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Sample records for strangeness chemical potentials

  1. The Strange World of Chemical Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes an oscillating chemical reaction, and discusses numerous parallels to it in research, such as in fibrillation of the heart, body-clock rhythms of animals and plants, the self-assembly of multicellular organisms, and certain stripes in volcanic rock. (GA)

  2. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  3. Strangeness production in heavy ion collisions -Constraining the KN - potential in medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifels, Yvonne; FOPI Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    We review the strangeness production in heavy ion collisions at energies around the NN production threshold and discuss recent measurements of the FOPI collaboration on charged kaon flow over a wide impact parameter range. The data are compared to comprehensive state-of-the-art transport models. The dense nuclear matter environment produced in those collisions may provide unique opportunities to form strange few body systems. The FOPI detector is especially suited to reconstruct such states by their charged particle decays. Apart from strongly decaying states special emphasis will be put on the search for long living weakly decaying states, i.e. Hyper-Nuclei. Light hyper nuclei are reconstructed by their two body decay channels and the production of Hyper-Tritons is studied with respect to Λ and t(3He).

  4. Quark-mass dependence of the three-flavor QCD phase diagram at zero and imaginary chemical potential: Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    We draw the three-flavor phase diagram as a function of light- and strange-quark masses for both zero and imaginary quark-number chemical potential, using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an effective four-quark vertex depending on the Polyakov loop. The model prediction is qualitatively consistent with 2+1 flavor lattice QCD prediction at zero chemical potential and with degenerate three-flavor lattice QCD prediction at imaginary chemical potential.

  5. Strange stars at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subharthi; Bagchi, Manjari; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2006-03-01

    We calculate strange star properties, using large Nc approximation with built-in chiral symmetry restoration (CSM). We used a relativistic Hartree Fock meanfield approximation method, using a modi.ed Richardson potential with two scale parameters Λ and Λ', to find a new set of equation of state (EOS) for strange quark matter. We take the effect of temperature (T) on gluon mass, in addition to the usual density dependence, and find that the transition T from hadronic matter to strange matter is 80 MeV. Therefore formation of strange stars may be the only signal for formation of QGP with asymptotic freedom (AF) and CSM.

  6. Strangeness at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2005-09-28

    In this contribution the authors discuss the physics of strange hadrons in low energy ({approx_equal} 1-2 AGeV) heavy ion collision. In this energy range the relevant strange particle are the kaons and anti-kaons. The most interesting aspect concerning these particles are so called in-medium modifications. They will attempt to review the current status of understanding of these in medium modifications. In addition they briefly discuss other issues related with kaon production, such as the nuclear equation of state and chemical equilibrium.

  7. Exact strangeness conservation and particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, J.; Redlich, K.; Suhonen, E.

    The production of strange particles is studied in terms of a statistical formalism requiring strangeness to be exactly conserved while baryon number is treated grand canonically using a chemical potential. The gas is considered to be in thermal and chemical equilibrium and to have zero overall strangeness. All particles and resonances having masses up to approximately 2 GeV and strangeness up to plus or minus 3 are included. General formulas for different particle multiplicities in terms of infinite series of modified Bessel functions are derived. In contrast to the integral representation of particle numbers in the canonical ensemble, results can be easily handled numerically since the series converge very rapidly. As an illustration, the above formalism is applied to the description of particle production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. In particular the K/pi ratio shows a strong dependence on the interaction volume on the system while, in contrast, the antiLambda/Lambda ratio is almost independent of the volume. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  8. Chemical corrosion potential in boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bairr, D.L.; McDonough, C.J.

    1998-12-31

    Misuse or abuse of chelants has long been recognized as a potential corrosion problem in boilers. In recent years all polymer chemical treatment programs have been introduced and although they are much more benign even all polymer programs must be properly designed and controlled. Under extreme conditions a similar corrosion potential exists. This paper discusses the potential for chelant or polymer corrosion in boilers and the proper safeguards. Case histories are presented.

  9. Strangeness conservation constraints in hadron gas models

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, V.K.; Singh, S.K.; Uddin, S.; Singh, C.P.

    1996-05-01

    We examine the implications of the constraints arising due to strangeness conservation on the strangeness production in various existing thermal hadron-gas models. The dependence of strangeness chemical potential {mu}{sub {ital S}} on the baryon chemical potential {mu}{sub {ital B}} and temperature {ital T} is investigated. The incorporation of finite-size, hard-core, repulsive interactions in the thermodynamically consistent description of hot and dense hadron gas alters the results obtained for pointlike particles. We compare results in two extreme alternative cases: (1) {ital K} and {ital K}{sup {asterisk}} mesons are treated as point particles and they can penetrate all volumes occupied by baryons and antibaryons and (2) the volume occupied by the baryons and antibaryons is not accessible to them. We find that the results indeed depend on the assumptions made. Moreover, the anomalous results obtained for the ratios {bar {Xi}}/{Xi} and {bar {Lambda}}/{Lambda} rule out the second possibility. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Prospects for strangeness measurement in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, R.

    2008-09-15

    The study of strangeness production at LHC will bring significant information on the bulk chemical properties, its dynamics, and the hadronization mechanisms involved at these energies. The ALICE experiment will measure strange particles from topology (secondary vertices) and from resonance decays over a wide range in transverse momentum and shed light on this new QCD regime. These motivations will be presented as well as the identification performance of ALICE for strange hadrons.

  11. Multiply Strange Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, J.; Dover, C. B.; Gal, A.; Greiner, C.; Millener, D. J.; Stocker, H.

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the stability of multiply strange baryonic systems, in the context of a mean field approach obtained from an underlying set of phenomenological meson-baryon interactions. The coupling parameters which determine the conventional σ + ω mean fields (Hartree potentials) seen by various baryon species (N, Λ, Ξ) in the many-body system are constrained by reproducing the trend of observed binding energies of single particle (N, Λ, Ξ) states, as well as the energy per particle and density of non-strange nuclear matter. We also consider additional scalar (σ*) and vector (φ) fields which couple strongly to strange baryons. The couplings of these fields are adjusted to produce strong hyperon-hyperon interactions, as suggested by the data on ΛΛ hypernuclei. Extrapolating this approach to systems of large strangeness S, we find a broad class of objects composed of neutrons, protons, Λ‧s and Ξ‧s, which are stable against strong decay. In these systems, the presence of filled Λ orbitals blocks the strong decay ΞN → ΛΛ, leading to a strangeness fraction fs = |S|/A ≍1, density ρ ≍ (2 - 3) ρ0, and charge fraction fq in the range - 0.1 strange quark matter ("stranglets"), but with a low binding energy per particle EB/A ≍ -10 to -20 MeV. We compare with an approximate mass formula which qualitatively describes the results of the mean field calculations. Such weakly bound multi-strange objects can be stable for very large A, unlike ordinary nuclei, since the Coulomb repulsion generated by the protons is largely cancelled by the presence of a comparable number of Ξ‧s, leading to a small net charge (positive or negative) of order A1/3. We comment on the weak decays of such subjects and the possibility of their production in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  12. Additional Strange Hadrons from QCD Thermodynamics and Strangeness Freezeout in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Ding, H.-T.; Hegde, P.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Maezawa, Y.; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H.; Petreczky, P.; Schmidt, C.; Sharma, S.; Soeldner, W.; Wagner, M.

    2014-08-01

    We compare lattice QCD results for appropriate combinations of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations with predictions from two hadron resonance gas (HRG) models having different strange hadron content. The conventionally used HRG model based on experimentally established strange hadrons fails to describe the lattice QCD results in the hadronic phase close to the QCD crossover. Supplementing the conventional HRG with additional, experimentally uncharted strange hadrons predicted by quark model calculations and observed in lattice QCD spectrum calculations leads to good descriptions of strange hadron thermodynamics below the QCD crossover. We show that the thermodynamic presence of these additional states gets imprinted in the yields of the ground-state strange hadrons leading to a systematic 5-8 MeV decrease of the chemical freeze-out temperatures of ground-state strange baryons.

  13. Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, Harleen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2007-10-03

    There are several different experimental indications, such as the {sigma}{sub {pi}}{sub N} term, strange spin polarization, strangeness contribution to the magnetic moment of the proton, ratio of strange and non strange quark flavor distributions which suggest that the nucleon contains a hidden strangeness component which is contradictory to the naive constituent quark model. Chiral constituent quark model with configuration mixing ({chi}CQM{sub config}) is known to provide a satisfactory explanation of the ''proton spin problem'' and related issues. In the present work, we have extended the model to carry out the calculations for the parameters pertaining to the strange quark content of the nucleon, for example, the strange spin polarization {delta}s, strange components of the weak axial vector form factors {delta}{sigma} and {delta}{sub 8} as well as F and D, strangeness magnetic moment of the proton {mu}{sub p}{sup s}, the strange quark content in the nucleon f{sub s} coming from the {sigma}{sub {pi}}{sub N} term, the ratios between strange and non-strange quarks (2s/u+d) and (2s/u-bar+d), contribution of strangeness to angular momentum sum rule etc. Our result demonstrates the broad consistency with the experimental observations as well as other theoretical considerations.

  14. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  15. QCD sign problem for small chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Splittorff, K.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2007-06-01

    The expectation value of the complex phase factor of the fermion determinant is computed in the microscopic domain of QCD at nonzero chemical potential. We find that the average phase factor is nonvanishing below a critical value of the chemical potential equal to half the pion mass and vanishes exponentially in the volume for larger values of the chemical potential. This holds for QCD with dynamical quarks as well as for quenched and phase quenched QCD. The average phase factor has an essential singularity for zero chemical potential and cannot be obtained by analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential or by means of a Taylor expansion. The leading order correction in the p-expansion of the chiral Lagrangian is calculated as well.

  16. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  17. The potential for chemical evolution on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J. I.; Welch, C.

    2002-01-01

    Sampling of organics to determine oxygen content, extent of acetylene polymerization, existence of chiral molecules and enantiomeric excesses, and searches for specific polymer products, would be of interest in assessing how organic chemistry evolves toward biochemistry. Such efforts would require fairly sophisticated chemical analyses from landed missions. This paper examines this chemistry and the potential instruments that could distinguish chemical evolution.

  18. Strange Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi N.

    2014-04-01

    "Strange" means 1) unusual or surprising, especially in a way that is difficult to explain or understand or 2) having strangeness degree of freedom. Light nuclear systems with strangeness, light hypernuclei, are perfect playground to study baryon force which would be a bridge between well established nuclear force in low energy region and QCD, the first principle of the strong interaction. Overview of study of light hypernuclei is given and recent experimental findings are reviewed.

  19. The physics of strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Olinto, A.V. |

    1991-12-01

    Strange matter may be the ground state of matter. We review the phenomenology and astrophysical implications of strange matter, and discuss the possible ways for testing the strange matter hypothesis.

  20. The Encyclopedia of Chemical Electrode Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Antelman, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Designed for industrial chemists concerned with chemical potential data in their day-to-day performance of experiments, The Encyclopedia of Chemical Electrode Potentials is the most comprehensive listing of chemical electrode potentials available today, including dat derived from many different reports, articles, and tabulations, and also previously unpublished complex formation EMF data. Thermodynamic calculations based on data reflecting varying conditions have made it possible to integrate results obtained at different pressures and electrolyte concentrations into a useful electromotive series. The electrochemical series which constitutes the core of the Encyclopedia embodies a novel arrangement which differentiates between anions, cations, complexes, and compounds. For the convenience of the practicing chemist, the data are made accessible in a number of different ways: all the information in the electrochemical series is reorganized into a listing of electrode potentials by element.

  1. 2+1 flavor Polyakov Nambu Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and nonzero chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Yu-Xin

    2008-01-01

    We extend the Polyakov-loop improved Nambu Jona-Lasinio model to 2+1 flavor case to study the chiral and deconfinement transitions of strongly interacting matter at finite temperature and nonzero chemical potential. The Polyakov loop, the chiral susceptibility of light quarks (u and d), and the strange quark number susceptibility as functions of temperature at zero chemical potential are determined and compared with the recent results of lattice QCD simulations. We find that there is always an inflection point in the curve of strange quark number susceptibility accompanying the appearance of the deconfinement phase, which is consistent with the result of lattice QCD simulations. Predictions for the case at nonzero chemical potential and finite temperature are made as well. We give the phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and temperature and find that the critical end point moves down to low temperature and finally disappears with the decrease of the strength of the ’t Hooft flavor-mixing interaction.

  2. Chemical-Sensing Cables Detect Potential Threats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Intelligent Optical Systems Inc. (IOS) completed Phase I and II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA's Langley Research Center to develop moisture- and pH-sensitive sensors to detect corrosion or pre-corrosive conditions, warning of potentially dangerous conditions before significant structural damage occurs. This new type of sensor uses a specially manufactured optical fiber whose entire length is chemically sensitive, changing color in response to contact with its target, and demonstrated to detect potentially corrosive moisture incursions to within 2 cm. After completing the work with NASA, the company received a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Phase III SBIR to develop the sensors further for detecting chemical warfare agents, for which they proved just as successful. The company then worked with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to fine tune the sensors for detecting potential threats, such as toxic industrial compounds and nerve agents. In addition to the work with government agencies, Intelligent Optical Systems has sold the chemically sensitive fiber optic cables to major automotive and aerospace companies, who are finding a variety of uses for the devices. Marketed under the brand name Distributed Intrinsic Chemical Agent Sensing and Transmission (DICAST), these unique continuous-cable fiber optic chemical sensors can serve in a variety of applications: Corrosive-condition monitoring, aiding experimentation with nontraditional power sources, as an economical means of detecting chemical release in large facilities, as an inexpensive "alarm" systems to alert the user to a change in the chemical environment anywhere along the cable, or in distance-resolved optical time domain reflectometry systems to provide detailed profiles of chemical concentration versus length.

  3. Chemical potential beyond the quasiparticle mean field

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh Dang, N.; Hung, N. Quang

    2010-03-15

    The effects of quantal and thermal fluctuations beyond the BCS quasiparticle mean field on the chemical potential are studied within a model, which consists of N particles distributed amongst {Omega} doubly folded equidistant levels interacting via a pairing force with parameter G. The results obtained at zero and finite temperatures T within several approaches, which include the fluctuations beyond the BCS theory, are compared with the exact results. The chemical potential, defined as the Lagrangian multiplier to preserve the average number of particles, is compared with the corresponding quantity, which includes the effect from fluctuations of particle and quasiparticle numbers beyond the BCS quasiparticle mean field. The analysis of the results shows that the latter differs significantly from the former as functions of G and T. The chemical potential loses its physical meaning in the system with a fixed number of particles or after eliminating quantal fluctuations of particle (quasiparticle) numbers by means of particle number projection. The validity of the criterion for the signature of the transition to Bose-Einstein condensation, which occurs in infinite systems when the chemical potential hits the bottom of the energy spectrum, is reexamined for the finite multilevel model.

  4. Ultrasoft fermionic excitation at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Satow, Daisuke

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested previously that an ultrasoft fermionic excitation develops, albeit with a small spectral weight, in a system of massless fermions and scalar bosons with Yukawa interaction at high temperature T. In this paper we study how this excitation is modified at finite chemical potential μ. We relate the existence of the ultrasoft mode to symmetries, in particular charge conjugation, and a supersymmetry of the free system which is spontaneously broken by finite temperature and finite density effects, as argued earlier by Lebedev and Smilga. A nonvanishing chemical potential breaks both symmetries explicitly and maximally at zero temperature where the mode ceases to exist. A detailed calculation indicates that the ultrasoft excitation persists as long as T≥0.71μ.

  5. Random matrix triality at nonzero chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, M.A.; Osborn, J.C.; Verbaarschot, J.J.

    1997-12-01

    We introduce three universality classes of chiral random matrix ensembles with a nonzero chemical potential and real, complex or quaternion real matrix elements. In the thermodynamic limit we find that the distribution of the eigenvalues in the complex plane does not depend on the Dyson index, and is given by the solution proposed by Stephanov. For a finite number of degrees of freedom, N, we find an accumulation of eigenvalues on the imaginary axis for real matrices, whereas for quaternion real matrices we find a depletion of eigenvalues in this domain. This effect is of order 1/{radical} (N) . In particular for the real case the resolvent shows a discontinuity of order 1/{radical} (N) . These results are in agreement with lattice QCD simulations with staggered fermions and recent instanton liquid simulations both for two colors and a nonzero chemical potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  7. [Through strangeness to oneself].

    PubMed

    Sorgedrager, D B

    1993-11-01

    "Being strange" as opposed to "being oneself" is part of the thinking in all cultures. Belonging to a given culture is actually defined by ones identity and by "being oneself". Both concepts--"being oneself" or "being strange"--are rational and related constructs. Whatever they are confronted with, for most human beings it is self-evident to differentiate between subject and object, between "being oneself" or "being strange". This explains why thinking often occurs in opposites or polarities, as an either/or. All "being strange" has its origins in one's own self. "Being strange" becomes most obvious when persons, gestalt or cultures strongly deviate from one's own familiar situation. It is part of man's disposition to be cautious, suspicious of and at distance from everything considered strange and different. That explains his xenophobia feelings and actions. Behind this attitude we can always discover one's wish to preserve the familiar beliefs--combined with an uneasiness to give up one's thinking and behaviour that is proven and routine. It is only by reflecting on our own culture and our own inheritance that we have the possibility to come to terms with our own ethnic identity and foreign behavioral patterns. If we do not try to understand other cultures while keeping our own cultural identity, tensions and violent conflicts will inevitably result. PMID:8278564

  8. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  9. Strange and Multi-strange Particle Production in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Dunlop, J.; et al.

    2011-02-04

    We present results on strange and multistrange particle production in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV as measured with the STAR detector at RHIC. Midrapidity transverse momentum spectra and integrated yields of K{sub S}{sup 0}, {lambda}, {Xi}, and {Omega} and their antiparticles are presented for different centrality classes. The particle yields and ratios follow a smooth energy dependence. Chemical freeze-out parameters, temperature, baryon chemical potential, and strangeness saturation factor obtained from the particle yields are presented. Intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T}) phenomena are discussed based on the ratio of the measured baryon-to-meson spectra and nuclear modification factor. The centrality dependence of various measurements presented show a similar behavior as seen in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

  10. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars. PMID:25699444

  11. Some analytical models of anisotropic strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Over the years of the concept of local isotropy has become a too stringent condition in modeling relativistic self-gravitating objects. Taking local anisotropy into consideration, in this work, some analytical models of relativistic anisotropic charged strange stars have been developed. The Einstein-Maxwell gravitational field equations have been solved with a particular form of one of the metric potentials. The radial pressure and the energy density have been assumed to follow the usual linear equation of state of strange quark matter, the MIT bag model.

