Science.gov

Sample records for stratospheric cloud formation

  1. Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A. )

    1994-04-22

    Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

  2. Cloud formation, convection, and stratospheric dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Wang, Tao; Avery, Melody A.; Jensen, Eric J.

    2014-12-01

    Using the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis winds, temperatures, and anvil cloud ice, we use our domain-filling, forward trajectory model combined with a new cloud module to show that convective transport of saturated air and ice to altitudes below the tropopause has a significant impact on stratospheric water vapor and upper tropospheric clouds. We find that including cloud microphysical processes (rather than assuming that parcel water vapor never exceeds saturation) increases the lower stratospheric average H2O by 10-20%. Our model-computed cloud fraction shows reasonably good agreement with tropical upper troposphere (TUT) cloud frequency observed by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument in boreal winter with poorer agreement in summer. Our results suggest that over 40% of TUT cirrus is due to convection, and it is the saturated air from convection rather than injected cloud ice that primarily contributes to this increase. Convection can add up to 13% more water to the stratosphere. With just convective hydration (convection adds vapor up to saturation), the global lower stratospheric modeled water vapor is close to Microwave Limb Sounder observations. Adding convectively injected ice increases the modeled water vapor to ~8% over observations. Improving the representation of MERRA tropopause temperatures fields reduces stratospheric water vapor by ~4%.

  3. Tropical Tropopause Layer Cloud Formation, Convection and Stratospheric Dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Dessler, A. E.; Wang, T.; Avery, M. A.; Jensen, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Using MERRA reanalysis winds, temperatures and anvil cloud ice, we use our domain-filling, forward trajectory model to study the impact that more realistic cloud formation and convective water injection has on stratospheric water vapor. Our model computed cloud fraction shows reasonable agreement with cloud frequency observed by HIRDLS and CALIOP in the tropical troposphere layer (TTL). Our results suggest that ~64% of the cirrus formed in the TTL are due convection. Overall we find that inclusion of cloud microphysical processes increases stratospheric water vapor by 0.5 ppmv. Adding anvil ice increases stratospheric water vapor by an additional 0.5-0.6 ppmv but has a bigger impact on cloud formation with an increase of ~20-30% in TTL cloud fraction. With convection and cloud dehydration global 18-30 km average water vapor is ~5-7% higher than MLS water vapor observations. Adding waves to the MERRA temperature fields reduces stratospheric water vapor bringing our estimates to within 3% of MLS.

  4. Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alex; Arutyunyan, Vardan; Larin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    A new mathematical model of the global transport of gaseous species and aerosols in the atmosphere and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres was constructed. PSCs play a significant role in ozone chemistry since heterogeneous reactions proceed on their particle surfaces and in the bulk, affecting the gas composition of the atmosphere, specifically, the content of chlorine and nitrogen compounds, which are actively involved in the destruction of ozone. Stratospheric clouds are generated by co-condensation of water vapor and nitric acid on sulfate particles and in some cases during the freezing of supercooled water as well as when nitric acid vapors are dissolved in sulfate aerosol particles [1]. These clouds differ in their chemical composition and microphysics [2]. In this study, we propose new kinetic equations describing the variability of species in the gas and condensed phases to simulate the formation of PSCs. Most models for the formation of PSCs use constant background values of sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere. This approach is too simplistic since sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere are characterized by considerably nonuniform spatial and temporal variations. Two PSC types are considered: Type 1 refers to the formation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type 2 refers to the formation of particles composed of different proportions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O. Their formation is coupled with the spatial problem of sulfate aerosol generation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere incorporating the chemical and kinetic transformation processes (photochemistry, nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation) and using a non-equilibrium particle-size distribution [3]. In this formulation, the system of equations is closed and allows an adequate description of the PSC dynamics in the stratosphere. Using the model developed, numerical experiments were performed to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of

  5. On the theories of type 1 polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, A. Robert; Kulmala, Markku; Laaksonen, Ari; Vesala, Timo

    1995-06-01

    Several mechanisms for the production of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles are investigated using the classical theories of nucleation and freezing and the multicomponent condensation theory. These mechanisms invoke particle compositions ranging from binary (H2SO4/H2O) solution, solid sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) and ternary (HNO3/H2O/H2SO4) solution to binary (HNO3/H2O) solution and solid nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). Empirical relations, derived from classical nucleation studies, are used to calculate the surface energies required in calculations of nucleation and freezing. Using these data, we calculate that the nucleation of nitric acid solutions or solid phases onto SAT particles is not efficient. Homogeneous freezing of SAT or NAT from ternary solutions does not occur under stratospheric conditions. Homogeneous freezing of water ice can occur at temperatures near the frost point of pure water. Heterogeneous freezing is a strong function of the contact parameter between the emergent crystal and the initiating seed particle. Heterogeneous freezing of the stratospheric aerosol to SAT and NAT at temperatures above the frost point is not ruled out by our calculations. If formed, NAT can deplete the gas phase nitric acid concentration, by condensational growth, more efficiently than ternary droplets. We conclude that the most likely route to type 1 PSC particles is via condensational growth of ternary solution droplets followed by rapid freezing to NAT, SAT, and water ice at temperatures near the ice frost point. The particles formed are then stable and can reduce nitric acid vapor pressures to the saturation vapor pressure over NAT at all temperatures below the NAT point. Such a mechanism is consistent with observations.

  6. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  7. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  8. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds: Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, R.F.; Snetsinger, K.G. ); Hamill, P.; Goodman, J.K. ); McCormick, M.P. )

    1990-03-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an ER-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a first appearance temperature T{sub fa} = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a first appearance temperature T{sub fa} = 198 K was found for the Antarctic samples.

  9. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.; Weigel, K.; Braesicke, P.; Pitts, M. C.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Murtagh, D.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O) increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations). The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000-2014) from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O) observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Performing linear regression analyses we derive from the Envisat/MIPAS (2002-2012) and Aura/MLS (2004-2014) observations predominantly positive changes in the potential temperature range 350 to 1000 K. The linear changes in water vapour derived from Envisat/MIPAS observations are largely insignificant, while those from Aura/MLS are mostly significant. For the temperature neither of the two instruments indicate any significant changes. Given the strong inter-annual variation observed in

  10. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  11. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  12. Denitrification of the polar winter stratosphere - Implications of SAM II cloud formation temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Toon, O. B.

    1990-01-01

    The SAM II extinction profiles and the associated temperature profiles are used to determine the amount of denitrification of the winter polar stratospheres. Clear evidence of the denitrification process in the Antarctic data is seen. There are indications in the Arctic data that denitrification mechanisms may be at work there also. At the latitudes observed by the SAM II satellite system, denitrification begins before the formation of extensive ice clouds and may be due to sedimentation of nitric acid particles. However, the possibility of dinitrification by type II PSCs at latitudes not observed by SAM II cannot be excluded.

  13. Investigating Type I Polar Stratospheric Cloud Formation Mechanisms with POAM Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Drdla, K.; Fromm, M.; Hoppel, K.; Browell, E.; Hamill, P.; Dempsey, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Type Ia PSCs are believed to be composed of nitric acid hydrate particles. Recent results from the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign showed evidence that this type of PSC was composed of a small number of very large particles capable of sedimentary denitrification of regions of the stratosphere. It is unknown whether homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation is responsible for the formation of these PSCs. Arctic winters are tending to be colder in response to global tropospheric warming. The degree to which this influences ozone depletion will depend on the freezing mechanism of nitric acid hydrate particles. If nucleation is homogeneous it implies that the freezing process is an inherent property of the particle, while heterogeneous freezing means that the extent of PSCs will depend in part on the number of nuclei available. The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM)II and III satellites have been making observations of stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) since 1994. Recently, we have developed a technique that can discriminate between Type Ia and Ib PSCs using these observations. A statistical approach is employed to demonstrate the robustness of this approach and results are compared with lidar measurements. The technique is used to analyze observations from POAM II and II during Northern Hemisphere winters where significant PSC formation occurred with the objective of exploring Type I PSC formation mechanisms. The different PSCs identified using this method exhibit different growth curve as expressed as extinction versus temperature.

  14. Modeling the formation of polar stratospheric clouds with allowance for kinetic and heterogeneous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloyan, A. E.; Yermakov, A. N.; Arutyunyan, V. O.

    2015-05-01

    A new mathematical model of global transport of multicomponent gaseous admixtures and aerosols in the atmosphere and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) in both hemispheres has been constructed. Two types of PSCs are considered: type Ia, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), and type Ib, supercooled ternary solutions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O (STS). New equations are used to describe the variation in gas- and condensed-phase components on the basis of their thermodynamic properties. The formation of PSCs is coupled with sulfate aerosols generated in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and with chemical and kinetic transformation processes (photochemistry, nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation). Using this coupled model, numerical experiments were performed to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of PSCs in winter in both hemispheres. First, the formation of primary sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere is considered and then these aerosols are incorporated to the PSC model. The results of the numerical experiments are analyzed.

  15. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-03-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  16. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B. ); Turco, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    During the Antarctic winter, strange and often invisible clouds form in the stratosphere over the pole. These clouds of ice and frozen nitric acid play a crucial role in the chemical cycle responsible for the recent appearance of the annual ozone hole. Their chemistry removes compounds that would normally trap ozone-destroying free chlorine produced by the breakdown of CFCs. The paper describes these clouds, their formation, and the mechanisms by which these clouds help chlorine destroy ozone.

  17. Stratospheric cloud observations during formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Deshler, T. )

    1991-02-20

    The results of six balloon flights at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, under varying temperature conditions, are used in a study of polar stratospheric clouds during September 1989. A new particle counter, with size resolution in the 0.5 {mu}m radius region, indicated that size distributions observed in the clouds were bimodal. Mode radii ranging from 0.05 to 0.10 {mu}m were observed for the small particle mode, representing the sulfate layer or condensational growth enhancements of it. Mode radii generally ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 {mu}m for the large particle mode at concentrations 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than the small particle mode. The large particle mode, when observed at temperatures above the water ice point, is believed to be the result of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) condensation on larger particles of the sulfate layer. In this case the HNO{sub 3} condensed mass mixing ratios were 1 to 5 ppbv for most of the cloud layers. Generally, the large particle NAT concentrations were higher in the lower stratosphere, indicating the redistribution of HNO{sub 3} through particle sedimentation. On several occasions, distributions were observed with mode radii as high as 7 {mu}m, and correspondingly large inferred mass, indicating water ice clouds in the 12 to 15 km region. On other occasions, absence of such clouds at very low temperatures inferred water vapor mixing ratios of less than 3 ppmv.

  18. Solid-state photochemistry as a formation mechanism for Titan's stratospheric C4N2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Yung, Y. L.; McLain, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We propose that C4N2 ice clouds observed in Titan's springtime polar stratosphere arise due to solid-state photochemistry occurring within extant ice cloud particles of HCN-HC3N mixtures. This formation process resembles the halogen-induced ice particle surface chemistry that leads to condensed nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles and ozone depletion in Earth's polar stratosphere. As our analysis of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer 478 cm-1 ice emission feature demonstrates, this solid-state photochemistry mechanism eliminates the need for the relatively high C4N2 saturation vapor pressures required (even though they are not observed) when the ice is produced through the usual procedure of direct condensation from the vapor.

  19. A case of type I polar stratospheric cloud formation by heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft flew on January 24, 1989, from Stavanger to Spitsbergen, Norway, at the 430-440 K potential temperature surface (19.2-19.8 km pressure altitude). Aerosols were sampled continuously by an optical particle counter (PMS-FSSP300) for concentration and size analyses, and during five 10-min intervals by four wire and one replicator impactor for concentration, size, composition, and phase analysis. During sampling, the air saturation of H2O with respect to ice changed from 20 to 100 percent, and of HNO3 with respect to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) from subsaturation to supersaturation. Data from both instruments indicate a condensation of hydrochloric acid and, later, nitric acid on the background aerosol particles as the ambient temperature decreases along the flight track. This heterogeneous nucleation mechanism generates type I polar stratospheric cloud particles of 10-fold enhanced optical depth, which could play a role in stratospheric ozone depletion.

  20. Physical processes in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard; Jordan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A one dimensional model of cloud microphysics was used to simulate the formation and evolution of polar stratospheric ice clouds. Some of the processes which are included in the model are outlined. It is found that the clouds must undergo preferential nucleation upon the existing aerosols just as do tropospheric cirrus clouds. Therefore, there is an energy barrier between stratospheric nitric acid particles and ice particles implying that nitric acid does not form a continuous set of solutions between the trihydrate and ice. The Kelvin barrier is not significant in controlling the rate of formation of ice particles. It was found that the cloud properties are sensitive to the rate at which the air parcels cool. In wave clouds, with cooling rates of hundreds of degrees per day, most of the existing aerosols nucleate and become ice particles. Such clouds have particles with sizes on the order of a few microns, optical depths on order of unity and are probably not efficient at removing materials from the stratosphere. In clouds which form with cooling rates of a few degrees per day or less, only a small fraction of the aerosols become cloud particles. In such clouds the particle radius is larger than 10 microns, the optical depths are low and water vapor is efficiently removed. Seasonal simulations show that the lowest water vapor mixing ratio is determined by the lowest temperature reached, and that the time when clouds disappear is controlled by the time when temperatures begin to rise above the minimum values.

  1. Investigation of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Solid Particle Formation Mechanisms Using ILAS and AVHRR Observations in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irie, H.; Pagan, K. L.; Tabazadeh, A.; Legg, M. J.; Sugita, T.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite observations of denitrification and ice clouds in the Arctic lower stratosphere in February 1997 are used with Lagrangian microphysical box model calculations to evaluate nucleation mechanisms of solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. The occurrences of ice clouds are not correlated in time and space with the locations of back trajectories of denitrified air masses, indicating that ice particle surfaces are not always a prerequisite for the formation of solid PSCs that lead to denitrification. In contrast, the model calculations incorporating a pseudoheterogeneous freezing process occurring at the vapor-liquid interface can quantitatively explain most of the observed denitrification when the nucleation activation free energy for nitric acid dihydrate formation is raised by only approx.10% relative to the current published values. Once nucleated, the conversion of nitric acid dihydrate to the stable trihydrate phase brings the computed levels of denitrification closer to the measurements. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0320 Atmospheric Composition and SblctureC: loud physics and chemistry; 0340 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Middle atmosphere-composition and chemistry

  2. The ozone hole - The role of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is considered. Several researchers have suggested that the decrease in ozone over Antarctica is related to the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which had been observed in the antarctic winter stratosphere. Some of the pertinent characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds are discussed, and it is shown how these clouds may participate in the ozone destruction process. The satellite data for PSCs is analyzed, and statistical information regarding the number and maximum extinctions of these clouds is presented. Evidence that the polar stratospheric clouds are composed of frozen nitric acid is considered. It is suggested that the evaporation of the clouds, in late August and September, will release HOCl and HNO3 to the environment. This could be followed by the photodissociation of HOCl to OH and Cl, which would very effectively destroy ozone. However, the ozone destruction mechanism could be halted when enough of the evaporated nitric acid is photolized.

  3. Titan's Tropopause Temperatures from CIRS: Implications for Stratospheric Methane Cloud Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Barnes, J. W.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) far-IR spectra enable the construction of Titan's temperature profile in the altitude region containing the tropopause. Whereas the methane V4 band at 1306/cm (7.7 microns) is the primary opacity source for deducing thermal structure between 100 km and 500 km, N2-N2 collision-induced absorption between 70 and 140/cm (143 microns and 71 microns) is utilized to determine temperatures at Titan's tropopause. Additional opacity due to aerosol and nitrile ices must also be taken into account in this part of the far-IR spectral region. The spectral characteristics of these particulate opacities have been deduced from CIRS limb data at 58degS, 15degS, 15degN, and 85degN. Empirically, the spectral shapes of these opacities appear to be independent of both latitude and altitude below 300 km (Anderson and Samuelson, 2011, Icarus 212, 762-778), justifying the extension of these spectral properties to all latitudes. We find that Titan's tropopause temperature is cooler than the HAS! value of 70.5K by approx. 6K. This leads to the possibility that subsidence at high northern latitudes can cause methane condensation in the winter polar stratosphere. A search for methane clouds in this region is in progress.

  4. Role of lee waves in the formation of solid polar stratospheric clouds: Case studies from February 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, E. D.; Huret, N.; Taupin, F. G.-; Renard, J.-B.; Pirre, M.; Eckermann, S. D.; Larsen, N.; Deshler, T.; Lefèvre, F.; Payan, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    2000-03-01

    Recent theories of solid polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) formation have shown that particles could remain liquid down to 3 K or 4 K below the ice frost point. Such temperatures are rarely reached in the Arctic stratosphere at synoptic scale, but nevertheless, solid PSCs are frequently observed. Mesoscale processes such as mountain-induced gravity waves could be responsible for their formation. In this paper, a microphysical-chemical Lagrangian model (MiPLaSMO) and a mountain wave model (NRL/MWFM) are used to interpret balloon-borne measurements made by an optical particle counter (OPC) and by the Absorption par Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (AMON) instrument above Kiruna on February 25 and 26, 1997, respectively. The model results show good agreement with the particle size distributions obtained by the OPC in a layer of large particles, and allow us to interpret this layer as an evaporating mesoscale type Ia PSC (nitric acid trihydrate) mixed with liquid particles. The detection of a layer of solid particles by AMON is also qualitatively reproduced by the model and is interpreted to be frozen sulfate acid aerosols (SAT). In this situation, the impact of mountain waves on chlorine activation is studied. It appears that mesoscale perturbations amplify significantly the amount of computed ClO, as compared to synoptic runs. Moreover, MiPLaSMO chemical results concerning HNO3 and HCl agree with measurements made by the Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere (LPMA) instrument on February 26 at a very close location to AMON, and explain part of the differences between LPMA measurement and Reactive Processes Ruling the Ozone Budget in the Stratosphere (REPROBUS) model outputs.

  5. Laboratory studies of the formation of polar stratospheric clouds: Nitric acid condensation on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-10-01

    Thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to 5 × 10-8 - 8 × 10-7 torr HNO3 and 2 - 3 × 10-4 torr H2O and cooled to temperatures near the ice frost point. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the condensed-phase species during isothermal experiments, and gas pressures were monitored with mass spectrometry. Supercooled liquid sulfuric acid films exposed to HNO3 (6 ≤ SNAT ≤ 114) showed indications of HNO3 uptake to form ternary solutions of approximately 4 wt % HNO3, 38 wt % H2SO4, and 59 wt % H2O, followed by crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). NAT crystallization did not initiate significant crystallization of the supercooled H2SO4, but the H2SO4 often crystallized to sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) upon warming. In contrast, when crystalline SAT films were exposed to HNO3 and water, NAT did not condense within several hours, even at HNO3 saturation ratios of 30 or higher. Calculations of the contact parameter from experimental data indicate that m <0.76 for NAT on SAT. Our film studies suggest that crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) growth is most easily accomplished when stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) remain liquid, absorb HNO3, and produce crystalline nitric acid trihydrate via heterogeneous nucleation. If SSAs crystallize to SAT at some point during the winter, nitric acid condensation is hindered, and PSC formation could become more difficult.

  6. Chemistry and microphysics of polar stratospheric clouds and cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, M A; Hudson, P K; Prenni, A J; Tolbert, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ice particles found within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and upper tropospheric cirrus clouds can dramatically impact the chemistry and climate of the Earth's atmosphere. The formation of PSCs and the subsequent chemical reactions that occur on their surfaces are key components of the massive ozone hole observed each spring over Antarctica. Cirrus clouds also provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions and significantly modify the Earth's climate by changing the visible and infrared radiation fluxes. Although the role of ice particles in climate and chemistry is well recognized, the exact mechanisms of cloud formation are still unknown, and thus it is difficult to predict how anthropogenic activities will change cloud abundances in the future. This article focuses on the nucleation, chemistry, and microphysical properties of ice particles composing PSCs and cirrus clouds. A general overview of the current state of research is presented along with some unresolved issues facing scientists in the future. PMID:11031290

  7. Condensed Acids In Antartic Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Toon, O. B.; Ferry, G. V.; Starr, W. L.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Chan, K. R.; Goodman, J. K.; Livingston, J. M.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses nitrate, sulfate, and chloride contents of stratospheric aerosols during 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Emphasizes growth of HNO3*3H2O particles in polar stratospheric clouds. Important in testing theories concerning Antarctic "ozone hole".

  8. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  9. On the influence of polar stratospheric cloud formation on chemical composition during the 1988/89 Arctic winter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. ); Solomon, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The northern winter polar vortex is more disturbed dynamically and warmer than the Antarctic equivalent, and correspondingly fewer polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are observed to form. However, the rapid flow of stratospheric air through slow moving synoptically forced PSC regions can result in exposure of both vortical and extra vortical air to PSCs intermittently throughout the winter months. This periodic exposure to PSCs may be sufficient to perturb the chemical composition of large volumes of northern hemisphere air. The synoptic forcing also leads to marked meridional flow which has a profound effect on chemical composition, having major impacts on both short term ozone depletion and the longer term recovery to lower ClOx abundances. Accurate simulation of the air flow is thus essential for the reliable calculation of ozone loss in polar regions.

  10. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  11. How do Polar Stratospheric Clouds Form?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Gandrud, Bruce; Baumgardner, Darrel; Herman, Robert; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    SOLVE measurements have been compared with results from a microphysical model to understand the composition and formation of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) observed during SOLVE. Evidence that the majority of the particles remain liquid throughout the winter will be presented. However, a small fraction of the particles do freeze, and the presence of these frozen particles can not be explained by current theories, in which the only freezing mechanism is homogeneous freezing to ice below the ice frost point. Alternative formation mechanisms, in particular homogeneous freezing above the ice frost point and heterogeneous freezing, have been explored using the microphysical model. Both nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) have been considered as possible compositions for the solid-phase nitric acid aerosols. Comparisons between the model results and the SOLVE measurements will be used to constrain the possible formation mechanisms. Other effects of these frozen particles will also be discussed, in particular denitrification.

  12. Cloud Condensation in Titan's Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Paul N.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    A 1-D condensation model is developed for the purpose of reproducing ice clouds in Titan's lower stratosphere observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), and ethane (C2H6) vapors are treated as chemically inert gas species that flow from an upper boundary at 500 km to a condensation sink near Titan's tropopause (-45 km). Gas vertical profiles are determined from eddy mixing and a downward flux at the upper boundary. The condensation sink is based upon diffusive growth of the cloud particles and is proportional to the degree of supersaturation in the cloud formation regIOn. Observations of the vapor phase abundances above the condensation levels and the locations and properties of the ice clouds provide constraints on the free parameters in the model. Vapor phase abundances are determined from CIRS mid-IR observations, whereas cloud particle sizes, altitudes, and latitudinal distributions are derived from analyses of CIRS far-IR observations of Titan. Specific cloud constraints include: I) mean particle radii of2-3 J.lm inferred from the V6 506 cm- band of HC3N, 2) latitudinal abundance distributions of condensed nitriles, inferred from a composite emission feature that peaks at 160/cm , and 3) a possible hydrocarbon cloud layer at high latitudes, located near an altitude of 60 km, which peaks between 60 and 80 cm l . Nitrile abundances appear to diminish substantially at high northern latitudes over the time period 2005 to 2010 (northern mid winter to early spring). Use of multiple gas species provides a consistency check on the eddy mixing coefficient profile. The flux at the upper boundary is the net column chemical production from the upper atmosphere and provides a constraint on chemical pathways leading to the production of these compounds. Comparison of the differing lifetimes, vapor phase transport, vapor phase loss rate, and particle sedimentation, sheds light on temporal stability

  13. Proceedings of a Workshop on Polar Stratospheric Clouds: Their Role in Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P. (Editor); Mcmaster, L. R. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of polar stratospheric clouds in atmospheric processes was assessed. The observations of polar stratospheric clouds with the Nimbus 7 SAM II satellite experiment were reviewed and a preliminary analysis of their formation, impact on other remote sensing experiments, and potential impact on climate were presented. The potential effect of polar stratospheric clouds on climate, radiation balance, atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric chemistry and water vapor budget, and cloud microphysics was assessed. Conclusions and recommendations, a synopsis of materials and complementary material to support those conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  14. Polar stratospheric clouds inferred from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J.; Jones, R. L.; Remsberg, E. E.; Tuck, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalously high radiances from the ozone channel of the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) sounding instrument have been observed in the Northern Hemisphere winter lower stratosphere. Such events, thought to be due to polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are examined further by computing relative humidities using Stratospheric Sounding Unit temperatures and water vapor measurements from the LIMS Map Archive Tape analyses. Regions identified as PSCs are found to correspond closely to regions of high humidity. While instances of saturation were found, the average humidity at the centers of 39 PSCs was calculated to be 58 percent. Possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy are discussed. Applying a similar approach to the Southern Hemisphere, in 1979, virtually no PSCs are found in the vortex after September 10 at 20 km. This result has important implications for a number of proposed explanations for the Antarctic ozone hole.

  15. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  16. Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds from Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Anthony, S. E.; Disselkamp, R.; Toon, O. B.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) have recently been implicated in Arctic and Antarctic ozone destruction. Although the chemistry is well documented, the composition of the clouds remains uncertain. The most common PSCs (type I) are thought to be composed of HNO3/H2O mixtures. Although the exact process is not clear, type I PSCs are believed to nucleate on preexisting stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) composed of sulfuric acid and water. We are using infrared spectroscopy to study the composition and formation mechanism of type I PSCs. In the laboratory, we have used FTIR spectroscopy to probe the composition and phase of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O aerosols under winter polar stratospheric conditions. We have also used recently measured infrared optical constants for HNO3/H2O mixtures to analyze solar infrared extinction measurements of type I PSCs obtained in September 1987 over Antarctica. The results of these studies will be discussed in the context of current theories for polar stratospheric clouds formation.

  17. Composition of polar stratospheric clouds from infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A.; Anthony, S.E.; Disselkamp, R.; Toon, O.B.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) have recently been implicated in Arctic and Antarctic ozone destruction. Although the chemistry is well documented, the composition of the clouds remains uncertain. The most common PSCs (type I) are thought to be composed of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O mixtures. Although the exact process is not clear, type I PSCs are believed to nucleate on preexisting stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) composed of sulfuric acid and water. We are using infrared spectroscopy to study the composition and formation mechanism of type I PSCs. In the laboratory, we have used FTIR spectroscopy to probe the composition and phase of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O aerosols under winter polar stratospheric conditions. We have also used recently measured infrared optical constants for HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O mixtures to analyze solar infrared extinction measurements of type I PSCs obtained in September, 1987 over Antarctica. The results of these studies will be discussed in the context of current theories for polar stratospheric cloud formation.

  18. Characteristics of cirrus clouds in the tropical lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Suginori; Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny; Kubota, Hisayuki; Shibata, Takashi; Okamoto, Hajime; Ishimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    A unique type of cloud in the tropical lower stratosphere, which we call "stratospheric cirrus", is described in this study. Stratospheric cirrus clouds are generally detached from overshooting deep convection and are much smaller than subvisual cirrus often observed near the tropical tropopause. We analyzed two cases of stratospheric cirrus in the tropical and subtropical lower stratosphere captured by the space-borne lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Both cases occurred 2-3 hours after the most active phase of the nearby convective cloud clusters. Case 1 has a double-layer structure above the cold point height (CPH); the CPH and two cloud top heights are, respectively, 17.8, 18.9, and 19.9 km. Case 2 has a single cloud layer where CPH and the cloud top height are, respectively, 16.5 and 18.7 km. The mode radius and ice water content of the stratospheric cirrus clouds are estimated to be 4-10 μm and 0.2-0.8 mg/m3 based on the radar-lidar method and consideration of the cloud particle terminal velocity. Comparisons with previous numerical model simulation studies suggest that the double-layer stratospheric cirrus clouds are likely from an overshooting plume, pushed up into the stratosphere in an overshoot when warm stratospheric air is inhomogeneously mixed with cold overshooting air. The single-layer stratospheric cirrus cloud is associated with some non-negligible wind shear, so it could be a jumping cirrus cloud, although we cannot rule out the possibility that it came from an overshooting plume because of the similarity in cloud characteristics and morphology between the two cases. Guided by the case studies, an automatic algorithm was developed to select stratospheric cirrus clouds for global survey and statistical analysis. A total of four years of CALIPSO and space-borne cloud radar (CloudSat) data were analyzed. Statistical analysis suggests that stratospheric cirrus clouds occur on the order of 3.0 × 103 times a year

  19. Monitoring of the Polar Stratospheric Clouds formation and evolution in Antarctica in August 2007 during IPY with the MATCH method applied to lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoux, Nadege; David, Christine; Klekociuk, Andrew; Pitts, Michael; di Liberto, Luca; Snels, Marcel; Jumelet, Julien; Bekki, Slimane; Larsen, Niels

    2010-05-01

    The project ORACLE-O3 ("Ozone layer and UV RAdiation in a changing CLimate Evaluated during IPY") is one of the coordinated international proposals selected for the International Polar Year (IPY). As part of this global project, LOLITA-PSC ("Lagrangian Observations with Lidar Investigations and Trajectories in Antarctica and Arctic, of PSC") is devoted to Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) studies. Indeed, understanding the formation and evolution of PSC is an important issue to quantify the impact of climate changes on their frequency of formation and, further, on chlorine activation and subsequent ozone depletion. In this framework, three lidar stations performed PSC observations in Antarctica during the 2006, 2007, and 2008 winters: Davis (68.58°S, 77.97°E), McMurdo (77.86°S, 166.48°E) and Dumont D'Urville (66.67°S, 140.01°E). The data are completed with the lidar data from CALIOP ("Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization") onboard the CALIPSO ("Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation") satellite. Lagrangian trajectory calculations are used to identify air masses with PSCs sounded by several ground-based lidar stations with the same method, called MATCH, applied for the first time in Arctic to study the ozone depletion with radiosoundings. The evolution of the optical properties of the PSCs and thus the type of PSCs formed (supercooled ternary solution, nitric acid trihydrate particles or ice particles) could thus be linked to the thermodynamical evolution of the air mass deduced from the trajectories. A modeling with the microphysical model of the Danish Meteorological Institute allows assessing our ability to predict PSCs for various environmental conditions. Indeed, from pressure and temperature evolution, the model allows retrieving the types of particles formed as well as their mean radii, their concentrations and could also simulate the lidar signals. In a first step, a case in August 2007 around 17-18 km, involving

  20. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  1. CALIOP Polar Stratospheric Cloud Data Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Baskin, W. E.; Lucker, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) characteristics. We have developed an approach for both detection and composition classification of PSCs based on CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements. The algorithm includes both the CALIOP 532-nm scattering ratio and perpendicular backscatter coefficient for cloud detection, which significantly improves the detection of tenuous PSC mixtures with Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) particles in low number density, and incorporates an innovative successive horizontal averaging scheme to enable the detection of strongly backscattering PSCs at fine horizontal resolution (5-km) and more tenuous clouds at increasingly coarser averaging scales. The algorithm also includes a scheme for classifying PSCs by composition based on the CALIOP aerosol depolarization and inverse scattering ratio. To date, only a research version of this PSC data product has been available on request. An autonomous production version is currently under development with the beta version scheduled to be released by the end of 2012. The PSC product will be archived and distributed by the Atmospheric Science Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). This poster presents an overview of the PSC detection and composition algorithms, describes the output parameters of the new PSC production version, and show examples to illustrate the utility of the data product. The poster also describes ancillary data chosen to better facilitate the use of the PSC data product for science applications.

  2. Stratospheric ion and aerosol chemistry and possible links with cirrus cloud microphysics - A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of stratospheric ion chemistry and physics are assessed as they relate to aerosol formation and the transport of aerosols to upper tropospheric regions to create conditions favorable for cirrus cloud formation. It is found that ion-induced nucleation and other known phase transitions involving ions and sulfuric acid vapor are probably not efficient processes for stratospheric aerosol formation, and cannot compete with condensation of sulfuric acid on preexisting particles of volcanic or meteoritic origin which are larger than about 0.15 micron in radius. Thus, galactic cosmic rays cannot have a significant impact on stratospheric aerosol population. Changes in the stratospheric aerosol burden due to volcanos are up to two orders of magnitude larger than changes in ion densities. Thus, volcanic activity may modulate the radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  3. Can we modify stratospheric water vapor by deliberate cloud seeding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baojun; Yin, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Stratospheric water vapor has an important effect on Earth's climate. Considering the significance of overshooting deep convection in modulating the water vapor content (WVC) of the lower stratosphere (LS), we use a three-dimensional convective cloud model to simulate the effects of various silver iodide (AgI) seeding scenarios on tropical overshooting deep convection that occurred on 30 November 2005 in Darwin, Australia. The primary motivation for this study is to investigate whether the WVC in the LS can be artificially modified by deliberate cloud seeding. It is found that AgI seeding done at the early stages of clouds produces significant effects on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties, and that further affects the WVC in the LS, while seeding at the mature stages of clouds has only a slight impact. The response of stratospheric water vapor to changes in the amount of seeding agent is nonlinear. The seeding with a small (large) amount of AgI increases (decreases) the WVC in the LS, due to enhanced (reduced) production and vertical transport of cloud ice from the troposphere and subsequent sublimation in the stratosphere. The results show that stratospheric water vapor can be artificially altered by deliberate cloud seeding with proper amount of seeding agent. This study also shows an important role of graupel in regulating cloud microphysics and dynamics and in modifying the WVC in the LS.

  4. Spectroscopic Evidence Against Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a key role in the photochemical mechanism thought to be responsible for ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic. Reactions of PSC particles activate chlorine to forms that are capable of photochemical ozone destruction, and sequester nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would otherwise deactivate the chlorine. Although the heterogeneous chemistry is now well established, the composition of the clouds themselves is uncertain. It is commonly thought that they are composed of nitric acid trihydrate, although observations have left this question unresolved. Here we reanalyse infrared spectra of type 1 PSCs obtained in Antarctica in September 1987, using recently measured optical constants of the various compounds that might be present in PSCs. We find these PSCs were not composed of nitric acid trihydrate but instead had a more complex compositon, perhaps that of a ternary solution. Because cloud formation is sensitive to their composition, this finding will alter our understanding of the locations and conditions in which PSCs form. In addition, the extent of ozone loss depends on the ability of the PSCs to remove NOx permanently through sedimentation, The sedimentation rates depend on PSC particle size which in turn is controlled by the composition and formation mechanism.

  5. Clouds in the Tropical Lowermost Stratosphere Observed by ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, J. J.; Galkina, I.; Sioris, C. E.; Nowlan, C. R.; McElroy, T.; Zou, J.; Hu, J.; Drummond, J. R.; McLinden, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    Evidence for the occurrence of cloud particles in the tropical lowermost stratosphere in the 2004-2007 period is presented. This study is based on measurements by the three Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) instruments onboard SCI-SAT. The Vis & NIR Imagers are used to determine the presence of clouds and their top height. The Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations are used to determine the size distribution and composition of the aerosols. The FTS has a 4 km field-of-view. Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) provide more precise altitude determination of the thermal tropopause and the cloud tops by virtue of its smaller FOV (~1 km). Clouds in the tropical lower stratosphere are a rare occurrence but April 2005 produced a few such cases, consistent with previous observations by OSIRIS. We discuss several individual case studies that demonstrate the presence of large particles (mode radius of ~8 microns) clearly above the tropopause.

  6. Polar stratospheric clouds climatology over Dumont d'Urville between 1989 and 1993 and the influence of volcanic aerosols on their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Bekki, S.; Godin, S.; MéGie, G.; Chipperfield, M. P.

    1998-09-01

    The first polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) climatology ever established from lidar data and relative to a specific site is presented here. It is based on lidar backscatter and depolarization measurements of PSCs carried out between 1989 and 1993 at Dumont d'Urville (66°S, 140°E), which is a primary station of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Changes (NDSC). The climatology was subdivided based on the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol content (background aerosols in 1989-1991 and volcanic aerosols in 1992-1993 following the Mount Pinatubo eruption). PSCs were mainly observed in July and August. Very few water ice clouds (type II) were detected. Most of the PSCs tended to form around the peak in sulphuric acid aerosol, between 17 and 23 km in 1989-1991 and between 11 and 20 km in 1992-1993. This tendency suggests that sulphuric acid aerosols are very likely to act as condensation nuclei for PSCs. As shown by previous lidar studies [Browell et al, 1990], two type I subclasses were identified: depolarizing (nonspherical) particles (type Ia) and nondepolarizing (spherical) particles (type Ib). No type Ia PSCs were detected above the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) saturation temperature, TNAT, lending support to the theory that NAT is the main component of type Ia PSCs. There was also no evidence of the existence of sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) in the data. Some type Ib PSCs were observed close to the frost point, showing that supersaturation with respect to NAT is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the existence of solid PSCs. No type Ib PSCs were clearly detected above TNAT in 1989-1991 whereas 18% of the PSCs seem to be found at temperatures above TNAT in 1992-1993. This difference might be linked to the HNO3 uptake by volcanic sulphuric acid particles starting at higher temperatures. The fraction of type Ia out of the total PSCs observations was lower in 1992-1993 than in 1989-1991. This difference was not found to be highly

  7. Quasi-Liquid Layer Formation on Ice under Stratospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Loerting, Thomas; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the interaction of hydrogen chloride (HCl) with ice is essential to understanding at a molecular level the processes responsible for ozone depletion involving polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. To explain the catalytic role PSC particle surfaces play during chlorine activation, we proposed previously that HCl induces the formation of a disordered region on the ice surface, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL), at stratospheric conditions. The QLL is known to exist in pure ice crystals at temperatures near the melting point, but its existence at stratospheric temperatures (-85 C to -70 C) had not been reported yet. We studied the interaction of HCl with ice under stratospheric conditions using the complementary approach of a) ellipsometry to directly monitor the ice surface, using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to monitor the gas phase species present in the ellipsometry experiments, and b) flow-tube experiments with CIMS detection. Here we show that trace amounts of HCl induce QLL formation at stratospheric temperatures, and that the QLL enhances the chlorine-activation reaction of HCl with chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and also enhances acetic acid (CH3COOH) adsorption.

  8. Case Studies of The Dynamical Development of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Using Multistatic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enell, C.-F.; Stebel, K.; Gustavsson, B.; Kirkwood, S.; Brändström, U.; Steen, Å.

    The important role of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in stratospheric chemistry is firmly established. The formation of PSCs is closely related to temperature, which is affected by wave activity on different scales. PSC occurrence thus reflects radiative and/or dynamical stratospheric temperature changes. The most obvious indication of PSC presence is the visual observation of mother-of- pearl clouds. We present case studies of the development of visual PSCs undertaken by means of ground-based cameras. Our observations show that the presence of mother- of-pearl clouds varies on a scale smaller than that of typical mesoscale models. The images are studied further in the context of the meteorological, dynamical situa- tion, and visibility conditions (solar elevation and tropospheric cloudiness).

  9. Theoretical Studies of Stratospheric and Tropospheric Clouds and Aerosols in Support of SOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2002-01-01

    We proposed a number of theoretical efforts to support NASA's SOLVE Mission which took place in Kiruna, Sweden in the winter of 1999-2000. We proposed to serve as one of the DC-8 project scientists, to work with various instrument teams to better understand the composition of polar stratospheric clouds, and their properties, and to help understand the physical conditions which lead to cloud formation in the polar winter.

  10. Status of Numerical Modelling of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Their Effect on Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Michelangeli, D. V.; Kletskin, I.

    2003-04-01

    A multi-dimensional stratospheric model for aerosols including detailed Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) microphysical processes, heterogeneous chemistry and comprehensive gas phase chemistry is being developed to study the formation and evolution of PSCs and the effect of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of PSCs on polar stratospheric ozone. The model can be used in parcel mode or one, two, three dimensions. Background sulfate aerosols, frozen sulfate aerosols (sulfuric acid tetrahydrate, SAT) , Type 1a PSCs (nitric acid trihydrate, NAT ), Type 1b PSCs (supercooled ternary solution, STS ), and Type 2 PSCs (water ice crystals) are all treated as interactive elements in the model. The possible microphysical processes included in the model are: uptake of HNO_3 and H_2O on background sulphate droplets to form Type 1b and evaporation of HNO_3 and H_2O from Type 1b to return background sulphate droplets; homogenous freezing of Type 1b to form Type 2 PSCs; heterogeneous nucleation of SAT to form NAT particles, and NAT to form Type 2 PSC ice; deliquescence of SAT to form Type 1b STS and melting of SAT to form background sulphate droplets. In addition, the model involves the growth of ice and NAT by H_2O and HNO_3 deposition, evaporation, coagulation, sedimentation and transport processes. Heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen, chlorine, and bromine compounds in and on sulphate droplets, ternary, and ice particles are considered in the model. In this paper, preliminary simulation results of sensitivity tests are presented to display the basic features of PSCs and their effects on polar ozone. Comparisons with satellite measurements will be discussed.

  11. Effects of a polar stratosphere cloud parameterization on ozone depletion due to stratospheric aircraft in a two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of Type 1 and 2 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation is presented which is appropriate for use in two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical models of the stratosphere. The calculations of PSC frequency of occurrence and surface area density uses climatological temperature probability distributions obtained from National Meteorological Center data to avoid using zonal mean temperatures, which are not good predictors of PSC behavior. The parameterization does not attempt to model the microphysics of PSCs. The parameterization predicts changes in PSC formation and heterogeneous processing due to perturbations of stratospheric trace constituents. It is therefore useful in assessing the potential effects of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft (high speed civil transports, or HSCTs) on stratospheric composition. the model calculated frequency of PSC occurrence agrees well with a climatology based on stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) 2 observations. PSCs are predicted to occur in the tropics. Their vertical range is narrow, however, and their impact on model O3 fields is small. When PSC and sulfate aerosol heterogeneous processes are included in the model calculations, the O3 change for 1980 - 1990 is in substantially better agreement with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS)-derived O3 trend than otherwise. The overall changes in model O3 response to standard HSCT perturbation scenarios produced by the parameterization are small and tend to decrease the model sensitivity to the HSCT perturbation. However, in the southern hemisphere spring a significant increase in O3 sensitivity to HSCT perturbations is found. At this location and time, increased PSC formation leads to increased levels of active chlorine, which produce the O3 decreases.

  12. Effects of a polar stratospheric cloud parameterization on ozone depletion due to stratospheric aircraft in a two-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Considine, D.B.; Douglass, A.R.; Jackman, C.H.

    1994-09-20

    A parameterization of Type 1 and 2 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation is presented which is appropriate for use in two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical models of the stratosphere. The calculation of PSC frequency of occurrence and surface area density uses climatological temperature probability distributions obtained from National Meteorological Center data to avoid using zonal mean temperatures, which are not good predictors of PSC behavior. The parameterization does not attempt to model the microphysics of PSCs. The parameterization predicts changes in PSC formation and heterogeneous processing due to perturbations of stratospheric trace constituents. It is therefore useful in assessing the potential effects of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft (high speed civil transports, or HSCTs) on stratospheric composition. The model calculated frequency of PSC occurrence agrees well with a climatology based on stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) II observations. PSCs are predicted to occur in the tropics. Their vertical range is narrow, however, and their impact on model O{sub 3} fields is small. When PSC and sulfate aerosol heterogeneous processes are included in the model calculations, the O{sub 3} change for 1980-1990 is in substantially better agreement with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) - derived O{sub 3} trend than otherwise. However, significant discrepancies in the northern midlatitudes remain. The overall changes in model O{sub 3} response to standard HSCT perturbation scenarios produced by the parameterization are small and tend to decrease the model sensitivity to the HSCT perturbation. However, in the southern hemisphere spring a significant increase in O{sub 3} sensitivity to HSCT perturbations is found. At this location and time, increased PSC formation leads to increased levels of active chlorine, which produce the O{sub 3} decrease. 38 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Combined system for observations of tropospheric and stratospheric thin clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, A.; Gobbi, G.P.; Viterbini, M.; Ugazio, S. CNR, Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, Frascati )

    1993-02-01

    A balloon-borne sonde and a polarization lidar have been developed to make combined observations of thin tropospheric and stratospheric clouds. Their first application was a campaign organized to study Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds, which are involved in the process of ozone depletion. The sonde collects cloud particles larger than 4 microns in diameter on a transparent impactor and observes them by means of a CCD camera microscope. Images are transmitted in real time to the ground station for recording and analysis. Shape, dimension, and size distribution of the particles are obtained from these frames. The lidar provides complementary information about the cloud optical depth, backscattering, depolarization, vertical distribution, and temporal evolution. Characteristics of both instruments are described. The experiments performed during the 1990 spring campaign at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, are discussed, and some results are reported to show the capabilities of the combined system. 14 refs.

  14. Cloud-to-stratosphere lightning discharges - A radio emission model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations of rare cloud-to-stratospheric lightning discharges suggest the events are inherently 'slow-rising', with the emitted energy reaching peak values in about 10 milliseconds. Applying a dipole radiation model, it is demonstrated that the emitted radio wave energy from such slow-rising events is strongest below about 50 Hz, and possesses a significant rolloff at higher frequencies. In the analysis, various current distributions are considered in order to determine the effect on the radio spectrum. Near 10 kHz, the emission from cloud-to-stratospheric lightning is significantly reduced as compared to the typical cloud-to-ground return stroke, with amplitudes as much as 50 dB lower. This result may explain the lack of detection of VLF signals from recently observed long-lasting discharge events.

  15. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  16. Polar stratospheric clouds observed by lidar at McMurdo Station during the 1993 winter

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, A.; Gobbi, G.P.; Donfrancesco, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    Since 1990, a lidar system has been operating at McMurdo Station (78{degrees}S 167{degrees}E) during the local spring. In 1993, it performed measurements between 1 March and 10 October. The lidar can monitor the presence of clouds by measuring the light backscattered from the atmosphere. After system calibration, the received signal is compared with the one expected from an atmosphere not containing particles. On such a basis, a parameter called backscattering ratio, R, is calculated. When particles are not present R is 1. Any value larger than 1 is related to the presence of particles. Lidar can be used to monitor clouds in the lower stratosphere (polar stratospheric clouds - PSCs- or volcanic clouds). PSCs have an important role in the heterogeneous chemistry of the polar stratosphere, and their presence is strictly linked with the `ozone hole`. During the 1993 winter and spring, the antarctic stratosphere still presented a measurable amount of volcanic aerosol from the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The volcanic aerosols facilitated the formation of PSCs observed during the 1993 winter because they need condensation nuclei to form. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  18. Observations of Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds by Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Fromm, Michael; Spinhirne, James

    2005-01-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) frequently occur in the polar regions during winter and are important because they play a role in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. During late September and early October 2003, GLAS frequently observed PSCs over western Antarctica. At the peak of this activity on September 29 and 30 we investigate the vertical structure and extent, horizontal coverage and backscatter characteristics of the PSCs using the GLAS data. The PSCs were found to cover an area approximately 10 to 15 % of the size of Antarctica in a region where enhanced PSC frequency has been noted by previous PSC climatology studies. The area of PSC formation was found to coincide with the coldest temperatures in the lower stratosphere. In addition, extensive cloudiness was seen within the troposphere below the PSCs indicating that tropospheric disturbances might have played a role in their formation.

