these imaging studies revealed very little about how cell-specific cerebellar activity responds to STN stimulation or if these changes contribute to its efficacy. In this study, we assess whether STN-DBS provides efficacy in managing motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease by recruiting cerebellar activity. We do this by applying STN-DBS in hemiparkinsonian rats and simultaneously recording neuronal activity from the STN, brainstem and cerebellum. We found that STN neurons decreased spiking activity by 55% during DBS (P = 0.038), which coincided with a decrease in most pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and Purkinje neurons by 29% (P < 0.001) and 28% (P = 0.003), respectively. In contrast, spike activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei increased 45% during DBS (P < 0.001), which was likely from reduced afferent activity of Purkinje cells. Then, we applied STN-DBS at sub-therapeutic current along with stimulation of the deep cerebellar nuclei and found similar improvement in forelimb akinesia as with therapeutic STN-DBS alone. This suggests that STN-DBS can engage cerebellar activity to improve parkinsonian motor symptoms. Our study is the first to describe how STN-DBS in Parkinson's disease alters cerebellar activity using electrophysiology in vivo and reveal a potential for stimulating the cerebellum to potentiate deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:25124274

  18. Site of cochlear stimulation and its effect on electrically evoked compound action potentials using the MED-EL standard electrode array

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The standard electrode array for the MED-EL MAESTRO cochlear implant system is 31 mm in length which allows an insertion angle of approximately 720°. When fully inserted, this long electrode array is capable of stimulating the most apical region of the cochlea. No investigation has explored Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential (ECAP) recordings in this region with a large number of subjects using a commercially available cochlear implant system. The aim of this study is to determine if certain properties of ECAP recordings vary, depending on the stimulation site in the cochlea. Methods Recordings of auditory nerve responses were conducted in 67 subjects to demonstrate the feasibility of ECAP recordings using the Auditory Nerve Response Telemetry (ART™) feature of the MED-EL MAESTRO system software. These recordings were then analyzed based on the site of cochlear stimulation defined as basal, middle and apical to determine if the amplitude, threshold and slope of the amplitude growth function and the refractory time differs depending on the region of stimulation. Results Findings show significant differences in the ECAP recordings depending on the stimulation site. Comparing the apical with the basal region, on average higher amplitudes, lower thresholds and steeper slopes of the amplitude growth function have been observed. The refractory time shows an overall dependence on cochlear region; however post-hoc tests showed no significant effect between individual regions. Conclusions Obtaining ECAP recordings is also possible in the most apical region of the cochlea. However, differences can be observed depending on the region of the cochlea stimulated. Specifically, significant higher ECAP amplitude, lower thresholds and steeper amplitude growth function slopes have been observed in the apical region. These differences could be explained by the location of the stimulating electrode with respect to the neural tissue in the cochlea, a higher density, or an increased neural survival rate of neural tissue in the apex. Trial registration The Clinical Investigation has the Competent Authority registration number DE/CA126/AP4/3332/18/05. PMID:20015362

  19. A multicarrier TDM transmission system for DBS-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, S. J.

    1992-03-01

    Satellite communications service for space based broadcasting has been suggested by the National Research Council's Technical Operation's Committee for the Voice of America. The service is referred to as direct broadcast from space-audio (DBS-A). This paper presents a concept incorporating low bit rate source coding for voice and music, digital modulation, forward error correction coding and Viterbi decoding, multiple satellite beams, and multiple carrier time division multiplexed (TDM) transmission to provide a system capable of world wide coverage. The system provides the capability to narrow cast to specific geographically clustered audiences. Emphasis is on the space segment (transmitter) and earth segment (receiver) using the techniques mentioned above.

  20. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D. Luke; Collier, Timothy J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1) did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2) did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3) did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation. PMID:26222442

  1. Short latency activation of cortex by clinically effective thalamic brain stimulation for tremor.

    PubMed

    Walker, Harrison C; Huang, He; Gonzalez, Christopher L; Bryant, James E; Killen, Jeffrey; Knowlton, Robert C; Montgomery, Erwin B; Cutter, Gary C; Yildirim, Abidin; Guthrie, Bart L; Watts, Ray L

    2012-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) relieves disabling symptoms of neurologic and psychiatric diseases when medical treatments fail, yet its therapeutic mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that ventral intermediate (VIM) nucleus stimulation for essential tremor activates the cortex at short latencies, and that this potential is related to the suppression of tremor in the contralateral arm. We measured cortical activity with electroencephalography in 5 subjects (seven brain hemispheres) across a range of stimulator settings, and reversal of the anode and cathode electrode contacts minimized the stimulus artifact, allowing visualization of brain activity. Regression quantified the relationship between stimulation parameters and both the peak of the short latency potential and tremor suppression. Stimulation generated a polyphasic event-related potential in the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, with peaks at discrete latencies beginning less than 1 ms after stimulus onset (mean latencies 0.9 ± 0.2, 5.6 ± 0.7, and 13.9 ± 1.4 ms, denoted R1, R2, and R3, respectively). R1 showed more fixed timing than the subsequent peaks in the response (P < 0.0001, Levene's test), and R1 amplitude and frequency were both closely associated with tremor suppression (P < 0.0001, respectively). These findings demonstrate that effective VIM thalamic stimulation for essential tremor activates the cerebral cortex at approximately 1 ms after the stimulus pulse. The association between this short latency potential and tremor suppression suggests that DBS may improve tremor by synchronizing the precise timing of discharges in nearby axons and, by extension, the distributed motor network to the stimulation frequency or one of its subharmonics. PMID:22926754

  2. Neuroplasticity-dependent and -independent mechanisms of chronic deep brain stimulation in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Bambico, F R; Bregman, T; Diwan, M; Li, J; Darvish-Ghane, S; Li, Z; Laver, B; Amorim, B O; Covolan, L; Nobrega, J N; Hamani, C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves depressive-like behaviour in rats via serotonergic and neurotrophic-related mechanisms. We hypothesise that, in addition to these substrates, DBS-induced increases in hippocampal neurogenesis may also be involved. Our results show that stress-induced behavioural deficits in the sucrose preference test, forced swim test, novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and elevated plus maze were countered by chronic vmPFC DBS. In addition, stressed rats receiving stimulation had significant increases in hippocampal neurogenesis, PFC and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. To block neurogenesis, stressed animals given DBS were injected with temozolomide. Such treatment reversed the anxiolytic-like effect of stimulation in the NSFT without significantly affecting performance in other behavioural tests. Taken together, our findings suggest that neuroplastic changes, including neurogenesis, may be involved in specific anxiolytic effects of DBS without affecting its general antidepressant-like response. PMID:26529427

  3. Optimized beamforming for simultaneous MEG and intracranial local field potential recordings in deep brain stimulation patients

    E-print Network

    Penny, Will

    - electrodes. DBS has been especially effective for treating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia (MEG) signals and subcortical local field potentials (LFP) in a Parkinson's disease (PD) patient

  4. Comparison of temporal properties of auditory single units in response to cochlear infrared laser stimulation recorded with multi-channel and single tungsten electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Xia, Nan; Young, Hunter; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-02-01

    Auditory prostheses may benefit from Infrared Neural Stimulation (INS) because optical stimulation allows for spatially selective activation of neuron populations. Selective activation of neurons in the cochlear spiral ganglion can be determined in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) because the tonotopic organization of frequencies in the cochlea is maintained throughout the auditory pathway. The activation profile of INS is well represented in the ICC by multichannel electrodes (MCEs). To characterize single unit properties in response to INS, however, single tungsten electrodes (STEs) should be used because of its better signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, we compared the temporal properties of ICC single units recorded with MCEs and STEs in order to characterize the response properties of single auditory neurons in response to INS in guinea pigs. The length along the cochlea stimulated with infrared radiation corresponded to a frequency range of about 0.6 octaves, similar to that recorded with STEs. The temporal properties of single units recorded with MCEs showed higher maximum rates, shorter latencies, and higher firing efficiencies compared to those recorded with STEs. When the preset amplitude threshold for triggering MCE recordings was raised to twice over the noise level, the temporal properties of the single units became similar to those obtained with STEs. Undistinguishable neural activities from multiple sources in MCE recordings could be responsible for the response property difference between MCEs and STEs. Thus, caution should be taken in single unit recordings with MCEs.

  5. Cellular mechanisms of deep brain stimulation: activity-dependent focal circuit reprogramming?

    PubMed Central

    Veerakumar, Avin; Berton, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established treatment modality for movement disorders. As more behavioral disorders are becoming understood as specific disruptions in neural circuitry, the therapeutic realm of DBS is broadening to encompass a wider range of domains, including disorders of compulsion, affect, and memory, but current understanding of the cellular mechanisms of DBS remains limited. We review progress made during the last decade focusing in particular on how recent methods for targeted circuit manipulations, imaging and reconstruction are fostering preclinical and translational advances that improve our neurobiological understanding of DBS’s action in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26719852

  6. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy. PMID:20798917

  7. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  8. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  9. Effects of deep brain stimulation on prepulse inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Gruendler, T O J; Huys, D; Sildatke, E; Dembek, T A; Hellmich, M; Vorderwulbecke, M; Timmermann, L; Ahmari, S E; Klosterkoetter, J; Jessen, F; Sturm, V; Visser-Vandewalle, V; Kuhn, J

    2015-01-01

    Owing to a high response rate, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral striatal area has been approved for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (tr-OCD). Many basic issues regarding DBS for tr-OCD are still not understood, in particular, the mechanisms of action and the origin of side effects. We measured prepulse inhibition (PPI) in treatment-refractory OCD patients undergoing DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and matched controls. As PPI has been used in animal DBS studies, it is highly suitable for translational research. Eight patients receiving DBS, eight patients with pharmacological treatment and eight age-matched healthy controls participated in our study. PPI was measured twice in the DBS group: one session with the stimulator switched on and one session with the stimulator switched off. OCD patients in the pharmacologic group took part in a single session. Controls were tested twice, to ensure stability of data. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between controls and (1) patients with pharmacological treatment and (2) OCD DBS patients when the stimulation was switched off. Switching the stimulator on led to an increase in PPI at a stimulus-onset asynchrony of 200?ms. There was no significant difference in PPI between OCD patients being stimulated and the control group. This study shows that NAcc-DBS leads to an increase in PPI in tr-OCD patients towards a level seen in healthy controls. Assuming that PPI impairments partially reflect the neurobiological substrates of OCD, our results show that DBS of the NAcc may improve sensorimotor gating via correction of dysfunctional neural substrates. Bearing in mind that PPI is based on a complex and multilayered network, our data confirm that DBS most likely takes effect via network modulation. PMID:26556284

  10. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Li; Chao, Yu; Ling, Lin; C-Y Lu, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called `pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  11. Regulation of vesicle transport and cell motility by Golgi-localized Dbs.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Ethan R; Hu, Tinghui; Ciccarelli, Bryan T; Whitehead, Ian P

    2014-01-01

    DBS/MCF2L has been recently identified as a risk locus for osteoarthritis. It encodes a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Dbs) that has been shown to regulate both normal and tumor cell motility. In the current study, we have determined that endogenous Dbs is predominantly expressed as 2 isoforms, a 130 kDa form (Dbs-130) that is localized to the Golgi complex, and an 80 kDa form (Dbs-80) that is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously described an inhibitor that binds to the RhoGEF domain of Dbs and blocks its transforming activity. Here we show that the inhibitor localizes to the Golgi, where it specifically interacts with Dbs-130. Inhibition of endogenous Dbs-130 activity is associated with reduced levels of activated Cdc42, enlarged Golgi, and resistance to Brefeldin A-mediated Golgi dispersal, suggesting a role for Dbs in vesicle transport. Cells treated with the inhibitor exhibit normal protein transport from the ER to the Golgi, but are defective in transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of Dbs-130 in MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor cells limits motility in both transwell and wound healing assays, but appears to have no effect on the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The reduced motility is associated with a failure to reorient the Golgi toward the leading edge. This is consistent with the Golgi localization, and suggests that the Dbs-130 regulates aspects of the secretory pathway that are required to support cell polarization during directed migration. PMID:25483302

  12. Axonal failure during high frequency stimulation of rat subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Lammert, Katja; Nixdorf-Bergweiler, Barbara E; Steigerwald, Frank; Volkmann, Jens; Alzheimer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as an effective surgical therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and gains increasing acceptance for otherwise intractable neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression or obsessive–compulsive disorders. In PD, DBS targets predominantly the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and relieves motor deficits only at high frequency (>100 Hz). In contrast to the well-documented clinical efficacy of DBS, its underlying principle remains enigmatic spawning a broad and, in part, contradictory spectrum of suggested synaptic and non-synaptic mechanisms within and outside STN. Here we focused on a crucial, but largely neglected issue in this controversy, namely the axonal propagation of DBS within and away from STN. In rat brain slices preserving STN projections to substantia nigra (SN) and entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rodent equivalent of internal globus pallidus), STN-DBS disrupted synaptic excitation onto target neurons through an unexpected failure of axonal signalling. The rapid onset and, upon termination of DBS, recovery of this effect was highly reminiscent of the time course of DBS in the clinical setting. We propose that DBS-induced suppression of axonal projections from and to STN serves to shield basal ganglia circuitry from pathological activity arising in or amplified by this nucleus. PMID:21486784

  13. Behavioral effects of deep brain stimulation of different areas of the Papez circuit on memory- and anxiety-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Jahanshahi, Ali; Meriaux, Céline; Lim, Lee Wei; Blokland, Arjan; Temel, Yasin

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained interest as a potential therapy for advanced treatment-resistant dementia. However, possible targets for DBS and the optimal stimulation parameters are not yet clear. Here, we compared the effects of DBS of the CA1 sub-region of the hippocampus, mammillothalamic tract, anterior thalamic nucleus, and entorhinal cortex in an experimental rat model of dementia. Rats with scopolamine-induced amnesia were assessed in the object location task with different DBS parameters. Moreover, anxiety-related side effects were evaluated in the elevated zero maze and open field. After sacrifice, we applied c-Fos immunohistochemistry to assess which memory-related regions were affected by DBS. When comparing all structures, DBS of the entorhinal cortex and CA1 sub-region was able to restore memory loss when a specific set of stimulation parameters was used. No anxiety-related side effects were found following DBS. The beneficial behavioral performance of CA1 DBS rats was accompanied with an activation of cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Therefore, we conclude that acute CA1 DBS restores memory loss possibly through improved attentional and cognitive processes in the limbic cortex. PMID:26119240

  14. A Feasibility Study of Bilateral Anodal Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex Using High-Definition Electrodes in Healthy Participants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Healy, Stephen M.; Truong, Dennis Q.; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) studies often use one anode to increase cortical excitability in one hemisphere. However, mental processes may involve cortical regions in both hemispheres. This study’s aim was to assess the safety and possible effects on affect and working memory of tDCS using two anodes for bifrontal stimulation. A group of healthy subjects participated in two bifrontal tDCS sessions on two different days, one for real and the other for sham stimulation. They performed a working memory task and reported their affect immediately before and after each tDCS session. Relative to sham, real bifrontal stimulation did not induce significant adverse effects, reduced decrement in vigor-activity during the study session, and did not improve working memory. These preliminary findings suggest that bifrontal anodal stimulation is feasible and safe and may reduce task-related fatigue in healthy participants. Its effects on neuropsychiatric patients deserve further study. PMID:26339204

  15. A Feasibility Study of Bilateral Anodal Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex Using High-Definition Electrodes in Healthy Participants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiansong; Healy, Stephen M; Truong, Dennis Q; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) studies often use one anode to increase cortical excitability in one hemisphere. However, mental processes may involve cortical regions in both hemispheres. This study's aim was to assess the safety and possible effects on affect and working memory of tDCS using two anodes for bifrontal stimulation. A group of healthy subjects participated in two bifrontal tDCS sessions on two different days, one for real and the other for sham stimulation. They performed a working memory task and reported their affect immediately before and after each tDCS session. Relative to sham, real bifrontal stimulation did not induce significant adverse effects, reduced decrement in vigor-activity during the study session, and did not improve working memory. These preliminary findings suggest that bifrontal anodal stimulation is feasible and safe and may reduce task-related fatigue in healthy participants. Its effects on neuropsychiatric patients deserve further study. PMID:26339204

  16. No Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Fear-Potentiated Startle in Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Johanna M. P.; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H.; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C.; Schuurman, P. Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive–compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  17. Conceptualization and validation of an open-source closed-loop deep brain stimulation system in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; Ghekiere, Hartwin; Beeckmans, Dorien; Tambuyzer, Tim; van Kuyck, Kris; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) applies constant electrical stimulation to specific brain regions to treat neurological disorders. Closed-loop DBS with real-time feedback is gaining attention in recent years, after proved more effective than conventional DBS in terms of pathological symptom control clinically. Here we demonstrate the conceptualization and validation of a closed-loop DBS system using open-source hardware. We used hippocampal theta oscillations as system input, and electrical stimulation in the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) as controller output. It is well documented that hippocampal theta oscillations are highly related to locomotion, while electrical stimulation in the mRt induces freezing. We used an Arduino open-source microcontroller between input and output sources. This allowed us to use hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) to steer electrical stimulation in the mRt. Our results showed that closed-loop DBS significantly suppressed locomotion compared to no stimulation, and required on average only 56% of the stimulation used in open-loop DBS to reach similar effects. The main advantages of open-source hardware include wide selection and availability, high customizability, and affordability. Our open-source closed-loop DBS system is effective, and warrants further research using open-source hardware for closed-loop neuromodulation. PMID:25897892

  18. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  19. Moving Forward: Advances in the Treatment of Movement Disorders with Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Terry K.; Matsumoto, Joseph Y.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2011-01-01

    The modern era of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery has ushered in state of the art technologies for the treatment of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson’s disease (PD), tremor, and dystonia. After years of experience with various surgical therapies, the eventual shortcomings of both medical and surgical treatments, and several serendipitous discoveries, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has risen to the forefront as a highly effective, safe, and reversible treatment for these conditions. Idiopathic advanced PD can be treated with thalamic, globus pallidus internus (GPi), or subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. Thalamic DBS primarily relieves tremor while GPi and STN DBS alleviate a wide range of Parkinsonian symptoms. Thalamic DBS is also used in the treatment of other types of tremor, particularly essential tremor, with excellent results. Both primary and various types of secondary dystonia can be treated very effectively with GPi DBS. The variety of anatomical targets for these movement disorders is indicative of the network-level dysfunction mediating these movement disturbances. Despite an increasing understanding of the clinical benefits of DBS, little is known about how DBS can create such wide sweeping neuromodulatory effects. The key to improving this therapeutic modality and discovering new ways to treat these and other neurologic conditions lies in better understanding the intricacies of DBS. Here we review the history and pertinent clinical data for DBS treatment of PD, tremor, and dystonia. While multiple regions of the brain have been targeted for DBS in the treatment of these movement disorders, this review article focuses on those that are most commonly used in current clinical practice. Our search criteria for PubMed included combinations of the following terms: DBS, neuromodulation, movement disorders, PD, tremor, dystonia, and history. Dates were not restricted. PMID:22084629

  20. A Bayesian statistical analysis of behavioral facilitation associated with deep brain stimulation

    E-print Network

    Smith, Anne C.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson's Disease and is being investigated as a treatment for chronic depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and for facilitating functional recovery of ...

  1. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin; Höllig, Anke; Falkenburger, Björn; Tan, Sonny KH

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. PMID:25914538

  2. Surface modification of neural stimulating/recording electrodes with high surface area platinum-iridium alloy coatings.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2011-01-01

    High-surface area platinum-iridium alloys were electrodeposited by on Pt and Au microelectrodes using a potential sweep technique. Detailed investigations of the structure and morphology and the electrochemical properties of the electrodeposited Pt-Ir alloy coatings were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used for the determination of the surface morphology and the chemical composition of the Pt-Ir coatings, respectively. The elemental analysis by EDS showed a nearly 60-40% Pt-Ir composition of the coatings. The electrochemical properties of the Pt-Ir coatings were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CV and EIS measurements revealed that the Pt-Ir coated electrodes exhibit significantly increased charge storage capacity and real surface area compared to uncoated Pt electrodes. Charge injection experiments of the Pt-Ir coated microelectrodes revealed low potential excursions, indicating high charge injection capabilities within safe potential limits. PMID:22254972

  3. Movement-Related Discharge in the Macaque Globus Pallidus during High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zimnik, Andrew J.; Nora, Gerald J.; Desmurget, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has largely replaced ablative therapies for Parkinson's disease. Because of the similar efficacies of the two treatments, it has been proposed that DBS acts by creating an “informational lesion,” whereby pathologic neuronal firing patterns are replaced by low-entropy, stimulus-entrained firing patterns. The informational lesion hypothesis, in its current form, states that DBS blocks the transmission of all information from the basal ganglia, including both pathologic firing patterns and normal, task-related modulations in activity. We tested this prediction in two healthy rhesus macaques by recording single-unit spiking activity from the globus pallidus (232 neurons) while the animals completed choice reaction time reaching movements with and without STN-DBS. Despite strong effects of DBS on the activity of most pallidal cells, reach-related modulations in firing rate were equally prevalent in the DBS-on and DBS-off states. This remained true even when the analysis was restricted to cells affected significantly by DBS. In addition, the overall form and timing of perimovement modulations in firing rate were preserved between DBS-on and DBS-off states in the majority of neurons (66%). Active movement and DBS had largely additive effects on the firing rate of most neurons, indicating an orthogonal relationship in which both inputs contribute independently to the overall firing rate of pallidal neurons. These findings suggest that STN-DBS does not act as an indiscriminate informational lesion but rather as a filter that permits task-related modulations in activity while, presumably, eliminating the pathological firing associated with parkinsonism. PMID:25740526

  4. Voice features of Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Kajita, Yasukazu; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Masuda, Michihito; Hara, Kazuhiro; Senda, Joe; Ito, Mizuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Horiguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-05-01

    Voice and speech disorders are one of the most important issues after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease patients; however, their characteristics remain unclear. We performed a comprehensive voice evaluation including the multi-dimensional voice program for acoustic analysis, the GRBAS scale for perceptual analysis, and the evaluation of the voice handicap index (VHI) for psychosocial analysis. In total, 68 patients who had undergone STN-DBS (37 assessed in the on- and off-stimulation conditions) and 40 who had been treated with medical therapy alone were evaluated. Further, we performed laryngoscopic examinations in 13 STN-DBS and 19 medical-therapy-alone patients. The STN-DBS group, especially females, showed widespread impairment of voice parameters and significantly poorer VHI scores than the medical-therapy-alone group. The degree of voiceless (DUV) and strained voice were the most impaired factors in the STN-DBS group; and DUV significantly improved after stopping stimulation. Furthermore strained voice, breathiness, and asthenia improved after stopping stimulation. Laryngoscopic examination showed that abnormal laryngeal muscle contraction and incomplete glottal closure were more prominent in the STN-DBS group than in the medical-therapy-alone group. We demonstrated that (1) more widespread voice impairment in females, (2) poorer voice-related QOL, (3) worse DUV and strained voice, and (4) abnormal laryngeal muscle contraction were the characteristic voice and laryngeal findings in the STN-DBS group compared with those in the medical-therapy-alone group. PMID:25712544

  5. Thinking Ahead on Deep Brain Stimulation: An Analysis of the Ethical Implications of a Developing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Veronica; Garwicz, Martin; Kanje, Martin; Halldenius, Lena; Schouenborg, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a developing technology. New generations of DBS technology are already in the pipeline, yet this particular fact has been largely ignored among ethicists interested in DBS. Focusing only on ethical concerns raised by the current DBS technology is, albeit necessary, not sufficient. Since current bioethical concerns raised by a specific technology could be quite different from the concerns it will raise a couple of years ahead, an ethical analysis should be sensitive to such alterations, or it could end up with results that soon become dated. The goal of this analysis is to address these changing bioethical concerns, to think ahead on upcoming and future DBS concerns both in terms of a changing technology and changing moral attitudes. By employing the distinction between inherent and noninherent bioethical concerns we identify and make explicit the particular limits and potentials for change within each category, respectively, including how present and upcoming bioethical concerns regarding DBS emerge and become obsolete. Many of the currently identified ethical problems with DBS, such as stimulation-induced mania, are a result of suboptimal technology. These challenges could be addressed by technical advances, while for instance perceptions of an altered body image caused by the mere awareness of having an implant may not. Other concerns will not emerge until the technology has become sophisticated enough for new uses to be realized, such as concerns on DBS for enhancement purposes. As a part of the present analysis, concerns regarding authenticity are used as an example. PMID:24587963

  6. The psychiatric and neuropsychiatric symptoms after subthalamic stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Philip E; Marsh, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Nonmotor features of PD, however, may not improve with STN DBS, and a specific constellation of neuropsychiatric symptoms may emerge in the postoperative period. Mania, impulsivity, depression, and apathy may curtail the potential gains from surgery. In this paper, the authors discuss surgical candidacy, postoperative management of neuropsychiatric issues, and clinical dilemmas for the psychiatrist at the DBS center. A paradigm that considers stimulation effects and dopamine replacement therapy to be key drivers of postoperative neuropsychiatric problems is presented. PMID:25716484

  7. Reduced ethanol consumption by alcohol-preferring (P) rats following pharmacological silencing and deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell

    PubMed Central

    Wilden, Jessica A.; Qing, Kurt Y.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; McBride, William J.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2015-01-01

    Object There is increasing interest in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of addiction. Initial testing must be conducted in animals, and the alcohol-preferring (P) rat meets the criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. This study is composed of 2 experiments designed to examine the effects of 1) pharmacological inactivation and 2) DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) on the consumption of alcohol by P rats. Methods In the first experiment, the effects of reversible inactivation of the AcbSh were investigated by administering intracranial injections of ?–aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists. Bilateral microinjections of drug were administered to the AcbSh in P rats (8–10 rats/group), after which the animals were placed in operant chambers containing 2 levers—one used to administer water and the other to administer 15% EtOH—to examine the acquisition and maintenance of oral EtOH self-administration. In the second experiment, a DBS electrode was placed in each P rat’s left AcbSh. The animals then received 100 or 200 ?A (3–4 rats/group) of DBS to examine the effect on daily consumption of oral EtOH in a free-access paradigm. Results In the first experiment, pharmacological silencing of the AcbSh with GABA agonists did not decrease the acquisition of EtOH drinking behavior but did reduce EtOH consumption by 55% in chronically drinking rats. Similarly, in the second experiment, 200 ?A of DBS consistently reduced EtOH intake by 47% in chronically drinking rats. The amount of EtOH consumption returned to baseline levels following termination of therapy in both experiments. Conclusions Pharmacological silencing and DBS of the AcbSh reduced EtOH intake after chronic EtOH use had been established in rodents. The AcbSh is a neuroanatomical substrate for the reinforcing effects of alcohol and may be a target for surgical intervention in cases of alcoholism. PMID:24460492

  8. 11. Platinum bipolar stimulating electrodes were low-ered 7 mm below the cortical surface 3.3 mm lateral

    E-print Network

    Storz, Gisela

    - mented into place with the use of sterile techniques approved under animal care protocol of the Univer- shielded, calibrated test chamber (5 days per week). Electrical stimulation began either 50 ms after tone behavioral responses (that is, did not cause rats to stop grooming or if sleeping, awaken). 12. Twenty

  9. Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus or ventralis intermedius nucleus of thalamus for Holmes tremor.