  12. Two alternative versions of strangeness

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Kazuhikoa

    2008-01-01

    The concept of strangeness emerged from the low energy phenomenology before the entry of quarks in particle physics. The connection between strangeness and isospin is rather accidental and loose and we recognize later that the definition of strangeness is model-dependent. Indeed, in Gell-Mann’s triplet quark model we realize that there is a simple alternative representation of strangeness. When the concept of generations is incorporated into the quark model we find that only the second alternative version of strangeness remains meaningful, whereas the original one does no longer keep its significance. PMID:18997448

  13. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  14. Dual condensates at finite isospin chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Miao, Qing

    2016-02-01

    The dual observables as order parameters for center symmetry are tested at finite isospin chemical potential μI in a Polyakov-loop enhanced chiral model of QCD with physical quark masses. As a counterpart of the dressed Polyakov-loop, the first Fourier moment of pion condensate is introduced for μI >mπ / 2 under the temporal twisted boundary conditions for quarks. We demonstrate that this dual condensate exhibits the similar temperature dependence as the conventional Polyakov-loop. We confirm that its rapid increase with T is driven by the evaporating of pion condensation. On the other hand, the dressed Polyakov-loop shows abnormal thermal behavior, which even decreases with T at low temperatures due to the influence of pion condensate. We also find that the dressed Polyakov-loop always rises most steeply at the chiral transition temperature, which is consistent with the previous results in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model and its variants without considering the center symmetry. Since both quantities are strongly affected by the chiral symmetry and pion condensation, we conclude that it is difficult to clarify the deconfinement transition from the dual condensates in this situation within this model.

  15. Strange stars, strange dwarfs, and planetary-like strange-matter objects

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Schaab, C.; Weigel, M.K.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the properties of all possible equilibrium sequences of compact strange-matter stars with nuclear crusts, which range from strange stars to strange dwarfs. In contrast to their non-strange counterparts--neutron stars and white dwarfs--their properties are determined by two (rather than one) parameters, the central star density and the density at the base of the nuclear crust. This leads to stellar strange-matter configurations whose properties are much more complex than those of the conventional sequence. As an example, two generically different categories of stable strange dwarfs are found, which could be the observed white dwarfs. Furthermore the authors find very-low-mass strange stellar objects, with masses as small as those of Jupiter or even lighter planets. Such objects, if abundant enough, should be seen by the presently performed gravitational microlensing searches.

  16. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  17. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  18. Seismic Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Vigdor

    2004-01-01

    Two decades ago, Witten suggested that the ground state of matter might be material of nuclear density made from up, down and strange quarks. Since then, much effort has gone into exploring astrophysical and other implications of this possibility. For example, neutron stars would almost certainly be strange quark stars; dark matter might be strange quark matter. Searches for stable strange quark matter have been made in various mass ranges, with negative, but not conclusive results. Recently, we [D. Anderson, E. Herrin, V. Teplitz, and I. Tibuleac, Bull. Seis. Soc. of Am. 93, 2363 (2003)] reported a positive result for passage through the Earth of a multi-ton "nugget" of nuclear density in a search of about a million seismic reports, to the U.S. Geological Survey for the years 1990-93, not associated with known Earthquakes. I will present the evidence (timing of first signals to the 9 stations involved, first signal directions, and unique waveform characteristics) for our conclusion and discuss potential improvements that could be obtained from exploiting the seismologically quieter environments of the moon and Mars.

  19. Is the Strange Situation Too Strange for Japanese Infants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujiie, Tastuo

    The applicability of the Strange Situation procedure and the ABC typology for Japanese infants is discussed by examining data from studies in which the Strange Situation procedure was performed with Japanese infants. Findings of a study conducted in Sapporo, Japan, are discussed and their implications are pointed out. The discussion concludes that…

  20. Dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals: Criteria for skin notation

    SciTech Connect

    Fiserova-Bergerova, V.; Pierce, J.T.; Droz, P.O. )

    1990-01-01

    A dermal penetration rate (flux), predicted from physical properties of 132 chemicals, is suggested as an index of the dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals. The prediction is designed for organic nonelectrolytes. Two reference values are recommended as criteria for skin notation: (1) dermal absorption potential, which relates to dermal absorption raising the dose of nonvolatile chemicals or biological levels of volatile chemicals 30% above those observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only--dermal absorption of chemicals belonging to this category should be considered when data obtained by biological monitoring are interpreted; and (2) dermal toxicity potential, which relates to dermal absorption that triples biological levels as compared with levels observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only. Chemicals belonging in this category should carry a skin notation. The toxicity criteria may not be valid for chemicals whose TLVs are based on preventing irritation and discomfort.

  1. Strange experiments at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to report recent progress in nuclear experiments involving strangeness which have been carried out at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron over the past three years. These recent developments are noted in three areas: few body systems and dibaryons; strange probes of the nucleus; and associated production of hypernuclei. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  3. POTENTIAL USE OF ULTRASOUND IN CHEMICAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been examining the potential of combining sonication with existing measurement technologies for monitoring specific classes of organic pollutants in water. he research specifically addressed using ultrasound (ultrasonic) processors to ...

  4. ``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-08-26

    We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

  5. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  6. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  7. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  8. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  9. Electrically charged strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanco; Weber, Fridolin; Malheiro, Manuel; Usov, Vladimir

    2009-10-15

    The possible existence of compact stars made of absolutely stable strange quark matter--referred to as strange stars--was pointed out by Witten almost a quarter of a century ago. One of the most amazing features of such objects concerns the possible existence of ultrastrong electric fields on their surfaces, which, for ordinary strange matter, is around 10{sup 18} V/cm. If strange matter forms a color superconductor, as expected for such matter, the strength of the electric field may increase to values that exceed 10{sup 19} V/cm. The energy density associated with such huge electric fields is on the same order of magnitude as the energy density of strange matter itself, which, as shown in this paper, alters the masses and radii of strange quark stars at the 15% and 5% levels, respectively. Such mass increases facilitate the interpretation of massive compact stars, with masses of around 2M{sub {center_dot}}, as strange quark stars.

  10. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  11. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  12. Two-color QCD at imaginary chemical potential and its impact on real chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Sasaki, Takahiro; Kouno, Hiroaki; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of two-color QCD at imaginary chemical potential (μ) from the viewpoint of the Roberge-Weiss periodicity, the charge conjugation, and the pseudoreality. At μ=±iπT/2, where T is temperature, the system is symmetric under the combination of the charge conjugation C and the Z2 transformation. The symmetry, called CZ2 symmetry, is preserved at lower T but spontaneously broken at higher T. The Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model has the same properties as two-color QCD for CZ2 symmetry and the pseudoreality. The nontrivial correlation between the chiral restoration and the deconfinement are investigated by introducing the entanglement vertex in the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The order of CZ2 symmetry breaking at the Roberge-Weiss end point is second order when the correlation is weak, but becomes first order when the correlation is strong. We also investigate the impact of the correlation on the phase diagram at real μ.

  13. Strangeness in Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Benaoum, Hachemi

    2008-04-01

    Results of the parity violating asymmetry APV for longitudinally polarized 3 GeV electrons from both hydrogen and helium cryogenic targets, at small scatteting angle thetalab~6 ° are presented. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of GEs and GMs, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for 4He is a function solely of GEs. The combination of the two results therefore allows GEs and GMs to be separately determined.

  14. Strange perspectives at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Sturm, C.; Schramm, S.; Stöcker, H.

    2010-09-01

    Adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt, Germany, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) substantially expands research goals and technical possibilities. It will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented fore-front research in hadron, nuclear and atomic physics as well as applied sciences which will be described briefly in this paper. The start version of FAIR, the so-called Modularized Start Version, will deliver first beams in 2017/2018. As an example the paper presents research efforts on strangeness at FAIR using heavy ion collisions, exotic nuclei from fragmentation and antiprotons to tackle various topics in this area. In particular hypernuclei and metastable exotic multi-hypernuclear objects will be investigated.

  15. EVALUATION OF TRICLOSAN AS A POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan is an industrial antibacterial agent commonly used in soaps, toothpaste and cleaners. The present investigation was designed to examine the endocrine modulating potential of Triclosan because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidial estrogens (e.g. ...

  16. Two-color QCD with chiral chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Goy, V. A.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Molochkov, A. V.; Müller-Preussker, M.; Petersson, B.; Schreiber, A.

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagram of two-color QCD with a chiral chemical potential is studied on the lattice. The focus is on the confinement/deconfinement phase transition and the breaking/restoration of chiral symmetry. The simulations are carried out with dynamical staggered fermions without rooting. The dependence of the Polyakov loop, the chiral condensate and the corresponding susceptibilities on the chiral chemical potential and the temperature are presented.

  17. Strangeness and onset of deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.

    2012-05-15

    I will review the current status of global strangeness production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with particular emphasis on recent results from core-corona model. I will discuss its relevance for the detection of the onset of deconfinement.

  18. Torsional oscillations of strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Strange stars are one of the hypothetical compact stellar objects that can be formed after a supernova explosion. The existence of these objects relies on the absolute stability of strange collapsed quark matter with respect to standard nuclear matter. We discuss simple models of strange stars with a bare quark matter surface, thus standard nuclear matter is completely absent. In these models an electric dipole layer a few hundreds Fermi thick should exist close to the star surface. Studying the torsional oscillations of the electrically charged layer we estimate the emitted power, finding that it is of the order of 1045 erg/s, meaning that these objects would be among the brightest compact sources in the heavens. The associated relaxation times are very uncertain, with values ranging between microseconds and minutes, depending on the crust thickness. Although part of the radiated power should be absorbed by the electrosphere surrounding the strange star, a sizable fraction of photons should escape and be detectable.

  19. How Strange is the Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Decowski

    2006-11-15

    The paper discusses application of parity violating polarized electron scattering off nucleons to study strange form factors of the nucleon. The results from the recent HAPPEX experiment are discussed in more detail.

  20. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237470

  1. Persistence and transport potential of chemicals in a multimedia environment

    SciTech Connect

    van de Meent, D.; McKone, T.E.; Parkerton, T.; Matthies, M.; Scheringer, M.; Wania, F.; Purdy, R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2000-02-01

    Persistence in the environment and potential for long-range transport are related since time in the environment is required for transport. A persistent chemical will travel longer distances than a reactive chemical that shares similar chemical properties. Scheringer (1997) has demonstrated the correlation between persistence and transport distance for different organic chemicals. However, this correlation is not sufficiently robust to predict one property from the other. Specific chemicals that are persistent mayor may not exhibit long-range transport potential. Persistence and long-range transport also present different societal concerns. Persistence concerns relate to the undesired possibility that chemicals produced and used now may somehow negatively affect future generations. Long-range transport concerns relate to the undesired presence of chemicals in areas where these compounds have not been used. Environmental policy decisions can be based on either or both considerations depending on the aim of the regulatory program. In this chapter, definitions and methods for quantifying persistence and transport potential of organic chemicals are proposed which will assist in the development of sound regulatory frameworks.

  2. Strange Star Surface: A Crust with Nuggets

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Reddy, Sanjay; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2006-02-03

    We reexamine the surface composition of strange stars. Strange quark stars are hypothetical compact stars which could exist if strange quark matter was absolutely stable. It is widely accepted that they are characterized by an enormous density gradient (10{sup 26} g/cm{sup 4}) and large electric fields at the surface. By investigating the possibility of realizing a heterogeneous crust, comprised of nuggets of strange quark matter embedded in an uniform electron background, we find that the strange star surface has a much reduced density gradient and negligible electric field. We comment on how our findings will impact various proposed observable signatures for strange stars.

  3. Determination of QCD phase diagram from the imaginary chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuji, Sakai; Kouji, Kashiwa; Hiroaki, Kouno; Masanobu, Yahiro

    2009-10-01

    Lattice QCD has the well-known sign problem at real chemical potential. An approach to circumvent the problem is the analytic continuation to real chemical potential from imaginary one. We propose a new analytic continuation by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. This work is published in our papers of Phys. Rev. D77, 051901 (2008), Phys. Rev. D78, 036001 (2008), Phys. Rev. D78 076007 (2008), Phys. Rev. D 79, 076008 (2009), Phys. Rev. D 79, 096001 (2009). This talk presents the latest result of these studies. The partition function of QCD has the Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity in the imaginary chemical potential region. We revealed that the PNJL model has the RW periodicity. Strength parameters of the vector-type four-quark and scalar-type eight- quark interactions are determined so as to reproduce lattice data on pseudocritical temperatures of the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions in the imaginary chemical potential region. The QCD phase diagram in the real chemical potential region is predicted by the PNJL model. The critical endpoint survives, even if the vector-type four-quark interaction is taken into account.

  4. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  5. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μe) and chemical hardness (ηe) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μe. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (-I), positive (-A), and zero values of the fractional charge (-(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  6. Chemical potential effects on neutrino diffusion in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of imposing a zero chemical potential for neutrinos in hydrodynamic calculations of collapsing supernovae is investigated in the diffusion approximation of neutrino transport. A coupled system of equations is solved for neutrino and energy diffusion fluxes as well as lepton diffusion in a collapsing supernovae ambient medium, and the results indicate a substantial growth in the neutrino chemical potential for densities greater than 10 to the 12th power gm/cu cm. The rate of energy transport is shown to be significantly affected by increases in Fermi integrals and chemical-potential gradients accompanied by decreases in temperature, and the extent of neutrino particle/antiparticle reactions is found also to affect energy diffusion rates. It is concluded that the photon-like behavior usually assumed for neutrinos may be incorrect and that an extension of the Sn transport approximation to include lepton characteristics is necessary for a definitive answer to the question of neutrino transport in supernovae.

  7. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, Volumes, and Physical-chemical Properties of Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Daiss, R.; Williams, L.; Singer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base fluid, proppant, and additives. Additives, comprised of one or more chemicals, are serve a specific engineering purpose (e.g., friction reducer, scale inhibitor, biocide). As part of the USEPA's Draft Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, we investigated the different types, volumes injected, and physical-chemical properties of HF fluid chemicals. The USEPA identified 1,076 chemicals used in HF fluids, based on 10 sources covering chemical use from 2005 to 2013. These chemicals fall into different classes: acids, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, bases, hydrocarbon mixtures, polysaccharides, and surfactants. The physical-chemical properties of these chemicals vary, which affects their movement through the environment if spilled. Properties range from fully miscible to insoluble, from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. Most of these chemicals are not volatile. HF fluid composition varies from site to site depending on a range of factors. No single chemical or set of chemicals are used at every site. A median of 14 chemicals are used per well, with a range of four to 28 (5th and 95th percentiles). Methanol was the chemical most commonly reported in FracFocus 1.0 (72% of disclosures), and hydrotreated light petroleum distillates and hydrochloric acid were both reported in over half the disclosures. Operators store chemicals on-site, often in multiple containers (typically in 760 to 1,500 L totes). We estimated that the total volume of all chemicals used per well ranges from approximately 10,000 to 110,000 L. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the USEPA.

  8. Responses of quark condensates to the chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamura, O.; Choe, S.; Liu, Y.; Takaishi, T.; Nakamura, A.

    2002-10-01

    The responses of quark condensates to the chemical potential, as a function of temperature T and chemical potential μ, are calculated within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. We compare our results with those from the recent lattice QCD simulations [QCD-TARO Collaboration, S. Choe et al., Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 106, 462 (2002)]. The NJL model and lattice calculations show qualitatively similar behavior, and they will be complimentary ways to study hadrons at finite density. The behavior above Tc requires more elaborated analyses.

  9. Phase of the Fermion Determinant at Nonzero Chemical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Splittorff, K.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2007-01-19

    We show that in the microscopic domain of QCD (also known as the {epsilon} domain) at nonzero chemical potential the average phase factor of the fermion determinant is nonzero for {mu}chemical potential. This follows from the chiral Lagrangian that describes the low-energy limit of the expectation value of the phase factor. Explicit expressions for the average phase factor are derived using a random matrix formulation of the zero momentum limit of this chiral Lagrangian.

  10. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  11. Modulation of mechanical resonance by chemical potential oscillation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan H.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2016-03-01

    The classical picture of the force on a capacitor assumes a large density of electronic states, such that the electrochemical potential of charges added to the capacitor is given by the external electrostatic potential and the capacitance is determined purely by geometry. Here we consider capacitively driven motion of a nano-mechanical resonator with a low density of states, in which these assumptions can break down. We find three leading-order corrections to the classical picture: the first of which is a modulation in the static force due to variation in the internal chemical potential; the second and third are changes in the static force and dynamic spring constant due to the rate of change of chemical potential, expressed as the quantum (density of states) capacitance. As a demonstration, we study capacitively driven graphene mechanical resonators, where the chemical potential is modulated independently of the gate voltage using an applied magnetic field to manipulate the energy of electrons residing in discrete Landau levels. In these devices, we observe large periodic frequency shifts consistent with the three corrections to the classical picture. In devices with extremely low strain and disorder, the first correction term dominates and the resonant frequency closely follows the chemical potential. The theoretical model fits the data with only one adjustable parameter representing disorder-broadening of the Landau levels. The underlying electromechanical coupling mechanism is not limited by the particular choice of material, geometry, or mechanism for variation in the chemical potential, and can thus be extended to other low-dimensional systems.

  12. Strange Erosional Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 December 2003

    The strange erosional pattern seen in this THEMIS visible image differs greatly from the surrounding terrain of Lycus Sulchi (see context image). The crescent-shaped erosional pits trend in the southwest-northeast direction, indicating a dominant wind direction from the southwest. Why these pits eroded in the shapes that they did, however, is a mystery.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.6, Longitude 214.6 East (145.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Seismic search for strange quark nuggets

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L.

    2006-02-15

    Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to 1 ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

  14. Production of strange particles in hadronization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-08-01

    Strange particles provide an important tool for the study of the color confinement mechanisms involved in hadronization processes. We review data on inclusive strange-particle production and on correlations between strange particles in high-energy reactions, and discuss phenomenological models for parton fragmentation. 58 refs., 24 figs.

  15. Simulation of the 3-state Potts model with chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Ydalia Delgado; Gattringer, Christof; Evertz, Hans Gerd

    2011-05-23

    The 3-state Potts model with chemical potential is mapped to a flux representation where the complex action problem is resolved. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation based on a worm algorithm to study the phase diagram of the model. Our results shed light on the role which center symmetry and its breaking play for the QCD phase diagram.

  16. Chemical potential and dimensions of chain molecules in athermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Fernando A.