  19. Mixed-phased particles in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J.; Loerting, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), ozone depletion, differential scanning calorimeter. The rate of chlorine activation reactions, which lead to ozone depletion in the winter/spring polar stratosphere (Molina, 1994), depends on the phase state of the surface of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) ice crystals (McNeil et al., 2006). PSCs are thought to consist of solid ice and NAT (nitric acid trihydrate, HNO3× 3H2O) particles and supercooled HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets. The corresponding PSCs are called Type II, Ia, and Ib PSCs, respectively (Zondlo et al., 1998). Type II PSCs are formed in the Antarctic region below the ice frost point of 189 K by homogeneous freezing of HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets (Chang et al., 1999) with the excess of HNO3. The PSC ice crystals are thought to be solid. However, the fate of H+, NO3-, SO42- ions during freezing was not investigated. Our differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of freezing emulsified HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets of sizes and compositions representative of the polar stratosphere demonstrate that during the freezing of the droplets, H+, NO3-, SO42- are expelled from the ice lattice. The expelled ions form a residual solution around the formed ice crystals. The residual solution does not freeze but transforms to glassy state at ~150 K (Bogdan et al., 2010). By contrast to glass-formation in these nitric-acid rich ternary mixtures the residual solution freezes in the case of sulphuric-acid rich ternary mixtures (Bogdan and Molina, 2009). For example, we can consider the phase separation into ice and a residual solution during the freezing of 23/3 wt% HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets. On cooling, ice is formed at ~189 K. This is inferred from the fact that the corresponding melting peak at ~248 K exactly matches the melting point of ice in the phase diagram of HNO3/H2SO4/H2O containing 3 wt % H2SO4. After the ice has formed, the glass transition occurs at Tg ≈ 150 K. The appearance of the glass transition indicates that the

  20. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  2. The polar stratospheric cloud event of January 24. II - Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. S.; Solomon, S.; Poole, L. R.; Brune, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988/89 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE), observations of the chemical composition, aerosol characteristics and atmospheric state were obtained from two aircraft, a NASA ER-2 and a DC-8. This paper presents a diagnosis of observations obtained using the ER-2 on January 24, 1989, using a Lagrangian coupled microphysical-photochemical model. The high chlorine monoxide mixing ratios observed from the ER-2 on the afternoon of January 24, 1989 are interpreted as a result of in situ heterogeneous release of reactive chlorine from the reservoirs HCl and CIONO2 on type-1 polar stratospheric cloud particles observed to be present at that time. This essential element in theories of polar ozone depletion has never before been observed directly in the stratosphere.

  3. Researchers Focus on Fire Clouds That Reach to the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Volcanic eruptions are not the only violent events that can inject smoke-colored and cauliflower-textured clouds into the stratosphere. Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCB) storms can, too. These recently discovered phenomena are storms caused or aided by fire; they have many characteristics similar to thunderstorms, including lightning, hail, and extreme vertical height through the troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Common wisdom had held that “the only event that can explosively pollute the stratosphere is a volcanic eruption,” Michael Fromm, a meteorologist with the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D. C., said at a 9 August press briefing at the 2010 Meeting of the Americas in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. “Now we know that pyroCBs can do a version of this, thanks to the heat from fire.”

  4. Observation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds down to the Mediterranean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keckhut, P.; David, Ch.; Marchand, M.; Bekki, S.; Jumelet, J.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2007-05-01

    A Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) was detected for the first time in January 2006 over Southern Europe after 25 years of systematic lidar observations. This cloud was observed while the polar vortex was highly distorted during the initial phase of a major stratospheric warming. Very cold stratospheric temperatures (<190 K) centred over the Northern-Western Europe were reported, extending down to the South of France where lidar observations were performed. CTM (Chemical Transport Model) investigations show that this event led to a significant direct ozone destruction (35 ppb/day), within and outside the vortex as chlorine activated air masses were moved to sunlight regions allowing ozone destruction. If such exceptional events of mid-latitudes PSCs were to become frequent in the future, they should not compromise the ozone recovery because their effect appears to be limited temporally and spatially. More importantly, these events might tend to be associated with the initial phase of a stratospheric warming that results into a weakening and warming of the polar vortex and hence into a reduced probability occurrence of PSC temperatures during the rest of the winter.

  5. Observation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds down to the Mediterranean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keckhut, P.; David, Ch.; Marchand, M.; Bekki, S.; Jumelet, J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Höpfner, M.

    2007-10-01

    A Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) was detected for the first time in January 2006 over Southern Europe after 25 years of systematic lidar observations. This cloud was observed while the polar vortex was highly distorted during the initial phase of a major stratospheric warming. Very cold stratospheric temperatures (<190 K) centred over the Northern-Western Europe were reported, extending down to the South of France where lidar observations were performed. CTM (Chemical Transport Model) investigations show that this event led to a significant direct ozone destruction (35 ppb/day), within and outside the vortex as chlorine activated air masses were moved to sunlight regions allowing ozone destruction. If such exceptional events of mid-latitudes PSCs were to become frequent in the future, they should not compromise the ozone recovery because their effect appears to be limited temporally and spatially. More importantly, these events might tend to be associated with the initial phase of a stratospheric warming that results into a weakening and warming of the polar vortex and hence into a reduced probability occurrence of PSC temperatures during the rest of the winter.

  6. Monstrous Ice Cloud System in Titan's Present South Polar Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; McLain, Jason; Achterberg, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Milam, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    During southern autumn when sunlight was still available, Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem discovered a cloud around 300 km near Titan's south pole (West, R. A. et al., AAS/DPS Abstracts, 45, #305.03, 2013); the cloud was later determined by Cassini's Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer to contain HCN ice (de Kok et al., Nature, 514, pp 65-67, 2014). This cloud has proven to be only the tip of an extensive ice cloud system contained in Titan's south polar stratosphere, as seen through the night-vision goggles of Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). As the sun sets and the gloom of southern winter approaches, evidence is beginning to accumulate from CIRS far-IR spectra that a massive system of nitrile ice clouds is developing in Titan's south polar stratosphere. Even during the depths of northern winter, nothing like the strength of this southern system was evident in corresponding north polar regions.From the long slant paths that are available from limb-viewing CIRS far-IR spectra, we have the first definitive detection of the ν6 band of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) ice in Titan’s south polar stratosphere. In addition, we also see a strong blend of nitrile ice lattice vibration features around 160 cm-1. From these data we are able to derive ice abundances. The most prominent (and still chemically unidentified) ice emission feature, the Haystack, (at 220 cm-1) is also observed. We establish the vertical distributions of the ice cloud systems associated with both the 160 cm-1 feature and the Haystack. The ultimate aim is to refine the physical and possibly the chemical relationships between the two. Transmittance thin film spectra of nitrile ice mixtures obtained in our Spectroscopy for Planetary ICes Environments (SPICE) laboratory are used to support these analyses.

  7. Cirrus and Polar Stratospheric Cloud Studies using CLAES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mergenthaler, John L.; Douglass, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We've concluded a 3 year (Period of Performance- January 21, 1998 to February 28, 2001) study of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds using CLAES (Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer) data. We have described the progress of this study in monthly reports, UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) science team meetings, American Geophysical Society Meetings, refereed publications and collaborative publications. Work undertaken includes the establishment of CLAES cloud detection criteria, the refinement of CLAES temperature retrieval techniques, compare the findings of CLAES with those of other instruments, and present findings to the larger community. This report describes the progress made in these areas.

  8. Case study of the development of polar stratospheric clouds using bistatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enell, C.-F.; Brändström, U.; Gustavsson, B.; Kirkwood, S.; Stebel, K.; Steen, A.

    2003-08-01

    The formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is closely related to wave activity on different scales since waves propagating into the stratosphere perturb the temperature profile. We present here a case study of the development of visible PSCs (mother-of-pearl clouds), appearing at the polar vortex edge on 9 January 1997, under-taken by means of ground-based cameras. It is shown that the presence of stratospheric clouds may be detected semi-automatically and that short-term dynamics such as altitude variations can be tracked in three dimensions. The PSC field showed distinct features separated by approximately 20 km, which implies wave-induced temperature variations on that scale. The wave-induced characteristics were further emphasised by the fact that the PSCs moved within a sloping spatial surface. The appearance of visible mother-of-pearl clouds seems to be related to leewave-induced cooling of air masses, where the synoptic temperature has been close to (but not necessarily below) the threshold temperatures for PSC condensation.

  9. Dehydration of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere by Subvisible Cirrus Clouds Near the Tropical Tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    The extreme dryness of the lower stratosphere is believed to be caused by freeze-drying of air as it enters the stratosphere through the cold tropical tropopause. Previous investigations have been focused on dehydration occurring at the tops of deep convective cloud systems, However, recent observations of a ubiquitous stratiform cirrus cloud layer near the tropical tropopause suggest the possibility of dehydration as air is slowly lifted by large-scale motions, In this study, we have evaluated this possibility using a detailed ice cloud model. Simulations of ice cloud formation in the temperature minima of gravity waves (wave periods of 1 - 2 hours) indicate that large numbers of ice crystals will likely form due to the low temperatures and rapid cooling. As a result, the crystals do not grow larger than about 10 microns, fallspeeds are no greater than a few cm/s, and little or no precipitation or dehydration occurs. However, ice cloud's formed by large-scale vertical motions (with lifetimes of a day or more) should have,fever crystals and more time for crystal sedimentation to occur, resulting in water vapor depletions as large as 1 ppmv near the tropopause. We suggest that gradual lifting near the tropical tropopause, accompanied by formation of thin cirrus, may account for the dehydration.

  10. Arctic stratospheric sulphur injections: radiative forcings and cloud responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Gasparini, B.; Miriam, K.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and climate projections show a high sensitivity of the Arctic climate to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions, known as the polar amplification. This study evaluates the options of counteracting the rising polar temperatures by stratospheric sulphur injections in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes.10 Mt of sulphur dioxide are emitted in a point emission source setup centred at the 100 hPa pressure level over Svalbard island (80°N,15°E). We perform simulations with the general circulation models ECHAM5, ECHAM6, and GISS ModelE. We study pulsed emission simulations that differ among themselves by the injection starting date (March-September), injection length (1, 30, or 90 day emission period), and the vertical resolution of the model (for ECHAM6). We find injections in April to be the most efficient in terms of the shortwave radiative forcing at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Arctic region. The distribution of sulphate aerosol spreads out beyond the injection region, with a significant share reaching the Southern Hemisphere. Results from ModelE show high latitude injections could counteract the spring and summer temperature increase due to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Preliminary results with a more realistic description of clouds in ECHAM-HAM reveal a complex pattern of responses, most notably: a decrease in Northern Hemisphere cirrus clouds strengthening the effect of stratospheric aerosols in ECHAM5 a decrease in low-level clouds over the Arctic increasing the incoming solar radiation and causing a net positive radiative balance cirrus clouds are resilient to stratospheric sulphur injections in the absence of sulphate warming

  11. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. Several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the TTL can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model has been used to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the TTL. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth, advection, and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties and cloud frequencies depend strongly on the assumed supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio. I will also discuss the impacts of Kelvin waves and gravity waves on cloud properties and dehydration efficiency. These simulations can be used to determine whether observed lower stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios can be explained by dehydration associated with in situ TTL cloud formation alone.

  12. Clouds, hazes, and the stratospheric methane abundance in Neptune.

    PubMed

    Baines, K H; Hammel, H B

    1994-05-01

    Analysis of high-spatial-resolution (approximately 0.8 arcsec) methane band and continuum imagery of Neptune's relatively homogeneous Equatorial Region yields significant constraints on (1) the stratospheric gaseous methane mixing ratio (fCH4,s), (2) the column abundances and optical properties of stratospheric and tropospheric hydrocarbon hazes, and (3) the wavelength-dependent single-scattering albedo of the 3-bar opaque cloud. From the center-to-limb behavior of the 7270-angstroms and 8900-angstrom sCH4 bands, the stratospheric methane mixing ratio is limited to fCH4,s < 1.7 x 10(-3), with a nominal value of fCH4,s = 3.5 x 10(-4), one to two orders of magnitude less than pre-Voyager estimates, but in agreement with a number of recent ultraviolet and thermal infrared measurements, and largely in agreement with the tropopause mixing ratio implied by Voyager temperature measurements. Upper limits to the stratospheric haze mass column abundance and 6190-angstroms and 8900-angstroms haze opacities are 0.61 microgram cm-2 and 0.075 and 0.042, respectively, with nominal values of 0.20 microgram cm-2 and 0.025 and 0.014 for the 0.2-micrometer radius particles preferred by the recent Voyager PPS analysis of Pryor et al. (1992, Icarus 99, 302-316). The tropospheric CH4 haze opacities are comparable to that found in the stratosphere, upper limits of 0.104 and 0.065 at 6190 angstroms and 8900 angstroms, respectively, with nominal values of 0.085 and 0.058. This indicates a column abundance less than 11.0 micrograms cm-2, corresponding to the methane gas content within a well-mixed 3% methane tropospheric layer only 0.1 cm thick near the 1.5-bar CH4 condensation level. Constraints on the single-scattering albedos of these hazes include (1) for the stratospheric component, 6190-angstroms and 8900-angstroms imaginary indices of refraction less than 0.047 and 0.099, respectively, with 0.000 (conservative scattering) being the nominal value at both wavelengths, and (2) CH4 haze

  13. Effects of stratospheric sulfate aerosol geo-engineering on cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebbeler, Miriam; Lohmann, Ulrike; Feichter, Johann

    2012-12-01

    Cooling the Earth through the injection of sulphate into the stratosphere is one of the most discussed geo-engineering (GE) schemes. Stratospheric aerosols can sediment into the troposphere, modify the aerosol composition and thus might impact cirrus clouds. We use a global climate model with a physically based parametrization for cirrus clouds in order to investigate possible microphysical and dynamical effects. We find that enhanced stratospheric aerosol loadings as proposed by several GE approaches will likely lead to a reduced ice crystal nucleation rate and thus optically thinner cirrus clouds. These optically thinner cirrus clouds exert a strong negative cloud forcing in the long-wave which contributes by 60% to the overall net GE forcing. This shows that indirect effects of stratospheric aerosols on cirrus clouds may be important and need to be considered in order to estimate the maximum cooling derived from stratospheric GE.

  14. Measurements in polar stratospheric clouds over Antarctica in September 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry

    1991-01-01

    The results of six balloon flights at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, under varying temperature conditions, are used in a study of polar stratospheric clouds during Sept. 1989. A particle counter, with size resolution in the 0.5 micron radius region, indicates that cloud size distributions are always bimodal. Mode radii ranging from 0.05 to 0.10 microns were observed for the small particle mode, representing the sulfate layer or condensational growth enhancements of it. The data are not inconsistent with the expected increase in size with decreasing temperature of the small particle mode in the sulfate layer owing to deliquescence although this phenomenon is often masked by nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) condensation when temperatures are sufficiently low. Mode radii generally ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 micron for the large particle mode at concentrations 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than the small particle mode. The large particle mode, which normally comprises most of the mass, is presumably caused by NAT condensation on larger particles of the sulfate layer and indicates HNO3 mixing ratios of 1 to 5 ppbv for most of the cloud layers observed, suggesting substantial denitrification. On several occasions, distributions were observed with mode radii as high as 7 microns, and correspondingly large inferred mass, indicating water ice clouds in the 12 to 15 km region. On other occasions, absence of such clouds at very low temperatures indicated water vapor mixing ratios of less than 3 ppmv suggesting dehydration. Generally, the inferred HNO3 mixing ratios were higher in the lower stratosphere, suggesting redistribution through particle sedimentation.

  15. Clouds, hazes, and the stratospheric methane abundance in Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Hammel, Heidi B.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of high-spatial-resolution (approximately 0.8 arcsec) methane band and continuum imagery of Neptune's relatively homogeneous Equatorial Region yields significant constraints on (1) the stratospheric gaseous methane mixing ratio (f(sub CH4, S)), (2) the column abundances and optical properties of stratospheric and tropospheric hydrocarbon hazes, and (3) the wavelength-dependent single-scattering albedo of the 3-bar opaque cloud. From the center-to-limb behavior of the 7270-A and 8900-A CH4 bands, the stratospheric methane mixing ratios is limited to f(sub CH4, S) less than 1.7 x 10(exp -3), with a nominal value of f(sub CH4, S) = 3.5 x 10(exp -4), one to two orders of magnitude less than pre-Voyager estimates, but in agreement with a number of recent ultraviolet and thermal infrared measurements, and largely in agreement with the tropopause mixing ratio implied by Voyager temperature measurements. Upper limits to the stratospheric haze mass column abundance and 6190-A and 8900-A haze opacities are 0.61 micrograms/sq cm and 0.075 and 0.042, respectively, with nominal values of 0.20 micrograms/sq cm and 0.025 and 0.014 for the 0.2 micrometers radius particles preferred by the recent Voyager PPS analysis of Pryor et al. (1992). The tropospheric CH4 haze opacities are comparable to that found in the stratosphere, i.e., upper limits of 0.104 and 0.065 at 6190 A and 8900 A, respectively, with nominal values of 0.085 and 0.058. This indicates a column abundance less than 11.0 micrograms/sq cm, corresponding to the methane gas content within a well-mixed 3% methane tropospheric layer only 0.1 cm thick near the 1.5-bar CH4 condensation level. Conservative scattering is ruled out for the opaque cloud near 3 bars marking the bottom of the visible atmosphere. Specifically, we find cloud single-scattering albedos of 0.915 +/- 0.006 at 6340 A, 0.775 +/- 0.012 at 7490 A, and 0.803 +/- 0.010 at 8260 A. Global models utilizing a complete global spectrum confirm the red

  16. Studies on the Effect of Cloud Coverage and Galactic Cosmic Ray on Stratospheric Moistening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Animesh; Saha, Upal; Das, Saurabh

    2012-07-01

    Increased stratospheric water vapor is one of the significant causes of global warming as increased stratospheric water vapor acts to cool the stratosphere but it warms the underlying troposphere. The sun can influence the clouds by mediating through Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) which controls the nucleation of water droplets in the atmosphere. The role of primary GCR in generating low-level cloud condensation nuclei reflects solar energy back into space affecting the temperature on earth. In the present study, variations of different types of cloud coverage (low, mid and high) are correlated with the intensity of GCR flux and their effects on the stratospheric moistening in the equatorial, mid- latitude and polar region have been investigated for the years 2004 and 2005 using the Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) water vapor data, ISCCP cloud data and GCR from neutron monitor observations at Calgary (51.080 N, 245.870 E). The relation between GCR and stratospheric moistening is also investigated in this paper. Additionally, the latitudinal variation of different types of cloud coverage is also studied for the same period. The southern mid-latitudinal region has the highest coverage of low-level cloud, followed by the equatorial region. Both the Polar Regions are highly covered with mid-level cloud. The mid-latitudinal region shows highest coverage of high-cloud, followed by the equatorial region. Lower level clouds exert a large net cooling effect on the climate indicating an inter-relationship between cosmic ray and cloud coverage. However, the mid and high cloud coverage have no significant correlation with GCR flux. The stratospheric moistening is controlled by transport of water vapour from troposphere to stratosphere through the tropopause region and the oxidation of methane within the stratosphere. Water vapour plays a major role in the chemistry and radiative budget of the stratosphere. One possible water vapor source in the stratosphere is the advection of

  17. SAGE II observations of polar stratospheric clouds near 50 deg N January 31 - February 2, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form at very cold temperatures which typically occur only at high latitudes during local winter. However, meteorological circumstances in the Arctic during late January 1989 led to PSC formation unusually far to the south, at latitudes (near 50 deg N) being sampled during the period by the orbiting SAGE II instrument. These unusual PSC sightings and the evolution of meteorological conditions which produced the episode are described. Profiles of SAGE II extinction measurements at 0.525 and 1.02 microns show clear signatures of PSCs and indicate that the cloud particles were considerably larger than the background aerosol. It is most important to note that the clouds were sighted at a latitude where there was extensive sunlight, thus increasing the likelihood of ozone loss both locally and downstream due to enhancements in reactive chlorine expected from heterogeneous chemical processing within the PSCs.

  18. Subsidence-induced methane clouds in Titan's winter polar stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Barnes, J. W.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-11-01

    Titan's atmospheric methane most likely originates from lakes at the surface and subsurface reservoirs. Accordingly, it has been commonly assumed that Titan's tropopause region, where the vertical temperature profile is a minimum, acts as a cold trap for convecting methane, leading to the expectation that the formation of methane clouds in Titan's stratosphere would be rare. The additional assumption that Titan's tropopause temperatures are independent of latitude is also required. However, Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) and Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) data sets reveal colder temperatures in Titan's tropopause region near the winter pole than those at low latitudes and in the summer hemisphere. This, combined with the presence of a cross-equatorial meridional circulation with winter polar subsidence, as suggested by current general circulation models, implies the inevitable formation of Subsidence-Induced Methane Clouds (SIMCs) over Titan's winter pole. We verified this by retrieving the stratospheric methane mole fraction at 70°N from the strength of the far infrared methane pure rotation lines observed by CIRS and by assuming the RSS-derived thermal profile at 74.1°N. Our retrieved methane mole fraction of 1.50 ± 0.15% allows for methane to condense and form SIMCs at altitudes between ∼48 and ∼20 km. Radiative transfer analyses of a color composite image obtained by the Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during northern winter appear to corroborate the existence of these clouds.

  19. Observations of cirrus clouds in the lowermost stratosphere: common feature, rare incident, or observational artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Reinhold; Günther, Gebhard; Müller, Rolf; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Rolf, Christian; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Ground based observations by lidar instruments show evidential occurrence of optically and vertically thin cirrus clouds in the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). The knowledge about the potential formation processes of these clouds, their occurrence and distribution, and their radiative impact is very limited. Global observations of LMS cirrus clouds by satellites would be very helpful to better characterise these clouds. However, this is a difficult task because the optical thickness of LMS cirrus is usually at the edge of the detection limit (for space borne limb-sounders) or even below (for infra red nadir sounders).In addition, instrument characteristics can make it difficult to judge if a cloud observation is inside the LMS of just at or below the tropopause. Consequently it is not really proven if LMS cirrus clouds are a rare occasion or a globally common feature. We will give a brief overview of the history of LMS cirrus observations from ground and space borne sensors and are highlighting the sometimes controversial discussion on the observation of clouds in the LMS. Then we will focus on results from measurements of the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) satellite instrument. CRISTA made a number of snapshot measurements of the UT/LS during its two Space Shuttle missions in 1994 and 1997. The measurements demonstrate the potential of the IR limb viewing technique to provide information on several trace constituents and optically thin cirrus clouds with comparably high spatial resolution. The CRISTA data are still unique for IR limb sounders in the sense of vertical (1.5 km) and horizontal (300-500 km) resolution as well as daily global coverage by using three telescopes for three different viewing directions simultaneously. The detection sensitivity for optically thin cirrus clouds is extremely high. Depending on the vertical and horizontal extent of a cirrus cloud, the detection of an ice water content > 10-5g/m3 is

  20. Continuous Lidar Monitoring of Polar Stratospheric Clouds at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D

    2009-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) play a primary role in the formation of annual ozone holes over Antarctica during the austral sunrise. Meridional temperature gradients in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, caused by strong radiative cooling, induce a broad dynamic vortex centered near the South Pole that decouples and insulates the winter polar airmass. PSC nucleate and grow as vortex temperatures gradually fall below equilibrium saturation and frost points for ambient sulfate, nitrate, and water vapor concentrations (generally below 197 K). Cloud surfaces promote heterogeneous reactions that convert stable chlorine and bromine-based molecules into photochemically active ones. As spring nears, and the sun reappears and rises, photolysis decomposes these partitioned compounds into individual halogen atoms that react with and catalytically destroy thousands of ozone molecules before they are stochastically neutralized. Despite a generic understanding of the ozone hole paradigm, many key components of the system, such as cloud occurrence, phase, and composition; particle growth mechanisms; and denitrification of the lower stratosphere have yet to be fully resolved. Satellite-based observations have dramatically improved the ability to detect PSC and quantify seasonal polar chemical partitioning. However, coverage directly over the Antarctic plateau is limited by polar-orbiting tracks that rarely exceed 80 degrees S. In December 1999, a NASA Micropulse Lidar Network instrument (MPLNET) was first deployed to the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) Atmospheric Research Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station for continuous cloud and aerosol profiling. MPLNET instruments are eye-safe, capable of full-time autonomous operation, and suitably rugged and compact to withstand long-term remote deployment. With only brief interruptions during the winters of 2001 and 2002, a nearly continuous data archive exists to the present.

  1. Polar stratospheric clouds as deduced from MLS and CLAES measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ricaud, P.D.; Carr, E.S.; Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1995-08-01

    From 30 August 1992 to 3 September 1992 a supersaturated area at 465 K potential temperature ({approximately}50 hPa) is deduced from MLS water vapour measurements over western Antarctica, where high extinction coefficients measured by CLAES indicate Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). These PSCs are attributed partly to the effect of an anticyclone located over South America and partly to localized orographic waves, which raise the isentropes and generate rapid adiabatic cooling. A local minimum in column O{sub 3} ({<=}200DU) is observed in this area, which is believed to be a consequence of the dynamics. Enhanced ClO abundances downstream of the region indicate PSC processing and chlorine activation. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Possible interaction of meteor explosion with stratospheric aerosols on cloud nucleation based on 2011 observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M.-A.; Vaillant, M.; Benoit, R.

    2012-04-01

    stratosphere aerosols is suggested to resulting from the energy released by the meteor explosion. A direct link between the meteor explosion and the subsequent hailstones and heavy precipitation is clearly established by their similar range of composite debris. The meteor explosion is suggested to have initiated phase transformation of the stratospheric aerosols and their agglutination by complex mechanisms that remain to be further elucidated. The agglutinated particles with carbonaceous components have probably initiated condensation processes thus resulting into cloud formation. This was accomplished within a few days as shown by the time lag between the initial meteor explosion and the following precipitation events. The occurrence of the later across approximately the same region as the one of the debris pulverization from the meteor explosion suggests that the trajectory of the meteor would strongly constrain the agglutination processes. This data reveals the occurrence of solid aerosols with carbonaceous components in the stratosphere, most probably loaded by former volcanic events. In the case of serial meteor explosion the agglutination processes could significantly increase the agglutination process of stratospheric aerosols with resulting cloud formation and thus change of radiative forcing. Further research should reveal the role of meteor explosion on climate through cloud-aerosol precipitation interactions.

  3. Cloud formation in substellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Christiane

    2009-02-01

    Clouds seem like an every-day experience. But-do we know how clouds form on brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets? How do they look like? Can we see them? What are they composed of? Cloud formation is an old-fashioned but still outstanding problem for the Earth atmosphere, and it has turned into a challenge for the modelling of brown dwarf and exo-planetary atmospheres. Cloud formation imposes strong feedbacks on the atmospheric structure, not only due to the clouds own opacity, but also due to the depletion of the gas phase, possibly leaving behind a dynamic and still supersaturated atmosphere. I summarise the different approaches taken to model cloud formation in substellar atmospheres and workout their differences. Focusing on the phase-non-equilibrium approach to cloud formation, I demonstrate the inside we gain from detailed microphysical modelling on for instance the material composition and grain size distribution inside the cloud layer on a Brown Dwarf atmosphere. A comparison study on four different cloud approaches in Brown Dwarf atmosphere simulations demonstrates possible uncertainties in interpretation of observational data.

  4. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  5. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer. Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the tropopause layer can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, we use a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the tropical tropopause layer. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties depend strongly on the assumed ice supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. with effective nuclei present (low supersaturation threshold), ice number densities are high (0.1--10 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals do not grow large enough to fall very far, resulting in limited dehydration. With higher supersaturation thresholds, ice number densities are much lower (less than 0.01 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals grow large enough to fall substantially; however, supersaturated air often crosses the tropopause without cloud formation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is typically 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio.

  6. Simultaneous Observations fo Polar Stratospheric Clouds and HNO3 over Scandinavia in January, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Grainger, R. G.; Lambert, A.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Dye, J. E.; Baumbardner, D.; Randel, W. J.; Tabazadeh, A.; Tie, X.; Pan, L.; Figarol, F.; Wu, F.; Brasseur, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud aerosol extinction and HNO3 mixing ratios over Scandinavia are examined for January 9-10, 1992. Data measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon, Spectrometer (CLAES), and Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMA) experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are examined at locations adjacent to parcel trajectory positions.

  7. CALIPSO Polar Stratospheric Cloud Observations from 2006-2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a crucial role in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIPSO is an excellent platform for studying polar processes with CALIOP acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we will provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC detection and composition classification algorithm and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data

  8. CALIPSO Polar Stratospheric Cloud Observations from 2006-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont

    2015-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a crucial role in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIPSO is an excellent platform for studying polar processes with CALIOP acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55 and 82 degrees in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we will provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC detection and composition classification algorithm and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine

  9. Heterogeneous reactions on nitric acid trihydrate. [on surfaces of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. B.; Keyser, L. F.; Leu, M.-T.; Smith, R. H.; Turco, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The first direct measurements are reported of the reaction probabilities at stratospheric temperatures for two important heterogeneous reactions on nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the compound which makes up the predominant, type I form of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC). Sticking coefficients and solubilities of HCl and NAT, which are important in modeling physicochemical processes in the stratosphere, are also reported. The results show that the conversion of the chlorine reservoir species in the stratosphere to photochemically active forms can occur within a few days of the first appearance of type I PSCs during the polar winter.

  10. Catastrophic loss of stratospheric ozone in dense volcanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Rapid, localized loss of ozone is predicted to occur in the midlatitude and tropical stratosphere in the presence of very large concentrations of sulfate aerosols. Volcanic eruptions can increase the effective surface area of sulfuric acid so that heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO2, and secondarily N2O5, are able to suppress NO(x) abundances by more than a factor of 10 relative to gas phase chemistry. When NO(x) levels fall below a threshold, e.g., 0.6 ppb at 24 km in mid-latitudes, the chlorine-catalyzed loss of O3 proceeds at rates comparable to those during the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole, more than 50 ppb per day. If such losses occurred following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the most volcanically perturbed regions over the tropics and mid-latitudes, this model predicts that they are driven primarily by the suppression of NO(x) below these critical levels. The increase in stratospheric chlorine since El Chichon has made Mount Pinatubo more than twice as effective in causing rapid O3 loss.

  11. SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) observations of polar stratospheric clouds near 50 degree N January 31-February 2, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.C. ); Poole, L.R.; McCormick, M.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form at very cold temperatures which typically occur only at high latitudes during local winter. However, meteorological circumstances in the Arctic during late January 1989 led to PSC formation unusually far to the south, at latitudes (near 50{degree}N) being sampled during the period (January 31-February 2) by the orbiting SAGE II instrument. These unusual PSC sightings and the evolution of meteorological conditions which produced the episode are described. Profiles of SAGE II extinction measurements at 0.525 and 1.02 {mu}m show clear signatures of PSCs and indicate that the cloud particles were considerably larger than the background aerosol. It is most important to note that the clouds were sighted at a latitude where there was extensive sunlight, thus increasing the likelihood of ozone loss both locally and downstream due to enhancements in reactive chlorine expected from heterogeneous chemical processing within the PSCs.

  12. Polar stratospheric clouds over Finland in the 2012/2013 Arctic winter measured by two Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kivi, Rigel; Schrems, Otto; Immler, Franz; Komppula, Mika

    2013-04-01

    Already in December 2012, the Arctic stratospheric vortex reached temperatures sufficiently low for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation over wide areas of Northern Europe and whole Finland. Within Finland, stratospheric aerosol lidar measurements have been and are performed with two Raman lidar systems, the PollyXT, owned by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and situated well below the Arctic circle close to Kuopio (63 N, 27 E) and the MARL lidar owned by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), and situated at the FMI Arctic Research Centre in Sodankylä (67 N, 26 E). The PollyXT has been designed as an autonomous tropospheric lidar system, but it has proven to be able to detect aerosol backscatter and depolarization at least as high up as 25 km. Measurements are ongoing as far as low clouds allow for stratospheric analysis with both lidars until the end of PSC season in February. For the winter 2012/2013, PSC occurrence frequency, types and characteristics will be determined. Comparative analysis with Calipso lidar profiles covering Finland will be performed. Preliminary results from December 17-24 show PSCs detected in Kuopio during seven days with the PollyXT lidar. The altitude of the clouds varied in the range of 17-25 km. In Sodankylä the measurements were running on one day during the period and PSCs were observed between altitudes 17-25 km. For the same time period (December 17-24, 2012) CALIPSO has observed stratospheric layers at all overpasses over Finland (9 tracks on five days). The clouds were observed between 18.5 and 26 km, with varying geometric and optical thickness.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study nitric-acid/ice films representative of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These studies reveal that in addition to amorphous nitric acid/ice mixtures, there are three stable stoichiometric hydrates of nitric acid: nitric-acid monohydrate (NAM), dihydrate (NAD), and trihydrate (NAT). We also observe two distinct crystalline forms of the trihydrate, which we denote alpha- and beta-NAT. These two forms appear to differ in their concentration of crystalline defects, but not in their chemical composition. In addition to probing the composition of type I PSCs, we have also used FTIR spectroscopy to study the interaction of HCl with model PSC films. In this work we find that for HCl pressures in the range 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -7 Torr, HCl is taken up by ice at 155 K to form a thin layer of HCl.6H2O. At 193 K, the uptake of HCl by ice was consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage. Uptake of HCl by alpha and beta-NAT at 175 K was also consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage.

  14. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  15. Microphysical Modelling of Polar Stratospheric Clouds During the 1999-2000 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Schoeberl, Mark; Rosenfield, Joan; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of the 1999-2000 Arctic winter has been examined using a microphysical/photochemical model run along diabatic trajectories. A large number of trajectories have been generated, filling the vortex throughout the region of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation, and extending from November until the vortex breakup, in order to provide representative sampling of the evolution of PSCs and their effect on stratospheric chemistry. The 1999-2000 winter was particularly cold, allowing extensive PSC formation. Many trajectories have ten-day periods continuously below the Type I PSC threshold; significant periods of Type II PSCs are also indicated. The model has been used to test the extent and severity of denitrification and dehydration predicted using a range of different microphysical schemes. Scenarios in which freezing only occurs below the ice frost point (causing explicit coupling of denitrification and dehydration) have been tested, as well as scenarios with partial freezing at warmer temperatures (in which denitrification can occur independently of dehydration). The sensitivity to parameters such as aerosol freezing rates and heterogeneous freezing have been explored. Several scenarios cause sufficient denitrification to affect chlorine partitioning, and in turn, model-predicted ozone depletion, demonstrating that an improved understanding of the microphysics responsible for denitrification is necessary for understanding ozone loss rates.

  16. Properties of Northern Hemisphere polar stratospheric clouds and volcanic aerosol in 1991/92 from UARS/ISAMS satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, F.W.; Lambert, A.; Grainger, R.G.; Rodgers, C.D.; Remedios, J.J.

    1994-10-15

    Observations of polar stratospheric clouds by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) experiment on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) have revealed new details of their global properties and behavior. These include the vertical and horizontal spatial distributions of Arctic and Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) as a function of time and air temperature, their optical thicknesses and estimated densities, their spectral properties, and their inferred composition. In particular, ISAMS spectral data allows different PSC types to be distinguished from each other and from volcanic aerosol by their compositional differences. Northern PSCs during the 1991/92 season are found to be more ephemeral and more compact than reported in previous years and to differ markedly in scale from those in the Southern Hemisphere, which cause the Antarctic ozone hole by activating stratospheric chlorine chemistry. There were only two episodes of dense PSC formation in the 1991/92 northern winter, one of which took place in sunlight. The latter correlates well with UARS/Microwave Limb Sounder observations of enhanced chlorine monoxide, but substantial amounts of chlorine monoxide were also reported at times and places with at most very minor PSC activity. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Microphysical Simulation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Within the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunqian

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are critical elements for polar ozone depletion. A new PSC model coupling stratospheric chemistry, microphysics and climate is constructed and the formation of STS (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-Acid Trihydrate) PSCs are explored. STS particle properties are dominated by thermodynamics. Simulations of particle volumes and size distributions are generally within the observational error bars. STS particles are not in equilibrium with their environment when the particle surface area is smaller than 4 mum2/cm 3. A new nucleation rate equation for NAT is derived based on observed denitrification in the 2010-2011 Arctic winter. The homogeneous nucleation scheme leads to supermicron NAT particles as observed. The simulated the lidar backscatter, and denitrification are generally within observational error bars. However, the simulations are very sensitive to temperature. Using the same STS and NAT schemes, as well as a prognostic treatment for ice PSC formation and dehydration, the PSCs are simulated during the Antarctic winter of 2010. The current model correctly simulates large NAT particles and denitrification, but cannot produce NAT with high backscattering ratio/number density sometimes observed by CALIPSO. However, our simulated ice has similar backscatter and depolarization which is often attributed to NAT by CALIPSO. Possibly the CALIPSO algorithm misclassifies ice as NAT when the stratosphere is denitrified or dehydrated. STS and NAT form near the pole in May and June, but form a ring outside 80?S later in the winter when polar HNO3 is depleted. Ice always forms in the coldest area, but becomes less abundant later in the winter. The model is missing some processes forming NAT such as gravity waves or evaporating ice. These processes should be added to the model in the future.

  18. A Climatology of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Types by MIPAS-Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Orr, Andrew; Höpfner, Michael; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    For Chemistry Climate Models (CCM) it is still a challenging task to properly represent the evolution of the polar vortices over the entire winter season. The models usually do not include comprehensive microphysical modules to evolve the formation of different types of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) over the winter. Consequently, predictions on the development and recovery of the future ozone hole have relatively large uncertainties. A climatological record of hemispheric measurement of PSC types could help to better validate and improve the PSC schemes in CCMs. The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument onboard the ESA Envisat satellite operated from July 2002 to April 2012. The infra-red limb emission measurements compile a unique dataset of day and night measurements of polar stratospheric clouds up to the poles. From the spectral measurements in the 4.15-14.6 microns range it is possible to select a number of atmospheric window regions and spectral signatures to classify PSC cloud types like nitric acid hydrates, sulfuric ternary solution droplets, and ice particles. The cloud detection sensitivity is similar to space borne lidars, but MIPAS adds complementary information due to its different measurement technique (limb instead of nadir) and wavelength region. Here we will describe a new classification method for PSCs based on the combination of multiple brightness temperature differences (BTD) and colour ratios. Probability density functions (PDF) of the MIPAS measurements in conjunction with a database of radiative transfer model calculations of realistic PSC particle size distributions enable the definition of regions attributed to specific or mixed types clouds. Applying a naive bias classifier for independent criteria to all defined classes in four 2D PDF distributions, it is possible to assign the most likely PSC type to any measured cloud spectrum. Statistical Monte Carlo test have been applied to quantify

  19. Tropical Stratospheric Cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset - an assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Heidinger, A. K.; Foster, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 micro meter brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross ropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (2 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales[1]. [1] GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 38, L18801, 5 PP., 2011 doi:10.1029/2011GL049429

  20. Tropical Stratospheric Cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset - an assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Foster, M. J.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 micro meter brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross ropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (1 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales.

  1. Tropical stratospheric cloud climatology from the PATMOS-x dataset: An assessment of convective contributions to stratospheric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. K.; Foster, M.; Heidinger, A.

    2011-09-01

    The PATMOS-x level 2b climatology, generated using three decades of AVHRR measurements, contains valuable information about the past global cloud record. We extract climatologies of tropical deep convective clouds from the PATMOS-x data set, based on the 10.30-11.30 μm brightness temperature. A comparison of the cross tropopause convective cloud frequency between ISCCP and PATMOS-x shows that PATMOS-x has a greater frequency of occurrence than does the ISCCP, and this enhanced frequency is attributed to greater horizontal resolution (2 km) in the PATMOS-x data. The high resolution makes this dataset suitable for a search for cross tropopause convection, which happens on length scales down to 1 km. We find there have been several changes in deep convective activity over land during the period 1982 to 2009. We explore specifically the epoch of the HALOE satellite, and find a correlation between land deep convective activity and anomalies in the HALOE stratospheric water retrievals. A simple model is able to predict stratospheric water vapor concentrations highly correlated to that observed using only frequency of deep convection. From this we conclude that deep convection over land contributes to moistening of the lowest tropical stratosphere on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales.

  2. A microphysical connection among biomass burning, cumulus clouds, and stratospheric moisture.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven

    2002-02-15

    A likely causal chain is established here that connects humidity in the stratosphere, relative humidity near the tropical tropopause, ice crystal size in towering cumulus clouds, and aerosols associated with tropical biomass burning. The connections are revealed in satellite-observed fluctuations of each quantity on monthly to yearly time scales. More aerosols lead to smaller ice crystals and more water vapor entering the stratosphere. The connections are consistent with physical reasoning, probably hold on longer time scales, and may help to explain why stratospheric water vapor appears to have been increasing for the past five decades. PMID:11847336

  3. Strong modification of stratospheric ozone forcing by cloud and sea-ice adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Hu, Yongyun; Huang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the climatic impact of stratospheric ozone recovery (SOR), with a focus on the surface temperature change in atmosphere-slab ocean coupled climate simulations. We find that although SOR would cause significant surface warming (global mean: 0.2 K) in a climate free of clouds and sea ice, it causes surface cooling (-0.06 K) in the real climate. The results here are especially interesting in that the stratosphere-adjusted radiative forcing is positive in both cases. Radiation diagnosis shows that the surface cooling is mainly due to a strong radiative effect resulting from significant reduction of global high clouds and, to a lesser extent, from an increase in high-latitude sea ice. Our simulation experiments suggest that clouds and sea ice are sensitive to stratospheric ozone perturbation, which constitutes a significant radiative adjustment that influences the sign and magnitude of the global surface temperature change.

  4. Aerosol measurements in the winter/spring Antarctic stratosphere. I - Correlative measurements with ozone. II - Impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Harder, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Aerosol measurements collected from August 25-November 3, 1986 at McMurdo Station using balloon-borne optical particle counters are examined in order to study the relationship between aerosol and ozone distribution and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Ozone, aerosol, and condensation nuclei profiles, and pressure, temperature, and humidity measurements are analyzed. It is observed that the height of the stratospheric sulfate layer decreases over the period of measurement suggesting that upwelling in the votex is not important in the zone depletion process. Three theories on PSC formation are described, and the effects of the aerosol measurements on the theories are considered. The three theories are: (1) the original theory of water vapor pressure over a solution of H2SO4 of Steele et al. (1983) and Hamill and Mc Master (1984); (2) the nitric acid theory of PSCs of Toon et al. (1986) and Hamill et al. (1986); and (3) the quasi-cirrus cloud theory of Heymsfield (1986).

  5. Nonorographic generation of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds during December 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchman, Matthew H.; Buker, Marcus L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas J.; Burris, John F.

    2003-03-01

    During December 1999, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed in the absence of conditions conducive to generation by topographic gravity waves. The possibility is explored that PSCs can be generated by inertia gravity waves (IGW) radiating from breaking synoptic-scale Rossby waves on the polar front jet. The aerosol features on 7 and 12 December are selected for comparison with theory and with simulations using the University of Wisconsin Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UWNMS). Consistent with Rossby adjustment theory, a common feature in the UWNMS simulations is radiation of IGW from the tropopause polar front jet, especially from sectors which are evolving rapidly in the Rossby wave breaking process. Packets of gravity wave energy radiate upward and poleward into the cold pool, while individual wave crests propagate poleward and downward, causing mesoscale variations in vertical motion and temperature. On 12 December the eastbound DC-8 lidar observations exhibited a fairly uniform field of six waves in aerosol enhancement in the 14-20 km layer, consistent with vertical displacement by a field of IGW propagating antiparallel to the flow, with characteristic horizontal and vertical wavelengths of ˜300 and ˜10 km. UWNMS simulations show emanation of a field of IGW upward and southwestward from a northward incursion of the polar front jet. The orientation and evolution of the aerosol features on 7 December are consistent with a single PSC induced by an IGW packet propagating from a breaking Rossby wave over western Russia toward the northeast into the coldest part of the base of the polar vortex, with characteristic period ˜9 hours, vertical wavelength ˜12 km, and horizontal wavelength ˜1000 km. Linear theory shows that for both of these cases, IGW energy propagates upward at ˜1 km/hour and horizontally at ˜100 km/hour, with characteristic trace speed ˜30 m/s. The spatial orientation of the PSC along IGW phase lines is contrasted with the nearly

  6. Analysis of a jet stream induced gravity wave associated with an observed stratospheric ice cloud over Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, S.; Hertzog, A.; Hostettler, C.; Bui, T. B.; Lüthi, D.; Wernli, H.

    2004-08-01

    A polar stratospheric ice cloud (PSC type II) was observed by airborne lidar above Greenland on 14 January 2000. It was the unique observation of an ice cloud over Greenland during the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. Mesoscale simulations with the hydrostatic HRM model are presented which, in contrast to global analyses, are capable to produce a vertically propagating gravity wave that induces the low temperatures at the level of the PSC afforded for the ice formation. The simulated minimum temperature is ~8 K below the driving analyses and ~4.5 K below the frost point, exactly coinciding with the location of the observed ice cloud. Despite the high elevations of the Greenland orography the simulated gravity wave is not a mountain wave. Analyses of the horizontal wind divergence, of the background wind profiles, of backward gravity wave ray-tracing trajectories, of HRM experiments with reduced Greenland topography and of several diagnostics near the tropopause level provide evidence that the wave is emitted from an intense, rapidly evolving, anticyclonically curved jet stream. The precise physical process responsible for the wave emission could not be identified definitely, but geostrophic adjustment and shear instability are likely candidates.

    In order to evaluate the potential frequency of such non-orographic polar stratospheric cloud events, the non-linear balance equation diagnostic is performed for the winter 1999/2000. It indicates that ice-PSCs are only occasionally generated by gravity waves emanating from spontaneous adjustment.

  7. Physical Chemistry of the H2SO4/HNO3/H2O System: Implications for Polar Stratospheric Clouds.

    PubMed

    Molina, M J; Zhang, R; Wooldridge, P J; McMahon, J R; Kim, J E; Chang, H Y; Beyer, K D

    1993-09-10

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Surface-catalyzed reactions on PSC particles generate chlorine compounds that photolyze readily to yield chlorine radicals, which in turn destroy ozone very efficiently. The most prevalent PSCs form at temperatures several degrees above the ice frost point and are believed to consist of HNO(3) hydrates; however, their formation mechanism is unclear. Results of laboratory experiments are presented which indicate that the background stratospheric H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O aerosols provide an essential link in this mechanism: These liquid aerosols absorb significant amounts of HNO(3) vapor, leading most likely to the crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The frozen particles then grow to form PSCs by condensation of additional amounts of HNO(3) and H(2)O vapor. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements reveal that the chlorine radical precursors are formed readily at polar stratospheric temperatures not just on NAT and ice crystals, but also on liquid H(2)SO(4) solutions and on solid H(2)SO(4) hydrates. These results imply that the chlorine activation efficiency of the aerosol particles increases rapidly as the temperature approaches the ice frost point regardless of the phase or composition of the particles. PMID:17745351

  8. Physical chemistry of the H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Zhang, R.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Mcmahon, J. R.; Kim, J. E.; Chang, H. Y.; Beyer, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Surface-catalyzed reactions on PSC particles generate chlorine compounds that photolyze readily to yield chlorine radicals, which in turn destroy ozone very efficiently. The most prevalent PSCs form at temperatures several degrees above the ice frost point and are believed to consist of HNO3 hydrates; however, their formation mechanism is unclear. Results of laboratory experiments are presented which indicate that the background stratospheric H2SO4/H2O aerosols provide an essential link in this mechanism: These liquid aerosols absorb significant amounts of HNO3 vapor, leading most likely to the crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The frozen particles then grow to form PSCs by condensation of additional amounts of HNO3 and H2O vapor. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements reveal that the chlorine radical precursors are formed readily at polar stratospheric temperatures not just on NAT and ice crystals, but also on liquid H2SO4 solutions and on solid H2SO4 hydrates. These results imply that the chlorine activation efficiency of the aerosol particles increases rapidly as the temperature approaches the ice frost point regardless of the phase or composition of the particles.

  9. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  10. The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens - Physical and chemical processes in the stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.; Keesee, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The large and diverse set of observational data collected in the high-altitude plumes of the May 18, May 25, and June 13, 1980 eruptions is organized and analyzed with a view to discerning the processes at work. The data serve to guide and constrain detailed model simulations of the volcanic clouds. For this purpose, use is made of a comprehensive one-dimensional model of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, sulfur precursor gases, and volcanic ash and dust. The model takes into account gas-phase and condensed-phase (heterogeneous) chemistry in the clouds, aerosol nucleation and growth, and cloud expansion. Computational results are presented for the time histories of the gaseous species concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and ash burdens of the eruption clouds. Also investigated are the long-term buildup of stratospheric aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere and the persistent effects of injected chlorine and water vapor on stratospheric ozone. It is concluded that SO2, water vapor, and ash were probably the most important substances injected into the stratosphere by the Mount St. Helens volcano, both with respect to their widespread effects on composition and their effect on climate.