    PubMed

    Espinoza Martinez, Jairo Alberto; Arango, Gabriel J; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Reithmeier, Thomas; Escobar, Oscar Andrés; Furlanetti, Luciano; Alvarez Berastegui, G Rene; Fernandes da Silva, Fabio Eduardo; Contreras Lopez, William Omar

    2015-10-01

    Holmes tremor (HT) is a difficult-to-treat, very disabling symptomatic condition which characteristically appears weeks to years after a brain lesion. It features a unique combination of rest, action, and postural tremors. Pharmacotherapy is mostly not effective. Chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim) of thalamus has been described as being the best surgical approach in singular case series; various authors observe, however, cases with partial responses only; therefore, alternatives are still needed. We report ten patients with HT unresponsive to best medical therapy who underwent DBS in our center from March 2002 to June 2012. Based in our previous experience dealing with cases of unsatisfactory Vim intraoperative tremor control and in order to optimize surgical results, presurgical target planning included two Nuclei: Vim and posteroventral Globus pallidus internus (GPi) (Espinoza et al. 2010; Espinoza et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 90(suppl 1):1-202, p 61, 2012). Definitive chosen target was decided after single-cell microelectrode recording, intraoperative test stimulation, thresholds for stimulation-induced adverse effects and best clinical response compared to baseline status. Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale (FTM-TRS) was used to evaluate outcome. The electrode was implanted in the nucleus with the best tremor suppression achievement; on the other hand, GPi DBS was initially decided if one of the following conditions was present: (a) If Vim nucleus anatomy was grossly altered; (b) when intraoperative tremor control was unsatisfactory despite Vim high-intensity stimulation; or (c) if unaffordable side effects or even tremor worsening occurred during intraoperative macrostimulation. Seven patients received definitive Gpi DBS implantation, while three patients received Vim DBS. In all observed cases, we observed an improvement on the TRS. In two cases where Vim thalamic anatomy was altered by the pathological insult GPI was planned from the beginning, and same was true in two additional cases where the Gpi nucleus showed major alterations allowing only Vim planning. Over all cases, the average improvement in tremor was of 2.55 points on the TRS or a 64 % increase in measured results; with a minimum of 1 point (25 %) improvement in one case and a maximum of 4 points (100 % improvement) also in one case. All the results were sustained at 2 years follow-up. One case with predominant resting component, implanted in the GPi, achieved the maximum possible tremor reduction (from 4 to 0 points, meaning 100 % tremor reduction); in the nine resting cases, the average reduction was of 3 points (or 75 %). DBS demonstrated in this case series adequate tremor control in 10 patients unresponsive to medical therapy. Presurgical planning of two targets allowed choosing best optimal response. Gpi stimulation could be considered as an alternative target for cases in which thalamic anatomy is considerably altered or Vim intraoperative stimulation does not produce satisfactory results. PMID:25990341

  10. Short latency activation of cortex during clinically effective subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Harrison C; Huang, He; Gonzalez, Christopher L; Bryant, James E; Killen, Jeffrey; Cutter, Gary R; Knowlton, Robert C; Montgomery, Erwin B; Guthrie, Bart L; Watts, Ray L

    2012-06-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is superior to medical therapy for the motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), and additional evidence suggests that it improves refractory symptoms of essential tremor, primary generalized dystonia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Despite this, its therapeutic mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that subthalamic stimulation activates the cerebral cortex at short latencies after stimulus onset during clinically effective stimulation for PD. In 5 subjects (six hemispheres), EEG measured the response of cortex to subthalamic stimulation across a range of stimulation voltages and frequencies. Novel analytical techniques reversed the anode and cathode electrode contacts and summed the resulting pair of event-related potentials to suppress the stimulation artifact. We found that subthalamic brain stimulation at 20 Hz activates the somatosensory cortex at discrete latencies (mean latencies: 1.0 ± 0.4, 5.7 ± 1.1, and 22.2 ± 1.8 ms, denoted as R1, R2, and R3, respectively). The amplitude of the short latency peak (R1) during clinically effective high-frequency stimulation is nonlinearly dependent on stimulation voltage (P < 0.001; repeated-measures analysis of variance), and its latency is less variable than that of R3 (1.02 versus 19.46 ms; P < 0.001, Levene's test). We conclude that clinically effective subthalamic brain stimulation in humans with PD activates the cerebral cortex at 1 ms after stimulus onset, most likely by antidromic activation. These findings suggest that alteration of the precise timing of action potentials in cortical neurons with axonal projections to the subthalamic region may be an important component of the therapeutic mechanism of subthalamic brain stimulation. PMID:22648508

  11. Intercalation of Hydrogen Phosphate Into Mg/Al-LAYERED Double Hydroxides with Dbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Akihiro; Jones, Mark I.; Metson, James B.

    Intercalation of hydrogen phosphate (HPO4) into Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) with DodecylBenzeneSulfonate (DBS) was investigated with regard to anion exchange, rehydration and a combination of delamination and anion exchange. HPO4 could not be intercalated into the interlayer space of LDH with DBS when using either anion exchange or rehydration methods. However, HPO4 was successfully intercalated into the Mg/Al-LDH using a combination of delamination and anion exchange methods.

  12. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Swann, Nicole; Ostrem, Jill L.; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S.; Luciano, Marta San; Galifianakis, Nicholas; Starr, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is increasingly applied to the treatment of brain disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unknown. Here, we evaluate the effect of basal ganglia DBS on cortical function using invasive cortical recordings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery. In the primary motor cortex of PD patients neuronal population spiking is excessively synchronized to the phase of network oscillations. This manifests in brain surface recordings as exaggerated coupling between the phase of the ? rhythm and the amplitude of broadband activity. We show that acute therapeutic DBS reversibly reduces phase-amplitude interactions over a similar time course as reduction in parkinsonian motor signs. We propose that DBS of the basal ganglia improves cortical function by alleviating excessive ? phase locking of motor cortex neurons. PMID:25867121

  13. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. PMID:26117774

  14. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  15. Deep brain stimulation for vocal tremor: a comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Erickson-Direnzo, Elizabeth; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Sung, Chih-Kwang; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-06-01

    Tremulous voice is a characteristic feature of a multitude of movement disorders, but when it occurs in individuals diagnosed with essential tremor, it is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT). For individuals with EVT, their tremulous voice is associated with significant social embarrassment and in severe cases may result in the discontinuation of employment and hobbies. Management of EVT is extremely difficult, and current behavioral and medical interventions for vocal tremor result in suboptimal outcomes. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic avenue for EVT, but few studies can be identified that have systematically examined improvements in EVT following DBS. The authors describe a case of awake bilateral DBS targeting the ventral intermediate nucleus for a patient suffering from severe voice and arm tremor. They also present their comprehensive, multidisciplinary methodology for definitive treatment of EVT via DBS. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time comprehensive intraoperative voice evaluation has been used to guide microelectrode/stimulator placement, as well as the first time that standard pre- and post-DBS assessments have been conducted, demonstrating the efficacy of this tailored DBS approach. PMID:26030706

  16. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after bilateral subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S; Paek, Sun-Ha; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui-Jun; Kim, Han-Joon; Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    The effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well known. We evaluated the change in the incidence of probable RBD after bilateral STN DBS in PD patients. Ninety patients with PD treated with bilateral STN DBS underwent retrospective assessment of RBD by interview before and after DBS. Forty-seven (52.2%) of the 90 patients had RBD preoperatively. RBD was resolved only in one patient and persisted in 46 patients at 1 year after DBS. RBD developed de novo in 16 patients (de novo RBD group) within 1 year after DBS, resulting in 62 (68.9%) of the 90 patients having RBD 1 year after DBS. Patients with RBD at any time within 1 year after DBS (RBD group, n = 63) were older than the patients without RBD (non-RBD group, n = 27). The sum of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) axial score for the "on" state was lower in the RBD group than in the non-RBD group after DBS (p = 0.029). Comparing the de novo RBD group and non-RBD group, the UPDRS Part III and total score and the levodopa equivalent daily doses for the "on" states decreased more in the de novo RBD group than in the non-RBD group (p < 0.05). The incidence of clinical RBD increased after bilateral STN DBS because de novo RBD developed and pre-existing RBD persisted after DBS. PMID:25439757

  17. Amelioration of binge eating by nucleus accumbens shell deep brain stimulation in mice involves D2 receptor modulation

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Casey H.; Tekriwal, Anand; Santollo, Jessica; Keating, Jeffrey G.; Wolf, John A.; Daniels, Derek; Bale, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    Hedonic over-consumption contributing to obesity involves altered activation within the mesolimbic dopamine system. Dysregulation of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAS) has been implicated in reward-seeking behaviors, such as binge eating, which contributes to treatment resistance in obesity (Wise, 2012). Direct modulation of the NAS with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical procedure currently under investigation in humans for the treatment of major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction, may also be effective in ameliorating binge eating. Therefore, we examined the ability of DBS of the NAS to block this behavior in mice. c-Fos immunoreactivity was assessed as a marker of DBS-mediated neuronal activation. NAS DBS was found to reduce binge eating, and increased c-Fos levels in this region. DBS of the dorsal striatum had no influence on this behavior, demonstrating anatomical specificity for this effect. The dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, raclopride, attenuated the action of DBS, while the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH-23390, was ineffective, suggesting that dopamine signaling involving D2 receptors underlies the effect of NAS DBS. To determine the potential translational relevance to the obese state, chronic NAS DBS was also examined in diet-induced obese mice, and was found to acutely reduce caloric intake and induce weight loss. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of the mesolimbic dopamine pathways in the hedonic mechanisms contributing to obesity, and the efficacy of NAS DBS to modulate this system. PMID:23616522

  18. Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects on Diadochokinetic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Unger, Elin; Wahlgren, Sofia; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; Zafar, Hamayun; van Doorn, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The hypokinetic dysarthria observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects the range, speed, and accuracy of articulatory gestures in patients, reducing the perceived quality of speech acoustic output in continuous speech. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) and of the caudal zona incerta (cZi-DBS) are current surgical treatment options for PD. This study aimed at investigating the outcome of STN-DBS (7 patients) and cZi-DBS (7 patients) in two articulatory diadochokinesis tasks (AMR and SMR) using measurements of articulation rate and quality of the plosive consonants (using the percent measurable VOT metric). The results indicate that patients receiving STN-DBS increased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition in the AMR task only, with no effect on production quality. Patients receiving cZi-DBS decreased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition and further showed a reduction in production quality. The data therefore suggest that cZi-DBS is more detrimental for extended articulatory movements than STN-DBS. PMID:22007342

  19. Amelioration of binge eating by nucleus accumbens shell deep brain stimulation in mice involves D2 receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Casey H; Tekriwal, Anand; Santollo, Jessica; Keating, Jeffrey G; Wolf, John A; Daniels, Derek; Bale, Tracy L

    2013-04-24

    Hedonic overconsumption contributing to obesity involves altered activation within the mesolimbic dopamine system. Dysregulation of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAS) has been implicated in reward-seeking behaviors, such as binge eating, which contributes to treatment resistance in obesity (Wise, 2012). Direct modulation of the NAS with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical procedure currently under investigation in humans for the treatment of major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction, may also be effective in ameliorating binge eating. Therefore, we examined the ability of DBS of the NAS to block this behavior in mice. c-Fos immunoreactivity was assessed as a marker of DBS-mediated neuronal activation. NAS DBS was found to reduce binge eating and increased c-Fos levels in this region. DBS of the dorsal striatum had no influence on this behavior, demonstrating anatomical specificity for this effect. The dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, raclopride, attenuated the action of DBS, whereas the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH-23390, was ineffective, suggesting that dopamine signaling involving D2 receptors underlies the effect of NAS DBS. To determine the potential translational relevance to the obese state, chronic NAS DBS was also examined in diet-induced obese mice and was found to acutely reduce caloric intake and induce weight loss. Together, these findings support the involvement of the mesolimbic dopamine pathways in the hedonic mechanisms contributing to obesity, and the efficacy of NAS DBS to modulate this system. PMID:23616522

  20. Effect of brain shift on the creation of functional atlases for deep brain stimulation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Remple, Michael S.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter E.; D’Haese, Pierre-François

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In the recent past many groups have tried to build functional atlases of the deep brain using intra-operatively acquired information such as stimulation responses or micro-electrode recordings. An underlying assumption in building such atlases is that anatomical structures do not move between pre-operative imaging and intra-operative recording. In this study, we present evidences that this assumption is not valid. We quantify the effect of brain shift between pre-operative imaging and intra-operative recording on the creation of functional atlases using intra-operative somatotopy recordings and stimulation response data. Methods A total of 73 somatotopy points from 24 bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) implantations and 52 eye deviation stimulation response points from 17 bilateral STN implantations were used. These points were spatially normalized on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas using a fully automatic non-rigid registration algorithm. Each implantation was categorized as having low, medium or large brain shift based on the amount of pneumocephalus visible on post-operative CT. The locations of somatotopy clusters and stimulation maps were analyzed for each category. Results The centroid of the large brain shift cluster of the somatotopy data (posterior, lateral, inferior: 3.06, 11.27, 5.36 mm) was found posterior, medial and inferior to that of the medium cluster (2.90, 13.57, 4.53 mm) which was posterior, medial and inferior to that of the low shift cluster (1.94, 13.92, 3.20 mm). The coordinates are referenced with respect to the mid-commissural point. Euclidean distances between the centroids were 1.68, 2.44 and 3.59 mm, respectively for low-medium, medium-large and low-large shift clusters. We found similar trends for the positions of the stimulation maps. The Euclidian distance between the highest probability locations on the low and medium-large shift maps was 4.06 mm. Conclusion The effect of brain shift in deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery has been demonstrated using intra-operative somatotopy recordings as well as stimulation response data. The results not only indicate that considerable brain shift happens before micro-electrode recordings in DBS but also that brain shift affects the creation of accurate functional atlases. Therefore, care must be taken when building and using such atlases of intra-operative data and also when using intra-operative data to validate anatomical atlases. PMID:20033503

  1. Surgical Neuroanatomy and Programming in Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Takashi; Fayad, Sarah M.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Foote, Kelly D.; Chen, Dennis; Peace, David A.; Rhoton, Albert L.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been established as a safe, effective therapy for movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, etc.), and its application is expanding to the treatment of other intractable neuropsychiatric disorders including Depression and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Several published studies have supported the efficacy of DBS for severely debilitating OCD. However, questions remain regarding the optimal anatomical target and the lack of a bedside programming paradigm for OCD DBS. Management of OCD DBS can be highly variable and is typically guided by each center’s individual expertise. In this paper, we review the various approaches to targeting and programming for OCD DBS. We also review the clinical experience for each proposed target, and discuss the relevant neuroanatomy. Methods A PubMed review was performed searching for literature on OCD DBS and included all articles published before March 2012. We included all available studies with a clear description of the anatomical targets, programming details, and the outcomes. Results Six different DBS approaches were identified. High frequency stimulation with high voltage was applied in most cases, and predictive factors for favorable outcomes were discussed in the literature. Conclusion DBS remains an experimental treatment for medication refractory OCD. Target selection and programming paradigms are not yet standardized, though, an improved understanding of the relationship between the DBS lead and the surrounding neuroanatomical structures will aid in the selection of targets and the approach to programming. We propose to form a registry to track OCD DBS cases for future clinical study design. PMID:24345303

  2. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26498277

  3. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  4. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  5. Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Daily Routine Driving Practice in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Carsten; Vettorazzi, Eik; Oehlwein, Christian; Rikkers, Fred; Poetter-Nerger, Monika; Gulberti, Alessandro; Gerloff, Christian; Moll, Christian K.; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on daily routine driving behavior in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was done in 121 DBS-PD patients. The influences of patient characteristics and DBS on current driving and driving at time of surgery and the predictive value of the preoperative levodopa-test on postoperative driving were evaluated. Results. 50% of 110 driving-license holders currently drove. 63.0% rated themselves as safe drivers, 39.4% reported improvement, and 10.9% noted deterioration in driving after DBS surgery. Inactive drivers had quit driving mainly due to disease burden (90.9%). Active drivers were younger, more often males, and less impaired according to H&Y and MMSE, had surgery more recently, and reported more often overall benefit from DBS. H&Y “on” and UPDRS III “off” scores at time of surgery were lower in pre- and postoperative active than in inactive drivers. Tremor and akinesia were less frequent reasons to quit driving after than before DBS surgery. Postoperatively, 22.7% (10/44) of patients restarted and 10.6% (7/66) of patients discontinued driving, independently of H&Y stage. The preoperative levodopa-test was not predictive for the postoperative driving outcome. Conclusion. 50% of PD patients with DBS drive. DBS surgery changes daily routine driving behavior. PMID:26640738

  6. Advancing deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burdick, Adam P; Foote, Kelly D

    2011-03-01

    Evaluation of: Denys D, Mantione M, Figee M et al. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 67(10), 1061-1068 (2010). Herein we review a prospective trial of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of severely debilitating, medication-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) recently published in Archives of General Psychiatry by Denys et al. This prospective 16-subject study, while having some technical limitations, is an excellent addition to the existing literature supporting the use of DBS in the region of the nucleus accumbens for severe OCD. It provides further evidence of efficacy and safety, sham versus active stimulation evidence that this efficacy is real, and several key observations on how DBS interacts with the brain that can shed light on the neuropathophysiology of OCD itself. PMID:21375439

  7. Effects of deep brain stimulation on balance and gait in patients with Parkinson's disease: A systematic neurophysiological review.

    PubMed

    Collomb-Clerc, A; Welter, M-L

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an efficient treatment for the alleviation of motor signs in patients with Parkinson's disease. The effects of DBS on gait and balance disorders are less successful and may even lead to an aggravation of freezing of gait and imbalance. The identification of a substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr)-mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) network in the control of locomotion and postural control and of its dysfunction/lesion in PD patients with gait and balance disorders led to suggestion that DBS should be targeting the SNr and the pedunculopontine nucleus (part of the MLR) for PD patients with these disabling axial motor signs. However, the clinical results to date have been disappointing. In this review, we discuss the effects of DBS of these basal ganglia and brainstem structures on the neurophysiological parameters of gait and balance control in PD patients. Overall, the data suggest that both STN and GPi-DBS improve gait parameters and quiet standing postural control in PD patients, but have no effect or may even aggravate dynamic postural control, in particular with STN-DBS. Conversely, DBS of the SNr and PPN has no effect on gait parameters but improves anticipatory postural adjustments and gait postural control. PMID:26319759

  8. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  9. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K; Biedermann, Sarah V; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-11-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  10. Feasibility and Safety of Continuous and Chronic Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Medial Forebrain Bundle in the Naïve Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetti, Luciano L.; Döbrössy, Máté D.; Aranda, Iñigo A.; Coenen, Volker A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the superolateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) has provided rapid and dramatic reduction of depressive symptoms in a clinical trial. Early intracranial self-stimulation experiments of the MFB suggested detrimental side effects on the animals' health; therefore, the current study looked at the viability of chronic and continuous MFB-DBS in rodents, with particular attention given to welfare issues and identification of stimulated pathways. Methods. Sprague-Dawley female rats were submitted to stereotactic microelectrode implantation into the MFB. Chronic continuous DBS was applied for 3–6 weeks. Welfare monitoring and behavior changes were assessed. Postmortem histological analysis of c-fos protein expression was carried out. Results. MFB-DBS resulted in mild and temporary weight loss in the animals, which was regained even with continuing stimulation. MFB-DBS led to increased and long-lasting c-fos expression in target regions of the mesolimbic/mesocortical system. Conclusions. Bilateral continuous chronic MFB-DBS is feasible, safe, and without impact on the rodent's health. MFB-DBS results in temporary increase in exploration, which could explain the initial weight loss, and does not produce any apparent behavioral abnormalities. This platform represents a powerful tool for further preclinical investigation of the MFB stimulation in the treatment of depression. PMID:25960609

  11. Proceedings of the Second Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: What's in the Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Morita, Hokuto; Rossi, P Justin; Allen, William L; Alterman, Ron L; Bronte-Stewart, Helen; Butson, Christopher R; Charles, David; Deckers, Sjaak; de Hemptinne, Coralie; DeLong, Mahlon; Dougherty, Darin; Ellrich, Jens; Foote, Kelly D; Giordano, James; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Greene, David; Gross, Robert; Judy, Jack W; Karst, Edward; Kent, Alexander; Kopell, Brian; Lang, Anthony; Lozano, Andres; Lungu, Codrin; Lyons, Kelly E; Machado, Andre; Martens, Hubert; McIntyre, Cameron; Min, Hoon-Ki; Neimat, Joseph; Ostrem, Jill; Pannu, Sat; Ponce, Francisco; Pouratian, Nader; Reymers, Donnie; Schrock, Lauren; Sheth, Sameer; Shih, Ludy; Stanslaski, Scott; Steinke, G Karl; Stypulkowski, Paul; Tröster, Alexander I; Verhagen, Leo; Walker, Harrison; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The proceedings of the 2nd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease and represent the insights of a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including advocacy for DBS, improving clinical outcomes, innovations in computational models of DBS, understanding of the neurophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) and evolving sensor and device technologies. PMID:25526555

  12. Clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Neil V; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy affects 50 million people worldwide and about 30% of these patients will not be adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) alone. For patients where resective surgery is not indicated, deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be an effective alternative. The majority of available literature targets the thalamic nuclei (anterior; centromedian), subthalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Here, we review patient outcomes and adverse events related to DBS to these various targets. Data show DBS may be a safe and effective treatment option for refractory epilepsy. PMID:26615464

  13. Exploiting pallidal plasticity for stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, Marcel A. J.; Schwab, Bettina C.; Nirody, Jasmine A.; Meijer, Hil G. E.; van Gils, Stephan A.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Continuous application of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) often effectively reduces motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease patients. While there is a growing need for more effective and less traumatic stimulation, the exact mechanism of DBS is still unknown. Here, we present a methodology to exploit the plasticity of GABAergic synapses inside the external globus pallidus (GPe) for the optimization of DBS. Approach. Assuming the existence of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) at GABAergic GPe-GPe synapses, we simulate neural activity in a network model of the subthalamic nucleus and GPe. In particular, we test different DBS protocols in our model and quantify their influence on neural synchrony. Main results. In an exemplary set of biologically plausible model parameters, we show that STDP in the GPe has a direct influence on neural activity and especially the stability of firing patterns. STDP stabilizes both uncorrelated firing in the healthy state and correlated firing in the parkinsonian state. Alternative stimulation protocols such as coordinated reset stimulation can clearly profit from the stabilizing effect of STDP. These results are widely independent of the STDP learning rule. Significance. Once the model settings, e.g., connection architectures, have been described experimentally, our model can be adjusted and directly applied in the development of novel stimulation protocols. More efficient stimulation leads to both minimization of side effects and savings in battery power.

  14. Deep brain stimulation of the inferior colliculus: a possible animal model to study paradoxical kinesia observed in some parkinsonian patients?

    PubMed

    Melo-Thomas, Liana; Thomas, Uwe

    2015-02-15

    The inferior colliculus (IC) plays an important role in the normal processing of the acoustic message and is also involved in the filtering of acoustic stimuli of aversive nature. The neural substrate of the IC can also influence haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Considering that (i) paradoxical kinesia, observed in some parkinsonian patients, seems to be dependent of their emotional state and (ii) deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents an alternative therapeutic route for the relief of parkinsonian symptoms, the present study investigated the consequence of DBS at the IC on the catalepsy induced by haloperidol in rats. Additionally, we investigated if DBS of the IC can elicit motor responses in anesthetized rats and whether DBS elicits distinct neural firing patterns of activity at the dorsal cortex (DCIC) or central nucleus (CNIC) of the IC. A significant reduction of the catalepsy response was seen in rats previously given haloperidol and receiving DBS at the IC. In addition, electrical stimulation to the ventral part of the CNIC induced immediate motor responses in anesthetized rats. The neuronal spontaneous activity was higher at the ventral part of the CNIC than the dorsal part. DBS to the ventral part but not to the dorsal part of the CNIC increased the spike rate at neurons a few hundred microns away from the stimulation site. It is possible that the IC plays a role in the sensorimotor gating activated by emotional stimuli, and that DBS at the IC can be a promising new animal model to study paradoxical kinesia in rats. PMID:25446814

  15. Abstract--As epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population, electrical stimulation of the brain has

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    stimulation including transcranial magnetic stimulation [2], [3] and transcranial direct current stimulation applied noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes on the scalp electrical stimulation via conventional disc electrodes applied across the head, transcranial electrical

  16. Analysis of benzodiazepines and their metabolites using DBS cards and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heesang; Park, Yujin; Jo, Jiyeong; In, Sangwhan; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; Pyo, Jaesung; Choe, Sanggil

    2015-10-01

    Dried Blood Spot (DBS) has been used a blood extraction method for inherited metabolic disorder screening since 1960s. With introduction of LC-MS/MS, not only DBS could be used to analysis drugs in small blood volume, but in various fields, such as toxicology, drug therapeutic monitoring, drug diagnostic screening, and illicit drugs. In toxicology field, many drugs (e.g. benzodiazepines, acetaminophen, small molecule drugs) have been tested with DBS. Compared with earlier blood extraction methods (SPE and LLE), DBS has lots of advantages; lower blood volume (less than 50?L), shorter analysis time caused by a more concise analysis procedure and lower cost. We optimized the DBS procedure and LC-MS/MS conditions for 18 benzodiazepines, seven benzodiazepine metabolites, and one z-drug (zolpidem) analysis in blood. 30?L of whole blood was spotted on FTA DMPK card C and dried for 2h in a desiccator. A 6-mm disk was punched and vortexed for 1min in a centrifuge tube with 300?L methanol/acetonitrile mixture (1:1, v/v). After evaporation, redissolved in 100?L mobile phase of LC-MS/MS and 5?L was injected. In the analysis for 26 target compounds in blood, all of the method validation parameters - LLOD, LLOQ, accuracy (intra- and inter-assay), and precision (intra- and inter-assay) - were satisfied with method validation criteria, within 15%. The results of matrix effect, recovery, and process efficiency were good. We developed a fast and reliable sample preparation method using DBS for 26 benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine metabolites, and z-drug (zolpidem). PMID:26255955

  17. Neuropsychological effects of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Ali; Müller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background: Putative changes of cognition after deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive abilities before and following bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS and to review the available literature. Methods: Twenty patients underwent bilateral DBS of the STN. Cognitive skills were assessed in a standardized fashion before and at least at 12 months after the surgical intervention. Results: There was a significant decline of both semantic and phonematic verbal fluency and a mild trend for a deterioration of verbal memory after DBS. Mood, general cognitive screening, and visospatial abilities remained unchanged. Conclusion: STN DBS in the treatment of PD has resulted in a significant reduction of motor symptoms and improved independence and quality of life in appropriately selected patients. However, it may have isolatable effects on verbal fluency and related function. Case series in the literature reported similar findings. Potential candidates for DBS should be counseled about the risk of mild cognitive declines. PMID:24349868

  18. DBS investigation on films of cobalt chloride doped PVA-PVP blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammannavar, Preeti B.; Baraker, Basavarajeshwari M.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Lobo, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    Films of Cobalt Chloride (CoCl2) doped polyvinylalcohol(PVA)- polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP) blend (doped from 0.5 wt% up to 28 wt%) were prepared by solution casting, and characterized by XRD, DSC, UV-Visible Spectrometry TGA, FTIR and electrical measurements. In this paper, the results of Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS) in CoCl2 doped PVA-PVP blend is discussed. An increase in crystallinity of PVA-PVP blend, is observed, on doping it with CoCl2. The DBS results are complemented by XRD and DSC scans.

  19. The combined effect of subthalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation and L-dopa increases emotion recognition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mondillon, Laurie; Mermillod, Martial; Musca, Serban C; Rieu, Isabelle; Vidal, Tiphaine; Chambres, Patrick; Auxiette, Catherine; Dalens, Hélène; Marie Coulangeon, Louise; Jalenques, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Ulla, Miguel; Derost, Philippe; Marques, Ana; Durif, Franck

    2012-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS) is a widely used surgical technique to suppress motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), and as such improves patients' quality of life. However, DBS may produce emotional disorders such as a reduced ability to recognize emotional facial expressions (EFE). Previous studies have not considered the fact that DBS and l-dopa medication can have differential, common, or complementary consequences on EFE processing. A thorough way of investigating the effect of DBS and l-dopa medication in greater detail is to compare patients' performances after surgery, with the two therapies either being administered ('on') or not administered ('off'). We therefore used a four-condition (l-dopa 'on'/DBS 'on', l-dopa 'on'/DBS 'off', l-dopa 'off'/DBS 'on', and l-dopa 'off'/DBS 'off') EFE recognition paradigm and compared implanted PD patients to healthy controls. The results confirmed those of previous studies, yielding a significant impairment in the detection of some facial expressions relative to controls. Disgust recognition was impaired when patients were 'off' l-dopa and 'on' DBS, and fear recognition impaired when 'off' of both therapies. More interestingly, the combined effect of both DBS and l-dopa administration seems much more beneficial for EFE recognition than the separate administration of each individual therapy. We discuss the implications of these findings in the light of the inverted U curve function that describes the differential effects of dopamine level on the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). We propose that, while l-dopa could "overdose" in dopamine the ventral stream of the OFC, DBS would compensate for this over-activation by decreasing OFC activity, thereby restoring the necessary OFC-amygdala interaction. Another finding is that, when collapsing over all treatment conditions, PD patients recognized more neutral faces than the matched controls, a result that concurs with embodiment theories. PMID:22944002

  20. Pathways of Translation: Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gionfriddo, Michael R.; Greenberg, Alexandra J.; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brain has a 2000 year history. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), one form of neurostimulation, is a functional neurosurgical approach in which a high frequency electric current stimulates targeted brain structures for therapeutic benefit. It is an effective treatment for certain neuropathologic movement disorders and an emerging therapy for psychiatric conditions and epilepsy. Its translational journey did not follow the typical bench-to-bedside path, but rather reversed the process. The shift from ancient and medieval folkloric remedy to accepted medical practice began with independent discoveries about electricity during the 17th century and was fostered by technological advances of the 20th. In this article we review that journey and discuss how the quest to expand its applications and continue to improve outcomes is taking DBS from the bedside back to the bench. PMID:24330698

  1. Changes in Vowel Articulation with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Dysarthric Speakers with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Mélanie; Prud'Homme, Michel; Cantin, Léo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate changes in vowel articulation with the electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in dysarthric speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Eight Quebec-French speakers diagnosed with idiopathic PD who had undergone STN DBS were evaluated ON-stimulation and OFF-stimulation (1 hour after DBS was turned off). Vowel articulation was compared ON-simulation versus OFF-stimulation using acoustic vowel space and formant centralization ratio, calculated with the first (F1) and second formant (F2) of the vowels /i/, /u/, and /a/. The impact of the preceding consonant context on articulation, which represents a measure of coarticulation, was also analyzed as a function of the stimulation state. Results. Maximum vowel articulation increased during ON-stimulation. Analyses also indicate that vowel articulation was modulated by the consonant context but this relationship did not change with STN DBS. Conclusions. Results suggest that STN DBS may improve articulation in dysarthric speakers with PD, in terms of range of movement. Optimization of the electrical parameters for each patient is important and may lead to improvement in speech fine motor control. However, the impact on overall speech intelligibility may still be small. Clinical considerations are discussed and new research avenues are suggested. PMID:25400977

  2. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS... Stations § 73.756 System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF... limit shall be 150 Hz, with lower frequencies attenuated at a slope of 6 dB per octave. (3)...