    A recently developed method for the simulation of chemical potentials of chain molecules (EVALENCH) is applied here to obtain the chemical potential, the mean square end-to-end distance (R2n) and the mean square radius of gyration (R2g) of dilute chains in different athermal media. The environments considered in this work are a frozen network structure, a deformable network matrix and a monomeric solvent at various densities. The properties of all chain lengths smaller than a preset maximum are calculated in a single simulation. A novel method is also presented for locating and computing the fraction of sampling space available to append one segment of an existing chain. This method enhances the range of densities where simulations of chemical potential are feasible. Simulated chemical potentials are compared with the predictions of two theories; good agreement is found in both cases. We find that R2n and R2g are reduced as the density of the medium is increased (network or solvent), while they are increased when the network is frozen and as the monomeric solvent size is made larger than that of the chain sites. At the conditions studied here, no direct evidence of chain collapse is observed.

  17. Response of quark condensate to the chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yu; Zhang Yanbin; Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for calculating the response of the quark condensate to the chemical potential. Based on the method of calculating the dressed-quark propagator at finite chemical potential in the framework of the rainbow-ladder approximation of the Dyson-Schwinger approach proposed in [H. S. Zong, L. Chang, F. Y. Hou, W. M. Sun, and Y. X. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 71, 015205 (2005).] and adopting the meromorphic form of the quark propagator given in [R. Alkofer, W. Detmold, C. S. Fischer, and P. Maris, Phys. Rev. D 70, 014014 (2004).][M. S. Bhagwat, M. A. Pichowsky, and P. C. Tandy, Phys. Rev. D 67, 054019 (2003).], the quark condensate at finite chemical potential [{mu}] is calculated analytically. The obtained expression for [{mu}] is real, which is different from the results in the previous literature. In addition, it is found that when the chemical potential {mu} is less than a critical one [{mu}] is kept unchanged from its vacuum value. A comparison is made between this behavior of the quark condensate and those reported in the previous literatures.

  18. Using the Moon as a Strange Quark Nugget Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, Eugene T.; Rosenbaum, Doris C.; Teplitz, Vigdor L.

    2007-11-01

    We review the romance and mystery of strange quark matter (SQM), including: its basics, our recent work on bounds on the abundance of ton-range strange quark nuggets (SQNs) from Earth seismology, potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon, and our recent bounds on SQNs in the 10 kilogram to ton range from the data of Apollo-implanted seismometers. Finally, we speculate a bit on using the sun or the solar system to detect passage of SQNs of much greater mass than the aforementioned.

  19. A multivariate chemical map of industrial chemicals--assessment of various protocols for identification of chemicals of potential concern.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Mia; Linusson, Anna; Tysklind, Mats; Andersson, Patrik L

    2009-08-01

    In present study the Industrial chemical map was created, and investigated. Molecular descriptors were calculated for 56072 organic substances from the European inventory of existing commercial chemical substances (EINECS). The resulting multivariate dataset was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), giving five principal components, mainly reflecting size, hydrophobicity, flexibility, halogenation and electronical properties. It is these five PCs that form the basis of the map of organic, industrial chemicals, the Industrial chemical map. The similarities and diversity in chemical characteristics of the substances in relation to their persistence (P), bioaccumulation (B) and long-range transport potential were then examined, by superimposing five sets of entries obtained from other relevant databases onto the Industrial chemical map. These sets displayed very similar diversity patterns in the map, although with a spread in all five PC vectors. Substances listed by the United Nations Environment Program as persistent organic pollutants (UNEP POPs) were on the other hand clearly grouped with respect to each of the five PCs. Illustrating similarities and differences in chemical properties are one of the strengths of the multivariate data analysis method, and to be able to make predictions of, and investigate new chemicals. Further, the results demonstrate that non-testing methods as read-across, based on molecular similarities, can reduce the requirements to test industrial chemicals, provided that they are applied carefully, in combination with sound chemical knowledge. PMID:19515399

  20. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  2. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-07-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov loop potential (μ PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the μ -dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of u , d quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyze the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and properties of the mixed phase would bring relevant information on the expected chemical potential dependence of the Polyakov loop contribution.

  3. Chemical and preclinical studies on Hedyotis diffusa with anticancer potential.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu; Meng, Qiu-Xia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the chemical and preclinical anticancer research on Hedyotis diffusa Willd. in detail, one of the most renowned herbs often prescribed in the polyherbal formulas for cancer treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Anthraquinones, flavonoids, and terpenoids constitute the majority of the 69 compounds that have been isolated and identified from H. diffusa. The anticancer effects of the methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts in various preclinical cancer models have been described. This review also summarized the anticancer activity of constituents of the herb and the mechanisms of action. All the studies suggest that H. diffusa has enormous potential in the therapy of cancer and warrants further chemical and pharmacological investigation. PMID:23600735

  4. Strange-quark-matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-11-01

    We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 13 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that it is implausible that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, is a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation if strange matter is stable at an energy density exceeding about 5.4 times that of nuclear matter. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 34 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. How strange is pion electroproduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert; Zhang, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    We consider pion production in parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) in the presence of nucleon strangeness in the framework of partial wave analysis with unitarity. Using the experimental bounds on the strange form factors obtained in elastic PVES, we study the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to strange nucleon form factors. For forward kinematics and electron energies above 1 GeV, we observe that this sensitivity may reach about 20% in the threshold region. With parity-violating asymmetries being as large as tens p.p.m., this study suggests that threshold pion production in PVES can be used as a promising way to better constrain strangeness contributions. Using this model for the neutral current pion production, we update the estimate for the dispersive γZ-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. In the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, our new prediction reads Re □γZV (E = 1.165 GeV) = (5.58 ± 1.41) ×10-3, an improvement over the previous uncertainty estimate of ± 2.0 ×10-3. Our new prediction in the kinematics of the upcoming MESA/P2 experiment reads Re □γZV (E = 0.155 GeV) = (1.1 ± 0.2) ×10-3.

  6. A strange cat in Dublin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2012-11-01

    Not many life stories in physics involve Nazis, illicit sex, a strange cat and the genetic code. Thus, a new biography of the great Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is always of interest, and with Erwin Schrödinger and the Quantum Revolution, veteran science writer John Gribbin does not disappoint.

  7. Strange and multistrange particle production in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Naglis, M.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.

    2011-02-15

    We present results on strange and multistrange particle production in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 GeV as measured with the STAR detector at RHIC. Midrapidity transverse momentum spectra and integrated yields of K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}, {Xi}, and {Omega} and their antiparticles are presented for different centrality classes. The particle yields and ratios follow a smooth energy dependence. Chemical freeze-out parameters, temperature, baryon chemical potential, and strangeness saturation factor obtained from the particle yields are presented. Intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T}) phenomena are discussed based on the ratio of the measured baryon-to-meson spectra and nuclear modification factor. The centrality dependence of various measurements presented show a similar behavior as seen in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV.

  8. Meson mass at real and imaginary chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2009-04-01

    Chemical-potential dependence of pi and sigma meson masses is analyzed at both real and imaginary chemical potentials, {mu}{sub R} and {mu}{sub I}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model that possesses both the extended Z{sub 3} symmetry and chiral symmetry. In the {mu}{sub I} region, the meson masses have the Roberge-Weiss periodicity. The {mu}{sub I} dependence of the meson masses becomes stronger as temperature increases. We argue that meson masses and physical quantities in the {mu}{sub R} region will be determined from lattice QCD data on meson masses in the {mu}{sub I} region by using the PNJL model, if the data are measured in the future.

  9. Meson mass at real and imaginary chemical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Kouno, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2009-04-01

    Chemical-potential dependence of pi and sigma meson masses is analyzed at both real and imaginary chemical potentials, μR and μI, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model that possesses both the extended Z3 symmetry and chiral symmetry. In the μI region, the meson masses have the Roberge-Weiss periodicity. The μI dependence of the meson masses becomes stronger as temperature increases. We argue that meson masses and physical quantities in the μR region will be determined from lattice QCD data on meson masses in the μI region by using the PNJL model, if the data are measured in the future.

  10. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current can be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity. Moreover, we show that in the relaxation-time approximation, the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is qualitatively similar to that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  11. Higher spin entanglement entropy at finite temperature with chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Jie-qiang

    2016-07-01

    It is generally believed that the semiclassical AdS3 higher spin gravity could be described by a two dimensional conformal field theory with W -algebra symmetry in the large central charge limit. In this paper, we study the single interval entanglement entropy on the torus in the CFT with a W_{3} deformation. More generally we develop the monodromy analysis to compute the two-point function of the light operators under a thermal density matrix with a W_{3} chemical potential to the leading order. Holographically we compute the probe action of the Wilson line in the background of the spin-3 black hole with a chemical potential. We find exact agreement.

  12. Lubricant base stock potential of chemically modified vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Sevim Z; Sharma, Brajendra K; Liu, Zengshe; Adhvaryu, Atanu

    2008-10-01

    The environment must be protected against pollution caused by lubricants based on petroleum oils. The pollution problem is so severe that approximately 50% of all lubricants sold worldwide end up in the environment via volatility, spills, or total loss applications. This threat to the environment can be avoided by either preventing undesirable losses, reclaiming and recycling mineral oil lubricants, or using environmentally friendly lubricants. Vegetable oils are recognized as rapidly biodegradable and are thus promising candidates as base fluids in environment friendly lubricants. Lubricants based on vegetable oils display excellent tribological properties, high viscosity indices, and flash points. To compete with mineral-oil-based lubricants, some of their inherent disadvantages, such as poor oxidation and low-temperature stability, must be corrected. One way to address these problems is chemical modification of vegetable oils at the sites of unsaturation. After a one-step chemical modification, the chemically modified soybean oil derivatives were studied for thermo-oxidative stability using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry and a thin-film micro-oxidation test, low-temperature fluid properties using pour-point measurements, and friction-wear properties using four-ball and ball-on-disk configurations. The lubricants formulated with chemically modified soybean oil derivatives exhibit superior low-temperature flow properties, improved thermo-oxidative stability, and better friction and wear properties. The chemically modified soybean oil derivatives having diester substitution at the sites of unsaturation have potential in the formulation of industrial lubricants. PMID:18783238

  13. Assessment of the extended Koopmans' theorem for the chemical reactivity: Accurate computations of chemical potentials, chemical hardnesses, and electrophilicity indices.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Dilan; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2016-01-30

    The extended Koopmans' theorem (EKT) provides a straightforward way to compute ionization potentials and electron affinities from any level of theory. Although it is widely applied to ionization potentials, the EKT approach has not been applied to evaluation of the chemical reactivity. We present the first benchmarking study to investigate the performance of the EKT methods for predictions of chemical potentials (μ) (hence electronegativities), chemical hardnesses (η), and electrophilicity indices (ω). We assess the performance of the EKT approaches for post-Hartree-Fock methods, such as Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled-electron pair theory, and their orbital-optimized counterparts for the evaluation of the chemical reactivity. Especially, results of the orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory method (with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set) for predictions of the chemical reactivity are very promising; the corresponding mean absolute errors are 0.16, 0.28, and 0.09 eV for μ, η, and ω, respectively. PMID:26458329

  14. Neutron stars and strange matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    The likelihood is investigated that quark matter with strangeness of order unity resides in neutron stars. In the strong coupling regime near rho/sub 0/ this is found to be unlikely. Considering higher densities where perturbative expansions are used, we find a lower bound to be at 7rho/sub 0/ for the transition density. This is higher than the inferred density of observed neutron stars, and thus the transition to quark matter is precluded. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Open strangeness production in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Niculescu

    2003-05-01

    An extensive program dedicated to the study of open strangeness systems was established in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. This program takes full advantage of the excellent characteristics of the CEBAF accelerator combined with the almost complete angular coverage of the CLAS detector. A general overview of the program is given, as well as results for the angular dependence of the electroproduction of kaon-hyperon final states.

  16. Comparing Chemical Mechanisms using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. It is produced by reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight [Atkinson,2000]. The chemistry of intermediate species formed during VOC degradation show a time dependence and impacts the amount of O3 produced by the VOC [Butler et al., 2011]. Representing the intricacies of these reactions is not viable for chemical mechanisms used in global and regional models due to the computational resources available. Thus, chemical mechanisms reduce the amount of reactions either by lumping chemical species together as a model species, reducing the number of reaction pathways or both. As different chemical mechanisms use varying reduction techniques and assumptions especially with respect to the intermediate degradation species, it is important to compare the temporal evolution of ozone production obtained from differing chemical mechanisms. In this study, chemical mechanisms are compared using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials (TOPP) [Butler et al.,2011]. TOPPs measure the effect of a VOC on the odd oxygen family (Ox), which includes O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and other species whose cycling effect O3 and NO2 production. TOPP values are obtained via a boxmodel run lasting seven diurnal cycles and tagging all species produced during VOC degradation; this enables the Ox production to be attributed to the VOC. This technique enables the temporal evolution of a VOCs' Ox production to be compared between the mechanisms. Comparing the TOPP profiles of the VOCs obtained using different mechanisms shows the effect of reduction techniques implemented by the mechanism and also allows a comparison of the tropospheric chemistry represented in the mechanisms. [Atkinson,2000] Atkinson, R. (2000). Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx. Atmospheric Environment, 34:2063-2101 [Butler et al., 2011] Butler, T. M

  17. Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

    1983-06-01

    This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

  18. CHEMICAL HAZARD EVALUATION FOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES: A METHOD FOR RANKING AND SCORING CHEMICALS BY POTENTIAL HUMAN HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 60,000 and 100,000 of the over than 8,000,000 chemicals listed by the Chemical Abstracts Services Registry are commercially produced and are potential environmental pollutants. Risk-based evaluation for these chemicals is often required to evaluate the potential impacts...

  19. Is the sub-millisecond pulsar strange?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Olinto, Angela V.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that the submillisecond pulsar from supernova 1987A is composed of strange matter is theoretically discussed. It is shown that for a range of hadron parameters, the maximum rotation rate of secularly stable strange stars may exceed that of the half-millisecond pulsar and the nonrotating maximum mass is greater than 1.52 solar mass. The low-mass companion(s) to SN1987A, inferred from the periodic modulations of the optical signal, can be accounted for by stable strange-matter lump(s) ejected from the young strange star.

  20. Computational prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Andreas; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Wichard, Jörg

    2006-10-01

    We report on the generation of computer-based models for the prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals as assessed in the in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) test. On the basis of publicly available CA-test results of more than 650 chemical substances, half of which are drug-like compounds, we generated two different computational models. The first model was realized using the (Q)SAR tool MCASE. Results obtained with this model indicate a limited performance (53%) for the assessment of a chromosome-damaging potential (sensitivity), whereas CA-test negative compounds were correctly predicted with a specificity of 75%. The low sensitivity of this model might be explained by the fact that the underlying 2D-structural descriptors only describe part of the molecular mechanism leading to the induction of chromosome aberrations, that is, direct drug-DNA interactions. The second model was constructed with a more sophisticated machine learning approach and generated a classification model based on 14 molecular descriptors, which were obtained after feature selection. The performance of this model was superior to the MCASE model, primarily because of an improved sensitivity, suggesting that the more complex molecular descriptors in combination with statistical learning approaches are better suited to model the complex nature of mechanisms leading to a positive effect in the CA-test. An analysis of misclassified pharmaceuticals by this model showed that a large part of the false-negative predicted compounds were uniquely positive in the CA-test but lacked a genotoxic potential in other mutagenicity tests of the regulatory testing battery, suggesting that biologically nonsignificant mechanisms could be responsible for the observed positive CA-test result. Since such mechanisms are not amenable to modeling approaches it is suggested that a positive prediction made by the model reflects a biologically significant genotoxic potential. An integration of the

  1. Semi-infinite jellium: Thermodynamic potential, chemical potential, and surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrobij, P. P.; Markovych, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    A general expression for the thermodynamic potential of the model of semi-infinite jellium is obtained. By using this expression, the surface energy for the infinite barrier model is calculated. The behavior of the surface energy and of the chemical potential as functions of the Wigner-Seitz radius and the influence of the Coulomb interaction between electrons on the calculated values is studied. It is shown that taking into account the Coulomb interaction between electrons leads to growth of the surface energy. The surface energy is positive in the entire area of the Wigner-Seitz radius. It is shown that taking into account the Coulomb interaction between electrons leads to a decrease of the chemical potential.

  2. Potential effects of environmental chemical contamination in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Francesca; Chiappa, Enrico; Gargani, Luna; Picano, Eugenio

    2014-04-01

    There is compelling evidence that prenatal exposures to environmental xenobiotics adversely affect human development and childhood. Among all birth defects, congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent of all congenital malformations and remains the leading cause of death. It has been estimated that in most cases the causes of heart defects remain unknown, while a growing number of studies have indicated the potential role of environmental agents as risk factors in CHD occurrence. In particular, maternal exposure to chemicals during the first trimester of pregnancy represents the most critical window of exposure for CHD. Specific classes of xenobiotics (e.g. organochlorine pesticides, organic solvents, air pollutants) have been identified as potential risk factors for CHD. Nonetheless, the knowledge gained is currently still incomplete as a consequence of the frequent heterogeneity of the methods applied and the difficulty in estimating the net effect of environmental pollution on the pregnant mother. The presence of multiple sources of pollution, both indoor and outdoor, together with individual lifestyle factors, may represent a further confounding element for association with the disease. A future new approach for research should probably focus on individual measurements of professional, domestic, and urban exposure to physical and chemical pollutants in order to accurately retrace the environmental exposure of parents of affected offspring during the pre-conceptional and pregnancy periods. PMID:24452958

  3. Estimation of Biodegradation Potential of Xenobiotic Organic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described to estimate the biodegradation potential of soluble, insoluble, and unknown organic chemicals. The method consists of two stages: (i) generation of a microbial inoculum in a bench scale semicontinuous activated sludge system during which microorganisms are acclimated to test material and the removal of dissolved organic carbon is monitored and (ii) biodegradability testing (CO2 evolution) in a defined minimal medium containing the test material as the sole carbon and energy source and a dilute bacterial inoculum obtained from the supernatant of homogenized activated sludge generated in the semicontinuous activated sludge system. Removal and biodegradation are measured using nonspecific methods, at initial concentrations of 5 to 10 mg of dissolved organic carbon per liter. Biodegradability data are accurately described by a nonlinear computer model which allows the rate and extent of biodegradation for different compounds to be compared and statistically examined. The evaluation of data generated in the combined removability-biodegradability system allows the biodegradation potential of a variety of xenobiotic organic chemicals to be estimated. PMID:16345479

  4. Role of nucleon strangeness in supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) evolution have highlighted the importance of thorough control over the microscopic physics responsible for such internal processes as neutrino heating. In particular, it has been suggested that modifications to the neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section can potentially play a crucial role in producing successful CCSN explosions. One possible source of such corrections can be found in a nonzero value for the nucleon's strange helicity content Δ s . In the present analysis, however, we show that theoretical and experimental progress over the past decade has suggested a comparatively small magnitude for Δ s , such that its sole effect is not sufficient to provide the physics leading to CCSN explosions.