  11. Impact of stratospheric aircraft on calculations of nitric acid trihydrate cloud surface area densities using NMC temperatures and 2D model constituent distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) clouds is developed for use in 2D models of the stratosphere. The parameterization uses model distributions of HNO3 and H2O to determine critical temperatures for NAT formation as a function of latitude and pressure. National Meteorological Center temperature fields are then used to determine monthly temperature frequency distributions, also as a function of latitude and pressure. The fractions of these distributions which fall below the critical temperatures for NAT formation are then used to determine the NAT cloud surface area density for each location in the model grid. By specifying heterogeneous reaction rates as functions of the surface area density, it is then possible to assess the effects of the NAT clouds on model constituent distributions. We also consider the increase in the NAT cloud formation in the presence of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft. The stratospheric aircraft NO(x) and H2O perturbations result in increased HNO3 as well as H2O. This increases the probability of NAT formation substantially, especially if it is assumed that the aircraft perturbations are confined to a corridor region.

  12. Influence of polar stratospheric clouds on the depletion of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation of nitrate in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can provide a significant sink for Antarctic stratospheric odd nitrogen. It is argued that the depth of the Ozone Hole is sensitive to the occurrence of temperatures below about 196 K. An increase in the prevalence of temperatures below 196 K would enhance ozone loss by increasing the spatial extent and persistence of PSCs, and by decreasing the level of HNO3 that remains following PSC evaporation. Concentrations of halogen gases in the 1960s and earlier were insufficient to support major ozone loss, even if thermal conditions were favorable.

  13. Extreme stratospheric springs and their consequences for the onset of polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, David E.; Allen, Douglas R.; Randall, Cora E.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry; Thurairajah, Brentha; Bailey, Scott M.; Russell, James M.

    2015-09-01

    We use data from the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) explorer and from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) stratospheric analysis to explore the variability in the onset of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) season. Consistent with recently published results, we show that the early onset of the NH PMC season in 2013 was accompanied by a warm springtime stratosphere; conversely, we show that the late onset in 2008 coincides with a very cold springtime stratosphere. Similar stratospheric temperature anomalies for 1997 and 2011 also are connected either directly, through observed temperatures, or indirectly, through an early PMC onset, to conditions near the mesopause. These 4 years, 2008, 1997, 2011, and 2013 represent the extremes of stratospheric springtime temperatures seen in the MERRA analysis and correspond to analogous extrema in planetary wave activity. The three years with enhanced planetary wave activity (1997, 2011 and 2013) are shown to coincide with the recently identified stratospheric Frozen In Anticyclone (FrIAC) phenomenon. FrIACs in 1997 and 2013 are associated with early PMC onsets; however, the dramatic FrIAC of 2011 is not. This may be because the 2011 FrIAC occurred too early in the spring. The link between NH PMC onset and stratospheric FrIAC occurrences represents a new mode of coupling between the stratosphere and mesosphere. Since FrIACs appear to be more frequent in recent years, we speculate that as a result, PMCs may occur earlier as well. Finally we compare the zonal mean zonal winds and observed gravity wave activity for the FrIACs of 2011 and 2013. We find no evidence that gravity wave activity was favored in 2013 relative to 2011, thus suggesting that direct forcing by planetary waves was the key mechanism in accelerating the cooling and moistening of the NH mesopause region in May of 2013.

  14. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Clouds After Volcanic Eruption of Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Jinhui; Qiu, Jinhuan; Xia, Qilin; Zhang, Jinding

    1992-01-01

    A very large increase of backscattered light from the stratospheric aerosol layer was observed by using a ruby laser in Beijing (39 degrees 54 minutes N, 116 degrees 27 minutes E) from the end of July 1991 to March 1992. It was concluded that this increase was almost certainly due to the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines in June 1991. The measuring instruments used are described. Information is given in graphical form for vertical profiles, fluctuation of the maximum backscattering ratio above 20 km during the nine month period, and the time variation of the integrated backscattering coefficient at a height of 15 to 30 km.

  15. Radiatively driven stratosphere-troposphere interactions near the tops of tropical cloud clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, Dean D.; Houze, Robert A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of two numerical simulations of the mechanism involved in the dehydration of air, using the model of Churchill (1988) and Churchill and Houze (1990) which combines the water and ice physics parameterizations and IR and solar-radiation parameterization with a convective adjustment scheme in a kinematic nondynamic framework. One simulation, a cirrus cloud simulation, was to test the Danielsen (1982) hypothesis of a dehydration mechanism for the stratosphere; the other was to simulate the mesoscale updraft in order to test an alternative mechanism for 'freeze-drying' the air. The results show that the physical processes simulated in the mesoscale updraft differ from those in the thin-cirrus simulation. While in the thin-cirrus case, eddy fluxes occur in response to IR radiative destabilization, and, hence, no net transfer occurs between troposphere and stratosphere, the mesosphere updraft case has net upward mass transport into the lower stratosphere.

  16. More rapid polar ozone depletion through the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The direct reaction of HOCl with HCl is shown here to play a critical part in polar ozone loss. Observations of high levels of OClO and ClO in the springtime Antarctic stratosphere confirm that most of the available chlorine is in the form of ClO(x). But current photochemical models have difficulty converting HCl to ClO(x) rapidly enough in early spring to account fully for the observations. Here, a chemical model is used to show that the direct reaction of HOCl with HCl provides the missing mechanism. As alternative sources of nitrogen-containing oxidants have been converted in the late autumn to inactive HNO3 by known reactions on the sulfate layer aerosols, the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds becomes the most important pathway for releasing that stratospheric chlorine which goes into polar night as HCl.

  17. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric acid - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fox, Lewis E.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO3.H2O, HNO3.2H2O, HNO3.3H2O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO3.2H2O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO3.3H2O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO3.2H2O and HNO3.3H2O. Vapor transfer from HNO3.2H2O to HNO3.3H2O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO3, which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone.

  18. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric Acid: implications for polar stratospheric clouds.

    PubMed

    Worsnop, D R; Zahniser, M S; Fox, L E; Wofsy, S C

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO(3).H(2)O, HNO(3).2H(2)O, HNO(3).3H(2)O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO(3).2H(2)O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO(3).3H(2)O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO(3).2H(2)O and HNO(3).3H(2)O. Vapor transfer from HNO(3).2H(2)O to HNO(3).3H(2)O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO(3), which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone. PMID:17757475

  19. Lidar Observations of the Pinatubo Stratospheric Aerosol Cloud over Frascati, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congeduti, Fernando; Adriani, Alberto; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Centurioni, Sante

    1992-01-01

    The Pinatubo eruption of June 1991 introduced large plumes into the local stratosphere. On several occasions, volcanic gases and particles reached altitudes of about 30 km, and spread towards the west. A lidar system has been operating to monitor the evolution of the stratospheric aerosol cloud. The backscattering ratio profiles of eight different measurements were chosen to summarize the most significant occurrences of the event. Since the beginning of the winter planetary wave activity, the Pinatubo cloud integrated backscatter exceeded El Chichon's. In this context, the perturbation generated by El Chichon can only be assumed as a lower limit of the one which will follow the Pinatubo eruption. Observations of the event are still in progress.

  20. Characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds as observed by SAM II, SAGE, and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Hamill, P.; Farrukh, U. O.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite and lidar data sets developed over several years of observations are analyzed to detail the macroscopic and microphysical characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Mappings were made of the sizes, locations, probabilities of occurrence and temperature dependence of the PSCs, and indicated that PSCs are correlated with an extended stratospheric cloud bank in the cold polar vortex region. The bank is bounded by a 188 K isotherm, and the probability of occurrence drops to 50 percent at the 193 K isotherm. Values of 6.3 particles/cu cm and radii averaging 0.0725 micron/particle are calculated, along with an estimated downward velocity of 0.01 m/sec.

  1. A possible water ice cloud in Jupiter's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Puertas, M.; Montañés-Rodríguez, M. P.; González-Merino, B.; Pallé, E.; García-Melendo, E.; Höpfner, M.; García-Comas, M.; Funke, B.

    2015-10-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere has been sounded in transmission from UV to IR, as if it were a transiting exoplanet by observing one of its satellites, Ganymede, while passing through Jupiter's shadow during a solar eclipse from Ganymede. The spectra show strong extinction due to the presence of aerosols and haze in the atmosphere and strong absorption features from CH4.In addition, the spectra show two broad features near 1.5 and 2.0μm that we tentatively attribute to a layer of H2O ice in Jupiter's stratosphere. While the spectral signatures seem to be unequivocally attributed to crystalline water ice, to explain the strong absorption features requires a large amount of water ice.

  2. Laboratory measurements of polar stratospheric cloud rate parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Rex D.; Plumb, Ian C.; Ryan, Keith R.

    1994-01-01

    It is now clear that heterogeneous reactions play an important role in controlling the concentration of ozone in the stratosphere. In this work, the loss of N2O5 on ice substrates has been studied in a flow reactor in an attempt to gain a more fundamental understanding of these reactions. The apparent reaction probability in this system was found to decrease as the substrate was exposed to N2O5. A model which corrected for the loss of surface sites was developed and although it appears to fit the data for a given experiment quite well, it is concluded that the loss of reactive sites is not the full explanation. In addition, the results of an experimental and modeling study suggest that reaction on the internal surface of the ice substrates is not a major loss mechanism for N2O5 in the current work.

  3. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Kocmond, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  4. On the size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Toon, Owen B.; Toon, Goeff C.; Farmer, Crofton B.; Browell, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    Attenuation measurements of the solar radiation between 1.5 and 15 micron wavelengths were performed with the airborne (DC-8) JPL MARK 4 interferometer during the 1987 Antarctic Expedition. The opacities not only provide information about the abundance of stratospheric gases but also about the optical depths of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) at wavelengths of negligible gas absorption (windows). The optical depth of PSCs can be determined for each window once the background attenuation, due to air-molecules and aerosol has been filtered out with a simple extinction law. The ratio of optical thicknesses at different wavelengths reveals information about particle size and particle composition. Among the almost 700 measured spectra only a few PSC cases exist. PSC events are identified by sudden reductions in the spectrally integrated intensity value and are also verified with backscattering data from an upward directed lidar instrument, that was mounted on the DC-8. For the selected case on September 21st at 14.40 GMT, lidar data indicate an optically thin cloud at 18k and later an additional optically thick cloud at 15 km altitude. All results still suffer from: (1) often arbitrary definitions of a clear case, that often already may have contained PSC particles and (2) noise problems that restrict the calculations of optical depths to values larger than 0.001. Once these problems are handled, this instrument may become a valuable tool towards a better understanding of the role PSCs play in the Antarctic stratosphere.

  5. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The first balloon-borne frost point measurements over Antarctica were made during September and October, 1987 as part of the NOZE 2 effort at McMurdo. The results indicate water vapor mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 15 to 20 km region which is somewhat smaller than the typical values currently being used significantly smaller than the typical values currently being used in polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) theories. The observed water vapor mixing ratio would correspond to saturated conditions for what is thought to be the lowest stratospheric temperatures encountered over the Antarctic. Through the use of available lidar observations there appears to be significant evidence that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the local frost point (with respect to water) in the 10 to 20 km region thus supporting the nitric acid theory of PSC composition. Clouds near 15 km and below appear to form in regions saturated with respect to water and thus are probably mostly ice water clouds although they could contain relatively small amounts of other constituents. Photographic evidence suggests that the clouds forming above the frost point probably have an appearance quite different from the lower altitude iridescent, colored nacreous clouds.

  6. Microphysical and radiative changes in cirrus clouds by geoengineering the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, A.; Spichtinger, P.; Luo, B. P.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wernli, H.; Lohmann, U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the absence of tangible progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the implementation of solar radiation management has been suggested as measure to stop global warming. Here we investigate the impacts on northern midlatitude cirrus from continuous SO2emissions of 2-10 Mt/a in the tropical stratosphere. Transport of geoengineering aerosols into the troposphere was calculated along trajectories based on ERA Interim reanalyses using ozone concentrations to quantify the degree of mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air termed "troposphericity". Modeled size distributions of the geoengineered H2SO4-H2O droplets have been fed into a cirrus box model with spectral microphysics. The geoengineering is predicted to cause changes in ice number density by up to 50%, depending on troposphericity and cooling rate. We estimate the resulting cloud radiative effects from a radiation transfer model. Complex interplay between the few large stratospheric and many small tropospheric H2SO4-H2O droplets gives rise to partly counteracting radiative effects: local increases in cloud radiative forcing up to +2 W/m2for low troposphericities and slow cooling rates, and decreases up to -7.5 W/m2for high troposphericities and fast cooling rates. The resulting mean impact on the northern midlatitudes by changes in cirrus is predicted to be low, namely <1% of the intended radiative forcing by the stratospheric aerosols. This suggests that stratospheric sulphate geoengineering is unlikely to have large microphysical effects on the mean cirrus radiative forcing. However, this study disregards feedbacks, such as temperature and humidity changes in the upper troposphere, which must be examined separately.

  7. Melting of H_2SO_4\\cdot4H_2O Particles upon Cooling: Implications for Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Thomas; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    1996-06-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are important for the chemical activation of chlorine compounds and subsequent ozone depletion. Solid PSCs can form on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) (H_2SO_4\\cdot4H_2O) nuclei, but recent laboratory experiments have shown that PSC nucleation on SAT is strongly hindered. A PSC formation mechanism is proposed in which SAT particles melt upon cooling in the presence of HNO_3 to form liquid HNO_3-H_2SO_4\\cdotH_2O droplets 2 to 3 kelvin above the ice frost point. This mechanism offers a PSC formation temperature that is defined by the ambient conditions and sets a temperature limit below which PSCs should form.

  8. Unprecedented Evidence for Large Scale Heterogeneous Nucleation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds, Likely by Nanometer-Sized Meteoritic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Pitts, M. C.; Luo, B.; Hoyle, C. R.; Zobrist, B.; Jacot, L.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.; Weigel, R.; Borrmann, S.; Ebert, M.; Duprat, J.; Peter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations cast serious doubts on our understanding of the processes responsible for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation. PSCs play crucial roles in polar ozone chemistry by hosting heterogeneous reactions and by removal of reactive nitrogen through sedimenting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles. An extensive field campaign took place in the Arctic during the winter 2009/2010 within the European Union project RECONCILE, complemented by measurements from the spaceborne CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument. Through trajectory and microphysical box model calculations, we analyzed CALIOP data from the RECONCILE winter to investigate the nucleation of PSC particles in detail. One significant finding was that liquid/NAT mixture PSCs were prevalent in late December 2009, a period during which no ice PSCs were observed, and temperatures were higher by 6 K than required for homogeneous ice freezing at the onset of PSC formation. These NAT particles must have formed through some non-ice nucleation mechanism, which runs counter to the widely held view that the only efficient NAT nuclei were ice crystals formed by homogeneous freezing of STS droplets. Furthermore, in mid-January 2010, a large region of the Arctic vortex cooled below the frost point, leading to widespread synoptic-scale ice PSCs, unusual for the Arctic. Our modeling studies indicate that a match with the CALIOP data calls for new heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms for both NAT and ice particles, namely freezing on nanometer-sized, solid nuclei immersed in the liquid stratospheric aerosols. Number concentrations of non-volatile particles were measured in situ during RECONCILE by means of the heated channel of the condensation nuclei (CN) counter COPAS on board of the high-flying aircraft Geophysica. 60-80 % of all CN survived heating to 250 °C. Offline Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis of RECONCILE impactor samples

  9. A Laboratory Study on the Phase Transition for Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of different phases of simulated polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were investigated in the laboratory. Solutions and mixtures of solutions at concentrations 1 to 5 m (molality) of ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, sodium chloride, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid were supercooled to prescribed temperatures below their equilibrium melting point. These solutions were contained in small diameter glass tubing of volumes ranging from 2.6 to 0.04 ml. Samples were nucleated by insertion of an ice crystal, or in some cases by a liquid nitrogen cooled wire. Crystallization velocities were determined by timing the crystal growth front passages along the glass tubing. Solution mixtures containing aircraft exhaust (soot) were also examined. Crystallization rates increased as deltaT2, where deltaT is the supercooling for weak solutions (2 m or less). The higher concentrated solutions (greater than 3 m) showed rates significantly less than deltaT2. This reduced rate suggested an onset of a glass phase. Results were applied to the nucleation of highly concentrated solutions at various stages of polar stratospheric cloud development within the polar stratosphere.

  10. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  11. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  12. Measurements of size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds from infrared solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, S.; Toon, O. B.; Toon, G. C.; Farmer, C. B.; Browell, E. V.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) observations, based on IR measurements of solar extinction, made by the airborne JPL Mark IV interferometer during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Expedition in 1987, together with the instrumentation and the theoretical aspects of data analysis. Thirty-three PSC cases were analyzed and categorized into two types, I and II, which were found to occur at different altitudes during September. Type I clouds, seen at altitudes above 15 km, contained particles with radii of about 0.5 micarons and nitric acid concentrations greater than 40 percent, while type II clouds, found usually below 15 km, contained particles with radii of 6 microns and larger, composed of water ice. In addition, particles of larger than the 15-micron-size detection limit were encounterd.

  13. Early evolution of a stratospheric volcanic eruption cloud as observed with TOMS and AVHRR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, D.J.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Coke, L.R.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Sprod, I.E.; Krueger, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a detailed study of remote sensing data from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite detectors, of the 1982 eruption of El Chicho??n, Mexico. The volcanic cloud/atmosphere interactions in the first four days of this eruption were investigated by combining ultraviolet retrievals to estimate the mass of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic cloud [Krueger et al., 1995] with thermal infrared retrievals of the size, optical depth, and mass of fine-grained (1-10 ??m radius) volcanic ash [Wen and Rose, 1994]. Our study provides the first direct evidence of gravitational separation of ash from a stratospheric, gas-rich, plinian eruption column and documents the marked differences in residence times of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide in volcanic clouds. The eruption column reached as high as 32 km [Carey and Sigurdsson, 1986] and was injected into an atmosphere with a strong wind shear, which allowed for an observation of the separation of sulfur dioxide and volcanic ash. The upper, more sulfur dioxide-rich part of the cloud was transported to the west in the stratosphere, while the fine-grained ash traveled to the south in the troposphere. The mass of sulfur dioxide released was estimated at 7.1 ?? 109 kg with the mass decreasing by approximately 4% 1 day after the peak. The mass of fine-grained volcanic ash detected was estimated at 6.5 ?? 109 kg, amounting to about 0.7% of the estimated mass of the ash which fell out in the mapped ash blanket close to the volcano. Over the following days, 98% of this remaining fine ash was removed from the volcanic cloud, and the effective radius of ash in the volcanic cloud decreased from about 8 ??m to about 4 ??m. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Application of physical adsorption thermodynamics to heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory isotherms for the binding of several nonheterogeneously active atmospheric gases and for HCl to water ice are translated into adsorptive equilibrium constants and surface enthalpies. Extrapolation to polar conditions through the Clausius Clapeyron relation yields coverage estimates below the percent level for N2, Ar, CO2, and CO, suggesting that the crystal faces of type II stratospheric cloud particles may be regarded as clean with respect to these species. For HCl, and perhaps HF and HNO3, estimates rise to several percent, and the adsorbed layer may offer acid or proton sources alternate to the bulk solid for heterogeneous reactions with stratospheric nitrates. Measurements are lacking for many key atmospheric molecules on water ice, and almost entirely for nitric acid trihydrate as substrate. Adsorptive equilibria enter into gas to particle mass flux descriptions, and the binding energy determines rates for desorption of, and encounter between, potential surface reactants.

  15. Dual-polarization airborne lidar observations of polar stratospheric cloud evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Kent, G. S.; Hunt, W. H.; Osborn, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    Dual-polarization 0.532 micron lidar data show systematic polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) evolution along a portion of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition DC-8 flight of January 31, 1989. This flight leg was roughly aligned with air parcel motion on isentropic surfaces from 400-500 K, where the local adiabatic cooling rate was about 20 K/day. Type 1 PSCs show low depolarization ratios and scattering ratios which approach intermediate limiting values as ambient temperature decreases. These data suggest that Type 1 particles formed by rapid cooling may be nearly spherical and are restricted in size by partitioning of a limited HNO3 vapor supply among many competing growth sites. Type 2 PSCs appear at temperatures below estimated local frost points with increases in depolarization and scattering typical of larger ice crystals.

  16. Theoretical Investigations of Clouds and Aerosols in the Stratosphere and Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2005-01-01

    support of the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Data Analysis Program. We investigated a wide variety of issues involving ambient stratospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds or heterogeneous chemistry, analysis of laboratory data, and particles in the upper troposphere. The papers resulting from these studies are listed below. In addition, I participated in the 1999-2000 SOLVE mission as one of the project scientists and in the 2002 CRYSTAL field mission as one of the project scientists. Several CU graduate students and research associates also participated in these mission, under support from the ACMAP program, and worked to interpret data. During the past few years my group has completed a number of projects under the

  17. Lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds at McMurdo, Antarctica, during NOZE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    SRI International operated a dual wavelength (1.064 micrometer and .532 micrometer) aerosol lidar at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of the National Ozone Expedition-2 (NOZE-2). The objective of the project was to map the vertical distributions of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which are believed to play an important role in the destruction of ozone in the Antarctic spring. Altitude, thickness, homogeneity, and duration of PSC events as well as information on particle shape, size or number density will be very useful in determining the exact role of PSCs in ozone destructions, and when combined with measurements of other investigators, additional properties of PSCs can be estimated. The results are currently being analyzed in terms of PSC properties which are useful for modeling the stratospheric ozone depletion mechanism.

  18. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  19. Star formation in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of their proximity, the Magellanic Clouds provide the opportunity to conduct a detailed study of the history and current state of star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies. There is considerable evidence that star formation in the Clouds was and is proceeding in a manner different from that found in a typical well-ordered spiral galaxy. Star formation in both Clouds appears to have undergone a number of relatively intense bursts. There exist a number of similarities and differences in the current state of star formation in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. Examination of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) sources with ground based telescopes allows identification of highly evolved massive stars with circumstellar shells as well as several types of compact emission line objects.

  20. Stratospheric and solar cycle effects on long-term variability of mesospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Baumgarten, G.

    2009-01-01

    Model results of mesospheric ice layers and background conditions at 69°N from 1961 to 2008 are analyzed. The model nudges to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data below ˜45 km. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the mesosphere are kept constant. At polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) altitudes (83 km) temperatures decrease until the mid 1990s by -0.08 K/yr resulting in trends of PMC brightness, occurrence rates, and, to a lesser extent, in PMC altitudes (-0.0166 km/yr). Ice layer trends are consistent with observations by ground-based and satellite instruments. Water vapor increases at PMC heights and decreases above due to increased freeze-drying caused by the temperature trend. Temperature trends in the mesosphere mainly come from shrinking of the stratosphere and from dynamical effects. A solar cycle modulation of H2O is observed in the model consistent with satellite observations. The effect on ice layers is reduced because of redistribution of H2O by freeze-drying. The accidental coincidence of low temperatures and solar cycle minimum in the mid 1990s leads to an overestimation of solar effects on ice layers. A strong correlation between temperatures and PMC altitudes is observed. Applied to historical measurements this gives negligible temperature trends at PMC altitudes (˜0.01-0.02 K/yr). Strong correlations between PMC parameters and background conditions deduced from the model confirm the standard scenario of PMC formation. The PMC sensitivity on temperatures, water vapor, and Ly-α is investigated. PMC heights show little variation with background parameters whereas brightness and occurrence rates show large variations. None of the background parameters can be ignored regarding its influence on ice layers.

  1. Stratospheric and solar cycle effects on long-term variability of mesospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Baumgarten, G.

    2009-11-01

    Model results of mesospheric ice layers and background conditions at 69°N from 1961 to 2008 are analyzed. The model nudges to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data below ˜45 km. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the mesosphere are kept constant. At polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) altitudes (83 km) temperatures decrease until the mid 1990s by -0.08 K/yr resulting in trends of PMC brightness, occurrence rates, and, to a lesser extent, in PMC altitudes (-0.0166 km/yr). Ice layer trends are consistent with observations by ground-based and satellite instruments. Water vapor increases at PMC heights and decreases above due to increased freeze-drying caused by the temperature trend. Temperature trends in the mesosphere mainly come from shrinking of the stratosphere and from dynamical effects. A solar cycle modulation of H2O is observed in the model consistent with satellite observations. The effect on ice layers is reduced because of redistribution of H2O by freeze-drying. The accidental coincidence of low temperatures and solar cycle minimum in the mid 1990s leads to an overestimation of solar effects on ice layers. A strong correlation between temperatures and PMC altitudes is observed. Applied to historical measurements this gives negligible temperature trends at PMC altitudes (˜0.01-0.02 K/yr). Strong correlations between PMC parameters and background conditions deduced from the model confirm the standard scenario of PMC formation. The PMC sensitivity on temperatures, water vapor, and Ly-α is investigated. PMC heights show little variation with background parameters whereas brightness and occurrence rates show large variations. None of the background parameters can be ignored regarding its influence on ice layers.

  2. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  3. Autonomous full-time lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) are an artifact of extremely low temperatures in the lower-stratosphere caused by a lack of sunlight during winter. Their presence induces increased concentrations of chlorine and bromine radicals that drive catalytic ozone destruction upon the return of sunlight in spring. An eye-safe micropulse lidar (MPL; 0.23 mum) was installed at the Scott-Amundsen South Pole Station, Antarctica in December 1999 to collect continuous long-term measurements of polar clouds. A four-year data subset for analyzing PSC is derived from measurements for austral winters 2000 and 2003--2005. A statistical algorithm based on MPL signal uncertainties is designed to retrieve PSC boundary heights, attenuated scattering ratios and demonstrate instrument performance for low signal-to-noise measurements. The MPL measurements consist mostly of Type II PSC (i.e., ice). The likelihood for Type I measurements are described for specific conditions. Seasonal PSC macrophysical properties are examined relative to thermodynamic and chemical characteristics. The potential for dehumidification and denitrification of the lower Antarctic stratosphere is examined by comparing PSC observations to theoretical predictions for cloud based on common scenarios for water vapor and nitric acid concentrations. Conceptual models for seasonal PSC occurrence, denitrification and dehumidification and ozone loss are described. A linear relationship is established between total integrated PSC scattering and ozone loss, with high correlation. Polar vortex dynamics are investigated in relation to PSC occurrence, including synoptic-scale geopotential height anomalies, isentropic airmass trajectories and local-scale gravity waves. Moisture overrunning, from quasi-adiabatic cooling and transport along isentropic boundaries, is considered a primary mechanism for PSC occurrence. Middle and late-season PSC are found to be the result of mixing of moist air from the outer edges of the vortex that

  4. Influence of Tropospheric SO2 Emissions on Particle Formation and the Stratospheric Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notholt, J.; Luo, B. P.; Fueglistaler, S.; Weisenstein, D.; Rex, M.; Lawrence, M. G.; Bingemer, H.; Wohltmann, I.; Corti, T.; Warneke, T.; vonKuhlmann, R.; Peters, T.

    2005-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor plays an important role in the chemistry and radiation budget of the stratosphere. Throughout the last decades stratospheric water vapor levels have increased and several processes have been suggested to contribute to this trend. Here we present a mechanism that would link increasing anthropogenic SO2 emissions in southern and eastern Asia with an increase in stratospheric water. Trajectory studies and model simulations suggest that the SO2 increase results in the formation of more sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper tropical troposphere. As a consequence, more ice crystals of smaller size are formed in the tropical tropopause, which are lifted into the stratosphere more readily. Our model calculations suggest that such a mechanism could increase the amount of water that entered the stratosphere in the condensed phase by up to 0.5 ppmv from 1950-2000.

  5. Stratospheric Ozone Changes and Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) Trends Observed in SBUV Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.; Thomas, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Olivero, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are observed at 80-85 km altitude and high latitudes (typically > 50°) only during summer months. It has been suggested that long-term variations of PMC occurrence frequency and brightness are indicators of global climate change as represented through changes in mesospheric temperature and water vapor. The Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) series of satellite instruments, although designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, have made global observations of bright PMCs since November 1978. Previous analysis of SBUV data found that long-term variations in PMC brightness and occurrence frequency were anti-correlated with solar activity, and that a positive secular trend was present at most latitudes. The limited database of mesospheric temperature and water vapor data has precluded further determination of the source of this trend. Motivated by recent studies with the LIMA general circulation model [Berger and Lübken 2011], which relate mesospheric temperature trends to changes in stratospheric ozone, we have investigated the use of stratospheric ozone changes as a proxy for changes in mesospheric heating and temperature. The decrease in ozone from 1979 to the mid-1990s leads to a cooler mesosphere, and is thus consistent with the rise in PMC ice water content observed in the SBUV record during this period. Similarly, stratospheric ozone changes are smaller from the mid-1990s to the present, and PMC ice water content trends are also reduced in recent years. We will discuss these results and their implications for both previous (before 1979) and future PMC behavior.

  6. An experimental study of growth and phase change of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Teets, Edward

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the progress made on understanding phase changes related to solutions which may comprise Polar Stratospheric Clouds. In particular, it is concerned with techniques for investigating specific classes of metastability and phase change which may be important not only in Polar Stratospheric Clouds but in all atmospheric aerosols in general. While the lower level atmospheric aerosol consists of mixtures of (NH4)(SO4)2, NH4HSO4, NaCl among others, there is evidence that aerosol at PSC levels is composed of acid aerosol, either injected from volcanic events (such as Pinatubo) or having diffused upward from the lower atmosphere. In particular, sulfuric acid and nitric acid are known to occur at PSC levels, and are suspected of catalyzing ozone destruction reactions by adsorption on surfaces of crystallized particles. The present study has centered on two approaches: (1) the extent of supercooling (with respect to ice) and supersaturation (with respect to hydrate) and the nature of crystal growth in acid solutions of specific molality; and (2) the nature of growth from the vapor of HNO3 - H2O crystals both on a substrate and on a pre-existing aerosol.

  7. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  8. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Wohltmann, I.; Wegner, T.; Takeda, M.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Lehmann, R.; Santee, M. L.; Rex, M.

    2015-08-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  9. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  10. What role do type I polar stratospheric cloud and aerosol parameterizations play in modelled lower stratospheric chlorine activation and ozone loss?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, J.; Good, P.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Pyle, J. A.

    1996-12-01

    The chlorine activation and subsequent ozone loss of the northern winter lower stratosphere have been modelled using different schemes for type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and sulphate aerosols. Type I PSCs were assumed to consist of either nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) at equilibrium, supercooled ternary solutions (STS) at equilibrium, or to follow a hysteresis cycle between frozen and liquid particles depending on the temperature history. The sulphate aerosol was assumed to be present as either liquid binary H2SO4/H2O aerosol (LBA) or as solid sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Our box model integrations show that NAT and STS, representing the upper and lower limits of lower stratospheric chlorine activation, respectively, appear to destroy ozone equally efficiently after a cold PSC event (Tmin ≤ 190K at 50 mbar). For higher minimum temperatures, up to the equilibrium NAT point, there is significantly more ozone loss in the NAT scheme than in the STS scheme. On NAT, chlorine is activated directly by ClONO2 + HCl → 2Cl + HNO3, whereas on STS, indirect activation by ClONO2 + H2O → HOCl + HNO3 followed by HOCl + HCl → 2Cl + H2O, dominates. During the processing period, the indirect activation on STS will produce a temporary peak in HOCl. Box model integrations also show that direct chlorine activation is faster on SAT than on LBA, yielding significantly more ozone loss in air parcels which remain below the SAT melting point (215-220 K). Our single-layer chemical transport model simulations (θ = 465K) of the lower stratospheric chlorine activation during Arctic winter 1994/1995 show that chlorine is activated more quickly on NAT than on STS. However, in mid December 1994, when temperatures are low enough for substantial STS particle growth, maximum active chlorine becomes similar in both schemes and remains similar until the end of January 1995. A model integration which includes SAT produces up to 200 parts per trillion by volume more ClOx, inside

  11. Effects of stratospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Zhang, T; He, F; Ding, K

    1997-01-20

    Using simulations, we determine the influence of stratospheric aerosol and thin cirrus clouds on the performance of the proposed atmospheric correction algorithm for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data over the oceans. Further, we investigate the possibility of using the radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere in the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to remove their effects prior to application of the algorithm. The computations suggest that for moderate optical thicknesses in the stratosphere, i.e., tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, the stratospheric aerosol-cirrus cloud contamination does not seriously degrade the MODIS except for the combination of large (approximately 60 degrees) solar zenith angles and large (approximately 45 degrees) viewing angles, for which multiple-scattering effects can be expected to be particularly severe. The performance of a hierarchy of stratospheric aerosol/cirrus cloud removal procedures for employing the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to correct for stratospheric aerosol/cirrus clouds, ranging from simply subtracting the reflectance at 1.38 microm from that in the visible bands, to assuming that their optical properties are known and carrying out multiple-scattering computations of their effect by the use of the 1.38-microm reflectance-derived concentration, are studied for stratospheric aerosol optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 0.15 and for cirrus cloud optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 1.0. Typically, those procedures requiring the most knowledge concerning the aerosol optical properties (and also the most complex) performed the best; however, for tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, their performance is usually not significantly better than that found by applying the simplest correction procedure. A semiempirical algorithm is presented that permits accurate correction for thin cirrus clouds with tau(s) as large as unity when an accurate estimate of the cirrus cloud

  12. Characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds With Spaceborne Lidar: CALIPSO and the 2006 Antarctic Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Thomason, L. W.; Poole, Lamont R.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in polar ozone loss has been well documented. The CALIPSO satellite mission offers a new opportunity to characterize PSCs on spatial and temporal scales previously unavailable. A PSC detection algorithm based on a single wavelength threshold approach has been developed for CALIPSO. The method appears to accurately detect PSCs of all opacities, including tenuous clouds, with a very low rate of false positives and few missed clouds. We applied the algorithm to CALIPSO data acquired during the 2006 Antarctic winter season from 13 June through 31 October. The spatial and temporal distribution of CALIPSO PSC observations is illustrated with weekly maps of PSC occurrence. The evolution of the 2006 PSC season is depicted by time series of daily PSC frequency as a function of altitude. Comparisons with virtual solar occultation data indicate that CALIPSO provides a different view of the PSC season than attained with previous solar occultation satellites. Measurement-based time series of PSC areal coverage and vertically-integrated PSC volume are computed from the CALIPSO data. The observed area covered with PSCs is significantly smaller than would be inferred from a temperature-based proxy such as TNAT but is similar in magnitude to that inferred from TSTS. The potential of CALIPSO measurements for investigating PSC microphysics is illustrated using combinations of lidar backscatter coefficient and volume depolarization to infer composition for two CALIPSO PSC scenes.

  13. Radiative-dynamical and microphysical processes of thin cirrus clouds controlling humidity of air entering the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Fueglistaler, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) are of great interest due to their role in the control of water vapor and temperature in the TTL. Previous research on TTL cirrus clouds has focussed mainly on microphysical processes, specifically the ice nucleation mechanism and dehydration efficiency. Here, we use a cloud resolving model to analyse the sensitivity of TTL cirrus characteristics and impacts with respect to microphysical and radiative processes. A steady-state TTL cirrus cloud field is obtained in the model forced with dynamical conditions typical for the TTL (2-dimensional setup with a Kelvin-wave temperature perturbation). Our model results show that the dehydration efficiency (as given by the domain average relative humidity in the layer of cloud occurrence) is relatively insensitive to the ice nucleation mechanism, i.e. homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation. Rather, TTL cirrus affect the water vapor entering the stratosphere via an indirect effect associated with the cloud radiative heating and dynamics. Resolving the cloud radiative heating and the radiatively induced circulations approximately doubles the domain average ice mass. The cloud radiative heating is proportional to the domain average ice mass, and the observed increase in domain average ice mass induces a domain average temperature increase of a few Kelvin. The corresponding increase in water vapor entering the stratosphere is estimated to be about 30 to 40%.

  14. Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Denitrification Using Laboratory Freezing Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1999-2000 Arctic winter, the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) provided evidence of widespread solid-phase polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) accompanied by severe nitrification. Previous simulations have shown that a freezing process occurring at temperatures above the ice frost point is necessary to explain these observations. In this work, the nitric acid freezing rates measured by Salcedo et al. and discussed by Tabazadeh et al. have been examined. These freezing rates have been tested in winter-long microphysical simulations of the 1999-2000 Arctic vortex evolution in order to determine whether they can explain the observations. A range of cases have been explored, including whether the PSC particles are composed of nitric acid dihydrate or trihydrate, whether the freezing process is a bulk process or occurs only on the particle surfaces, and uncertainties in the derived freezing rates. Finally, the possibility that meteoritic debris enhances the freezing rate has also been examined. The results of these simulations have been compared with key PSC and denitrification measurements made by the SOLVE campaign. The cases that best reproduce the measurements will he highlighted, with a discussion of the implications for our understanding of PSCs.

  15. Fourier transform infrared studies of the interaction of HCl with model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1993-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions involving hydrochloric acid adsorbed on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are postulated to contribute to polar ozone loss. Using FTIR spectroscopy to probe the condensed phase, we have examined the interaction of HCl with ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) films representative of types II and I PSCs, respectively. For HCl pressures in the range of 10 exp -7 to 10 exp -5 Torr, our FTIR studies show that a small amount of crystalline HCl-6H2O formed on or in ice at 155 K. However, for higher HCl pressures, we observed that the entire film of ice rapidly converted into an amorphous 4:1 H2O:HCl mixture. From HCl-uptake experiments with P(HCl) = 8 x 10 exp -7 Torr, we estimate roughly that the diffusion coefficient of HCl in ice is around 2 x 10 exp -12 sq cm/s at 158 K. For higher temperatures more closely approximating those found in the stratosphere, we were unable to detect bulk HCl uptake by ice. Indirect evidence suggests that HCl adsorption onto the surface of model PSC films inhibited the evaporation of both ice and NAT by 3-5 K.

  16. Analysis of the physical state of one Arctic polar stratospheric cloud based on observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R. P.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Dye, J. E.; Twohy, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    1994-01-01

    During the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) simultaneous measurements of aerosol size distribution and NO(y)(HN03 + NO + NO2 + 2(N205)) were made along ER-2 flight paths. The flow characteristics of the NO(y) instrument allow us to derive the condensed NO(y) amount (assumed to be HN03) present during polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events. Analysis of the January 24th flight indicates that this condensed HN03 amount does not agree well with the aerosol volume if the observed PSCs are composed of solid nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as is generally assumed. However, the composition agrees well with that predicted for liquid H2S04/HN03/H20 solution droplets using a new Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model (APCM). The agreement corresponds in detail to variations in temperature and humidity. The weight percentages of H2SO4, HN03, and H2O derived from the measurements all correspond to those predicted for ternary, liquid solutions.

  17. Experimental Insights into the Sulfuric Acid/Water Phase Diagram: Implications for Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, K. D.; Hansen, A. R.

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated the H2SO4/H2O binary liquid/solid phase diagram using a highly sensitive differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. In particular we have sought to investigate the region from pure ice to sulfuric acid hemihexahydrate (SAH, H2SO4ú6.5H2O), including a detailed look at the sulfuric acid octahydrate (SAO). Our studies have found that there is a unique, repeatable IR spectra for SAO, which is not merely a combination of spectra of ice and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), as has been previously suggested could be the case. From our DSC studies, we have identified the melting, or solid/solid phase transition of the octahydrate. We have also determined from our studies using the energy of fusion for SAO that SAO is a major component of H2SO4 solutions in the range 20 - 40 wt.% when they freeze. Our results indicate that SAO could be a significant portion of solid or partially frozen polar stratospheric cloud particles. As such, key stratospheric reactions should be studied on SAO surfaces.

  18. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties from Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Yang, P.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A retrieval algorithm has been developed for the microphysical analysis of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical data obtained using lidar instrumentation. The parameterization scheme of the PSC microphysical properties allows for coexistence of up to three different particle types with size-dependent shapes. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate optical properties of particles with maximum dimensions equal to or less than 2 mu m and with shapes that can be considered more representative of PSCs on the scale of individual crystals than the commonly assumed spheroids. Specifically. these are irregular and hexagonal crystals. Selection of the optical parameters that are input to the inversion algorithm is based on a potential data set such as that gathered by two of the lidars on board the NASA DC-8 during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 0 p (SAGE) Ozone Loss Validation experiment (SOLVE) campaign in winter 1999/2000: the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) and the NASA Langley Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). The 0 microphysical retrieval algorithm has been applied to study how particle shape assumptions affect the inversion of lidar data measured in leewave PSCs. The model simulations show that under the assumption of spheroidal particle shapes, PSC surface and volume density are systematically smaller than the FDTD-based values by, respectively, approximately 10-30% and approximately 5-23%.

  19. The interannual variability of polar stratospheric clouds and related parameters in Antarctica during September and October

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.R.; McCormick, M.P. ); Solomon, S. ); Pitts, M.C. )

    1989-10-01

    Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) sightings by the orbiting SAM II sensor during September and October show a pronounced Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) signal, and October sightings have increased markedly over the past 10 years in years of westerly QBO phase. The QBO in PSC frequency is likely to affect the rate of Antarctic heterogeneous chemical processes and, hence, ozone depletion. Studies of the observed long-term temperature trend suggest that the decadal PSC trend probably results from the ozone decline through its effect on stratospheric heating rates. A more detailed analysis of data from 1986 and 1987 shows that there were more PSCs in 1987 and that they persisted much later into the spring season as compared to 1986. Qualitatively similar behavior was found for the OClO column abundances and 18-km ozone depletion observed at McMurdo Station during these 2 years. These observations suggest that both the intensity and duration of heterogeneous chemical processes are likely greater during colder, QBO-westerly phase years.

  20. Chlorine chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles in the Arctic winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Newman, P.; Lait, L.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Chan, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) in the Arctic winter vortex showed large HCl losses of up to 1 ppbv, which were correlated with high ClO levels of up to 1.4 ppbv. Air parcel trajectory analysis identified that this conversion of inorganic chlorine occurred at air temperatures of less than 196 -/+ 4 kelvin. High ClO was always accompanied by loss of HCl mixing ratios equal to 1/2(ClO+ 2Cl2O2). These data indicate that the heterogeneous reaction HCl + ClONO2 - Cl2 + HNO3 on particles of polar stratospheric clouds establishes the chlorine partitioning, which, contrary to earlier notions, begins with an excess of ClONO2, not HCl.

  1. Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite measurements of el Chichon stratospheric aerosols. 1: Cloud morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Eparvier, F. G.; Thomas, G. E.; Thomas, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Data from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) is used to track the time, latitude, and altitude (above 18 km) development of the aerosol cloud injected into the stratosphere by the eruption of el Chichon. This unique data set, using scattering data from the near-infrared (1.27 and 1.87 microns) and visible (440 nm) spectrometers on SME, covers the period from the initial injection in April 1982 through the end of 1986. Although the bulk of the mass is contained in the latitude band from 10 deg S to 30 deg N for the entire duration of the measurements, transport of material to high latitudes is apparent in the data in the post eruption period. The times aerosol density maxima vary greatly as a function of altitude and latitude.

  2. Optical imaging of cloud-to-stratosphere/mesosphere lightning over the Amazon Basin (CS/LAB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, Davis D.; Wescott, Eugene M.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the CS/LAB project was to obtain images of cloud to stratosphere lightning discharges from aboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory while flying in the vicinity of thunderstorms over the Amazon Basin. We devised a low light level imaging package as an add-on experiment to an airborne Laboratory deployment to South America during May-June, 1993. We were not successful in obtaining the desired images during the South American deployment. However, in a follow up flight over the American Midwest during the night of July 8-9, 1993 we recorded nineteen examples of the events over intense thunderstorms. From the observations were estimated absolute brightness, terminal altitudes, flash duration, horizontal extents, emission volumes, and frequencies relative to negative and positive ground strokes.

  3. Diffusion and location of hydorchloric acid in ice: Implications for polar stratosphere clouds and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, E.W.; Mulvaney, R. ); Oates, K. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors have carried out experiments to study the incorporation and movement of HCl within the structure of ice. These involved freezing HCl solutions, and observing them in a scanning electron microscope fitted with an X-ray microanalysis system. The authors are able to show that HCl is not easily incorporated into ice crystals, but is strongly partitioned towards the grain boundaries. Furthermore, the diffusion of HCl through ice crystals is slow. These results contradict the interpretation of earlier experiments. They mean that if HCl is to be available for reaction on polar stratospheric cloud particles, as required by current theories of Antarctic ozone depletion, then it must be present in some form other than a solid solution.

  4. Detection of Ice Polar Stratospheric Clouds from Assimilation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Benson, Craig; Liu, Hui-Chun; Pawson, Steven; Chang, Ping; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique is presented for detection of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) that form at extremely low temperatures in the lower polar stratosphere during winter. Temperature is a major factor in determining abundance of PSCs, which in turn provide surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions leading to ozone loss and radiative cooling. The technique infers the presence of ice PSCs using radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. Brightness temperatures are computed from short-term GEOS-5 forecasts for several hundred AIRS channels, using a radiation transfer module. The differences between collocated AIRS observations and these computed values are the observed-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals in the assimilation system. Because the radiation model assumes clear-sky conditions, we hypothesize that these O-F residuals contain quantitative information about PSCs. This is confirmed using sparse data from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III occultation instrument. The analysis focuses on 0-F residuals for the 6.79pm AIRS moisture channel. At coincident locations, when POAM III detects ice clouds, the AIRS O-F residuals for this channel are lower than -2K. When no ice PSCs are evident in POAM III data, the AIRS 0-F residuals are larger. Given this relationship, the high spatial density of AIRS data is used to construct maps of regions where 0-F residuals are lower than -2K, as a proxy for ice PSCs. The spatial scales and spatio-temporal variations of these PSCs in the Antarctic and Arctic are discussed on the basis of these maps.

  5. Radiatively forced dispersion of the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic cloud and induced temperature perturbations in the stratosphere during the first few months following the eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.; Houben, Howard; Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    A combined 3-dimensional circulation model and aerosol microphysical/transport model is used to simulate the dispersion of the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic cloud in the stratosphere for the first few months following the eruption. Radiative heating of the cloud due to upwelling infrared radiation from the troposphere is shown to be an important factor affecting the transport. Without cloud heating, cloud material stays mostly north of the equator, whereas with cloud heating, the cloud is transported southward across the equator within the first two weeks following the eruption. Generally the simulations agree with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite observations showing the latitude distribution of cloud material to be between about 20 deg S and 30 deg N within the first few months. Temperature perturbations in the stratosphere induced by the aerosol heating are generally 1-4 K, in the range of those observed.