  3. Swallowing and deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Troche, Michelle S; Brandimore, Alexandra E; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the current state of the literature on the topic of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and its effects on swallowing function in Parkinson's disease (PD). Pubmed, Cochrane review, and web of science searches were completed on all articles addressing DBS that contained a swallowing outcome measure. Outcome measures included the penetration/aspiration scale, pharyngeal transit time, oropharyngeal residue, drooling, aspiration pneumonia, death, hyolaryngeal excursion, epiglottic inversion, UPDRS scores, and presence of coughing/throat clearing during meals. The search identified 13 studies specifically addressing the effects of DBS on swallowing. Critical assessment of the 13 identified peer-reviewed publications revealed nine studies employing an experimental design, (e.g. "on" vs. "off", pre- vs. post-DBS) and four case reports. None of the nine experimental studies were found to identify clinically significant improvement or decline in swallowing function with DBS. Despite these findings, several common threads were identified across experimental studies and will be examined in this review. Additionally, available data demonstrate that, although subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has been considered to cause more impairment to swallowing function than globus pallidus internus (GPi) stimulation, there are no experimental studies directly comparing swallowing function in STN vs. GPi. Moreover, there has been no comparison of unilateral vs. bilateral DBS surgery and the coincident effects on swallowing function. This review includes a critical analysis of all experimental studies and discusses methodological issues that should be addressed in future studies. PMID:23726461

  4. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON DBS-INDUCED BLOCK COPOLYMER GELS: A RHEOLOGICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) is capable of gelling a variety of organic solvents and polymeric materials by forming a rigid, 3-D hydrogen-bonded network. In this work, two poly(siloxane)/poly(propylene oxide) segmented copolymers of equal composition and molecular weight, but di...

  5. Timing of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease: a need for reappraisal?

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ruth-Mary; Moro, Elena; Lang, Anthony E; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2013-05-01

    We review the current application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) and consider the evidence that earlier use of DBS confers long-term symptomatic benefit for patients compared to best medical therapy. Electronic searches were performed of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify all article types relating to the timing of DBS in PD. Current evidence suggests that DBS is typically performed in late stage PD, a mean of 14 to 15 years after diagnosis. Current guidelines recommend that PD patients who are resistant to medical therapies, have significant medication side effects and lengthening off periods, but are otherwise cognitively intact and medically fit for surgery be considered for DBS. If these criteria are rigidly interpreted, it may be that, by the time medical treatment options have been exhausted, the disease has progressed to the point that the patient may no longer be fit for neurosurgical intervention. From the evidence available, we conclude that surgical management of PD alone or in combination with medical therapy results in greater improvement of motor symptoms and quality of life than medical treatment alone. There is evidence to support the use of DBS in less advanced PD and that it may be appropriate for earlier stages of the disease than for which it is currently used. The improving short and long-term safety profile of DBS makes early application a realistic possibility. PMID:23483564

  6. Validation of CT-MRI fusion for intraoperative assessment of stereotactic accuracy in DBS surgery.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Chapple, Kristina; Lambert, Meg; Dhall, Rohit; Ponce, Francisco A

    2014-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation is typically performed with intraoperative microelectrode recording and test stimulation for target confirmation. Recent studies have shown accurate, clinically efficacious results after lead placement without microelectrode recording or test stimulation, using interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or intraoperative computed tomography (CT; iCT) for verification of accuracy. The latter relies on CT-MRI fusion. To validate CT-MRI fusion in this setting, we compared stereotactic coordinates determined intraoperatively using CT-MRI fusion with those obtained on postoperative MRI. Deep brain stimulation electrodes were implanted with patients under general anesthesia. Direct targeting was performed on preoperative MRI, which was merged with preimplantation iCT images for stereotactic registration and postimplantation iCT images for accuracy confirmation. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained 6 weeks postoperatively for comparison. Postoperative MRI was obtained for 48 patients, with 94 leads placed over a 1-year period. Vector error of the targeted contact relative to the initial plan was 1.1?±?0.7 mm on iCT and 1.6?±?0.7 mm on postoperative MRI. Variance comparisons (F-tests) showed that the discrepancy between iCT- and postoperative MRI-determined errors was attributable to measurement error on postoperative MRI, as detected in inter-rater reliability testing. In multivariate analysis, improved lead placement accuracy was associated with frame-based stereotaxy with the head of the bed at 0° compared with frameless stereotaxy with the head of the bed at 30° (P?=?0.037). Intraoperative CT can be used to determine lead placement accuracy in deep brain stimulation surgery. The discrepancy between coordinates determined intraoperatively by CT-MRI fusion and postoperatively by MRI can be accounted for by inherent measurement error. PMID:25377213

  7. Characteristic laryngoscopic findings in Parkinson's disease patients after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and its correlation with voice disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Speech and voice disorders are one of the most common adverse effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). However, the pathophysiology of voice and laryngeal dysfunction after STN-DBS remains unclear. We assessed 47 PD patients (22 treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 25 treated medically (PD-Med); all patients in both groups matched by age, sex, disease duration, and motor and cognitive function) using the objective and subjective voice assessment batteries (GRBAS scale and Voice Handicap Index), and laryngoscopy. Laryngoscopic examinations revealed that PD-DBS patients showed a significantly higher incidence of incomplete glottal closure (77 vs 48 %; p = 0.039), hyperadduction of the false vocal folds (73 vs 44 %; p = 0.047), anteroposterior hypercompression (50 vs 20 %; p = 0.030) and asymmetrical glottal movement (50 vs 16 %; p = 0.002) than PD-Med patients. On- and off-stimulation assessment revealed that STN-DBS could induce or aggravate incomplete glottal closure, hyperadduction of the false vocal folds, anteroposterior hypercompression, and asymmetrical glottal movement. Incomplete glottal closure and hyperadduction of the false vocal folds significantly correlated with breathiness and strained voice, respectively (r = 0.590 and 0.539). We should adjust patients' DBS settings in consideration of voice and laryngeal functions as well as motor function. PMID:26254905

  8. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  9. Acute high frequency stimulation of the prefrontal cortex or nucleus accumbens does not increase hippocampal neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christine; Bregman, Tatiana; Voget, Mareike; Raymond, Roger; Hadar, Ravit; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement

    2015-09-01

    To date, the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on hippocampal neurogenesis have been mainly characterized in the context of memory. Acute stimulation (i.e. for 1 h) of either the entorhinal cortex or the anterior thalamus increases both cell proliferation and survival. We investigate whether stimulation applied to targets being considered for the treatment of depression, namely the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) or nucleus accumbens (Acb), also increases hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents. Rats were treated with vmPFC or Acb DBS for 1 h at different settings. 5'-bromo-2'deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected three days following stimulation onset and animals were sacrificed 24 h or 28 days later. Overall, we found that neither vmPFC nor Acb DBS increased hippocampal neurogenesis. In summary, the delivery of acute stimulation into targets homologous to those used in human depression trials does not increase hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26228396

  10. Deep brain stimulation in rats: different targets induce similar antidepressant-like effects but influence different circuits.

    PubMed

    Hamani, Clement; Amorim, Beatriz O; Wheeler, Anne L; Diwan, Mustansir; Driesslein, Klaus; Covolan, Luciene; Butson, Christopher R; Nobrega, José N

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies in patients with treatment-resistant depression have shown similar results with the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subcallosal cingulate gyrus (SCG), ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) and nucleus accumbens (Acb). As these brain regions are interconnected, one hypothesis is that by stimulating these targets one would just be influencing different relays in the same circuitry. We investigate behavioral, immediate early gene expression, and functional connectivity changes in rats given DBS in homologous regions, namely the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), white matter fibers of the frontal region (WMF) and nucleus accumbens. We found that DBS delivered to the vmPFC, Acb but not WMF induced significant antidepressant-like effects in the FST (31%, 44%, and 17% reduction in immobility compared to controls). Despite these findings, stimulation applied to these three targets induced distinct patterns of regional activity and functional connectivity. While animals given vmPFC DBS had increased cortical zif268 expression, changes after Acb stimulation were primarily observed in subcortical structures. In animals receiving WMF DBS, both cortical and subcortical structures at a distance from the target were influenced by stimulation. In regard to functional connectivity, DBS in all targets decreased intercorrelations among cortical areas. This is in contrast to the clear differences observed in subcortical connectivity, which was reduced after vmPFC DBS but increased in rats receiving Acb or WMF stimulation. In conclusion, results from our study suggest that, despite similar antidepressant-like effects, stimulation of the vmPFC, WMF and Acb induces distinct changes in regional brain activity and functional connectivity. PMID:25131446

  11. A novel quality of life instrument for deep brain stimulation in movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kuehler, A; Henrich, G; Schroeder, U; Conrad, B; Herschbach, P; Ceballos-Baumann, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a short instrument to examine quality of life (QoL) which specifically addresses patients with movement disorders treated by deep brain stimulation (DBS). Design: The instrument was developed within an existing concept of a modular questionnaire (questions on life satisfaction: "general life satisfaction" QLSM-A, and "satisfaction with health" QLSM-G), in which each item is weighted according to its relative importance to the individual. Methods: Items were generated by interviews with 20 DBS patients, followed by item reduction and scale generation, factor analysis to determine relevant and final questionnaire items, estimation of reliability, and validation based on the medical outcome study 36 item short form health survey (SF-36) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) (data from 152 patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, or idiopathic torsion dystonia, including 75 patients with DBS). Results: Initial questionnaires were reduced to 12 items for a "movement disorder module" (QLSM-MD), and five items for a "deep brain stimulation module" (QLSM-DBS). Psychometric analysis revealed Cronbach's ? values of of 0.87 and 0.73, and satisfactory correlation coefficients for convergent validity with SF-36 and EQ-5D. Conclusions: QLSM-MD and QLSM-DBS can evaluate quality of life aspects of DBS in movement disorders. Psychometric evaluation showed the questionnaires to be reliable, valid, and well accepted by the patients. PMID:12876228

  12. A new biomarker for subthalamic deep brain stimulation for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease—a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmel, Gerrit E.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Obradovic, Milan; Gorman, Robert B.; Single, Peter S.; Chenery, Helen J.; Coyne, Terry; Silburn, Peter A.; Parker, John L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard treatment for advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other motor disorders. Although the surgical procedure has improved in accuracy over the years thanks to imaging and microelectrode recordings, the underlying principles that render DBS effective are still debated today. The aim of this paper is to present initial findings around a new biomarker that is capable of assessing the efficacy of DBS treatment for PD which could be used both as a research tool, as well as in the context of a closed-loop stimulator. Approach. We have used a novel multi-channel stimulator and recording device capable of measuring the response of nervous tissue to stimulation very close to the stimulus site with minimal latency, rejecting most of the stimulus artefact usually found with commercial devices. We have recorded and analyzed the responses obtained intraoperatively in two patients undergoing DBS surgery in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced PD. Main results. We have identified a biomarker in the responses of the STN to DBS. The responses can be analyzed in two parts, an initial evoked compound action potential arising directly after the stimulus onset, and late responses (LRs), taking the form of positive peaks, that follow the initial response. We have observed a morphological change in the LRs coinciding with a decrease in the rigidity of the patients. Significance. These initial results could lead to a better characterization of the DBS therapy, and the design of adaptive DBS algorithms that could significantly improve existing therapies and help us gain insights into the functioning of the basal ganglia and DBS.

  13. Epidural and subdural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tronnier, V; Rasche, D

    2013-01-01

    Cortical stimulation, either transcranial or by means of electrodes implanted epidurally or subdurally, is used increasingly to treat neuropsychiatric diseases. In cases where transcranial stimulation gives only short-term success, implanted electrodes can yield results that are similar but long-term. Epidural stimulation is used widely to treat chronic neuropathic pain, whereas newer fields are in movement disorders, tinnitus, depression, and functional rehabilitation after stroke. For epidural stimulation, computational models explain the geometry of stimulation parameters (anodal, cathodal, and bifocal) and are used for targeting to yield the best clinical results. Nevertheless, the role of the cerebrospinal fluid layer also has to be taken into consideration. Subdural or intrasulcal stimulation allows a more focused stimulation with lower current intensities. This advantage, however, is counterbalanced by a higher complication rate with regard to epileptic seizures, subdural or intracerebral hemorrhages, and wound infections. PMID:24112907

  14. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated. PMID:26459361

  15. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  18. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  19. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  20. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  2. Deep brain stimulation: Are astrocytes a key driver behind the scene?

    PubMed Central

    Fenoy, Albert J.; Goetz, Laurent; Chabardès, Stéphan; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Despite its widespread use, the underlying mechanism of deep brain stimulation (DBS) remains unknown. Once thought to impart a "functional inactivation", there is now increasing evidence showing that DBS actually can both inhibit neurons and activate axons, generating a wide range of effects. This implies that the mechanisms that underlie DBS work not only locally but also at the network level. Therefore, not only may DBS induce membrane or synaptic plastic changes in neurons over a wide network, but it may also trigger celllular and molecular changes in other cells, especially astrocytes, where together the glial-neuronal interactions may explain effects that are not clearly rationalized by simple activation/inhibition theories alone. Recent studies suggest that 1) High frequency stimulation (HFS) activates astrocytes and leads to the release of gliotransmitters that can regulate surrounding neurons at the synapse; 2) Activated astrocytes modulate synaptic activity and increase axonal activation; 3) Activated astrocytes can signal further astrocytes across large networks, contributing to observed network effects induced by DBS; 4) Activated astrocytes can help explain the disparate effects of activation and inhibition induced by HFS at different sites; 5) Astrocytes contribute to synaptic plasticity through long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), possibly helping to mediate the long term effects of DBS; and 6) DBS may increase delta-opioid receptor activity in astrcoytes to confer neuroprotection. Together, the plastic changes in these glial-neuronal interactions network-wide likely underlie the range of effects seen, from the variable temporal latencies to observed effect to global activation patterns. This article reviews recent research progress in the literature on how astrocytes play a key role in DBS efficacy. PMID:24456263

  3. Chronic deep brain stimulation of the rat ventral medial prefrontal cortex disrupts hippocampal-prefrontal coherence.

    PubMed

    Insel, Nathan; Pilkiw, Maryna; Nobrega, José N; Hutchison, William D; Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Hamani, Clement

    2015-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subgenual cingulate gyrus (SCG) has been used to treat patients with treatment-resistant depression. As in humans, DBS applied to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of rats induces antidepressant-like responses. Physiological interactions between structures that play a role in depression and antidepressant treatment are still unknown. The present study examined the effect of DBS on inter-region communication by measuring the coherence of local field potentials in the rat infralimbic cortex (IL; homologue of the SCG) and one of its major afferents, the ventral hippocampus (VH). Rats received daily IL DBS treatment (100 ?A, 90 ?s, 130 Hz; 8h/day). Recordings were conducted in unrestrained, behaving animals on the day before treatment, after 1 and 10 days of treatment, and 10 days stimulation offset. VH-IL coherence in the 2-4 Hz range was reduced in DBS-treated animals compared with shams after 10 days, but not after only 1 day of treatment. No effect of DBS was observed in the 6-10 Hz (theta) range, where coherence was generally high and could be further evoked with a loud auditory stimulus. Finally, coherence was not affected by fluoxetine (10mg/kg), suggesting that the effects of DBS were not likely mediated by increased serotonin levels. While these data support the hypothesis that DBS disrupts communication between regions important for expectation-based control of emotion, they also suggest that lasting physiological effects require many days of treatment and, furthermore, may be specific to lower-frequency patterns, the nature and scope of which await further investigation. PMID:25842268

  4. Solvent and electrolyte effects in PPyDBS free standing films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Rudolf; Martinez, Jose G.; Otero, Toribio F.; Kesküla, Arko; Kaasik, Friedrich; Harjo, Madis; Valner, Robert; Vaddepally, Vishwaja; Peikolainen, Anna-Liisa; Aabloo, Alvo

    2015-04-01

    Free standing conducting polymer films based on polypyrrole doped with dodecylbenzoesulfate (PPyDBS) are investigated in TBACF3SO3 (tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate) propylene carbonate (PC-Tf) followed in aqueous TMACl tetramethylammonium chloride (Aq-TM) with the aim to investigate actuation properties (anion or cation-driven actuation). Under isometric (constant force) conditions ECMD (electro-chemo-mechanical deformation) measurements are performed during cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric experiments. Electrolyte and solvent effects revealing that the actuation direction in propylene carbonate electrolyte changed from expansion at anodic potential to expansion at cathodic potentials during square wave potential steps. Finally if the PPyDBS film immersed in aqueous electrolyte the anion-driven actuation properties are maintenance. SEM measurements are implemented to reefer changes in film morphology and ion content (EDX, energy dispersive X-Ray) before and after actuation.

  5. Target coverage and selectivity in field steering brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Ruben; Astrom, Mattias; Medvedev, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment in Parkinson's Disease. The target area is defined based on the state and brain anatomy of the patient. The stimulation delivered via state-of-the-art DBS leads that are currently in clinical use is difficult to individualize to the patient particularities. Furthermore, the electric field generated by such a lead has a limited selectivity, resulting in stimulation of areas adjacent to the target and thus causing undesirable side effects. The goal of this study is, using actual clinical data, to compare in silico the stimulation performance of a symmetrical generic lead to a more versatile and adaptable one allowing, in particular, for asymmetric stimulation. The fraction of the volume of activated tissue in the target area and the fraction of the stimulation field that spreads beyond it are computed for a clinical data set of patients in order to quantify the lead performance. The obtained results suggest that using more versatile DBS leads might reduce the stimulation area beyond the target and thus lessen side effects for the same achieved therapeutical effect. PMID:25570011

  6. Stochastic modeling of mouse motor activity under deep brain stimulation: the extraction of arousal information.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Daniel M; Quinkert, Amy W; Pfaff, Donald W

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, we quantify, with a rigorous approach, the nature of motor activity in response to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), in the mouse. DBS is currently being used in the treatment of a broad range of diseases, but its underlying principles are still unclear. Because mouse movement involves rapidly repeated starting and stopping, one must statistically verify that the movement at a given stimulation time was not just coincidental, endogenously-driven movement. Moreover, the amount of activity changes significantly over the circadian rhythm, and hence the means, variances and autocorrelations are all time varying. A new methodology is presented. For example, to discern what is and what is not impacted by stimulation, velocity is classified (in a time-evolving manner) as being zero-, one- and two-dimensional movement. The most important conclusions of the paper are: (1) (DBS) stimulation is proven to be truly effective; (2) it is two-dimensional (2-D) movement that strongly differs between light and dark and responds to stimulation; and, (3) stimulation in the light initiates a manner of movement, 2-D movement, that is more commonly seen in the (non-stimulated) dark. Based upon these conclusions, it is conjectured that the above patterns of 2-D movement could be a straightforward, easy to calculate correlate of arousal. The above conclusions will aid in the systematic evaluation and understanding of how DBS in CNS arousal pathways leads to the activation of behavior. PMID:25720000

  7. Origin and Evolution of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Vittorio A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how the electrical stimulation, used since antiquity to modulate the nervous system, has been a fundamental tool of neurophysiologic investigation in the second half of the eighteenth century and was subsequently used by the early twentieth century, even for therapeutic purposes. In mid-twentieth century the advent of stereotactic procedures has allowed the drift from lesional to stimulating technique of deep nuclei of the brain for therapeutic purposes. In this way, deep brain stimulation (DBS) was born, that, over the last two decades, has led to positive results for the treatment of medically refractory Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. In recent years, the indications for therapeutic use of DBS have been extended to epilepsy, Tourette’s syndrome, psychiatric diseases (depression, obsessive–compulsive disorder), some kinds of headache, eating disorders, and the minimally conscious state. The potentials of the DBS for therapeutic use are fascinating, but there are still many unresolved technical and ethical problems, concerning the identification of the targets for each disease, the selection of the patients and the evaluation of the results. PMID:21887135

  8. Mechanoelectrochemistry of PPy(DBS) from correlated characterization of electrochemical response and extensional strain.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Robert G; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates nanostructured morphology-dependent charge storage and coupled mechanical strain of polypyrrole membranes doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PPy(DBS)). Nanoscale features introduced in PPy(DBS) using phospholipid vesicles as soft-templates create a uniform and long-range order to the polymer morphology, and lead to higher specific capacitance. It is widely stated that nanostructured architecture offer reduced mechanical loading at higher charge capacities, but metrics and methods to precisely quantify coupled localized strains do not exist. Towards this goal, we demonstrate the use of scanning electrochemical microscope with shear force imaging hardware (SECM-SF) to precisely measure charge storage function and volumetric strain simultaneously, and define two metrics - filling efficiency and chemomechanical coupling coefficient to compare nanostructured morphologies and thicknesses. For thin membranes (smaller charge densities), planar and vesicle-templated membranes have comparable mechanoelectrochemical response. For thick membranes (0.4 to 0.8 C cm(-2)), a 15% increase in charge storage is associated with 50% reduction in extensional strain. These results allow for the formulation of rules to design nanostructured PPy(DBS)-based actuators and energy storage devices. PMID:26583690

  9. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  10. Personality Changes after Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Skogseid, Inger-Marie; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Andersson, Stein; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit; Aarsland, Dag; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a recognized therapy that improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on personality. To address this topic, we have assessed personality traits before and after STN-DBS in PD patients. Methods. Forty patients with advanced PD were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation Seeking impulsive behaviour scale (UPPS), and the Neuroticism and Lie subscales of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-N, EPQ-L) before surgery and after three months of STN-DBS. Collateral information obtained from the UPPS was also reported. Results. Despite improvement in motor function and reduction in dopaminergic dosage patients reported lower score on the TCI Persistence and Self-Transcendence scales, after three months of STN-DBS, compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P = 0.024). Relatives reported significantly increased scores on the UPPS Lack of Premeditation scale at follow-up (P = 0.027). Conclusion. STN-DBS in PD patients is associated with personality changes in the direction of increased impulsivity. PMID:25705545

  11. Chronic Deep Brain Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Nucleus in Wistar Rats Alters Circulatory Levels of Corticosterone and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Calleja-Castillo, Juan Manuel; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Morales-Espinoza, Gabriel; Moreno-Aguilar, Julia; Hernández, Maria Eugenia; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic option for several diseases, but its effects on HPA axis activity and systemic inflammation are unknown. This study aimed to detect circulatory variations of corticosterone and cytokines levels in Wistar rats, after 21 days of DBS-at the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl), unilateral cervical vagotomy (UCVgX), or UCVgX plus DBS. We included the respective control (C) and sham (S) groups (n = 6 rats per group). DBS treated rats had higher levels of TNF-? (120%; P < 0.01) and IFN-? (305%; P < 0.001) but lower corticosterone concentration (48%; P < 0.001) than C and S. UCVgX animals showed increased corticosterone levels (154%; P < 0.001) versus C and S. UCVgX plus DBS increased IL-1? (402%; P < 0.001), IL-6 (160%; P < 0.001), and corsticosterone (178%; P < 0.001 versus 48%; P < 0.001) compared with the C and S groups. Chronic DBS at VMHvl induced a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by a decrease of HPA axis function. UCVgX rats experienced HPA axis hyperactivity as result of vagus nerve injury; however, DBS was unable to block the HPA axis hyperactivity induced by unilateral cervical vagotomy. Further studies are necessary to explore these findings and their clinical implication. PMID:24235973

  12. The Current Status of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Parkinson Disease in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Il

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing prevalence in Korea. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a safe and effective surgical treatment option for this disease. The aim of this review was to provide an update regarding current DBS practices with respect to the treatment of PD in the Republic of Korea. The first DBS in Korea was performed in 2000; approximately 2,000 patients have undergone DBS for a variety of neurological disorders, the majority of whom were patients with PD. Approximately 150 new patients with PD receive DBS annually, and more than 20 centers perform DBS. However, DBS remains underutilized for many reasons, and the clinical case burden at many institutions is below the level presumed adequate for qualified practice. With a rapidly aging population and an evolving socioeconomic environment, the need for surgical intervention for PD is likely to increase significantly in the future. Many issues such as finances, education, and quality assurance must be resolved to cope with this need. PMID:26413238

  13. Self-Reported Executive Functioning in Everyday Life in Parkinson's Disease after Three Months of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen Ha Gia; Andersson, Stein; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebolt; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Studies on the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on executive functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial. In this study we compared self-reported daily executive functioning in PD patients before and after three months of STN-DBS. We also examined whether executive functioning in everyday life was associated with motor symptoms, apathy, and psychiatric symptoms. Method. 40 PD patients were examined with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). Results. PD patients reported significant improvement in daily life executive functioning after 3 months of STN-DBS. Anxiety scores significantly declined, while other psychiatric symptoms remained unchanged. The improvement of self-reported executive functioning did not correlate with motor improvement after STN-DBS. Apathy scores remained unchanged after surgery. Only preoperative depressed mood had predictive value to the improvement of executive function and appears to prevent potentially favorable outcomes from STN-DBS on some aspects of executive function. Conclusion. PD patients being screened for STN-DBS surgery should be evaluated with regard to self-reported executive functioning. Depressive symptoms in presurgical PD patients should be treated. Complementary information about daily life executive functioning in PD patients might enhance further treatment planning of STN-DBS. PMID:26167329

  14. Tourette syndrome deep brain stimulation: a review and updated recommendations.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Lauren E; Mink, Jonathan W; Woods, Douglas W; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Dominico; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Silburn, Peter A; Foltynie, Thomas; Walker, Harrison C; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Savica, Rodolfo; Klassen, Bryan T; Machado, Andre G; Foote, Kelly D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K; Lozano, Andres; Auyeung, M; Kaido, Takanobu; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie L; Khandhar, Suketu M; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Walter, Benjamin L; Juncos, Jorge L; Gross, Robert E; Kuhn, Jens; Leckman, James F; Neimat, Joseph A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may improve disabling tics in severely affected medication and behaviorally resistant Tourette syndrome (TS). Here we review all reported cases of TS DBS and provide updated recommendations for selection, assessment, and management of potential TS DBS cases based on the literature and implantation experience. Candidates should have a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V) diagnosis of TS with severe motor and vocal tics, which despite exhaustive medical and behavioral treatment trials result in significant impairment. Deep brain stimulation should be offered to patients only by experienced DBS centers after evaluation by a multidisciplinary team. Rigorous preoperative and postoperative outcome measures of tics and associated comorbidities should be used. Tics and comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions should be optimally treated per current expert standards, and tics should be the major cause of disability. Psychogenic tics, embellishment, and malingering should be recognized and addressed. We have removed the previously suggested 25-year-old age limit, with the specification that a multidisciplinary team approach for screening is employed. A local ethics committee or institutional review board should be consulted for consideration of cases involving persons younger than 18 years of age, as well as in cases with urgent indications. Tourette syndrome patients represent a unique and complex population, and studies reveal a higher risk for post-DBS complications. Successes and failures have been reported for multiple brain targets; however, the optimal surgical approach remains unknown. Tourette syndrome DBS, though still evolving, is a promising approach for a subset of medication refractory and severely affected patients. PMID:25476818

  15. Virtual electrodes for high-density electrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Cela, Carlos J.; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2015-10-13

    The present embodiments are directed to implantable electrode arrays having virtual electrodes. The virtual electrodes may improve the resolution of the implantable electrode array without the burden of corresponding complexity of electronic circuitry and wiring. In a particular embodiment, a virtual electrode may include one or more passive elements to help steer current to a specific location between the active electrodes. For example, a passive element may be a metalized layer on a substrate that is adjacent to, but not directly connected to an active electrode. In certain embodiments, an active electrode may be directly coupled to a power source via a conductive connection. Beneficially, the passive elements may help to increase the overall resolution of the implantable array by providing additional stimulation points without requiring additional wiring or driver circuitry for the passive elements.