  5. Maximum rotation frequency of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zdunik, J.L.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Using the MIT bag model of strange-quark matter, we calculate the maximum angular frequency of the uniform rotation of strange stars. After studying a broad range of the MIT bag-model parameters, we obtain an upper bound of 12.3 kHz.

  6. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei.

  7. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei.

  8. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  9. Proper time regularization at finite quark chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Li; Shi, Yuan-Mei; Xu, Shu-Sheng; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we use the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to study the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) chiral phase transition. To deal with the ultraviolet (UV) issue, we adopt the popular proper time regularization (PTR), which is commonly used not only for hadron physics but also for the studies with magnetic fields. This regularization scheme can introduce the infrared (IR) cutoff to include quark confinement. We generalize the PTR to zero temperature and finite chemical potential case use a completely new method, and then study the chiral susceptibility, both in the chiral limit case and with finite current quark mass. The chiral phase transition is second-order in μ = 0 and T = 0 and crossover at μ≠0 and T = 0. Three sets of parameters are used to make sure that the results do not depend on the parameter choice.

  10. QCD Phase Diagram at Finite Baryon and Isospin Chemical Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yahiro, M.; Kouno, H.

    2011-10-21

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for finite temperature T and finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub I}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data in the {mu}{sub I}-T plane at {mu}{sub B} = 0. In the {mu}{sub I}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub I} = 0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub I}-T plane at {mu}{sub B} = 0 as {mu}{sub I} increases.

  11. QCD in Neutron Stars and Strange Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Fridolin; Negreiros, Rodrigo

    2011-05-24

    This paper provides an overview of the possible role of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) for neutron stars and strange stars. The fundamental degrees of freedom of QCD are quarks, which may exist as unconfined (color superconducting) particles in the cores of neutron stars. There is also the theoretical possibility that a significantly large number of up, down, and strange quarks may settle down in a new state of matter known as strange quark matter, which, by hypothesis, could be more stable than even the most stable atomic nucleus, {sup 56}Fe. In the latter case new classes of self-bound, color superconducting objects, ranging from strange quark nuggets to strange quark stars, should exist. The properties of such objects will be reviewed along with the possible existence of deconfined quarks in neutron stars. Implications for observational astrophysics are pointed out.

  12. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  13. Importance of imaginary chemical potential for determination of QCD phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Kouno, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2009-10-01

    Lattice QCD (LQCD) calculations have the well-known sign problem at finite real chemical potential. One approach to circumvent the problem is the analytic continuation of LQCD data to real chemical potential from imaginary one. This approach, however, has some problems in moderate real chemical potential region. Therefore, we propose the new approach, Imaginary chemical potential matching approach, to quantitatively determine the QCD phase diagram by using a phenomenological model that reproduce LQCD data at imaginary chemical potential. In this approach, we fit the model parameter by LQCD data at imaginary chemical potential. At the imaginary chemical potential, the QCD partition function has the special periodicity called Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity. Therefore, an adopted model must have the RW periodicity. We reveal the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model has the RW periodicity. Moreover, we investigate the meson mass behavior and show that meson mass is useful for fitting the model parameters at imaginary chemical potential.

  14. QCD phase diagram at finite baryon and isospin chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2010-12-01

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for thermal systems with finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub iso}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data at not only {mu}{sub iso}={mu}{sub B}=0, but also {mu}{sub iso}>0 and {mu}{sub B}=0. In the {mu}{sub iso}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, where T is temperature, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub iso}=0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub iso}-T plane at {mu}{sub B}=0 as {mu}{sub iso} increases. The thermodynamics at small T is controlled by {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{pi}{sup 2}) defined by the chiral and pion condensates, {sigma} and {pi}.

  15. Molecular Spectrum Capture by Tuning the Chemical Potential of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yue; Yang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiannan; Tang, Hao; Huang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to its adjustable electronic properties and effective excitation of surface plasmons in the infrared and terahertz frequency range, research on graphene has attracted a great deal of attention. Here, we demonstrate that plasmon modes in graphene-coated dielectric nanowire (GNW) waveguides can be excited by a monolayer graphene ribbon. What is more the transverse resonant frequency spectrum of the GNW can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the chemical potential of graphene, and amplitude of the resonance peak varies linearly with the imaginary part of the analyte permittivity. As a consequence, the GNW works as a probe for capturing the molecular spectrum. Broadband sensing of toluene, ethanol and sulfurous anhydride thin layers is demonstrated by calculating the changes in spectral intensity of the propagating mode and the results show that the intensity spectra correspond exactly to the infrared spectra of these molecules. This may open an effective avenue to design sensors for detecting nanometric-size molecules in the terahertz and infrared regimes. PMID:27240372

  16. Molecular Spectrum Capture by Tuning the Chemical Potential of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yue; Yang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiannan; Tang, Hao; Huang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to its adjustable electronic properties and effective excitation of surface plasmons in the infrared and terahertz frequency range, research on graphene has attracted a great deal of attention. Here, we demonstrate that plasmon modes in graphene-coated dielectric nanowire (GNW) waveguides can be excited by a monolayer graphene ribbon. What is more the transverse resonant frequency spectrum of the GNW can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the chemical potential of graphene, and amplitude of the resonance peak varies linearly with the imaginary part of the analyte permittivity. As a consequence, the GNW works as a probe for capturing the molecular spectrum. Broadband sensing of toluene, ethanol and sulfurous anhydride thin layers is demonstrated by calculating the changes in spectral intensity of the propagating mode and the results show that the intensity spectra correspond exactly to the infrared spectra of these molecules. This may open an effective avenue to design sensors for detecting nanometric-size molecules in the terahertz and infrared regimes. PMID:27240372

  17. Crataegus pinnatifida: chemical constituents, pharmacology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaqi; Peng, Wei; Qin, Rongxin; Zhou, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Crataegus pinnatifida (Hawthorn) is widely distributed in China and has a long history of use as a traditional medicine. The fruit of C. pinnatifida has been used for the treatment of cardiodynia, hernia, dyspepsia, postpartum blood stasis, and hemafecia and thus increasing interest in this plant has emerged in recent years. Between 1966 and 2013, numerous articles have been published on the chemical constituents, pharmacology or pharmacologic effects and toxicology of C. pinnatifida. To review the pharmacologic advances and to discuss the potential perspective for future investigation, we have summarized the main literature findings of these publications. So far, over 150 compounds including flavonoids, triterpenoids, steroids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, lignans, hydroxycinnamic acids, organic acids and nitrogen-containing compounds have been isolated and identified from C. pinnatifida. It has been found that these constituents and extracts of C. pinnatifida have broad pharmacological effects with low toxicity on, for example, the cardiovascular, digestive, and endocrine systems, and pathogenic microorganisms, supporting the view that C. pinnatifida has favorable therapeutic effects. Thus, although C. pinnatifida has already been widely used as pharmacological therapy, due to its various active compounds, further research is warranted to develop new drugs. PMID:24487567

  18. The strange beauty of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; Ferretti, Jacopo; Santopinto, Elena

    2012-10-01

    The contribution of strange quarks to the proton is addressed in two different models of the nucleon, a phenomenological two-component model in which the nucleon is described in terms of an intrinsic three-quark structure surrounded by a meson cloud, and the unquenched quark model in which the effects of the sea quarks are taken into account through a 3P0 quark-antiquark pair creation mechanism. The results for the strange magnetic moment and the strangeness radius of the proton are found to be small, in agreement with the latest experimental results from parity-violating electron scattering and recent lattice calculations.

  19. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rate modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in fundamental physics: CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K0-anti K0 mixing has provided one of the most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, (SIGMA) decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given.

  20. Strangeness production in PHENIX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, D. O.

    2016-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured production of K±, Ks, K* and ϕmesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. While p+p collisions provide a baseline and are used for precision tests of pQCD calculations, for heavier colliding systems such as d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au nuclear modification factors are studied at different centralities. These systematic studies enrich current understanding of the strange meson production and its difference from light quark hadrons. The role of radial flow and coalescence in particle production is discussed.

  1. Antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Cameron S; Day, Brian J

    2016-01-15

    The continuing horrors of military conflicts and terrorism often involve the use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Many CWA and TIC exposures are difficult to treat due to the danger they pose to first responders and their rapid onset that can produce death shortly after exposure. While the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity of these agents are diverse, many are associated either directly or indirectly with increased oxidative stress in affected tissues. This has led to the exploration of various antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC exposures. Studies have been performed across a wide array of agents, model organisms, exposure systems, and antioxidants, looking at an almost equally diverse set of endpoints. Attempts at treating CWAs/TICs with antioxidants have met with mixed results, ranging from no effect to nearly complete protection. The aim of this commentary is to summarize the literature in each category for evidence of oxidative stress and antioxidant efficacy against CWAs and TICs. While there is great disparity in the data concerning methods, models, and remedies, the outlook on antioxidants as medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC management appears promising. PMID:26476351

  2. Production of organic chemicals via bioconversion: A review of the potential

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, S.A.; Ward, T.E.; Andrews, G.F.

    1991-07-01

    The United States should develop alternative feedstocks for production of organic chemicals as a step in reducing dependence on foreign oil and to protect the US economy from oil supply disruptions. Potential alternative feedstocks include lignocellulose, polysaccharides, and sugars. These feedstocks can be converted to organic chemicals via bioconversion; sources include feedstock crops (lignocellulosic, polysac-charide, and sugar crops grown specifically for use as feedstocks in organic chemicals production) and industrial, municipal, and agricultural wastes. A wide range of chemicals can be produced via bioconversion, including existing commodity chemicals and entirely new chemicals and polymers. In this review, potential feedstocks are described and are shown to be sufficient to support a bioconversion -- based organic chemicals industry. In addition, the current US organic chemicals industry is briefly described. The potential of bioconversion for production of existing commodity chemicals and entirely new chemicals and polymers is discussed. 228 refs., 21 tabs.

  3. Exposure to Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors in Vulnerable Groups and Potential Health Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures to chemical stressors Understanding of the myriad non-chemical stressorsLinkages between chemical and non-chemical stressors and health and well-beingPriority research in children’s environmental health, Tribal research needs, and disproportionately impacted comm...

  4. Characterization of Indian beers: chemical composition and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tapasya V; Sawant, Siddhi Y; Ghatak, Arindam A; Chaturvedi, Palak A; Gupte, Arpita M; Desai, Neetin S

    2015-03-01

    Chemical composition, antioxidant potential and corresponding lipid preoxidation of Indian commercial beers were evaluated. The presence of polyphenolic compounds such as tannic acid, gallic acid, catechol, vanillin, caffeic acid, quercetin, p-coumaric acid and rutin was quantified using LC-MS while the organic acids including tartaric, malic, acetic, citric and succinic acids were analysed using HPLC. Beer sample B8 had the greatest concentration of phenolic and flavonoid components (0.620 ± 0.084 mg/mL and 0.379 ± 0.020 mg/mL respectively) among the beer samples studied. The DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed in the range of 68.34 ± 0.85 % to 89.90 ± 0.71 % and ABTS radical cation scavenging activity was in the range of 59.75 ± 0.20 % to 76.22 ± 0.50 %. Percent protection in lipid peroxidation was quantified to be maximum (54.45 ± 3.39 %) in sample B5. Total phenolic content positively correlates with antioxidant assays, DPPH and ABTS (r = 0.35 and r = 0.58 respectively) with p < 0.001 and also with lipid peroxidation (r = 0.04) with p < 0.001. Negative correlation was observed between total flavonoid content with ABTS and lipid peroxidation (r = -0.1 and r = -0.05) respectively. The process of brewing warrants additional research to determine how the concentration of selected phenolic compounds can be increased. PMID:25745209

  5. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  6. Strange Creatures: An Additive Wood Sculpture Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create strange creatures using scraps of wood. Discusses how the students use the wood and other materials. Explains that the students also write about the habitat characteristics of their creatures. Includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  7. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  8. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  9. Strangeness in the Meson Cloud Model

    SciTech Connect

    Signal, A. I.

    2010-07-27

    I review progress in calculating strange quark and antiquark distributions of the nucleon using the meson cloud model. This progress parallels that of the meson cloud model, which is now a useful theoretical basis for understanding symmetry breaking in nucleon parton distribution functions. I examine the breaking of symmetries involving strange quarks and antiquarks, including quark--antiquark symmetry in the sea, SU(3) flavour symmetry and SU(6) spin-flavour symmetry.

  10. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker

    2009-10-01

    A brief overview of strangeness physics with the CLAS detector at JLab is given, mainly covering the domain of nucleon resonances. Several excited states predicted by the symmetric constituent quark model may have signiffcant couplings to the K+ or K0 channels. I will discuss data that are relevant in the search for such states in the strangeness channel, and give an outlook on the future prospects of the N* program at JLab with electromagnetic probes.

  11. Exact baryon, strangeness, and charge conservation in hadronic gas models

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Marais, M.; Suhonen, E.

    1997-11-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied assuming that particles can be described by a hadron gas in thermal and chemical equilibrium. The exact conservation of baryon number, strangeness, and charge is explicitly taken into account. For heavy ions the effect arising from the neutron surplus becomes important and leads to a substantial increase in, e.g., the {pi}{sup {minus}}/{pi}{sup +} ratio. A method is developed which is suited to the study of small systems up to baryon number 20, which, unfortunately excludes cases like S-S. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. On the resonance energy of the strange dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoichi Ikeda, Hiroyuki Kamano, Toru Sato

    2010-03-01

    The three-body resonance energies of the strange dibaryon are studied with the View the MathML source coupled-channels Faddeev equations. Our resonance energies are compared with those of an effective potential approach (EPA), where a coupling to the πYN channel is simulated by an effective View the MathML source potential, and the spectator momentum in the πYN Green function is neglected. About a 30% reduction of the binding energies due to neglecting the spectator momentum in the πYN Green's function is observed.

  13. Topological feature and phase structure of QCD at complex chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The pseudo-critical temperature of the confinement-deconfinement transition and the phase transition surface are investigated by using the complex chemical potential. We can interpret the imaginary chemical potential as the Aharonov-Bohm phase, then the analogy of the topological order suggests that the Roberge-Weiss endpoint would define the pseudo-critical temperature. The behavior of the Roberge-Weiss endpoint at small real quark chemical potential is investigated with the perturbative expansion. The expected QCD phase diagram at complex chemical potential is presented.

  14. Two-color QCD with non-zero chiral chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Goy, V. A.; Ilgenfritz, E. M.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Molochkov, A. V.; Müller-Preussker, M.; Petersson, B.

    2015-06-01

    The phase diagram of two-color QCD with non-zero chiral chemical potential is studied by means of lattice simulation. We focus on the influence of a chiral chemical potential on the confinement/deconfinement phase transition and the breaking/restoration of chiral symmetry. The simulation is carried out with dynamical staggered fermions without rooting. The dependences of the Polyakov loop, the chiral condensate and the corresponding susceptibilities on the chiral chemical potential and the temperature are presented. The critical temperature is observed to increase with increasing chiral chemical potential.

  15. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rare modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in our knowledge of fundamental physics. They have revealed to us CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing has provided us with one of our most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to our knowledge of fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they may bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, ..mu.. decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given. (WHK)

  16. Strangeness Production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has an extensive program of studying the electromagnetic production of strange particles. One of the main components of this program has been the study of both photo- and electropro- duction of K+ + â º0 and K+ + Å 0 final states. Experiments are being, or have been conducted in all three of Jefferson Lab s experimental halls measuring a wide range of observables at kinematics from threshold up to W H 3.0 GeV and Q2 from 0.4 up to 5 (GeV/c)2. The largest effort in this endeavor is taking place in Hall B using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Data have been taken at about ten different polarized electron beam energies and are currently being analyzed. Preliminary results [1] for one beam energy exist wherein the unpolarized cross section has been separated into three components: AT + eLAL, ATT , and ALT . The data indicate a t-channel dominance for the â º0 production and a strong s-channel dominance for Å 0 produc

  17. OPTIMIZING POTENTIAL GREEN REPLACEMENT CHEMICALS – BALANCING FUNCTION AND RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important focus of green chemistry is the design of new chemicals that are inherently less toxic than the ones they might replace, but still retain required functional properties. A variety of methods exist to measure or model both functional and toxicity surrogates that could...

  18. STICK INSECT CHEMICAL DEFENSES: POTENTIAL FOR USEFUL CHEMISTRY (ORDER PHASMATODEA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects make up the most numerous and diverse group of organisms on the planet, yet make up one of the least explored groups of organisms in natural products research (Dossey, A. T., Nat. Prod Rep. 2010, 27, 1737–1757). For about five years our stick insect chemical defense research has led to sever...

  19. Strange hadron production at low transverse momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest results of the PHOBOS experiment from the \\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 200\\ GeV Au+Au data are discussed. Those relevant to strangeness production are emphasized. These observations relate to the nature of the matter created when heavy ions collide at the highest achieved energy. The invariant yields of strange and non-strange charged hadrons at very low transverse momentum have been measured, and used to differentiate between different dynamical scenarios. In the intermediate transverse momentum range, the measured ratios of strange and anti-strange kaons approach one, while the antibaryon to baryon ratio is still significantly less, independent of collision centrality and transverse momentum. At high transverse momenta, we find that central and peripheral Au+Au collisions produce similar numbers of charged hadrons per participant nucleon pair, rather than per binary nucleon-nucleon collision. Finally, we describe the upgrades of PHOBOS completed for the 2003 d+Au and p+p run, which extend the transverse momentum range over which particle identification is possible and, at the same time, implement a trigger system selective for high-pT particles.