  6. Effects of polar stratospheric clouds in the Nimbus 7 LIMS Version 6 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Harvey, V. Lynn

    2016-07-01

    The historic Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measurements of 1978-1979 from the Nimbus 7 satellite were re-processed with Version 6 (V6) algorithms and archived in 2002. The V6 data set employs updated radiance registration methods, improved spectroscopic line parameters, and a common vertical resolution for all retrieved parameters. Retrieved profiles are spaced about every 1.6° of latitude along orbits and include the additional parameter of geopotential height. Profiles of O3 are sensitive to perturbations from emissions of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This work presents results of implementing a first-order screening for effects of PSCs using simple algorithms based on vertical gradients of the O3 mixing ratio. Their occurrences are compared with the co-located, retrieved temperatures and related to the temperature thresholds needed for saturation of H2O and/or HNO3 vapor onto PSC particles. Observed daily locations where the major PSC screening criteria are satisfied are validated against PSCs observed with the Stratospheric Aerosol Monitor (SAM) II experiment also on Nimbus 7. Remnants of emissions from PSCs are characterized for O3 and HNO3 following the screening. PSCs may also impart a warm bias in the co-located LIMS temperatures, but by no more than 1-2 K at the altitudes of where effects of PSCs are a maximum in the ozone; thus, no PSC screening was applied to the V6 temperatures. Minimum temperatures vary between 187 and 194 K and often occur 1 to 2 km above where PSC effects are first identified in the ozone (most often between about 21 and 28 hPa). Those temperature-pressure values are consistent with conditions for the existence of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) mixtures and to a lesser extent of super-cooled ternary solution (STS) droplets. A local, temporary uptake of HNO3 vapor of order 1-3 ppbv is indicated during mid-January for the 550 K surface. Seven-month time series of the distributions of LIMS O3 and HNO3 are shown

  7. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.; Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes.

  8. A comparison of the longitudinal distributions of polar stratospheric clouds and temperatures for the 1987 Antarctic spring

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, I.G. ); Tuck, A.F. )

    1989-11-30

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II stratospheric extinction coefficients have been analyzed to provide information on the geographical distribution of Antarctic stratospheric clouds in 1987. The peak extinction above 15 km was determined for each of the approximately 14 vertical profiles each day. A longitude by time graph of this extinction is presented, extending from early June to late October. Similar graphs for extinction at 17 km and for temperature at 17 km and 70 mbar geopotential height from the National Meteorological Center at the measurement locations are also shown. It is assumed that extinction is a measure of cloud density. Statistics of the fractional incidence of cloud and of temperature and pressure for five time periods and 24 longitudinal sectors are presented. Cloud incidences for latitudes which either cross or pass to the south of the Antarctic Peninsula are shown. In order to remove the effect of the latitudinal drift of the measurements the statistics are also shown for data binned by 70-mbar geopotential height relative to the minimum within the vortex. In general, there is a good correlation between enhanced extinctions and cold temperatures. Both exhibit a planetary wave structure which tends to move eastward. However, the distribution of dense clouds is highly zonally asymmetric and unlike that of temperature. These clouds are very rare over East Antarctica even when temperatures are low there. After July, clouds are also rare close to the center of the vortex, as determined by the 70-mbar geopotential height of the measurement locations. It is concluded that both cold temperature and the availability of condensable material are important in determining the location of cloud.

  9. A multi-wavelength classification method for polar stratospheric cloud types using infrared limb spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Höpfner, Michael; Griessbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf; Pitts, Michael C.; Orr, Andrew M. W.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument on board the ESA Envisat satellite operated from July 2002 until April 2012. The infrared limb emission measurements represent a unique dataset of daytime and night-time observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) up to both poles. Cloud detection sensitivity is comparable to space-borne lidars, and it is possible to classify different cloud types from the spectral measurements in different atmospheric windows regions. Here we present a new infrared PSC classification scheme based on the combination of a well-established two-colour ratio method and multiple 2-D brightness temperature difference probability density functions. The method is a simple probabilistic classifier based on Bayes' theorem with a strong independence assumption. The method has been tested in conjunction with a database of radiative transfer model calculations of realistic PSC particle size distributions, geometries, and composition. The Bayesian classifier distinguishes between solid particles of ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as well as liquid droplets of super-cooled ternary solution (STS). The classification results are compared to coincident measurements from the space-borne lidar Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument over the temporal overlap of both satellite missions (June 2006-March 2012). Both datasets show a good agreement for the specific PSC classes, although the viewing geometries and the vertical and horizontal resolution are quite different. Discrepancies are observed between the CALIOP and the MIPAS ice class. The Bayesian classifier for MIPAS identifies substantially more ice clouds in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex than CALIOP. This disagreement is attributed in part to the difference in the sensitivity on mixed-type clouds. Ice seems to dominate the spectral behaviour in the limb infrared spectra and may cause an overestimation in ice occurrence

  10. Formation of planetesimals in collapsing pebble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg Jansson, K.; Johansen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. Their physical properties hold important clues to understanding how minor bodies formed in the Solar Nebula. The first stage of the planet formation process is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm-cm-sized pebbles. Due to the interaction with the gas in the protoplanetary disk, these pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound particle pebble 'clouds'. Pebbles in the cloud collide with each other, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it contracts, and one would expect the particles to move faster and faster due to the negative heat capacity nature of self-gravitating systems. However, for high-mass clouds, the collapse is limited by free-fall and the cloud does not have time to virialize. This in turn leads to lower collision speeds but thanks to increased density also to increased collision rates and a runaway collapse. We investigate three important properties of the collapse: (i) the time-scale to collapse to solid density, (ii) the temporal evolution of the size spectrum of the pebbles, and (iii) the multiplicity of the resulting planetesimals. We find that planetesimals larger than 100 km in radius collapse on the free-fall time-scale of about 25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision time-scales and hence collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10-km-scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1-km-scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the structure of the resulting planetesimal. The collision speed among the pebbles in low- mass clouds is below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble- pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the nebula. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone

  11. Correlating Polar Stratospheric Cloud Occurrence at the South Pole with Transport and Polar Geopotential Height Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Sassen, K.

    2007-12-01

    In a recent paper, we describe the macrophysical and thermodynamic properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) at the South Pole based on continuous eye-safe lidar measurements made over five seasons (2000, 2003-2006). In this paper, we describe the relationship between PSC occurrence and the propensity for transport within the austral polar vortex. The southern lower-stratospheric polar airmass may be approximated as a closed system from May to September. Saturation vapor pressures for background concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid and water vapor are reached either through radiational cooling or isentropic lift. Once nucleated, PSC acquire fall-velocities that remove these compounds from these heights. Satellite measurements (e.g., MLS) depict the widening proximity of the depleted airmass through the polar night. Yet, our measurements show that PSC occurrence can occur up to 20 km late in the season, which suggests replenishment of these species in air originating near the edges of the vortex. We examine 120-h back-trajectories during July and August and temperature histories to identify conditions and circumstances favorable to this occurring. Furthermore, we describe geopotential height anomalies averaged along 60° - 90° S, and compared to a twenty-year mean, as a proxy for the dynamic character of the polar vortex. Negative/positive anomalies indicate a strong/weak and deep/shallow vortex where its circulation inhibits/promotes meridional transport, replenishment and the likelihood of PSC at South Pole. We test this hypothesis using our dataset and reach conclusions on the influence of the polar vortex on total PSC observed each season, which, in turn, may influence the severity of annual ozone losses.

  12. Simultaneous ozone and polar stratospheric cloud observations at South Pole Station during winter and spring 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Kjome, N.T.; Oltmans, S.J.

    1993-07-20

    Simultaneous polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) and ozone measurements were made over South Pole Station using a two-wavelength backscattersonde. This instrument produces aerosol profiles similar to those obtained with a ground-based lidar system but with higher vertical resolution. In one sounding, depolarization of the PSCs was also measured. The backscattersondes were supplemented with occasional frost point soundings. The measurements made before the appearance of PSCs do not show clear evidence of particle deliquescence, suggesting that the background sulfate particles may be frozen solids rather than liquids. PSCs began appearing at {approximately}20 km when the temperature at that altitude dropped to {minus}80{degrees}C (193 K). Initially, there was apparent evidence of supersaturation (with respect to nitric acid trihydrate) associated with some type I PSCs, while other examples indicated that the condensation of nitric acid was in quantitative agreement with that expected from the saturation vapor pressure and available nitric acid vapor. The apparent supersaturated layers (which occurred within the first 2 weeks of the onset of PSCs) can alternatively be interpreted as denitrified regions. In the polarization sensitive sounding, two varieties of type I PSCs were observed, one of which exhibited significant depolarization and another which produced very little depolarization. This observation would be consistent with the classification of types Ia and Ib, respectively. At the precise time that sunlight was returning to the stratosphere near South Pole Station, a strong inverse correlation in the structure of PSCs and ozone mixing ratio was observed. Using trajectory analysis, it is argued that the effect is probably the result of chemical depletion rather than transport processes. This chance observation is consistent with enhanced ozone depletion occurring in association with sunlit PSCs during the early spring. 36 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Using back-propagation neural networks to analyze hyperspatial and hypertemporal data to detect polar stratospheric clouds over antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Foschi, P.G.; Pagan, K.L.; Garcia, O.

    1996-11-01

    A study to support ozone depletion and climatic change research is briefly summarized. The goal of the study to to develop back-propagation neural network techniques for detection of optically thin polar stratospheric clouds in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer thermal infrared imagery. The neural networks are being used to analyze hyperspatial and hypertemporal data; these data sets are defined in the paper. Assessments of the neural network are very briefly described; these include verification, accuracy, and robustness over time.

  14. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties From Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens; Yang, Ping; McGee, Thomas J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of particle sizes and number densities of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is highly important, because they are critical parameters for the modeling of the ozone chemistry of the stratosphere. In situ measurements of PSC particles are rare. the main instrument for the accumulation of PSC data are lidar systems. Therefore the derivation of some microphysical properties of PSCS from the optical parameters measured by lidars would be highly beneficial for ozone research. Inversion of lidar data obtained in the presence of PSCs formed from crystalline particles type 11 and the various nitric acid tri Ydrrate (NAT) types cannot be easily accomplished, because a suitable scattering theory for small faceted crystals has not been readily available tip to now. As a consequence, the T-matrix method is commonly used for the interpretation of these PSC lidar data. Here the assumption is made that the optical properties of an ensemble of spheroids resemble those of crystalline PSCs, and microphysical properties of the PSC are inferred from the optical signatures of the PSC at two or more wavelengths. The problem with the T-matrix approach is that the assumption of spheroidal instead of faceted particles can lead to dramatically wrong results: Usually cloud particle properties are deduced from analysis of lidar profiles of backscatter ratio and depolarization ratio. The particle contribution to the backscatter ratio is given by the product of the particle number density and the backscattering cross section. The latter is proportional to the value of the particle's scattering phase function at 180 degrees scattering angle. At 180 degrees however, the phase functions of rough, faceted crystals and of spheroids with same maximum dimension differ by a factor of 6. From this it follows that for a PSC consisting of faceted crystals, the particle number density is underestimated by roughly the same factor if spheroidal particles are unrealistically assumed. We are currently

  15. Molecular cloud cores and bimodal star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizano, Susana; Shu, Frank H.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of bimodal star formation is reviewed in the context of supercritical and subcritical states for molecular clouds that are supported against their self-gravitation by magnetic fields. The governing set of equations is derived subject to the quasi-static and axisymmetric approximations. The method of numerical solution and tests of the resultant computer code are outlined. The results of the evolutionary calculations are discussed, emphasizing time scales, masses, and typical sizes of modeled cores that can be compared with observations. For a fixed mass, it is found that the level or turbulent support determines whether a dense core forms or not. This is used to generalize the concept of a critical mass to account for the contributions of turbulence and thermal pressures to the support of a cloud.

  16. Qualitative analysis of the e-cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifets, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of the electron cloud formation is presented. Two mechanisms of the cloud formation, generation of jets of primary photo-electrons and thermalization of electrons in the electron cloud, are analyzed and compared with simulations for the NLC damping ring.

  17. The effect of clouds on photolysis rates and ozone formation in the unpolluted troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The photochemistry of the lower atmosphere is sensitive to short- and long-term meteorological effects; accurate modeling therefore requires photolysis rates for trace gases which reflect this variability. As an example, the influence of clouds on the production of tropospheric ozone has been investigated, using a modification of Luther's two-stream radiation scheme to calculate cloud-perturbed photolysis rates in a one-dimensional photochemical transport model. In the unpolluted troposphere, where stratospheric inputs of odd nitrogen appear to represent the photochemical source of O3, strong cloud reflectance increases the concentration of NO in the upper troposphere, leading to greatly enhanced rates of ozone formation. Although the rate of these processes is too slow to verify by observation, the calculation is useful in distinguishing some features of the chemistry of regions of differing mean cloudiness.

  18. Climate extremes in multi-model simulations of stratospheric aerosol and marine cloud brightening climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathy, V. N.; Boucher, O.; Quaas, M.; Niemeier, U.; Muri, H.; Quaas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations from a multi-model ensemble for the RCP4.5 climate change scenario for the 21st century, and for two solar radiation management schemes (stratospheric sulfate injection, G3, and marine cloud brightening, G3SSCE) have been analyzed in terms of changes in the mean and extremes for surface air temperature and precipitation. The climate engineered (SRM 2060s - RCP4.5 2010s) and termination (2080s - 2060s) periods are investigated. During the climate engineering period, both schemes, as intended, offset temperature increases by about 60% globally, but are more effective in the low latitudes and exhibit some residual warming in the Arctic (especially in the case of marine cloud brightening that is only applied in the low latitudes). In both climate engineering scenarios, extreme temperatures changes are similar to the mean temperature changes over much of the globe. The exception is in Northern Hemisphere high latitudes, where high temperatures (90th percentile of the distribution) of climate engineering relative to RCP4.5 rise less than the mean and cold temperatures (10th percentile) much more than the mean. When defining temperature extremes by fixed thresholds, namely number of frost days and summer days, it is found that both climate engineering experiments are not completely alleviating the changes relative to RCP 4.5. The reduction in 2060s dry spell occurrence over land region in G3-SSCE is is more pronounced than over oceans. Experiment G3 exhibits same pattern as G3-SSCE albeit, stronger in magnitude. A strong termination effect is found for the two climate engineering schemes, with large temperature increases especially in the Arctic. Mean temperatures rise faster than the extremes, especially over oceans, with the exception of the Tropics. Conversely precipitation extremes rise much more than the mean, even more so over the ocean, and especially in the Tropics.

  19. The Formation of Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, C.; Stahler, S. W.

    1997-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a detailed, numerical study of gravitational condensation in an unbounded, magnetized medium. The calculation is intended to model each stage in the formation of a dense core, similar to those found within star-forming regions, out of its parent molecular cloud. We assume that the evolution proceeds quasi-statically, through the combined action of self-gravity and ambipolar diffusion. The condensation is followed from its origin as a small perturbation in an initially homogeneous background medium of density rho_0 , until the point when its central density is ~ 10(2) rho_0 . The evolution is characterized by three distinct epochs: (i) an early growth phase, in which the region of interest grows to a size somewhat larger than the Jeans' length in the background medium; (ii) a pivotal phase, marked by the detachment of the (now self-gravitating) cloud from the background; and (iii) a contracting phase, in which the central density rapidly increases, while the cloud continues to accrete gas from the background. We compare our results from phase (iii) with the properties inferred from molecular line studies.

  20. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  1. A Lidar and Backscatter Sonde Aerosol Measurement Campaign at Table Mountain During February-March 1997: Observations of Stratospheric Background Aerosols and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M.; Haner, D.; Kjome, N.; McDermid, I.; McGee, T.; Rosen, J.; Schafer, H. J.; Schrems, O.

    1999-01-01

    Altitude profiles of backscater ratio of the stratospheric background aerosol layer at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are analyzed and discussed. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of the 26 campaign nights.

  2. 21st Century Trends in Antarctic Temperature and Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) Area in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines trends in Antarctic temperature and APSC, a temperature proxy for the area of polar stratospheric clouds, in an ensemble of Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations of the 21st century. A selection of greenhouse gas, ozone-depleting substance, and sea surface temperature scenarios is used to test the trend sensitivity to these parameters. One scenario is used to compare temperature trends in two versions of the GEOS CCM. An extended austral winter season is examined in detail. In May, June, and July, the expected future increase in CO2-related radiative cooling drives temperature trends in the Antarctic lower stratosphere. At 50 hPa, a 1.3 K cooling is expected between 2000 and 2100. Ozone levels increase, despite this robust cooling signal and the consequent increase in APSC, suggesting the enhancement of stratospheric transport in future. In the lower stratosphere, the choice of climate change scenarios does not affect the magnitude of the early winter cooling. Midwinter temperature trends are generally small. In October, APSC trends have the same sign as the prescribed halogen trends. That is, there are negative APSC trends in "grealistic future" simulations, where halogen loading decreases in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and CO2 continues to increase. In these simulations, the speed of ozone recovery is not influenced by either the choice of sea surface temperature and greenhouse gas scenarios or by the model version.

  3. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the polarization of light from the sky.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1983-04-01

    A dense volcanic cloud from the El Chichon volcanic eruption has been observed in the stratosphere over Hawaii since it was first discovered at the Mauna Loa Observatory 9 Apr. 1982. Lidar observations have shown the cloud to have been dense and highly layered in its early stages, but as the cloud matured it became more homogeneous and the top portion underwent considerable enhancement. Measurements of the degree of polarization of skylight at the zenith and across the sky in the sun's vertical show that the polarization field is strongly modified by the effects of the cloud and that the modifications are of a different nature from those produced by high turbidity in the lower layers of the atmosphere. The degree of polarization at the zenith during twilight shows a secondary maximum at a solar depression D = 4.8-5 degrees, a secondary minimum at D = 4 degrees, a primary maximum at D = 1-2 degrees, and a rapid decrease to values generally <10% in the immediate sunrise period. The positions of the neutral points are strongly affected by the cloud, the Arago point being shifted from its normal position by as much as 15-20 degrees and the Babinet point being shifted even farther. Multiple Babinet points were observed on some occasions. The measurements indicate the polarization field to be modified more by the El Chichon cloud than it was by the clouds from previous eruptions which have occurred during this century. PMID:18195919

  4. Star formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balfour, S. K.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.; Jaffa, S. E.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations in which two clouds, each having mass MO = 500 M⊙ and radius RO = 2 pc, collide head-on at relative velocities of ΔvO = 2.4, 2.8, 3.2, 3.6 and 4.0 km s-1. There is a clear trend with increasing ΔvO. At low ΔvO, star formation starts later, and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into an array of predominantly radial filaments; stars condense out of these filaments and fall, together with residual gas, towards the centre of the layer, to form a single large-N cluster, which then evolves by competitive accretion, producing one or two very massive protostars and a diaspora of ejected (mainly low-mass) protostars; the pattern of filaments is reminiscent of the hub and spokes systems identified recently by observers. At high ΔvO, star formation occurs sooner and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into a network of filaments; the pattern of filaments here is more like a spider's web, with several small-N clusters forming independently of one another, in cores at the intersections of filaments, and since each core only spawns a small number of protostars, there are fewer ejections of protostars. As the relative velocity is increased, the mean protostellar mass increases, but the maximum protostellar mass and the width of the mass function both decrease. We use a Minimal Spanning Tree to analyse the spatial distributions of protostars formed at different relative velocities.

  5. 3D Modeling of GJ1214b’s Atmosphere: Formation of Inhomogeneous High Clouds and Observational Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnay, B.; Meadows, V.; Misra, A.; Leconte, J.; Arney, G.

    2015-11-01

    The warm sub-Neptune GJ1214b has a featureless transit spectrum that may be due to the presence of high and thick clouds or haze. Here, we simulate the atmosphere of GJ1214b with a 3D General Circulation Model for cloudy hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, including cloud radiative effects. We show that the atmospheric circulation is strong enough to transport micrometric cloud particles to the upper atmosphere and generally leads to a minimum of cloud at the equator. By scattering stellar light, clouds increase the planetary albedo to 0.4-0.6 and cool the atmosphere below 1 mbar. However, the heating by ZnS clouds leads to the formation of a stratospheric thermal inversion above 10 mbar, with temperatures potentially high enough on the dayside to evaporate KCl clouds. We show that flat transit spectra consistent with Hubble Space Telescope observations are possible if cloud particle radii are around 0.5 μm, and that such clouds should be optically thin at wavelengths >3 μm. Using simulated cloudy atmospheres that fit the observed spectra we generate transit, emission, and reflection spectra and phase curves for GJ1214b. We show that a stratospheric thermal inversion would be readily accessible in near- and mid-infrared atmospheric spectral windows. We find that the amplitude of the thermal phase curves is strongly dependent on metallicity, but only slightly impacted by clouds. Our results suggest that primary and secondary eclipses and phase curves observed by the James Webb Space Telescope in the near- to mid-infrared should provide strong constraints on the nature of GJ1214b's atmosphere and clouds.

  6. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  7. A Long Data Record (1979-2003) of Stratospheric Ozone Derived from TOMS Cloud Slicing: Comparison with SAGE and Implications for Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jerry R.; Chandra, Sushil; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    It is generally recognized that Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment (SAGE) stratospheric ozone data have become a standard long-record reference field for comparison with other stratospheric ozone measurements. This study demonstrates that stratospheric column ozone (SCO) derived from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) Cloud Slicing may be used to supplement SAGE data as a stand-alone long- record reference field in the tropics extending to middle and high latitudes over the Pacific. Comparisons of SAGE I1 version 6.2 SCO and TOMS version 8 Cloud Slicing SCO for 1984-2003 exhibit remarkable agreement in monthly ensemble means to within 1-3 DU (1 - 1.5% of SCO) despite being independently-calibrated measurements. An important component of our study is to incorporate these column ozone measurements to investigate long-term trends for the period 1979-2003. Our study includes Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBW) version 8 measurements of upper stratospheric column ozone (i.e., zero to 32 hPa column ozone) to characterize seasonal cycles and seasonal trends in this region, as well as the lower stratosphere and troposphere when combined with TOMS SCO and total column ozone. The trend analyses suggest that most ozone reduction in the atmosphere since 1979 in mid-to-high latitudes has occurred in the Lower stratosphere below approx. 25 km. The delineation of upper and lower stratospheric column ozone indicate that trends in the upper stratosphere during the latter half of the 1979-2003 period have reduced to near zero globally, while trends in the lower stratosphere have become larger by approx. 5 DU decade%om the tropics extending to mid-latitudes in both hemispheres. For TCO, the trend analyses suggest moderate increases over the 25-year time record in the extra-tropics of both hemispheres of around 4-6 DU (Northern Hemisphere) and 6-8 DU (Southern Hemisphere).

  8. A Unified Satellite-Observation Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) Database for Long-Term Climate-Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromm, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Alfred, Jerome

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the project team's activity and accomplishments during the period 12 February, 1999 - 12 February, 2000. The primary objective of this project was to create and test a generic algorithm for detecting polar stratospheric clouds (PSC), an algorithm that would permit creation of a unified, long term PSC database from a variety of solar occultation instruments that measure aerosol extinction near 1000 nm The second objective was to make a database of PSC observations and certain relevant related datasets. In this report we describe the algorithm, the data we are making available, and user access options. The remainder of this document provides the details of the algorithm and the database offering.

  9. Microphysical properties of synoptic-scale polar stratospheric clouds: in situ measurements of unexpectedly large HNO3-containing particles in the Arctic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Schlager, H.; Luo, B.; Frey, W.; Klingebiel, M.; Weigel, R.; Ebert, M.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Woiwode, W.; Oelhaf, H.; Dörnbrack, A.; Stratmann, G.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Vogel, B.; Müller, R.; Krämer, M.; Meyer, J.; Cairo, F.

    2014-10-01

    In January 2010 and December 2011, synoptic-scale polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) fields were probed during seven flights of the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica within the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interaction) and the ESSenCe (ESSenCe: ESA Sounder Campaign) projects. Particle size distributions in a diameter range between 0.46 and 40μm were recorded by four different optical in situ instruments. Three of these particle instruments are based on the detection of forward-scattered light by single particles. The fourth instrument is a grayscale optical array imaging probe. Optical particle diameters of up to 35μm were detected with particle number densities and total particle volumes exceeding previous Arctic measurements. Also, gas-phase and particle-bound NOy was measured, as well as water vapor concentrations. The optical characteristics of the clouds were measured by the remote sensing lidar MAL (Miniature Aerosol Lidar) and by the in situ backscatter sonde MAS (Multiwavelength Aerosol Scatterometer), showing the synoptic scale of the encountered PSCs. The particle mode below 2μm in size diameter has been identified as supercooled ternary solution (STS) droplets. The PSC particles in the size range above 2μm in diameter are considered to consist of nitric acid hydrates, and the particles' high HNO3 content was confirmed by the NOy instrument. Assuming a particle composition of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the optically measured size distributions result in particle-phase HNO3 mixing ratios exceeding available stratospheric values. Therefore the measurement uncertainties concerning probable overestimations of measured particle sizes and volumes are discussed in detail. We hypothesize that either a strong asphericity or an alternate particle composition (e.g., water ice coated with NAT) could explain our observations. In particular

  10. Cloud acidity and acidic deposition in the lower troposphere and ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere: Modeling and data analysis regarding the role of atmospheric aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Nenghuei.

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the role of atmospheric aerosols in determining the cloud acidity and acidic deposition in the lower troposphere and the ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere. For the former, a cloud chemistry model is developed to study the in-cloud chemistry and acidity in cloud droplets. The cloud chemistry model includes the absorption of trace gases, the oxidation of aqueous phase SO{sub 2}, and the scavenging of atmospheric aerosols. A new scheme is developed to differentiate the acidity and chemical composition distributing in individual cloud droplets. The above cloud chemistry model is incorporated into a two-layer flow model in order to investigate the effects of mountain waves on the cloud acidity. Using the three-year database acquired at Mt. Mitchell site, the in-cloud chemistry and acidic deposition through dry, wet and cloud deposition pathways are investigated. The in-cloud scavenging of submicron aerosols such as sulfates and nitrates is parameterized as a function of cloud deposition rate. The deposition fluxes of sulfur (S) compounds are found primarily contributed by cloud capture mechanism followed by incident precipitation and dry deposition. A comparison of deposition estimates at Mt. Mitchell with those at other sites shows that the sulfate deposition at sites exceeding 1,200 m MSL in elevation in Bavaria (Germany) and eastern USA is almost identical within error limits. The features of the Antarctic stratospheric aerosols during the ozone depletion episode of October 1987 are investigated based on the SAGE 2 (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2) data. The study focuses on (1) inferring the aerosol size spectrum using a modified randomized minimization-search-technique (RMST), and (2) investigating the vertical, zonal and columnar averages of aerosol properties, together with the ozone concentration.

  11. To examine the association between oscillations of the stratospheric aerosol layer peaks and different types of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, P. B.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol measurements have been carried out at Kolhapur (16°42'N, 74°14'E) by using newly designed Semiautomatic Twilight Photometer. The system is a ground based simple and inexpensive but very sensitive passive remote sensing technique. The altitudes of the Junge layer peaks on measurement days were derived from the aerosol vertical profiles. One attempt is made to examine the association between oscillations of the stratospheric aerosol layer peaks and different types of clouds. The values of AND for the Junge layer peaks for each observational day were also calculated. The graph between AND at peak point of Junge layer and day numbers was also studied in comparison with High, Medium and Low level clouds. There is an annual variation in the altitude of the peak of Junge layer also. Its maximum is observed during January. The annual variation of the altitude of the peak of Junge layer and the AND of Junge layer peak showed opposite phase relation.

  12. Climate extremes in multi-model simulations of stratospheric aerosol and marine cloud brightening climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathy, V. N.; Boucher, O.; Quaas, M.; Niemeier, U.; Muri, H.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Quaas, J.

    2015-08-01

    Simulations from a multi-model ensemble for the RCP4.5 climate change scenario for the 21st century, and for two solar radiation management (SRM) schemes (stratospheric sulfate injection (G3), SULF and marine cloud brightening by sea salt emission SALT) have been analysed in terms of changes in the mean and extremes of surface air temperature and precipitation. The climate engineering and termination periods are investigated. During the climate engineering period, both schemes, as intended, offset temperature increases by about 60 % globally, but are more effective in the low latitudes and exhibit some residual warming in the Arctic (especially in the case of SALT which is only applied in the low latitudes). In both climate engineering scenarios, extreme temperature changes are similar to the mean temperature changes over much of the globe. The exceptions are the mid- and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, where high temperatures (90th percentile of the distribution) of the climate engineering period compared to RCP4.5 control period rise less than the mean, and cold temperatures (10th percentile), much more than the mean. This aspect of the SRM schemes is also reflected in simulated reduction in the frost day frequency of occurrence for both schemes. However, summer day frequency of occurrence increases less in the SALT experiment than the SULF experiment, especially over the tropics. Precipitation extremes in the two SRM scenarios act differently - the SULF experiment more effectively mitigates extreme precipitation increases over land compared to the SALT experiment. A reduction in dry spell occurrence over land is observed in the SALT experiment. The SULF experiment has a slight increase in the length of dry spells. A strong termination effect is found for the two climate engineering schemes, with large temperature increases especially in the Arctic. Globally, SULF is more effective in reducing extreme temperature increases over land than SALT. Extreme

  13. Accretion phase of star formation in clouds with different metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Nakamura, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    The main accretion phase of star formation is investigated in clouds with different metallicities in the range 0 ≤ Z ≤ Z⊙, resolving the protostellar radius. Starting from a near-equilibrium prestellar cloud, we calculate the cloud evolution up to ˜100 yr after the first protostar forms. Star formation differs considerably between clouds with lower (Z ≤ 10-4 Z⊙) and higher (Z > 10-4 Z⊙) metallicities. Fragmentation frequently occurs and many protostars appear without a stable circumstellar disc in lower-metallicity clouds. In these clouds, although protostars mutually interact and some are ejected from the cloud centre, many remain as a small stellar cluster. In contrast, higher-metallicity clouds produce a single protostar surrounded by a nearly stable rotation-supported disc. In these clouds, although fragmentation occasionally occurs in the disc, the fragments migrate inwards and finally fall on to the central protostar. The difference in cloud evolution is due to different thermal evolutions and mass accretion rates. The thermal evolution of the cloud determines the emergence and lifetime of the first core. The first core develops prior to the formation of a protostar in higher-metallicity clouds, whereas no (obvious) first core appears in lower-metallicity clouds. The first core evolves into a circumstellar disc with a spiral pattern, which effectively transfers the angular momentum outwards and suppresses frequent fragmentation. In lower-metallicity clouds, the higher mass accretion rate increases the disc surface density within a very short time, rendering the disc unstable to self-gravity and inducing vigorous fragmentation.

  14. Magmatic gas source for the stratospheric SO[sub 2] cloud from the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mount Pinatubo

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R. ); Gerlach, T.M. )

    1992-10-01

    A water-rich magmatic gas phase escaped explosively from Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991, taking with it a load of crystalline and molten material sufficient to form pumice and tephra deposits with an estimated total dense-rock-equivalent volume of 3-5 km[sup 3], and carrying in it enough sulfur to form a 20 Mt SO[sub 2] cloud in the stratosphere. Application of the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing during the climatic event from the sulfur content of trapped glass inclusions and matrix glasses in the pumice deposits requires an unacceptably large volume of erupted magma to account for SO[sub 2] in the stratospheric cloud. The ubiquitous presence of primary vapor bubbles in glass inclusions and unaltered anhydrite phenocrysts in the pumice suggest that sulfur was present in a separate H[sub 2]O-rich gas phase of the Pinatubo magma before eruption. Thus, for this eruption, and perhaps others, the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing is prone to substantial underestimation of sulfur release and the potential climatic impact of past explosive eruptions.

  15. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n{sub thresh} ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

  16. Letter to the Editor: A strange cloud in the Arctic summer stratosphere 1998 above Esrange (68 deg N), Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, J.; Timmis, C.; Vaughan, G.; Fricke, K. H.

    2000-04-01

    When the University of Bonn lidar on the Esrange (68 deg N, 21 deg E), Sweden, was switched on in the evening of July 18, 1998, a geometrically and optically thin cloud layer was present near 14 km altitude or 400 K potential temperature, where it persisted for two hours. The tropopause altitude was 4 km below the cloud altitude. The cloud particles depolarized the lidar returns, thus must they have been aspherical and hence solid. Atmospheric temperatures near 230 K were approximately 40 K too high to support ice particles at stratospheric water vapour pressures of a few ppmv. The isentropic back trajectory on 400 K showed the air parcels to have stayed clear of active major rocket launch sites. The air parcels at 400 K had traveled from the Aleutians across Canada and the Atlantic Ocean arriving above central Europe and then turned northward to pass over above the lidar station. Parcels at levels at +/-25 K from 400 K had come from the pole and joined the 400 K trajectory path above eastern Canada. Apparently the cloud existed in a filament of air with an origin different from those filaments both above and below. Possibly the 400 K level air parcels had carried soot particles from forest wild fires in northern Canada or volcanic ash from the eruption of the Korovin Volcano in the Aleutian Islands.

  17. Low Mass Star Formation in the Norma Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, B.; Nielbock, M.

    2008-12-01

    A small filamentary cloud in Norma hosts a number of young low-mass stars in various stages of evolution, from visible Hα emission stars to embedded sources detected only in the sub-millimeter regime. The best known source is V346 Nor, an FU Orionis star that brightened in the early 1980s. The morphology of the cloud complex and an apparent age gradient along the cloud suggests that star formation in this region was triggered by an external event.

  18. Do cloud-cloud collisions trigger high-mass star formation? I. Small cloud collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Ken; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao

    2014-09-01

    We performed sub-parsec (∼0.06 pc) scale simulations of two idealized molecular clouds with different masses undergoing a collision. Gas clumps with densities greater than 10{sup –20} g cm{sup –3} (0.3 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked throughout the simulation. The colliding system showed a partial gas arc morphology with core formation in the oblique shock front at the collision interface. These characteristics support NANTEN observations of objects suspected to be colliding giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We investigated the effect of turbulence and collision speed on the resulting core population and compared the cumulative mass distribution to cores in observed GMCs. Our results suggest that a faster relative velocity increases the number of cores formed but that cores grow via accretion predominately while in the shock front, leading to a slower shock being more important for core growth. The core masses obey a power-law relation with index γ = –1.6, in good agreement with observations. This suggests that core production through collisions should follow a similar mass distribution as quiescent formation, albeit at a higher mass range. If cores can be supported against collapse during their growth, then the estimated ram pressure from gas infall is of the right order to counter the radiation pressure and form a star of 100 M {sub ☉}.

  19. Drizzle formation in stratocumulus clouds: effects of turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaritz-Ronen, L.; Pinsky, M.; Khain, A.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism of drizzle formation in shallow stratocumulus clouds and the effect of turbulent mixing on this process are investigated. A Lagrangian-Eularian model of the cloud-topped boundary layer is used to simulate the cloud measured during flight RF07 of the DYCOMS-II field experiment. The model contains ~ 2000 air parcels that are advected in a turbulence-like velocity field. In the model all microphysical processes are described for each Lagrangian air volume, and turbulent mixing between the parcels is also taken into account. It was found that the first large drops form in air volumes that are closest to adiabatic and characterized by high humidity, extended residence near cloud top, and maximum values of liquid water content, allowing the formation of drops as a result of efficient collisions. The first large drops form near cloud top and initiate drizzle formation in the cloud. Drizzle is developed only when turbulent mixing of parcels is included in the model. Without mixing, the cloud structure is extremely inhomogeneous and the few large drops that do form in the cloud evaporate during their sedimentation. It was found that turbulent mixing can delay the process of drizzle initiation but is essential for the further development of drizzle in the cloud.

  20. Drizzle formation in stratocumulus clouds: Effects of turbulent mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Magaritz-Ronen, L.; Pinsky, M.; Khain, A.

    2016-02-17

    The mechanism of drizzle formation in shallow stratocumulus clouds and the effect of turbulent mixing on this process are investigated. A Lagrangian–Eularian model of the cloud-topped boundary layer is used to simulate the cloud measured during flight RF07 of the DYCOMS-II field experiment. The model contains ~ 2000 air parcels that are advected in a turbulence-like velocity field. In the model all microphysical processes are described for each Lagrangian air volume, and turbulent mixing between the parcels is also taken into account. It was found that the first large drops form in air volumes that are closest to adiabatic andmore » characterized by high humidity, extended residence near cloud top, and maximum values of liquid water content, allowing the formation of drops as a result of efficient collisions. The first large drops form near cloud top and initiate drizzle formation in the cloud. Drizzle is developed only when turbulent mixing of parcels is included in the model. Without mixing, the cloud structure is extremely inhomogeneous and the few large drops that do form in the cloud evaporate during their sedimentation. Lastly, it was found that turbulent mixing can delay the process of drizzle initiation but is essential for the further development of drizzle in the cloud.« less

  1. In-situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water vapor, and aerosols in polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  2. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER( box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric coolings and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  3. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K Cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  4. The Sensitivity of Arctic Ozone Loss to Polar Stratospheric Cloud Volume and Chlorine and Bromine Loading in a Chemistry and Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Polansky, B. C.

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of Arctic ozone loss to polar stratospheric cloud volume (V(sub PSC)) and chlorine and bromine loading is explored using chemistry and transport models (CTMs). A simulation using multi-decadal output from a general circulation model (GCM) in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) CTM complements one recycling a single year s GCM output in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) CTM. Winter polar ozone loss in the GSFC CTM depends on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) and polar vortex characteristics (temperatures, descent, isolation, polar stratospheric cloud amount). Polar ozone loss in the GMI CTM depends only on changes in EESC as the dynamics repeat annually. The GSFC CTM simulation reproduces a linear relationship between ozone loss and Vpsc derived from observations for 1992 - 2003 which holds for EESC within approx.85% of its maximum (approx.1990 - 2020). The GMI simulation shows that ozone loss varies linearly with EESC for constant, high V(sub PSC).

  5. Simulation studies of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the stratospheric clouds of the Mount St. Helens eruptions of May and June 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, C.; Keesee, R. G.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The large and diverse set of observational data collected in the high-altitude clouds of May 18, May 25, and June 13, 1980 was organized and analyzed for trends which reveal the processes at work. The data were used to guide and constrain model simulations of the volcanic eruptions. A comprehensive one-dimensional model of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, sulfur precursor gases, and volcanic ash and dust particles is utilized which accounts for homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry in the clouds, aerosol nucleation and growth, and cloud expansion. Computational results are given for the time histories of the gaseous species concentrations, sulfate aerosol size dispersions, and ash burdens in the eruption clouds. The long-term buildup of stratospheric aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere and the persistent effects of injected chlorine and water vapor on ozone are discussed. It is concluded that SO2, water vapor, and ash are the most important substances injected by the volcano into the stratosphere, with respect to both the widespread effects on composition and the impact on climate. It is found that the volcano probably had little influence on the climate ( 0.05 K global surface cooling) or on stratospheric ozone ( 0.2 percent maximum hemispherical reduction).

  6. Simulation of the climate effects of a geoengineered stratospheric sulfate cloud with the NASA GEOSCCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, L.; Aquila, V.; Colarco, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Suggested solar radiation management (SRM) methods to mitigate global warming include the injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) in the stratosphere. We present the results from SRM simulation ensemble performed with the NASA GEOS-5 Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We focus on the response of the stratosphere to a stratospheric SO2 injection. In particular, we investigate the changes of the stratospheric dynamics and composition, and the impact of an increased aerosol layer on ozone recovery. As prescribed for experiment G4 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), we inject 5 Tg/year of SO2 from 2020 to 2070. The location of the injection is the equator at 0° longitude between 16 km and 25 km altitude. After 2070, we interrupt the SO2 injection and simulate the readjustment until 2090. The emissions scenario is RCP4.5, which predicts a radiative forcing of about 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. This is considered a "medium-low" scenario in terms of radiative forcing. GEOSCCM does not include an interactive ocean model, therefore we use the sea surface temperatures forecasted by the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) for RCP4.5.

  7. Polar stratospheric clouds in the 1998-2003 Antarctic vortex: Microphysical modeling and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, C. M.; Drdla, K.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Alfred, J.; Hoppel, K. W.

    2006-09-01

    The Integrated Microphysics and Aerosol Chemistry on Trajectories (IMPACT) model is used to study polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and evolution in the Antarctic vortex. The model is applied to individual air parcel trajectories driven by UK Met Office (UKMO) wind and temperature fields. The IMPACT model calculates the parcel microphysics, including the formation and sedimentation of ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), and supercooled ternary solution (STS) aerosols. Model results are validated by comparison with data obtained by the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III solar occultation instrument and are examined for 6 years of POAM data (1998-2003). Comparisons of POAM water vapor and aerosol extinction measurements to the model results help to constrain three microphysical parameters influencing the formation and growth of both type I and type II PSCs. Principally, measurements of aerosol extinction prove to be valuable in differentiating model runs; the relationship of aerosol extinction to temperature is determined by the various particle types as they form and grow. Comparison of IMPACT calculations of this relationship to POAM measurements suggests that the initial fraction of nuclei available for heterogeneous NAT freezing is approximately 0.02% of all aerosols. Constraints are also placed on the accommodation coefficient of ice and the NAT-ice lattice compatibility. However, these two parameters have similar effects on the extinction-temperature relationship, and thus a range of values are permissible for each.

  8. New Particle Formation in and Around Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axisa, D.; Reeves, J. M.; Wilson, J. C.; Lawson, P.; Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Schiller, C.; Kraemer, M.

    2012-12-01

    The MACPEX mission permitted observation of aerosol size distributions in the 4 to 1000 nm diameter range, cloud particles and water vapor in and around clouds in the mid-latitude upper troposphere. The NMASS consists of 5 condensation particle counters (cpcs) operating in parallel. The 5 cpcs have lower detection limits of approximately 4 nm, 8 nm, 16 nm, 32 nm and 50 nm. The FCAS measures the optical size of particles in the 100 nm to 1000 nm range. The data from these instruments are combined to provide size distributions from 4 to 1000 nm. Size distributions that show a local maximum in the smallest size range are evidence for recent new particle formation since the lifetime of particles in this size range is short due to coagulation. Size distributions showing evidence of new particle formation were observed inside and near clouds in the altitude range from 10 to 14 km. The cloud particles in these high clouds are expected to be ice. Care was taken to avoid interpreting shattering of ice on the aerosol inlets as new particles. The size distributions showing new particle formation are contrasted with size distributions that do not show new particle formation in and out of the clouds. Temperature, relative humidity and trace gas abundances in air parcels exhibiting new particle formation are contrasted with those in air parcels not showing new particle formation.

  9. How Temperature and Water levels affect Polar Mesospheric Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. L.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument data, which is part of the Aeronomy in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission, we compare the albedo and ice water content measurements of CIPS with the Navy Operation Global Atmospheric Prediction System - Advanced Level Phyiscs and High Altitude (NOGAPS-ALPHA) temperature and water vapor data in order to derive a greater understanding of cloud formation and physics. We particularly focus on data from June 2007 and July 2007 in this case study because of particular cloud structures and formations during this time period for future studies.

  10. SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Karna M.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Dluger, William; Katz, Marshall; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie W.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Hughes, Annie; Muller, Erik; Ott, Juergen; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2010-08-15

    It has often been suggested that supernova remnants (SNRs) can trigger star formation. To investigate the relationship between SNRs and star formation, we have examined the known sample of 45 SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to search for associated young stellar objects (YSOs) and molecular clouds. We find seven SNRs associated with both YSOs and molecular clouds, three SNRs associated with YSOs but not molecular clouds, and eight SNRs near molecular clouds but not associated with YSOs. Among the 10 SNRs associated with YSOs, the association between the YSOs and SNRs either can be rejected or cannot be convincingly established for eight cases. Only two SNRs have YSOs closely aligned along their rims; however, the time elapsed since the SNR began to interact with the YSOs' natal clouds is much shorter than the contraction timescales of the YSOs, and thus we do not see any evidence of SNR-triggered star formation in the LMC. The 15 SNRs that are near molecular clouds may trigger star formation in the future when the SNR shocks have slowed down to <45 km s{sup -1}. We discuss how SNRs can alter the physical properties and abundances of YSOs.

  11. Fourier transform infrared studies of model polar stratospheric cloud surfaces - Growth and evaporation of ice and nitric acid/ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared surface studies are used to probe the microphysical properties of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and ice films representative of type I and II polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Experiments indicate that, on initial exposure to 1.8 microtorr of HNO3, a layer of ice is quantitatively converted to NAT. However, conversion of ice to NAT does not proceed indefinitely, but rather the system reaches saturation. For longer exposures or higher HNO3 pressures, NAM becomes the dominant nitric acid containing species on the surface. Evaporation studies were performed to test the feasibility of a recent denitrification mechanism. The results indicate that ice coated with 0.20 micron of NAT evaporates at a temperature of about 4 C higher than uncoated ice.

  12. Lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, 1988 - Signature of small, solid particles above the frost point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Osborn, M. T.; Hunt, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents recent (January 1988) Arctic airborne lidar data which suggest that Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of small solid particles with radii on the order of 0.5 micron. PSCs were observed remotely in the 21-24 km altitude range north of Greenland during a round-trip flight from Andenes, Norway on January 29, 1988, aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility P-3 Orion aircraft. Synoptic analyses at the 30-mb level show local temperatures of 191-193 K, which are well above the estimated frost point temperature of 185 K; this suggests that the PSCs were probably of the binary HNO3-H2O (Type I) class.

  13. Temperature dependent optical constants from aerosol spectroscopy: Applications to stratospheric clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, R.F.; Miller, R.E.

    1996-10-01

    The refractive indices of various atmospheric condensates are of great importance in both modeling and remote sensing. In the past, data of this type was only available from thin film measurements made on substrates. The applicability of these data for the study of atmospheric aerosols has really never been tested in detail. We have developed a new approach that allows for the direction determination of frequency dependent refractive indices directly from aerosol spectra. In this paper we discuss the application of this methodology to the study of laboratory generated aerosols of interest in stratospheric heterogeneous chemistry. In particular, we report studies on water, nitric and sulfuric acid aerosols. In the latter case, we report temperature and composition dependent optical constants over the range of conditions appropriate for the stratosphere.

  14. Laboratory analyses of meteoric debris in the upper stratosphere from settling bolide dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Della Corte, V.; Ferrari, M.; Rotundi, A.; Brunetto, R.

    2016-03-01

    Bolide and fireball fragmentation produce vast amounts of dust that will slowly fall through the stratosphere. DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval) was designed to intercept the nanometer to micrometer meteoric dust from these events for laboratory analyses while it is still in the upper stratosphere. This effort required extraordinary precautions to avoid particle contamination during collection and in the laboratory. Here we report dust from the upper stratosphere that was collected during two campaigns one in 2008 and another in 2011. We collected and characterized forty five uncontaminated meteoric dust particles. The collected particles are alumina, aluminosilica, plagioclase, fassaite, silica, CaCO3, CaO, extreme F-rich Csbnd Osbnd Ca particles, and oxocarbon particles. These particles are found in friable CI and CM carbonaceous chondrite, and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteoroids that are the most common source of bolides and fireballs. The oxocarbons have no meteorite counterparts. Some F-bearing CaCO3 particles changed shape when they interacted with the ambient laboratory atmosphere which might indicate their highly unequilibrated state as a result of fragmentation. Equilibrium considerations constrain the thermal regime experienced by the collected particles between ∼2000 °C and ∼1000 °C, as high as 3700 °C and as low as ∼650 °C after 9 s, followed by rapid quenching (μs) to below 1600 °C, but equilibrium conditions during these events is most unlikely. So far the observed thermal conditions in these events put the temperatures between ∼4300 °C and ∼430 °C for 5 s and high cooling rates. Such conditions are present in the immediate wake of meteors and fireballs.

  15. Cloud-particle galactic gas dynamics and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Galactic gas dynamics, spiral structure, and star formation are discussed in relation to N-body computational studies based on a cloud-particle model of the interstellar medium. On the small scale, the interstellar medium is seen as cloud-dominated and supernova-perturbed. It is noted that the cloud-particle model simulates cloud-cloud collisions, the formation of stellar associations, and supernova explosions as dominant local processes. On the large scale, in response to a spiral galactic gravitational field, global density waves and galactic shocks develop having large-scale characteristics similar to those found in continuum gas dynamical studies. Both the system of gas clouds and the system of young stellar associations forming from the clouds figure in the global spiral structure. However, with the attributes of neither assuming a continuum of gas (as in continuum gas dynamical studies) or requiring a prescribed equation of state (such as the isothermal condition), the cloud-particle picture retains much of the detail lost in earlier work. By detail is meant the small-scale features and structures so important in understanding the local, turbulent state of the interstellar medium as well as the degree of raggedness often seen to be superposed on the global spiral structure.