  16. Deep brain stimulation and dantrolene for secondary dystonia in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara; Horvath, Gabriella; Murphy, Tyler; Purtzki, Jacqueline; Bowden, Kristin; Sirrs, Sandra; Honey, Christopher R; Stockler, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat secondary dystonias caused by inborn errors of metabolism with varying degrees of effectiveness. Here we report for the first time the application of DBS as treatment for secondary dystonia in a 22-year-old male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The disease manifested at age 6 with ADHD, tics, and dystonic gait, and deteriorated to loss of ambulation by age 11, and speech difficulties, seizures, and characteristic adrenal insufficiency by age 16. DBS in the globus pallidus internus was commenced at age 18. However, after 25 months, no improvement in dystonia was observed (Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) scores of 65.5 and 62 and disability scores of 28 and 26, pre- and post-DBS, respectively) and the DBS device was removed. Treatment with dantrolene reduced skeletal muscle tone and improved movement (Global Dystonia Rating Scores from 5 to 1 and BFM score 42). Therefore, we conclude that DBS was a safe but ineffective intervention in our case with long-standing dystonia, whereas treatment of spasticity with dantrolene did improve the movement disorder in this young man with X-ALD. PMID:24718842

  17. A Network Analysis of 15O-H2O PET Reveals Deep Brain Stimulation Effects on Brain Network of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Park, Bumhee; Kim, Hae Yu; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Kim, Joong Il; Yoon, Misun; Lee, Jong Doo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a network abnormality, the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) need to be investigated in the aspect of networks. This study aimed to examine how DBS of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) affects the motor networks of patients with idiopathic PD during motor performance and to show the feasibility of the network analysis using cross-sectional positron emission tomography (PET) images in DBS studies. Materials and Methods We obtained [15O]H2O PET images from ten patients with PD during a sequential finger-to-thumb opposition task and during the resting state, with DBS-On and DBS-Off at STN. To identify the alteration of motor networks in PD and their changes due to STN-DBS, we applied independent component analysis (ICA) to all the cross-sectional PET images. We analysed the strength of each component according to DBS effects, task effects and interaction effects. Results ICA blindly decomposed components of functionally associated distributed clusters, which were comparable to the results of univariate statistical parametric mapping. ICA further revealed that STN-DBS modifies usage-strengths of components corresponding to the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits in PD patients by increasing the hypoactive basal ganglia and by suppressing the hyperactive cortical motor areas, ventrolateral thalamus and cerebellum. Conclusion Our results suggest that STN-DBS may affect not only the abnormal local activity, but also alter brain networks in patients with PD. This study also demonstrated the usefulness of ICA for cross-sectional PET data to reveal network modifications due to DBS, which was not observable using the subtraction method. PMID:25837179

  18. The Ethanol-Induced Stimulation of Rat Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Secretion In Vivo Is Critically Dependent on Luminal Cl–

    PubMed Central

    Sommansson, Anna; Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol may induce metabolic and functional changes in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, contributing to impaired mucosal barrier function. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) is a primary epithelial defense against gastric acid and also has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the juxtamucosal microenvironment. The aim in this study was to investigate the effects of the luminal perfusion of moderate concentrations of ethanol in vivo on epithelial DBS, fluid secretion and paracellular permeability. Under thiobarbiturate anesthesia, a ?30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum with an intact blood supply was perfused in situ in rats. The effects on DBS, duodenal transepithelial net fluid flux and the blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-EDTA were investigated. Perfusing the duodenum with isotonic solutions of 10% or 15% ethanol-by-volume for 30 min increased DBS in a concentration-dependent manner, while the net fluid flux did not change. Pre-treatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 (i.p. or i.v.) did not change the secretory response to ethanol, while removing Cl? from the luminal perfusate abolished the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. The administration of hexamethonium (i.v.) but not capsazepine significantly reduced the basal net fluid flux and the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. Perfusing the duodenum with a combination of 1.0 mM HCl and 15% ethanol induced significantly greater increases in DBS than 15% ethanol or 1.0 mM HCl alone but did not influence fluid flux. Our data demonstrate that ethanol induces increases in DBS through a mechanism that is critically dependent on luminal Cl? and partly dependent on enteric neural pathways involving nicotinic receptors. Ethanol and HCl appears to stimulate DBS via the activation of different bicarbonate transporting mechanisms. PMID:25033198

  19. Characterizing the therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a single center long-term perspective

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Andrea L.; Garlow, Steven J.; Riva-Posse, Patricio; Mayberg, Helen S.

    2015-01-01

    The number of depressed patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) is relatively small. However, experience with this intervention now spans more than 10 years at some centers, with study subjects typically monitored closely. Here we describe one center’s evolving impressions regarding optimal patient selection for DBS of the subcallosal cingulate (SCC) as well as observations of short- and long-term patterns in antidepressant response and mood reactivity. A consistent time course of therapeutic response with distinct behavioral phases is observed. Early phases are characterized by changes in mood reactivity and a transient and predictable worsening in self ratings prior to stabilization of response. It is hypothesized that this characteristic recovery curve reflects the timeline of neuroplasticity in response to DBS. Further investigation of these emerging predictable psychiatric, biological, and psychosocial patterns will both improve treatment optimization and enhance understanding and recognition of meaningful DBS antidepressant effects. PMID:26124710

  20. Ethical Issues in Deep Brain Stimulation Research for Treatment-Resistant Depression: Focus on Risk and Consent

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Hoop, Jinger G.; Mayberg, Helen S.; Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is currently in pivotal trials as an intervention for treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Although offering hope for TRD, DBS also provokes ethical concerns—particularly about decision-making capacity of people with depression—among bioethicists, investigators, institutional review boards, and the public. Here, we examine this critical issue of informed consent for DBS research using available evidence regarding decision-making capacity and depression. Further, we explore the implications of the nature of TRD as well as that of the intervention (invasive brain surgery) for informed consent. Based on these analyses, we argue that additional safeguards specific to DBS research for TRD, beyond those that might be used in any higher risk study, are not supported by available empirical evidence. We nevertheless underscore the limited data on such invasive procedures in severely ill psychiatric patients and advocate a research agenda for the systematic study of ethical issues raised by these research endeavors. PMID:26229726

  1. Role of radiology in central nervous system stimulation.

    PubMed

    Minks, D P; Pereira, E A C; Young, V E L; Hogarth, K M; Quaghebeur, G

    2015-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) stimulation is becoming increasingly prevalent. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proven to be an invaluable treatment for movement disorders and is also useful in many other neurological conditions refractory to medical treatment, such as chronic pain and epilepsy. Neuroimaging plays an important role in operative planning, target localization and post-operative follow-up. The use of imaging in determining the underlying mechanisms of DBS is increasing, and the dependence on imaging is likely to expand as deep brain targeting becomes more refined. This article will address the expanding role of radiology and highlight issues, including MRI safety concerns, that radiologists may encounter when confronted with a patient with CNS stimulation equipment in situ. PMID:25715044

  2. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reverses oral tremor in pharmacological models of parkinsonism: interaction with the effects of adenosine A2A antagonism.

    PubMed

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Paul, Nicholas E; Ledgard, Felicia; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Kovner, Rotem; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Senatus, Patrick B; Salamone, John D

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus is increasingly being employed as a treatment for parkinsonian symptoms, including tremor. The present studies used tremulous jaw movements, a pharmacological model of tremor in rodents, to investigate the tremorolytic effects of subthalamic DBS in rats. Subthalamic DBS reduced the tremulous jaw movements induced by the dopamine D2 family antagonist pimozide and the D1 family antagonist ecopipam, as well as the cholinomimetics pilocarpine and galantamine. The ability of DBS to suppress tremulous jaw movements was dependent on the neuroanatomical locus being stimulated (subthalamic nucleus vs. a striatal control site), as well as the frequency and intensity of stimulation used. Importantly, administration of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 reduced the frequency and intensity parameters needed to attenuate tremulous jaw movements. These results have implications for the clinical use of DBS, and future studies should determine whether adenosine A2A antagonism could be used to enhance the tremorolytic efficacy of subthalamic DBS at low frequencies and intensities in human patients. PMID:23600953

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Globus Pallidus Internus in the Parkinsonian Primate: Local Entrainment and Suppression of Low-Frequency Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    McCairn, Kevin W.; Turner, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Competing theories seek to account for the therapeutic effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal globus pallidus (GPi) for medically intractable Parkinson's disease. To investigate this question, we studied the spontaneous activity of 102 pallidal neurons during GPiDBS in two macaques rendered parkinsonian by administration of MPTP. Stimulation through macroelectrodes in the GPi (?200 ?A at 150 Hz for 30 s) reduced rigidity in one animal and increased spontaneous movement in both. Novel artifact subtraction methods allowed uninterrupted single-unit recording during stimulation. GPiDBS induced phasic (78% of cells) or sustained (22%) peristimulus changes in firing in both pallidal segments. A subset of cells responded at short latency (<2 ms) in a manner consistent with antidromic driving. Later phasic increases clustered at 3- to 5-ms latency. Stimulation-induced decreases were either phasic, clustered at 1–3 ms, or sustained, showing no peristimulus modulation. Response latency and magnitude often evolved over 30 s of stimulation, but responses were relatively stable by the end of that time. GPiDBS reduced mean firing rates modestly and only in GPi (?6.9 spikes/s). Surprisingly, GPiDBS had no net effect on the prevalence or structure of burst firing. GPiDBS did reduce the prevalence of synchronized low-frequency oscillations. Some cell pairs became synchronized instead at the frequency of stimulation. Suppression of low-frequency oscillations did not require high-frequency synchronization, however, or even the presence of a significant peristimulus response. In summary, the therapeutic effects of GPiDBS may be mediated by an abolition of low-frequency synchronized oscillations as a result of phasic driving. PMID:19164104

  5. Executive control in Parkinson's disease: effects of dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation on anti-cue keypress performance.

    PubMed

    Adam, Jos J; van Houdt, Hanna; Scholtissen, Bart; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Winogrodzka, Ania; Duits, Annelien

    2011-08-15

    Using an anti-cue keypress task, we examined executive control in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and dopaminergic medication. Across sessions, we varied stimulation (on, off) and dopaminergic medication (on, off). Reaction time (RT) results of the PD patients and their age-matched controls showed a consistent pattern of RT costs and benefits generated by anti-cues with short and long preparation intervals, respectively. This pattern was evident in all sessions, except when DBS stimulation and medication were off. In this condition PD patients showed no RT benefits. These findings are discussed in terms of an executive control process that suppresses the automatic but inappropriate response activation generated by anti-cues. In PD this mechanism is severely compromised but it can be remediated by dopaminergic medication and DBS, suggesting an essential role of the basal ganglia in the selection and suppression of competing responses. PMID:21704125

  6. Forniceal deep brain stimulation rescues hippocampal memory in Rett syndrome mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Ure, Kerstin; Sun, Yaling; Tao, Huifang; Gao, Yan; Patel, Akash J; Curry, Daniel J; Samaco, Rodney C; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Tang, Jianrong

    2015-10-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has improved the prospects for many individuals with diseases affecting motor control, and recently it has shown promise for improving cognitive function as well. Several studies in individuals with Alzheimer disease and in amnesic rats have demonstrated that DBS targeted to the fimbria-fornix, the region that appears to regulate hippocampal activity, can mitigate defects in hippocampus-dependent memory. Despite these promising results, DBS has not been tested for its ability to improve cognition in any childhood intellectual disability disorder. Such disorders are a pressing concern: they affect as much as 3% of the population and involve hundreds of different genes. We proposed that stimulating the neural circuits that underlie learning and memory might provide a more promising route to treating these otherwise intractable disorders than seeking to adjust levels of one molecule at a time. We therefore studied the effects of forniceal DBS in a well-characterized mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), which is a leading cause of intellectual disability in females. Caused by mutations that impair the function of MeCP2 (ref. 6), RTT appears by the second year of life in humans, causing profound impairment in cognitive, motor and social skills, along with an array of neurological features. RTT mice, which reproduce the broad phenotype of this disorder, also show clear deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here we show that forniceal DBS in RTT mice rescues contextual fear memory as well as spatial learning and memory. In parallel, forniceal DBS restores in vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation and hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that forniceal DBS might mitigate cognitive dysfunction in RTT. PMID:26469053

  7. Miniature wireless recording and stimulation system for rodent behavioural testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnell, R. C.; Dempster, J.; Pratt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Elucidation of neural activity underpinning rodent behaviour has traditionally been hampered by the use of tethered systems and human involvement. Furthermore the combination of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) and various neural recording modalities can lead to complex and time-consuming laboratory setups. For studies of this type, novel tools are required to drive forward this research. Approach. A miniature wireless system weighing 8.5 g (including battery) was developed for rodent use that combined multichannel DBS and local-field potential (LFP) recordings. Its performance was verified in a working memory task that involved 4-channel fronto-hippocampal LFP recording and bilateral constant-current fimbria-fornix DBS. The system was synchronised with video-tracking for extraction of LFP at discrete task phases, and DBS was activated intermittently at discrete phases of the task. Main results. In addition to having a fast set-up time, the system could reliably transmit continuous LFP at over 8 hours across 3-5 m distances. During the working memory task, LFP pertaining to discrete task phases was extracted and compared with well-known neural correlates of active exploratory behaviour in rodents. DBS could be wirelessly activated/deactivated at any part of the experiment during EEG recording and transmission, allowing for a seamless integration of this modality. Significance. The wireless system combines a small size with a level of robustness and versatility that can greatly simplify rodent behavioural experiments involving EEG recording and DBS. Designed for versatility and simplicity, the small size and low-cost of the system and its receiver allow for enhanced portability, fast experimental setup times, and pave the way for integration with more complex behaviour.

  8. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the functional effects of DBS in AN. PMID:24175936

  9. Determination of trace amount of oxalic acid with zirconium(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) by spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2008-11-01

    A novel method is proposed for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in the present article. In 1.0 M hydrochloric acid medium, oxalic acid can react with the zirconium(IV) in Zr(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) complex and replaces the DBS-arsenazo to produce a hyperchromic effect at 520 nm. The hyperchromic degree is proportional to the concentration of the oxalic acid added over a defined range. Based on this property, a new method for the spectrophotometric determination of trace oxalic acid was developed. Beer's law is held over the concentration range of 9.0 × 10 -6 to 5.0 × 10 -4 M for oxalic acid with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The apparent molar absorptivity of the method is ?520 nm = 1.16 × 10 3 L mol -1 cm -1 and the detection limit for oxalic acid is 0.815 ?g/mL. The developed method was directly applied to the determination of oxalic acid in tomato samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with cortisol changes.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Pelle P; Figee, Martijn; Endert, Erik; Storosum, Jitschak G; Fliers, Eric; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Since DBS may induce rapid symptomatic changes and the pathophysiology of OCD has been linked to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, we set out to study whether DBS affects the HPA axis in OCD patients. We compared a stimulation ON and OFF condition with a one-week interval in 16 therapy-refractory OCD patients, treated with DBS for at least one year, targeted at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We measured changes in 24-h urinary excretion of free cortisol (UFC), adrenaline and noradrenaline and changes in obsessive-compulsive (Y-BOCS), depressive (HAM-D) and anxiety (HAM-A) symptom scores. Median UFC levels increased with 53% in the OFF condition (from 93 to 143nmol/24h, p=0.12). There were no changes in urinary adrenaline or noradrenaline excretion. The increase in Y-BOCS (39%), and HAM-D (78%) scores correlated strongly with increased UFC levels in the OFF condition. Our findings indicate that symptom changes following DBS for OCD patients are associated with changes in UFC levels. PMID:23333254

  11. 21 CFR 882.5810 - External functional neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... An external functional neuromuscular stimulator is an electrical stimulator that uses external electrodes for stimulating muscles in the leg and ankle of partially paralyzed patients (e.g., after stroke) to provide flexion of the foot and thus...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5810 - External functional neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... An external functional neuromuscular stimulator is an electrical stimulator that uses external electrodes for stimulating muscles in the leg and ankle of partially paralyzed patients (e.g., after stroke) to provide flexion of the foot and thus...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...cerebellar stimulator is a device used to stimulate electrically a patient's cerebellar cortex for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, spasticity, and some movement disorders. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are...

  14. Recording evoked potentials during deep brain stimulation: development and validation of instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact

    PubMed Central

    Kent, A R; Grill, W M

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but the selection of stimulus parameters is a clinical burden and often yields sub-optimal outcomes for patients. Measurement of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) during DBS could offer insight into the type and spatial extent of neural element activation and provide a potential feedback signal for the rational selection of stimulus parameters and closed-loop DBS. However, recording ECAPs presents a significant technical challenge due to the large stimulus artefact, which can saturate recording amplifiers and distort short latency ECAP signals. We developed DBS-ECAP recording instrumentation combining commercial amplifiers and circuit elements in a serial configuration to reduce the stimulus artefact and enable high fidelity recording. We used an electrical circuit equivalent model of the instrumentation to understand better the sources of the stimulus artefact and the mechanisms of artefact reduction by the circuit elements. In vitro testing validated the capability of the instrumentation to suppress the stimulus artefact and increase gain by a factor of 1,000 to 5,000 compared to a conventional biopotential amplifier. The distortion of mock ECAP (mECAP) signals was measured across stimulation parameters, and the instrumentation enabled high fidelity recording of mECAPs with latencies of only 0.5 ms for DBS pulse widths of 50 to 100 ?s/phase. Subsequently, the instrumentation was used to record in vivo ECAPs, without contamination by the stimulus artefact, during thalamic DBS in an anesthetized cat. The characteristics of the physiological ECAP were dependent on stimulation parameters. The novel instrumentation enables high fidelity ECAP recording and advances the potential use of the ECAP as a feedback signal for the tuning of DBS parameters. PMID:22510375

  15. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Green, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    The frontal cortex and basal ganglia form a set of parallel but mostly segregated circuits called cortico-basal ganglia loops. The oculomotor loop controls eye movements and can direct relatively simple movements, such as reflexive prosaccades, without external help but needs input from “higher” loops for more complex behaviors. The antisaccade task requires the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is part of the prefrontal loop. Information flows from prefrontal to oculomotor circuits in the striatum, and directional errors in this task can be considered a measure of failure of prefrontal control over the oculomotor loop. The antisaccadic error rate (AER) is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has no effect on the AER, but a previous case suggested that DBS of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) might. Our aim was to compare the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on the AER. We tested eye movements in 14 human DBS patients and 10 controls. GPi DBS substantially reduced the AER, restoring lost higher control over oculomotor function. Interloop information flow involves striatal neurons that receive cortical input and project to pallidum. They are normally silent when quiescent, but in PD they fire randomly, creating noise that may account for the degradation in interloop control. The reduced AER with GPi DBS could be explained by retrograde stimulation of striatopallidal axons with consequent activation of inhibitory collaterals and reduction in background striatal firing rates. This study may help explain aspects of PD pathophysiology and the mechanism of action of GPi DBS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease causes symptoms including stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremor. Electrical stimulation of specific areas deep in the brain can effectively treat these symptoms, but exactly how is not fully understood. Part of the cause of such symptoms may be impairments in the way information flows from one circuit within the brain to another, as a result of overactivity of certain nerve cells. By demonstrating that stimulation of an area called the globus pallidus interna partially reverses deficits in voluntary control of eye movements, this study shows that stimulation can improve information flow between circuits, probably by calming down the overactive cells. PMID:26400935

  16. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James J

    2015-09-23

    The frontal cortex and basal ganglia form a set of parallel but mostly segregated circuits called cortico-basal ganglia loops. The oculomotor loop controls eye movements and can direct relatively simple movements, such as reflexive prosaccades, without external help but needs input from "higher" loops for more complex behaviors. The antisaccade task requires the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is part of the prefrontal loop. Information flows from prefrontal to oculomotor circuits in the striatum, and directional errors in this task can be considered a measure of failure of prefrontal control over the oculomotor loop. The antisaccadic error rate (AER) is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has no effect on the AER, but a previous case suggested that DBS of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) might. Our aim was to compare the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on the AER. We tested eye movements in 14 human DBS patients and 10 controls. GPi DBS substantially reduced the AER, restoring lost higher control over oculomotor function. Interloop information flow involves striatal neurons that receive cortical input and project to pallidum. They are normally silent when quiescent, but in PD they fire randomly, creating noise that may account for the degradation in interloop control. The reduced AER with GPi DBS could be explained by retrograde stimulation of striatopallidal axons with consequent activation of inhibitory collaterals and reduction in background striatal firing rates. This study may help explain aspects of PD pathophysiology and the mechanism of action of GPi DBS. Significance statement: Parkinson's disease causes symptoms including stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremor. Electrical stimulation of specific areas deep in the brain can effectively treat these symptoms, but exactly how is not fully understood. Part of the cause of such symptoms may be impairments in the way information flows from one circuit within the brain to another, as a result of overactivity of certain nerve cells. By demonstrating that stimulation of an area called the globus pallidus interna partially reverses deficits in voluntary control of eye movements, this study shows that stimulation can improve information flow between circuits, probably by calming down the overactive cells. PMID:26400935

  17. Effects of ketamine and propofol on motor evoked potentials elicited by intracranial microstimulation during deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Furmaga, Havan; Park, Hyun-Joo; Cooperrider, Jessica; Baker, Kenneth B.; Johnson, Matthew; Gale, John T.; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Few preclinical or clinical studies have evaluated the effect of anesthetics on motor evoked potentials (MEPs), either alone or in the presence of conditioning stimuli such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). In this study we evaluated the effects of two commonly used anesthetic agents, propofol and ketamine (KET), on MEPs elicited by intra-cortical microstimulation of the motor cortex in a rodent model with and without DBS of the dentatothalamocortical (DTC) pathway. The effects of propofol anesthesia on MEP amplitudes during DTC DBS were found to be highly dose dependent. Standard, but not high, dose propofol potentiated the facilitatory effects of 30 Hz DTC DBS on MEPs. This facilitation was sustained and phase-dependent indicating that, compared to high dose propofol, standard dose propofol has a beta-band excitatory effect on cortical networks. In contrast, KET anesthetic demonstrated a monotonic relationship with increasing frequencies of stimulation, such that the highest frequency of stimulation resulted in the greatest MEP amplitude. KET also showed phase dependency but less pronounced than standard dose propofol. The results underscore the importance of better understanding the complex effects of anesthetics on cortical networks and exogenous stimuli. Choice of anesthetic agents and dosing may significantly confound or even skew research outcomes, including experimentation in novel DBS indications and paradigms. PMID:24904312

  18. Structural Modelling of the Whole Head for Electrical Impedance Imaging and Deep Brain Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Duffy, Ken

    models of the whole human head to simulate the dynamic electrical field distribution during deep brain this electrical stimulation acts on neuronal activity is unclear. Experimental in situ investigation the effects of DBS in a defined region of the brain. To address this problem we have adapted a bio imaging

  19. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  20. Demultiplexer circuit for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O; Okandan, Murat; Pearson, Sean

    2012-10-09

    A demultiplexer circuit is disclosed which can be used with a conventional neural stimulator to extend the number of electrodes which can be activated. The demultiplexer circuit, which is formed on a semiconductor substrate containing a power supply that provides all the dc electrical power for operation of the circuit, includes digital latches that receive and store addressing information from the neural stimulator one bit at a time. This addressing information is used to program one or more 1:2.sup.N demultiplexers in the demultiplexer circuit which then route neural stimulation signals from the neural stimulator to an electrode array which is connected to the outputs of the 1:2.sup.N demultiplexer. The demultiplexer circuit allows the number of individual electrodes in the electrode array to be increased by a factor of 2.sup.N with N generally being in a range of 2-4.

  1. Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hee; Chang, Won Seok; Jung, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on levodopa-induced peak-dose dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients who underwent STN DBS for PD from May 2000 to July 2012. Only patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia prior to surgery and more than 1 year of available follow-up data after DBS were included. The outcome measures included the dyskinesia subscore of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part IV (items 32 to 34 of UPDRS part IV) and the levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). The patients were divided into two groups based on preoperative to postoperative LEDD change at 12 months after the surgery: Group 1, LEDD decrease >15%; Group 2, all other patients. Group 2 was further divided by the location of DBS leads. Results Of the 100 patients enrolled, 67 were in Group 1, while those remaining were in Group 2. Twelve months after STN DBS, Groups 1 and 2 showed improvements of 61.90% and 57.14%, respectively, in the dyskinesia subscore. Group 1 was more likely to experience dyskinesia suppression; however, the association between the groups and dyskinesia suppression was not statistically significant (p=0.619). In Group 2, dyskinesia was significantly decreased by stimulation of the area above the STN in 18 patients compared to stimulation of the STN in 15 patients (p=0.048). Conclusion Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is attenuated by STN DBS without reducing the levodopa dosage. PMID:26256974

  2. The role of serotonin in the antidyskinetic effects of deep brain stimulation: focus on antipsychotic-induced motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Creed, Meaghan C; Nobrega, José N

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with the classic antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as haloperidol (HAL), is associated with both acute and chronic motor side effects. Acutely, these drugs may induce extrapyramidal symptoms, whereas a prolonged treatment may result in tardive dyskinesia (TD). Atypical antipsychotics have a lower incidence of motor side effects, which have been partially ascribed to the antagonism of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Although there is currently no satisfactory pharmacotherapy for TD, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a promising therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying its effects remain largely unknown. DBS has been shown to affect several neurotransmitter systems, including 5-HT. In this review, we outline the involvement of 5-HT in the development of HAL-induced catalepsy and TD. We also discuss the evidence for DBS-induced alterations in 5-HT function and the relevance of serotonergic alterations to the antidyskinetic effects of DBS. The evidence suggests that the serotonergic mechanisms may be involved in the acute and chronic motor side effects of APDs as well as in adverse psychiatric effects that have been reported following DBS. However, the current evidence suggests that 5-HT alterations do not play an important role in the effectiveness of DBS in models of dyskinesias induced by chronic APDs. PMID:23399586

  3. Pp65 antigenemia, plasma real-time PCR and DBS test in symptomatic and asymptomatic cytomegalovirus congenitally infected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many congenitally cytomegalovirus-infected (cCMV) neonates are at risk for severe consequences, even if they are asymptomatic at birth. The assessment of the viral load in neonatal blood could help in identifying the babies at risk of sequelae. Methods In the present study, we elaborated the results obtained on blood samples collected in the first two weeks of life from 22 symptomatic and 48 asymptomatic newborns with cCMV diagnosed through urine testing. We evaluated the performances of two quantitative methods (pp65 antigenemia test and plasma Real-time PCR) and the semi-quantitative results of dried blood sample (DBS) test in the aim of identifying a valid method for measuring viral load. Results Plasma qPCR and DBS tests were positive in 100% of cases, antigenemia in 81%. Only the latter test gave quantitatively different results in symptomatic versus asymptomatic children. qPCR values of 103 copies/ml were found in 52% of newborn. "Strong" DBS test positivity cases had higher median values of both pp65 positive PBL and DNA copies/ml than cases with a "weak" positivity. Conclusions As expected antigenemia test was less sensitive than molecular tests and DBS test performed better on samples with higher rates of pp65 positive PBL and higher numbers of DNA copies/ml. The prognostic significance of the results of these tests will be evaluated on completion of the ongoing collection of follow-up data of these children. PMID:20149232

  4. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: All that glitters isn't gold?

    PubMed

    Galati, Salvatore; Stefani, Alessandro

    2015-04-15

    With the silver anniversary of deep brain stimulation (DBS) behind us, this would seem to be a good juncture to consider its successes and unanswered questions. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has changed the clinical perspective of several thousand Parkinson's disease (PD) patients worldwide. A recent reappraisal animates the field with strong arguments in favor of an anticipation of the stereotactic approach in patients with as little as 5 to 6 years of disease history if they manifest motor complications. From what was once a no-choice option, STN-DBS is now becoming more and more attractive to neurologists dealing with movement disorders. Despite the development of new pharmacological treatment and renewed rehabilitation programs able to modify the severity of drug-related complications, a resurgence of stimulation therapy reminiscent of an old era of medicine with an attendant blinkered mindset has emerged. Yet, the DBS-mediated effects are modest on critical aspects such as gait impairment and extremely variable depending on the clinical phenotype and individual clinical profile. Hence, the indication for DBS should become more, and not less, individually tailored. Those physicians considering deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a therapeutic option need to evaluate results beyond short-term quality of life, giving the correct weight to the direct and indirect costs over the longer term as well as to life prognosis. Unequivocal recourse to early-stimulation surgery necessitates investigations not limited to a mere comparative assessment versus drug-mediated benefits, but instead showing evidence of a clear degree of disease-modifying effect or a rescue of basal ganglia plasticity. PMID:25649375

  6. Early gene mapping after deep brain stimulation in a rat model of tardive dyskinesia: comparison with transient local inactivation.