  20. Potential animal model of multiple chemical sensitivity with cholinergic supersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, D H; Miller, C S; Janowsky, D S; Russell, R W

    1996-07-17

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a clinical phenomenon in which individuals, after acute or intermittent exposure to one or more chemicals, commonly organophosphate pesticides (OPs), become overly sensitive to a wide variety of chemically-unrelated compounds, which can include ethanol, caffeine and other psychotropic drugs. The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats were selectively bred to be more sensitive to the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) compared to their control counterparts, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats. The present paper will summarize evidence which indicates that the FSL rats exhibit certain similarities to individuals with MCS. In addition to their greater sensitivity to DFP, the FSL rats are more sensitive to nicotine and the muscarinic agonists arecoline and oxotremorine, suggesting that the number of cholinergic receptors may be increased, a conclusion now supported by biochemical evidence. The FSL rats have also been found to exhibit enhanced responses to a variety of other drugs, including the serotonin agonists m-chlorophenylpiperazine and 8-OH-DPAT, the dopamine antagonist raclopride, the benzodiazepine diazepam, and ethanol. MCS patients report enhanced responses to many of these drugs, indicating some parallels between FSL rats and MCS patients. The FSL rats also exhibit reduced activity and appetite and increased REM sleep relative to their FRL controls. Because these behavioral features and the enhanced cholinergic responses are also observed in human depressives, the FSL rats have been proposed as a genetic animal model of depression. It has also been reported that MCS patients have a greater incidence of depression, both before and after onset of their chemical sensitivities, so cholinergic supersensitivity may be a state predisposing individuals to depressive disorders and/or MCS. Further exploration of the commonalities and differences between MCS patients, human depressives, and FSL rats will help to elucidate the

  1. Bioconcentration potential of organic environmental chemicals in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F.

    1986-12-01

    A list of environmental chemicals detectable in adipose tissue and/or milk of non-occupationally exposed humans is presented. Besides their physiochemical properties (n-octanol/water partition coefficient and water solubility), their acceptable daily intake (ADI) values, production figures, fate in the environment, concentrations in human adipose tissue, and data from total diet studies from market basket investigations are given. Average bioconcentration factors (BCF) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), DDT, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dieldrin, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (alpha-HCH, beta-HCH, gamma-HCH, delta-HCH), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene (BHT) in human adipose tissue are calculated. The bioconcentration factors (wet wt basis) of these compounds are between 3 and 47 times higher in humans than in rats. The environmental chemicals are divided into three groups in respect to their bioconcentration factors in human adipose tissue: group I, high BCF (greater than 100); group II, medium BCF (10-100); and group III, low BCF (less than 10). The bioconcentration factors are useful for hazard assessment of chemicals to humans.

  2. Bandwidth Study on Energy Use and Potential Energy Saving Opportunities in U.S. Chemical Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine Brueske, Caroline Kramer, Aaron Fisher

    2015-06-01

    Energy bandwidth studies of U.S. manufacturing sectors can serve as foundational references in framing the range (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. chemical manufacturing. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate the energy used in the production of 74 individual chemicals, representing 57% of sector-wide energy consumption. Energy savings opportunities for individual chemicals and for 15 subsectors of chemicals manufacturing are based on technologies currently in use or under development; these potential savings are then extrapolated to estimate sector-wide energy savings opportunity.

  3. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  4. Electronic Chemical Potentials of Porous Metal–Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The binding energy of an electron in a material is a fundamental characteristic, which determines a wealth of important chemical and physical properties. For metal–organic frameworks this quantity is hitherto unknown. We present a general approach for determining the vacuum level of porous metal–organic frameworks and apply it to obtain the first ionization energy for six prototype materials including zeolitic, covalent, and ionic frameworks. This approach for valence band alignment can explain observations relating to the electrochemical, optical, and electrical properties of porous frameworks. PMID:24447027

  5. Chemical diversity and antiviral potential in the pantropical Diospyros genus.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, Laure-Anne; Eparvier, Véronique; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Stien, Didier; Litaudon, Marc

    2016-07-01

    A screening using a dengue replicon virus-cell-based assay was performed on 3563 ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts from different parts of 1500 plants. The screening led to the selection of species from the genus Diospyros (Ebenaceae), among which 25 species distributed in tropical areas showed significant inhibitory activity on dengue virus replication. A metabolic analysis was conducted from the UPLC-HRMS profiles of 33 biologically active and inactive plant extracts, and their metabolic proximity is presented in the form of a dendrogram. The results of the study showed that chemical similarity is not related to plant species or organ. Overall, metabolomic profiling allowed us to define large groups of extracts, comprising both active and inactive ones. Closely related profiles from active extracts might indicate that the common major components of these extracts were responsible for the antiviral activity, while the comparison of chemically similar active and inactive extracts, will permit to find compounds of interest. Eventually, the phytochemical investigation of Diospyros glans bark EtOAc extract afforded usnic acid and 7 known ursane- and lupane-type triterpenoids, among which 5 were found significantly active against dengue virus replication. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was also evaluated on a DENV-NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase assay. PMID:27126897

  6. Potential for portal detection of human chemical and biological contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary S.; McGann, William J.

    2001-08-01

    The walk-through metal-detection portal is a paradigm of non-intrusive passenger screening in aviation security. Modern explosive detection portals based on this paradigm will soon appear in airports. This paper suggests that the airborne trace detection technology developed for that purpose can also be adapted to human chemical and biological contamination. The waste heat of the human body produces a rising warm-air sheath of 50-80 liters/sec known as the human thermal plume. Contained within this plume are hundreds of bioeffluents from perspiration and breath, and millions of skin flakes. Since early medicine, the airborne human scent was used in the diagnosis of disease. Recent examples also include toxicity and substance abuse, but this approach has never been quantified. The appearance of new bioeffluents or subtle changes in the steady-state may signal the onset of a chemical/biological attack. Portal sampling of the human thermal plume is suggested, followed by a pre-concentration step and the detection of the attacking agent or the early human response. The ability to detect nanogram levels of explosive trace contamination this way was already demonstrated. Key advantages of the portal approach are its rapidity and non-intrusiveness, and the advantage that it does not require the traditional bodily fluid or tissue sampling.

  7. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  8. Recent results from strangeness in transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Botvina, A. S.; Bleicher, M.

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings we discuss recent developments in the microscopic description of strange particle production in nuclear collisions. We put a special emphasis on the production of hypernuclei at the upcoming FAIR and NICA facilities as well as the deep sub threshold, ϕ and Ξ- production yields measured with the HADES experiment. Employing new resonance decay channels we obtain a satisfactory description of ϕ and Ξ- production in deep sub threshold Ar+KCl reactions. Our results implicate that no new medium effects are required to describe the rare strange particle production data from low energy nuclear collisions.

  9. Connecting coherent structures and strange attractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, Laurence R.

    1990-01-01

    A concept of turbulence derived from nonlinear dynamical systems theory suggests that turbulent solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations are restricted to strange attractors, and, by implication, that turbulent phenomenology must find some expression or source in the structure of these mathematical objects. Examples and discussions are presented to link coherent structures to some of the commonly known characteristics of strange attractors. Basic to this link is a geometric interpretation of conditional sampling techniques employed to educe coherent structures that offers an explanation for their appearance in measurements as well as their size.

  10. Chemical analysis and potential health risks of hookah charcoal.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Yehya; Dalibalta, Sarah; Abu-Farha, Nedal

    2016-11-01

    Hookah (waterpipe) smoking is a very common practice that has spread globally. There is growing evidence on the hazardous consequences of smoking hookah, with studies indicating that its harmful effects are comparable to cigarette smoking if not worse. Charcoal is commonly used as a heating source for hookah smoke. Although charcoal briquettes are thought to be one of the major contributors to toxicity, their composition and impact on the smoke generated remains largely unidentified. This study aims to analyze the elemental composition of five different raw synthetic and natural charcoals by using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Elemental analysis showed that the raw charcoals contain heavy metals such as zinc, iron, cadmium, vanadium, aluminum, lead, chromium, manganese and cobalt at concentrations similar, if not higher than, cigarettes. In addition, thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the smoke produced from burning the charcoal samples. The smoke emitted from charcoal was found to be the source of numerous compounds which could be hazardous to health. A total of seven carcinogens, 39 central nervous system depressants and 31 respiratory irritants were identified. PMID:27343945

  11. Molecular simulation of aqueous electrolytes: Water chemical potential results and Gibbs-Duhem equation consistency tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R.

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with molecular simulation of the chemical potentials in aqueous electrolyte solutions for the water solvent and its relationship to chemical potential simulation results for the electrolyte solute. We use the Gibbs-Duhem equation linking the concentration dependence of these quantities to test the thermodynamic consistency of separate calculations of each quantity. We consider aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions, using the standard SPC/E force field for water and the Joung-Cheatham force field for the electrolyte. We calculate the water chemical potential using the osmotic ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm by varying the number of water molecules at a constant amount of solute. We demonstrate numerical consistency of these results in terms of the Gibbs-Duhem equation in conjunction with our previous calculations of the electrolyte chemical potential. We present the chemical potential vs molality curves for both solvent and solute in the form of appropriately chosen analytical equations fitted to the simulation data. As a byproduct, in the context of the force fields considered, we also obtain values for the Henry convention standard molar chemical potential for aqueous NaCl using molality as the concentration variable and for the chemical potential of pure SPC/E water. These values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.

  12. CHEMICAL REMOVAL OF BIOMASS FROM WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS: SCREENING CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL INTEREST. (R825392)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A protocol was developed to rapidly assess the efficiency of chemical washing for the removal of excess biomass from biotrickling filters for waste air treatment. Although the experiment was performed on a small scale, conditions were chosen to simulate application in full-scale ...

  13. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  14. 'Strange money': risk, finance and socialized debt.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Nigel

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores an essential but neglected aspect of recent discussions of the banking and financial system, namely money itself. Specifically, I take up a distinction drawn by Susan Strange which has never been fully elaborated: between a financial system that is global, and an international monetary system that remains largely territorial. I propose a sociological elaboration of this distinction by examining each category, 'finance' and 'money', in terms of its distinctive orientation to risk and debt. Money is distinguished by its high degree of liquidity and low degree of risk, corresponding to expectations that derive from its status as a 'claim upon society'- a form of socialized debt. But as Strange argued, these features of money are being undermined by the proliferation of sophisticated instruments of financial risk management -'strange money'- that, as monetary substitutes, both weaken states' capacity to manage money, and more broadly, contribute to 'overbanking'. The ultimate danger, according to Strange, is the 'death of money'. The paper concludes by exploring the implications of the distinction for sociological arguments about the changing nature of money. PMID:21361907

  15. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites. PMID:26443032

  16. Chemical composition and methane potential of commercial food wastes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Victoria M; De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in anaerobic digestion in the U.S. However, there is little information on the characterization of commercial food waste sources as well as the effect of waste particle size on methane yield. The objective of this research was to characterize four commercial food waste sources: (1) university dining hall waste, (2) waste resulting from prepared foods and leftover produce at a grocery store, (3) food waste from a hotel and convention center, and (4) food preparation waste from a restaurant. Each sample was tested in triplicate 8L batch anaerobic digesters after shredding and after shredding plus grinding. Average methane yields for the university dining, grocery store, hotel, and restaurant wastes were 363, 427, 492, and 403mL/dry g, respectively. Starch exhibited the most complete consumption and particle size did not significantly affect methane yields for any of the tested substrates. Lipids represented 59-70% of the methane potential of the fresh substrates. PMID:27506286

  17. CURRENT STATE OF PREDICTING THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGY POTENTIAL OF CHEMICALS: WHAT ARE THE ISSUES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current State of Predicting the Respiratory Allergy Potential of Chemicals: What Are the Issues? M I. Gilmour1 and S. E. Loveless2, 1USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC and 2DuPont Haskell Laboratory, Newark, DE.

    Many chemicals are clearly capable of eliciting immune respon...

  18. POTENTIAL INHALATION EXPOSURE TO VOLATILE CHEMICALS IN WATER-BASED HARD-SURFACE CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential inhalation exposure of building occupants to volatile chemicals in water-based hard-surface cleaners was evaluated by analyzing 267 material safety data sheets (MSDSs). Among the 154 chemicals reported, 44 are volatile or semi-volatile. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) r...

  19. An Event-Related Potentials Study of Mental Rotation in Identifying Chemical Structural Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how mental rotation strategies affect the identification of chemical structural formulas. This study conducted event-related potentials (ERPs) experiments. In addition to the data collected in the ERPs, a Chemical Structure Conceptual Questionnaire and interviews were also admin-istered for data…

  20. WORKSHOP ON STATUS OF TEST METHODS FOR ASSESSING POTENTIAL OF CHEMICALS TO INDUCE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the association between allergy and asthma and the increasing incidence of morbidity and mortality due to asthma, there is growing concern over the potential of industrial chemicals to produce allergic reactions in the respiratory tract. Two classes of chemicals have b...

  1. EVALUATION OF TRICLOSAN AS A POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL (POSTER SESSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan is an industrial antibacterial agent commonly used in soaps, toothpaste and cleaners. The present investigation was designed to examine the endocrine modulating potential of Triclosan because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidial estrogens (e.g. ...

  2. a Direct Probe for Chemical Potentials Difference Between Neutron and Protons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Zhang, Yan-Li; Wang, Shan-Shan

    We briefly introduce the newly proposed probe to the neutron and proton chemical potential (and density) difference, which is called as the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD). The IBD probe is related to the chemical potential difference of neutrons and protons between two reactions, at the same time, the nuclear density difference between two reactions. The relationship between the IBD probe and the isoscaling method has also been discussed.

  3. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite U(1) chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Long; Ge, Xian-Hui; Wu, Shang-Yu

    2016-05-01

    We perform the calculation of the drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic N=4 SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a U(1) chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any value of the anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of the anisotropy. We find the effect of the chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for our charged solution.

  4. Prioritizing chemicals for environmental management in China based on screening of potential risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangyi; Mao, Yan; Sun, Jinye; Shen, Yingwa

    2014-03-01

    The rapid development of China's chemical industry has created increasing pressure to improve the environmental management of chemicals. To bridge the large gap between the use and safe management of chemicals, we performed a comprehensive review of the international methods used to prioritize chemicals for environmental management. By comparing domestic and foreign methods, we confirmed the presence of this gap and identified potential solutions. Based on our literature review, we developed an appropriate screening method that accounts for the unique characteristics of chemical use within China. The proposed method is based on an evaluation using nine indices of the potential hazard posed by a chemical: three environmental hazard indices (persistence, bioaccumulation, and eco-toxicity), four health hazard indices (acute toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicity), and two environmental exposure hazard indices (chemical amount and utilization pattern). The results of our screening agree with results of previous efforts from around the world, confirming the validity of the new system. The classification method will help decisionmakers to prioritize and identify the chemicals with the highest environmental risk, thereby providing a basis for improving chemical management in China.

  5. POTENTIALLY TOXIC AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES IN THE INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC CHEMICALS AND ORGANIC DYES AND PIGMENTS INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program were identification of the potential hazards associated with the production and use of industrial organic chemicals (IOC) and organic dyes and pigments (ODP) and determination of the state of the art of the control and treatment of potentially hazard...

  6. Comparison of Modeling Approaches to Prioritize Chemicals Based on Estimates of Exposure and Exposure Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    While only limited data are available to characterize the potential toxicity of over 8 million commercially available chemical substances, there is even less information available on the exposure and use-scenarios that are required to link potential toxicity to human and ecologic...

  7. SEARCH FOR NUCLEI CONTAINING TWO STRANGE QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MAY,M.

    1997-10-13

    This paper discusses a search for nuclei containing two strange quarks performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The goals and approach of experiment E885 are reviewed. Preliminary missing mass spectra for a subset of the data are presented, showing sensitivity for {Xi} hypernuclei and H particle searches. Existence of an angular correlation between pions in the sequential decay of {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclei is suggested on theoretical grounds.

  8. Strangeness and meson-nucleon sigma terms

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, Harleen; Sharma, Neetika

    2011-10-21

    The chiral constituent quark model ({chi}CQM) has been extended to calculate the flavor structure of the nucleon through the meson-nucleon sigma terms which have large contributions from the quark sea and are greatly affected by chiral symmetry breaking and SU(3) symmetry breaking. The hidden strangeness component in the nucleon has also been investigated and its significant contribution is found to be consistent with the recent available experimental observations.

  9. Chemical potential, Helmholtz free energy and entropy of argon with kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Do, D. D.; Nicholson, D.; Ustinov, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine the chemical potential, Helmholtz free energy and entropy of a fluid within the course of a simulation. The procedure requires no recourse to auxiliary methods to determine the chemical potential, such as the implementation of a Widom scheme in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, as it is determined within the course of the simulation. The equation for chemical potential is proved, for the first time in the literature, to have a direct connection with inverse Widom potential theory in using real molecules rather than ghost molecules. We illustrate this new procedure by several examples, including fluid argon and adsorption of argon as a non-uniform fluid on a graphite surface and in slit pores.

  10. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  11. Charmed-strange mesons revisited: Mass spectra and strong decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the present experimental status of charmed-strange mesons, we perform a systematic study of the charmed-strange meson family in which we calculate the mass spectra of the charmed-strange meson family by taking a screening effect into account in the Godfrey-Isgur model and investigate the corresponding strong decays via the quark pair creation model. These phenomenological analyses of charmed-strange mesons not only shed light on the features of the observed charmed-strange states, but also provide important information on future experimental search for the missing higher radial and orbital excitations in the charmed-strange meson family, which will be a valuable task in LHCb, the forthcoming Belle II, and PANDA.

  12. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  13. Strangeness asymmetry of the nucleon in the statistical parton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrely, Claude; Soffer, Jacques; Buccella, Franco

    2007-04-01

    We extend to the strange quarks and antiquarks, the statistical approach of parton distributions and we calculate the strange quark asymmetry s -sbar. We find that the asymmetry is small, positive in the low x region and negative in the high x region. In this framework, the polarized strange quarks and antiquarks distributions, which are obtained simultaneously, are found to be both negative for all x values.

  14. Heavy quark scattering and quenching in a QCD medium at finite temperature and chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrehrah, H.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Cassing, W.; Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J.

    2015-05-01

    The heavy quark collisional scattering on partons of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) is studied in a quantum chromodynamics medium at finite temperature and chemical potential. We evaluate the effects of finite parton masses and widths, finite temperature T , and quark chemical potential μq on the different elastic cross sections for dynamical quasiparticles (on- and off-shell particles in the QGP medium as described by the dynamical quasiparticle model "DQPM") using the leading order Born diagrams. Our results show clearly the decrease of the q Q and g Q total elastic cross sections when the temperature and the quark chemical potential increase. These effects are amplified for finite μq at temperatures lower than the corresponding critical temperature Tc(μq) . Using these cross sections we, furthermore, estimate the energy loss and longitudinal and transverse momentum transfers of a heavy quark propagating in a finite temperature and chemical potential medium. Accordingly, we have shown that the transport properties of heavy quarks are sensitive to the temperature and chemical potential variations. Our results provide some basic ingredients for the study of charm physics in heavy-ion collisions at Beam Energy Scan at RHIC and CBM experiment at FAIR.