  16. On the detectability of acid formation in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Daum, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of detecting by means of field measurements the occurrence of acid forming reactions in natural clouds. This evaluation is performed by calculating the changes in reagent and product concentrations expected from four potentially important in-cloud acid production mechanisms, in representative cloud types, and comparing those changes with concentration differences detectable by available analytical methods. The four acid production mechanisms considered are: aqueous-phase reactions of SO/sub 2/ with O/sub 3/ and with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and gas-phase reactions of NO/sub 2/ with OH radical and with O/sub 3/, the latter leading to acid formation by reaction of N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ with cloud liquid water. The cloud types considered are fog, stratus, cumulus, and mountain lee wave. This evaluation indicates that oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ should be detectable in a wide variety of cloud conditions, but that oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by O/sub 3/ is unlikely to be detected by field measurements. The reactions oxidizing NO/sub 2/ may be detectable in fog and stratus clouds, which provide long in-cloud residence times. The paper includes discussion of factors which favor or hinder detection of acid production in clouds, and reviews evidence from published field studies on the occurrence of such production.

  17. Effect of Stellar Encounters on Comet Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Kokubo, E.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of stellar encounters on the formation and disruption of the Oort cloud using the classical impulse approximation. We calculate the evolution of a planetesimal disk into a spherical Oort cloud due to the perturbation from passing stars for 10 Gyr. We obtain the empirical fits of the e-folding time for the number of Oort cloud comets using the standard exponential and Kohlrausch formulae as functions of the stellar parameters and the initial semimajor axes of planetesimals. The e-folding time and the evolution timescales of the orbital elements are also analytically derived. In some calculations, the effect of the Galactic tide is additionally considered. We also show the radial variations of the e-folding times to the Oort cloud. From these timescales, we show that if the initial planetesimal disk has the semimajor axes distribution {dn}/{da}\\propto {a}-2, which is produced by planetary scattering, the e-folding time for planetesimals in the Oort cloud is ∼10 Gyr at any heliocentric distance r. This uniform e-folding time over the Oort cloud means that the supply of comets from the inner Oort cloud to the outer Oort cloud is sufficiently effective to keep the comet distribution as {dn}/{dr}\\propto {r}-2. We also show that the final distribution of the semimajor axes in the Oort cloud is approximately proportional to {a}-2 for any initial distribution.

  18. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  19. Polar stratospheric clouds observed at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) in the Canadian Arctic during the 1994/1995 winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Uchino, O.; Itabe, T.; Shibata, T.; Mizutani, K.; Fujimoto, T.

    1997-09-01

    A lidar system was installed at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) in January 1993 to monitor stratospheric aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). In the winter of 1994/1995, PSCs were found at altitudes of around 20km in the middle of December. In early January 1995, PSCs were observed at altitudes from 14.3 km to 16 km, where the temperature ranged from 199K to 202K. Since this range is higher than the frost point of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the particles in these PSCs may have consisted of sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT).

  20. Microturbulence, systematic motions, and line formation in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Microturbulence and systematic motions are viewed as simplifying assumptions made to facilitate treatment of line formation in molecular clouds, and line intensities calculated in the two approximations are compared to estimate how uncertainties about the actual line-broadening mechanism affect the interpretation of molecular emission lines. For lines formed by two-level molecules in an isothermal homogeneous cloud, the alternative assumptions lead to peak and integrated line intensities which agree within the differences (up to a factor of 3) associated with the ignorance of cloud geometry. New multilevel calculations for CO in the same cloud model bear out the generality of this result. It follows that, within the geometrical uncertainties, the Sobolev (1960) approximation may be used confidently in the numerous applications for which this simple cloud model suffices.

  1. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Michael J.; Lane, Todd P.; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  2. Numerical models of Oort Cloud formation and comet delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaib, Nathan A.

    I use a newly designed numerical algorithm to simulate the dynamics of the Oort Cloud. The processes I model are the formation of the cloud, the current delivery of comets to the planetary region, and long-period comet production during comet showers. Concerning the cloud's formation, I find that the Sun's birth environment dramatically affects the structure of the inner Oort Cloud as well as the amount of material trapped in this region. In addition, the structure of this reservoir is also sensitive to the Sun's orbital history in the Milky Way. This raises the possibility that constraining our inner Oort Cloud's properties can constrain the Sun's dynamical history. In this regard, I use my simulations of comet delivery to better understand what the population of comets passing through the planetary region can tell us about the inner Oort Cloud. I find that the inner Oort Cloud (rather than the scattered disk) dominates the production of planet-crossing TNOs with perihelia beyond 15 AU and semimajor axes greater than a few hundred AU. My results indicate that two objects representing this population (2000 00 67 and 2006 SQ 372 ) have already been detected, and the detection of many analogous objects can constrain the inner Oort Cloud. In addition, these simulations of comet delivery also demonstrate that, contrary to previous understanding, the inner Oort Cloud is a significant and perhaps the dominant source of known long-period comets. This result can be used to place the first observationally motivated upper limit on the inner Oort Cloud's population. Finally, with this maximum population value, I use my comet shower simulations to show that comet showers are unlikely to be responsible for more than one minor extinction event since the Cambrian Explosion.

  3. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry; Jensen, Eric; Sachse, Glenn; Podolske, James; Schoeberl, Mark; Browell, Edward; Ismail, Syed; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld is import-an: for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper Troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large, even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. These tended to coincide with regions of low temperatures, though some cases suggest water vapor enhancements due to troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. The goal of this work is to understand the importance of processes in and at the edge of the arctic stratospheric middleworld in determining water vapor at these levels. Specifically, is water vapor at these levels determined largely by the descent of air from above, or are clouds both within and at the edge of the stratospheric middleworld potentially important? How important is troposphere-to-stratosphere transport of air in determining stratospheric middleworld water vapor content? To this end, we will first examine the minimum saturation mixing ratios along theta/EPV tubes during the SOLVE winter and compare these with DC-8 water vapor observations. This will be a rough indicator of how high relative humidities can get, and the likelihood of cirrus cloud formation in various parts of the stratospheric middleworld. We will then examine saturation mixing ratios along both diabatic and adiabatic trajectories, comparing these values with actual aircraft water vapor observations, both in situ and remote. Finally, we will attempt to actually predict water vapor using minimum saturation mixing ratios along trajectories, cloud injection (derived from satellite imagery) along

  4. Electric field measuring and display system. [for cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Lovall, D. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for monitoring the electric fields of cloud formations within a particular area. It utilizes capacitor plates that are alternately shielded from the clouds for generating an alternating signal corresponding to the intensity of the electric field of the clouds. A synchronizing signal is produced for controlling sampling of the alternating signal. Such samplings are fed through a filter and converted by an analogue to digital converter into digital form and subsequently fed to a transmitter for transmission to the control station for recording.

  5. Schmidt's conjecture and star formation in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos; Alves, João F. E-mail: marco.lombardi@unimi.it E-mail: jan.forbrich@univie.ac.at

    2013-12-01

    We investigate Schmidt's conjecture (i.e., that the star formation rate (SFR) scales in a power-law fashion with the gas density) for four well-studied local molecular clouds (giant molecular clouds, GMCs). Using the Bayesian methodology, we show that a local Schmidt scaling relation of the form Σ{sub ∗}(A{sub K})=κA{sub K}{sup β} (protostars pc{sup –2}) exists within (but not between) GMCs. Further, we find that the Schmidt scaling law does not by itself provide an adequate description of star formation activity in GMCs. Because the total number of protostars produced by a cloud is given by the product of Σ{sub *}(A {sub K}) and S'(> A {sub K}), the differential surface area distribution function, integrated over the entire cloud, the cloud's structure plays a fundamental role in setting the level of its star formation activity. For clouds with similar functional forms of Σ{sub *}(A {sub K}), observed differences in their total SFRs are primarily due to the differences in S'(> A {sub K}) between the clouds. The coupling of Σ{sub *}(A {sub K}) with the measured S'(> A {sub K}) in these clouds also produces a steep jump in the SFR and protostellar production above A{sub K} ∼ 0.8 mag. Finally, we show that there is no global Schmidt law that relates the SFR and gas mass surface densities between GMCs. Consequently, the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt scaling relation for disk galaxies is likely an artifact of unresolved measurements of GMCs and not a result of any underlying physical law of star formation characterizing the molecular gas.

  6. Thermal instabilities in diffuse molecular clouds - Formation of molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Frank R.; Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of diffuse clouds to thermal instabilities is examined using the semiempirical cooling function derived by Tarafdar et al. (1985) for these clouds. It is found that diffuse clouds which obey such a cooling function are susceptible to thermal instability at densities n of less than about 70-80/cu cm. The growth rate for instability is large and the mass contained in unstable regions ranges from about 0.001 to 1 solar mass. It is suggested that such instabilities may trigger formation of molecular cloud cores of the type found in low-mass molecular clouds (e.g., TMC-2). Criteria for thermal instability in self-gravitating systems are also derived.

  7. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  8. The vapor pressures of supercooled NHO3/H2O solutions. [in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure utilizing the Gibbs-Duhem relation is used to extrapolate vapor pressures of supercooled HNO3 mixtures to 190 K. Values of A and B from the equation logP = A - B/T are presented for solutions between 0.20 and 0.25 mole fraction HNO3. In the stratosphere, if sufficient HNO3 vapor is present because it has not come into equilibrium with the nitric acid trihydrate, supercooled nitric acid solutions could condense at temperatures up to 1.5 + or - 0.8 K above the ice point.

  9. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltsmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon-borne frost point measurements were performed over Antarctica during September-October 1987 as part of the NOZE II effort at McMurdo. The results show water mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 20 km region, suggesting that models of the springtime Antarctic stratosphere should be based on approximately 2 ppmv water vapor. Evidence indicating that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the frost point in the 15 to 20 km region is discussed. This supports the binary HNO3-H2O theory of PSC composition.

  10. Ice supersaturation and cirrus cloud formation from global in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui

    Water vapor, clouds and aerosols are three major components in the atmosphere that largely influence the Earth's climate and weather systems. However, there is still a lack of understanding on the distribution and interaction of these components. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and direction of the aerosol indirect effect on cloud radiative forcing, which potentially can either double or cancel out all anthropogenic greenhouse gas effect. In particular, a small variation in water vapor mixing ratio and cloud distribution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) can generate large impacts on the Earth's surface temperature. Yet the understanding of water vapor and clouds in the UT/LS is still limited due to difficulties in observations. To improve our understanding of these components, observations are needed from the microscale (~100 m) to the global scale. The first part of my PhD work is to provide quality-controlled, high resolution (~200 m), in situ water vapor observations using an open-path, aircraft-based laser hygrometer. The laboratory calibrations of the laser hygrometer were conducted using complementary experimental systems. The second part is to compare the NASA AIRS/AMSU-A water vapor and temperature retrievals with aircraft-based observations from the surface to the UT/LS at 87°N-67°S in order to understand the accuracy and uncertainties in remote sensing measurements. The third part of my research analyzes the spatial characteristics and formation condition of ice supersaturation (ISS), the birthplace of cirrus clouds, and shows that water vapor horizontal heterogeneities play a key role in determining the spatial distribution of ISS. The fourth part is to understand the formation and evolution of ice crystal regions (ICRs) in a quasi-Lagrangian view. Finally, to help estimate the hemispheric differences in ice nucleation, the ISS distribution and ICR evolution are compared between the two hemispheres

  11. Precipitation factors leading to arc cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The combined efforts of three graduate students and the principal investigator are presented. Satellite observations and interpretation have become increasingly important in the areas of weather research and operational forecasting. One reason is that geostationary satellite imagery is the only meteorological observing tool that can follow the evolution of clouds from the synoptic scale down to the cumulas scale. Therefore, it can depict atmospheric activity which is up to two orders of magnitude smaller than can be resolved by conventional meteorological observations. This unique ability of the satellite provides the meteorologist a mechanism to infer weather events down to the mesoscale. This evolution is the subject of this report.

  12. Connecting the density structure of molecular clouds and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2015-08-01

    In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated interstellar medium (ISM), star formation rates of entire galaxies are intricately linked to the density structure of the individual molecular clouds in the ISM. This density structure is essentially encapsulated in the probability distribution function of volume densities (rho-PDF), which directly affects the star formation rates predicted by analytic models. Contrasting its fundamental role, the rho-PDF function and its evolution have remained virtually unconstrained by observations. I describe in this contribution our recent progress in attaining observational constraints for the rho-PDFs of molecular clouds. Specifically, I review our first systematic determination of the rho-PDFs in Solar neighborhood molecular clouds. I will also present new evidence of the time evolution of the projected rho-PDFs, i.e., column density PDFs. These results together enable us to build the first observationally constrained link between the evolving density structure of molecular clouds and the star formation within. Finally, I discuss our work to expand the analysis into a Galactic context and to observationally connect the physical processes acting at the scale of molecular clouds with star formation at the scale of galaxies.

  13. Development of a Polar Stratospheric Cloud Model within the Community Earth System Model using constraints on Type I PSCs from the 2010-2011 Arctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunqian; Toon, Owen B.; Lambert, Alyn; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Brakebusch, Matthias; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; English, Jason M.

    2015-06-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are critical elements of Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion. We establish a PSC microphysics model using coupled chemistry, climate, and microphysics models driven by specific dynamics. We explore the microphysical formation and evolution of STS (Supercooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric Acid Trihydrate). Characteristics of STS particles dominated by thermodynamics compare well with observations. For example, the mass of STS is close to the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption when the particle surface area is >4 µm2/cm3. We derive a new nucleation rate equation for NAT based on observed denitrification in the 2010-2011 Arctic winter. The homogeneous nucleation scheme leads to supermicron NAT particles as observed. We also find that as the number density of NAT particles increases, the denitrification also increases. Simulations of the PSC lidar backscatter, denitrification, and gas phase species are generally within error bars of the observations. However, the simulations are very sensitive to temperature, which limits our ability to fully constrain some parameters (e.g., denitrification, ozone amount) based on observations.

  14. Simulations of Carbon Dioxide Cloud Formation at the Martian Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaprete, A.; Toon, O. B.

    1999-09-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) experiment flying onboard the Mars Global Surveyor has observed echoes from cloud tops above the north polar cap. Due to the location and time of year that these clouds are forming, it has been assumed that these clouds consist primarily of carbon dioxide ice particles. The structure of these echoes suggests that a number of these clouds may be the product of buoyancy or gravity waves (Zuber et al., 1998). While the presence of carbon dioxide clouds in the Martian atmosphere is generally accepted, how and where they form is still not understood and little is known about the physics of carbon dioxide particle formation. Recently, Glandorf et al. (personal communication) measured the critical saturation ratio required for carbon dioxide to nucleate onto ice. From this measurement, using nucleation theory, the contact parameter between ice and carbon dioxide under Martian conditions was determined. Using the nucleation rates measured by Glandorf et al. we have developed a 2D time dependent microphyical simulation of carbon dioxide clouds forming in the Mars polar regions. In this simulation we explore the mechanism of cloud initiation by orographic waves and compare our results to MOLA observations.

  15. Collapsing molecular clouds and their evolving star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the evidence suggesting that molecular clouds (MCs) may be in global, hierarchical gravitational collapse, and the regulation of their star formation rate (SFR) by stellar feedback. The evidence includes observations of multi-scale collapse in MCs, and numerical simulations of MC evolution, from their formation to the onset of gravitational collapse, then the onset of star formation, and, finally, the clouds' destruction by stellar feedback. In this scenario, the SFR evolves in time, increasing until the feedback begins to destroy the clouds, at which point it drops significantly, or stops altogether. This evolution of the SFR explains the observed form of the age histograms of embedded clusters, the evolutionary sequence observed for giant MCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and the locus of clouds in the SFR vs. mass diagram of Gao & Solomon. Finally, this scenario implies that the material that at one time conforms a low-mass star-forming MC such as Perseus, will constitute the massive-SF clumps embedded in a massive GMC, and that MCs constitute a regime of flow rather than well defined objects.

  16. A study of the effect of overshooting deep convection on the water content of the TTL and lower stratosphere from Cloud Resolving Model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Choularton, T. W.; Coe, H.; Held, G.

    2007-09-01

    Simulations of overshooting, tropical deep convection using a Cloud Resolving Model with bulk microphysics are presented in order to examine the effect on the water content of the TTL (Tropical Tropopause Layer) and lower stratosphere. This case study is a subproject of the HIBISCUS (Impact of tropical convection on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at global scale) campaign, which took place in Bauru, Brazil (22° S, 49° W), from the end of January to early March 2004. Comparisons between 2-D and 3-D simulations suggest that the use of 3-D dynamics is vital in order to capture the mixing between the overshoot and the stratospheric air, which caused evaporation of ice and resulted in an overall moistening of the lower stratosphere. In contrast, a dehydrating effect was predicted by the 2-D simulation due to the extra time, allowed by the lack of mixing, for the ice transported to the region to precipitate out of the overshoot air. Three different strengths of convection are simulated in 3-D by applying successively lower heating rates (used to initiate the convection) in the boundary layer. Moistening is produced in all cases, indicating that convective vigour is not a factor in whether moistening or dehydration is produced by clouds that penetrate the tropopause, since the weakest case only just did so. An estimate of the moistening effect of these clouds on an air parcel traversing a convective region is made based on the domain mean simulated moistening and the frequency of convective events observed by the IPMet (Instituto de Pesquisas Meteorológicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista) radar (S-band type at 2.8 Ghz) to have the same 10 dBZ echo top height as those simulated. These suggest a fairly significant mean moistening of 0.26, 0.13 and 0.05 ppmv in the strongest, medium and weakest cases, respectively, for heights between 16 and 17 km. Since the cold point and WMO (World Meteorological Organization) tropopause in this region lies at ~15.9 km

  17. STAR FORMATION LAWS: THE EFFECTS OF GAS CLOUD SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetti, D.; Liu, G.; Koda, J.

    2012-06-20

    Recent observational results indicate that the functional shape of the spatially resolved star formation-molecular gas density relation depends on the spatial scale considered. These results may indicate a fundamental role of sampling effects on scales that are typically only a few times larger than those of the largest molecular clouds. To investigate the impact of this effect, we construct simple models for the distribution of molecular clouds in a typical star-forming spiral galaxy and, assuming a power-law relation between star formation rate (SFR) and cloud mass, explore a range of input parameters. We confirm that the slope and the scatter of the simulated SFR-molecular gas surface density relation depend on the size of the sub-galactic region considered, due to stochastic sampling of the molecular cloud mass function, and the effect is larger for steeper relations between SFR and molecular gas. There is a general trend for all slope values to tend to {approx}unity for region sizes larger than 1-2 kpc, irrespective of the input SFR-cloud relation. The region size of 1-2 kpc corresponds to the area where the cloud mass function becomes fully sampled. We quantify the effects of selection biases in data tracing the SFR, either as thresholds (i.e., clouds smaller than a given mass value do not form stars) or as backgrounds (e.g., diffuse emission unrelated to current star formation is counted toward the SFR). Apparently discordant observational results are brought into agreement via this simple model, and the comparison of our simulations with data for a few galaxies supports a steep (>1) power-law index between SFR and molecular gas.

  18. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and direct N-body methods. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 10^4 to 10^6 M_sun, and a density between 17 and 1700 cm^-3. We continue the SPH simulations for a free-fall time scale, and analyze the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution is very clumpy with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100 to 10000 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyze the results of the N-body simulations at 2 Myr and 10 Myr. From dense massive molecular clouds, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of beta = -1.73 at 2 Myr and beta = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of < -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of M_g scales with 6.1 M_g^0.51 which also agrees with recent observation in M51. The molecular clouds which can form massive clusters are much denser than those typical in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20 km/s and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603

  19. Observations of cloud microphysics and ice formation during COPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Blyth, A. M.; Liu, Z.; Bower, K. N.; Crosier, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Flynn, M. J.; Bennett, L. J.; Huang, Y.; French, J.; Korolev, A.; Brown, P. R. A.

    2015-06-01

    Intense rainfall generated by convective clouds causes flash flooding in many parts of the world. Understanding the microphysical processes leading to the formation of precipitation is one of the main challenges to improving our capability to make quantitative precipitation forecasts. Here, we present microphysics observations of cumulus clouds measured over the Southwest Peninsula of the UK during the COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) in August 2013, which are framed into a wider context using ground-based and airborne radar measurements. Two lines of cumulus clouds formed in the early afternoon along convergence lines aligned with the peninsula. The lines became longer and broader during the afternoon as a result of new cell formation and stratiform regions forming downwind of the convective cells. Aircraft penetrations at -5 °C showed that all the required conditions of the Hallett-Mossop (H-M) ice multiplication process were met in developing regions, and ice concentrations up to 350 L-1 were measured in the mature stratiform regions, indicating that secondary ice production was active. Detailed sampling focused on an isolated liquid cloud that glaciated as it matured to merge with a band of cloud downwind. In the initial cell, a few drizzle drops were measured, some of which froze to form graupel; the ice images are most consistent with freezing drizzle, rather than smaller cloud drops forming the first ice. As new cells developed in and around the cloud, ice concentrations up to two orders of magnitude higher than the predicted ice nuclei concentrations began to be observed and the cloud glaciated over a period of 12-15 min. Ice splinters were captured by supercooled drizzle drops causing them to freeze to form instant-rimers. Graupel and columns were observed in cloud penetrations up to the -12 °C level, though many ice particles were mixed-habit due to riming and growth by vapour diffusion at multiple temperatures. Frozen drizzle

  20. Giant Molecular Cloud Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Van Loo, Sven; nakamura, fumitaka; Bruderer, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a potentially dominant mechanism for galactic star formation: triggering via collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We create detailed numerical simulations of this process, utilizing the Enzo code with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), including non-ideal effects, and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to explore how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments, clumps and stars. We implement photo-dissociation region (PDR) based density/temperature/extinction-dependent heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. We first carried out a parameter space study via a suite of 2D simulations, which track the fate of an initially stable clump embedded within one of the clouds. We have then extended these calculations to 3D, including introduction of initial turbulence into the clouds and magnetically-regulated sub-grid models for star formation. Different magnetic field strengths and orientations are considered, as is the role of cloud collisions at various velocities and impact parameters. We examine the effects of including ambipolar diffusion. Between isolated and colliding cases, the density and kinematic structure are visualized and characterized, in addition to magnetic field configuration. We discuss observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, focusing on 13CO(J=2-1), 13CO(J=3-2), and 12CO(J=8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra, which we synthesize from our simulation outputs. We find the ratio of J=8-7 to lower-J emission to be a powerful diagnostic probe of GMC collisions. We also analyze magnetic field orientation relative to filamentary structure, comparing to observations within the Galaxy. Finally, we examine the level of star formation activity that is induced by collisions and distinguishing kinematic properties of the stars that form by this mechanism.

  1. Open-cell cloud formation over the Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What atmospheric scientists refer to as open cell cloud formation is a regular occurrence on the back side of a low-pressure system or cyclone in the mid-latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, a low-pressure system will draw in surrounding air and spin it counterclockwise. That means that on the back side of the low-pressure center, cold air will be drawn in from the north, and on the front side, warm air will be drawn up from latitudes closer to the equator. This movement of an air mass is called advection, and when cold air advection occurs over warmer waters, open cell cloud formations often result. This MODIS image shows open cell cloud formation over the Atlantic Ocean off the southeast coast of the United States on February 19, 2002. This particular formation is the result of a low-pressure system sitting out in the North Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles east of Massachusetts. (The low can be seen as the comma-shaped figure in the GOES-8 Infrared image from February 19, 2002.) Cold air is being drawn down from the north on the western side of the low and the open cell cumulus clouds begin to form as the cold air passes over the warmer Caribbean waters. For another look at the scene, check out the MODIS Direct Broadcast Image from the University of Wisconsin. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. Electron cloud experiments at Fermilab: Formation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments at Fermilab to explore the electron cloud phenomenon. The Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased four-fold in the Project X upgrade, and would be subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. We present measurements of the cloud formation in the Main Injector and experiments with materials for the mitigation of the Cloud. An experimental installation of Titanium-Nitride (TiN) coated beam pipes has been under study in the Main Injector since 2009; this material was directly compared to an adjacent stainless chamber through electron cloud measurement with Retarding Field Analyzers (RFAs). Over the long period of running we were able to observe the secondary electron yield (SEY) change and correlate it with electron fluence, establishing a conditioning history. Additionally, the installation has allowed measurement of the electron energy spectrum, comparison of instrumentation techniques, and energydependent behavior of the electron cloud. Finally, a new installation, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, will allow direct SEY measurement of material samples irradiated in the accelerator.

  3. Formation and destruction of clouds and spurs in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Rahul; Ostriker, E. C.

    We investigate the formation of clouds and substructure in spiral galaxies using high resolution global MHD simulations, including gas self gravity. Previously, local modeling by Kim and Ostriker (2002) has shown that self gravity and magnetic fields cause the growth of high density clumps in the spiral arms rather rapidly; subsequently, these clumps result in the formation of sheared, feather like structures in the interarms, known as spurs. Recently, Shetty and Ostriker (2006) performed global simulations and found that gas self gravity can cause the growth of sheared features regardless of the strength of the external spiral potential. However, a sufficiently strong spiral potential is required to produce arm clouds, as well as spurs, which are the filamentary structures distinctly associated with the spiral arms, having near-perpendicular intersections with the main dust lane. Here, we use higher resolution modeling to study the detailed properties of the clouds and spurs. We analyze the resulting masses, angular momenta, and magnetic fields of the clouds, and their relation to the background dynamics. We also include a feedback mechanism, representing turbulent forcing via supernovae, to destroy the clouds. We thus assess the role of turbulence on the clump properties. Further, we also follow how subsequent spur morphology evolves under quasi-steady conditions. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant AST-0507315.

  4. Facet shapes and thermo-stabilities of H₂SO₄•HNO₃ hydrates involved in polar stratospheric clouds.

    PubMed

    Verdes, Marian; Paniagua, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    The nucleation, ice crystal shapes and thermodynamic stability of polar stratospheric clouds particles are interesting concerns owing to their implication in the ozone layer destruction. Some of these particles are formed by conformers of H2O, HNO3, and H2SO4. We carried out calculations using density functional theory (DFT) to obtain optimized structures. Several stable trimers are achieved -divided in two groups, one with HNO3 moiety, second with H2SO4 moiety- after pre-optimization at B3LYP/6-31G and subsequently optimization at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. For both most stable conformers five H2O molecules are added to their optimized trimers to calculate hydrated geometries. The OH stretching harmonic frequencies are provided for all aggregates. The zero-point energy correction (ZEPC), relative electronic energies (∆E), relative reaction Gibbs free energies ∆(∆G)k-relative, and cooling constant (K cooling ) are reported at three temperatures: 188 K, 195 K, and 210 K. Shapes given in our calculations are compared with various experimental shapes as well as comparisons with their thermo-stabilities. PMID:26287119

  5. Changes in the character of Polar stratospheric clouds over Antarctica in 1992 due to the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshler, T.; Johnson, B.J.; Rozier, W.R. )

    1994-02-15

    Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration were measured on 8 occasions from McMurdo Station, Antarctica (78[degrees]S), between late August and early October 1992. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed on 6 of these soundings. The characteristics of PSCs, and ozone, were quite different above and below about 16 km. Above 16 km PSCs were variable in time, with particles > 1.0 [mu]m radius contributing significantly to the surface area, generally < 8 [mu]m[sup 2] cm[sup [minus]3]. Below 16 km PSCs were much more stable and were dominated by high concentrations of smaller particles, < 1.0 [mu]m, with surface areas of 20-30 [mu]m[sup 2] cm[sup [minus]3]. This lower layer coincided with the altitude of the primary Pinatubo volcanic aerosol as measured in mid September and October, and with the 4 km region of the atmosphere where ozone was virtually completed destroyed over Antarctica in 1992. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Convective Formation of Pileus Cloud Near the Tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Liu, Chuntao; Barnett, Brian K.; Mace, Gerald G.; Baumgardner, Darrel G.; Webster, Christopher R.; Bui, T. Paul; Read, William G.; Minnis, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Pileus clouds form where humid, stably stratified air is mechanically displaced vertically ahead of rising convection. This paper describes convective formation of pileus cloud in the tropopause transition layer (TTL), and explores a possible link to the formation of long-lasting cirrus at cold temperatures. In-situ measurements from off the coast of Honduras during the July 2002 CRYSTALFACE experiment show an example of TTL cirrus associated with, and penetrated by, deep convection. The cirrus was enriched with total water compared to its surroundings, but composed of extremely small ice crystals with effective radii between 2 and 4 m. Through gravity wave analysis, and intercomparison of measured and simulated cloud microphysics, it is argued that the TTL cirrus in this case originated neither from convectively-forced gravity wave motions nor environmental mixing alone. Rather, it is hypothesized that some combination was involved in which, first, convection forced pileus cloud to form from TTL air; second, it punctured the pileus layer, contributing larger ice crystals through interfacial mixing; third, the addition of condensate inhibited evaporation of the original pileus ice crystals in the warm phase of the ensuing gravity wave; fourth, through successive pulses, deep convection formed the observed layer of TTL cirrus. While the general incidence and longevity of pileus cloud remains unknown, in-situ measurements, and satellite-based Microwave Limb Sounder retrievals, suggest that much of the tropical TTL is sufficiently humid to be susceptible to its formation. Where these clouds form and persist, there is potential for an irreversible repartition from water vapor to ice at cold temperatures.

  7. One-dimensional cloud fluid model for propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the propagation of star formation (SF) with a self-consistent deterministic model for the interstellar gas. The questions of under what conditions does star formation propagate in this model and what are the mechanisms of the propagation are explored. Here, researchers used the deterministic Oort-type cloud fluid model of Scalo and Struck-Marcell (1984, also see the review of Struck-Marcell, Scalo and Appleton 1987). This cloud fluid approach includes simple models for the effects of cloud collisional coalescence or disruption, collisional energy dissipation, and cloud disruption and acceleration as the result of young star winds, HII regions and supernovae. An extensive one-zone parameter study is presented in Struck-Marcell and Scalo (1987). To answer the questions above, researchers carried out one-dimensional calculations for an annulus within a galactic disk, like the so-called solar neighborhood of the galactic chemical evolution. In the calculations the left-hand boundary is set equal to the right hand boundary. The calculation is obviously idealized; however, it is computationally convenient to study the first order effects of propagating star formation. The annulus was treated as if it were at rest, i.e., in the local rotating frame. This assumption may remove some interesting effects of a supersonic gas flow, but was necessary to maintain a numerical stability in the annulus. The results on the one-dimensional propagation of SF in the Oort cloud fluid model follow: (1) SF is propagated by means of hydrodynamic waves, which can be generated by external forces or by the pressure generated by local bursts. SF is not effectively propagated via diffusion or variation in cloud interaction rates without corresponding density and velocity changes. (2) The propagation and long-range effects of SF depend on how close the gas density is to the critical threshold value, i.e., on the susceptibility of the medium.

  8. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  9. Formation of compact HII regions possibly triggered by cloud-cloud collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohama, Akio; Torii, Kazufumi; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Fukui, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Compact HII regions are ionized by young high-mass star(s) and ~1000 compact HII regions are cataloged in the Galaxy (Urquhart et al. MNRAS 443, 1555-1586 (2014)). Compact HII regions are one of the major populations of Galactic HII regions. The molecular environments around compact HII regions are however not well understood due to lack of extensive molecular surveys. In order to better understand formation of exciting stars and compact HII regions, we have carried out a systematic study of molecular clouds toward compact HII regions by using the 12CO datasets obtained with the JCMT and NANTEN2 telescopes for l = 10 - 56, and present here the first results.In one of the present samples, RCW166, we have discovered that the HII region is associated with two molecular clouds whose velocity separation is ~10 km s-1 the two clouds show complimentary spatial distributions, where one of the clouds have a cavity-like distribution apparently embracing the other. We present an interpretation that the two clouds collided with each other and the cavity-like distribution represents a hole created by the collision in the larger cloud as modeled by Habe and Ohta (1992). Similar molecular distributions are often found in the other compact HII regions in the present study.A recent study by Torii et al. (2015, arXiv:1503.00070) indicates that the Spitzer bubble RCW120 was formed by cloud-cloud collision where the inside of the cavity is fully ionized by the exiting stars. RCW166, on the other hand, shows that only a small part of the cavity, the compact HII region, is ionized. We thus suggest that RCW166 represents an evolutionary stage corresponding to an earlier phase of RCW120 in the collision scenario.

  10. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  11. Molecule formation in quasar broad-line cloud gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, T.; Lepp, S.; Giovannoni, P.

    1987-10-01

    Models for the broad-line emitting clouds of quasars typically assume that the clouds have column densities of at most 10 to the 23rd/sq cm. The consequences of relaxing this assumption are examined, and it is shown that: (1) at slightly larger column densities the gas may cool to about 1000 K as a result of molecule formation; (2) in much of the molecule-forming region the temperature may have either of two values, about 1000 K or 6000-8000 K; (3) the strengths of most observable optical lines, including C II semiforbidden 2326-A lines and Fe II lines, are unaffected by such large column densities; and (4) lines from low-ionization species such as Na I are readily formed at large column densities. Observations of such lines provide evidence for large cloud column densities. 47 references.

  12. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, Christopher R.; Davies, James F.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation.

  13. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ruehl, Christopher R; Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-03-25

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation. PMID:27013731

  14. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wong, T.; Hughes, A.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  15. Observations of cloud microphysics and ice formation during COPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Blyth, A. M.; Liu, Z.; Bower, K. N.; Crosier, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Flynn, M. J.; Bennett, L. J.; Huang, Y.; French, J.; Korolev, A.; Brown, P. R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present microphysical observations of cumulus clouds measured over the southwest peninsula of the UK during the COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) in August 2013, which are framed into a wider context using ground-based and airborne radar measurements. Two lines of cumulus clouds formed in the early afternoon along convergence lines aligned with the peninsula. The lines became longer and broader during the afternoon due to new cell formation and stratiform regions forming downwind of the convective cells. Ice concentrations up to 350 L-1, well in excess of the expected ice nuclei (IN) concentrations, were measured in the mature stratiform regions, suggesting that secondary ice production was active. Detailed sampling focused on an isolated liquid cloud that glaciated as it matured to merge with a band of cloud downwind. In the initial cell, drizzle concentrations increased from ˜ 0.5 to ˜ 20 L-1 in around 20 min. Ice concentrations developed up to a few per litre, which is around the level expected of primary IN. The ice images were most consistent with freezing drizzle, rather than smaller cloud drops or interstitial IN forming the first ice. As new cells emerged in and around the cloud, ice concentrations up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than the predicted IN concentrations developed, and the cloud glaciated over a period of 12-15 min. Almost all of the first ice particles to be observed were frozen drops, while vapour-grown ice crystals were dominant in the latter stages. Our observations are consistent with the production of large numbers of small secondary ice crystals/fragments, by a mechanism such as Hallett-Mossop or droplets shattering upon freezing. Some of the small ice froze drizzle drops on contact, while others grew more slowly by vapour deposition. Graupel and columns were seen in cloud penetrations up to the -12 °C level, though many ice particles were mixed habit due to riming and growth by vapour deposition at multiple temperatures

  16. Optically thin ice clouds in Arctic; Formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, Caroline; Pelon, Jacques; Girard, Eric; Blanchet, Jean-Pierre; Wobrock, Wolfram; Gayet, Jean-Franćois; Schwarzenböck, Alfons; Gultepe, Ismail; Delanoë, Julien; Mioche, Guillaume

    2010-05-01

    Arctic ice cloud formation during winter is poorly understood mainly due to lack of observations and the remoteness of this region. Yet, their influence on Northern Hemisphere weather and climate is of paramount importance, and the modification of their properties, linked to aerosol-cloud interaction processes, needs to be better understood. Large concentration of aerosols in the Arctic during winter is associated to long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Observations show that sulphuric acid coats most of these aerosols. Laboratory and in-situ measurements show that at cold temperature (< -30°C), acidic coating lowers the freezing point and deactivates ice nuclei (IN). Therefore, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions and there is less competition for the same available moisture. As a result, large ice crystals form in relatively small concentrations. It is hypothesized that the observed low concentration of large ice crystals in thin ice clouds is linked to the acidification of aerosols. To check this, it is necessary to analyse cloud properties in the Arctic. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing (CloudSat and CALIPSO) reveal the existence of two types of extended optically thin ice clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. The first type (TIC-1) is seen only by the lidar, but not the radar, and is found in pristine environment whereas the second type (TIC-2) is detected by both sensors, and is associated with high concentration of aerosols, possibly anthropogenic. TIC-2 is characterized by a low concentration of ice crystals that are large enough to precipitate. To further investigate the interactions between TICs clouds and aerosols, in-situ, airborne and satellite measurements of specific cases observed during the POLARCAT and ISDAC field experiments are analyzed. These two field campaigns took place respectively over the North Slope of

  17. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery. Appendix L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4 - 0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  18. Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, Daniel J; Froyd, Karl D; Hoose, Corinna; Jensen, Eric J; Diao, Minghui; Zondlo, Mark A; Smith, Jessica B; Twohy, Cynthia H; Murphy, Daniel M

    2013-06-14

    Formation of cirrus clouds depends on the availability of ice nuclei to begin condensation of atmospheric water vapor. Although it is known that only a small fraction of atmospheric aerosols are efficient ice nuclei, the critical ingredients that make those aerosols so effective have not been established. We have determined in situ the composition of the residual particles within cirrus crystals after the ice was sublimated. Our results demonstrate that mineral dust and metallic particles are the dominant source of residual particles, whereas sulfate and organic particles are underrepresented, and elemental carbon and biological materials are essentially absent. Further, composition analysis combined with relative humidity measurements suggests that heterogeneous freezing was the dominant formation mechanism of these clouds. PMID:23661645

  19. How chemistry influences cloud structure, star formation, and the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocuk, S.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the earliest phases of star-forming clouds, stable molecular species, such as CO, are important coolants in the gas phase. Depletion of these molecules on dust surfaces affects the thermal balance of molecular clouds and with that their whole evolution. For the first time, we study the effect of grain surface chemistry (GSC) on star formation and its impact on the initial mass function (IMF). We follow a contracting translucent cloud in which we treat the gas-grain chemical interplay in detail, including the process of freeze-out. We perform 3D hydrodynamical simulations under three different conditions, a pure gas-phase model, a freeze-out model, and a complete chemistry model. The models display different thermal evolution during cloud collapse as also indicated in Hocuk, Cazaux & Spaans, but to a lesser degree because of a different dust temperature treatment, which is more accurate for cloud cores. The equation of state (EOS) of the gas becomes softer with CO freeze-out and the results show that at the onset of star formation, the cloud retains its evolution history such that the number of formed stars differ (by 7 per cent) between the three models. While the stellar mass distribution results in a different IMF when we consider pure freeze-out, with the complete treatment of the GSC, the divergence from a pure gas-phase model is minimal. We find that the impact of freeze-out is balanced by the non-thermal processes; chemical and photodesorption. We also find an average filament width of 0.12 pc (±0.03 pc), and speculate that this may be a result from the changes in the EOS caused by the gas-dust thermal coupling. We conclude that GSC plays a big role in the chemical composition of molecular clouds and that surface processes are needed to accurately interpret observations, however, that GSC does not have a significant impact as far as star formation and the IMF is concerned.

  20. Real refractive indices of infrared-characterized nitric-acid/ice films: Implications for optical measurements of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Berland, Brian S.; George, Steven M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared spectra of nitric-acid/ice films representative of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were collected with simultaneous optical interference measurements to determine the real refractive indices at lambda = 632 nm. Ice and amphorous nitric-acid/ice films were prepared by condensation of water and nitric acid vapors onto a wedged Al2O3 substrate. The real refractive indices of these films were determined from the optical interference of a reflected helium-neon laser during film growth. The indices of the amphorous films varied smoothly from n = 1.30 for ice to n = 1.49 for nitric acid, similar to observations in previous work. We were unable to obtain the refractive index of crystlline films during adsorption because of optical scattering caused by surface roughness. Therefore crystlline nitric acid hydrate films were prepared by annealing amphorous nitric-acid/ice films. Further heating caused desorption of the crystalline hydrate films. During desorption, the refractive indices for ice, NAM (nitric acid monohydrate), alpha- and beta-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) films were measured using the optical interference technique. In agreement with earlier data, the real refractive indices for ice and NAM determined in desorption were n = 1.30 +/- 0.01 and n = 1.53 +/- 0.03, respectively. The real refractive indices for alpha- and beta-NAT were found to be n = 1.51 +/- 0.01 and n greater than or equal to 1.46, respectively. Our measurements also suggest that the shape of crystalline nitric acid particles may depend on whether they nucleate from the liquid or by vapor deposition. If confirmed by future studies, this observation may provide a means of distinguishing the nucleation mechanism of crystalline PSCs.

  1. Assessing lidar-based classification schemes for polar stratospheric clouds based on 16 years of measurements at Esrange, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Tesche, M.

    2014-02-01

    Lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are commonly analyzed in classification schemes that apply the backscatter ratio and the particle depolarization ratio. This similarity of input data suggests comparable results of different classification schemes—despite measurements being performed with a variety of mostly custom-made instruments. Based on a time series of 16 years of lidar measurements at Esrange (68°N, 21°E), Sweden, we show that PSC classification differs substantially depending on the applied scheme. The discrepancies result from varying threshold values of lidar-derived parameters used to define certain PSC types. The resulting inconsistencies could impact the understanding of long-term PSC observations documented in the literature. We identify two out of seven considered classification schemes that are most likely to give reliable results and should be used in future lidar-based studies. Using polarized backscatter ratios gives the advantage of increased contrast for observations of weakly backscattering and weakly depolarizing particles. Improved confidence in PSC classification can be achieved by a more comprehensive consideration of the effect of measurement uncertainties. The particle depolarization ratio is the key to a reliable identification of different PSC types. Hence, detailed information on the calibration of the polarization-sensitive measurement channels should be provided to assess the findings of a study. Presently, most PSC measurements with lidar are performed at 532 nm only. The information from additional polarization-sensitive measurements in the near infrared could lead to an improved PSC classification. Coincident lidar-based temperature measurements at PSC level might provide useful information for an assessment of PSC classification.

  2. Star Formation Studies in the Magellanic Clouds with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Margaret; Jones, Olivia; Nayak, Omnarayani; Ochsendorf, Bram

    2016-01-01

    The photometric and spectroscopic Spitzer Surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC): Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) resulted in the discovery of thousands of massive young stellar objects. The JWST instruments will have an angular resolution at least 10 times better than Spitzer with hundreds or more times better sensitivity. This new capability in the 0.6 to 28 micron range will allow detailed studies of star formation regions at sub-solar metallicity in the LMC (~0.5 Z_sun) and SMC (~0.2 Z_sun) at the 0.05 pc scale size which is comparable to Galactic studies. In this presentation, we summarize highlights and open issues from the SAGE surveys and discuss some potential JWST observing programs that focus on the study of star formation at low metallicity in the Magellanic Clouds. Does the interstellar medium gas density threshold for star formation change at low metallicity? Is the dust content and ice composition of young stellar objects modified by the lower metallicity and high radiation fields found in the Magellanic Clouds? Do low metallicity solar mass pre-main sequence stars have sufficient circumstellar dust to form planets? The best regions for JWST followup will have been investigated with ALMA, HST and ground based high angular resolution telescopes. Examples of such regions include 30 Doradus, NGC 602, N159, and NGC 346.

  3. What flow conditions are conducive to banner cloud formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Volkmar; Prestel, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Banner clouds are clouds that are attached to the leeward slope of a steep mountain. Their formation is essentially due to strong Lagrangian uplift of air in the lee of the mountain. However, little is known about the flow regime in which banner clouds can be expected to occur. The present study addresses this question through numerical simulations of flow past an idealized mountain. Systematic sets of simulations are carried out exploring the parameter space spanned by two dimensionless numbers, which represent the aspect ratio of the mountain and the stratification of the flow. The simulations include both two-dimensional flow past a two-dimensional mountain and three-dimensional flow past a three-dimensional mountain. Regarding boundary layer separation, both the two- and the three-dimensional simulations show the characteristic regime behavior which has previously been found in laboratory experiments for two-dimensional flow. Boundary layer separation is observed in two of the three regimes, namely in the "leeside separation regime", which occurs preferably for steep mountains in weakly stratified flow, and in the "post-wave separation regime", which requires increased stratification. The physical mechanism for the former is boundary layer friction, while the latter may also occur for inviscid flow. However, boundary layer separation is only a necessary, not sufficient condition for banner cloud formation. Diagnosing the vertical uplift and its leeward-windward asymmetry it turns out that banner clouds cannot form in the two-dimensional simulations. In addition, even in the three-dimensional simulations they can only be expected in a small part of the parameter space corresponding to steep mountains in weakly stratified flow.

  4. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2015-09-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed cs in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with a Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for Pext. Our results correspond to Mcore=1.2cs4 (G3ρ0v02)-1/2 and Rcore=0.34 cs2 (Gρ0v02)-1/2 for ρ0 and v0 the large-scale mean density and velocity. For our parameter range, the median Mcore 0.1-1M⊙, but a very high pressure cloud could have lower characteristic core mass. We find cores and filaments form simultaneously, and filament column densities are a factor of 2 greater than the surrounding cloud when cores first collapse. We also show that cores identified in our simulations have physical properties comparable to those observed in the Perseus cloud. Superthermal cores in our models are generally also magnetically supercritical, suggesting that the same may be true in observed clouds.

  5. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld (that part of the stratosphere with potential temperatures lower than the tropical tropopause) is important for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. The relationship between ozone and CO from aircraft measurements taken during the early, middle and late part of the winter of 1999-2000 show that recent mixing with tropospheric air extends up to ozone values of about 350-450 ppbv. Above that level, the relationship suggests stratospheric air with minimal tropospheric influence. The transition is quite abrupt, particularly in early spring. Trajectory analyses are consistent with these relationships, with a significant drop-off in the percentage of trajectories with tropospheric PV values in their 10-day history as in-situ ozone increases above 400 ppbv. The water distribution is affected by these mixing characteristics, and by cloud formation. Significant cloud formation along trajectories occurs up to ozone values of about 400 ppbv during the early spring, with small, but nonzero probabilities extending to 550 ppbv. Cloud formation in the stratospheric middleworld is minimal during early and midwinter. Also important is the fact that, during early spring 30% of the trajectories near the tropopause (ozone values less than 200 ppbv) have minimum saturation mixing ratios less than 5 ppmv. Such parcels can mix out into the troposphere and could lead to very dry conditions in

  6. Freezing Drizzle Formation in Stably Stratified Layer Clouds: The Role of Radiative Cooling of Cloud Droplets, Cloud Condensation Nuclei, and Ice Initiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Roy M.; Geresdi, István; Thompson, Greg; Manning, Kevin; Karplus, Eli

    2002-02-01

    This study evaluates the role of 1) low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) conditions and 2) preferred radiative cooling of large cloud drops as compared to small cloud drops, on cloud droplet spectral broadening and subsequent freezing drizzle formation in stably stratified layer clouds. In addition, the sensitivity of freezing drizzle formation to ice initiation is evaluated. The evaluation is performed by simulating cloud formation over a two-dimensional idealized mountain using a detailed microphysical scheme implemented into the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model version 5. The height and width of the two-dimensional mountain were designed to produce an updraft pattern with extent and magnitude similar to documented freezing drizzle cases. The results of the model simulations were compared to observations and good agreement was found.The key results of this study are 1) low CCN concentrations lead to rapid formation of freezing drizzle. This occurs due to the broad cloud droplet size distribution formed throughout the cloud in this situation, allowing for rapid broadening of the spectra to the point at which the collision-coalescence process is initiated. 2) Continental clouds can produce freezing drizzle given sufficient depth and time. 3) Radiative cooling of the cloud droplets near cloud top can be effective in broadening an initially continental droplet spectrum toward that of a maritime cloud droplet size distribution. 4) Any mechanism that only broadens the cloud droplet spectra near cloud top, such as radiative cooling, may not act over a sufficiently broad volume of the cloud to produce significant amounts of freezing drizzle. 5) Low ice-crystal concentrations (<0.08 L1) in the region of freezing drizzle formation is a necessary condition for drizzle formation (from both model and observations). 6) Ice nuclei depletion is a necessary requirement for the formation of freezing drizzle. 7) The maximum cloud

  7. Using new airborne instruments to observe precipitation formation in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stith, Jeffrey; Bansemer, Aaron; Beals, Matthew; Fugal, Jacob; Heymsfield, Andy; Rogers, David; Shaw, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    We describe recent progress in using two relatively new instruments for studying precipitation formation in clouds. Holodec II is an airborne in-line holographic camera, which allows about three holograms per second to be captured. Recent developments in automated holographic reconstruction of particle size and concentrations has allowed for direct comparisons between holographic imagery and traditional techniques for measuring hydrometeor size distributions, such as 2-D diode occultation. The main advantages of the holographic technique are: (a) the ability to resolve small hydrometeors (a few microns in size) as well as larger (mm-sized) ones, (b) a relatively large sample volume at the points where the holograms are taken (which is a critical issue for identifying precipitation formation), (c) identifying the position of particles in a three dimensional volume. The 3D distribution allows for flagging of particle shattering events when hydrometeors strike the tips of the instrument. The main disadvantages of the Holodec II are the data gaps between holograms and the large amount of computing resources needed to perform the reconstructions. Current development efforts include quantifying contamination from noise at the lower size limit and determining edge effects. The second instrument, SID II-H, a small ice detector, uses light scattering patterns to distinguish between water and ice. As with Holodec II, SID II-H measures both small ice and water droplets. SID II-H limitations are its small sample volume and in some cases contamination caused by splashing and shattering of large particles in precipitating clouds. SID II-H and Holodec II, due to the different ways they sample clouds, present a much different viewpoint for studying precipitation formation. We illustrate these differences by comparing data from both instruments during flight through mixed phase clouds.