    PubMed

    Creed, Meaghan C; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2012-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been extensively used in Parkinson's disease and is also currently being investigated in tardive dyskinesia (TD), a movement disorder induced by chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs such as haloperidol (HAL). In rodents, vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) following chronic HAL administration are suggested to model orofacial dyskinesias in TD. We show that 60 min of DBS (100 ?A, 90 ?s, 130 Hz) applied to the entopeduncular (EPN) or subthalamic (STN) nuclei significantly decreases HAL-induced VCMs. Using zif268 as a neural activity marker, we found that in HAL-treated animals EPN stimulation increased zif268 mRNA levels in the globus pallidus (+65%) and substantia nigra compacta (+62%) and reticulata (+76%), while decreasing levels in the motor cortex and throughout the thalamus. In contrast, after STN DBS zif268 levels in HAL-treated animals decreased in all basal ganglia structures, thalamus and motor cortex (range: 29% in the ventrolateral caudate-putamen to 100% in the EPN). Local tissue inactivation by muscimol injections into the STN or EPN also reduced VCMs, but to a lesser degree than DBS. When applied to the EPN muscimol decreased zif268 levels in substantia nigra (-29%), whereas STN infusions did not result in significant zif268 changes in any brain area. These results confirm the effectiveness of DBS in reducing VCMs and suggest that tissue inactivation does not fully account for DBS effects in this preparation. The divergent effects of STN vs. EPN manipulations on HAL-induced zif268 changes suggest that similar behavioral outcomes of DBS in these two areas may involve different neuroanatomical mechanisms. PMID:22153973

  7. [New indications for deep brain stimulation: ethical criteria for research and therapy].

    PubMed

    Synofzik, M

    2013-10-01

    The applications of deep brain stimulation (DBS) are rapidly increasing and now include a large variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases, such as depression, obsessive compulsive disorders, addiction, Alzheimer's disease, anorexia nervosa and rare movement disorders. These new applications confer a huge therapeutic potential in diseases for which often no treatment exists or which are refractory to existing therapies. This spread of applications, however, implies ethical problems in several domains: clinical use, research and presentation in the media and public. Thus, a systematic ethical analysis is needed to inform and guide this process. In this article we identify ethical problems involved in research and clinical use of novel DBS applications, suggest criteria and distinctions for structuring the ethical analysis, and articulate ethical demands for DBS research of novel applications. PMID:23979358

  8. Effect of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on dual-task cognitive and motor performance in isolated dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Kelly A; Markun, Leslie C; Luciano, Marta San; Rizk, Rami; Allen, I Elaine; Racine, Caroline A; Starr, Philip A; Alberts, Jay L; Ostrem, Jill L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) can improve motor complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) but may worsen specific cognitive functions. The effect of STN DBS on cognitive function in dystonia patients is less clear. Previous reports indicate that bilateral STN stimulation in patients with PD amplifies the decrement in cognitive-motor dual-task performance seen when moving from a single-task to dual-task paradigm. We aimed to determine if the effect of bilateral STN DBS on dual-task performance in isolated patients with dystonia, who have less cognitive impairment and no dementia, is similar to that seen in PD. Methods Eight isolated predominantly cervical patients with dystonia treated with bilateral STN DBS, with average dystonia duration of 10.5?years and Montreal Cognitive Assessment score of 26.5, completed working memory (n-back) and motor (forced-maintenance) tests under single-task and dual-task conditions while on and off DBS. Results A multivariate, repeated-measures analysis of variance showed no effect of stimulation status (On vs Off) on working memory (F=0.75, p=0.39) or motor function (F=0.22, p=0.69) when performed under single-task conditions, though as working memory task difficulty increased, stimulation disrupted the accuracy of force-tracking. There was a very small worsening in working memory performance (F=9.14, p=0.019) when moving from single-task to dual-tasks when using the ‘dual-task loss’ analysis. Conclusions This study suggests the effect of STN DBS on working memory and attention may be much less consequential in patients with dystonia than has been reported in PD. PMID:25012202

  9. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  10. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, Jacob (Rockville, MD); Fan, Xiyun (Orange, TX)

    1998-01-01

    An electrode composition for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5-4.5 volts.

  11. Deep brain stimulation induces rapidly reversible transcript changes in Parkinson's leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Soreq, Lilach; Bergman, Hagai; Goll, Yael; Greenberg, David S; Israel, Zvi; Soreq, Hermona

    2012-07-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) reversibly modulates Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms, providing an unusual opportunity to compare leucocyte transcripts in the same individuals before and after neurosurgery and 1 hr after stimulus cessation (ON- and OFF-stimulus). Here, we report DBS-induced reversibility and OFF-stimulus restoration in 12 of 16 molecular functions and 3 of 4 biological processes shown in exon microarrays to be differentially expressed between PD patients and controls, post-DBS from pre-DBS and OFF from ON states. Intriguingly, 6 of 18 inflammation and immune-related functions exhibited reversibility, and the extent of stimulus-induced changes correlated with the neurological DBS efficacy, suggesting mechanistic implications. A minimal list of 29 transcripts that changed in all three comparisons between states discriminated pre-surgery and OFF states from post-surgery and controls. Six of these transcripts were found to be able to distinguish between PD patients and both healthy controls and patients with other neurological diseases in a previously published whole blood 3' array data study of early PD patients. Our findings support the future use of this approach for identifying targets for therapeutic intervention and assessing the efficacy of current and new treatments in this and other neurological diseases. PMID:21910823

  12. PEDOT Electrochemical Polymerization Improves Electrode Fidelity and Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Christopher M.; Wei, Benjamin; Baghmanli, Ziya; Cederna, Paul S.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of the authors is to restore fine motor control and sensation for high-arm amputees. They developed a regenerative peripheral nerve interface with the aim of attaining closed loop neural control by integrating directly with the amputee's residual motor and sensory peripheral nerves. PEDOT, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), has both electrical and ionic conduction characteristics. This hybrid character could help bridge the salutatory conduction of the nervous system to an electrode. The purpose of this study was to determine whether electrodes polymerized with PEDOT have improved ability to both record and stimulate peripheral nerve action potentials. Methods Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed on electrodes before and after polymerization to measure electrode impedance and charge capacity. Both recording needle and bipolar stimulating electrodes were polymerized with PEDOT. Plain and PEDOT electrodes were tested using rat (n = 18) in situ nerve conduction studies. The peroneal nerve was stimulated using a bipolar electrode at multiple locations along the nerve. Action potentials were measured in the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Results Bench testing showed PEDOT electrodes had a higher charge capacity and lower impedance than plain electrodes, indicating significantly improved electrode fidelity. Nerve conduction testing indicated a significant reduction in the stimulus threshold for both PEDOT recording and PEDOT stimulatory electrodes when compared with plain electrodes, indicating an increase in sensitivity. Conclusions PEDOT electrochemical polymerization improves electrode fidelity. Electrodes that have been electropolymerized with PEDOT show improved sensitivity when recording or stimulating action potentials at the tissue–electrode interface. PMID:22456363

  13. Penfield’s Prediction: A Mechanism for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Murrow, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Despite its widespread use, the precise mechanism of action of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy remains unknown. The modern urgency to publish more and new data can obscure previously learned lessons by the giants who have preceded us and whose shoulders we now stand upon. Wilder Penfield extensively studied the effects of artificial electrical brain stimulation and his comments on the subject are still very relevant today. In particular, he noted two very different (and seemingly opposite) effects of stimulation within the human brain. In some structures, artificial electrical stimulation has an effect, which mimics ablation, while, in other structures, it produces a stimulatory effect on that tissue. Hypothesis: The hypothesis of this paper is fourfold. First, it proposes that some neural circuits are widely synchronized with other neural circuits, while some neural circuits are unsynchronized and operate independently. Second, it proposes that artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of a synchronized neural circuit results in an ablative effect, but artificial high-frequency electrical stimulation of an unsynchronized neural circuit results in a stimulatory effect. Third, it suggests a part of the mechanism by which large-scale physiologic synchronization of widely distributed independently processed information streams may occur. This may be the neural mechanism underlying Penfield’s “centrencephalic system,” which he emphasized so many years ago. Fourth, it outlines the specific anatomic distribution of this physiologic synchronization, which Penfield has already clearly delineated as the distribution of his centrencephalic system. Evidence: This paper draws on a brief overview of previous theory regarding the mechanism of action of DBS and on historical, as well as widely known modern clinical data regarding the observed effects of stimulation delivered to various targets within the brain. Basic science investigations, which support the hypothesis are also cited. Conclusion: This paper proposes a novel hypothesis for the mechanism of action of DBS, which was conceptually foreshadowed by Wilder Penfield decades ago. PMID:25368601

  14. Conjugated Polymer Actuators for Articulating Neural Probes and Electrode Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene Dariush

    This thesis investigated the potential use of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) to controllably articulate (bend or guide) flexible neural probes and electrodes. PPy(DBS) actuation performance was characterized in the ionic mixture and temperature found in the brain. Nearly all the ions in aCSF were exchanged into the PPy---the cations Na +, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, as well as the anion PO43-; Cl- was not present. Nevertheless, deflections in aCSF were comparable to those in NaDBS and they were monotonic with oxidation level: strain increased upon reduction, with no reversal of motion despite the mixture of ionic charges and valences being exchanged. Actuation depended on temperature. Upon warming, the cyclic voltammograms showed additional peaks and an increase of 70% in the consumed charge. Actuation strain was monotonic under these conditions, demonstrating that conducting polymer actuators can indeed be used for neural interface and neural probe applications. In addition, a novel microelectro-mechanical system (MEMS) was developed to measure previously disregarded residual stress in a bilayer actuator. Residual stresses are a major concern for MEMS devices as that they can dramatically influence their yield and functionality. This device introduced a new technique to measure micro-scaled actuation forces that may be useful for characterization of other MEMS actuators. Finally, a functional movable parylene-based neural electrode prototype was developed. Employing PPy(DBS) actuators, electrode projections were successfully controlled to either remain flat or actuate out-of-plane and into a brain phantom during insertion. An electrode projection 800 microm long and 50 microm wide was able to deflect almost 800 microm away from the probe substrate. Applications that do not require insertion into tissue may also benefit from the electrode projections described here. Implantable neural interface devices are a critical component to a broad class of emerging neuroprosthetic and neurostimulation systems aimed to restore functionality, or abate symptoms related to physical impairments, loss of sensory abilities, and neurological disorders. The therapeutic outcome and performance of these systems hinge to a large degree on the proximity, size, and placement of the device or interface with respect to the targeted neurons or tissue.

  15. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer’s disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  16. EFFECTS OF DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION IN SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS OR GLOBUS PALLIDUS INTERNUS ON STEP INITIATION IN PARKINSON DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, Laura; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Chiari, Lorenzo; Burchiel, Kim J.; Hogarth, Penelope; Horak, Fay B.

    2014-01-01

    Object Difficulty with step initiation, called ‘start hesitation,’ is related to bradykinesia of gait and an early hallmark of freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This study investigated the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and levodopa on step initiation in 29 patients with PD before and six months after DBS surgery randomized to either the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods We measured the amplitude and duration of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), the feed-forward postural preparation that precedes the onset of voluntary step initiation, based on center of pressure displacements on a forceplate. We also measured the length and velocity of the first step from kinematic motion analysis. The subjects were a cohort from a large, multi-center, double-blinded, clinical trial randomized to DBS in either bilateral STN (15 subjects) or bilateral GPi (14 subjects). Twenty-eight elderly healthy control subjects were tested and nine PD control subjects, who met criteria for DBS, were tested at baseline and six months later. Differences in step initiation were investigated in two conditions before surgery (Off/On levodopa) and in four conditions after surgery (Off/On levodopa combined with Off/On DBS). Results The PD subjects had smaller amplitudes and longer durations of APAs compared to healthy control subjects in all conditions. Before surgery, APAs improved with levodopa. After surgery, the APAs were significantly worse than in the best treatment state before surgery and responsiveness to levodopa decreased. No differences were detected between STN and GPi groups. Comparison with PD control subjects who did not have surgery confirmed that deterioration of step preparation was not related to disease progression. Step length and velocity were smaller in PD-DBS group than control group in all conditions. Before surgery, levodopa improved both length and velocity of the first step. Both step length and velocity were unchanged in the best treatment state before surgery (DOPA condition) as compared with after surgery (DBS+DOPA), with only the step velocity in STN group getting worse after surgery. Conclusions Six months of DBS in the STN or GPi impaired the anticipatory postural preparation for step initiation, the opposite effect as levodopa. Step execution was not as disrupted as postural preparation by DBS, suggesting independent motor pathways for preparation and execution of gait. Although turning the stimulators on after surgery had an added benefit with levodopa on postural preparation to step, comparison pre- and post-surgery suggests that either the surgery itself or six months of continuous stimulation may result in alteration of circuits or plastic changes that impair step initiation. PMID:23039143

  17. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  18. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  19. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, VOL. 21, NO. 3, MAY 2013 383 Noninvasive Transcranial Focal Stimulation Via

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    including transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS)[18]­[21]andtranscra- nial direct current stimulation (t Noninvasive Transcranial Focal Stimulation Via Tripolar Concentric Ring Electrodes Lessens Behavioral Seizure developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring

  1. Cortical Potentials Evoked by Deep Brain Stimulation in the Subthalamic Area

    PubMed Central

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Wichmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been used since the mid-1990s as a treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease, and more recently also in other conditions, such as dystonia or obsessive compulsive disorder. Non-invasive studies of cortical evoked potentials (EPs) that follow individual STN–DBS stimuli has provided us with insights about the conduction of the DBS pulses to the cortex. Such EPs have multiple components of different latencies, making it possible to distinguish short-latency and long-latency responses (3–8?ms and 18–25?ms latency, respectively). The available evidence indicates that these short- and long-latency EPs correspond to conduction from the STN stimulation site to the cortical recording location via anti- and orthodromic pathways, respectively. In this review we survey the literature from recording studies in human patients treated with STN–DBS for Parkinson's disease and other conditions, as well as recent animal studies (including our own) that have begun to elucidate details of the pathways, frequency dependencies, and other features of EPs. In addition, we comment on the possible clinical utility of this knowledge. PMID:21625611

  2. Analysis of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Series Network Models of Parkinson's Disease During Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Clare M; de Paor, Annraoi M; Cagnan, Hayriye; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by hallmark motor symptoms. It is associated with pathological, oscillatory neural activity in the basal ganglia. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is often successfully used to treat medically refractive Parkinson's disease. However, the selection of stimulation parameters is based on qualitative assessment of the patient, which can result in a lengthy tuning period and a suboptimal choice of parameters. This study explores fourth-order, control theory-based models of oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. Describing function analysis is applied to examine possible mechanisms for the generation of oscillations in interacting nuclei and to investigate the suppression of oscillations with high-frequency stimulation. The theoretical results for the suppression of the oscillatory activity obtained using both the fourth-order model, and a previously described second-order model, are optimized to fit clinically recorded local field potential data obtained from Parkinsonian patients with implanted DBS. Close agreement between the power of oscillations recorded for a range of stimulation amplitudes is observed ( R(2)=0.69-0.99 ). The results suggest that the behavior of the system and the suppression of pathological neural oscillations with DBS is well described by the macroscopic models presented. The results also demonstrate that in this instance, a second-order model is sufficient to model the clinical data, without the need for added complexity. Describing the system behavior with computationally efficient models could aid in the identification of optimal stimulation parameters for patients in a clinical environment. PMID:26340768

  3. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. Comparison of dysphagia before and after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Silbergleit, Alice K; LeWitt, Peter; Junn, Fred; Schultz, Lonni R; Collins, Denise; Beardsley, Tausha; Hubert, Meghan; Trosch, Richard; Schwalb, Jason M

    2012-12-01

    Although dysphagia is a common problem for many Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on swallowing is unclear. Fourteen subjects with advanced PD underwent videofluorographic swallowing studies prior to bilateral DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and at 3 and 12 months postprocedure. They were tested under several stimulation and medication conditions. Subjects completed the Dysphagia Handicap Index at each time. There was a strong trend toward improved swallowing response for solid intake in the medication-free condition with the stimulator on compared with the stimulator off (P = .0107). Also, there was a trend toward improved oral preparation of thin liquids (P = .0368) in the medication-free condition when the stimulator was on versus off 12 months later. The remaining swallowing parameters showed no change or worsening of swallowing function regardless of stimulator or medication status. Results of the Dysphagia Handicap Index revealed significant improvement in subject self-perception of swallowing 3 and 12 months following the procedure compared with baseline on the functional subscale (P = .020 and P = .010, respectively), the emotional subscale (P = .013 and P = .003, respectively), and the total score (P = .025 and P = .003, respectively). These data suggest that bilateral STN-DBS does not substantively impair swallowing in PD. In addition, it may improve motor sequencing of the oropharyngeal swallow for solid consistencies (which are known to provide increased sensory feedback to assist motor planning of the oropharyngeal swallow). Subjects with advanced PD who are undergoing DBS may perceive significant improvement in swallowing ability despite the lack of objective improvements in swallowing function. PMID:23115021

  7. Analyzing 7000 texts on deep brain stimulation: what do they tell us?

    PubMed Central

    Ineichen, Christian; Christen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The enormous increase in numbers of scientific publications in the last decades requires quantitative methods for obtaining a better understanding of topics and developments in various fields. In this exploratory study, we investigate the emergence, trends, and connections of topics within the whole text corpus of the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature based on more than 7000 papers (title and abstracts) published between 1991 to 2014 using a network approach. Taking the co-occurrence of basic terms that represent important topics within DBS as starting point, we outline the statistics of interconnections between DBS indications, anatomical targets, positive, and negative effects, as well as methodological, technological, and economic issues. This quantitative approach confirms known trends within the literature (e.g., regarding the emergence of psychiatric indications). The data also reflect an increased discussion about complex issues such as personality connected tightly to the ethical context, as well as an apparent focus on depression as important DBS indication, where the co-occurrence of terms related to negative effects is low both for the indication as well as the related anatomical targets. We also discuss consequences of the analysis from a bioethical perspective, i.e., how such a quantitative analysis could uncover hidden subject matters that have ethical relevance. For example, we find that hardware-related issues in DBS are far more robustly connected to an ethical context compared to impulsivity, concrete side-effects or death/suicide. Our contribution also outlines the methodology of quantitative text analysis that combines statistical approaches with expert knowledge. It thus serves as an example how innovative quantitative tools can be made useful for gaining a better understanding in the field of DBS. PMID:26578908

  8. The reorganization of motor network in hemidystonia from the perspective of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Victoria; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Cif, Laura; van Dokkum, Liesjet E H; Laffont, Isabelle; Bonafé, Alain; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Zanca, Michel; Coubes, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Hemidystonia is usually 'secondary' to structural lesions within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic or the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops. Globus pallidus internus Deep Brain Stimulation (GPi DBS) is a validated technique in the treatment of primary dystonia and still under assessment for secondary dystonia. Results of DBS in hemidystonia are limited and heterogeneous. Further knowledge concerning motor network organization after focal brain lesions might contribute to the understanding of this mitigated response to DBS and to the refinement of DBS indications and techniques in secondary dystonia. This study aimed to identify movement-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation patterns in a group of hemidystonic patients in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Further analysis assessed recruitment pattern in different patient subgroups defined according to clinical and radiological criteria relevant to GPi DBS eligibility (hyperkinetic/hypokinetic and prepallidal/postpallidal). Eleven patients and nine HC underwent fMRI with a block-design alternating active and rest conditions. The motor paradigm consisted of self-paced elbow flexion-extension movements. The main results were as follows: single-subject studies revealed several activation patterns involving motor-related network regions; both ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres showed abnormal patterns of activity; compared with HC, hemidystonic patients showed decreased brain activity in ipsilesional thalamus, pallidal and temporal areas during affected arm task execution; 'hypokinetic' subgroup was commonly related to widespread bilateral overactivity. This study provides additional arguments for case-by-case assessment of DBS surgery indication and target selection in hemidystonia. Single-lead approach might be unable to modulate a highly disorganized network activity in certain patients with this clinical syndrome. PMID:24728838

  9. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin J.; Sheppard, Daylan T.; Huynh, Rachel; Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Polar, Christian A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian (hPD) onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. PMID:26217192

  10. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reestablishes neuronal information transmission in the 6-OHDA rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological activity of basal ganglia neurons accompanies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. High-frequency (>90 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces parkinsonian symptoms, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that parkinsonism-associated electrophysiological changes constitute an increase in neuronal firing pattern disorder and a concomitant decrease in information transmission through the ventral basal ganglia, and that effective DBS alleviates symptoms by decreasing neuronal disorder while simultaneously increasing information transfer through the same regions. We tested these hypotheses in the freely behaving, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of hemiparkinsonism. Following the onset of parkinsonism, mean neuronal firing rates were unchanged, despite a significant increase in firing pattern disorder (i.e., neuronal entropy), in both the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase in neuronal entropy was reversed by symptom-alleviating DBS. Whereas increases in signal entropy are most commonly indicative of similar increases in information transmission, directed information through both regions was substantially reduced (>70%) following the onset of parkinsonism. Again, this decrease in information transmission was partially reversed by DBS. Together, these results suggest that the parkinsonian basal ganglia are rife with entropic activity and incapable of functional information transmission. Furthermore, they indicate that symptom-alleviating DBS works by lowering the entropic noise floor, enabling more information-rich signal propagation. In this view, the symptoms of parkinsonism may be more a default mode, normally overridden by healthy basal ganglia information. When that information is abolished by parkinsonian pathophysiology, hypokinetic symptoms emerge. PMID:24554786

  11. 21 CFR 882.5810 - External functional neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...stimulator that uses external electrodes for stimulating muscles in the leg and ankle of partially paralyzed patients (e.g., after stroke) to provide flexion of the foot and thus improve the patient's gait. (b) Classification. Class II...

  12. Creating a Reinforcement Learning Controller for Functional Electrical Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Branicky, Michael S.

    Simulation Environment* · Two-dimensional (planar movement) · Six muscles simulated ­ Three-element Hill 2008 Outline · Problem · Previous Work · Methods · Experiments / Results · Conclusion / Future Work #12 levels of voluntary control Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) · Implanted electrodes can stimulate

  13. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...some movement disorders. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed on the patient's cerebellum and an external transmitter for transmitting the stimulating pulses across the patient's skin to the implanted...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...some movement disorders. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed on the patient's cerebellum and an external transmitter for transmitting the stimulating pulses across the patient's skin to the implanted...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring the evoked response. (b) Classification....

  16. Advanced therapy learning algorithm for spinal cord stimulation

    E-print Network

    Gaudreau Balderrama, Amanda Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) is a technique used to treat chronic pain and has been shown to be an effective method of treatment, both financially and socioeconomically. Stimulating electrodes are surgically implanted ...

  17. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  18. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  19. Method of making biocompatible electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Wollam, John S. (Acton, MA)

    1992-01-01

    A process of improving the sensing function of biocompatible electrodes and the product so made are disclosed. The process is designed to alter the surfaces of the electrodes at their tips to provide increased surface area and therefore decreased contact resistance at the electrode-tissue interface for increased sensitivity and essentially includes rendering the tips atomically clean by exposing them to bombardment by ions of an inert gas, depositing an adhesion layer on the cleaned tips, forming a hillocked layer on the adhesion layer by increasing the temperature of the tips, and applying a biocompatible coating on the hillocked layer. The resultant biocompatible electrode is characterized by improved sensitivity, minimum voltage requirement for organ stimulation and a longer battery life for the device in which it is employed.

  20. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation in the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Ferrara, L.; Fernandez, F.; Salas, R.; de Erausquin, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major social, economic, and public health problem. Alcoholism can lead to damage of the gastrointestinal, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems and it can be lethal, costing hundreds of billions to the health care system. Despite the existence of cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychosocial interventions, and spiritually integrated treatment to treat it, alcohol dependence has a high relapse rate and poor prognosis, albeit with high interindividual variability. In this review, we discuss the use of two neuromodulation techniques, namely repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS), and their advantages and disadvantages compared to first-line pharmacological treatment for alcohol dependence. We also discuss rTMS and DBS targets for alcohol dependence treatment, considering experimental animal and human evidence, with careful consideration of methodological issues preventing the identification of feasible targets for neuromodulation treatments, as well as inter-individual variability factors influencing alcoholism prognosis. Lastly, we anticipate future research aiming to tailor the treatment to each individual patient by combining neurofunctional, neuroanatomical and neurodisruptive techniques optimizing the outcome. PMID:25598743

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation Can Preserve Working Status in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deli, Gabriella; Balás, István; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Karádi, Kázmér; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Ferenc; Makkos, Attila; Kovács, Márton; Bosnyák, Edit; Kovács, Norbert; Komoly, Sámuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Our investigation aimed at evaluating if bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) could preserve working capability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials. We reviewed the data of 40 young (<60 year-old) PD patients who underwent DBS implantation and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Patients were categorized based on their working capability at time of surgery: “active job” group (n = 20) and “no job” group (n = 20). Baseline characteristics were comparable. Quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Results. Although similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in the severity of motor and major nonmotor symptoms in both groups, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the “active job” group (0.687 versus 0.587, medians, p < 0.05). Majority (80%) of “active job” group members were able to preserve their job 2 years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (5%) of the “no job” group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Although our study has several limitations, our results suggest that in patients with active job the appropriately “early” usage of DBS might help preserve working capability and gain higher improvement in quality of life. PMID:26295005

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation Can Preserve Working Status in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deli, Gabriella; Balás, István; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Karádi, Kázmér; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Ferenc; Makkos, Attila; Kovács, Márton; Bosnyák, Edit; Kovács, Norbert; Komoly, Sámuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Our investigation aimed at evaluating if bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) could preserve working capability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials. We reviewed the data of 40 young (<60 year-old) PD patients who underwent DBS implantation and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Patients were categorized based on their working capability at time of surgery: "active job" group (n = 20) and "no job" group (n = 20). Baseline characteristics were comparable. Quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Results. Although similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in the severity of motor and major nonmotor symptoms in both groups, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the "active job" group (0.687 versus 0.587, medians, p < 0.05). Majority (80%) of "active job" group members were able to preserve their job 2 years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (5%) of the "no job" group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Although our study has several limitations, our results suggest that in patients with active job the appropriately "early" usage of DBS might help preserve working capability and gain higher improvement in quality of life. PMID:26295005

  4. Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth by Intracellular Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Lee, Hye Yeong; Kim, Hyungsuk; Lee, Eungjang; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Park, Seung-Han; Ha, Yoon; Na, Jukwan; Chae, Youngcheol; Yi, Seong; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2015-08-12

    Electrical stimulation through direct electrical activation has been widely used to recover the function of neurons, primarily through the extracellular application of thin film electrodes. However, studies using extracellular methods show limited ability to reveal correlations between the cells and the electrical stimulation due to interference from external sources such as membrane capacitance and culture medium. Here, we demonstrate long-term intracellular electrical stimulation of undamaged pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells by utilizing a vertical nanowire electrode array (VNEA). The VNEA was prepared by synthesizing silicon nanowires on a Si substrate through a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism and then fabricating them into electrodes with semiconductor nanodevice processing. PC-12 cells were cultured on the VNEA for 4 days with intracellular electrical stimulation and then a 2-day stabilization period. Periodic scanning via two-photon microscopy confirmed that the electrodes pierced the cells without inducing damage. Electrical stimulation through the VNEA enhances cellular differentiation and neurite outgrowth by about 50% relative to extracellular stimulation under the same conditions. VNEA-mediated stimulation also revealed that cellular differentiation and growth in the cultures were dependent on the potential used to stimulate them. Intracellular stimulation using nanowires could pave the way for controlled cellular differentiation and outgrowth studies in living cells. PMID:26177864

  5. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. PMID:25521796

  6. Preserving cortico-striatal function: deep brain stimulation in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Sean J.; Machado, Andre G.; Gale, John T.; Lobel, Darlene A.; Pandya, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of chorea, cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disturbances. Since the discovery of the HD gene, the pathogenesis has been outlined, but to date a cure has not been found. Disease modifying therapies are needed desperately to improve function, alleviate suffering, and provide hope for symptomatic patients. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a proven therapy for managing the symptoms of some neurodegenerative movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, has been reported as a palliative treatment in select cases of HD with debilitating chorea with variable success. New insights into the mechanism of action of DBS suggest it may have the potential to circumvent other manifestations of HD including cognitive deterioration. Furthermore, because DBS is already widely used, reversible, and has a risk profile that is relatively low, new studies can be initiated. In this article we contend that new clinical trials be considered to test the effects of DBS for HD. PMID:25814939

  7. Investigating irregularly patterned deep brain stimulation signal design using biophysical models

    PubMed Central

    Summerson, Samantha R.; Aazhang, Behnaam; Kemere, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder which follows from cell loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), a nucleus in the basal ganglia (BG). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an electrical therapy that modulates the pathological activity to treat the motor symptoms of PD. Although this therapy is currently used in clinical practice, the sufficient conditions for therapeutic efficacy are unknown. In this work we develop a model of critical motor circuit structures in the brain using biophysical cell models as the base components and then evaluate performance of different DBS signals in this model to perform comparative studies of their efficacy. Biological models are an important tool for gaining insights into neural function and, in this case, serve as effective tools for investigating innovative new DBS paradigms. Experiments were performed using the hemi-parkinsonian rodent model to test the same set of signals, verifying the obedience of the model to physiological trends. We show that antidromic spiking from DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has a significant impact on cortical neural activity, which is frequency dependent and additionally modulated by the regularity of the stimulus pulse train used. Irregular spacing between stimulus pulses, where the amount of variability added is bounded, is shown to increase diversification of response of basal ganglia neurons and reduce entropic noise in cortical neurons, which may be fundamentally important to restoration of information flow in the motor circuit. PMID:26167150

  8. Electrode modifications to lower electrode impedance and improve neural signal recording sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Wang, J. Q.; Wang, J.; Cao, B.; Li, Y.; Pang, S. W.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Although electrode size should be miniaturized to provide higher selectivity for neural signal recording and to avoid tissue damage, small sized electrodes induce high impedance, which decreases recording quality. In this work, the electrode surface was modified to increase the effective surface area to lower the electrode impedance and to improve the neural signal detection quality by optimizing plasma conditions. Approach. A tetrafluoromethane (CF4) plasma was used to increase the effective surface area of gold electrode sites of polyimide-based neural probes. In vitro electrode impedance and in vivo neural signal recording and stimulation were characterized. Main results. For 15 ?m diameter (dia.) electrode size, the average surface roughness could be increased from 1.7 to 22 nm after plasma treatment, and the electrode impedance was decreased by 98%. Averaged background noise power in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz was decreased to -106 dB after the 30 ?m dia. electrodes were plasma modified—lower than the noise level of -86 dB without plasma treatment. Neural probes with plasma-modified electrode sites of 15 and 30 ?m dia. were implanted to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) region for acute recording of spontaneous and electrical evoked local field potential (LFP) of neural signals. Spontaneous LFP recorded in vivo by the plasma-modified electrodes of 30 ?m dia. was two times higher compared to electrodes without treatment. For a stimulation current of 400 ?A, electrically evoked LFP recorded by the plasma-modified electrodes was seven times higher than those without plasma exposure. Significance. A controllable technology was developed to increase the effective surface area of electrodes using a CF4 plasma. Plasma-modified electrodes improved the quality of the neural probe recording and more sensitive to record spontaneous and evoked LFP in the ACC region.