  15. Phase diagram of dynamical twisted-mass Wilson fermions at finite isospin chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Oliver; Kieburg, Mario; Splittorff, K.; Verbaarschot, Jacobus J. M.; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-05-01

    We consider the phase diagram of twisted-mass Wilson fermions of two-flavor QCD in the parameter space of the quark mass, the isospin chemical potential, the twist angle and the lattice spacing. This work extends earlier studies in the continuum and those at zero chemical potential. We evaluate the phase diagram as well as the spectrum of the (pseudo-)Goldstone bosons using the chiral Lagrangian for twisted-mass Wilson fermions at nonzero isospin chemical potential. The phases are obtained from a mean field analysis. At zero twist angle we find that already an infinitesimal isospin chemical potential destroys the Aoki phase. The reason is that in this phase we have massless Goldstone bosons with a nonzero isospin charge. At finite twist angle, only two different phases are present—one phase which is continuously connected to the Bose condensed phase at nonzero chemical potential, and another phase which is continuously connected to the normal phase. For either zero or maximal twist, the phase diagram is more complicated, as the saddle-point equations allow for more solutions.

  16. Impact of strange quark matter nuggets on pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crusts of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Golf, B.; Hellmers, J.; Weber, F.

    2009-07-15

    This article presents an investigation into the pycnonuclear reaction rates in dense crustal matter of neutron stars contaminated with strange quark matter nuggets. The presence of such nuggets in the crustal matter of neutron stars would be a natural consequence if Witten's strange quark matter hypothesis is correct. The methodology presented in this article is a recreation of a recent representation of nuclear force interactions embedded within pycnonuclear reaction processes. The study then extends the methodology to incorporate distinctive theoretical characteristics of strange quark matter nuggets, like their low charge-per-baryon ratio, and then assesses their effects on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Particular emphasis is put on the impact of color superconductivity on the reaction rates. Depending on whether quark nuggets are in this novel state of matter, their electric charge properties vary drastically, which turns out to have a dramatic effect on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Future nuclear fusion network calculations may thus have the potential to shed light on the existence of strange quark matter nuggets and on whether they are in a color superconducting state, as suggested by QCD.

  17. Chemically transferable coarse-grained potentials from conditional reversible work calculations.

    PubMed

    Brini, E; van der Vegt, N F A

    2012-10-21

    The representability and transferability of effective pair potentials used in multiscale simulations of soft matter systems is ill understood. In this paper, we study liquid state systems composed of n-alkanes, the coarse-grained (CG) potential of which may be assumed pairwise additive and has been obtained using the conditional reversible work (CRW) method. The CRW method is a free-energy-based coarse-graining procedure, which, by means of performing the coarse graining at pair level, rigorously provides a pair potential that describes the interaction free energy between two mapped atom groups (beads) embedded in their respective chemical environments. The pairwise nature of the interactions combined with their dependence on the chemically bonded environment makes CRW potentials ideally suited in studies of chemical transferability. We report CRW potentials for hexane using a mapping scheme that merges two heavy atoms in one CG bead. It is shown that the model is chemically and thermodynamically transferable to alkanes of different chain lengths in the liquid phase at temperatures between the melting and the boiling point under atmospheric (1 atm) pressure conditions. It is further shown that CRW-CG potentials may be readily obtained from a single simulation of the liquid state using the free energy perturbation method, thereby providing a fast and versatile molecular coarse graining method for aliphatic molecules. PMID:23083154

  18. Equation of state for five-dimensional hyperspheres from the chemical-potential route.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, René D; Santos, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    We use the Percus-Yevick approach in the chemical-potential route to evaluate the equation of state of hard hyperspheres in five dimensions. The evaluation requires the derivation of an analytical expression for the contact value of the pair distribution function between particles of the bulk fluid and a solute particle with arbitrary size. The equation of state is compared with those obtained from the conventional virial and compressibility thermodynamic routes and the associated virial coefficients are computed. The pressure calculated from all routes is exact up to third density order, but it deviates with respect to simulation data as density increases, the compressibility and the chemical-potential routes exhibiting smaller deviations than the virial route. Accurate linear interpolations between the compressibility route and either the chemical-potential route or the virial one are constructed. PMID:26382402

  19. Spontaneous parity and charge-conjugation violations at real isospin and imaginary baryon chemical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Hiroaki; Kishikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is investigated at real isospin and imaginary quark chemical potentials by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In the region, parity symmetry is spontaneously broken by the pion-superfluidity phase transition, whereas charge-conjugation symmetry is spontaneously violated by the Roberge-Weiss transition. The chiral (deconfinement) crossover at zero isospin and quark chemical potentials is a remnant of the parity (charge-conjugation) violation. The interplay between the parity and charge-conjugation violations are analyzed, and it is investigated how the interplay is related to the correlation between the chiral and deconfinement crossovers at zero isospin and quark chemical potentials.

  20. Magnon spin transport driven by the magnon chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, L. J.; Peters, K. J. H.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Duine, R. A.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a linear-response transport theory of diffusive spin and heat transport by magnons in magnetic insulators with metallic contacts. The magnons are described by a position-dependent temperature and chemical potential that are governed by diffusion equations with characteristic relaxation lengths. Proceeding from a linearized Boltzmann equation, we derive expressions for length scales and transport coefficients. For yttrium iron garnet (YIG) at room temperature we find that long-range transport is dominated by the magnon chemical potential. We compare the model's results with recent experiments on YIG with Pt contacts [L. J. Cornelissen et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 1022 (2015), 10.1038/nphys3465] and extract a magnon spin conductivity of σm=5 ×105 S/m. Our results for the spin Seebeck coefficient in YIG agree with published experiments. We conclude that the magnon chemical potential is an essential ingredient for energy and spin transport in magnetic insulators.

  1. Equation of state for five-dimensional hyperspheres from the chemical-potential route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, René D.; Santos, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    We use the Percus-Yevick approach in the chemical-potential route to evaluate the equation of state of hard hyperspheres in five dimensions. The evaluation requires the derivation of an analytical expression for the contact value of the pair distribution function between particles of the bulk fluid and a solute particle with arbitrary size. The equation of state is compared with those obtained from the conventional virial and compressibility thermodynamic routes and the associated virial coefficients are computed. The pressure calculated from all routes is exact up to third density order, but it deviates with respect to simulation data as density increases, the compressibility and the chemical-potential routes exhibiting smaller deviations than the virial route. Accurate linear interpolations between the compressibility route and either the chemical-potential route or the virial one are constructed.

  2. Screening of chemicals for human bioaccumulative potential with a physiologically based toxicokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Tonnelier, Arnaud; Coecke, Sandra; Zaldívar, José-Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Human bioaccumulative potential is an important element in the risk assessment of chemicals. Due to the high number of synthetic chemicals, there exists the need to develop prioritisation strategies. The purpose of this study was to develop a predictive tool for human bioaccumulation risk assessment that incorporates not only the chemical properties of the compounds, but also the processes that tend to decrease the concentration of the compound such as metabolisation. We used a generic physiologically based toxicokinetic model that based on in vitro human liver metabolism data, minimal renal excretion and a constant exposure was able to assess the bioaccumulative potential of a chemical. The approach has been analysed using literature data on well-known bioaccumulative compounds and liver metabolism data from the ECVAM database and a subset of the ToxCast phase I chemical library-in total 94 compounds covering pharmaceuticals, plant protection products and industrial chemicals. Our results provide further evidence that partitioning properties do not allow for a reliable screening criteria for human chemical hazard. Our model, based on a 100% intestinal absorption assumption, suggests that metabolic clearance, plasma protein-binding properties and renal excretion are the main factors in determining whether bioaccumulation will occur and its amount. It is essential that in vitro metabolic clearance tests with metabolic competent cell lines as well as plasma protein-binding assays be performed for suspected bioaccumulative compounds. PMID:22089525

  3. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A.; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H.; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H.Kim

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  4. Thermodynamical vibronic coupling constant and density: Chemical potential and vibronic coupling in reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Haruta, Naoki; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Vibronic coupling constant (VCC) and density (VCD) defined for a pure state, which have been successfully applied for reactions of fullerenes and nanographenes as reactivity indices, are extended for a mixed state. The extended VCC and VCD, thermodynamical vibronic coupling constant (ThVCC) and density (ThVCD), are formulated in the finite-temperature grand-canonical ensemble. ThVCD can be applied for charge transfer of a fractional number of electron. Based on the total differential of chemical potential, the relationship between chemical potential, absolute hardness, and vibronic coupling in a bimolecular reaction is discussed.

  5. Chiral symmetry restoration at large chemical potential in strongly coupled SU(N) gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tomboulis, E. T.

    2013-12-15

    We show that at sufficiently large chemical potential SU(N) lattice gauge theories in the strong coupling limit with staggered fermions are in a chirally symmetric phase. The proof employs a polymer cluster expansion which exploits the anisotropy between timelike and spacelike directions in the presence of a quark chemical potential μ. The expansion is shown to converge in the infinite volume limit at any temperature for sufficiently large μ. All expectations of chirally non-invariant local fermion operators vanish identically, or, equivalently, their correlations cluster exponentially, within the expansion. The expansion itself may serve as a computational tool at large μ and strong coupling.

  6. Chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters in biological systems from Kirkwood-Buff theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul E

    2006-08-01

    New expressions for chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters for ternary mixtures are derived for open, semiopen, and closed ensembles in terms of Kirkwood-Buff integrals, where all three components are present at finite concentrations. This is achieved using a simple approach that avoids the use of the general matrix formulation of Kirkwood-Buff theory. The resulting expressions provide a rigorous foundation for the analysis of experimental and simulation data. Using the results, a simple model is developed and used to investigate the possible effects of finite protein concentrations on the corresponding cosolvent dependent chemical potential and denaturation thermodynamics. PMID:16679363

  7. Determination of QCD phase diagram from the imaginary chemical potential region

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yuji; Kashiwa, Kouji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Masayuki

    2009-05-01

    We test the reliability of the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model, comparing the model result with the lattice data at nonzero imaginary chemical potential. The PNJL model with the vector-type four-quark and scalar-type eight-quark interactions reproduces the lattice data on the pseudocritical temperatures of the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The QCD phase diagram in the real chemical potential region is predicted by the PNJL model. The critical end point survives, even if the vector-type four-quark interaction is taken into account.

  8. Shot noise in superconducting wires with a periodic modulation of the chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Zhao, Hong-Kang; Xu, H. Q.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the shot noise in superconducting wires under the periodic modulation of the chemical potential. The nonequilibrium Green's function technique is employed, and the formula for current and shot noise is obtained. The coupling between the Majorana bound states at ends of wire can be tuned by the periodic modulation of chemical potential. It is related with the strength A and the phase δ intimately. The current, shot noise and the corresponding Fano factor display oscillation behavior as the strength A increases. In addition, the coupling between Majorana bound states can be suppressed by strong coupling between leads and superconducting wire.

  9. Energy Dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ Interactions and Resonance Pole of Strange Dibaryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y.; Kamano, H.; Sato, T.

    2010-09-01

    We study the resonance energy of the strange dibaryons using two models with the energy-independent and energy-dependent potentials for the s-wave $\\bar{K}N$ interaction, both of which are derived by certain reductions from the leading order term of the effective chiral Lagrangian. These potential models produce rather different off-shell behaviors of the two-body $\\bar{K}N$ - $\\pi\\Sigma$ amplitudes in $I=0$ channel, i.e., the model with energy-independent (energy-dependent) potential predicts one (two) resonance pole in the $\\Lambda(1405)$ region, while they describe the available data equally well. We find that the energy-independent potential model predicts one resonance pole of the strange dibaryons, whereas the energy-dependent potential model predicts two resonance poles: one is the shallow quasi-bound state of the $\\bar{K}NN$, and another is the resonance of the $\\pi Y N$ with large width. An investigation of the binding energy of the strange dibaryons will make a significant contribution to clarify resonance structure of s-wave $\\bar{K}N$ -$\\pi\\Sigma$ around the $\\Lambda(1405)$ region.

  10. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N* resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c2 in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000)++ are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  11. Deconfinement and chiral restoration in non-local PNJL models at zero and imaginary chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagura, V.; Gómez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2012-01-01

    We study the deconfinement and chiral restoration transitions in the context of non-local PNJL models, considering the impact of the presence of dynamical quarks on the scale parameter appearing in the Polyakov potential. We show that the corresponding critical temperatures are naturally entangled for both zero and imaginary chemical potential, in good agreement with lattice QCD results. We also analyze the Roberge-Weiss transition, which is found to be first order at the associated endpoint.

  12. Field Characterization of Potential Reference Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico: Chemical and Biological Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Jed G. Campbell, Peggy S. Harris, Darrin D. Dantin, Steve S. Foss, Robert L. Quarles, James C. Moore and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. Characterization of Potential Reference Areas in the Gulf of Mexico: Near-Coastal Sediment Chemical and Biological Quality. En...

  13. MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAMMALIAN SCREENING ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF POTENTIAL
    ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON MALES.
    Authors: L E Gray 1 , J Furr 1 , M G Price 2 , C J Wolf 3 and J S Ostby 1
    Institutions: 1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NH...

  14. Calculation of equation of state of QCD at zero temperature and finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei-Min; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we calculate the equation of state (EOS) of QCD at zero temperature and finite chemical potential by using several models of quark propagators including the Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) model, the hard-dense-loop (HDL) approximation and the quasi-particle model. The results are analyzed and compared with the known results in the literature.

  15. Effect of the chiral chemical potential on the position of the critical endpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Yong-Long; Cui, Zhu-Fang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-02-01

    The effect of chiral imbalance on the QCD phase structure is studied in a framework of Dyson-Schwinger equations. It is found that the chiral phase transition is always a crossover in the T -μ5 plane when μ is 0 MeV or small values. The trail of the critical endpoints (CEPs) along with the variation of the chiral chemical potential is given. We find that the effect of μ5 is somewhat different from the existing chiral model calculations; namely, the CEP first moves roughly along the phase boundary of T -μ plane in a smaller μ direction, as in the chiral model calculations, but turns in the opposite direction to move away from the small chemical potential region, which has never been observed before. In addition, we also discuss the possibility of whether the study at finite temperature and chiral chemical potential can provide some useful information for the detection of the CEP at finite temperature and baryon chemical potential, since the former can be calculated in lattice QCD without the sign problem.

  16. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease Processes: Potential Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction...

  17. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239, a Potential Psychrophilic Chemical Producer through Syngas Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonkyu; Song, Yoseb

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239 is an anaerobic, psychrophilic, and chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that is a potential platform for producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. We report here the draft genome sequence of A. bakii DSM 8239 (4.14 Mb) to elucidate its physiological and metabolic properties related to syngas fermentation. PMID:26404601

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) is a computer-based model developed for estimating dietary exposure to chemical residues in food. The DEPM is based on food consumption data from the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) administered by the United States ...

  20. An alternative approach to the Boltzmann distribution through the chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Michele; Job, Georg

    2016-05-01

    The Boltzmann distribution is one of the most significant results of classical physics. Despite its importance and its wide range of application, at high school level it is mostly presented without any derivation or link to some basic ideas. In this contribution we present an approach based on the chemical potential that allows to derive it directly from the basic idea of thermodynamical equilibrium.

  1. Iso-chemical potential trajectories in the P-T plane for He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, B.; Nissen, J. A.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Trajectories of constant chemical potential in the P-T plane serve as an integral formulation of London's equation. The trajectories are useful for analysis and synthesis of fountain effect pump performance. A family of trajectories is generated from available numerical codes.

  2. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  3. HD 207739 - A strange composite star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S. B.; Holm, A. V.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    This star, classified F8 IIe + B:, has a very unusual ultraviolet spectrum, with abnormally strong and numerous absorption features in the far-UV and exceptionally strong Mg II emission. There is some resemblance to shell and pre-main-sequence B stars, but it more closely matches the strange spectra of the eclipsing systems VV Cep and SX Cas, and it probably has considerable circumstellar material at fairly high temperature. HD 207739 is probably an interacting binary and needs to be monitored for light and velocity variations.

  4. Radial oscillations of charged strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbañil, J. D. V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-04-01

    The radial oscillations of charged strange quark stars is investigated. It is considered that the fluid pressure follows the MIT bag model equation of state and the charge density to be proportional to the energy density, ρe = αρ (where α is proportionality constant). The modified equations of radial oscillations to the introduction of the electric charge are integrated to determine the fundamental mode. It is found that the stability of the charged object decreases with the increment of the central energy density and with the growth of the charge fraction.

  5. Quark number susceptibilities, strangeness, and dynamical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavai, Rajiv V.; Gupta, Sourendu

    2001-10-01

    We report the first results on the strange quark number susceptibility χs over a large range of temperatures, mainly in the plasma phase of QCD. χs jumps across the phase transition temperature Tc and grows rapidly with temperature above but close to Tc. For all quark masses and susceptibilities in the entire temperature range studied, we find a significant departure from ideal-gas values. We also observe a strong correlation between these quantities and the susceptibility in the pseudoscalar channel, supporting ideas of ``dynamical confinement'' in the high temperature phase of the QCD plasma.

  6. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Strange attractors in rattleback dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Aleksei V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.

    2003-04-01

    This review is dedicated to the dynamics of the rattleback, a phenomenon with curious physical properties that is studied in nonholonomic mechanics. All known analytical results are collected here, and some results of our numerical simulation are presented. In particular, three-dimensional Poincare maps associated with dynamical systems are systematically investigated for the first time. It is shown that the loss of stability of periodic and quasiperiodic solutions, which gives rise to strange attractors, is typical of the three-dimensional maps related to rattleback dynamics. This explains some newly discovered properties of the rattleback related to the transition from regular to chaotic solutions at certain values of the physical parameters.

  7. Stability of charged strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Arbañil, José D. V.; Malheiro, Manuel

    2015-12-17

    We investigate the hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged stars made of a charged perfect fluid. The matter contained in the star follows the MIT bag model equation of state and the charge distribution to a power-law of the radial coordinate. The hydrostatic equilibrium and the stability of charged strange stars are analyzed using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation and the Chandrasekhar’s equation pulsation, respectively. These two equation are modified from their original form to the inclusion of the electric charge. We found that the stability of the star decreases with the increment of the central energy density and with the increment of the amount of charge.