  8. Dependence of debris cloud formation on projectile shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, C. H.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Boslough, M. B.; Piekutowski, A. J.; Poormon, K. L.; Mullin, S. A.; Littlefield, D. L.

    1994-07-01

    A two-stage lights-gas gun has been used to impact thin zinc bumpers by zinc projectiles over the velocity range of 2.4 km/s to 6.7 km/s to determine the propagation characteristics of the impact generated debris. Constant-mass projectiles in the form of spheres, discs, cylinders, and rods were used in these studies. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact and the dynamic formation of the resulting rupture in an aluminum backing plate resulting from the loading of the debris cloud. The characteristics of the debris cloud generated upon impact is found to depend on the projectile shape. The data indicate that the debris front velocity is independent of the shape of the projectile, whereas the debris lateral/radial velocity is strongly dependent on projectile geometry. Spherical impactors generate the most radially dispersed debris cloud while the normal plate impactors result in column-like debris. It has been observed that the debris generated by the impact of thin plates on a thin bumper shield is considerably more damaging to a backwall than the debris generated by an equivalent-mass sphere.

  9. Dependence of debris cloud formation on projectile shape

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, C.H.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Piekutowski, A.J.; Poormon, K.L.; Mullin, S.A.; Littlefield, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    A two-stage light-gas gun has been used to impact thin zinc bumpers by zinc projectiles over the velocity range of 2.4 km/s to 6.7 km/s to determine the propagation characteristics of the impact generated debris. Constant-mass projectiles in the form of spheres, discs, cylinders and rods were used in these studies. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact and the dynamic formation of the resulting rupture in an aluminum backing plate resulting from the loading of the debris cloud. The characteristics of the debris cloud generated upon impact is found to depend on the projectile shape. The data indicate that the debris front velocity is independent of the shape of the projectile, whereas the debris lateral/radial velocity is strongly dependent on projectile geometry. Spherical impactors generate the most radially dispersed debris cloud while the normal plate impactors result in column-like debris. It has been observed that the debris generated by the impact of thin plates on a thin bumper shield is considerably more damaging to a backwall than the debris generated by an equivalent-mass sphere.

  10. Weather from the Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Thompson, David W. J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.; Norton, Warwick A.; Gillett, Nathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Is the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km, important for predicting changes in weather and climate? The traditional view is that the stratosphere is a passive recipient of energy and waves from weather systems in the underlying troposphere, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. At a workshop in Whistler, British Columbia (1), scientists met to discuss how the stratosphere responds to forcing from below, initiating feedback processes that in turn alter weather patterns in the troposphere. The lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, is highly dynamic and rich in water vapor, clouds, and weather. The stratosphere above it is less dense and less turbulent (see the figure). Variability in the stratosphere is dominated by hemispheric-scale changes in airflow on time scales of a week to several months. Occasionally, however, stratospheric air flow changes dramatically within just a day or two, with large-scale jumps in temperature of 20 K or more. The troposphere influences the stratosphere mainly through atmospheric waves that propagate upward. Recent evidence shows that the stratosphere organizes this chaotic wave forcing from below to create long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation. These stratospheric changes can feed back to affect weather and climate in the troposphere.

  11. H2 distribution during the formation of multiphase molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gérin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Context. H2 is the simplest and the most abundant molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM), and its formation precedes the formation of other molecules. Aims: Understanding the dynamical influence of the environment and the interplay between the thermal processes related to the formation and destruction of H2 and the structure of the cloud is mandatory to understand correctly the observations of H2. Methods: We performed high-resolution magnetohydrodynamical colliding-flow simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES in which the physics of H2 has been included. We compared the simulation results with various observations of the H2 molecule, including the column densities of excited rotational levels. Results: As a result of a combination of thermal pressure, ram pressure, and gravity, the clouds produced at the converging point of HI streams are highly inhomogeneous. H2 molecules quickly form in relatively dense clumps and spread into the diffuse interclump gas. This in particular leads to the existence of significant abundances of H2 in the diffuse and warm gas that lies in between clumps. Simulations and observations show similar trends, especially for the HI-to-H2 transition (H2 fraction vs. total hydrogen column density). Moreover, the abundances of excited rotational levels, calculated at equilibrium in the simulations, turn out to be very similar to the observed abundances inferred from FUSE results. This is a direct consequence of the presence of the H2 enriched diffuse and warm gas. Conclusions: Our simulations, which self-consistently form molecular clouds out of the diffuse atomic gas, show that H2 rapidly forms in the dense clumps and, due to the complex structure of molecular clouds, quickly spreads at lower densities. Consequently, a significant fraction of warm H2 exists in the low-density gas. This warm H2 leads to column densities of excited rotational levels close to the observed ones and probably reveals the complex intermix between

  12. Optically thin ice clouds in Arctic : Formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, C.; Girard, E.; Pelon, J.; Blanchet, J.; Wobrock, W.; Gultepe, I.; Gayet, J.; Delanoë, J.; Mioche, G.; Adam de Villiers, R.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic ice cloud formation during winter is poorly understood mainly due to lack of observations and the remoteness of this region. Their influence on Northern Hemisphere weather and climate is of paramount importance, and the modification of their properties, linked to aerosol-cloud interaction processes, needs to be better understood. Large concentration of aerosols in the Arctic during winter is associated to long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Observations show that sulphuric acid coats most of these aerosols. Laboratory and in-situ measurements show that at cold temperature (<-30°C), acidic coating lowers the freezing point and deactivates ice nuclei (IN). Therefore, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions and there is less competition for the same available moisture. As a result, large ice crystals form in relatively small concentrations. It is hypothesized that the observed low concentration of large ice crystals in thin ice clouds is linked to the acidification of aerosols. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing (CloudSat and CALIPSO) reveal the existence of two types of extended optically thin ice clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. The first type (TIC-1) is seen only by the lidar, but not the radar, and is found in pristine environment whereas the second type (TIC-2) is detected by both sensors, and is associated with high concentration of aerosols, possibly anthropogenic. TIC-2 is characterized by a low concentration of ice crystals that are large enough to precipitate. To further investigate the interactions between TICs clouds and aerosols, in-situ, airborne and satellite measurements of specific cases observed during the POLARCAT and ISDAC field experiments are analyzed. These two field campaigns took place respectively over the North Slope of Alaska and Northern part of Sweden in April 2008. Analysis of cloud type can be

  13. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII - Inner core formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta.

  14. Sulfuric Acid droplet formation and growth in the stratosphere after the 1982 eruption of el chichon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, D J; Rosen, J M

    1983-10-21

    The eruption of El Chichón Volcano in March and April 1982 resulted in the nucleation of large numbers of new sulfuric acid droplets and an increase by nearly an order of magnitude in the size of the preexisting particles in the stratosphere. Nearly 10(7) metric tons of sulfuric acid remained in the stratosphere by the end of 1982, about 40 times as much as was deposited by Mount St. Helens in 1980. PMID:17734833

  15. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  16. Star formation in a diffuse high-altitude cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Röhser, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. A recent discovery of two stellar clusters associated with the diffuse high-latitude cloud HRK 81.4-77.8 has important implications for star formation in the Galactic halo. Aims: We derive a plausible distance estimate to HRK 81.4-77.8 primarily from its gaseous properties. Methods: We spatially correlate state-of-the-art HI, far-infrared and soft X-ray data to analyze the diffuse gas in the cloud. The absorption of the soft X-ray emission from the Galactic halo by HRK 81.4-77.8 is used to constrain the distance to the cloud. Results: HRK 81.4-77.8 is most likely located at an altitude of about 400 pc within the disk-halo interface of the Milky Way Galaxy. The HI data discloses a disbalance in density and pressure between the warm and cold gaseous phases. Apparently, the cold gas is compressed by the warm medium. This disbalance might trigger the formation of molecular gas high above the Galactic plane on pc to sub-pc scales.

  17. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  18. Star formation in the M17 SW giant molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    1982-01-01

    The first high-sensitivity, high-resolution far-IR survey of an entire molecular cloud complex is presented. The 20 km/s M17 SW complex, in addition to the three luminous M17 sources, contains 10 sources spread over 110 pc. The 10 lower luminosity sources divide into two groups: small blister sources powered by late O stars and compact sources powered by clusters of early B stars. No compact far-IR sources with luminosities between the detection limit and 10,000 solar luminosities were detected. Three possible formation mechanisms for the stars that power the far-IR sources in the M17 SW complex are examined. Sequential formation cannot explain the sources seen throughout the complex. Some type of stochastic formation mechanism or collapse induced by a spiral density wave could explain the observations.

  19. Molecular cloud-scale star formation in NGC 300

    SciTech Connect

    Faesi, Christopher M.; Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Menten, Karl M.; Bouy, Hervé

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a galaxy-wide study of molecular gas and star formation in a sample of 76 H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300. We have measured the molecular gas at 250 pc scales using pointed CO(J = 2-1) observations with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We detect CO in 42 of our targets, deriving molecular gas masses ranging from our sensitivity limit of ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} to 7 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. We find a clear decline in the CO detection rate with galactocentric distance, which we attribute primarily to the decreasing radial metallicity gradient in NGC 300. We combine Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet, Spitzer 24 μm, and Hα narrowband imaging to measure the star formation activity in our sample. We have developed a new direct modeling approach for computing star formation rates (SFRs) that utilizes these data and population synthesis models to derive the masses and ages of the young stellar clusters associated with each of our H II region targets. We find a characteristic gas depletion time of 230 Myr at 250 pc scales in NGC 300, more similar to the results obtained for Milky Way giant molecular clouds than the longer (>2 Gyr) global depletion times derived for entire galaxies and kiloparsec-sized regions within them. This difference is partially due to the fact that our study accounts for only the gas and stars within the youngest star-forming regions. We also note a large scatter in the NGC 300 SFR-molecular gas mass scaling relation that is furthermore consistent with the Milky Way cloud results. This scatter likely represents real differences in giant molecular cloud physical properties such as the dense gas fraction.

  20. Large scale and cloud scale dynamics and microphysics in the formation and evolution of a TTL cirrus : a case modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Plougonven, Riwal; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) control dehydration of air masses entering the stratosphere and strongly contribute to the local radiative heating. In this study, we aim at understanding, through a real case simulation, the dynamics controlling the formation and life cycle of a cirrus cloud event in the TTL. We also aim at quantifying the chemical and radiative impacts of the clouds. To do this, we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to simulate a large scale TTL cirrus event happening in January 2009 (27-29) over the Eastern Pacific, which has been extensively described through satellite observations (Taylor et al., 2011). Comparison of simulated and observed high clouds shows a fair agreement, and validates the reference simulation regarding cloud extension, location and life time. The simulation and Lagrangian trajectories within the simulation are then used to characterize the evolution of the cloud : displacement, Lagrangian life time and links with dynamics. The efficiency of dehydration by such clouds is also examined. Sensitivity tests were performed to evaluate the importance of different microphysics schemes and initial and boundary conditions to accurately simulate the cirrus. As expected, both were found to have strong impacts. In particular, there were substantial differences between simulations using different initial and boundary conditions from atmospheric analyses (NCEP CFSR and ECMWF). This illustrates the primordial role of accurate vapour and dynamics for realistic cirrus modelling, on top of the need for appropriate microphysics. Last, we examined the effects of cloud radiative heating. Long wave radiative heating in cirrus clouds has been invoked to induce a cloud scale circulation that would lengthen the cloud lifetime, and increase the size of its dehydration area (Dinh et al. 2010). To try to diagnose this, we have carried out simulations using different radiative schemes, including or suppressing the

  1. The Two Molecular Clouds in RCW 38: Evidence for the Formation of the Youngest Super Star Cluster in the Milky Way Triggered by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Ohama, A.; Hasegawa, K.; Hattori, Y.; Sano, H.; Ohashi, S.; Fujii, K.; Kuwahara, S.; Mizuno, N.; Dawson, J. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K.; Okuda, T.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.

    2016-03-01

    We present distributions of two molecular clouds having velocities of 2 and 14 km s-1 toward RCW 38, the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, in the 12CO J = 1-0 and 3-2 and 13CO J = 1-0 transitions. The two clouds are likely physically associated with the cluster as verified by the high intensity ratio of the J = 3-2 emission to the J = 1-0 emission, the bridging feature connecting the two clouds in velocity, and their morphological correspondence with the infrared dust emission. The velocity difference is too large for the clouds to be gravitationally bound. We frame a hypothesis that the two clouds are colliding with each other by chance to trigger formation of the ˜20 O stars that are localized within ˜0.5 pc of the cluster center in the 2 km s-1 cloud. We suggest that the collision is currently continuing toward part of the 2 km s-1 cloud where the bridging feature is localized. This is the third super star cluster alongside Westerlund 2 and NGC 3603 where cloud-cloud collision has triggered the cluster formation. RCW 38 is the youngest super star cluster in the Milky Way, holding a possible sign of on-going O star formation, and is a promising site where we may be able to witness the moment of O star formation.

  2. Turbulence-induced disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Klessen, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    We present collapse simulations of strongly magnetized, turbulent molecular cloud cores with masses ranging from 2.6 to 1000 M⊙ in order to study the influence of the initial conditions on the turbulence-induced disc formation mechanism proposed recently by Seifried et al. We find that Keplerian discs are formed in all cases independently of the core mass, the strength of turbulence or the presence of global rotation. The discs appear within a few kyr after the formation of the protostar, are 50-150 au in size, and have masses between 0.05 and a few 0.1 M⊙. During the formation of the discs the mass-to-flux ratio stays well below the critical value of 10 for Keplerian disc formation. Hence, flux-loss alone cannot explain the formation of Keplerian discs. The formation of rotationally supported discs at such early phases is rather due to the disordered magnetic field structure and due to turbulent motions in the surroundings of the discs, two effects lowering the classical magnetic braking efficiency. Binary systems occurring in the discs are mainly formed via the disc capturing mechanism rather than via disc fragmentation, which is largely suppressed by the presence of magnetic fields.

  3. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  4. Fragmentation of Molecular Clouds and Binary Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    Using three-dimensional MHD nested-grid simulations we study the binary star formation process paying particular attention to the fragmentation of a rotating magnetized molecular cloud. We assume an isothermal rotating and magnetized cylindrical cloud in hydrostatic balance. Non-axisymmetric as well as axisymmetric perturbations are added to the initial state and the subsequent evolutions are studied. The evolution is characterized by three parameters: the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbations the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. As a result it is found that non-axisymmetry hardly evolves in the early phase but begins to grow after the gas contracts and forms a thin disk. Disk formation is strongly promoted by the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. There are two types of fragmentation: fragmentation from a ring and that from a bar. Thin adiabatic cores fragments if a thickness is smaller than 1/4 of the radius. For the fragments to survive they should be formed in a heavily elongated barred core or a flat round disk. In the models showing fragmentation outflows from respective fragments are found as well as those driven by the rotating bar or the disk

  5. Observational and simulated cloud microphysical features of rain formation in the mixed phase clouds observed during CAIPEEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patade, Sachin; Shete, Sonali; Malap, Neelam; Kulkarni, Gayatri; Prabha, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical observations of rain formation in mixed phase monsoon clouds (from 10 to - 9 °C) using instrumented aircraft during Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) are presented. The drop size and particle size distributions are broader in the mixed phase region, indicating efficient growth of liquid as well as ice phase. Aircraft observations noticed higher ice particle concentrations in Hallet-Mossop zone (- 3 to - 8 °C) with existence of smaller and larger cloud droplets, rimed needles columns, and graupel particles. Observations strongly suggested the active presence of Hallet-Mossop (1974) process in this cloud. The higher correlations found between slope and intercept parameters of exponential size distributions can be attributed to the efficient secondary ice production as well as to the aggregation growth of ice particles. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of these clouds are compared with observed cloud microphysical properties, also illustrated the important role of Hallet-Mossop (HM) process and its link with warm rain and graupel formation. The raindrop freezing plays a crucial role in graupel formation in early stage of ice development. The observed mean values of microphysical parameters including liquid water content, ice water content, ice number concentrations, and reflectivity showed good agreement with model simulations. Primary ice nuclei have only a minor role in the total ice mass in these clouds.

  6. SAGE II observations of a previously unreported stratospheric volcanic aerosol cloud in the northern polar summer of 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Veiga, Robert E.; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of aerosol extinction profiles obtained by the spaceborne SAGE II sensor reveals that there was an anomalous increase of aerosol extinction below 18.5 km at latitudes poleward of 50 deg N from July 28 to September 9, 1990. This widespread increase of aerosol extinction in the lower stratosphere was apparently due to a remote high-latitude volcanic eruption that has not been reported to date. The increase in stratospheric optical depth in the northern polar region was about 50% in August and had diminished by October 1990. This eruption caused an increase in stratospheric aerosol mass of about 0.33 x 10(exp 5) tons, assuming the aerosol was composed of sulfuric acid and water.

  7. Comparisons of cirrus cloud formation and evolution lifetime between five field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Zondlo, M. A.; DiGangi, J. P.; O'Brien, A.; Heymsfield, A.; Rogers, D. C.; Beaton, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, it is important to understand the formation and evolution of the environments where ice crystals form and reside on the microscale (~100 m). Uncertainties remain in simulating/parameterizing the evolution of ice crystals, which require more analyses in the Lagrangian view. However, most in situ observations are in the Eulerian view and are restricted from examining the lifecycle of cirrus clouds. In this work, a new method of Diao et al. GRL (2013)* is used to separate out five phases of ice crystal evolution, using the horizontal spatial relationships between ice supersaturated regions (ISSRs) and ice crystal regions (ICRs). In-situ, aircraft-based observations from five flight campaigns are used to compare the evolution processes of ISSRs and ICRs, which include the National Science Foundation HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) Global campaign (2009-2011 Arctic to Antarctic over the central Pacific Ocean), the Stratosphere Troposphere Analyses Regional Transport 2008 (START08) campaign (2008 North America), the Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud-Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) campaign (2010 tropical western Atlantic), the Tropical Ocean Troposphere Exchange of Reactive Halogen Species and Oxygenated VOC (2012 Costa Rica), and the Deep Convection, Clouds, and Chemistry (DC3) campaign (2011 Interior North America). To understand the evolution of ICRs and ISSRs on the microscale, we compare the microphysical evolution processes inside ISSRs and ICRs in terms of relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi), ice crystal mean diameter (Dc) and ice crystal number density (Nc) at different meteorological and dynamical backgrounds during these five campaigns. Different phases of ice nucleation and evolution are contrasted to understand how cirrus clouds evolve from clear-sky ISS into fully developed clouds, and finally into sedimentation/evaporation phase. The results show that the ratios of

  8. The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William W., Jr.; Stewart, Glen R.

    1987-01-01

    The role of orbit crowding and cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of GMCs and their organization in global spiral structure is investigated. Both N-body simulations of the cloud system and a detailed analysis of individual particle orbits are used to develop a conceptual understanding of how individual clouds participate in the collective density response. Detailed comparisons are made between a representative cloud-particle simulation in which the cloud particles collide inelastically with one another and give birth to and subsequently interact with young star associations and stripped down simulations in which the cloud particles are allowed to follow ballistic orbits in the absence of cloud-cloud collisions or any star formation processes. Orbit crowding is then related to the behavior of individual particle trajectories in the galactic potential field. The conceptual picture of how GMCs are formed in the clumpy ISMs of spiral galaxies is formulated, and the results are compared in detail with those published by other authors.

  9. Experimental study of fuel cloud formation inside aircraft fuel tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putthawong, Panu

    The design of fuel tank flammability has relied on the flammability envelope of a homogeneous mixture. There are researches indicated that the presence of droplets could cause such mixture to be flammable even the fuel-to-air ratio was below the Lower Flammability Limit. This research aims to investigate the formation of fuel cloud/droplets by a condensation process and its effect on tank flammability. The center-wing tank is the main interest because the fuel vapor in the ullage space can condense when its temperature and pressure are changed. The Fuel Tank Test Facility has proven that a cloud or group of droplets is produced under normal operating condition of the center-wing tank. Results from the experiments show the number densities of droplets on the order of 103--105 and the maximum drop size being recorded is 18 mum. The experiments also indicate that Jet A vapor and droplets must have different properties from its liquid form because of the volatility difference among species in fuel. The new parameter for droplets flammability, i.e., non-dimensional droplet spacing, suggested by Hayashi et al. (1984) is employed for a flammability assessment. The non-dimensional droplet spacings from the experiments have found to be in the vicinity of the critical value. It points toward the high possibility of having flammable center-wing tank. The explosion strength calculation of droplets-vapor-air mixture implies the sufficient explosive condition if an ignition source is introduced.

  10. Formation of Magnetized Prestellar Cores in Turbulent Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.; Classy Team

    2015-01-01

    In GMCs, shocks in the turbulent flow create high-density regions, in which filaments grow and then fragment gravitationally into prestellar cores. This process is influenced by the cloud's magnetic field, which is also amplified during the shock. We showed in three-dimensional simulations that in typical GMC environments, the turbulence-compressed regions are strongly-magnetized sheet-like layers. Within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form via gathering material along the magnetic field lines. As a result of the preferred-direction mass collection, velocity gradients perpendicular to the filament major axis are a common feature seen in our simulations, which is in good agreement with the most recent results from CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). From our simulations, we identified hundreds of self-gravitating cores with masses, sizes, and mass-to-magnetic flux ratios comparable to observations. We found that core masses and sizes do not depend on the coupling strength between neutrals and ions, and ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. This is a result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which can explain the fact that magnetically supercritical cores are commonly observed even in a strongly magnetized medium. We then confirmed the anisotropic core formation model by extending the parameter space of the three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations, and quantified how the scalings of median core properties depend on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength.

  11. A new parameterization of polar stratospheric clouds based on the effective growth of NAT particles in the chemistry-climate-model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Ole; Ruhnke, Roland; Hoepfner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), consisting of STS, NAT and ice particles, play a major role in polar ozone depletion. On the one hand there is the activation of chlorine reservoirs at the surface of the PSCs, on the other hand PSCs lead to the stratospheric denitrification with the effect of a delay in the deactivation of active chlorine in polar spring. Due to the relevance of a good representation of these PSCs in global chemistry-climate-models (CCMs) a new algorithm based on efficient growth of NAT particles, developed by van den Broek et al. [2004], has been implemented into the submodel PSC of the CCM ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). We present results of an EMAC simulation from 2000 to 2012, performed with the new NAT parameterization. The simulated results are analyzed regarding the composition of PSCs and their distribution in the polar regions as well as their influence to the ozone related chemistry. The new results are compared with an EMAC simulation with the old standard thermodynamical NAT parameterization. A comparison with PSC measurements retrieved by the satellite instrument MIPAS on ENVISAT [Höpfner et al., 2006] show the quality of the new PSC scheme in EMAC. With the help of an additional sensitivity simulation it can be shown that the significance of heterogeneous reactions on ice particles, in comparison to liquid particles, is subordinate regarding chlorine activation and ozone depletion in Antarctic winter and spring as noted in Drdla and Mueller [2012].

  12. Phase equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl hydrates and the composition of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  13. Phase Equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl Hydrates and the Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  14. Clouds in a Bottle: Qualitative and Quantiative Demonstrations for Cloud Formation in a Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, T. D.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA CloudSat mission has been revealing the inner secrets of clouds since 2006 using its one-of-a-kind spaceborne cloud radar. During its mission, the CloudSat Education Network, consisting of schools in Asia, Europe, and North America, have been collecting data on Clouds when CloudSat passes overhead. The education team has spent many hours researching and presenting different methods for making clouds for demonstrations in formal and informal settings. In this presentation, we will present several variations on methods for doing the cloud in a bottle demonstration, including strengths and weaknesses for each, and a brief overview of the science involved in the various demonstrations.

  15. FORMATION PUMPING OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Farahjabeen; Viti, Serena; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Casu, Silvia E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.u E-mail: scasu@ca.astro.i

    2010-12-10

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies predict H{sub 2} to be formed in highly excited rovibrational states. The consequent relaxation of excited levels via a cascade of infrared transitions might be observable in emission from suitable interstellar regions. In this work, we model H{sub 2} formation pumping in standard dense clouds, taking into account the H/H{sub 2} transition zone, through an accurate description of chemistry and radiative transfer. The model includes recent laboratory data on H{sub 2} formation, as well as the effects of the interstellar UV field, predicting the populations of gas-phase H{sub 2} molecules and their IR emission spectra. Calculations suggest that some vibrationally excited states of H{sub 2} might be detectable toward lines of sight where significant destruction of H{sub 2} occurs, such as X-ray sources, and provides a possible explanation as to why observational attempts resulted in no detections reported to date.

  16. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  17. Measuring the efficiency of ice formation in mixed-phase clouds over Europe with Cloudnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, Johannes; Engelmann, Ronny; Ansmann, Albert; Patric, Seifert

    2016-04-01

    Mixed-phase clouds play an important role in current weather and climate research. The complex interaction between aerosols, clouds and dynamics taking place within these clouds is still not understood. The unknown impact of ice formation on cloud lifetime and precipitation evolution introduces large uncertainties into numeric weather prediction and climate projections. In the framework of the BACCHUS project, we have evaluated combined remote sensing data gathered at different European Cloudnet sites (Leipzig, Lindenberg, Potenza and Mace-Head) to study the relation between ice and liquid water in mixed-phase cloud layers. In this way, we can quantify the efficiency of ice production within these clouds. The study also allows contrasting marine (Potenza and Mace-Head) and continental sites (Leipzig and Lindenberg). We derive liquid and ice water content together with vertical motions of ice particles falling through cloud base. The ice mass flux is quantified by combining measurements of ice water content and particle fall velocity. The efficiency of heterogeneous ice formation and its impact on cloud lifetime is estimated for different cloud-top temperatures by relating the ice mass flux and the liquid water content at cloud top. Cloud radar measurements of polarization and fall velocity yield, that ice crystals formed in cloud layers with a geometrical thickness of less than 350 m are mostly pristine when they fall out of the cloud. A difference of four orders of magnitude in ice formation efficiency in mixed-phase cloud layers is found over the cloud-top-temperature range from -40 to 0 °C.

  18. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  19. Efficient Formation of Stratospheric Aerosol for Climate Engineering by Emission of Condensible Vapor from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Heckendorn, Patricia; Peter. Thomas; Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent analysis suggests that the effectiveness of stratospheric aerosol climate engineering through emission of non-condensable vapors such as SO2 is limited because the slow conversion to H2SO4 tends to produce aerosol particles that are too large; SO2 injection may be so inefficient that it is difficult to counteract the radiative forcing due to a CO2 doubling. Here we describe an alternate method in which aerosol is formed rapidly in the plume following injection of H2SO4, a condensable vapor, from an aircraft. This method gives better control of particle size and can produce larger radiative forcing with lower sulfur loadings than SO2 injection. Relative to SO2 injection, it may reduce some of the adverse effects of geoengineering such as radiative heating of the lower stratosphere. This method does not, however, alter the fact that such a geoengineered radiative forcing can, at best, only partially compensate for the climate changes produced by CO2.

  20. Gravity waves and high-altitude CO2 ice cloud formation in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-06-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO2 condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral parameterization. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO2 ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO2 cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  1. Radiative heating rates near the stratospheric fountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, G. M.; Newell, R. E.; Danielsen, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    Radiative heating rates are computed for various sets of conditions thought to be appropriate to the stratospheric fountain region: with and without a layer of cirrus cloud between 100 and 150 mbar; with standard ozone and with decreased ozone in the lower stratosphere, again with and without the cirrus cloud; and with different temperatures in the tropopause region. The presence of the cloud decreases the radiative cooling below the cloud in the upper troposphere and increases the cooling above it in the lower stratosphere. The cloud is heated at the base and cooled at the top and thus radiatively destabilized; overall it gains energy by radiation. Decreasing ozone above the cloud also tends to cool the lower stratosphere. The net effect is a tendency for vertical convergence and horizontal divergence in the cloud region. High resolution profiles of temperature, ozone, and cloudiness within the fountain region are required in order to assess the final balance of the various processes.

  2. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F. )

    1993-05-20

    The author describes evidence from three different cloud types observed in the Australian monsoon, continental-maritime convective, maritime convective, and tropical cyclones, which contribute to transport of tropospheric air masses into the lower stratosphere. Measurements were made from ER-2 aircraft flying out of Darwin, Australia, equipped to measure an array of different parameters, including water vapor, temperatures, pressures, radon, etc. Maritime environmental conditions do not produce as much bouyancy for ascending air masses near Darwin, as do continental-maritime conditions when intense solar heating over the arid continental center of Australia heat and drys air masses which flow over the moist surface marine layers and have bouyancy to allow deep penetration into the lower stratosphere. For the tropical cyclones, their large scale, slower ascending air seems to mix into the stratosphere by gravity wave generation, which produces turbulence enough to drive air mass mixing across the inversions which cap these features.

  3. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brégonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Pangui, E.; Morales, S. B.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Gratien, A.; Michoud, V.; Cazaunau, M.; DeWitt, H. L.; Tapparo, A.; Monod, A.; Doussin, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The impact of cloud events on isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has been studied from an isoprene/NOx/light system in an atmospheric simulation chamber. It was shown that the presence of a liquid water cloud leads to a faster and higher SOA formation than under dry conditions. When a cloud is generated early in the photooxidation reaction, before any SOA formation has occurred, a fast SOA formation is observed with mass yields ranging from 0.002 to 0.004. These yields are two and four times higher than those observed under dry conditions. When the cloud is generated at a later photooxidation stage, after isoprene SOA is stabilized at its maximum mass concentration, a rapid increase (by a factor of two or higher) of the SOA mass concentration is observed. The SOA chemical composition is influenced by cloud generation: the additional SOA formed during cloud events is composed of both organics and nitrate containing species. This SOA formation can be linked to water soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolution in the aqueous phase and to further aqueous phase reactions. Cloud-induced SOA formation is experimentally demonstrated in this study, thus highlighting the importance of aqueous multiphase systems in atmospheric SOA formation estimations.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brégonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Pangui, E.; Morales, S. B.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Gratien, A.; Michoud, V.; Cazaunau, M.; DeWitt, H. L.; Tapparo, A.; Monod, A.; Doussin, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of cloud events on isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has been studied from an isoprene / NOx / light system in an atmospheric simulation chamber. It was shown that the presence of a liquid water cloud leads to a faster and higher SOA formation than under dry conditions. When a cloud is generated early in the photooxidation reaction, before any SOA formation has occurred, a fast SOA formation is observed with mass yields ranging from 0.002 to 0.004. These yields are 2 and 4 times higher than those observed under dry conditions. When the cloud is generated at a later photooxidation stage, after isoprene SOA is stabilized at its maximum mass concentration, a rapid increase (by a factor of 2 or higher) of the SOA mass concentration is observed. The SOA chemical composition is influenced by cloud generation: the additional SOA formed during cloud events is composed of both organics and nitrate containing species. This SOA formation can be linked to the dissolution of water soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the aqueous phase and to further aqueous phase reactions. Cloud-induced SOA formation is experimentally demonstrated in this study, thus highlighting the importance of aqueous multiphase systems in atmospheric SOA formation estimations.

  5. A two-channel, tunable diode laser-based hygrometer for measurement of water vapor and cirrus cloud ice water content in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2014-08-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cloud water content sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol mol-1), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 μm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting ice water content detection limit (2σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2

  6. A two-channel, tunable diode laser-based hygrometer for measurement of water vapor and cirrus cloud ice water content in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure, and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An onboard calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cloud water content sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on the NASA Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol mol-1), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33 to 48 for ice particles larger than 8 μm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting ice water content detection limit (2σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2 μg m

  7. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  8. What the Kinematics of Molecular Clouds Signify About Their Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in Galactic molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution 13CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic HI Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient—ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km/s/pc—whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding HI by a factor of 1 - 6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated—by as much as 130 degrees in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  9. What Controls the Temperature of the Arctic Stratosphere during the Spring?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the temperature of the polar lower stratosphere during spring is key to understanding ozone loss in the Arctic polar vortex. Spring ozone loss rates are directly tied to polar stratospheric temperatures by the formation of polar stratospheric clouds, and the conversion of chlorine species to reactive forms on these cloud particle surfaces. In this paper, we study those factors that control temperatures in the polar lower stratosphere. We use the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/NCAR reanalysis data covering the last two decades to investigate how planetary wave driving of the stratosphere is connected to polar temperatures. In particular, we show that planetary waves forced in the troposphere in mid- to late winter (January-February) are principally responsible for the mean polar temperature during the March period. These planetary waves are forced by both thermal and orographic processes in the troposphere, and propagate into the stratosphere in the mid and high latitudes. Strong mid-winter planetary wave forcing leads to a warmer Arctic lower stratosphere in early spring, while weak mid-winter forcing leads to cooler Arctic temperatures.

  10. Evaluation of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds data obtained by ground based lidars (at Dome C, McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville) and the satellite based CALIOP lidar system versus a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snels, Marcel; Fierli, Federico; de Muro, Mauro; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Cairo, Francesco; Di Liberto, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds play an important role in the ozone depletion process in polar regions and are thus strongly linked to climate changes. Long term observations are needed to monitor the presence of PSCs and to compare to climate models. The last decades PSCs in Antarctica have been observed by using the CALIOP lidar system on the CALIPSO satellite and by ground based lidars at Dumont D'Urville, McMurdo, Casey, and since 2014 at Dome C. We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville and Dome C stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. However, a statistical analysis of PSC observations shows a satisfactory agreement between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar. The differences may be attributed to averaging processes for data with a bad signal to noise ratio, which tends to smear out the values of the optical parameters. Data from some Chemistry Climate models (CCMs) having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i

  11. Suppression of Arctic Air Formation by Cloud Radiative Effects in a Two-Dimensional Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand equable paleoclimates, Arctic amplification of winter warming, and the high-latitude lapse-rate feedback, we investigate the process of Arctic air formation, wherein a high latitude maritime air mass is advected over land during polar night and strongly cooled from the surface up. We extend previous work done using a single-column model (Cronin and Tziperman, PNAS, in press) by performing two-dimensional idealized cloud-resolving simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Quantitatively consistent with previous results, we find that as the initial atmospheric state is warmed, increases in low cloud amount reduce the average surface cooling over a 14-day period by roughly a degree for each degree of warming of the initial atmospheric state, with the feedback strength increasing with warming. This is primarily attributed to a monotonic increase in surface cloud radiative forcing of approximately 2 W m-2 for each degree that the initial atmospheric sounding is warmed. The use of a two-dimensional model as opposed to a single-column model shows that the lower-tropospheric cloud layer becomes more turbulent and dominated by cumulus clouds as the climate is warmed, yet the cloud fraction remains high owing to the continued prevalence of stratus and fog layers. These results are robust across a variety of cloud microphysics schemes and are not sensitive to the horizontal or vertical resolution of the model. We also explore the vertical structure and horizontal variability of the bulk horizontal flow, the sensitivity of the results to subsidence and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, and the contrasting roles of top-of-atmosphere and surface cloud radiative effects.

  12. Influence of wave activity on the composition of the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Galin, V. Ya.; Drobashevskaya, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The planetary wave impact on the polar vortex stability, polar stratosphere temperature, and content of ozone and other gases was simulated with the global chemical-climatic model of the lower and middle atmosphere. It was found that the planetary waves propagating from the troposphere into the stratosphere differently affect the gas content of the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere. In the Arctic region, the degree of wave activity critically affects the polar vortex formation, the appearance of polar stratospheric clouds, the halogen activation on their surface, and ozone anomaly formation. Ozone anomalies in the Arctic region as a rule are not formed at high wave activity and can be registered at low activity. In the Antarctic Regions, wave activity affects the stability of polar vortex and the depth of ozone holes, which are formed at almost any wave activity, and the minimal ozone values depend on the strong or weak wave activity that is registered in specific years.

  13. Polar Stratospheric Clouds and heterogeneous chemistry: Comparison between a 3D-CTM with detailed online PSC microphysics and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Errera, Quentin; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Chabrillat, Simon; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    A 3-D Chemical Transport Model (CTM), with full stratospheric chemistry and driven by the ECMWF temperature and wind fields, has been coupled to a detailed PSC microphysical model to simulate polar winters. The formation and evolution of four types of PSC particles (STS, SAT, NAT, and ice) are described through relevant microphysical processes which alter interactively the nitric acid and water vapor concentrations of the atmosphere. Each particle type is described by a binned size distribution for the number density and chemical composition. This set-up allows for detailed calculation of optical properties and surface area densities used to compute the heterogeneous reaction rates. After comparing the evolution of the stratospheric chemical structure to satellite observations, we will investigate how the model reproduces the PSC coverage detected by CALIPSO. A comparison between the model and CALIPSO optical properties will be used to discuss the PSC composition. Finally, we aim at estimating the contribution of each PSC particle type to the chlorine activation.

  14. Finding of the key formation mechanisms of the ionospheric response to sudden stratospheric warming using GSM TIP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Vladimir; Klimenko, Maxim; Bessarab, Fedor; Korenkov, Yurij; Karpov, Ivan

    The Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) is a large-scale phenomenon, which response is detected in the mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. SSW ionospheric effects are studied using multi-instrumental satellites and by ground-based measurements. We report a brief overview of the observational and theoretical results of the global ionospheric response and its formation mechanisms during Sudden Stratospheric Warming. We also present the results of our investigation of thermosphere-ionosphere response to the SSW obtained within the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Protonosphere (GSM TIP). The SSW effects were modeled by specifying various boundary conditions at the height of 80 km in the GSM TIP model: (1) by setting the stationary perturbations s = 1 of the temperature and density at high latitudes; (2) by setting the global distribution of the neutral atmosphere parameters, calculated in the TIME-GCM and CCM SOCOL models for the conditions of the SSW 2009 event. It has been shown that the selected low boundary conditions do not allow to fully reproduce the observed variation in the ionospheric parameters during SSW 2009 event. Based on observations of the velocity of vertical plasma drift obtained by the incoherent scatter radar at Jicamarca, we introduced additional electric potential in the GSM TIP model, which allowed us to reproduce the zonal electric field (ÉB vertical plasma drift) and the observed SSW effects in the low-latitude ionosphere. Furthermore, we tried to reproduce the SSW ionospheric effects by including internal gravity waves in the high-latitude mesosphere. We discuss the model calculation results and possible reasons for model/data disagreements and give the proposals for further investigations. This work was supported by RFBR Grants №12-05-31217 and №14-05-00578.

  15. Mathematical model of formation of Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sal'nikova, T. V.; Stepanov, S. Ya.

    2015-07-01

    The question of occurrence of cosmic dust clouds, which were found by Kordylewski in 1961 in the vicinity of libration point L 5 of the Earth-Moon system, still causes debates and concern. We explain theoretically the phenomenon of the apparent vanishing and appearance of the Kordylewski cosmic dust clouds in the vicinity of triangular libration points L 4 and L 5 of the Earth-Moon system. The possibility of occurrence of two such clouds rotating around libration points L 4 and two clouds rotating around point L 5 is shown and optimal times for their observation from the Earth are determined. The investigation is performed based on analysis of a stable periodic motion in a planar restricted circular problem of three bodies, Earth-Moon—Particle, allowing for perturbations from the Sun under the assumption that the orbits of the Earth and Moon are circular and lie in one plane.

  16. A stochastic formation of radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.L.; Gabriel, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    The research carried out under this award dealt with issues involving deterministic radiative transfer, remote sensing, Stochastic radiative transfer, and parameterization of cloud optical properties. A number of different forms of radiative transfer models in one, two, and three dimensions were developed in an attempt to build an understanding of the radiative transfer in clouds with realistic spatial structure and to determine the key geometrical parameter that influence this transfer. The research conducted also seeks to assess the relative importance of these geometrical effects in contrast to microphysical effects of clouds. The main conclusion of the work is that geometry has a profound influence on all aspects of radiative transfer and the interpretation of this transfer. We demonstrate how this geometry can influence estimate of particle effective radius to the 30-50% level and also how geometry can significantly bias the remote sensing of cloud optical depth.

  17. Hunting for the signatures of molecular cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Clark, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    In order to understand how molecular clouds form in the Galactic interstellar medium, we would like to be able to map the structure and kinematics of the gas flows responsible for forming them. However, doing so is observationally challenging. CO, the workhorse molecule for studies of molecular clouds, traces only relatively dense gas and hence only allows us to study those portions of the clouds that have already assembled. Numerical simulations suggest that the inflowing gas that forms these clouds is largely composed of CO-dark H2. These same simulations allow us to explore the usefulness of different tracers of this CO-dark molecular material, and we use them here to show that the [C ii] fine structure line is potentially a very powerful tracer of this gas and should be readily detectable using modern instrumentation.

  18. Ice Formation and Growth in Orographically-Enhanced Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Robert; Lowenthal, Douglas; Gannet Hallar, A.; McCubbin, Ian; Avallone, Linnea; Mace, Gerald; Wang, Zhien

    2015-04-01

    The formation and evolution of ice in mixed-phase clouds continues to be an active area of research due to the complex interactions between vapor, liquid and ice. Orographically-enhanced clouds are commonly mixed-phase during winter. An airborne study, the Colorado Airborne Mixed-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS), and a ground-based field campaign, the Storm Peak Lab (SPL) Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) were conducted in the Park Range of the Colorado Rockies. The CAMPS study utilized the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) to provide airborne cloud microphysical and meteorological data on 29 flights totaling 98 flight hours over the Park Range from December 15, 2010 to February 28, 2011. The UWKA was equipped with instruments that measured both cloud droplet and ice crystal size distributions, liquid water content, total water content (vapor, liquid, and ice), and 3-dimensional wind speed and direction. The Wyoming Cloud Radar and Lidar were also deployed during the campaign. These measurements are used to characterize cloud structure upwind and above the Park Range. StormVEx measured temperature, and cloud droplet and ice crystal size distributions at SPL. The observations from SPL are used to determine mountain top cloud microphysical properties at elevations lower than the UWKA was able to sample in-situ. Comparisons showed that cloud microphysics aloft and at the surface were consistent with respect to snow growth processes. Small ice crystal concentrations were routinely higher at the surface and a relationship between small ice crystal concentrations, large cloud droplet concentrations and temperature was observed, suggesting liquid-dependent ice nucleation near cloud base. Terrain flow effects on cloud microphysics and structure are considered.

  19. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  20. Numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelangeli, Diane V.; Toon, Owen B.; Haberle, Robert M.; Pollack, James B.

    1993-01-01

    A model of the formation, evolution, and description of Martian water ice clouds is developed which well reproduces the physical processes governing the microphysics of water ice cloud formation on Mars. The model is used to show that the cloud properties are most sensitive to the temperature profile, the number of days for which condensation previously occurred, the contact angle, and the presence of incoming meteoritic debris at the top of the atmosphere. The AM-PM differences in optical depths measured at the Viking Lander site were successfully simulated with the model, obtaining total column optical depths of ice of a few tenths in agreement with observations.

  1. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the intensity of light from the sky.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1983-08-01

    This is the second of two papers dealing with the effects of volcanic debris from the eruption of El Chichon on light from the sunlit sky. The polarization of skylight was considered in the first of the two, whereas this one is devoted to skylight intensity. It is shown here that the magnitude of the skylight intensity is modified very significantly from its clear sky value by the volcanic cloud, as is its change with solar depression angle during twilight and its distribution over the sky during the day. Emphasis is on measurements at a wavelength of 0.07 microm. Generally the volcanic cloud produces a diminution of zenith intensity during twilight with a considerable enhancement of intensity over the sky throughout the main part of the day. The solar aureole is not as sharp as it is in normally clear conditions, but the volcanic cloud causes a very diffuse type of aureole which covers a large portion of the sky. The preferential scattering of the longer wavelengths of sunlight, which is made evident by brilliant red and yellow colors in the sunrise period, causes a pronounced change of longwave/shortwave color ratios during twilight from their values in clear atmospheric conditions. The combination of intensity data shown here with polarization data in the previous paper should give a relatively complete picture of the effects of volcanic debris on solar radiation in the atmosphere and be useful in the verification of radiative transfer models of atmospheric turbidity. PMID:18196123

  2. Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Catherine L.

    The era of space astronomy has given researchers new insight into pre-main sequence evolution. IUE, Einstein, and IRAS have already revolutionized this topic by identification of new classes of PMS stars and by yielding detailed information on chromospheres, coronae, winds, and disks. One approach to understanding PMS evolution involves the detailed study of individual objects; this is the basis of nearly all IUE programs to date. Another approach is to perform a statistical study of a number of stars. This avenue is essential to establish the generality of individual studies, and to find trends and correlations among the stars involving differences in age, angular momentum, mass, and so forth. The ultraviolet provides essential diagnostics of the chromosphere and transition region and of the accretion disk boundary layer. However, of the various data sets, the IUE data on pre-main sequence stars is the most incomplete (a natural limitation of a pointed instrument). The limitations of the data set, especially the bias toward the brighter, more massive, less typical PMS stars, make the statistical analysis of the IUE data difficult. We propose to survey a prototypical low-mass star-formation region, the Taurus-Auriga dark clouds, with IUE. We find that it is feasible to obtain IUE data down to specific limiting magnitudes for the various classes of objects (T Tauri stars, "weak" T Tauri stars, SU Aurigae stars, Herbig Ae/Be stars). Doing so would result in a substantial improvement in the data set for this region. The data would include Mg II fluxes, long-wavelength UV "continuum" spectra, and far-ultraviolet emission-line fluxes in order to study chromospheric emission, winds, and disks, either active or passive. New and archival IUE data will be combined with satellite and ground-based data at all wavelength regimes for statistical analysis. We will examine the indicators of various phenomena (chromospheres winds, disks), study their occurence in the various

  3. Jupiter as an Exoplanet: UV to NIR Transmission Spectrum Reveals Hazes, a Na Layer, and Possibly Stratospheric H2O-ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montañés-Rodríguez, Pilar; González-Merino, B.; Pallé, E.; López-Puertas, Manuel; García-Melendo, E.