  9. Cermet electrode

    DOEpatents

    Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1988-08-30

    Disclosed is a cermet electrode consisting of metal particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or alloys or mixtures thereof immobilized by zirconia stabilized in cubic form which contains discrete deposits of about 0.1 to about 5% by weight of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof. The solid oxide electrode can be made by covering a substrate with particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixtures thereof, growing a stabilized zirconia solid oxide skeleton around the particles thereby immobilizing them, contacting the skeleton with a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, and heating the skeleton to a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. The electrode can also be made by preparing a slurry of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixture and a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, depositing the slurry on a substrate, heating the slurry to dryness, and growing a stabilized zirconia skeleton around the metal particles.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Treatment Outcome and Predictors of Response

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Pino; Cuadras, Daniel; Gabriëls, Loes; Denys, Damiaan; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Ben D.; Jimenez-Ponce, Fiacro; Kuhn, Jens; Lenartz, Doris; Mallet, Luc; Nuttin, Bart; Real, Eva; Segalas, Cinto; Schuurman, Rick; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Menchon, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an alternative to ablative neurosurgery for severe treatment-resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), although with partially discrepant results probably related to differences in anatomical targetting and stimulation conditions. We sought to determine the efficacy and tolerability of DBS in OCD and the existence of clinical predictors of response using meta-analysis. Methods We searched the literature on DBS for OCD from 1999 through January 2014 using PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We performed fixed and random-effect meta-analysis with score changes (pre-post DBS) on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) as the primary-outcome measure, and the number of responders to treatment, quality of life and acceptability as secondary measures. Findings Thirty-one studies involving 116 subjects were identified. Eighty-three subjects were implanted in striatal areas—anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule and ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens and ventral caudate—27 in the subthalamic nucleus and six in the inferior thalamic peduncle. Global percentage of Y-BOCS reduction was estimated at 45.1% and global percentage of responders at 60.0%. Better response was associated with older age at OCD onset and presence of sexual/religious obsessions and compulsions. No significant differences were detected in efficacy between targets. Five patients dropped out, but adverse effects were generally reported as mild, transient and reversible. Conclusions Our analysis confirms that DBS constitutes a valid alternative to lesional surgery for severe, therapy-refractory OCD patients. Well-controlled, randomized studies with larger samples are needed to establish the optimal targeting and stimulation conditions and to extend the analysis of clinical predictors of outcome. PMID:26208305

  11. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  12. Photoelectrochemical electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Rembaum, A. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    The surface of a moderate band gap semiconductor such as p-type molybdenum sulfide is modified to contain an adherent film of charge mediating ionene polymer containing an electroactive unit such as bipyridimium. Electron transport between the electrode and the mediator film is favorable and photocorrosion and recombination processes are suppressed. Incorporation of particles of catalyst such as platinum within the film provides a reduction in overvoltage. The polymer film is readily deposited on the electrode surface and can be rendered stable by ionic or addition crosslinking. Catalyst can be predispersed in the polymer film or a salt can be impregnated into the film and reduced therein.

  13. Neurodegeneration of lateral habenula efferent fibers after intermittent cocaine administration: implications for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lax, Elad; Friedman, Alexander; Croitoru, Ofri; Sudai, Einav; Ben-Moshe, Hila; Redlus, Lior; Sasson, Efrat; Blumenfeld-Katzir, Tamar; Assaf, Yaniv; Yadid, Gal

    2013-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging technique for effective, non-pharmacological intervention in the course of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Several brain targets have been suggested as suitable for DBS treatment of drug addiction. Previously, we showed that DBS of the lateral habenula (LHb) can reduce cocaine intake, facilitate extinction and attenuate drug-induced relapse in rats trained to self-administrate cocaine. Herein, we demonstrated that cocaine self-administration dose-dependently decreased connectivity between the LHb and midbrain, as shown by neurodegeneration of the main LHb efferent fiber, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR). FR degeneration, in turn, may have caused lack of response to LHb stimulation in rats trained to self-administer high-dose cocaine (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.). Furthermore, we show that the micro-structural changes caused by cocaine can be non-invasively detected using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Detection of cocaine-induced alterations in FR anatomy can aid the selection of potential responders to LHb stimulation for treatment of drug addiction. PMID:23891640

  14. Participants’ Perceptions of Deep Brain Stimulation Research for Treatment-Resistant Depression: Risks, Benefits, and Therapeutic Misconception

    PubMed Central

    Leykin, Yan; Christopher, Paul P.; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Mayberg, Helen S.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Dunn, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is the focus of great interest and numerous studies. Given the state of this research, the risks of DBS, the uncertainty of direct benefits, and the potential for therapeutic misconception (TM), examination of research participants’ perspectives is critical to addressing concerns about the adequacy of consent among people with TRD. Methods Among 31 participants considering DBS studies at two sites, self-report questionnaires were used to examine three dimensions of TM (eight true/false items). Additional Likert-scale items assessed perceptions of risks, potential benefits, and altruistic motivations. Results Participants correctly identified the surgery itself as the riskiest study procedure, although only four participants rated the surgery as “high risk.” Most participants rated the entire DBS study as “moderate” or lower risk. Participants rated the likelihood of others benefiting in the future more strongly than they did the likelihood of personal benefit. Participants held positive attitudes toward research, and were moderately altruistic. Nearly two-thirds of the 31 participants (64.5%) answered at least one of the true/false TM items incorrectly. Conclusions Individuals considering DBS studies for TRD demonstrated reasonable perceptions of risks and benefits, distinguished among procedural risks, and expressed hopes for personal benefit as well as altruism. Findings related to TM were mixed: Participants understood the experimental stage of DBS for depression and endorsed the possibility of no personal benefit, yet there was some evidence for TM. Although these findings are reassuring, investigators must nevertheless remain vigilant about identifying and addressing potential misconceptions. PMID:26225215

  15. Interpulse interval discrimination within and across channels: comparison of monopolar and tripolar mode of stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Claire A; Kluk, Karolina; McKay, Colette M

    2014-05-01

    Perception of temporal patterns is crucial to speech understanding and music perception in normal hearing, and is fundamental in the design and implementation of processing strategies for cochlear implants. Two experiments described here investigated the effect of stimulation mode (monopolar versus tripolar) on interpulse interval discrimination using single-electrode stimulation (experiment 1) and dual-electrode stimulation (experiment 2). Experiment 1 required participants to discriminate stimuli containing different interpulse intervals and experiment 2 required listeners to discriminate between two dual-electrode stimuli that had the same temporal pattern on each electrode, but differed in inter-electrode timing. The hypotheses were that (i) stimulation mode would affect the ability to distinguish interpulse interval patterns on a single electrode and (ii) the electrode separation range in which subjects were sensitive to inter-electrode timing would be more restricted in tripolar than in monopolar stimulation. Results in nine cochlear implant users showed that mode did not have a significant mean effect on either the ability to discriminate interpulse intervals in single-electrode stimulation or the range of electrode separation in dual-electrode stimulation in which participants were sensitive to inter-electrode timing. In conclusion, tripolar stimulation did not show any advantage in delivering temporal information within or across channels in this group. PMID:24815271

  16. Vertical nanowire electrode arrays as a scalable platform for intracellular interfacing to

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Vertical nanowire electrode arrays as a scalable platform for intracellular interfacing to neuronal nanowires that allows parallel electrical inter- facing to multiple mammalian neurons. Specifically, we show that our vertical nanowire electrode arrays can intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity

  17. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  18. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  19. Comparison of frequencies of non motor symptoms in Indian Parkinson’s disease patients on medical management versus deep brain stimulation: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rukmini Mridula, Kandadai; Borgohain, Rupam; Jabeen, Shaik Afshan; Padmaja, Gaddamanugu; Bandaru, VCS Srinivasarao; Ankathi, Praveen; Kanikannan, Meena A; Ali Khan, Mohammed Shujath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non motor symptoms (NMS) of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a major cause of disability and recognition of these symptoms and treatment is important for comprehensive health care. Deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) has been shown to improve motor symptoms in PD and effects on NMS are unknown. To investigate the NMS among PD patients who underwent STN DBS. Methods: We recruited prospectively 56 patients with PD, who had undergone bilateral STN DBS and 53 age and duration of illness matched PD patients on dopaminergic therapy (controls). NMS were assessed using 30 item questionnaire NMS Quest. These questions evaluated 9 domains, gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, sexual, cognition (apathy/attention/memory), anxiety/depression, hallucinations/delusions, sleep and miscellaneous. Comparison was done on individual symptoms as well as in various domains. This study was carried at Nizam’s Institution of Medical Sciences and study period was from January 2011 to December 2012. Results: Patients who underwent STN DBS had a significantly lower mean total score on NMS quest (6.7 ± 3.8) compared to controls (8.4 ± 3.7) (P < 0.00100). Symptoms in the domains of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, sleep were significantly less frequent while sexual disturbances were significantly more frequent among patients compared to controls. On individual symptom analysis, nocturia  (P < 0.00010), unexplained pains (P < 0.00010), nausea and vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, depression, and insomnia were less prevalent, while sexual disturbances were significantly more common in STN DBS group compared to controls. Conclusion: Bilateral STN DBS not only improves the motor symptoms but also improves many NMS in PD patients. PMID:26056553

  20. Ventral tegmental area dopaminergic lesion-induced depressive phenotype in the rat is reversed by deep brain stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed

    Furlanetti, L L; Coenen, V A; Döbrössy, M D

    2016-02-15

    DBS of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) has been investigated clinically in major depressive disorder patients with rapid and long-term reduction of symptoms. In the context of chronic bilateral high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the MFB, the current study looked at the impact of lesioning the ascending dopaminergic pathway at the level of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Sprague-Dawley female rats were given bilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the VTA (VTA-lx group) or were left unlesioned (control group). Later, all animals received bilateral microelectrode implantation into the MFB followed by chronic continuous stimulation for 3 weeks. Behavioral tests were performed as baseline and following MFB-DBS, along with histological analysis. Pre-stimulation baseline testing of the VTA-lx animals indicated depressive-like phenotype in comparison with controls. Response to MFB-DBS varied according to (i) the degree of dopaminergic depletion: animals with severe mesocorticolimbic dopamine depletion did not, whilst those with mild dopamine loss responded well to stimulation; (ii) environmental conditions and the nature of the behavioral tests, e.g., stressful vs non-stressful situations. Neuromodulation-induced c-fos expression in the prelimbic frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens was also dependent upon integrity of the dopaminergic ascending projections. Our results confirm a potential role for dopamine in symptom relief observed in clinical MFB-DBS. Although mechanisms are not fully understood, the data suggests that the rescue of depressive phenotype in rodents can work via both dopamine-dependent and independent mechanisms. Further investigations concerning the network of depression using neuromodulation platforms in animal models might give insight into genesis and treatment of major depression disorder. PMID:26657994

  1. The effect of deep brain stimulation randomized by site on balance in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    St George, R.J.; Carlson-Kuhta, P.; Nutt, J.G.; Hogarth, P.; Burchiel, K.J.; Horak, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of the surgical site of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) on balance and gait in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is uncertain. This is the first double-blind study of subjects randomized to either the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN, N=14) or Globus Pallidus interna (GPi, N=14) who were assessed on a range of clinical balance measures. Methods Balance testing occurred before and 6 months post-surgery. A control PD group was tested over the same time period without surgery (N=9). All subjects were tested on and off medication and DBS subjects were also tested on and off DBS. The Postural Instability and Gait Disability items of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and additional functional tests we call the Balance and Gait scale were assessed. Activities of Balance Confidence and Activities of Daily Living questionnaires were also recorded. Results Balance was not different between the best-treated states before and after DBS surgery for both sites. Switching DBS on improved balance scores and scores further improved with medication compared to the off state. The GPi group showed improved performance in the post-surgery off state and better ratings of balance confidence after surgery compared to the STN group. Conclusions Clinical measures of balance function for both the STN and GPi sites showed that balance did not improve beyond the best medically-treated state prior to surgery. Both clinical balance testing in the OFF/OFF state and self-reported balance confidence after surgery showed better performance in the GPi than the STN group. PMID:24532106

  2. Electrode structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, M.P.

    1981-01-06

    In a sodium sulphur cell, a cathode electrode of annular form comprising a plurality of segments, each of trapezoidal form in cross-section and joined by webs along a longer edge of each segment so that the assembly is foldable to form a substantially annular structure. This electrode may be made by compressing a blanket or sheet of carbon or graphite felt or fibres in a heated mould, which is shaped to produce the segments joined by thin webs, the material being impregnated with sulphur or sodium polysulphide before or after insertion in the mould, and the material being cooled before removal from the mould. Alternatively, the segments may be formed from the blanket or sheet by using shaped rolls, the material being cooled, E.G. By water or air, as it leaves the rolls.

  3. Physiological challenges for intracortical electrodes.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, Jitte; Ramsey, Nick F; Ramakers, Geert M J; van der Plasse, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of chronic electrode implants for measurement or stimulation of neuronal activity has increased over the past decade with the advent of deep brain stimulation and the use of brain-computer interfaces. However, despite the wide-spread application of electrode implants, their chronic use is still limited by technical difficulties. Many of the reported issues, ranging from short-circuits to loss of signal due to increased electrical impedance, may be traced back to the reaction of the cortical tissue to the implanted devices: the foreign body response (FBR). This response consists of several phases that ultimately result in neuronal loss and the formation of a dense glial sheath that encapsulates the implant. Empirical evidence suggests that reducing the FBR has a positive effect on the electrical properties of implants, which can potentially expand their clinical use by improving their chronic usability. The primary focus of this work is to review the consequences of the FBR and recent developments that can be considered to control and limit its development. We will discuss how the choice of device material and electrode-architecture influences the tissue reaction, as well as modifications that allow for less stiff implants, increase electrode conductivity, or improve the implant-tissue integration. Several promising biological solutions include the local release of anti-inflammatory compounds to weaken the initial inflammatory phase of the FBR, as well as methods to diminish the negative effects of the glial sheath on neuronal regrowth. PMID:23941984

  4. Chronic deep brain stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle reverses depressive-like behavior in a hemiparkinsonian rodent model.

    PubMed

    Furlanetti, Luciano L; Coenen, Volker A; Aranda, Iñigo A; Döbrössy, Máté D

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that depression might be associated with a dysfunction in the reward/motivation circuitry. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the superolateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) has been shown in a recent clinical trial to provide a prompt and consistent improvement of depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant patients. In order to better understand the underlying mechanisms of neuromodulation in the context of depression, the effects of chronic bilateral MFB-DBS were assessed in a combined rodent model of depression and Parkinson's disease. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received unilateral 6-OHDA injection in the right MFB and were divided into three groups: CMS-STIM, CMS-noSTIM and control group. The CMS groups were submitted to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS) protocol for 6 weeks. MFB-DBS was applied only to the CMS-STIM group for 1 week. All groups were repeatedly probed on a series of behavioral tasks following each intervention, and to a postmortem histological analysis. CMS led to an increase in immobility in the forced swim test, to a decrease in sucrose solution consumption in the sucrose preference test, as well as to an increased production of ultrasonic vocalizations in the 22 kHz range, indicating increased negative affect. MFB-DBS reversed the anhedonic-like and despair-like behaviors. The results suggest that unilateral dopamine depletion did not preclude MFB-DBS in reversing depressive-like and anhedonic-like behavior in the rodent. Further understanding of the importance of hemispheric dominance in neuropsychiatric disorders is essential in order to optimize stimulation as a therapeutic strategy in these diseases. PMID:26195164

  5. The decision-making process leading to deep brain stimulation in men and women with parkinson’s disease – an interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with advanced parkinson’s disease (PD). Research shows that women are under-represented among patients undergoing DBS surgery. This may be due to gender-biased selection of patients, but patients’ wishes and attitudes may also contribute. This study investigated the decision making process to undergo DBS from the patient’s perspective, and explored any gender patterns in the participants’ decision-making. Methods All patients operated on with DBS for PD at the University Hospital of Northern Sweden between January 2002 and April 2010 were invited to an interview study. In this way 39 patients were recruited, 31 men and eight women. Three additional women, operated elsewhere, were recruited to acheive a more gender-balanced sample. In a mixed-method analysis, the interviews were analysed according to the constant comparison technique in grounded theory and descriptive statistics was used to present demographics and compare categories. Results Three different approaches to DBS were identified among the patients. ‘Taking own initiative’, included 48% of the patients and implied that the patients’ own initiatives and arguments had been crucial for having surgery. ‘Agreeing when offered’, and accepting DBS when suggested by doctors embraced 43%. The third approach, ‘Hesitating and waiting’ included?DBS. Half of the patients had held a leadership position at work or in another organisation, and among patients ‘taking own initiative’ the proportion with leadership experiences was 80%. At time for surgery ten men but no woman were professionally active. Conclusion This study suggests that many patients with advanced PD have to argue and struggle with their clinicians in order to be referred to a DBS-team. The study further suggests that patients’ wishes, behaviour and position in society may all contribute to the skewed gender distribution among patients treated with DBS. PMID:24761767

  6. The Boston Retinal Prosthesis A 15-Channel Hermetic Wireless Neural Stimulator

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Shawn K.

    and drives a microfabricated thin-film polyimide stimulating electrode array with sputtered iridium oxide. Thin-film microfabricated electrode arrays were surgically inserted into the subjects' eyes, resting

  7. Electrical high frequency stimulation modulates GABAergic activity in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Varatharajan, Ramya; Joseph, Kevin; Neto, Sonya Carvalho; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Moser, Andreas; Tronnier, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective treatment option for those affected by obsessive compulsive disorder, who do not respond to pharmacological treatment strategies. Yet, little is known about the mechanism by which DBS achieve its therapeutic effects. Previous studies have shown an increase in GABA levels due to high frequency stimulation (HFS) in the rat caudate putamen. Here, the effect of high frequency stimulation in the nucleus accumbens of conscious and freely moving rats was characterized using unilateral but simultaneous microdialysis and HFS with a frequency of 124 Hz and 0.5 mA current. Extracellular levels of neurotransmitters - GABA, glutamate, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were quantified by means of HPLC with electrochemical detection. Basal levels of GABA were significantly increased in animals of the stimulation group compared to the control group without HFS. The levels of other neurotransmitters were unaffected. The influence of NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine (5 mg/kg) on the effect of HFS was investigated by subcutaneous administration of memantine on the day of the experiment. Memantine (without stimulation) enhanced basal GABA and dopamine levels. However, under the influence of both memantine and HFS, GABA levels were not affected by HFS whereas dopamine levels decreased during the stimulation period. The results of our study demonstrate that HFS in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats induces selective increase in GABA outflow and show a possible involvement of NMDA receptors in the mechanistic action of HFS. PMID:26449310

  8. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Asahina, Masato; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation. Methods In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients. Results Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase three months after STN-DBS. The preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels had significantly negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in off phase one year after STN-DBS and the preoperative CSF homovanilic acid (HVA) levels had significant negative correlations with postoperative UPDRS- III score in on phase three months after STN-DBS. In PDQ-39 SI (summary index), preoperative plasma dopamine (DA) level had significantly negative correlations with postoperative PDQ-39 SI one year after STN-DBS suggesting that higher preoperative plasma DA level resulted in better quality of life (QOL) one year after STN-DBS. The stepwise multiple linear regression study revealed that higher preoperative plasma HVA levels had negative influence on the postoperative motor symptoms (i.e., increase in the score of UPDRS), whereas higher preoperative CSF L-DOPA levels had positive influence on the postoperative motor symptoms and QOL (decrease in the score of UPDRS and PDQ-39 SI) The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively in 11 patients despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. Unexpectedly, CSF HVA levels significantly increased from 0.00089±0.0003 ng/?l to 0.002±0.0008 ng/?l after STN-DBS. Conclusion The preoperative catecholamine levels might affect the postoperative motor symptoms and quality of life. The catecholamine levels were not significantly reduced postoperatively despite the significant reduction in levodopa equivalent doses. PMID:26394059

  9. Fabrication of 3D polypyrrole microstructures and their utilization as electrodes in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Vinh; Zhou, Cheng; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel fabrication method for constructing three-dimensional (3D) conducting microstructures based on the controlled-growth of electrodeposited polypyrrole (PPy) within a lithographically patterned photoresist layer. PPy thin films, post arrays, suspended planes supported by post arrays and multi-layered PPy structures were fabricated. The performance of supercapacitors based on 3D PPy electrodes doped with dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS-) and perchlorate (ClO4-) anions was studied using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. The highest specific capacitance obtained from the multi-layered PPy(ClO4) electrodes was 401 ± 18 mF cm-2, which is roughly twice as high as the highest specific capacitance of PPy-based supercapacitor reported thus far. The increase in capacitance is the result of higher surface area per unit footprint achieved through the fabrication of multi-layered 3D electrodes.

  10. Impact of thalamic deep brain stimulation on disability and health-related quality of life in patients with essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Hariz, G; Lindberg, M; Bergenheim, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) on disability and health-related quality of life in patients with essential tremor. Methods: Twenty seven consecutive patients were evaluated prospectively, before surgery and at a mean of 12 months (range 6–26) after thalamic DBS. Assessment tools included the Fahn-Tolosa-Marìn tremor rating scale (TRS), activities of daily living (ADL) taxonomy, Nottingham health profile (NHP) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) for measuring impact of disease on life. Additional information on the side effects of, and expectations from surgery was obtained by interview. Results: Thalamic DBS improved the ability of the patients in eating, drinking, writing, home maintenance, hobbies, and participation in society. Activities of daily life requiring bimanual skills were less improved. The emotional condition of the patients was positively affected and the negative impact of the disease on life as a whole, and on social life was decreased. Seventy per cent of the patients considered that the surgical treatment met their expectations. Conclusions: After thalamic DBS, health-related quality of life including disability in ADL and social life were improved in patients with essential tremor. PMID:11784825

  11. Treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with amygdalohippocampal stimulation: A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MIN, BAO; GUOMING, LUAN; JIAN, ZHOU

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Here, we report two patients treated with amygdalohippocampal (AH)-DBS for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were admitted to Beijing Sanbo Brain Hospital. The first patient was a 34-year-old male with a 31-year history of epileptic seizures. The second patient was a 27-year-old male with a 19-year history of drug-resistant epilepsy. The patients received a comprehensive presurgical workup and were considered unsuitable candidates for resective surgery. AH-DBS was recommended for the two patients. The last follow-up for patient 1 was 36 months after surgery and the final parameter settings were 3.6 mA, 450 ?sec, 130 Hz and cycling with 60 sec on, 180 sec off. The last follow-up for patient 2 was 18 months after surgery and the final parameter settings were 2.6 mA, 450 ?sec, 130 Hz and cycling with 60 sec on, 180 sec off. The patients experienced a seizure frequency reduction of 90 and 65%, respectively, with respect to the baseline. AH-DBS is a safe, micro-invasive alternative in patients with MTLE who are not candidates for resective surgery. It effectively reduces seizures without a negative effect on memory performance. PMID:23596499

  12. Evaluation of stimulus parameters and electrode geometry for an effective suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shivdasani, Mohit N; Luu, Chi D; Cicione, Rosemary; Fallon, James B; Allen, Penny J; Leuenberger, James; Suaning, Gregg J; Lovell, Nigel H; Shepherd, Robert K; Williams, Chris E

    2010-06-01

    Several approaches have been proposed for placement of retinal prostheses: epiretinal, subretinal and suprachoroidal. We aimed to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of varying a range of stimulus parameters and electrode geometry for a suprachoroidal electrode array, using cortical evoked responses to monopolar electrical stimulation in cats. Our results indicate that charge thresholds were not dependent on electrode size, pulse widths or position of the return electrode tested, but were dependent on the number of sites stimulated in parallel. Further, we found that the combination of monopolar stimulation with large diameter electrodes, wide pulse widths and parallel stimulation minimized the voltage requirements for stimulation. These results provide useful insights for the design specifications of a low voltage suprachoroidal stimulator. PMID:20479521

  13. Addiction therapy. Refining deep brain stimulation to emulate optogenetic treatment of synaptic pathology.

    PubMed

    Creed, Meaghan; Pascoli, Vincent Jean; Lüscher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Circuit remodeling driven by pathological forms of synaptic plasticity underlies several psychiatric diseases, including addiction. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been applied to treat a number of neurological and psychiatric conditions, although its effects are transient and mediated by largely unknown mechanisms. Recently, optogenetic protocols that restore normal transmission at identified synapses in mice have provided proof of the idea that cocaine-adaptive behavior can be reversed in vivo. The most efficient protocol relies on the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluRs, which depotentiates excitatory synaptic inputs onto dopamine D1 receptor medium-sized spiny neurons and normalizes drug-adaptive behavior. We discovered that acute low-frequency DBS, refined by selective blockade of dopamine D1 receptors, mimics optogenetic mGluR-dependent normalization of synaptic transmission. Consequently, there was a long-lasting abolishment of behavioral sensitization. PMID:25657248

  14. Oscillations in pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson’s disease and its relationship with deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Zhang, Wangming

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) for the treatment of parkinsonian patients, particularly those in advanced stages with axial symptoms, has ignited interest into the study of this brain nucleus. In contrast to the extensively studied alterations of neural activity that occur in the basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease (PD), our understanding of the activity of the PPN remains insufficient. In recent years, however, a series of studies recording oscillatory activity in the PPN of parkinsonian patients have made important findings. Here, we briefly review recent studies that explore the different kinds of oscillations observed in the PPN of parkinsonian patients, and how they underlie the pathophysiology of PD and the efficacy of PPN-DBS in these disorders. PMID:26388741