  8. A sudden change of a strange repeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming-Quan; Wu, Shunguang; He, Da-Ren

    1998-03-01

    We have observed a transient chaos[1] after a boundary crisis in a simplified model of an impact oscillator. A strange repeller was found there and the scaling of the averaged life time was calculated both analytically and numerically. With the developing of the control parameter, the transient chaos was suddenly destroyed via a collision of a pair of the saddle nodes with a non-differential point of the mapping. The repeller disappeared and the scaling rules significantly changed as well after this collision. [1]:T.Tél, in ``Directions in Chaos'', vol.3, ed. by Hao Bai-lin, World Scientific Pub., Singapore, 1990.

  9. Strangeness of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Koutsou, Giannis; Vaquero, Alejandro; ETM Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present a nonperturbative calculation of the strangeness of the nucleon yN within the framework of lattice QCD. This observable is known to be an important cornerstone to interpret results from direct dark matter detection experiments. We perform a lattice computation for yN with an analysis of systematic effects originating from discretization, finite size, chiral extrapolation and excited state effects leading to the value of yN=0.173 (50 ) . The rather large uncertainty of this value of yN is dominated by systematic uncertainties which we are able to quantify in this work.

  10. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2010-08-05

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the {Lambda}(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the {Xi} resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  11. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  12. Strangeness at high temperatures: from hadrons to quarks.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Ding, H-T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Maezawa, Y; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Wagner, M

    2013-08-23

    Appropriate combinations of up to fourth order cumulants of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number and electric charge fluctuations, obtained from lattice QCD calculations, have been used to probe the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom at high temperatures. For temperatures up to the chiral crossover, separate contributions of strange mesons and baryons can be well described by an uncorrelated gas of hadrons. Such a description breaks down in the chiral crossover region, suggesting that the deconfinement of strangeness takes place at the chiral crossover. On the other hand, the strangeness carrying degrees of freedom inside the quark gluon plasma can be described by a weakly interacting gas of quarks only for temperatures larger than twice the chiral crossover temperature. In the intermediate temperature window, these observables show considerably richer structures, indicative of the strongly interacting nature of the quark gluon plasma. PMID:24010429

  13. Exchange repulsive potential adaptable for electronic structure changes during chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, D.

    2015-04-28

    Hybrid methods combining quantum mechanical (QM) and classical calculations are becoming important tools in chemistry. The popular approach to calculate the interaction between QM and classical calculations employs interatomic potentials. In most cases, the interatomic potential is constructed of an electrostatic (ES) potential and a non-ES potential. Because QM treatment is employed in the calculation of the ES potential, the electronic change can be considered in this ES potential. However, QM treatment of the non-ES potential is difficult because of high computational cost. To overcome this difficulty of evaluating the non-ES potential, we proposed an exchange repulsive potential as the main part of the non-ES potential on the basis of a QM approach. This potential is independent of empirical parameters and adaptable for electronic structure. We combined this potential with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution and successfully applied it to the chemical reactions in aqueous phase.

  14. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  15. Chemical diversity of microbial volatiles and their potential for plant growth and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Malnoy, Mickael; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) are produced by a wide array of microorganisms ranging from bacteria to fungi. A growing body of evidence indicates that MVOCs are ecofriendly and can be exploited as a cost-effective sustainable strategy for use in agricultural practice as agents that enhance plant growth, productivity, and disease resistance. As naturally occurring chemicals, MVOCs have potential as possible alternatives to harmful pesticides, fungicides, and bactericides as well as genetic modification. Recent studies performed under open field conditions demonstrate that efficiently adopting MVOCs may contribute to sustainable crop protection and production. We review here the chemical diversity of MVOCs by describing microbial–plants and microbial–microbial interactions. Furthermore, we discuss MVOCs role in inducing phenotypic plant responses and their potential physiological effects on crops. Finally, we analyze potential and actual limitations for MVOC use and deployment in field conditions as a sustainable strategy for improving productivity and reducing pesticide use. PMID:25821453

  16. Searches for a possible strangeness S = -2 dibaryon

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    Since the advent of QCD there has been a strong interest in manifestations of quark degrees of freedom in medium energy nuclear and particle physics. Within the framework of multiquark states the emphasis has centered on states with more than three quarks bound by colour forces rather than by the conventional mesonic forces. Dibaryon systems have played an important role within that framework. One of the most spectacular and exciting predictions is the possible existence, according to the MIT bag model, of a stable, flavor-singlet, strangeness = /sup -/2,J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ dihyperon, called by R. Jaffe the H particle. It is a six-quark object (2u, 2d, 2s quarks) with a predicted mass around 2150 MeV, i.e., below the ..lambda lambda.. mass with a binding energy around 80 MeV. Its decay channels would be restricted to ..sigma..N and ..lambda..N, via the weak interaction. The relevant two body states are shown. A similar prediction was obtained on the basis of the same model by Mulders et al., with a mass of 2164 MeV for this state. For completeness it should be mentioned that in a recent estimate of the center-of-mass correction to the static MIT bag model, the authors suggest that the dilambda mass moves up to just above the ..lambda lambda.. threshold. These calculations are undergoing further tets. Although all these results come from a specific model, Lipkin has argued that the general features of QCD and the known baryon mass splittings imply that the six-quark state with charge zero, spin zero, and strangeness = /sup -/2 would have the greatest binding potential.

  17. FEROS Finds a Strange Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    New Spectrograph Explores the Skies from La Silla While a major effort is now spent on the Very Large Telescope and its advanced instruments at Paranal, ESO is also continuing to operate and upgrade the extensive research facilities at La Silla, its other observatory site. ESO PR Photo 03a/99 ESO PR Photo 03a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 1212 pix - 606k] [High-Res - JPEG: 1981 x 3000 pix - 3.6M] Caption to PR Photo 03a/99 : This photo shows the ESO 1.52-m telescope, installed since almost 30 years in its dome at the La Silla observatory in the southern Atacama desert. The new FEROS spectrograph is placed in an adjacent, thermally and humidity controlled room in the telescope building (where a classical coudé spectrograph was formerly located). The light is guided from the telescope to the spectrograph by 14-m long optical fibres. Within this programme, a new and powerful spectrograph, known as the Fibre-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) , has recently been built by a consortium of European institutes. It was commissioned in late 1998 at the ESO 1.52-m telescope by a small team of astronomers and engineers and has already produced the first, interesting scientific results. FEROS is able to record spectra of comparatively faint stars. For instance, it may be used to measure the chemical composition of stars similar to our Sun at distances of up to about 2,500 light-years, or to study motions in the atmospheres of supergiant stars in the Magellanic Clouds. These satellite galaxies to the Milky Way are more than 150,000 light-years away and can only be observed with telescopes located in the southern hemisphere. First FEROS observations uncover an unusual star ESO PR Photo 03b/99 ESO PR Photo 03b/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 958 pix - 390k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3594 pix - 1.7M] Caption to PR Photo 03b/99 : This diagramme shows the spectrum of the Lithium rich giant star S50 in the open stellar cluster Be21 , compared to that of a normal giant star ( S156

  18. Dilepton and strangeness production probed with HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Rustamov, A.

    2012-05-15

    With the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI we have studied dilepton production in the few-GeV energy regime in various collisions systems, from elementary NN, over pA, up to the medium-heavy Ar + KCl system. We have thus confirmed the puzzling results of the former DLS Collaboration at the Bevalac. While we have traced the origin of the excess pair yield in CC collisions to elementary pp and pn processes, in our Ar + KCl data a contribution from the dense phase of the collision has been identified. Together with the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, we have also obtained in the Ar + KCl system at 1.76 A GeV a high-statistics data set on open and hidden strangeness, i.e. K{sup {+-}}, K{sub s}{sup 0}, {Lambda}, {phi}, and {Xi}{sup -}, allowing for a comprehensive discussion of strangeness production in this system.

  19. Notes on properties of holographic strange metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Pang, Da-Wei

    2010-11-15

    We investigate properties of holographic strange metals in p+2 dimensions, generalizing the analysis performed in [S. A. Hartnoll et al. J. High Energy Phys. 04 (2010) 120]. The bulk spacetime is a p+2-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, while the role of charge carriers is played by probe D-branes. We mainly focus on massless charge carriers, where most of the results can be obtained analytically. We obtain exact results for the free energy and calculate the entropy density and the heat capacity, as well as the speed of sound at low temperature. We obtain the DC conductivity and DC Hall conductivity and find that the DC conductivity takes a universal form in the large density limit, while the Hall conductivity is also universal in all dimensions. We also study the resistivity in different limits and clarify the condition for the linear dependence on the temperature, which is a key feature of strange metals. We show that our results for the DC conductivity are consistent with those obtained via the Kubo formula and we obtain the charge diffusion constant analytically. The corresponding properties of massive charge carriers are also discussed in brief.

  20. Strangeness electroproduction on the nucleon at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Carman

    2012-04-01

    High-precision measurements of strange particle production from both proton and neutron targets are a core part of the physics program with the CLAS spectrometer in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Measurements have been carried out at beam energies up to 6 GeV in experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets. This talk will focus on the electroproduction measurements that have been completed, which include cross sections and hyperon polarization observables for K{sup +}Y (Y = {Lambda}{Sigma}{sup 0}) final states over a broad kinematic range in momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and invariant energy W, while spanning nearly the full kaon center-of-mass angular range. These data in the strangeness sector are necessary to better understand the different production mechanisms for {Lambda} and {Sigma} hyperons and to disentangle the different resonant and non-resonant amplitudes in the intermediate state. The usefulness of the CLAS electroproduction data as part of a coupled-channel model fit will be discussed as well as an outlook of this program for the future.

  1. Notes on properties of holographic strange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Pang, Da-Wei

    2010-11-01

    We investigate properties of holographic strange metals in p+2 dimensions, generalizing the analysis performed in [S. A. Hartnoll J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 04 (2010) 120]. The bulk spacetime is a p+2-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, while the role of charge carriers is played by probe D-branes. We mainly focus on massless charge carriers, where most of the results can be obtained analytically. We obtain exact results for the free energy and calculate the entropy density and the heat capacity, as well as the speed of sound at low temperature. We obtain the DC conductivity and DC Hall conductivity and find that the DC conductivity takes a universal form in the large density limit, while the Hall conductivity is also universal in all dimensions. We also study the resistivity in different limits and clarify the condition for the linear dependence on the temperature, which is a key feature of strange metals. We show that our results for the DC conductivity are consistent with those obtained via the Kubo formula and we obtain the charge diffusion constant analytically. The corresponding properties of massive charge carriers are also discussed in brief.

  2. Strangeness and charm in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Cabrera, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; Romanets, Olena; Salcedo, Lorenzo Luis

    2013-09-01

    The properties of strange (K, Kbar and K) and open-charm (D, Dbar and D*) mesons in dense matter are studied using a unitary approach in coupled channels for meson-baryon scattering. In the strangeness sector, the interaction with nucleons always comes through vector-meson exchange, which is evaluated by chiral and hidden gauge Lagrangians. For the interaction of charmed mesons with nucleons we extend the SU(3) Weinberg-Tomozawa Lagrangian to incorporate spin-flavor symmetry and implement a suitable flavor symmetry breaking. The in-medium solution for the scattering amplitude accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies. On one hand, we obtain the K, Kbar and K spectral functions in the nuclear medium and study their behaviour at finite density, temperature and momentum. We also make an estimate of the transparency ratio of the γA→K+KA‧ reaction, which we propose as a tool to detect in-medium modifications of the K meson. On the other hand, in the charm sector, several resonances with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. The properties of these states in matter are analyzed and their influence on the open-charm meson spectral functions is studied. We finally discuss the possible formation of D-mesic nuclei at FAIR energies.

  3. Intrinsic Clearance of Xenobiotic Chemicals by Liver Microsomes: Assessment of Trophic Magnification Potentials.

    PubMed

    Guomao, Zheng; Yi, Wan; Jianying, Hu

    2016-06-21

    The use of trophic magnification factors (TMFs) to characterize the bioaccumulation potentials of chemicals was encouraged; however, the method for the assessment of trophic magnification potentials is still lacking. We optimized the in vitro assays used for the measurement of intrinsic clearance in liver microsomes by incorporating benzo[a]pyrene (B(a)P) as a benchmark compound. The intrinsic clearance of 40 compounds was then measured in microsomes from fish (weevers) and birds (quail); the characteristics of the trophic transfer of these 40 compounds were previously investigated in an aquatic food web in Bohai in northern China. Chemicals that are biotransformed at a rate similar to or higher than that of B[a]P in the microsomes of both weevers and quail (in vitro intrinsic clearance values, CL; CL/CLB[a]P: 0.1 to 2.4) generally exhibited no significant trophic magnification or dilution in the food web (TMF ≈ 1 or < 1), whereas chemicals that are biotransformed at extremely slow rates compared with B[a]P (CL/CLB[a]P: 0 to 0.2) showed significant trophic magnification in the food web (TMF > 1). The in vitro intrinsic clearance values of the target chemicals were found to be consistent with their respective trophic transfer behavior in the aquatic food web. Significant negative correlations were also found between the TMFs and the intrinsic clearance values of all target chemicals obtained in microsomes from both weevers and quail. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that biotransformation rates (CL/CLB[a]P) are a more important factor compared with the lipophilicity of the chemicals (log Kow) in the assessment of the trophic magnification of chemicals in the aquatic food web. PMID:27152959

  4. Screening of potential cancer preventing chemicals for induction of glutathione in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    White, E L; Ross, L J; Schmid, S M; Kelloff, G J; Steele, V E; Hill, D L

    1998-01-01

    With BRL 3A hepatocytes, a series of selected, potentially chemopreventive chemicals was evaluated for their capacity to elevate glutathione (GSH) levels. Since sodium selenite consistently increased GSH levels by approximately 70%, it was selected as a positive control. Of 62 test chemicals, eighteen stimulated GSH levels by >30%, but eleven of these had only a modest effect or displayed considerable toxicity. At non-toxic concentrations, seven compounds had substantial activity: black tea extract (decaffeinated), trans-chalcone, N-ethyl-9-cis-retinamide, indole-3-carbinol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) curcumin and N-(4-carboxyphenyl)retinamide. These should be considered for further development as cancer preventive agents. PMID:9468590

  5. The protoelectric potential map (PPM): an absolute two-dimensional chemical potential scale for a global understanding of chemistry.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Valentin; Himmel, Daniel; Pütz, Katharina; Goll, Sascha K; Krossing, Ingo

    2014-04-01

    We introduce the protoelectric potential map (PPM) as a novel, two-dimensional plot of the absolute reduction potential (peabs scale) combined with the absolute protochemical potential (Brønsted acidity: pHabs scale). The validity of this thermodynamically derived PPM is solvent-independent due to the scale zero points, which were chosen as the ideal electron gas and the ideal proton gas at standard conditions. To tie a chemical environment to these reference states, the standard Gibbs energies for the transfer of the gaseous electrons/protons to the medium are needed as anchor points. Thereby, the thermodynamics of any redox, acid-base or combined system in any medium can be related to any other, resulting in a predictability of reactions even over different media or phase boundaries. Instruction is given on how to construct the PPM from the anchor points derived and tabulated with this work. Since efforts to establish "absolute" reduction potential scales and also "absolute" pH scales already exist, a short review in this field is given and brought into relation to the PPM. Some comments on the electrochemical validation and realization conclude this concept article. PMID:24615801

  6. Calculating excess chemical potentials using dynamic simulations in the fourth dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.; Eisenmesser, E.; Post, C.B.; Roux, B.

    1999-08-01

    A general method for computing excess chemical potentials is presented. The excess chemical potential of a solute or ligand molecule is estimated from the potential of mean-force (PMF) calculated along a nonphysical fourth spatial dimension, {ital w}, into which the molecule is gradually inserted or from which it is gradually abstracted. According to this {open_quotes}4D-PMF{close_quotes} (four dimensional) scheme, the free energy difference between two limiting states defines the excess chemical potential: At w={plus_minus}{infinity}, the molecule is not interacting with the rest of the system, whereas at w=0, it is fully interacting. Use of a fourth dimension avoids the numerical instability in the equations of motion encountered upon growing or shrinking solute atoms in conventional free energy perturbation simulations performed in three dimensions, while benefiting from the efficient sampling of configurational space afforded by PMF calculations. The applicability and usefulness of the method are illustrated with calculations of the hydration free energy of simple Lennard-Jones (LJ) solutes, a water molecule, and camphor, using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. Physical insight into the nature of the PMF profiles is gained from a continuum treatment of short- and long-range interactions. The short-range barrier for dissolution of a LJ solute in the added dimension provides an apparent surface tension of the solute. An approximation to the long-range behavior of the PMF profiles is made in terms of a continuum treatment of LJ dispersion and electrostatic interactions. Such an analysis saves the need for configurational sampling in the long-range limit of the fourth dimension. The 4D-PMF method of calculating excess chemical potentials should be useful for neutral solute and ligand molecules with a wide range of sizes, shapes, and polarities. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Recently disclosed chemical entities as potential candidates for management of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stec, Jozef; Abourashed, Ehab A

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious diseases worldwide. The drug discovery process of novel, safe and effective agents to combat TB involves identification of new molecular targets and novel chemical scaffolds. The current anti-TB drug pipeline includes several small molecules with more to follow as new candidates are disclosed. This review highlights the most significant findings described in 78 international, European and US patents for chemically diverse compounds as prospective anti-TB medications. Main points of emphasis include chemical classification, in vitro and in vivo activity, ADME/Tox profile and mycobacterial target as described in each patent. The collective mass of compounds disclosed in the reviewed patents introduces new candidates as potential therapeutic agents for TB infections. PMID:26174569

  8. Pattern of (Multi)strange (Anti)baryon Production and Search for Deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann

    1998-04-01

    We study (multi)strange particle abundances obtained recently in relativistic heavy ion collisions and determine thermal and chemical source parameters(J. Letessier et al., Phys. Lett. B410 (1997) 315--322 hep-ph/9710310 and: Acta Physica Polonica in press, hep- ph/9710340). These are primarily constrained by (multi)strange (anti)baryon relative abundances, which have been measured for Pb--Pb 158 A GeV interactions(I. Kralik, for WA97 collaboration, QM97 Tsukuba, to appear in Nucl. Phys. A) and S-S/W/Pb 200 A GeV interactions(See: proceedings of S'96-Budapest, APH N.S., Heavy Ion Physics 4 (1996) vii--x). We have extended our analysis and have now determined the properties of the particle source using the fitted macro canonical parameters, allowing as required for non-equilibrium dynamics of the locally thermal fireball. We find that in the 158 A GeV Pb--Pb collisions the entropy per baryon, energy per baryon, strangeness per baryon implied by particle spectra are all in the range of values associated commonly with the deconfined QGP phase.