    2015-03-01

    Currently, the analysis of transmission spectra is the most successful technique to probe the chemical composition of exoplanet atmospheres. However, the accuracy of these measurements is constrained by observational limitations and the diversity of possible atmospheric compositions. Here, we show the UV-VIS-IR transmission spectrum of Jupiter as if it were a transiting exoplanet, obtained by observing one of its satellites, Ganymede, while passing through Jupiter’s shadow, i.e., during a solar eclipse from Ganymede. The spectrum shows strong extinction due to the presence of clouds (aerosols) and haze in the atmosphere and strong absorption features from CH4. More interestingly, the comparison with radiative transfer models reveals a spectral signature, which we attribute here to a Jupiter stratospheric layer of crystalline H2O ice. The atomic transitions of Na are also present. These results are relevant for the modeling and interpretation of giant transiting exoplanets. They also open a new technique to explore the atmospheric composition of the upper layers of Jupiter’s atmosphere.

  4. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  5. Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

    2009-02-27

    The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed

  6. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  7. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  8. A global non-hydrostatic model study of a downward coupling through the tropical tropopause layer during a stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, N.; Kodera, K.; Nasuno, T.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical coupling process between the stratosphere and troposphere in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) during a~stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in boreal winter was investigated using simulation data from a global non-hydrostatic model (NICAM) that does not use cumulus parameterization. The model reproduced well the observed tropical tropospheric changes during the SSW, including the enhancement of convective activity following the amplification of planetary waves. Deep convective activity was enhanced in the latitude zone 20-10° S, in particular over the southwest Pacific and southwest Indian Ocean. Although the upwelling in the TTL was correlated with that in the stratosphere, the temperature tendency in the TTL changed little due to a compensation by diabatic heating originating from cloud formation. This result suggests that the stratospheric meridional circulation affects cloud formation in the TTL.

  9. A global non-hydrostatic model study of a downward coupling through the tropical tropopause layer during a stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, N.; Kodera, K.; Nasuno, T.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamical coupling process between the stratosphere and troposphere in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) during a stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in boreal winter was investigated using simulation data from a global non-hydrostatic model (NICAM) that does not use cumulus parameterization. The model reproduced well the observed tropical tropospheric changes during the SSW including the enhancement of convective activity following the amplification of planetary waves. Deep convective activity was enhanced in the latitude zone 20-10° S, in particular over the southwest Pacific and southwest Indian Ocean. Although the upwelling in the TTL was correlated with that in the stratosphere, the temperature tendency in the TTL was mainly controlled by diabatic heating originating from cloud formation. This result suggests that the stratospheric meridional circulation affects cloud formation in the TTL.

  10. Chemistry of the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, Michael B.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric measurements of HCl, ClNO3, HNO3, NO2, and NO obtained over the Antarctic in 1986 are used to model the chemistry of the atmosphere in the region of the Ozone Hole. The low abundance noted in stratospheric HCl is attributed to incorporation of HCl in polar stratospheric clouds and subsequent reaction of HCl with ClNO3. The results point to a net loss of HNO3 from the stratosphere and to the suppression of the abundance of odd nitrogen at high altitudes in the vortex. O3 loss is suggested to be due to the catalytic influence of halogen radicals.

  11. An Evolutionary Model for Collapsing Molecular Clouds and their Star Formation Activity. II. Mass Dependence of the Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M max <~ 104 M ⊙) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ~104 M ⊙ Myr-1, although their time-averaged SFR is only langSFRrang ~ 102 M ⊙ Myr-1. The corresponding efficiencies are SFEfinal <~ 60% and langSFErang <~ 1%. For more massive clouds (M max >~ 105 M ⊙), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, langSFRrang and langSFErang are well represented by the fits langSFRrang ≈ 100(1 + M max/1.4 × 105 M ⊙)1.68 M ⊙ Myr-1 and langSFErang ≈ 0.03(M max/2.5 × 105 M ⊙)0.33, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao & Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  12. The effects of flow-inhomogeneities on molecular cloud formation: Local versus global collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian

    2014-07-20

    Observational evidence from local star-forming regions mandates that star formation occurs shortly after, or even during, molecular cloud formation. Models of molecular cloud formation in large-scale converging flows have identified the physical mechanisms driving the necessary rapid fragmentation. They also point to global gravitational collapse driving supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. Previous cloud formation models have focused on turbulence generation, gravitational collapse, magnetic fields, and feedback. Here, we explore the effect of structure in the flow on the resulting clouds and the ensuing gravitational collapse. We compare two extreme cases, one with a collision between two smooth streams, and one with streams containing small clumps. We find that structured converging flows lead to a delay of local gravitational collapse ({sup c}ore formation{sup )}. Hence, the cloud has more time to accumulate mass, eventually leading to a strong global collapse, and thus to a high core formation rate. Uniform converging flows fragment hydrodynamically early on, leading to the rapid onset of local gravitational collapse and an overall low core formation rate. This is also mirrored in the core mass distribution: the uniform initial conditions lead to more low-mass cores than the clumpy initial conditions. Kinetic (E{sub k} ) and gravitational energy (E{sub g} ) budgets suggest that collapse is only prevented for E{sub k} >> E{sub g} , which occurs for large scales in the smooth flow, and for small scales for the clumpy flow. Whenever E{sub k} ≈ E{sub g} , we observe gravitational collapse on those scales. Signatures of chemical abundance variations evolve differently for the gas phase and for the stellar population. For smooth flows, the forming cloud is well mixed, while its stellar population retains more information about the initial metallicities. For clumpy flows, the gas phase is less well mixed, while the stellar population has lost most of the

  13. THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G0.253+0.016: A MASSIVE DENSE CLOUD WITH LOW STAR FORMATION POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Zhang Qizhou

    2013-03-10

    We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using CARMA and the SMA. This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) into a radius of only 3 pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates ''star formation laws'' presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor {approx}45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths {approx}< 1 km s{sup -1}-probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date-are found. Evolution over several 10{sup 5} yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches-like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound nature of G0.253+0.016, it is not clear that this evolution will happen.

  14. On the Influence of the Tibetan High on the Distribution of Column Ozone and Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchman, M. H.; Rogal, M. J.; Harvey, V. L.

    2003-12-01

    We describe a new hypothesis regarding a teleconnection between the boreal summer and austral winter: the distribution of ozone in the southern hemisphere is controlled primarily by outflow from the top of the northern Asian monsoon (Tibetan High). The anthropogenic ozone hole which appears each September and October over Antarctica is surrounded by a croissant-shaped ozone maximum in the 40-60S latitude band, characterized by a broad maximum of larger column ozone amounts centered south of Australia (in the Australian High) and lower amounts over the South Atlantic. The shape of the ozone croissant relates directly to the longitudinal distribution of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) at high latitudes. The existence of this structure and its particular longitudinal distribution is hitherto unexplained. Observational analyses and numerical simulations will be shown which illuminate the process by which the ozone croissant is established. Solar occultation data from HALOE, SAGE, and POAM are used to characterize the distribution of ozone and PSCs. A major current of air flows out of the Tibetan High across the Indian Ocean, where it runs into the southern hemisphere winter westerly flow. Outflow surges occur in pulses lasting several days, with southward flow generating an anticyclone over the Indian Ocean - Australia sector. The pulsed flow excites a train of Rossby waves which propagate eastward. Descent of ozone-rich air occurs preferentially just to the east of the synoptic anticyclones. Extensive mixing occurs within the train of breaking Rossby waves. The coincident climatological ozone maximum and Australian High are viewed as a 3D mixing lens of higher ozone from above and higher potential vorticity from the tropics. This mechanism brings chemicals from the upper troposphere over Asia into juxtaposition with stratospheric air in the southern middle latitudes and is thus important for a variety of global climate change problems. It contributes to our

  15. Carbon in different phases ([CII], [CI], and CO) in infrared dark clouds: Cloud formation signatures and carbon gas fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Ragan, S. E.; Ossenkopf, V.; Glover, S.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Nielbock, M.; Krause, O.; Stutzki, J.; Schilke, P.; Güsten, R.

    2014-11-01

    Context. How molecular clouds form out of the atomic phase and what the relative fractions of carbon are in the ionized, atomic, and molecular phase are questions at the heart of cloud and star formation. Aims: We want to understand the kinematic processes of gas flows during the formation of molecular clouds. In addition to that, we aim at determining the abundance ratios of carbon in its various gas phases from the ionized to the molecular form. Methods: Using multiple observatories from Herschel and SOFIA to APEX and the IRAM 30 m telescope, we mapped the ionized and atomic carbon as well as carbon monoxide ([CII] at 1900 GHz, [CI] at 492 GHz, and C18O(2-1) at 220 GHz) at high spatial resolution (12''-25'') in four young massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). Results: The three carbon phases were successfully mapped in all four regions, only in one source does the [CII] line remain a non-detection. With these data, we dissect the spatial and kinematic structure of the four IRDCs and determine the abundances of gas phase carbon in its ionized, atomic, and most abundant molecular form (CO). Both the molecular and atomic phases trace the dense structures well, with [CI] also tracing material at lower column densities. [CII] exhibits diverse morphologies in our sample from compact to diffuse structures, probing the cloud environment. In at least two out of the four regions, we find kinematic signatures strongly indicating that the dense gas filaments have formed out of a dynamically active and turbulent atomic and molecular cloud, potentially from converging gas flows. The atomic carbon-to-CO gas mass ratios are low between 7% and 12% with the lowest values found toward the most quiescent region. In the three regions where [CII] is detected, its mass is always higher by a factor of a few than that of the atomic carbon. While the ionized carbon emission depends on the radiation field, we also find additional signatures that indicate that other processes, for example

  16. Cloud processing of organic compounds: Secondary organic aerosol and nitrosamine formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, James W., III

    Cloud processing of atmospheric organic compounds has been investigated through field studies, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling. Observational cloud chemistry studies were performed in northern Arizona and fog studies in central Pennsylvania. At both locations, the cloud and fogs showed low acidity due to neutralization by soil dust components (Arizona) and ammonia (Pennsylvania). The field observations showed substantial concentrations (20-5500 ng•L -1) of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the cloud droplets. The potential generation of secondary organic aerosol mass through the processing of these anthropogenic VOCs was investigated through laboratory and modeling studies. Under simulated atmospheric conditions, in idealized solutions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) degraded quickly in the aqueous phase with half lives of approximately three hours. The degradation process yielded less volatile products which would contribute to new aerosol mass upon cloud evaporation. However, when realistic cloud solutions containing natural organic matter were used in the experiments, the reaction kinetics decreased with increasing organic carbon content, resulting in half lives of approximately 7 hours. The secondary organic aerosol (SUA) mass formation potential of cloud processing of BTEX was evaluated. SOA mass formation by cloud processing of BTEX, while strongly dependent on the atmospheric conditions, could contribute up to 9% of the ambient atmospheric aerosol mass, although typically ˜1% appears realistic. Field observations also showed the occurrence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a potent carcinogen, in fogs and clouds (100-340 ng•L -1). Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the formation of NDMA from nitrous acid and dimethylamine in the homogeneous aqueous phase within cloud droplets. While NDMA was produced in the cloud droplets, the low yields (<1%) observed could not explain observational concentrations

  17. Effect of Smoke on Cloud Formation during the Biomass Burning Season over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, I.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Remer, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption of sunlight reduces surface irradiation and heats the aerosol layer. The consequent changes in the temperature and humidity profiles can affect cloud formation extent and life time, which is called the semi-direct effect. We evaluate this aerosol semi-direct effect using data collected during the 2002 biomass burning season over the Amazon basin from the MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite. MODIS measures the cloud coverage and the aerosol optical thickness among the clouds. We found that the radiative heating of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface due to the presence of the smoke decreases the cloud coverage. A very clear negative correlation emerges between the cloud fraction and the smoke optical depth. The results are compared to calculations using 1-D radiation model (M.D. Chou), and used to calculate this regional semi direct effect on climate forcing.

  18. Modeling studying on ice formation by bacteria in warm-based convective cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.

    2005-12-01

    Bacteria have been recognized as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and certain bacteria, commonly found in plants, have exhibited capacity to act as ice nuclei (IN) at temperatures as warm as -2 °C. These ice nucleating bacteria are readily disseminated into the atmosphere and have been observed in clouds at altitudes of several kilometres. It is noteworthy that over 20 years ago, one assumed the possibility of bacterial transport and their importance into cloud formation process, rain and precipitation, as well as causing disease in plants and animal kingdom. We used a 1-D cumulus cloud model with the CCOPE 19th July 1981 case and the observed field profile of bacterial concentration, to simulate the significance of bacteria as IN through condensation freezing mechanism. In this paper, we will present our results on the role of bacteria as active ice nuclei in the developing stage of cumulus clouds, and their potential significance in atmospheric sciences.

  19. Students' Understanding of Cloud and Rainbow Formation and Teachers' Awareness of Students' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malleus, Elina; Kikas, Eve; Kruus, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    This study describes primary school students' knowledge about rainfall, clouds and rainbow formation together with teachers' predictions about students' performance. In our study, primary school students' (N = 177) knowledge about rainfall and rainbow formation was examined using structured interviews with open-ended questions. Primary school…

  20. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  1. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  2. Overshooting cloud top, variation of tropopause and severe storm formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development of severe multicell thunderstorms leading to the touchdown of six tornados near Pampa, TX, on May 19-20, 1982, is characterized in detail on the basis of weather maps, rawinsonde data, and radar summaries, and the results are compared with GOES rapid-scan IR images. The multicell storm cloud is shown to have formed beginning at 1945 GMT at the point of highest horizontal moisture convergence and lowest tropopause height and to have penetrated the tropopause at 2130 GMT, reaching a maximum altitude and a cloud-top black-body temperature 9 C lower than the tropopause temperature at 2245 GMT and collapsing about 20 min, when the firt tornado touched down. The value of the real-time vertical profiles provided by satellite images in predicting which severe storms will produce tornados or other violent phenomena is stressed.

  3. Ionization-regulated star formation in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudritz, Ralph E.; Silk, Joseph

    1987-05-01

    The authors present a theory for the early evolution of contracting magnetized flattened clouds in molecular clouds which undergo magnetic braking and field slip (ambipolar diffusion). If magnetic torques are the means by which angular momentum is removed from disks, then accretion rates and protostellar masses depend on how efficient braking is with respect to field line slip and hence can depend sensitively on ionization conditions. The authors discuss homologously evolving structures and calculate the evolution of the disk rotation frequency, toroidal field, accretion velocity, accretion rate, and core mass. It is found that cores which accrete out of very weakly ionized pancakes may have their masses increased by factors of 5 - 10 by increasing the ionization rate of the material by a decade.

  4. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  5. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N.; Lathem, Terry L.; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-01-01

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8–10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas–aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  6. Star formation driven mechanical feedback in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.

    The ubiquity and high density of outflows from young stars in clusters make them an intriguing candidate for the source of turbulence energy in molecular clouds. This work addresses, by direct numerical simulation, elements of protostellar outflow evolution that is relevant to their ability to drive turbulent flows in molecular clouds. The result of this work is surprising in that it shows that fossil cavities, rather than how shocks from active outflows, constitute the primary avenue by which outflows re-energize turbulence. This work first considers collisions between active jets, showing that this process is ineffective at converting the directed momentum and mechanical energy of outflows into turbulence. This effect is due to radiative energy loss which constrains the surface area through which colliding outflows entrain ambient gas. Recent observational results are discussed which indicate that fossil cavities from extinct outflows are abundant in molecular material surrounding clusters such as NGC1333. These structures, rather than the bow shocks of active outflows, comprise the link between outflow energy input, and re-energizing turbulence in the parent molecular cloud core. Numerical simulations are presented winch confirm that the evolution of cavities front decaying outflow sources leads to structures which match the observations of fossil cavities. The algorithms and tests of the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh refinement code for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics are also presented. The code was developed during the course of this work and used for the numerical simulations.

  7. AN EVOLUTIONARY MODEL FOR COLLAPSING MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THEIR STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Aviles, Manuel; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Colin, Pedro

    2012-05-20

    We present an idealized, semi-empirical model for the evolution of gravitationally contracting molecular clouds (MCs) and their star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The model assumes that the instantaneous SFR is given by the mass above a certain density threshold divided by its free-fall time. The instantaneous number of massive stars is computed assuming a Kroupa initial mass function. These stars feed back on the cloud through ionizing radiation, eroding it. The main controlling parameter of the evolution turns out to be the maximum cloud mass, M{sub max}. This allows us to compare various properties of the model clouds against their observational counterparts. A giant molecular cloud (GMC) model (M{sub max} {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) adheres very well to the evolutionary scenario recently inferred by Kawamura et al. for GMCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A model cloud with M{sub max} Almost-Equal-To 2000 M{sub Sun} evolves in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram, first passing through the locus of typical low-to-intermediate-mass star-forming clouds, and then moving toward the locus of high-mass star-forming ones over the course of {approx}10 Myr. Also, the stellar age histograms for this cloud a few Myr before its destruction agree very well with those observed in the {rho}-Oph stellar association, whose parent cloud has a similar mass, and imply that the SFR of the clouds increases with time. Our model thus agrees well with various observed properties of star-forming MCs, suggesting that the scenario of gravitationally collapsing MCs, with their SFR regulated by stellar feedback, is entirely feasible and in agreement with key observed properties of MCs.

  8. Numerical modelling of the formation process of planets from protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, N. N.; Eneyev, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    Evolution of the plane protoplanetary cloud, consisting of a great number of gravitationally interacting and uniting under collision bodies (protoplanets) moving in the central field of a large mass (the Sun or a planet), is considered. It is shown that in the course of protoplanetary cloud evolution the ring zones of matter expansion and compression occur with the subsequent development leading to formation of planets, rotating about their axes mainly directly. The principal numerical results were obtained through digital simulation of planetary accumulation.

  9. Influence of Dust Composition on Cloud Droplet Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J T; Chuang, C C; Wexler, A S

    2006-08-21

    Previous studies suggest that interactions between dust particles and clouds are significant; yet the conditions where dust particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are uncertain. Since major dust components are insoluble, the CCN activity of dust strongly depends on the presence of minor components. However, many minor components measured in dust particles are overlooked in cloud modeling studies. Some of these compounds are believed to be products of heterogeneous reactions involving carbonates. In this study, we calculate Kohler curves (modified for slightly soluble substances) for dust particles containing small amounts of K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Ca{sup 2+} compounds to estimate the conditions where reacted and unreacted dust can activate. We also use an adiabatic parcel model to evaluate the influence of dust particles on cloud properties via water competition. Based on their bulk solubilities, K{sup +} compounds, MgSO{sub 4} x 7H{sub 2}O, Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} x 6H{sub 2}O, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} x 4H{sub 2}O are classified as highly soluble substances, which enable activation of fine dust. Slightly soluble gypsum and MgSO{sub 3} x 6H{sub 2}O, which may form via heterogeneous reactions involving carbonates, enable activation of particles with diameters between about 0.6 and 2 mm under some conditions. Dust particles > 2 mm often activate regardless of their composition. Only under very specialized conditions does the addition of a dust distribution into a rising parcel containing fine (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles significantly reduce the total number of activated particles via water competition. Effects of dust on cloud saturation and droplet number via water competition are generally smaller than those reported previously for sea salt. Large numbers of fine dust CCN can significantly enhance the number of activated particles under certain conditions. Improved representations of dust mineralogy and reactions in global aerosol models

  10. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis; Scalo, John M.; Appleton, P. N.

    1987-01-01

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density.

  11. In situ observations of new particle formation in the tropical upper troposphere: the role of clouds and the nucleation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Borrmann, S.; Kazil, J.; Minikin, A.; Stohl, A.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Kunkel, D.; de Reus, M.; Frey, W.; Lovejoy, E. R.; Volk, C. M.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Schiller, C.; Peter, T.; Schlager, H.; Cairo, F.; Law, K. S.; Shur, G. N.; Belyaev, G. V.; Curtius, J.

    2011-09-01

    New particle formation (NPF), which generates nucleation mode aerosol, was observed in the tropical Upper Troposphere (UT) and Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) by in situ airborne measurements over South America (January-March 2005), Australia (November-December 2005), West Africa (August 2006) and Central America (2004-2007). Particularly intense NPF was found at the bottom of the TTL. Measurements with a set of condensation particle counters (CPCs) with different dp50 (50% lower size detection efficiency diameter or "cut-off diameter") were conducted on board the M-55 Geophysica in the altitude range of 12.0-20.5 km and on board the DLR Falcon-20 at up to 11.5 km altitude. On board the NASA WB-57F size distributions were measured over Central America in the 4 to 1000 nm diameter range with a system of nucleation mode aerosol spectrometers. Nucleation mode particle concentrations (NNM) were derived from these measurements which allow for identifying many NPF events with NNM in the range of thousands of particles per cm3. Over Australia and West Africa, we identified NPF in the outflow of tropical convection, in particular of a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS). Newly formed particles with NNM > 1000 cm-3 were found to coexist with ice cloud particles (dp > 2 μm) as long as cloud particle concentrations remained below 2 cm-3. The occurrence of NPF within the upper troposphere and the TTL was generally confined within 340 K to 380 K potential temperature, but NPF was of particular strength between 350 K and 370 K (i.e. ~1-4 km below the cold point tropopause). Analyses of the aerosol volatility (at 250 °C) show that in the TTL on average 75-90% of the particles were volatile, compared to typically only 50% in the extra-tropical UT, indicative for the particles to mainly consist of H2SO4-H2O and possibly organic compounds. Along two flight segments over Central and South America (24 February 2005 and 7 August 2006, at 12.5 km altitude) in cloud free air, above thin

  12. Noctilucent cloud formation and the effects of water vapor variability on temperatures in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of low temperatures and the formation of noctilucent clouds in the summer mesosphere, a one-dimensional time-dependent photochemical-thermal numerical model of the atmosphere between 50 and 120 km has been constructed. The model self-consistently solves the coupled photochemical and thermal equations as perturbation equations from a reference state assumed to be in equilibrium and is used to consider the effect of variability in water vapor in the lower mesosphere on the temperature in the region of noctilucent cloud formation. It is found that change in water vapor from an equilibrium value of 5 ppm at 50 km to a value of 10 ppm, a variation consistent with observations, can produce a roughly 15 K drop in temperature at 82 km. It is suggested that this process may produce weeks of cold temperatures and influence noctilucent cloud formation.

  13. Measurements of Chlorine Partitioning in the Winter Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachnik, R.; Salawitch, R.; Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    1999-01-01

    Under the extremely cold conditions in the polar winter stratosphere, heterogeneous reactions involving HCl and CIONO(sub 2) on the surfaces of polar stratospheric cloud particles can release large amounts of reactive chlorine from these reservoirs leading to rapid chemical loss of ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during late winter and early spring.

  14. An Assessment of Stratospheric Water Vapor Using a General Circulation Model. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor not only participates in the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in cloud formation, it also participates in stratospheric chemistry and, due to the strong dependence of saturation on temperature, serves as a tracer for exposure of air to cold temperatures. The application of general circulation models (GCM`s) to stratospheric chemistry and transport both enables and requires a thorough investigation of stratospheric water vapor. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has redesigned its GCM, the CCM2, to enable studies of stratospheric chemistry and tracer transport, including that of water vapor. Simple methane chemistry provides an adequate representation of the upper stratospheric water vapor source in the CCM2. The CCM2`s water vapor distribution and seasonality compare favorably with observations in many respects, and the CCM2 fills gaps in the obsevations, yielding some new insights. For example, southern polar dehydration can affect midlatitude water mixing ratios by a few tenths of a ppmv. The annual cycle of water vapor in the tropical and subtropical lower stratosphere is dominated by drying at the tropical tropopause. Water vapor has a very long adjustment time, a factor 2-4 longer than for methane, a common long-lived tracer. In the lower stratosphere, however, two model deficiencies have a profound impact on simulated water vapor. The first is a cold temperature bias in the winter polar stratosphere, a deficiency common to GCM`s. The cold bias produces excessive dehydration in the southern hemisphere. This deficiency can be eliminated fairly simply by setting a minimum vapor pressure. The second deficiency, however, is not so easily remedied. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropics has a different character from the observed; for example, too little mass flux occurs under low mixing ratio conditions, so that the stratosphere is somewhat too moist.

  15. Schmidt’s Conjecture and Star Formation in Galactic Molecular Clouds and External Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Joao; Lada, Charles; Lombardi, Marco; Forbrich, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The star formation rate and its variation in time are intimately connected to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the Milky Way and external galaxies. Ever since the pioneering work of Martin Schmidt a half-century ago there has been great interest in finding an appropriate empirical relation that would directly link some property of interstellar gas with the physical process of star formation within it. Schmidt conjectured that this might take the form of a relation between the rate of star formation and the surface density of the interstellar gas. In this talk I will describe how recent observations of nearby GMCs made with robust, high-dynamic range Planck-Herschel-2MASS maps, are providing new insights into the nature of this relationship. I will show that though a Schmidt relation is observed within individual molecular clouds, there is no Schmidt law that characterizes star formation between the clouds in the Milky Way. Instead, a linear scaling exists between the total SFR and the amount of dense gas within molecular clouds. This scaling may be the underlying physical relationship that most directly connects star formation activity with interstellar gas both between clouds in the Milky Way and within and between external galaxies. Finally I will discuss the implications of these results for the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for galaxies.

  16. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1993-01-01

    The STEP tropical objectives were successfully met during the flight experiments conducted from Darwin, Australia, January 16 to February 16, 1987. Necessary and sufficient measurements were made in, above, and downwind from very cold cirrus clouds, produced by three convective cloud types, to demonstrate irreversible mass transports into and dehydration in the lower tropical stratosphere. The three types are defined and described in terms of the physical processes that produce them and illustrated by examples derived from in situ and remote measurements. Intense solar heating is shown to produce, in addition to the usual vertical, sea breeze circulations normal to the coastline, an unusual pair of continental spanning, horizontal circulations. An upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric anticyclonic circulation, inclined upward toward the tropics, contributes to the dehydration of dissipating cirrus anvils and intensifies the upper level, tropical easterlies. The lower tropospheric cyclonic circulation with tropical westerlies and extratropical easterlies is in direct conflict with the normal tropical easterlies and extratropical westerlies. Impulsive switches between these two opposing lower-level wind systems create conditions favorable for each of these cloud types and explain the summer season's aperiodic variability.

  17. Laser-filamentation-induced condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-04-01

    Using 1 kHz, 9 mJ femtosecond laser pulses, we demonstrate laser-filamentation-induced spectacular snow formation in a cloud chamber. An intense updraft of warm moist air is generated owing to the continuous heating by the high-repetition filamentation. As it encounters the cold air above, water condensation and large-sized particles spread unevenly across the whole cloud chamber via convection and cyclone like action on a macroscopic scale. This indicates that high-repetition filamentation plays a significant role in macroscopic laser-induced water condensation and snow formation. PMID:22466199

  18. Detection of pedestal features in dark clouds - Evidence for formation of low mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerking, M. A.; Langer, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    To assess whether B335 is unique among dark clouds or whether CO-12 pedestal features are quite common, 180 opacity class 5 and 6 Lynds clouds were surveyed. From this set of data, three additional sources were found to have pedestal features. These suggest the presence of embedded low-mass stars, though a hot differentially rotating disk cannot be excluded for B335. Estimates of the mass-loss rate required to produce stellar winds consistent with observations are comparable with mass-loss rates for T Tauri stars. Further, the pedestal feature formation rate is similar to the local low-mass star formation rate.

  19. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  20. Heated gaseous streamers and star formation in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1996-07-01

    THE Orion molecular cloud, which is obscured by the dust and ionized gas of the Orion nebula, is the nearest example of a giant molecular cloud. Massive stars are actively forming deep in the core of this cloud as a result of large-scale cloud instabilities, fragmentation and gravitational collapse. These young stars will inject a considerable amount of energy back into the surrounding environment through stellar winds and radiation1, and they are thus expected to exert a major influence on the evolution of the cloud. Here we present a mosaic of ten high-resolution radio maps of the region of the cloud known as OMC-1; the maps were constructed from observations of two ammonia emission lines, which trace the densest regions of the gas while mitigating the obscuring effects of the dust. We find dense filaments of molecular gas with complex motions fanning out more than 0.5 parsec from the central core of the cloud. These filaments appear as long, bead-like chains, consisting of dense clumps of gas that may be the sites of future star formation. The outer sheaths of clumps and the edges of filaments may be heated as a direct result of radiation and outflows from young stars embedded in the central core.

  1. The effect of a temperature-dependent contact parameter on Mars cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuki Urata, Richard; Hollingsworth, Jeffery; Kahre, Melinda

    2015-11-01

    Modeling the current water cycle on Mars is a complex problem that at present remains a scientific challenge. The water cycle is highly coupled to atmospheric temperature, dust, surface ice temperature, atmospheric transport and mixing (i.e. planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes, and radiation, just to name a few. One of the main features of Mars' water cycle is the formation of the aphelion cloud belt. Clouds are formed at altitude (10-40 km) within the subtropics during the aphelion season (Ls=60°-120°). In general the aphelion cloud belt forms at higher altitudes compared to the polar and high-latitude clouds, and therefore at colder temperatures (180 K and below). Laboratory experiments of nucleation under cold temperatures indicate that nucleation becomes more difficult at and below 180 K than expected. This can be modeled by using a temperature-dependent contact parameter, m(T). In this study we use the NASA Ames Mars Global Circulation Model (Mars GCM) to compare the constant contact parameter with the temperature-dependent contact parameterization described by Iraci et al. (2010). The simulations demonstrate that the contact parameter has a significant affect on the opacity of the aphelion clouds, as well as the clouds that form at the edge of the seasonal CO2 ice caps. Both types of clouds tend to form near 180 K, supporting the importance of a temperature-dependent contact parameter.

  2. Ice Nuclei Variability and Ice Formation in Mixed-phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demott, P. J.; Twohy, C. H.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Brooks, S. D.; Rogers, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    While it is expected that ice nuclei impose a critical role in ice initiation in clouds, there are relatively few validations of direct relations between ice nuclei concentrations and ice crystal concentrations. Further, very little is known about the spatial and temporal distribution of ice nuclei, let alone their sources. Such knowledge is critical for understanding precipitation formation, cloud lifetimes, the existence of aircraft icing hazards, and the impacts of changing atmospheric aerosol particle concentrations and compositions on cold cloud processes. In this study, we document measurements of ice nuclei in relation to the presence and concentrations of ice crystals in modestly supercooled clouds and also consider the implications of differences in ice nuclei concentrations measured at different locations and times during several studies. In the first part of this presentation, we show results from measurements made in the Alliance Icing Research Study II, conducted in late Fall 2003 over the Northeast U.S. and Eastern Canada. A counterflow virtual impactor was used for selectively sampling cloud particles during aircraft measurements of clouds. Measurements were made on the evaporated residual aerosol particles, including re-processing at controlled temperatures and relative humidities to determine their ice nucleating behavior for conditions of direct relevance to the clouds using a continuous flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC). Comparing to measurements of ice crystals in clouds, a clear correlation between the presence or absence of ice nuclei and ice crystals was demonstrated in some cases. However, the concentrations of the two populations did not correlate as well. Reasons for this may reflect different (or not assessed) ice formation processes, redistribution of ice in clouds, and potential artifacts of the sampling procedure. Since these results and those of Prenni et al. (this meeting), describing the vital role of ice nuclei in affecting

  3. Studying the Formation and Development of Molecular Clouds: With the CCAT Heterodyne Array Instrument (CHAI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Surveys of all different types provide basic data using different tracers. Molecular clouds have structure over a very wide range of scales. Thus, "high resolution" surveys and studies of selected nearby clouds add critical information. The combination of large-area and high resolution allows Increased spatial dynamic range, which in turn enables detection of new and perhaps critical morphology (e.g. filaments). Theoretical modeling has made major progress, and suggests that multiple forces are at work. Galactic-scale modeling also progressing - indicates that stellar feedback is required. Models must strive to reproduce observed cloud structure at all scales. Astrochemical observations are not unrelated to questions of cloud evolution and star formation but we are still learning how to use this capability.

  4. Turbulence induced fluctuations in cloud saturation ratio: Doppler radar measurements and implications for drizzle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, R. L.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a statistical examination of in-cloud updraft and downdraft velocities using Doppler cloud radar and radiosonde measurements collected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility. The measurements, including moments and other statistical properties derived from them are used in conjunction with adiabatic parcel and entrainment models to derive the properties of turbulence-induced fluctuations in saturation ratio and cloud droplet size. An especially important parameter for models of cloud droplet evolution and dispersion and also for predicting conditions at the drizzle threshold is the ratio of saturation ratio fluctuation variance to correlation time [McGraw and Liu, GRL, 33, L03802 (2006)]. The goal of the present analysis is to develop methods to estimate this key turbulence parameter needed in the kinetic potential theory of drizzle formation from remote sensing methods and in particular from the Doppler radar measurements.

  5. Worldwide data sets constrain the water vapor uptake coefficient in cloud formation

    PubMed Central

    Raatikainen, Tomi; Nenes, Athanasios; Seinfeld, John H.; Morales, Ricardo; Moore, Richard H.; Lathem, Terry L.; Lance, Sara; Padró, Luz T.; Lin, Jack J.; Cerully, Kate M.; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Cozic, Julie; Ruehl, Christopher R.; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Flagan, Richard C.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Smith, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud droplet formation depends on the condensation of water vapor on ambient aerosols, the rate of which is strongly affected by the kinetics of water uptake as expressed by the condensation (or mass accommodation) coefficient, αc. Estimates of αc for droplet growth from activation of ambient particles vary considerably and represent a critical source of uncertainty in estimates of global cloud droplet distributions and the aerosol indirect forcing of climate. We present an analysis of 10 globally relevant data sets of cloud condensation nuclei to constrain the value of αc for ambient aerosol. We find that rapid activation kinetics (αc > 0.1) is uniformly prevalent. This finding resolves a long-standing issue in cloud physics, as the uncertainty in water vapor accommodation on droplets is considerably less than previously thought. PMID:23431189

  6. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicutt, R.C.,JR.; Hodge, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies. 42 references.

  7. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Hodge, P. W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies.

  8. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute

  9. Formation and characterization of simulated small droplet icing clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two pneumatic two-fluid atomizers operating at high liquid and gas pressures produced water sprays that simulated small droplet clouds for use in studying icing effects on aircraft performance. To measure median volume diameter, MVD or D sub v.5, of small droplet water sprays, a scattered-light scanning instrument was developed. Drop size data agreed fairly well with calculated values at water and nitrogen pressures of 60 and 20 psig, respectively, and at water and nitrogen pressures of 250 and 100 psig, respectively, but not very well at intermediate values of water and nitrogen pressure. MVD data were correlated with D sub 0, W sub N, and W sub w, i.e., orifice diameter, nitrogen, and water flowrate, respectively, to give the expression for MVD in microns.

  10. Star Formation and Outflows in Molecular Clouds: The Role of Radiative Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2015-08-01

    Radiation feedback from massive clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation on the scale of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). However, due to the extreme cost of implementing full radiative transfer in 3D hydrodynamic simulations, the influence of radiation feedback on GMCs has been poorly understood. We employ the recently developed Hyperion extension of the Athena code, which solves the equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) using the Reduced Speed of Light (RSL) approximation and M1 closure of the moment equations, to investigate the effects of direct, non-ionizing UV radiation on cloud dynamical evolution and star formation. Our model GMCs span a range of surface densities between 10 and 500 solar masses per square parsec, making them optically thick to UV and thin to reprocessed IR.We find that radiation feedback has little effect on the density structure in the cloud or its star formation rate, both of which are set by the interaction between turbulence and gravity. Instead, the main effect of radiation is to truncate star formation and disperse gas rapidly whena sufficiently luminous cluster has formed. We show that our numerical results can be explained by a simple paradigm of feedback-limited star formation that operates across a wide range of cloud surface densities. In this model, stars form steadily in a turbulent medium with log-normally distributed surface and volume densities, and successively larger portions of the original cloud become unbound when the forces on successively denser local patches of gas become super-Eddington. The global stellar efficiency in a GMC is therefore set not by the radiative force at the mean cloud surface density, but by the Eddington ratio in the high surface density tail of the gas distribution.

  11. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does Stellar Feedback Result in Cloud Death?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  13. A Search for Star Formation in the Translucent Cloud MBM 40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnani, Loris; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Hearty, Thomas; Stauffer, John; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Verter, Frances; Dwek, Eli

    1996-01-01

    The star formation status of the translucent high-latitude molecular cloud, MBM 40, is explored through analysis of radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray data. With a peak visual extinction of 1 to 2 mag, MBM 40 is an example of a high-latitude cloud near the diffuse/translucent demarcation. However, unlike most translucent clouds, MBM 40 exhibits a compact morphology and a kinetic energy-to gravitational potential energy ratio near unity. Our radio data, encompassing the CO (J = 1-0), CS (J = 2-1), and H2CO 1(sub 11-1(sub 10), spectral line transitions, reveal that the cloud contains a ridge of molecular gas with n greater than or equal to 10(exp 3)/ cc. In addition, the molecular data, together with IRAS data, indicate that the mass of MBM 40 is approx. 40 solar mass. In light of the ever-increasing number of recently formed stars far from any dense molecular clouds or cores, we searched the environs of MBM 40 for any trace of recent star formation. We used the ROSAT All-Sky Survey X-ray data and a ROSAT PSPC pointed observation toward MBM 40 to identify 33 stellar candidates with properties consistent with pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. Follow-up optical spectroscopy of the candidates with V less than 15.5 was conducted with the 1.5 m Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory telescope in order to identify signatures of T Tauri or pre-main- sequence stars (such as the Li 6708 A resonance line). Since none of our optically observed candidates display standard PMS signatures, we conclude that MBM 40 displays no evidence of recent or ongoing star formation. The absence of high-density molecular cores in the cloud and the relatively low column density compared to star-forming interstellar clouds may be the principal reasons that MBM 40 is devoid of star formation. More detailed comparison between this cloud and other, higher extinction translucent and dark clouds may elucidate the necessary initial conditions for the onset of low-mass star formation.

  14. Diagnosing Warm Frontal Cloud Formation in a GCM: A Novel Approach Using Conditional Subsetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, James F.; Naud, Catherine M.; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes characteristics of clouds and vertical motion across extratropical cyclone warm fronts in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model. The validity of the modeled clouds is assessed using a combination of satellite observations from CloudSat, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), and the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. The analysis focuses on developing cyclones, to test the model's ability to generate their initial structure. To begin, the extratropical cyclones and their warm fronts are objectively identified and cyclone-local fields are mapped into a vertical transect centered on the surface warm front. To further isolate specific physics, the cyclones are separated using conditional subsetting based on additional cyclone-local variables, and the differences between the subset means are analyzed. Conditional subsets are created based on 1) the transect clouds and 2) vertical motion; 3) the strength of the temperature gradient along the warm front, as well as the storm-local 4) wind speed and 5) precipitable water (PW). The analysis shows that the model does not generate enough frontal cloud, especially at low altitude. The subsetting results reveal that, compared to the observations, the model exhibits a decoupling between cloud formation at high and low altitudes across warm fronts and a weak sensitivity to moisture. These issues are caused in part by the parameterized convection and assumptions in the stratiform cloud scheme that are valid in the subtropics. On the other hand, the model generates proper covariability of low-altitude vertical motion and cloud at the warm front and a joint dependence of cloudiness on wind and PW.

  15. Star formation efficiencies of molecular clouds in a galactic centre environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Erik; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-08-01

    We use the AREPO moving mesh code to simulate the evolution of molecular clouds exposed to a harsh environment similar to that found in the galactic centre (GC), in an effort to understand why the star formation efficiency (SFE) of clouds in this environment is so small. Our simulations include a simplified treatment of time-dependent chemistry and account for the highly non-isothermal nature of the gas and the dust. We model clouds with a total mass of 1.3 × 105 M⊙ and explore the effects of varying the mean cloud density and the virial parameter, α = Ekin/|Epot|. We vary the latter from α = 0.5 to 8.0, and so many of the clouds that we simulate are gravitationally unbound. We expose our model clouds to an interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and cosmic ray flux (CRF) that are both a factor of 1000 higher than the values found in the solar neighbourhood. As a reference, we also run simulations with local solar neighbourhood values of the ISRF and the CRF in order to better constrain the effects of the extreme conditions in the GC on the SFE. Despite the harsh environment and the large turbulent velocity dispersions adopted, we find that all of the simulated clouds form stars within less than a gravitational free-fall time. Increasing the virial parameter from α = 0.5 to 8.0 decreases the SFE by a factor of ˜4-10, while increasing the ISRF/CRF by a factor of 1000 decreases the SFE again by a factor of ˜2-6. However, even in our most unbound clouds, the SFE remains higher than that inferred for real GC clouds. We therefore conclude that high levels of turbulence and strong external heating are not enough by themselves to lead to a persistently low SFE at the centre of the Galaxy.

  16. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  17. DUSTER: collection of meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Ferrari, M.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-04-01

    Nanometer CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38-km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval), a balloon-borne instrument for the non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 microns. We report the collection of micron sized CaCO3 (calcite) grains. Their morphologies show evidence of melting and condensation after vaporization suggest at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. The formation environment of the collected grains was probably a dense dust cloud formed by the disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the Earth's atmosphere.

  18. Oligomerization as a potential mechanism for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmeen, F.; Sauret, N.; Claeys, M.; Maria, P. C.; Massi, L.

    2009-04-01

    Electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to investigate oligomer formation in dark chamber experiments designed to study the polymerization conditions of common atmospheric photooxidation products without photochemical action. Methylglyoxal has been selected as the monomer considering, it is a gas-phase product from the atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and terpenes (biogenic sources) as well as of aromatic compounds (anthropogenic sources). Aqueous-phase oligomer formation of methylglyoxal has been investigated in a simulated cloud matrix, under dark conditions in view of its short life time (~1.6 hrs). A mechanistic pathway for the growth of oligomers via aldol condensation under cloud conditions and in the absence of UV-light and the OH radical is proposed here for the first time. Soluble oligomers (n=1-12) formed in the course of acid-catalyzed aldol condensation have been detected and identified by positive and negative ion ESI-MS, while their relative abundance is estimated from the full-scan mass spectra. In particular, oligomer abundances and their adduct formation was considered with special emphasis on the structural elucidation of these oligomers and their corresponding adduct products. The oligomer series starts with a β-hydroxy ketone via aldol condensation and oligomers are formed by multiple addition of C3H4O2 units (72 Da) to the parent β-hydroxy ketone. MS2 ion trap experiments have been performed to structurally characterize the oligomers. Oligomers could form under conditions encountered in clouds even at micromolar concentrations and thus could significantly result in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) after cloud droplet evaporation. Therefore, it is proposed that oligomer formation does not only occur during droplet evaporation when the concentrations of products increase but could as well be an in-cloud process and substantially enhance in-cloud SOA yields.

  19. The Remarkable 2003--2004 Winter and Other Recent Warm Winters in the Arctic Stratosphere Since the Late 1990s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Kruger, Kirstin; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Sena, Sara Amina; Pawson, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The 2003-2004 Arctic winter was remarkable in the approximately 50-year record of meteorological analyses. A major warming beginning in early January 2004 led to nearly 2 months of vortex disruption with high-latitude easterlies in the middle to lower stratosphere. The upper stratospheric vortex broke up in late December, but began to recover by early January, and in February and March was the strongest since regular observations began in 1979. The lower stratospheric vortex broke up in late January. Comparison with 2 previous years, 1984-1985 and 1986-1987, with prolonged midwinter warming periods shows unique characteristics of the 2003-2004 warming period: The length of the vortex disruption, the strong and rapid recovery in the upper stratosphere, and the slow progression of the warming from upper to lower stratosphere. January 2004 zonal mean winds in the middle and lower stratosphere were over 2 standard deviations below average. Examination of past variability shows that the recent frequency of major stratospheric warmings (7 in the past 6 years) is unprecedented. Lower stratospheric temperatures were unusually high during 6 of the past 7 years, with 5 having much lower than usual potential for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and ozone loss (nearly none in 1998-1999, 2001-2002, and 2003-2004, and very little in 1997-1998 and 2000-2001). Middle and upper stratospheric temperatures, however, were unusually low during and after February. The pattern of 5 of the last 7 years with very low PSC potential would be expected to occur randomly once every 850 years. This cluster of warm winters, immediately following a period of unusually cold winters, may have important implications for possible changes in interannual variability and for determination and attribution of trends in stratospheric temperatures and ozone.

  20. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  1. Barium cloud evolution and striation formation in the magnetospheric release on September 21, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    The joint NASA-Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud (BIC) Experiment on September 21, 1971 involved the release of 1.7 kg of neutral barium at an altitude of 31,500 km at a latitude of 6.93 deg N. and a longitude of 74.40 deg W. A theoretical model describing the barium neutral cloud expansion and the ion cloud formation is developed. The mechanism of formation of the striational features observed in the release is also discussed. Two candidate instabilities, which may contribute to striation formation, are examined. The drift instability stemming from the outwardly directed drag force exerted on the ions by the outstreaming neutrals is rejected on the grounds that the ion density is too low during the collision-dominated phase of the cloud expansion to support this kind of instability. The joint action of Rayleigh-Taylor and flute instabilities plausibly accounts for the observed striational structure. This same mechanism may well be operative at times of sudden injection of plasma into the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms and may thus contribute to the formation of field-alined inhomogeneities which serve as whistler ducts.

  2. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  3. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  4. Molecules in interstellar clouds. [physical and chemical conditions of star formation and biological evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    1981-01-01

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  5. Ice nucleation by cellulose and its potential contribution to ice formation in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Möhler, O.; Yamashita, K.; Tajiri, T.; Saito, A.; Kiselev, A.; Hoffmann, N.; Hoose, C.; Jantsch, E.; Koop, T.; Murakami, M.

    2015-04-01

    Ice particles in the atmosphere influence clouds, precipitation and climate, and often form with help from aerosols that serve as ice-nucleating particles. Biological particles, including non-proteinaceous ones, contribute to the diverse spectrum of ice-nucleating particles. However, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, and their role in clouds and the climate system is poorly constrained. One biological particle type, cellulose, has been shown to exist in an airborne form that is prevalent throughout the year even at remote and elevated locations. Here we report experiments in a cloud simulation chamber to demonstrate that microcrystalline cellulose particles can act as efficient ice-nucleating particles in simulated supercooled clouds. In six immersion mode freezing experiments, we measured the ice nucleation active surface-site densities of aerosolized cellulose across a range of temperatures. Using these active surface-site densities, we developed parameters describing the ice nucleation ability of these particles and applied them to observed atmospheric cellulose and plant debris concentrations in a global aerosol model. We find that ice nucleation by cellulose becomes significant (>0.1 l-1) below about -21 °C, temperatures relevant to mixed-phase clouds. We conclude that the ability of cellulose to act as ice-nucleating particles requires a revised quantification of their role in cloud formation and precipitation.

  6. Ozone response to a CO2 doubling - Results from a stratospheric circulation model with heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitari, G.; Palermi, S.; Visconti, G.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral 3D model of the stratosphere has been used to study the sensitivity of polar ozone with respect to a carbon dioxide increase. The lower stratospheric cooling associated with an imposed CO2 doubling may increase the probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and this affect ozone. The ozone perturbation obtained with the inclusion of a simple parameterization for heterogeneous chemistry on PSCs is compared to that relative to a pure homogeneous chemistry. In both cases the temperature perturbation is determined by a CO2 doubling, while the total chlorine content is kept at the present level. It is shown that the lower temperature may increase the depth and the extension of the ozone hole by extending the area amenable to PSC formation. It may be argued that this effect, coupled with an increasing amount of chlorine, may produce a positive feedback on the ozone destruction.