  15. A Novel Brain Stimulation Technology Provides Compatibility with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Serano, Peter; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Katnani, Husam; Eskandar, Emad; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical electrical stimulation systems — such as pacemakers and deep brain stimulators (DBS) — are an increasingly common therapeutic option to treat a large range of medical conditions. Despite their remarkable success, one of the significant limitations of these medical devices is the limited compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standard diagnostic tool in medicine. During an MRI exam, the leads used with these devices, implanted in the body of the patient, act as an electric antenna potentially causing a large amount of energy to be absorbed in the tissue, which can lead to serious heat-related injury. This study presents a novel lead design that reduces the antenna effect and allows for decreased tissue heating during MRI. The optimal parameters of the wire design were determined by a combination of computational modeling and experimental measurements. The results of these simulations were used to build a prototype, which was tested in a gel phantom during an MRI scan. Measurement results showed a three-fold decrease in heating when compared to a commercially available DBS lead. Accordingly, the proposed design may allow a significantly increased number of patients with medical implants to have safe access to the diagnostic benefits of MRI. PMID:25924189

  16. Tinnitus modulation by deep brain stimulation in locus of caudate neurons (area LC).

    PubMed

    Cheung, S W; Larson, P S

    2010-09-15

    Tinnitus is an auditory disorder characterized by perception of internally generated phantom auditory sensations without corresponding mechanical stimuli arising from the body or external environment. Current auditory based treatment approaches, sometimes in conjunction with nonauditory based strategies, such as Tinnitus Retraining Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, have been helpful in mitigating symptoms for the majority of patients. Yet there are over 1 million tinnitus sufferers who still endure troublesome chronic, continuous head noises that are debilitating and interfere with activities of daily living. Here we show that application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy to a locus of caudate neurons (area LC) in the body of the nucleus, a subsite of the striatum that is not part of the classical auditory pathway, can decrease or increase tinnitus loudness perception. The DBS lead traversed through or was adjacent to area LC in six Parkinson's disease and essential tremor subjects with concomitant tinnitus who underwent implantation of the subthalamic or ventral intermediate nucleus. In five subjects where the DBS lead tip traversed area LC, tinnitus loudness in both ears was suppressed to a nadir of level 2 or lower on a 0-10 rating scale. In one subject where the DBS lead was outside area LC, tinnitus was not modulated. In three subjects with preoperative and postoperative audiograms, hearing thresholds were unchanged by area LC stimulation. Neuromodulation of area LC may be interrupting perceptual integration of phantom sensations generated in the central auditory system. This new, basal ganglia based approach to tinnitus modulation warrants further investigation and may be ultimately refined to treat patients with refractory symptoms. PMID:20541595

  17. PTFOS: Flexible and Absorbable Intracranial Electrodes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial electrocortical recording and stimulation can provide unique knowledge about functional brain anatomy in patients undergoing brain surgery. This approach is commonly used in the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. However, it can be very difficult to integrate the results of cortical recordings with other brain mapping modalities, particularly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The ability to integrate imaging and electrophysiological information with simultaneous subdural electrocortical recording/stimulation and fMRI could offer significant insight for cognitive and systems neuroscience as well as for clinical neurology, particularly for patients with epilepsy or functional disorders. However, standard subdural electrodes cause significant artifact in MRI images, and concerns about risks such as cortical heating have generally precluded obtaining MRI in patients with implanted electrodes. We propose an electrode set based on polymer thick film organic substrate (PTFOS), an organic absorbable, flexible and stretchable electrode grid for intracranial use. These new types of MRI transparent intracranial electrodes are based on nano-particle ink technology that builds on our earlier development of an EEG/fMRI electrode set for scalp recording. The development of MRI-compatible recording/stimulation electrodes with a very thin profile could allow functional mapping at the individual subject level of the underlying feedback and feed forward networks. The thin flexible substrate would allow the electrodes to optimally contact the convoluted brain surface. Performance properties of the PTFOS were assessed by MRI measurements, finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, micro-volt recording, and injecting currents using standard electrocortical stimulation in phantoms. In contrast to the large artifacts exhibited with standard electrode sets, the PTFOS exhibited no artifact due to the reduced amount of metal and conductivity of the electrode/trace ink and had similar electrical properties to a standard subdural electrode set. The enhanced image quality could enable routine MRI exams of patients with intracranial electrode implantation and could also lead to chronic implantation solutions. PMID:22984396

  18. The Quantitative Measurement of Reversible Acute Depression after Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Daniel B.; Dashtipour, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Background. Depression is the most commonly reported mood symptom affecting 2–8% of patients after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Usually, symptoms develop gradually; however there have been cases of reproducible events that the mood symptoms were elicited within seconds to minutes after stimulation and were immediately reversible upon cessation of the stimulus. In the current study, we applied a self-reported questionnaire to assess the patient's mood state. Objective. To objectively measure the reversible acute depression induced by DBS in a patient with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods. A statistically validated Spanish version of the Beck Depression Inventory Short Form (BDI-SF) was used. The questionnaire was administered three times. Results. The patient became acutely depressed within ninety seconds of monopolar stimulation on the right side. His symptoms resolved immediately after changing the setting to bipolar stimulation. The BDI-SF scores during stimulation off, on, and off again were 15, 19, and 6, respectively. Conclusions. The BDI-SF scores increased during stimulation and decreased after cessation. This is consistent with a reversible depressive state. The poststimulation BDI-SF score decreased to less than half of the baseline score. This may suggest that the depression was more severe than the patient was able to express during the stimulation. PMID:26090244

  19. Modulation of epileptic activity by deep brain stimulation: a model-based study of frequency-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Mina, Faten; Benquet, Pascal; Pasnicu, Anca; Biraben, Arnaud; Wendling, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can modulate the activity in the epileptic brain and that a decrease of seizures can be achieved in "responding" patients. In most of these studies, the choice of stimulation parameters is critical to obtain desired clinical effects. In particular, the stimulation frequency is a key parameter that is difficult to tune. A reason is that our knowledge about the frequency-dependant mechanisms according to which DBS indirectly impacts the dynamics of pathological neuronal systems located in the neocortex is still limited. We address this issue using both computational modeling and intracerebral EEG (iEEG) data. We developed a macroscopic (neural mass) model of the thalamocortical network. In line with already-existing models, it includes interconnected neocortical pyramidal cells and interneurons, thalamocortical cells and reticular neurons. The novelty was to introduce, in the thalamic compartment, the biophysical effects of direct stimulation. Regarding clinical data, we used a quite unique data set recorded in a patient (drug-resistant epilepsy) with a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In this patient, DBS strongly reduced the sustained epileptic activity of the FCD for low-frequency (LFS, < 2 Hz) and high-frequency stimulation (HFS, > 70 Hz) while intermediate-frequency stimulation (IFS, around 50 Hz) had no effect. Signal processing, clustering, and optimization techniques allowed us to identify the necessary conditions for reproducing, in the model, the observed frequency-dependent stimulation effects. Key elements which explain the suppression of epileptic activity in the FCD include: (a) feed-forward inhibition and synaptic short-term depression of thalamocortical connections at LFS, and (b) inhibition of the thalamic output at HFS. Conversely, modeling results indicate that IFS favors thalamic oscillations and entrains epileptic dynamics. PMID:23882212

  20. Multi-pad electrode for effective grasping: design.

    PubMed

    Popovi?-Maneski, Lana; Kosti?, Milos; Bijeli?, Goran; Keller, Thierry; Mitrovi?, Sindi; Konstantinovi?, Ljubica; Popovi?, Dejan B

    2013-07-01

    We designed a new surface multi-pad electrode for the electrical stimulation of the forearm that is effective in controlling functional grasp in hemiplegic patients. The electrode shape and size were designed on the basis of the surface stimulation map of the forearm, determined from measurements in seven hemiplegic patients who had limited or absent voluntary movements of the fingers, thumb and wrist. The stimulation map for each patient was assessed with a conventional set of single pad Pals Platinum electrodes. Since the sites for the stimulation varied greatly between patients, the end result was a rather large multi-pad electrode. Modulating multi-pad electrode size, shape, position and individual pad stimulation parameters allows us to accommodate the diversity of the neural tissues in patients that need to be activated for functional grasp. This also allows asynchronous activation of different portions of the muscle and dynamic adaptation of the stimulation sites to appropriate underlying tissues during functional use. The validity of the determined stimulation map was tested in the same group of hemiplegic patients. The selected set of active pads resulted in fully functional and reproducible palmar and lateral grasps similar to healthy-like grasps. PMID:23529101

  1. Transducers and electrodes Influenceof materialsand geometry on

    E-print Network

    Meng, Ellis

    nerve. Various materials and geometrical arrange- ments of contacts and locations within the scala--Cochlear prosthesis, Electrical fields, Electrical stimulation, Electrodes, Iridium, neural prosthesis, platinum Med and perfomance of a prosthesis is paired with a large 'indifferent' contact, creating a spherical improved

  2. A CURVATURE-CONTROLLED 3D MICRO-ELECTRODE ARRAY FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

    E-print Network

    Tang, William C

    A CURVATURE-CONTROLLED 3D MICRO-ELECTRODE ARRAY FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS Jian Wu1 , Le Yan2 , Han Xu2-electrode array for cochlear implants. The main body of the device is fabricated using standard thin stimulation threshold. Keywords: Micro-electrode array, 3D, Cochlear implant INTRODUCTION In the last decade

  3. G51DBS 2008-2009 coursework 5: answer 1. The relation is not in 2NF because there is a partial dependency of a

    E-print Network

    Alechina, Natasha

    dependency of a non-key attribute City on the candidate key (Publisher City). 2. The relation is not in 3NFG51DBS 2008-2009 coursework 5: answer 1. The relation is not in 2NF because there is a partial because it is not in 2NF and also (another reason, but this is just for completeness sake - not in 2NF

  4. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, A.; Moll, C.K.E.; Hamel, W.; Buhmann, C.; Koeppen, J.A.; Boelmans, K.; Zittel, S.; Gerloff, C.; Westphal, M.; Schneider, T.R.; Engel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing. PMID:26594626

  5. A Power-Efficient Wireless System With Adaptive Supply Control for Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Park, Hangue; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    A power-efficient wireless stimulating system for a head-mounted deep brain stimulator (DBS) is presented. A new adaptive rectifier generates a variable DC supply voltage from a constant AC power carrier utilizing phase control feedback, while achieving high AC-DC power conversion efficiency (PCE) through active synchronous switching. A current-controlled stimulator adopts closed-loop supply control to automatically adjust the stimulation compliance voltage by detecting stimulation site potentials through a voltage readout channel, and improve the stimulation efficiency. The stimulator also utilizes closed-loop active charge balancing to maintain the residual charge at each site within a safe limit, while receiving the stimulation parameters wirelessly from the amplitude-shift-keyed power carrier. A 4-ch wireless stimulating system prototype was fabricated in a 0.5-?m 3M2P standard CMOS process, occupying 2.25 mm². With 5 V peak AC input at 2 MHz, the adaptive rectifier provides an adjustable DC output between 2.5 V and 4.6 V at 2.8 mA loading, resulting in measured PCE of 72 ~ 87%. The adaptive supply control increases the stimulation efficiency up to 30% higher than a fixed supply voltage to 58 ~ 68%. The prototype wireless stimulating system was verified in vitro. PMID:24678126

  6. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  7. Chemical Modification of Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Allen J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of preparing and characterizing modified electrodes are outlined and several applications are described. Topics include how electrodes are modified, characterization of such electrodes, and why it is necessary to modify electrodes. Reasons include use in electrocatalysis and display devices and in analytical/photoelectrochemical…

  8. Fundamental electrode kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elder, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents the fundamentals of electrode kinetics and the methods used in evaluating the characteristic parameters of rapid-charge transfer processes at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The concept of electrode kinetics is outlined, followed by the principles underlying the experimental techniques for the investigation of electrode kinetics.

  9. Ion-Selective Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Mark A.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) is reviewed in seven sections: books, conferences, reviews; potentiometric membrane electrodes; glass and solid-state membrane electrodes; liquid and polymer membrane ISEs; coated wire electrodes, ion-selective field effect transistors, and microelectrodes; gas sensors and selective bioelectrode…

  10. Optimal target localization for subthalamic stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Michael; Czernecki, Virginie; Karachi, Carine; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Serra, Giulia; Navarro, Soledad; Welaratne, Arlette; Hartmann, Andréas; Mesnage, Valérie; Pineau, Fanny; Cornu, Philippe; Pidoux, Bernard; Worbe, Yulia; Zikos, Panayiotis; Grabli, David; Galanaud, Damien; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Belaid, Hayat; Dormont, Didier; Vidailhet, Marie; Mallet, Luc; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jerome; Agid, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To further determine the causes of variable outcome from deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Data were obtained from our cohort of 309 patients with PD who underwent DBS-STN between 1996 and 2009. We examined the relationship between the 1-year motor, cognitive, and psychiatric outcomes and (1) preoperative PD clinical features, (2) MRI measures, (3) surgical procedure, and (4) locations of therapeutic contacts. Results: Pre- and postoperative results were obtained in 262 patients with PD. The best motor outcome was obtained when stimulating contacts were located within the STN as compared with the zona incerta (64% vs 49% improvement). Eighteen percent of the patients presented a postoperative cognitive decline, which was found to be principally related to the surgical procedure. Other factors predictive of poor cognitive outcome were perioperative confusion and psychosis. Nineteen patients showed a stimulation-induced hypomania, which was related to both the form of the disease (younger age, shorter disease duration, higher levodopa responsiveness) and the ventral contact location. Postoperative depression was more frequent in patients already showing preoperative depressive and/or residual axial motor symptoms. Conclusion: In this homogeneous cohort of patients with PD, we showed that (1) the STN is the best target to improve motor symptoms, (2) postoperative cognitive deficit is mainly related to the surgery itself, and (3) stimulation-induced hypomania is related to a combination of both the disease characteristics and a more ventral STN location. PMID:24647024

  11. HSPES membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved fuel cell electrode, as well as fuel cells and membrane electrode assemblies that include such an electrode, in which the electrode includes a backing layer having a sintered layer thereon, and a non-sintered free-catalyst layer. The invention also features a method of forming the electrode by sintering a backing material with a catalyst material and then applying a free-catalyst layer.

  12. LC-MS/MS bioanalysis of loratadine (Claritin) in dried blood spot (DBS) samples collected by subjects in a clinical research study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkui; Doherty, John; Moench, Paul; Flarakos, Jimmy; Tse, Francis L S

    2015-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of loratadine, an H1 histamine antagonist, in human dried blood spot (DBS) samples following a single self-administered 10 or 20mg oral dose. The samples were produced by spotting approximately 30?l of whole blood onto PE-226 cards. Two 3-mm discs were cut from the DBS samples and extracted using aqueous methanol containing the internal standard. After transfer and drying of the resulting sample extract, the reconstituted residues were chromatographed using a Waters XSelect C18 column and isocratic elution for MS/MS detection. The possible impact due to hematocrit, volume of blood sample spotted, storage temperature, and humidity, on the accuracy of measured DBS results were investigated. The results showed that only spotted blood volume might have an impact; a small volume (10?l) tended to give a larger negative bias in the measured value than the large volume ones (?20?l). The current method was fully validated over a dynamic range of 0.200-20.0ng/ml with correlation coefficients (r(2)) for three validation batches equal to or better than 0.990. The intra-day accuracy and precision at the LLOQ were -11.5 to 0.0% bias and 6.4 to 8.9% CV, respectively. For the other QC samples (0.600, 3.00, 10.0 and 15.0ng/ml), the precision ranged from 4.2 to 9.8% CV and from 6.3 to 8.1% CV, respectively, in the intra-day and inter-day evaluations; the accuracy ranged from -1.7 to 10.0% and 2.7 to 5.3% bias, respectively, in the intra-day and inter-day batches. Loratadine is stable in the DBS samples for at least 271 days at ambient temperature in a desiccator, for at least 24h at 60°C and under 80% relative humidity, followed by re-conditioning at ambient temperature in a desiccator. The current methodology has been applied to determine the loratadine levels in DBS samples collected by subjects in a clinical research study to evaluate pharmacokinetic sampling in point-of-care setting. PMID:25645810

  13. ADVANCED ELECTROSTATIC STIMULATION OF FABRIC FILTRATION: PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the performance and economics of advanced electrostatic stimulation of fabric filtration (AESFF), in which a high-voltage electrode is placed coaxially inside a filter bag to establish an electric field between the electrode and the bag surface. The electric f...

  14. Deep brain stimulation in the media: over-optimistic portrayals call for a new strategy involving journalists and scientists in ethical debates.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Ovadia, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is optimistically portrayed in contemporary media. This already happened with psychosurgery during the first half of the twentieth century. The tendency of popular media to hype the benefits of DBS therapies, without equally highlighting risks, fosters public expectations also due to the lack of ethical analysis in the scientific literature. Media are not expected (and often not prepared) to raise the ethical issues which remain unaddressed by the scientific community. To obtain a more objective portrayal of DBS in the media, a deeper collaboration between the science community and journalists, and particularly specialized ones, must be promoted. Access to databases and articles, directly or through science media centers, has also been proven effective in increasing the quality of reporting. This article has three main objectives. Firstly, to explore the past media coverage of leukotomy, and to examine its widespread acceptance and the neglect of ethical issues in its depiction. Secondly, to describe how current enthusiastic coverage of DBS causes excessive optimism and neglect of ethical issues in patients. Thirdly, to discuss communication models and strategies to enhance media and science responsibility. PMID:21617733

  15. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  16. Management of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, and Importance of Clinical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Kaihan; Hastings, Erin; Butson, Christopher R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Zeilman, Pam; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS) battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. Background Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator). Methods A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002–2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY). Results The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson’s disease was 7.2 µC/cm2/phase (SD?=?3.82), for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm2/phase (SD?=?8.53), for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm2/phase (SD?=?4.85), and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm2/phase (SD?=?4.35). There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r?=??.59, p<.001), as well as total power and battery life (r?=??.64, p<.001). The UF estimator (r?=?.67, p<.001) and the Medtronic helpline (r?=?.74, p<.001) predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r?=?.65 and r?=?.70, respectively, both p<.001). Conclusions Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain. PMID:23536810

  17. Hippocampal closed-loop modeling and implications for seizure stimulation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Roman A.; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Traditional hippocampal modeling has focused on the series of feedforward synapses known as the trisynaptic pathway. However, feedback connections from CA1 back to the hippocampus through the entorhinal cortex (EC) actually make the hippocampus a closed-loop system. By constructing a functional closed-loop model of the hippocampus, one may learn how both physiological and epileptic oscillations emerge and design efficient neurostimulation patterns to abate such oscillations. Approach. Point process input-output models where estimated from recorded rodent hippocampal data to describe the nonlinear dynamical transformation from CA3 ? CA1, via the schaffer-collateral synapse, and CA1 ? CA3 via the EC. Each Volterra-like subsystem was composed of linear dynamics (principal dynamic modes) followed by static nonlinearities. The two subsystems were then wired together to produce the full closed-loop model of the hippocampus. Main results. Closed-loop connectivity was found to be necessary for the emergence of theta resonances as seen in recorded data, thus validating the model. The model was then used to identify frequency parameters for the design of neurostimulation patterns to abate seizures. Significance. Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) is a new and promising therapy for intractable seizures. Currently, there is no efficient way to determine optimal frequency parameters for DBS, or even whether periodic or broadband stimuli are optimal. Data-based computational models have the potential to be used as a testbed for designing optimal DBS patterns for individual patients. However, in order for these models to be successful they must incorporate the complex closed-loop structure of the seizure focus. This study serves as a proof-of-concept of using such models to design efficient personalized DBS patterns for epilepsy.

  18. Controlled porosity in electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Bae, Chang-Jun; Halloran, John William; Fu, Qiang; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Erdonmez, Can K.

    2015-06-23

    Porous electrodes in which the porosity has a low tortuosity are generally provided. In some embodiments, the porous electrodes can be designed to be filled with electrolyte and used in batteries, and can include low tortuosity in the primary direction of ion transport during charge and discharge of the battery. In some embodiments, the electrodes can have a high volume fraction of electrode active material (i.e., low porosity). The attributes outlined above can allow the electrodes to be fabricated with a higher energy density, higher capacity per unit area of electrode (mAh/cm.sup.2), and greater thickness than comparable electrodes while still providing high utilization of the active material in the battery during use. Accordingly, the electrodes can be used to produce batteries with high energy densities, high power, or both compared to batteries using electrodes of conventional design with relatively highly tortuous pores.

  19. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  20. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  1. Modiolus-hugging intracochlear electrode array with shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyou Sik; Jun, Sang Beom; Lim, Yoon Seob; Park, Se-Ik; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear implant system, the distance between spiral ganglia and the electrodes within the volume of the scala tympani cavity significantly affects the efficiency of the electrical stimulation in terms of the threshold current level and spatial selectivity. Because the spiral ganglia are situated inside the modiolus, the central axis of the cochlea, it is desirable that the electrode array hugs the modiolus to minimize the distance between the electrodes and the ganglia. In the present study, we propose a shape-memory-alloy-(SMA-) embedded intracochlear electrode which gives a straight electrode a curved modiolus-hugging shape using the restoration force of the SMA as triggered by resistive heating after insertion into the cochlea. An eight-channel ball-type electrode array is fabricated with an embedded titanium-nickel SMA backbone wire. It is demonstrated that the electrode array changes its shape in a transparent plastic human cochlear model. To verify the safe insertion of the electrode array into the human cochlea, the contact pressures during insertion at the electrode tip and the contact pressures over the electrode length after insertion were calculated using a 3D finite element analysis. The results indicate that the SMA-embedded electrode is functionally and mechanically feasible for clinical applications. PMID:23762181

  2. Noninvasive techniques for probing neurocircuitry and treating illness: vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    George, Mark S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Although the preceding chapters discuss much of the new knowledge of neurocircuitry of neuropsychiatric diseases, and an invasive approach to treatment, this chapter describes and reviews the noninvasive methods of testing circuit-based theories and treating neuropsychiatric diseases that do not involve implanting electrodes into the brain or on its surface. These techniques are transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation. Two of these approaches have FDA approval as therapies. PMID:19693003

  3. Evaluation of Intradural Stimulation Efficiency and Selectivity in a Computational Model of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Bryan; Lad, Shivanand P.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an alternative or adjunct therapy to treat chronic pain, a prevalent and clinically challenging condition. Although SCS has substantial clinical success, the therapy is still prone to failures, including lead breakage, lead migration, and poor pain relief. The goal of this study was to develop a computational model of SCS and use the model to compare activation of neural elements during intradural and extradural electrode placement. We constructed five patient-specific models of SCS. Stimulation thresholds predicted by the model were compared to stimulation thresholds measured intraoperatively, and we used these models to quantify the efficiency and selectivity of intradural and extradural SCS. Intradural placement dramatically increased stimulation efficiency and reduced the power required to stimulate the dorsal columns by more than 90%. Intradural placement also increased selectivity, allowing activation of a greater proportion of dorsal column fibers before spread of activation to dorsal root fibers, as well as more selective activation of individual dermatomes at different lateral deviations from the midline. Further, the results suggest that current electrode designs used for extradural SCS are not optimal for intradural SCS, and a novel azimuthal tripolar design increased stimulation selectivity, even beyond that achieved with an intradural paddle array. Increased stimulation efficiency is expected to increase the battery life of implantable pulse generators, increase the recharge interval of rechargeable implantable pulse generators, and potentially reduce stimulator volume. The greater selectivity of intradural stimulation may improve the success rate of SCS by mitigating the sensitivity of pain relief to malpositioning of the electrode. The outcome of this effort is a better quantitative understanding of how intradural electrode placement can potentially increase the selectivity and efficiency of SCS, which, in turn, provides predictions that can be tested in future clinical studies assessing the potential therapeutic benefits of intradural SCS. PMID:25536035

  4. High performance cermet electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills Boro, PA); Zymboly, Gregory E. (Penn Hills, PA)

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of increasing the operating cell voltage of a solid oxide electrochemical cell having metal electrode particles in contact with an oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte. The metal electrode is heated with the cell, and oxygen is passed through the oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte to the surface of the metal electrode particles so that the metal electrode particles are oxidized to form a metal oxide layer between the metal electrode particles and the electrolyte. The metal oxide layer is then reduced to form porous metal between the metal electrode particles and the ceramic electrolyte.

  5. System of fabricating a flexible electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Polla, Dennis L. (Roseville, MN); Maghribi, Mariam N. (Davis, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA); Humayun, Mark S. (La Canada, CA); Weiland, James D. (Valencia, CA)

    2010-10-12

    An image is captured or otherwise converted into a signal in an artificial vision system. The signal is transmitted to the retina utilizing an implant. The implant consists of a polymer substrate made of a compliant material such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS. The polymer substrate is conformable to the shape of the retina. Electrodes and conductive leads are embedded in the polymer substrate. The conductive leads and the electrodes transmit the signal representing the image to the cells in the retina. The signal representing the image stimulates cells in the retina.

  6. System of fabricating a flexible electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Polla, Dennis L. (Roseville, MN); Maghribi, Mariam N. (Davis, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA); Humayun, Mark S. (La Canada, CA); Weiland, James D. (Valencia, CA)

    2012-01-28

    An image is captured or otherwise converted into a signal in an artificial vision system. The signal is transmitted to the retina utilizing an implant. The implant consists of a polymer substrate made of a compliant material such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS. The polymer substrate is conformable to the shape of the retina. Electrodes and conductive leads are embedded in the polymer substrate. The conductive leads and the electrodes transmit the signal representing the image to the cells in the retina. The signal representing the image stimulates cells in the retina.

  7. Flexible electrode array for artifical vision

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Polla, Dennis L. (Roseville, MN); Maghribi, Mariam N. (Davis, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-05

    An image is captured or otherwise converted into a signal in an artificial vision system. The signal is transmitted to the retina utilizing an implant. The implant consists of a polymer substrate made of a compliant material such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS. The polymer substrate is conformable to the shape of the retina. Electrodes and conductive leads are embedded in the polymer substrate. The conductive leads and the electrodes transmit the signal representing the image to the cells in the retina. The signal representing the image stimulates cells in the retina.

  8. Montage Matters: The Influence of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation on Human Physiological Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arpan R.; Pogosyan, Alek; Brown, Peter; Brittain, John-Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Classically, studies adopting non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation have placed greater importance on the position of the primary “stimulatingelectrode than the secondary “reference” electrode. However, recent current density modeling suggests that ascribing a neutral role to the reference electrode may prove an inappropriate oversimplification. Hypothesis We set out to test the hypothesis that the behavioral effects of transcranial electrical stimulation are critically dependent on the position of the return (“reference”) electrode. Methods We examined the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation (sinusoidal waveform with no direct current offset at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2000 ?A and a frequency matched to each participant's peak tremor frequency) on physiological tremor in a group of healthy volunteers (N = 12). We implemented a sham-controlled experimental protocol where the position of the stimulating electrode remained fixed, overlying primary motor cortex, whilst the position of the return electrode varied between two cephalic (fronto-orbital and contralateral primary motor cortex) and two extracephalic (ipsilateral and contralateral shoulder) locations. We additionally controlled for the role of phosphenes in influencing motor output by assessing the response of tremor to photic stimulation, through self-reported phosphene ratings. Results Altering only the position of the return electrode had a profound behavioral effect: only the montage with extracephalic return contralateral to the primary stimulating electrode significantly entrained physiological tremor (15.9% ± 6.1% increase in phase stability, 1 S.E.M.). Photic stimulation also entrained tremor (11.7% ± 5.1% increase in phase stability). Furthermore, the effects of electrical stimulation are distinct from those produced from direct phosphene induction, in that the latter were only seen with the fronto-orbital montage that did not affect the tremor. Conclusion The behavioral effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation appear to be critically dependent on the position of the reference electrode, highlighting the importance of electrode montage when designing experimental and therapeutic protocols. PMID:25499037

  9. Scientic Review Functional electrical stimulation for grasping and walking: indications

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    rehabilitation period the FES systems with surface stimulation electrodes should be used to assist training of hand and leg movements in SCI patients. Our clinical trials have shown that a number of acute SCI paraplegic and tetraplegic patients with permanent limb impair- ment is the Functional Electrical Stimulation

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation in Persistent Vegetative States: Ethical Issues Governing Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Patuzzo, Sara; Manganotti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to investigate the fundamental ethical issues of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) on patients remaining in Persistent Vegetative State (PVS). First, the purpose of this analysis was to discuss the nature of this intervention in order to classify it such as an ordinary clinical practice, or otherwise as an extraordinary clinical practice or as experimental research. Second, ethical issues, criticisms, and methodological issues of this intervention, also in the future perspectives, are discussed, attempting to identify who could give informed consent for a patient in PVS. PMID:24803730

  11. Improved biomedical electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Newly designed electrode is prefilled, disposable, electrolyte-saturated spong. New design permits longe periods of storage without deterioration, and readiness in matter of seconds. Electrodes supply signals for electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and electrocardiogram.