  9. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari; Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2008-01-10

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.

  10. Production of strange clusters in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.; Baltz, A.J.; Pang, Yang; Schlagel, T.J.; Kahana, S.H.

    1993-02-01

    We address a number of issues related to the production of strangeness in high energy heavy ion collisions, including the possibility that stable states of multi-strange hyperonic or quark matter might exist, and the prospects that such objects may be created and detected in the laboratory. We make use of events generated by the cascade code ARC to estimate the rapidity distribution dN/dy of strange clusters produced in Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at AGS energies. These calculations are performed in a simple coalescence model, which yields a consistent description of the strange cluster (d, [sup 3]HE, [sup 3]H, [sup 4]He) production at these energies. If a doubly strange, weakly bound [Lambda][Lambda] dibaryon exists, we find that it is produced rather copiously in Au+Au collisions, with dN/dy [approximately]0.1 at raid-rapidity. If one adds another non-strange or strange baryon to a cluster, the production rate decreases by roughly one or two orders of magnitude, respectively. For instance, we predict that the hypernucleus [sub [Lambda][Lambda

  11. Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristic determinant and edge universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Nowak, Maciej A.; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-08-01

    We derive an exact formula for the stochastic evolution of the characteristic determinant of a class of deformed Wishart matrices following from a chiral random matrix model of QCD at finite chemical potential. In the WKB approximation, the characteristic determinant describes a sharp droplet of eigenvalues that deforms and expands at large stochastic times. Beyond the WKB limit, the edges of the droplet are fuzzy and described by universal edge functions. At the chiral point, the characteristic determinant in the microscopic limit is universal. Remarkably, the physical chiral condensate at finite chemical potential may be extracted from current and quenched lattice Dirac spectra using the universal edge scaling laws, without having to solve the QCD sign problem.

  12. Chemical compounds toxic to invertebrates isolated from marine cyanobacteria of potential relevance to the agricultural industry.

    PubMed

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2014-11-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  13. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    PubMed Central

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  14. Nonlocal Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and imaginary chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Hell, Thomas; Weise, Wolfram

    2011-09-01

    With the aim of setting constraints for the modeling of the QCD phase diagram, the phase structure of the two-flavor Polyakov-loop-extended Nambu and Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model is investigated in the range of imaginary chemical potentials (μI) and compared with available Nf=2 lattice QCD results. The calculations are performed using the advanced nonlocal version of the PNJL model with the inclusion of vector-type quasiparticle interactions between quarks, and with wave-function-renormalization corrections. It is demonstrated that the nonlocal PNJL model reproduces important features of QCD at finite μI, such as the Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity and the RW transition. Chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures for Nf=2 turn out to coincide both at zero chemical potential and at finite μI. Detailed studies are performed concerning the RW endpoint and its neighborhood where a first-order transition occurs.

  15. Distortion of surface plasmon polariton propagation on graphene due to chemical potential variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanatiadis, Stamatios; Kantartzis, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    The variation of graphene chemical potential owing to surface plasmon polariton excitation and its influence on the propagation properties of the latter is systematically examined in this paper. Although the chemical potential is controlled via a constant electric field bias, the excitation of the highly confined surface wave can considerably affect it, thus disrupting the wave natural propagation. To this aim, the propagation properties of the surface wave are extracted to reliably estimate the aforesaid distortion effect with regard to frequency. Numerical results, obtained in terms of an accurate finite-difference time-domain scheme, certify this interesting convention. Furthermore, the electrodynamic forces on the free electrons of the graphene layer are calculated to justify the electrostatic assumption.

  16. A consistent calculation of the chemical potential for dense simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Bomont, Jean-Marc

    2006-05-28

    A general method to calculate the excess chemical potential betamuex, that is based on the Kirkwood coupling parameter's dependence of the correlation functions, is presented. The expression for the one particle bridge function B(1)r is derived for simple fluids with spherical interactions. Only the knowledge of the bridge function B(2)r is required. The accuracy of our approach is illustrated for a dense hard sphere fluid. As far as B(2)r is considered as exact, B(1)r is found to be, at high densities, the normalized bridge function -B(2)rB(2)(r=0). This expression ensures a consistent calculation of the excess chemical potential by satisfying implicitly the Gibbs-Duhem constraint. Only the pressure-consistency condition is necessary to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the fluid. PMID:16774388

  17. Production of strange clusters in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.; Baltz, A.J.; Pang, Yang; Schlagel, T.J.; Kahana, S.H.

    1993-02-01

    We address a number of issues related to the production of strangeness in high energy heavy ion collisions, including the possibility that stable states of multi-strange hyperonic or quark matter might exist, and the prospects that such objects may be created and detected in the laboratory. We make use of events generated by the cascade code ARC to estimate the rapidity distribution dN/dy of strange clusters produced in Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at AGS energies. These calculations are performed in a simple coalescence model, which yields a consistent description of the strange cluster (d, {sup 3}HE, {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He) production at these energies. If a doubly strange, weakly bound {Lambda}{Lambda} dibaryon exists, we find that it is produced rather copiously in Au+Au collisions, with dN/dy {approximately}0.1 at raid-rapidity. If one adds another non-strange or strange baryon to a cluster, the production rate decreases by roughly one or two orders of magnitude, respectively. For instance, we predict that the hypernucleus {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 6}He should have dN/dy {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} for Au+Au central collisions. It should be possible to measure the successive {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{minus} weak decays of this object. We comment on the possibility that conventional multi-strange hypernuclei may serve as ``doorway states`` for the production of stable configurations of strange quark matter, if such states exist.

  18. Using low-energy neutrinos from pion decay at rest to probe the proton strangeness.

    PubMed

    Pagliaroli, G; Lujan-Peschard, C; Mitra, M; Vissani, F

    2013-07-12

    The study of the neutral current elastic scattering of neutrinos on protons at lower energies can be used as a compelling probe to improve our knowledge of the strangeness of the proton. We consider a neutrino beam generated from pion decay at rest, as provided by a cyclotron or a spallation neutron source and a 1 kton scintillating detector with a potential similar to the Borexino detector. Despite several backgrounds from solar and radioactive sources, it is possible to estimate two optimal energy windows for the analysis, one between 0.65 and 1.1 MeV and another between 1.73 and 2.2 MeV. The expected number of neutral current events in these two regions, for an exposure of 1 yr, is enough to obtain an error on the strange axial charge 10 times smaller than available at present. PMID:23889387

  19. Stream geochemistry, chemical weathering and CO 2 consumption potential of andesitic terrains, Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Steven T.; Carey, Anne E.; Johnson, Brent M.; Welch, Susan A.; Lyons, W. Berry; McDowell, William H.; Pigott, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of chemical weathering of andesitic-dacitic material on high-standing islands (HSIs) have shown these terrains have some of the highest observed rates of chemical weathering and associated CO 2 consumption yet reported. However, the paucity of stream gauge data in many of these terrains has limited determination of chemical weathering product fluxes. In July 2006 and March 2008, stream water samples were collected and manual stream gauging was performed in watersheds throughout the volcanic island of Dominica in the Lesser Antilles. Distinct wet and dry season solute concentrations reveal the importance of seasonal variations on the weathering signal. A cluster analysis of the stream geochemical data shows the importance of parent material age on the overall delivery of solutes. Observed Ca:Na, HCO 3:Na and Mg:Na ratios suggest crystallinity of the parent material may also play an important role in determining weathering fluxes. From total dissolved solids concentrations and mean annual discharge calculations we calculate chemical weathering yields of (6-106 t km -2 a -1), which are similar to those previously determined for basalt terrains. Silicate fluxes (3.1-55.4 t km -2 a -1) and associated CO 2 consumption (190-1575 × 10 3 mol km -2 a -1) determined from our study are among the highest determined to date. The calculated chemical fluxes from our study confirm the weathering potential of andesitic-dacitic terrains and that additional studies of these terrains are warranted.

  20. The hapten-atopy hypothesis III: the potential role of airborne chemicals.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J P; Basketter, D A; Dearman, R J; Puangpet, P; Kimber, I

    2014-01-01

    One explanation for the large increase in the prevalence of atopic disease in developed countries during the last 50 years is the 'hygiene hypothesis'. This proposes that a reduced exposure to pathogenic microorganisms at a key period(s) during development results in the maintenance or acquisition of an atopic phenotype. Alternatively, or additionally, we have postulated that increased exposure to chemicals generally, and to irritant/haptenic chemicals in particular, during critical windows of maternal pregnancy/early life have also contributed to changes in the prevalence of atopic disease. Having previously reviewed the potential roles of oral and cutaneous exposure to chemicals on the subsequent diagnosis of atopic disease, we here consider possible evidence of a role for exposure to airborne chemicals as a contributory factor in acquired susceptibility to atopic allergy. After controlling for known confounders, five specific maternal occupations during pregnancy have been implicated as being associated with subsequent atopic disease in the offspring. Each of these occupations is characterized by high and persistent exposure to airborne chemicals. High-level exposure to volatile organic compounds in the domestic environment, either during pregnancy or in early life, is also associated with development of childhood atopic disease. Similarly, sustained exposure to airborne chlorinated chemicals from swimming pools during childhood has been associated with the development of atopic allergy. A possible immunological basis for these associations is that exposure to certain airborne chemicals, even at low levels, can result in the delivery of 'danger' signals that, in turn, bias the immune response towards the selective induction or maintenance of preferential T helper 2-type immune responses consistent with the acquisition of allergic sensitization. PMID:23980877

  1. Chemical potential of water from measurements of optic axial angle of zeolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donald, Eberlein G.; Christ, C.L.

    1968-01-01

    Values of the uncorrected optic axial angle (2H??) of a crystal of the calcium zeolite stellerite (CaAl2Si7O 18 ?? 7H2O) immersed in calcium chloride solutions of known activity of water (aw) are directly proportional to log aw. A general relationship between the chemical potential of water in the crystal and the optic axial angle is obeyed.

  2. Quantum origins of the Iczkowski-Margrave model of chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Charge flow in materials is controlled at the atomistic level through some model of the chemical potential, such as the Iczkowski-Margrave (IM) model. This model is built largely on heuristic arguments. Here a model Hamiltonian is constructed at the atomistic level commensurate with the IM model. Essential properties of the model Hamiltonian are presented, including a possible revision of the charge dependence in the IM model. Transitional properties of the model are shown to be central to regulating charge flow.

  3. Typology of exogenous organic matters based on chemical and biochemical composition to predict potential nitrogen mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lashermes, G; Nicolardot, B; Parnaudeau, V; Thuriès, L; Chaussod, R; Guillotin, M L; Linères, M; Mary, B; Metzger, L; Morvan, T; Tricaud, A; Villette, C; Houot, S

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a typology predicting potential N availability of exogenous organic matters (EOMs) in soil based on their chemical characteristics. A database of 273 EOMs was constructed including analytical data of biochemical fractionation, organic C and N, and results of N mineralization during incubation of soil-EOM mixtures in controlled conditions. Multiple factor analysis and hierarchical classification were performed to gather EOMs with similar composition and N mineralization behavior. A typology was then defined using composition criteria to predict potential N mineralization. Six classes of EOM potential N mineralization in soil were defined, from high potential N mineralization to risk of inducing N immobilization in soil after application. These classes were defined on the basis of EOM organic N content and soluble, cellulose-, and lignin-like fractions. A decision tree based on these variables was constructed in order to easily attribute any EOM to 1 of the 6 classes. PMID:19726180

  4. Fast Method for Computing Chemical Potentials and Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria of Macromolecular Solutions.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-08-25

    Chemical potential is a fundamental property for determining thermodynamic equilibria involving exchange of molecules, such as between two phases of molecular systems. Previously, we developed the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based method for Modeling Atomistic Protein-crowder interactions (FMAP) to calculate excess chemical potentials according to the Widom insertion. Intermolecular interaction energies were expressed as correlation functions and evaluated via FFT. Here, we extend this method to calculate liquid-liquid phase equilibria of macromolecular solutions. Chemical potentials are calculated by FMAP over a wide range of molecular densities, and the condition for coexistence of low- and high-density phases is determined by the Maxwell equal-area rule. When benchmarked on Lennard-Jones fluids, our method produces an accurate phase diagram at 18% of the computational cost of the current best method. Importantly, the gain in computational speed increases dramatically as the molecules become more complex, leading to many orders of magnitude in speed up for atomistically represented proteins. We demonstrate the power of FMAP by reporting the first results for the liquid-liquid coexistence curve of γII-crystallin represented at the all-atom level. Our method may thus open the door to accurate determination of phase equilibria for macromolecular mixtures such as protein-protein mixtures and protein-RNA mixtures, that are known to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27327881

  5. Direct detection of spin chemical potential shift through spin filtering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2010-03-01

    Spin filtering (SF) effect is a unique way to generate highly spin-polarized tunnel currents from nonmagnetic electrodes. Magnetic tunnel junctions based on pure SF effect have been realized recently [1] as a clear demonstration of principle for the spin manipulation through SF effect. The next challenge is the readout of spin information. In this work, we present the direct detection of the spin chemical potential shift in an Al nano cluster sandwiched between two SF EuS tunnel barriers. The spin channels are split by depositing Al directly onto EuS, and the indirect exchange interaction between the Al conduction electrons and the localized Eu 4f electrons gives rise to an effective Zeeman splitting with the strength of a few mV. EuS on the readout side is isolated from the Al clusters with a natural Al2O3 barrier. In a vertical measurement geometry with no transport current, we directly detected the spin dependent voltage levels by aligning the detection SF barrier parallel or antiparallel to the first SF barrier, corresponding to the equilibrium up- and down-spin chemical potentials. A simple analysis treating the barriers as a set of resistors revealed that the observed voltage difference is the actual chemical potential shift modulated by the SF efficiency.[4pt] [1] G.X. Miao, M. Muller, J.S. Moodera,PRL102,076601(2009)

  6. Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Arblaster, Jennifer A.; Bowman, Sarah R.; Conder, Jason M.; Elliott, John E.; Johnson, Mark S.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Rattner, Barnett A.; Sample, Bradley E.; Shore, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Field-based studies are an essential component of research addressing the behavior of organic chemicals, and a unique line of evidence that can be used to assess bioaccumulation potential in chemical registration programs and aid in development of associated laboratory and modeling efforts. To aid scientific and regulatory discourse on the application of terrestrial field data in this manner, this article provides practical recommendations regarding the generation and interpretation of terrestrial field data. Currently, biota-to-soil-accumulation factors (BSAFs), biomagnification factors (BMFs), and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) are the most suitable bioaccumulation metrics that are applicable to bioaccumulation assessment evaluations and able to be generated from terrestrial field studies with relatively low uncertainty. Biomagnification factors calculated from field-collected samples of terrestrial carnivores and their prey appear to be particularly robust indicators of bioaccumulation potential. The use of stable isotope ratios for quantification of trophic relationships in terrestrial ecosystems needs to be further developed to resolve uncertainties associated with the calculation of terrestrial trophic magnification factors (TMFs). Sampling efforts for terrestrial field studies should strive for efficiency, and advice on optimization of study sample sizes, practical considerations for obtaining samples, selection of tissues for analysis, and data interpretation is provided. Although there is still much to be learned regarding terrestrial bioaccumulation, these recommendations provide some initial guidance to the present application of terrestrial field data as a line of evidence in the assessment of chemical bioaccumulation potential and a resource to inform laboratory and modeling efforts.

  7. Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Nico W; Arblaster, Jennifer A; Bowman, Sarah R; Conder, Jason M; Elliott, John E; Johnson, Mark S; Muir, Derek C G; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Rattner, Barnett A; Sample, Bradley E; Shore, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Field-based studies are an essential component of research addressing the behavior of organic chemicals, and a unique line of evidence that can be used to assess bioaccumulation potential in chemical registration programs and aid in development of associated laboratory and modeling efforts. To aid scientific and regulatory discourse on the application of terrestrial field data in this manner, this article provides practical recommendations regarding the generation and interpretation of terrestrial field data. Currently, biota-to-soil-accumulation factors (BSAFs), biomagnification factors (BMFs), and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) are the most suitable bioaccumulation metrics that are applicable to bioaccumulation assessment evaluations and able to be generated from terrestrial field studies with relatively low uncertainty. Biomagnification factors calculated from field-collected samples of terrestrial carnivores and their prey appear to be particularly robust indicators of bioaccumulation potential. The use of stable isotope ratios for quantification of trophic relationships in terrestrial ecosystems needs to be further developed to resolve uncertainties associated with the calculation of terrestrial trophic magnification factors (TMFs). Sampling efforts for terrestrial field studies should strive for efficiency, and advice on optimization of study sample sizes, practical considerations for obtaining samples, selection of tissues for analysis, and data interpretation is provided. Although there is still much to be learned regarding terrestrial bioaccumulation, these recommendations provide some initial guidance to the present application of terrestrial field data as a line of evidence in the assessment of chemical bioaccumulation potential and a resource to inform laboratory and modeling efforts. PMID:26436822

  8. STAR results on strangeness production in beam energy scan program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    We present the recent STAR results on the production of strange hadrons (K0s, ϕ, Λ, Ξ and Ω) in √sNN= 7.7 — 39 GeV Au+Au collisions in the RHIC beam energy scan program. We investigate the strangeness enhancement and strangeness equilibration as a function of beam energy and system size at RHIC. Nuclear modification factors and particle ratios will be highlighted. Implications on partonic vs. hadronic dynamics as a function of the beam energy will be discussed.

  9. The Strange Quark Polarisation from COMPASS data

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2009-12-17

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) was derived at LO from the inclusive asymmetry A{sub a,d} and the semi-inclusive asymmetries A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup +}, A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup -}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K+}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K-}, measured by COMPASS in polarised deep inelastic muon-deuteron scattering. The distribution of {delta}s(x) is compatible with zero in the whole measured range. The value of the first moment of {delta}s and its error are very sensitive to the assumed value of the ratio of the s-bar-quark to u-quark fragmentation functions into positive kaons {integral}D(K+/s)(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  10. The Universe is a Strange Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of ordinary matter is remarkably accurate and complete, but it is based on principles that are very strange and unfamiliar. As I'll explain, we've come to understand matter to be a Music of the Void, in a remarkably literal sense. Just as we physicists finalized that wonderful understanding, towards the end of the twentieth century, astronomers gave us back our humility, by informing us that ordinary matter - what we, and chemists and biologists, and astronomers themselves, have been studying all these centuries constitutes only about 5% of the mass of the universe as a whole. I'll describe some of our promising attempts to rise to this challenge by improving, rather than merely complicating, our description of the world.