  12. Accuracy Evaluation Of microTargeting™ Platforms For Deep-Brain Stimulation Using Virtual Targets

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Ramya; Mitchell, Jason; Dawant, Benoit M.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Deep-brain-stimulation (DBS) surgery requires implanting stimulators at target positions with submillimetric accuracy. Traditional stereotactic frames can provide such accuracy, but a recent innovation called the microTargeting™ Platform (FHC, Inc.) replaces this large, universal frame with a single-use, miniature, custom-designed platform. Both single-target and dual-target platforms are available for unilateral and bilateral procedures, respectively. In this paper their targeting accuracies are evaluated in vitro. Our approach employs “virtual targets”, which eliminates the problem of collision of the implant with the target. We implement virtual targets by mounting fiducial markers, which are not used in platform targeting, on an artificial skull and defining targets relative to the skull via that fiducial system. The fiducial system is designed to surround the targets, thereby reducing the overall effect of fiducial localization inaccuracies on the evaluation. It also provides the geometrical transformation from image to physical space. Target selection is based on an atlas of stimulation targets from a set of 31 DBS patients. The measured targeting error is the displacement between the phantom implant and the virtual target. Our results show that the microTargeting™ Platform exhibits submillimetric in vitro accuracy with a mean of 0.42 mm and a 99.9% level of 0.90 mm. PMID:19224717

  13. Primary experimental study on safety of deep brain stimulation in RF electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jun, Xu; Luming, Li; Hongwei, Hao

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical application of Deep Brain Stimulation, its safety and functional concern in the electromagnetic field, another pollution becoming much more serious, has become more and more significant. Meanwhile, the measuring standards on Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) for DBS are still incomplete. Particularly, the knowledge of the electromagnetic field induced signals on the implanted lead is ignorant while some informal reports some side effects. This paper briefly surmised the status of EMC standards on implantable medical devices. Based on the EMC experiments of DBS device we developed, two experiments for measuring the induced voltage of the deep brain stimulator in RF electromagnetic field were reported. The measured data showed that the induced voltage in some frequency was prominent, for example over 2V. As a primary research, we think these results would be significant to cause researcher to pay more attention to the EMC safety problem and biological effects of the induced voltage in deep brain stimulation and other implantable devices. PMID:19963563

  14. A vestibular prosthesis with highly-isolated parallel multichannel stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dai; Cirmirakis, Dominik; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an implantable vestibular stimulation system capable of providing high flexibility independent parallel stimulation to the semicircular canals in the inner ear for restoring three-dimensional sensation of head movements. To minimize channel interaction during parallel stimulation, the system is implemented with a power isolation method for crosstalk reduction. Experimental results demonstrate that, with this method, electrodes for different stimulation channels located in close proximity ( mm) can deliver current pulses simultaneously with minimum inter-channel crosstalk. The design features a memory-based scheme that manages stimulation to the three canals in parallel. A vestibular evoked potential (VEP) recording unit is included for closed-loop adaptive stimulation control. The main components of the prototype vestibular prosthesis are three ASICs, all implemented in a 0.6- ?m high-voltage CMOS technology. The measured performance was verified using vestibular electrodes in vitro. PMID:25073175

  15. Insulated ECG electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  16. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  17. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  18. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Dublin, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  19. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  20. Near-electrode imager

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  1. Fuel cell electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Strmcnik, Dusan; Cuesta, Angel; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad

    2015-06-23

    A process includes patterning a surface of a platinum group metal-based electrode by contacting the electrode with an adsorbate to form a patterned platinum group metal-based electrode including platinum group metal sites blocked with adsorbate molecules and platinum group metal sites which are not blocked.

  2. Optical nerve stimulation for a vestibular prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Bierer, Steven M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Phillips, James O.

    2009-02-01

    Infrared Nerve Stimulation (INS) offers several advantages over electrical stimulation, including more precise spatial selectivity and improved surgical access. In this study, INS and electrical stimulation were compared in their ability to activate the vestibular branch of the VIIIth nerve, as a potential way to treat balance disorders. The superior and lateral canals of the vestibular system of Guinea pigs were identified and approached with the aid of precise 3-D reconstructions. A monopolar platinum stimulating electrode was positioned near the ampullae of the canals, and biphasic current pulses were used to stimulate vestibular evoked potentials and eye movements. Thresholds and input/output functions were measured for various stimulus conditions. A short pulsed diode laser (Capella, Lockheed Martin-Aculight, Inc., Bothell WA) was placed in the same anatomical position and various stimulus conditions were evaluated in their ability to evoke similar potentials and eye movements.

  3. Emotion recognition in early Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation or dopaminergic therapy: a comparison to healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lindsey G.; Mannava, Sishir; Camalier, Corrie R.; Folley, Bradley S.; Albritton, Aaron; Konrad, Peter E.; Charles, David; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is traditionally regarded as a neurodegenerative movement disorder, however, nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is also thought to disrupt non-motor loops connecting basal ganglia to areas in frontal cortex involved in cognition and emotion processing. PD patients are impaired on tests of emotion recognition, but it is difficult to disentangle this deficit from the more general cognitive dysfunction that frequently accompanies disease progression. Testing for emotion recognition deficits early in the disease course, prior to cognitive decline, better assesses the sensitivity of these non-motor corticobasal ganglia-thalamocortical loops involved in emotion processing to early degenerative change in basal ganglia circuits. In addition, contrasting this with a group of healthy aging individuals demonstrates changes in emotion processing specific to the degeneration of basal ganglia circuitry in PD. Early PD patients (EPD) were recruited from a randomized clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in early-staged PD. EPD patients were previously randomized to receive optimal drug therapy only (ODT), or drug therapy plus STN-DBS (ODT + DBS). Matched healthy elderly controls (HEC) and young controls (HYC) also participated in this study. Participants completed two control tasks and three emotion recognition tests that varied in stimulus domain. EPD patients were impaired on all emotion recognition tasks compared to HEC. Neither therapy type (ODT or ODT + DBS) nor therapy state (ON/OFF) altered emotion recognition performance in this study. Finally, HEC were impaired on vocal emotion recognition relative to HYC, suggesting a decline related to healthy aging. This study supports the existence of impaired emotion recognition early in the PD course, implicating an early disruption of fronto-striatal loops mediating emotional function. PMID:25653616

  4. Control of phonatory onset and offset in Parkinson patients following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus and caudal zona incerta.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Blomstedt, Patric; Olofsson, Katarina; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Laryngeal hypokinesia is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD) that affects quality of life. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is well recognized as a complementary method for treatment of motor symptoms in PD but the outcomes on patients' control over phonatory alternation have yet not been clearly elucidated. The present study examined the effect of subthalamic nucleus STN-DBS (n = 8, aged 51-72 yrs; median = 63 yrs) and caudal Zona incerta cZi-DBS (n = 8, aged 49-71 yrs; median = 61 yrs) on control of onset and offset of phonation in connected speech. The patients were evaluated in a preoperatively (Med ON, 1.5 times the ordinary Levodopa dose) and 12 months post-operatively (Med ON, ordinary Levodopa dose). The results provided evidence of a progressive reduction in the ability to manifest alternations between voicing and voiceless states in a reading task. Mean proportion produced with inappropriate voicing increased from 47.6% to 55.3% and from 62.9% to 68.6% of the total duration for the two groups of patients between Pre-op and Post-op, Stim OFF evaluations. The medial and final parts of the fricative were more affected than the initial part, indicating an increased voicing lead into the following vowel. We propose that this reduction in phonatory control is be due to either progression of the disease, an effect of reduced Levodopa dosage or a microlesional effect. Patients' proficiency in alternating between voiced and voiceless states in connected speech remained unaffected by both STN-DBS and cZi-DBS. PMID:22522070

  5. Desynchronizing effect of high-frequency stimulation in a generic cortical network model

    E-print Network

    Markus Schütt; Jens Christian Claussen

    2012-03-21

    Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (TCES) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are two different applications of electrical current to the brain used in different areas of medicine. Both have a similar frequency dependence of their efficiency, with the most pronounced effects around 100Hz. We apply superthreshold electrical stimulation, specifically depolarizing DC current, interrupted at different frequencies, to a simple model of a population of cortical neurons which uses phenomenological descriptions of neurons by Izhikevich and synaptic connections on a similar level of sophistication. With this model, we are able to reproduce the optimal desynchronization around 100Hz, as well as to predict the full frequency dependence of the efficiency of desynchronization, and thereby to give a possible explanation for the action mechanism of TCES.

  6. Abstract--As epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population, electrical stimulation of the brain has

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    magnetic stimulation [2], [3] and transcranial direct current stimulation [4]. Yet, as previously concluded applied noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation (TFS) via concentric ring electrodes on the scalp with a growing body of research on different forms of noninvasive electrical stimulation including transcranial

  7. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex acoustic environments.

  8. Using the nerve stimulator for peripheral or plexus nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Urmey, W F

    2006-06-01

    Conventional methodology for nerve location utilizes anatomical landmarks followed by invasive exploration with a needle to a suitable endpoint. An appropriate endpoint can be either anatomical in nature (e.g. transaterial technique) or functional (paresthesia or motor response to electrical stimulation). Ability to electrically stimulate a peripheral nerve or plexus depends upon many variables, including; 1) conductive area at the electrode, 2) electrical impedance, 3) electrode-to-nerve distance, 4) current flow (amperage), and 5) pulse duration. Electrode conductive area follows the equation R = rhoL/A, where R = electrical resistance, p = tissue resistivity, L = electrode-to-nerve distance, and A = electrode conductive area. Therefore resistance varies to the inverse of the electrode's conductive area. Tissue electrical impedance varies as a function of the tissue composition. In general, tissues with higher lipid content have higher impedances. Modern electrical nerve stimulators are designed to keep current constant, in spite of varying impedance. The electrode-to-nerve distance has the most influence on the ability to elicit a motor response to electrical stimulation. This is governed by Coulomb's law: E = K(Q/r2) where E = required stimulating charge, K= constant, Q = minimal required stimulating current, and r = electrode-to-nerve distance. Therefore, ability to stimulate the nerve at low amperage (e.g. < 0.5 mA), indicates an extremely close position to the nerve. Similarly, increasing current flow (amperage) increases the ability to stimulate the nerve at a distance. Increasing pulse duration increases the flow of electrons during a current pulse at any given amperage. Therefore, reducing pulse duration to very short times (e.g. 0.1 or 0.05 ms) diminishes current dispersion, requiring the needle tip to be extremely close to the nerve to elicit a motor response. The above parameters can be varied optimally to enhance successful nerve location and subsequent blockade. Unlike imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, electrical nerve stimulation depends upon nerve conduction. Similarly, percutaneous electrode guidance (PEG) makes use of the above variables to allow prelocation of the nerve by transcutaneous stimulation. PMID:16682917

  9. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ? 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ? 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  10. Laser patterning of platinum electrodes for safe neurostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Palmer, J.; Dueck, W. F.; Hassarati, R. T.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Laser surface modification of platinum (Pt) electrodes was investigated for use in neuroprosthetics. Surface modification was applied to increase the surface area of the electrode and improve its ability to transfer charge within safe electrochemical stimulation limits. Approach. Electrode arrays were laser micromachined to produce Pt electrodes with smooth surfaces, which were then modified with four laser patterning techniques to produce surface structures which were nanosecond patterned, square profile, triangular profile and roughened on the micron scale through structured laser interference patterning (SLIP). Improvements in charge transfer were shown through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and biphasic stimulation at clinically relevant levels. A new method was investigated and validated which enabled the assessment of in vivo electrochemically safe charge injection limits. Main results. All of the modified surfaces provided electrical advantage over the smooth Pt. The SLIP surface provided the greatest benefit both in vitro and in vivo, and this surface was the only type which had injection limits above the threshold for neural stimulation, at a level shown to produce a response in the feline visual cortex when using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. This surface was found to be stable when stimulated with more than 150 million clinically relevant pulses in physiological saline. Significance. Critical to the assessment of implant devices is accurate determination of safe usage limits in an in vivo environment. Laser patterning, in particular SLIP, is a superior technique for improving the performance of implant electrodes without altering the interfacial electrode chemistry through coating. Future work will require chronic in vivo assessment of these electrode patterns.

  11. Chronic Electrical Stimulation with a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis: A Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; Williams, Richard A.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar M.; Finch, Sue; Ayton, Lauren N.; Saunders, Alexia L.; McPhedran, Michelle; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Wise, Andrew K.; Yeoh, Jonathan; Xu, Jin; Feng, Helen; Millard, Rodney; McWade, Melanie; Thien, Patrick C.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of chronic electrical stimulation of the retina with a suprachoroidal visual prosthesis. Methods Seven normally-sighted feline subjects were implanted for 96–143 days with a suprachoroidal electrode array and six were chronically stimulated for 70–105 days at levels that activated the visual cortex. Charge balanced, biphasic, current pulses were delivered to platinum electrodes in a monopolar stimulation mode. Retinal integrity/function and the mechanical stability of the implant were assessed monthly using electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Electrode impedances were measured weekly and electrically-evoked visual cortex potentials (eEVCPs) were measured monthly to verify that chronic stimuli were suprathreshold. At the end of the chronic stimulation period, thresholds were confirmed with multi-unit recordings from the visual cortex. Randomized, blinded histological assessments were performed by two pathologists to compare the stimulated and non-stimulated retina and adjacent tissue. Results All subjects tolerated the surgical and stimulation procedure with no evidence of discomfort or unexpected adverse outcomes. After an initial post-operative settling period, electrode arrays were mechanically stable. Mean electrode impedances were stable between 11–15 k? during the implantation period. Visually-evoked ERGs & OCT were normal, and mean eEVCP thresholds did not substantially differ over time. In 81 of 84 electrode-adjacent tissue samples examined, there were no discernible histopathological differences between stimulated and unstimulated tissue. In the remaining three tissue samples there were minor focal fibroblastic and acute inflammatory responses. Conclusions Chronic suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the retina using a suprachoroidal electrode array evoked a minimal tissue response and no adverse clinical or histological findings. Moreover, thresholds and electrode impedance remained stable for stimulation durations of up to 15 weeks. This study has demonstrated the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal stimulation with charge balanced stimulus currents. PMID:24853376

  12. Radio frequency energy harvesting from a feeding source in a passive deep brain stimulation device for murine preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Samad, Mst Fateha; Kale, Rajas P; Bennet, Kevin E; Manciu, Felicia S; Berk, Michael

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an energy harvesting circuit for use with a head-mountable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. It consists of a circular planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) and a Schottky diode-based Cockcroft-Walton 4-voltage rectifier. The PIFA has the volume of ? × 10(2) × 1.5 mm(3), resonance frequency of 915 MHz, and bandwidth of 16 MHz (909-925 MHz) at a return loss of -10 dB. The rectifier offers maximum efficiency of 78% for the input power of -5 dBm at a 5 k? load resistance. The developed rectenna operates efficiently at 915 MHz for the input power within -15 dBm to +5 dBm. For operating a DBS device, the DC voltage of 2 V is recorded from the rectenna terminal at a distance of 55 cm away from a 26.77 dBm transmitter in free space. An in-vitro test of the DBS device is presented. PMID:26318799

  13. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing?induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during “ON” and “OFF” condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients. PMID:17371906

  14. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in long-term deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Fallon, James B.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation has been shown to produce restricted neural activation using intracochlear stimulation in animals with a normal population of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). However, in a clinical setting, the widespread loss of SGNs and peripheral fibres following deafness is expected to influence the effectiveness of FMP. Approach. We compared the efficacy of FMP stimulation to both monopolar (MP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation in long-term deafened cat cochleae (n = 8). Unlike our previous study, these cochleae contained <10% of the normal SGN population adjacent to the electrode array. We also evaluated the effect of electrode position on stimulation modes by using either modiolar facing or lateral wall facing half-band electrodes. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus, a major nucleus within the central auditory pathway, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Main results. In cochleae with significant SGN degeneration, we observed that FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation (p < 0.001). However, thresholds were significantly higher for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation (p < 0.001). No difference between FMP and TP stimulation was found in any measures. The high threshold levels for FMP stimulation was significantly reduced without compromising spatial selectivity by varying the degree of current focusing (referred as ‘partial-FMP’ stimulation). Spatial selectivity of all stimulation modes was unaffected by the electrode position. Finally, spatial selectivity in long-term deafened cochleae was significantly less than that of cochleae with normal SGN population (George S S et al 2014 J. Neural Eng. 11 065003). Significance. The present results indicate that the greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation over MP stimulation is maintained in cochleae with significant neural degeneration and is not adversely affected by electrode position. The greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation would be expected to result in improved clinical performance.

  15. Different Movement of Hyolaryngeal Structures by Various Application of Electrical Stimulation in Normal Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Hyun; Oh, Byung-Mo; Han, Tae Ryun; Jeong, Ho Joong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the differences in the movement of the hyoid bone and the vocal cord with and without electrical stimulation in normal subjects. Methods Two-dimensional motion analysis using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study with and without electrical stimulation was performed. Surface electrical stimulation was applied during swallowing using electrodes placed at three different locations on each subject. All subjects were analyzed three times using the following electrode placements: with one pair of electrodes on the suprahyoid muscles and a second pair on the infrahyoid muscles (SI); with placement of the electrode pairs on only the infrahyoid muscles (IO); and with the electrode pairs placed vertically on the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles (SIV). Results The main outcomes of this study demonstrated an initial downward displacement as well as different movements of the hyoid bone with the three electrode placements used for electrical stimulation. The initial positions of the hyoid bone with the SI and IO placements resulted in an inferior and anterior displaced position. During swallowing, the hyoid bone moved in a more superior and less anterior direction, resulting in almost the same peak position compared with no electrical stimulation. Conclusion These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation caused an initial depression of the hyoid bone, which had nearly the same peak position during swallowing. Electrical stimulation during swallowing was not dependent on the position of the electrode on the neck, such as on the infrahyoid or on both the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles. PMID:26361589

  16. Comparison of Interaural Electrode Pairing Methods for Bilateral Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Dietz, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    In patients with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs), pairing matched interaural electrodes and stimulating them with the same frequency band is expected to facilitate binaural functions such as binaural fusion, localization, and spatial release from masking. Because clinical procedures typically do not include patient-specific interaural electrode pairing, it remains the case that each electrode is allocated to a generic frequency range, based simply on the electrode number. Two psychoacoustic techniques for determining interaurally paired electrodes have been demonstrated in several studies: interaural pitch comparison and interaural time difference (ITD) sensitivity. However, these two methods are rarely, if ever, compared directly. A third, more objective method is to assess the amplitude of the binaural interaction component (BIC) derived from electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses for different electrode pairings; a method has been demonstrated to be a potential candidate for bilateral CI users. Here, we tested all three measures in the same eight CI users. We found good correspondence between the electrode pair producing the largest BIC and the electrode pair producing the maximum ITD sensitivity. The correspondence between the pairs producing the largest BIC and the pitch-matched electrode pairs was considerably weaker, supporting the previously proposed hypothesis that whilst place pitch might adapt over time to accommodate mismatched inputs, sensitivity to ITDs does not adapt to the same degree. PMID:26631108

  17. Sensory threshold measurements for electrical stimulation of the digits.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S L; Cohen, B A

    1977-03-01

    Repeated impedance measurements of electrical stimulation to the finger using the stimulator of an electromyograph were evaluated in seven normal subjects to determine whether reliable threshold values to perception of pain could be obtained. Stimuli were delivered through ring or disc electrodes separated by 3 cm and interfaced to the skin of the digit with EKG paste. Stimulation through these electrodes produced only relative values of threshold, expressed as a potentiometer dial setting. Such values proved to be meaningful only when repeated during a single session. A possible reason for the apparent unreliability of repeated measurements over time is discussed. When a constant current source was substituted, reliable and consistent threshold measurements were obtained. It is suggested that the clinician wishing to make accurate, repeatable and quantified measurements of patient thresholds to electrical stimulation of the finger employ a nonloading source, namely, a constant current or constant voltage stimulator. PMID:843204

  18. MEMS technologies for epiretinal stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, W.

    2004-09-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yields visual sensations. Therefore, a retina implant for blind humans suffering from retinitis pigmentosa based on this concept seems to be feasible. In Germany, there are two projects funded by the government working on different approaches namely the subretinal and the epiretinal approaches. This paper describes the epiretinal approach for such a system. The extraocular part of this system records visual images. The images are transformed by a neural net into corresponding signals for stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells. These signals are transmitted to a receiver unit of an intraocular implant, the retina stimulator. Integrated circuitry of this unit decodes the signals and transfers the data to a stimulation circuitry that selects stimulation electrodes placed onto the retina and generates current pulses to the electrodes. By this, action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are evoked, causing a visual sensation. This paper concentrates on the MEMS part of this implant.

  19. Nanoscopic electrode molecular probes

    DOEpatents

    Krstic, Predrag S. (Knoxville, TN); Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-22

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for enhancing the electron transport property measurements of a molecule when the molecule is placed between chemically functionalized carbon-based nanoscopic electrodes to which a suitable voltage bias is applied. The invention includes selecting a dopant atom for the nanoscopic electrodes, the dopant atoms being chemically similar to atoms present in the molecule, and functionalizing the outer surface and terminations of the electrodes with the dopant atoms.

  20. A finite element analysis of the effect of electrode area and inter-electrode distance on the spatial distribution of the current density in tDCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Paula; Hallett, Mark; Cavaleiro Miranda, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effect of electrode area and inter-electrode distance on the spatial distribution of the current density in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). For this purpose, we used the finite element method to compute the distribution of the current density in a four-layered spherical head model using various electrode montages, corresponding to a range of electrode sizes and inter-electrode distances. We found that smaller electrodes required slightly less current to achieve a constant value of the current density at a reference point on the brain surface located directly under the electrode center. Under these conditions, smaller electrodes also produced a more focal current density distribution in the brain, i.e. the magnitude of the current density fell more rapidly with distance from the reference point. The combination of two electrodes with different areas produced an asymmetric current distribution that could lead to more effective and localized neural modulation under the smaller electrode than under the larger one. Focality improved rapidly with decreasing electrode size when the larger electrode sizes were considered but the improvement was less marked for the smaller electrode sizes. Also, focality was not affected significantly by inter-electrode distance unless two large electrodes were placed close together. Increasing the inter-electrode distance resulted in decreased shunting of the current through the scalp and the cerebrospinal fluid, and decreasing electrode area resulted in increased current density on the scalp under the edges of the electrode. Our calculations suggest that when working with conventional electrodes (25-35 cm2), one of the electrodes should be placed just 'behind' the target relative to the other electrode, for maximum current density on the target. Also electrodes with areas in the range 3.5-12 cm2 may provide a better compromise between focality and current density in the scalp than the traditional electrodes. Finally, the use of multiple small return electrodes may be more efficient than the use of a single large return electrode.

  1. Approximating transcranial magnetic stimulation with electric stimulation in mouse: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Walter L; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models are valuable for preclinical examination of novel therapeutic techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, comparison of TMS effects in rodents and humans is confounded by inaccurate scaling of the spatial extent of the induced electric field in rodents. The electric field is substantially less focal in rodent models of TMS due to the technical restrictions of making very small coils that can handle the currents required for TMS. We examine the electric field distributions generated by various electrode configurations of electric stimulation in an inhomogeneous high-resolution finite element mouse model, and show that the electric field distributions produced by human TMS can be approximated by electric stimulation in mouse. Based on these results and the limits of magnetic stimulation in mice, we argue that the most practical and accurate way to model focal TMS in mice is electric stimulation through either cortical surface electrodes or electrodes implanted halfway through the mouse cranium. This approach could allow much more accurate approximation of the human TMS electric field focality and strength than that offered by TMS in mouse, enabling, for example, focal targeting of specific cortical regions, which is common in human TMS paradigms. PMID:25571396

  2. Iridium oxide microelectrode arrays for in vitro stimulation of individual rat neurons from dissociated cultures.

    PubMed

    Eick, Stefan; Wallys, Jens; Hofmann, Boris; van Ooyen, André; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We present the first in vitro extracellular stimulation of individual neurons from dissociated cultures with iridium oxide (IrO(x)) electrodes. Microelectrode arrays with sputtered IrO(x) films (SIROF) were developed for electrophysiological investigations with electrogenic cells. The microelectrodes were characterized with scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, revealing rough and porous electrodes with enlarged surface areas. As shown by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the large surface area in combination with the good electrochemical properties of SIROF resulted in high charge storage capacity and low electrode impedance. Thus, we could transfer the good properties of IrO(x) as material for in vivo stimulation electrodes to multi-electrode arrays with electrode diameters as small as 10 mum for in vitro applications. Single rat cortical neurons from dissociated cultures were successfully stimulated to fire action potentials using single or trains of biphasic rectangular voltage-controlled stimulation pulses. The stimulated cell's membrane potential was simultaneously monitored using whole-cell current-clamp recordings. This experimental configuration allowed direct evaluation of the influence of pulse phase sequence, amplitude, and number on the stimulation success ratio and action potential latency. Negative phase first pulses were more effective for extracellular stimulation and caused reduced latency in comparison to positive phase first pulses. Increasing the pulse amplitude also improved stimulation reliability. However, in order to prevent cell or electrode damage, the pulse amplitude is limited to voltages below the threshold for irreversible electrochemical reactions at the electrode. As an alternative to increasing the amplitude, a higher number of stimulation pulses was also shown to increase stimulation success. PMID:19949459

  3. Iridium Oxide Microelectrode Arrays for In Vitro Stimulation of Individual Rat Neurons from Dissociated Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Eick, Stefan; Wallys, Jens; Hofmann, Boris; van Ooyen, André; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We present the first in vitro extracellular stimulation of individual neurons from dissociated cultures with iridium oxide (IrOx) electrodes. Microelectrode arrays with sputtered IrOx films (SIROF) were developed for electrophysiological investigations with electrogenic cells. The microelectrodes were characterized with scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, revealing rough and porous electrodes with enlarged surface areas. As shown by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the large surface area in combination with the good electrochemical properties of SIROF resulted in high charge storage capacity and low electrode impedance. Thus, we could transfer the good properties of IrOx as material for in vivo stimulation electrodes to multi-electrode arrays with electrode diameters as small as 10??m for in vitro applications. Single rat cortical neurons from dissociated cultures were successfully stimulated to fire action potentials using single or trains of biphasic rectangular voltage-controlled stimulation pulses. The stimulated cell's membrane potential was simultaneously monitored using whole-cell current-clamp recordings. This experimental configuration allowed direct evaluation of the influence of pulse phase sequence, amplitude, and number on the stimulation success ratio and action potential latency. Negative phase first pulses were more effective for extracellular stimulation and caused reduced latency in comparison to positive phase first pulses. Increasing the pulse amplitude also improved stimulation reliability. However, in order to prevent cell or electrode damage, the pulse amplitude is limited to voltages below the threshold for irreversible electrochemical reactions at the electrode. As an alternative to increasing the amplitude, a higher number of stimulation pulses was also shown to increase stimulation success. PMID:19949459

  4. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  5. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A low noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free ranging subject is described. The electrode comprises a pocket shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member, remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  6. Sacral root stimulation for controlled defecation.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1995-01-01

    Selective rectal or sphincter neurostimulation aiming at controlled defecation was performed in 10 dogs. While the dogs were under anesthesia, the rectal and rectal neck pressures, balloon expulsion as well as external anal sphincter (EAS) response to stimulation of the second sacral ventral nerve root (S2) and its autonomic and somatic branches were determined. Each of these nerves was stimulated separately using bipolar platinum cuff electrodes. S2 stimulation resulted in rectal and rectal neck pressure elevation as well as increase of EMG activity of EAS without balloon expulsion. Autonomic branch stimulation effected rectal pressure increase and balloon expulsion, while somatic branch stimulation caused increase of rectal neck pressure and EAS EMG activity with no balloon expulsion. S2 stimulation with somatic branch transection produced rectal pressure elevation and balloon expulsion. In contrast to rectal pressure, the rectal neck pressure increased with increasing stimulus frequency. In conclusion, rectal evacuation and sphincteric control could be induced by selective sacral root electrostimulation: S2 stimulation with transection of the somatic branch for the former and pudendal branch stimulation for the latter. PMID:7890007

  7. Organic electrode coatings for next-generation neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Aregueta-Robles, Ulises A.; Woolley, Andrew J.; Poole-Warren, Laura A.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Green, Rylie A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional neuronal interfaces utilize metallic electrodes which in recent years have reached a plateau in terms of the ability to provide safe stimulation at high resolution or rather with high densities of microelectrodes with im