  7. Secondary organic aerosol formation in cloud and fog droplets: a literature evaluation of plausibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blando, James D.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    This paper investigates the hypothesis that cloud and fog processes produce fine organic particulate matter in the atmosphere. The evidence provided suggests that cloud and fog processes could be important contributors to secondary organic aerosol formation, and the contribution of this formation pathway should be further investigated. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (1) many organic vapors present in the atmosphere are sorbed by suspended droplets and have been measured in cloud and fog water, (2) organics participate in aqueous-phase reactions, and (3) organic particulate matter is sometimes found in the size mode attributed to cloud processing (i.e. the droplet mode). Specific compounds identified as potential precursors include aldehydes (e.g. formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde), acetone, alcohols (e.g. methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and phenol), monocarboxylic acids, and organic peroxides. Carboxylic acids (e.g. diacids and oxo-acids), glyoxal, esters, organosulfur compounds, polyols, amines and amino acids are potential products of cloud and fog processing.

  8. Lifetime Extension of Cirrus Cloud Ice Particles upon Contamination with HCl and HNO3 under conditions of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Delval, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Ice particles in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) are the seat of heterogeneous chemical processes that are important in polar ozone chemistry. Estimated evaporative lifetimes of typical pure ice particles of a few micrometers radius in Cirrus clouds are on the order of a minute or so at 80% relative humidity, too short to allow significant heterogeneous processing. We took this as a motivation to systematically measure absolute rates of evaporation and condensation of H2O in 1 to 2 micrometer thick ice films taken as proxies for small atmospheric ice particles under controlled conditions of HCl and HNO3 trace gas contamination. We have used a multidiagnostic reaction vessel equipped with residual gas mass spectrometry (MS), FTIR absorption spectroscopy in transmission and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCMB) in order to simultaneously observe both the gas and condensed phases under relevant atmospheric conditions. The rates (Rev(H2O)) or fluxes of evaporation (Jev(H2O)) of H2O from thin ice films contaminated by a measured amount of HCl in the range of 10% of a formal monolayer to 20 formal monolayers decreased by factors of between 2 and 50 depending on parameters such as temperature of deposition (Tdep), rate (RHCl) and dose (NHCl) of contaminant doping. Experiments with HCl fell into two categories as far as the decrease of Jev with the average mole fraction of contaminant (χHCl) in the remaining ice slab was concerned: one group where Jev(H2O) decreased gradually after pure ice evaporated, and another group where Jev(H2O) abruptly changes with χHCl after evaporation of excess ice. FTIR spectroscopy revealed an unknown, yet crystalline form of HCl hydrate upon HCl doping that does not correspond to a known crystalline hydrate. Of importance is the observation, that the equilibrium vapor pressure of these contaminated ices correspond to that of pure ice even after evaporation of excess ice at the characteristic rate of pure ice evaporation

  9. Tiny Molten Droplets, Dusty Clouds, and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2008-11-01

    Chondrules, millimeter-sized spherules that formed as rapidly-cooled molten droplets, are characteristic of chondrite meteorites. If they formed at low pressure in the solar nebula (the cloud of gas and dust surrounding the infant Sun and from which the planets formed), then they should have lost almost all their inventories of volatile elements, such as sodium, because volatile elements would have boiled off the chondrules when they were molten. Conel Alexander (Carnegie Institution of Washington) and colleagues at Carnegie, the U.S. Geological Survey (Reston), and the American Museum of Natural History (New York) show that there was little sodium loss. They measured the sodium concentrations in numerous crystals of olivine inside chondrules in the Semarkona meteorite. The results show that the variations in concentrations from the centers of crystals to their edges are consistent with crystallization in a molten droplet that was not losing sodium to the surrounding gas. These results are supported by independent measurements by Alexander Borisov (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) and colleagues at the University of Hannover, Georg-August-University Goettingen, and Koln University, all in Germany. Sodium loss could have been suppressed if the gas surrounding each chondrule had a much higher pressure of sodium than that expected for the solar nebula. Such a high pressure of sodium is most easily explained if chondrules formed in a region with a high density of solids. Alexander and his co-workers argue that such dense regions could have enough mass in a small space to collapse by gravity, perhaps forming planetesimals, the first step in constructing the inner planets.

  10. Giant Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Non-Grand Design Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.

    2012-01-01

    Although the internal physical properties of molecular clouds have been extensively studied (Solomon et al. 1987), a more detailed understanding of their origin and evolution in different types of galaxies is needed. In order to disentangle the details of this process, we performed CO(1-0) CARMA observations of the eastern part of the multi-armed galaxy NGC 6946. Although we found no evidence of an angular offset between molecular gas, atomic gas and star formation regions in our observations (Tamburro et al. 2008), we observe a clear radial progression from regions where molecular gas dominates over atomic gas (for r ≤ 2.8 kpc) to regions where the gas becomes mainly atomic (5.6 kpc ≤ r ≤ 7.6 kpc) when azimuthally averaged. In addition, we found that the densest concentrations of molecular gas are located on arms, particularly where they appear to intersect, which is in concordance with the predictions by simulations of the spiral galaxies with an active potential (Clarke & Gittins 2006; Dobbs & Bonnell 2008). At CO(1-0) resolution (140 pc), we were able to find CO emitting complexes with masses greater than those of typical Giant Molecular Clouds (105-106 M⊙). To identify GMCs individually and make a more detailed study of their physical properties, we made D array observations of CO(2-1) toward the densest concentrations of gas, achieving a resolution similar to GMCs sizes found in other galaxies (Bolatto et al. 2008). We present first results about differences in properties of the on-arm clouds and inter-arm clouds. We found that, in general, on-arm clouds present broader line widths, are more massive and more active in star formation than inter-arm clouds. We investigated if the velocity dispersion observed in CO(1-0) emitting complexes reflects velocity differences between unresolved smaller clouds, or if it corresponds to actual internal turbulence of the gas observed.

  11. A possible role of ground-based microorganisms on cloud formation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, S.; Nozière, B.; Hultberg, M.; Alsberg, T.; Magnér, J.; Nilsson, E. D.; Artaxo, P.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of clouds is an important process for the atmosphere, the hydrological cycle, and climate, but some aspects of it are not completely understood. In this work, we show that microorganisms might affect cloud formation without leaving the Earth's surface by releasing biological surfactants (or biosurfactants) in the environment, that make their way into atmospheric aerosols and could significantly enhance their activation into cloud droplets. In the first part of this work, the cloud-nucleating efficiency of standard biosurfactants was characterized and found to be better than that of any aerosol material studied so far, including inorganic salts. These results identify molecular structures that give organic compounds exceptional cloud-nucleating properties. In the second part, atmospheric aerosols were sampled at different locations: a temperate coastal site, a marine site, a temperate forest, and a tropical forest. Their surface tension was measured and found to be below 30 mN/m, the lowest reported for aerosols, to our knowledge. This very low surface tension was attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, the only natural substances able to reach to such low values. The presence of strong microbial surfactants in aerosols would be consistent with the organic fractions of exceptional cloud-nucleating efficiency recently found in aerosols, and with the correlations between algae bloom and cloud cover reported in the Southern Ocean. The results of this work also suggest that biosurfactants might be common in aerosols and thus of global relevance. If this is confirmed, a new role for microorganisms on the atmosphere and climate could be identified.

  12. An explicit study of aerosol mass conversion and its parameterization in warm rain formation of cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Fen, J.; Ungar, R. K.

    2013-10-01

    The life time of atmospheric aerosols is highly affected by in-cloud scavenging processes. Aerosol mass conversion from aerosols embedded in cloud droplets into aerosols embedded in raindrops is a pivotal pathway for wet removal of aerosols in clouds. The aerosol mass conversion rate in the bulk microphysics parameterizations is always assumed to be linearly related to the precipitation production rate, which includes the cloud water autoconversion rate and the cloud water accretion rate. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration has typically been considered to be the same as the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration. However, the mass of an aerosol embedded in a cloud droplet is not linearly proportional to the mass of the cloud droplet. A simple linear relationship cannot be drawn between the precipitation production rate and the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate. In this paper, we studied the evolution of aerosol mass concentration conversion rates in a warm rain formation process with a 1.5-dimensional non-hydrostatic convective cloud and aerosol interaction model in the bin microphysics. We found that the ratio of the aerosol mass conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration can be statistically expressed by the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration with an exponential function. We further gave some regression equations to determine aerosol conversions in the warm rain formation under different threshold radii of raindrops and different aerosol size distributions.

  13. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VII - Opacity and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of variations in the Rosseland mean opacity of dust grains on numerical models of three-dimensional protostellar collapse and fragmentation. In particular, it is found that increasing the dust grain opacity by factors of three to four has little effect upon the gross characteristics of protostellar fragmentation. Consequently, theoretical quantities such as the estimated minimum protostellar mass for Population I star formation are insensitive to the precise value of the opacity.

  14. Diagnosing Warm Frontal Cloud Formation in a GCM: A Novel Approach using Conditional Subsetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, J. F.; Naud, C. M.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    This study analyzes characteristics of clouds and vertical motion across extratropical cyclone warm fronts in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model. The validity of the modeled clouds is assessed using a combination of satellite observations from CloudSat, CALIPSO and AMSR-E and the NASA-MERRA reanalysis. The analysis focuses on developing cyclones, to test the model's ability to generate their initial structure. To begin, the extratropical cyclones and their warm fronts are objectively identified and cyclone-local fields are mapped into a vertical transect centered on the surface warm front. To further isolate specific physics, the cyclones are separated using conditional subsetting based on additional cyclone-local variables, and the differences between the subset means are analyzed. Conditional subsets are created based on: (1, 2) the transect clouds and vertical motion, (3) the strength of the temperature gradient along the warm front, as well as the storm-local (4) wind speed and (5) precipitable water (PW). The analysis shows that the model does not generate enough frontal cloud, especially at low altitude. The subsetting results reveal that compared to the observations, the model exhibits a decoupling between cloud formation at high and low altitudes across warm fronts and a weak sensitivity to moisture. These issues are caused in part by the parameterized convection and assumptions in the stratiform cloud scheme that are valid in the subtropics. On the other hand, the model generates proper co-variability of low-altitude vertical motion and cloud at the warm front, and a joint dependence of cloudiness on wind and PW.

  15. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. II. Signatures of gravitational collapse of IRDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Federrath, C.

    2015-06-01

    We analyse column density and temperature maps derived from Herschel dust continuum observations of a sample of prominent, massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) i.e. G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, G28.37+0.07, and G28.53-0.25. We disentangle the velocity structure of the clouds using 13CO 1→0 and 12CO 3→2 data, showing that these IRDCs are the densest regions in massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and not isolated features. The probability distribution function (PDF) of column densities for all clouds have a power-law distribution over all (high) column densities, regardless of the evolutionary stage of the cloud: G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, and G28.37+0.07 contain (proto)-stars, while G28.53-0.25 shows no signs of star formation. This is in contrast to the purely log-normal PDFs reported for near and/or mid-IR extinction maps. We only find a log-normal distribution for lower column densities, if we perform PDFs of the column density maps of the whole GMC in which the IRDCs are embedded. By comparing the PDF slope and the radial column density profile of three of our clouds, we attribute the power law to the effect of large-scale gravitational collapse and to local free-fall collapse of pre- and protostellar cores for the highest column densities. A significant impact on the cloud properties from radiative feedback is unlikely because the clouds are mostly devoid of star formation. Independent from the PDF analysis, we find infall signatures in the spectral profiles of 12CO for G28.37+0.07 and G11.11-0.12, supporting the scenario of gravitational collapse. Our results are in line with earlier interpretations that see massive IRDCs as the densest regions within GMCs, which may be the progenitors of massive stars or clusters. At least some of the IRDCs are probably the same features as ridges (high column density regions with N> 1023 cm-2 over small areas), which were defined for nearby IR-bright GMCs. Because IRDCs are only confined to the densest (gravity dominated

  16. Low virial parameters in molecular clouds: Implications for high-mass star formation and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Goldsmith, Paul F. E-mail: tpillai@astro.caltech.edu

    2013-12-20

    Whether or not molecular clouds and embedded cloud fragments are stable against collapse is of utmost importance for the study of the star formation process. Only 'supercritical' cloud fragments are able to collapse and form stars. The virial parameter α = M {sub vir}/M, which compares the virial mass to the actual mass, provides one way to gauge stability against collapse. Supercritical cloud fragments are characterized by α ≲ 2, as indicated by a comprehensive stability analysis considering perturbations in pressure and density gradients. Past research has suggested that virial parameters α ≳ 2 prevail in clouds. This would suggest that collapse toward star formation is a gradual and relatively slow process and that magnetic fields are not needed to explain the observed cloud structure. Here, we review a range of very recent observational studies that derive virial parameters <<2 and compile a catalog of 1325 virial parameter estimates. Low values of α are in particular observed for regions of high-mass star formation (HMSF). These observations may argue for a more rapid and violent evolution during collapse. This would enable 'competitive accretion' in HMSF, constrain some models of 'monolithic collapse', and might explain the absence of high-mass starless cores. Alternatively, the data could point at the presence of significant magnetic fields ∼1 mG at high gas densities. We examine to what extent the derived observational properties might be biased by observational or theoretical uncertainties. For a wide range of reasonable parameters, our conclusions appear to be robust with respect to such biases.

  17. Laboratory studies of stratospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of the two sets of projects funded by the NASA grant NAG2-632, namely investigations of various thermodynamic and nucleation properties of the aqueous acid system which makes up stratospheric aerosols, and measurements of reaction probabilities directly on ice aerosols with sizes corresponding to those of polar stratospheric cloud particles. The results of these investigations are of importance for the assessment of the potential stratospheric effects of future fleets of supersonic aircraft. In particular, the results permit to better estimate the effects of increased amounts of water vapor and nitric acid (which forms from nitrogen oxides) on polar stratospheric clouds and on the chemistry induced by these clouds.

  18. Diffusion and reaction of pollutants in stratus clouds: application to nocturnal acid formation in plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, C.; Saxena, P.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the transport, turbulent diffusion, and chemical reactions of air pollutants in stratus clouds. The chemical kinetic mechanism treats 97 gaseous, heterogeneous, and aqueous reactions between 54 species. The dispersion and night-time chemistry of a power plant plume in a stratus cloud is simulated. The contributions of various chemical pathways to the formation of sulfate and nitrate, the differences between plume and background concentrations, and the effect of reduced primary emissions on secondary pollutants are discussed. Calculated sulfate and nitrate concentrations are commensurate with measured atmospheric concentrations.

  19. Stratospheric changes caused by geoengineering applications: potential repercussions and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    , larger injections might be required than previously assumed. Rasch et al. (2008) showed that smaller particles would be advantageous in terms of cooling the surface. However, with a continuous injection of sulphur dioxide into to lower tropical stratosphere aerosol size distributions with mode radii larger than 0.5 microns are likely to form. An additional complication is that the sedimenting particles tend to heat the tropical tropopause region and as a consequence the entry mixing ratio of water vapour increases. For the extreme scenario of 10 Mt/year injection SOCOL predicts an enhancement of the water vapour entry mixing ratio by more than 1 ppmv. This is predicted to have a significant impact on the radiative forcing and the total ozone, because of enhanced heterogeneous reactions and because the increased water vapour intensifies the hydrogen and chlorine catalysed ozone destruction cycles. The intense warming of the lower stratosphere further intensifies the catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Furthermore, the stratospheric circulation is predicted to change due to the strong heating of the lower stratosphere. As a consequence of the intensified meridional temperature gradient the polar vortices are strengthened with enhanced formation of polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion. The ozone loss due to changed stratospheric dynamic is four times larger than the ozone loss caused by the increase of aerosol surface for heterogeneous reactions, which would postpone the recovery of the ozone hole even more as already pointed out by Tilmes et al. [2008]. At the same time the uncertainties involved in the different modelling steps are tremendous. Model validation, by comparing model runs of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption with observations, reveals that the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere and the tropopause region is probably overestimated by SOCOL. Other CCMs show similar behaviour. This lets us conclude that with the present modelling tools we are

  20. Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Southern H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Reiko; Saito, Hiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mine, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Akira; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    1999-12-01

    We have carried out extensive 13CO(J = 1-0) observations toward 23 southern H II regions associated with bright-rimmed clouds. In total, 95 molecular clouds have been identified to be associated with the H II regions. Among the 95, 57 clouds \\ are found to be associated with 204 IRAS point sources which are candidates for young stellar objects. There is a significant increase of star-formation efficiency on the side facing to the H II regions; the luminosity-to-mass ratio, defined as the ratio of the stellar luminosity to the molecular cloud mass, is higher by an order of magnitude on the near side of the H II \\ regions than that on the far side. This indicates that molecular gas facing to the H II regions is more actively forming massive s\\ tars whose luminosity is >~ 103 LO . In addition, the number density of the IRAS point sources increases by a factor of 2 on the near side of the H II regions compared with on the far side. These results strongly suggest that the active formation of massive stars on the near side of the H II regions is due to the effects of the H II regions, such as the compression of molecular material by the ionization/shock fronts. For the whole Galaxy, we estimate that the present star-formation rate under such effects is at least 0.2-0.4 MO yr-1, corresponding to a few 10% by mass.

  1. Star formation in a turbulent framework: from giant molecular clouds to protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    Turbulence is thought to be a primary driving force behind the early stages of star formation. In this framework large, self-gravitating, turbulent clouds fragment into smaller clouds which in turn fragment into even smaller ones. At the end of this cascade we find the clouds which collapse into protostars. Following this process is extremely challenging numerically due to the large dynamical range, so in this paper we propose a semi-analytic framework which is able to model star formation from the largest, giant molecular cloud scale, to the final protostellar size scale. Because of the simplicity of the framework it is ideal for theoretical experimentation to explore the principal processes behind different aspects of star formation, at the cost of introducing strong assumptions about the collapse process. The basic version of the model discussed in this paper only contains turbulence, gravity and crude assumptions about feedback; nevertheless it can reproduce the observed core mass function and provide the protostellar system mass function (PSMF), which shows a striking resemblance to the observed initial mass function (IMF), if a non-negligible fraction of gravitational energy goes into turbulence. Furthermore we find that to produce a universal IMF protostellar feedback must be taken into account otherwise the PSMF peak shows a strong dependence on the background temperature.

  2. The Roles of Mineral Dusts and Coastal Aerosol in Cold and Warm Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline

    The indirect effect of atmospheric aerosol is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the Earth's radiative budget. This uncertainty has been attributed to our lack of understanding of processes leading to cloud formation. Consequently, this thesis investigates the abilities of two main types of aerosol to form warm and mixed-phase clouds. To study the mixed-phase cloud formation properties of 24 atmospherically-relevant minerals, their deposition ice nucleation properties were studied using a single experimental method. From a set of minerals present in mineral dusts it was found that feldspars were the most efficient ice nuclei. In addition, the warm cloud formation properties, or hygroscopicity (e), of coastal ambient aerosol and its organic components were investigated in Ucluelet, BC. While the e of 50 nm and 100 nm particles exhibited a wide size-independent variation (0.14 - 1.08), the e of its organic fraction was estimated to be between 0.3 and 0.5.

  3. Star formation in massive Milky Way molecular clouds: Building a bridge to distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Sarah Elizabeth

    The Kennicutt-Schmidt relation is an empirical power-law linking the surface density of the star formation rate (SigmaSFR) to the surface density of gas (Sigmagas ) averaged over the observed face of a starforming galaxy Kennicutt (1998). The original presentation used observations of CO to measure gas density and H alpha emission to measure the population of hot, massive young stars (and infer the star formation rate). Observations of Sigma SFR from a census of young stellar objects in nearby molecular clouds in our Galaxy are up to 17 times higher than the extragalactic relation would predict given their Sigmagas. These clouds primarily form low-mass stars that are essentially invisible to star formation rate tracers. A sample of six giant molecular cloud (GMC) complexes with signposts of massive star formation was identified in our galaxy. The regions selected have a range of total luminosity and morphology. Deep ground-based observations in the near-infrared with NEWFIRM and IRAC observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope were used to conduct a census of the young stellar content associated with each of these clouds. The star formation rates from the stellar census in each of these regions was compared with the star formation rates measured by extragalactic star formation rate tracers based on monochromatic mid-infrared luminosities. Far-infrared Herschel observations from 160 through 500 mum were used to determine the column density and temperature in each region. The region NGC 6334 served as a test case to compare the Herschel column density measurements with the measurements for near-infrared extinction. The combination of the column density maps and the stellar census lets us examine SigmaSFR vs. Sigma gas for the massive GMCs. These regions are consistent with the results for the low-mass molecular clouds, indicating Sigma SFR levels that are higher than predicted based on Sigma gas. The overall Sigmagas levels are higher for the massive star forming

  4. Reaction of ClO with NO[sub 3]: OClO formation and night-time O[sub 3] loss

    SciTech Connect

    Toumi, R. )

    1994-06-22

    The author presents the results of a model study of the atmospheric chemistry of ClO with NO[sub 3]. No effort is made to consider heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric cloud nuclei for example. There seem to be two major product channels. One results in the formation of Cl and NO[sub 2], and is able to contribute to catalytic ozone destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere at night. The other process results in OClO formation at night, and is a major source of this molecule in the upper stratosphere. For the arctic this reaction does not make a significant contribution in the lower stratosphere.

  5. Recent Star Formation in the Lupus Clouds as Seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, Kazi L. J.; Benedettini, Milena

    We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 μm maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key-Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III and its decreasing SFR suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, that after having experienced a major star formation event, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR. Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR, however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower than in Lupus I, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak.

  6. High-Mass Star Formation and Infrared Dark Clouds in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Susanna C.

    2011-05-01

    Massive stars play many important roles in the universe. However, while massive stars are very luminous and thus easy to observe from large distances, the early stages of the formation of high-mass stars are difficult to observe and therefore not well-understood. In the 1990s, a new class of interstellar clouds called infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) was discovered in mid-IR surveys of the Galactic Plane. These clouds are dense (nH2 > 10^5 cm^-3), cold (T < 20K), and have very high column densities (N 10^23-10^25 cm^-2). These properties, along with detections of dense cores within the clouds, have led to the conclusion that IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation. The research for my dissertation has focused on infrared dark clouds and determining their distribution in the Galaxy, their physical and chemical properties, and the role they play in high-mass star formation. In this talk I will present the results of some of this research. The Galactic distribution of a large sample of IRDCs determined from kinematic distances shows that IRDCs are largely confined to spiral arms. LTE gas masses and virial masses derived from CS (2-1) maps of a sample of IRDCs agree well with expected masses for high-mass star forming regions. I will also briefly discuss the filamentary shape of IRDCs and the "sausage instability" as a possible mechanism for the formation of high-mass star and cluster-forming cores within these filaments. The filament properties in a few cases I have observed roughly agree with theoretical predictions for this fluid instability.

  7. The Formation of First Generation Stars and Globular Clusters in Protogalactic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-07-07

    Within collapsing protogalaxies, thermal instability leads to the formation of a population of cool fragments which are confined by the pressure of a residual hot background medium. The critical mass required for the cold clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form stars is determined by both their internal temperature and external pressure. Massive first generation stars form in primordial clouds with sufficient column density to shield themselves from external UV photons emitted by nearby massive stars or AGNs. Less massive photoionized clouds gain mass due to ram pressure stripping by the residual halo gas. Collisions may also trigger thermal instability and fragmentation into cloudlets. While most cloudlets have substellar masses, the largest become self-gravitating and collapse to form protostellar cores without further fragmentation. The initial stellar mass function is established as these cores capture additional residual cloudlets. Energy dissipation from the mergers ensures that the cluster remains bound in the limit of low star formation efficiency. Dissipation also promotes the formation and retention of the most massive stars in the cluster center. On the scale of the protogalactic clouds, the formation of massive stars generates intense UV radiation which photoionizes gas and quenches star formation in nearby regions. As gas density accumulates in the center of the galactic potential, the self-regulated star formation rate increases. At the location where most of the residual gas can be converted into stars on its internal dynamical timescale, a galaxy attains its asymptotic kinematic structure such as exponential profiles, Tully-Fisher, and Faber-Jackson laws.

  8. Simultaneous balloonborne measurements of stratospheric water vapor and ozone in the polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J. ); Deshler, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Vertical profiles of stratospheric water vapor and ozone were measured together at McMurdo and South Pole Stations in Antarctica, and at Kiruna, Sweden, on several occasions during the austral spring of 1990 and the boreal winter of 1991. The Antarctic data indicated that major dehydration had occurred on a continental scale over the winter stratospheric cloud formation period leaving only 2 to 3 ppmv water vapor between 11 and 19 km. Measurements before and after movement of the boundary of the polar vortex across McMurdo detected increases in both water vapor and ozone in the 17 to 20 km region. This injected layer was still observed at South Pole Station a month later suggesting continental proportions. In early November, with the vortex still intact, South Pole measurements indicated a substantial degree of inhomogeneity in both water vapor and ozone in the lower stratosphere. In comparison, stratospheric water vapor measurements in the Arctic gave values of 4 to 5 ppmv indicating the absence of the gross stratospheric dehydration effects obvious in the Antarctic, and they did not reveal significant structure except on one occasion with very cold temperatures ({minus}90C) at 25 km and nacreous cloud displays.

  9. Theory of molecular formation by radiative association in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of molecular formation by radiative association is presented which is consistent with angular momentum being conserved during the encounter and which incorporates explicitly the long-range attraction between the reactants. It is pointed out that the activated complex would not have a Boltzmann energy distribution should the rotational and kinetic temperatures of the reactants differ, and it is shown how allowance for this may be made. Account is taken of the inaccessibility of a considerable fraction of the nuclear spin states of the complex. Methods are given for treating the effect which the finiteness of the dissociation frequency may have on the association rate. Calculations on some reactions of interest are performed. A very simple semiempirical formula for the rate coefficient for radiative association is also given.

  10. Investigation of Low Altitude Water Ice Cloud Formation in Mars using a Laboratory Based Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino Moreno, L. A.; Abbatt, J.

    2012-12-01

    The ice nuclei abilities of the two available Martian regolith analogs (the Mojave Mars simulant and Johnson Space Center Mars-1) to form low altitude water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere were investigated with the help of the University of Toronto continuous flow diffusion chamber (UT-CFDC). Polydisperse aerosol particles (below 1μm) generated using a dry disperser and monodisperse aerosol particles (100 nm and 240 nm) generated with an atomizer were exposed to different supersaturations with respect to ice as a function of temperature. Experiments using 100 nm size selected sulfuric acid particles defined the homogeneous freezing threshold in the chamber. Both simulants were found to be active ice nuclei in the deposition nucleation mode between 223 K and 203 K. The Mojave Mars simulant particles were found to be slightly better ice nuclei than the Johnson Space Center Mars-1 particles since they require lower supersaturations to nucleate ice at the different tested temperatures. It was observed that the critical supersaturation (Scrit) to activate 1 % of the aerosol particles increased with decreasing temperature. It was also found that Scrit decreased when the particle size was increased from 100 nm to 240 nm. The Johnson Space Center Mars-1 analog behaves similarly to the well known terrestrial ice nuclei such as kaolinite and Arizona test dust particles, whereas, the Mojave Mars simulant behaves closer to another clay, montmorillonite. The m parameter values and the contact angles were calculated from the experimental Scrit. Those values follow the literature trends; however, our values are larger than in previous studies perhaps due to the use of submicron aerosol particles and the lower sensitivity of our system for determining the Scrit values. A general finding is that the barrier to ice nucleation becomes larger at lower temperatures. This behaviour is typically neglected in most of the microphysical models since the nucleation rates at this

  11. Studies of the effects of electron cloud formation on beam dynamics at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J. A.; Calvey, J. R.; Dugan, G.; Livezey, J. A.; Kreinick, D.L.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R. L.; Ohmi, K.; Furman, M. A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) has commenced operation as a linear collider damping ring test bed following its conversion from an e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider in 2008. A core component of the research program is the measurement of effects of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron cloud formation on beam dynamics. We have studied the interaction of the beam with the cloud with measurements of coherent tune shifts and emittance growth in various bunch train configurations, bunch currents, beam energies, and bunch lengths, for both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. This paper compares a subset of these measurements to modeling results from the two-dimensional cloud simulation packages ECLOUD and POSINST. These codes each model most of the tune shift measurements with remarkable accuracy, while some comparisons merit further investigation.

  12. Multiphase galaxy formation: high-velocity clouds and the missing baryon problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maller, Ariyeh H.; Bullock, James S.

    2004-12-01

    The standard treatment of cooling in cold dark matter haloes assumes that all of the gas within a `cooling radius' cools and contracts monolithically to fuel galaxy formation. Here we take into account the expectation that the hot gas in galactic haloes is thermally unstable and prone to fragmentation during cooling and we show that the implications are more far-reaching than previously expected: allowing multiphase cooling fundamentally alters expectations about gas infall in galactic haloes and naturally gives rise to a characteristic upper limit on the masses of galaxies, as observed. Specifically, we argue that cooling should proceed via the formation of high-density, ~104 K clouds, pressure-confined within a hot gas background. The background medium that emerges has a low density, and can survive as a hydrostatically stable corona with a long cooling time. The fraction of halo baryons contained in the residual hot core component grows with halo mass because the cooling density increases with gas temperature, and this leads to an upper-mass limit in quiescent, non-merged galaxies of ~1011 Msolar. In this scenario, galaxy formation is fuelled by the infall of pressure-supported clouds. For Milky-Way-size systems, clouds of mass ~5 × 106 Msolar that formed or merged within the last several Gyr should still exist as a residual population in the halo, with a total mass in clouds of ~2 × 1010 Msolar. The baryonic mass of the Milky Way galaxy is explained naturally in this model, and is a factor of 2 smaller than would result in the standard treatment without feedback. We expect clouds in galactic haloes to be ~1 kpc in size and to extend ~150 kpc from galactic centres. The predicted properties of Milky Way clouds match well the observed radial velocity distribution, angular sizes, column densities and velocity widths of high-velocity clouds around our Galaxy. The clouds we predict are also of the type needed to explain high-ion absorption systems at z < 1, and the

  13. Evolution of prolate molecular clouds at H II boundaries - II. Formation of BRCs of asymmetrical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnear, T. M.; Miao, J.; White, G. J.; Sugitani, K.; Goodwin, S.

    2015-06-01

    A systematic investigation on the evolution of a prolate cloud at an H II boundary is conducted using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in order to understand the mechanism for a variety of irregular morphological structures found at the boundaries of various H II regions. The prolate molecular clouds in this investigation are set with their semimajor axes at inclinations between 0° and 90° to a plane-parallel ionizing radiation flux. A set of four parameters, the number density n, the ratio of major to minor axis γ, the inclination angle ϕ and the incident flux FEUV, are used to define the initial state of the simulated clouds. The dependence of the evolution of a prolate cloud under radiation-driven implosion (RDI) on each of the four parameters is investigated. It is found that (i) in addition to the well-studied standard type A, B or C bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs), many other types such as asymmetrical BRCs, filamentary structures and irregular horse-head structures could also be developed at H II boundaries with only simple initial conditions; (ii) the final morphological structures are very sensitive to the four initial parameters, especially to the initial density and the inclination; (iii) the previously defined ionizing radiation penetration depth can still be used as a good indicator of the final morphology. Based on the simulation results, the formation time-scales and masses of the early RDI-triggered star formation from clouds of different initial conditions are also estimated. Finally a unified mechanism for the various morphological structures found in many different H II boundaries is suggested.

  14. Unfolding the laws of star formation: the density distribution of molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Kainulainen, Jouni; Federrath, Christoph; Henning, Thomas

    2014-04-11

    The formation of stars shapes the structure and evolution of entire galaxies. The rate and efficiency of this process are affected substantially by the density structure of the individual molecular clouds in which stars form. The most fundamental measure of this structure is the probability density function of volume densities (ρ-PDF), which determines the star formation rates predicted with analytical models. This function has remained unconstrained by observations. We have developed an approach to quantify ρ-PDFs and establish their relation to star formation. The ρ-PDFs instigate a density threshold of star formation and allow us to quantify the star formation efficiency above it. The ρ-PDFs provide new constraints for star formation theories and correctly predict several key properties of the star-forming interstellar medium. PMID:24723608

  15. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Timothy W.; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback—consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state—slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the “lapse rate feedback” in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. PMID:26324919

  16. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Timothy W; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-09-15

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback--consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state--slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼ 10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the "lapse rate feedback" in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. PMID:26324919

  17. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  18. Star Formation in the Molecular Cloud Associated with the Monkey Head Nebula: Sequential or Spontaneous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Imura, Kenji; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Fujisawa, Kenta; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Nakano, Makoto; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    We mapped the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of NH3 toward the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with a 1.'6 angular resolution using a Kashima 34 m telescope operated by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The kinetic temperature of the molecular gas is 15-30 K in the eastern part and 30-50 K in the western part. The warmer gas is confined to a small region close to the compact H II region S252A. The cooler gas is extended over the cloud even near the extended H II region, the MHN. We made radio continuum observations at 8.4 GHz using the Yamaguchi 32 m radio telescope. The resultant map shows no significant extension from the Hα image. This means that the molecular cloud is less affected by the MHN, suggesting that the molecular cloud did not form by the expanding shock of the MHN. Although the spatial distribution of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources suggests that triggered low- and intermediate-mass star formation took place locally around S252A, but the exciting star associated with it should be formed spontaneously in the molecular cloud.

  19. STAR FORMATION IN THE MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATED WITH THE MONKEY HEAD NEBULA: SEQUENTIAL OR SPONTANEOUS?

    SciTech Connect

    Chibueze, James O.; Imura, Kenji; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nakano, Makoto; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    We mapped the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of NH{sub 3} toward the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with a 1.'6 angular resolution using a Kashima 34 m telescope operated by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The kinetic temperature of the molecular gas is 15-30 K in the eastern part and 30-50 K in the western part. The warmer gas is confined to a small region close to the compact H II region S252A. The cooler gas is extended over the cloud even near the extended H II region, the MHN. We made radio continuum observations at 8.4 GHz using the Yamaguchi 32 m radio telescope. The resultant map shows no significant extension from the H{alpha} image. This means that the molecular cloud is less affected by the MHN, suggesting that the molecular cloud did not form by the expanding shock of the MHN. Although the spatial distribution of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources suggests that triggered low- and intermediate-mass star formation took place locally around S252A, but the exciting star associated with it should be formed spontaneously in the molecular cloud.

  20. Laboratory and Cloud Chamber Studies of Formation Processes and Properties of Atmospheric Ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisner, T.; Abdelmonem, A.; Benz, S.; Brinkmann, M.; Möhler, O.; Rzesanke, D.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice in tropospheric clouds controls the evolution of precipitation and thereby influences climate and weather via a complex network of dynamical and microphysical processes. At higher altitudes, ice particles in cirrus clouds or contrails modify the radiative energy budget by direct interaction with the shortwave and longwave radiation. In order to improve the parameterisation of the complex microphysical and dynamical processes leading to and controlling the evolution of tropospheric ice, laboratory experiments are performed at the IMK Karlsruhe both on a single particle level and in the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA. Single particle experiments in electrodynamic levitation lend themselves to the study of the interaction between cloud droplets and aerosol particles under extremely well characterized and static conditions in order to obtain microphysical parameters as freezing nucleation rates for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation. They also allow the observation of the freezing dynamics and of secondary ice formation and multiplication processes under controlled conditions and with very high spatial and temporal resolution. The inherent droplet charge in these experiments can be varied over a wide range in order to assess the influence of the electrical state of the cloud on its microphysics. In the AIDA chamber on the other hand, these processes are observable under the realistic dynamic conditions of an expanding and cooling cloud- parcel with interacting particles and are probed simultaneously by a comprehensive set of analytical instruments. By this means, microphysical processes can be studied in their complex interplay with dynamical processes as for example coagulation or particle evaporation and growth via the Bergeron - Findeisen process. Shortwave scattering and longwave absorption properties of the nucleating and growing ice crystals are probed by in situ polarised laser light scattering measurements and infrared extinction

  1. Formation of Brown Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol during Multiphase Cloud Simulations using the CESAM Chamber Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Welsh, H.; De Haan, D. O.; Doussin, J. F.; Pednekar, R.; Caponi, L.; Pangui, E.; Gratien, A.; Cazaunau, M.; Formenti, P.; Pajunoja, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the formation of aqueous brown carbon (aqBrC) from methylglyoxal and methylamine in multiphase reactions using the CESAM chamber facility at the University Paris-Est Creteil. Following reaction in the chamber, droplets and particles were sampled with a Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS), a capillary waveguide cell for UV/visible spectroscopy, and a total organic carbon analyzer (TOC). Particle size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and used to determine the mass absorption coefficient (a normalized absorbance measurement). Absorption spectra were recorded while aerosol or gas phase aqBrC precursors were introduced into the humid chamber. Sampling was continuous during and after cloud events. The events lasted 5-10 minutes and produced measurable brown carbon signal at 365 nm. When lights were used, absorbance at 365 nm decreased steadily indicating photobleaching of aqBrC products or preferential formation of different, non-absorbing products. Although absorptivity increases prior to cloud formation, cloud events produce sharp increased in aqBrC absorptivity. While measurable absorbance at 365 nm indicates aqBrC formation, very little absorbance was recorded beyond 450 nm indicating that the products were not as oligomerized as products observed in prior work in multi-day, bulk phase simulations.

  2. Laboratory studies of chemical and photochemical processes relevant to stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(sub x) and NO(sub x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO2 radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. In this annual report, we focus on our recent accomplishments in the quantitative spectroscopy of the HO2 radical. This report details the measurements of the broadening coefficients for the v(sub 2) vibrational band. Further measurements of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates relevant to the polar stratospheric cloud formation indicate the importance of metastable crystalline phases of H2SO4, HNO3, and H2O. Large particles produced from these metastable phases may provide a removal mechanism for HNO3 in the polar stratosphere.

  3. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R.P.; Jacobson, M.Z.

    1994-06-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  4. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    1994-01-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  5. Attack of the flying snakes: formation of isolated H I clouds by fragmentation of long streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Jáchym, P.; Keenan, O.; Minchin, R. F.; Palouš, J.; Smith, R.; Wünsch, R.

    2016-09-01

    The existence of long (>100 kpc) H I streams and small (<20 kpc) free-floating H I clouds is well known. While the formation of the streams has been investigated extensively, and the isolated clouds are often purported to be interaction debris, little research has been done on the formation of optically dark H I clouds that are not part of a larger stream. One possibility is that such features result from the fragmentation of more extended streams, while another idea is that they are primordial, optically dark galaxies. We test the validity of the fragmentation scenario (via harassment) using numerical simulations. In order to compare our numerical models with observations, we present catalogues of both the known long H I streams (42 objects) and free-floating H I clouds suggested as dark galaxy candidates (51 objects). In particular, we investigate whether it is possible to form compact features with high velocity widths (>100 km s-1), similar to observed clouds which are otherwise intriguing dark galaxy candidates. We find that producing such features is possible but extremely unlikely, occurring no more than 0.2% of the time in our simulations. In contrast, we find that genuine dark galaxies could be extremely stable to harassment and remain detectable even after 5 Gyr in the cluster environment (with the important caveat that our simulations only explore harassment and do not yet include the intracluster medium, heating and cooling, or star formation). We also discuss the possibility that such objects could be the progenitors of recently discovered ultra diffuse galaxies.

  6. Collapse of primordial gas clouds and the formation of quasar black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Abraham; Rasio, Frederic A.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of quasar black holes during the hydrodynamic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds is discussed. The dissipational collapse and long-term dynamical evolution of these systems is analyzed using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The calculations focus on the final collapse stages of the inner baryonic component and therefore ignore the presence of dark matter. Two types of initial conditions are considered: uniformly rotating spherical clouds, and iirotational ellipsoidal clouds. In both cases the clouds are initially cold, homogeneous, and not far from rotational support (T/(absolute value of W) approximately equals 0.1). Although the details of the dynamical evolution depend sensitively on the initial conditions, the qualitative features of the final configurations do not. Most of the gas is found to fragment into small dense clumps, that eventually make up a spheroidal component resembling a galactic bulge. About 5% of the initial mass remains in the form of a smooth disk of gas supported by rotation in the gravitational potential potential well of the outer spheroid. If a central seed black hole of mass approximately greater than 10(exp 6) solar mass forms, it can grow by steady accretion from the disk and reach a typical quasar black hole mass approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in less than 5 x 10(exp 8) yr. In the absence of a sufficiently massive seed, dynamical instabilities in a strongly self-gravitating inner region of the disk will inhibit steady accretion of gas and may prevent the immediate formation of quasar.

  7. Rapid collisional evolution of comets during the formation of the Oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Stern, S A; Weissman, P R

    2001-02-01

    The Oort cloud of comets was formed by the ejection of icy planetesimals from the region of giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune--during their formation. Dynamical simulations have previously shown that comets reach the Oort cloud only after being perturbed into eccentric orbits that result in close encounters with the giant planets, which then eject them to distant orbits about 10(4) to 10(5) AU from the Sun (1 AU is the average Earth-Sun distance). All of the Oort cloud models constructed until now simulate its formation using only gravitational effects; these include the influence of the Sun, the planets and external perturbers such as passing stars and Galactic tides. Here we show that physical collisions between comets and small debris play a fundamental and hitherto unexplored role throughout most of the ejection process. For standard models of the protosolar nebula (starting with a minimum-mass nebula) we find that collisional evolution of comets is so severe that their erosional lifetimes are much shorter than the timescale for dynamical ejection. It therefore appears that collisions will prevent most comets escaping from most locations in the region of the giant planets until the disk mass there declines sufficiently that the dynamical ejection timescale is shorter than the collisional lifetime. One consequence is that the total mass of comets in the Oort cloud may be less than currently believed. PMID:11214311

  8. Gas Cloud Accretion onto the SMBH SgrA* and Formation of Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    A dense gas cloud is rapidly approaching the Galactic supermassive black hole (SMBH) SgrA^*, and will be ~ 2,200 Schwarzschild radii from the SMBH at the pericenter of its eccentric orbit in Sep 2013. The cloud is expected to be disrupted by instabilities and tidal forces, and the cloud fragments accrete onto the SMBH on the dynamical timescale of several days to several weeks, suggesting a jet formation in 2013. So we are carrying out daily monitoring observations of SgrA^* in near-infrared and radio wavelengths, and we propose quick follow-up observations with Subaru/Gemini. Br-gamma line emission maps obtained with Gemini/NIFS will be used to fine tune our 3D simulation to estimate how much mass is, and when the fragment is accreted onto the SMBH. Polarimetric signals from a jet taken with Subaru/HiCIAO will be compared with the finely tuned simulation to understand the timescale of a jet formation, and to investigate the correlation between the accreted mass of the cloud fragment and a luminosity of a newly-formed jet. Spectroscopic and imaging observations from 1.6 - 11 mum (Subaru/IRCS, COMICS) will also be conducted to understand processes responsible for near to mid-infrared emission during the accretion event.

  9. Population I Cepheids and understanding star formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Yogesh Chandra; Prasad Mohanty, Auro; Joshi, Santosh

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the age and spatial distributions of Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) as a function of their ages using data from the OGLE III photometric catalogue. A period - age relation derived for Classical Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has been used to find the ages of Cepheids. The age distribution of the SMC Classical Cepheids is found to have a peak at log(Age) = 8.40 ± 0.10 which suggests that a major star formation event might have occurred in the SMC about 250 ± 50 Myr ago. It is believed that this star forming burst had been triggered by close interactions of the SMC with the LMC and/or the Milky Way. A comparison of the observed spatial distributions of the Cepheids and open star clusters has also been carried out to study the star formation scenario in the SMC.

  10. A High-Latitude Winter Continental Low Cloud Feedback Suppresses Arctic Air Formation in Warmer Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Tziperman, E.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. It has also been found that the high-latitude lapse rate feedback plays an important role in Arctic amplification of climate change in climate model simulations, but we have little understanding of why lapse rates at high latitudes change so strongly with warming. To better understand these problems, we study Arctic air formation - the process by which a high-latitude maritime air mass is advected over a continent during polar night, cooled at the surface by radiation, and transformed into a much colder continental polar air mass - and its sensitivity to climate warming. We use a single-column version of the WRF model to conduct two-week simulations of the cooling process across a wide range of initial temperature profiles and microphysics schemes, and find that a low cloud feedback suppresses Arctic air formation in warmer climates. This cloud feedback consists of an increase in low cloud amount with warming, which shields the surface from radiative cooling, and increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ~10 days for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 oC. Given that this is about the time it takes an air mass starting over the Pacific to traverse the north American continent, this suggests that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. We find that CMIP5 climate model runs show large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, consistent with the proposed low-cloud feedback

  11. Effect of cloud-scale vertical velocity on the contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Ice nucleation is a critical process for the ice crystal formation in cirrus clouds. The relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation versus heterogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation differs between measurements and predictions from general circulation models. Here we perform large-ensemble simulations of the ice nucleation process using a cloud parcel model driven by observed vertical motions and find that homogeneous nucleation occurs rather infrequently, in agreement with recent measurement findings. When the effect of observed vertical velocity fluctuations on ice nucleation is considered in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, the relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus cloud occurrences decreases to only a few percent. However, homogeneous nucleation still has strong impacts on the cloud radiative forcing. Hence, the importance of homogeneous nucleation for cirrus cloud formation should not be dismissed on the global scale.

  12. Modelling new particle formation from Jülich plant atmosphere chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Li; Boy, Michael; Mogensen, Ditte; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Franchin, Alessandro; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kleist, Einhard; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kulmala, Markku; dal Maso, Miikka

    2013-05-01

    An MALTE-BOX model is used to study the effects of oxidation of SO2 and BVOCs to new particle formation from Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements. Several days of continuously measurements were chosen for the simulation. Our preliminary results show that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in nucleation process. Nucleation involving the oxidation of BVOCs shows better agreements with measurements.

  13. Some effects of the emissions of explosive volcanoes on the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadle, Richard D.

    1980-08-01

    A previously published 2-D numerical model of the global dispersion of an eruption cloud in the stratosphere as a function of time assumed an instantaneous injection of the eruption cloud (the source function). New calculations show that the dispersion rate is quite insensitive to the manner of introducing the source function into the model, including spreading the eruption time over 10 days. Results obtained by flying through the eruption clouds from explosive volcanoes in Guatemala indicated that most of the sulfur in such clouds is SO2. If, as is generally believed, SO2 reacts with OH in the stratosphere, leading to the production of H2SO4 droplets, hugh explosive eruptions can deplete the stratosphere of OH for long time periods. The OH is thus controlled by the rate of O(1D) formation from ozone. By using the results from the 2-D dispersion model referred to above applied to the eruption cloud from the 1963 Agung eruption, and chemical kinetic rate constants, the `e folding' residence time for sulfur dioxide conversion to sulfuric acid was estimated to be about 300 days. The Guatemala studies showed that the eruption clouds from explosive volcanoes contain large amounts of HCl. Unless much of this HCl is removed by rain accompanying the eruption, this HCl might be expected to have a marked influence on stratospheric chemistry as a result of the reaction OH + HCl → H2O + Cl. The volcanic HCl will probably remove OH much less rapidly than will SO2, and if the OH concentration is greatly decreased by the SO2, the above reaction may be too slow to be important.

  14. METHANE-NITROGEN BINARY NUCLEATION: A NEW MICROPHYSICAL MECHANISM FOR CLOUD FORMATION IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, I-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2012-03-01

    It is known that clouds are present in the troposphere of Titan; however, their formation mechanism, particle size, and chemical composition remain poorly understood. In this study, a two-component (CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}) bin-microphysics model is developed and applied to simulate cloud formation in the troposphere of Titan. A new process, binary nucleation of particles from CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases, is considered. The model is validated and calibrated by recent laboratory experiments that synthesize particle formation in Titan-like environments. Our model simulations show that cloud layers can be formed at about 20 km with a particle size ranging from one to several hundred {mu}m and number concentration 10{sup -2} to over 100 cm{sup -3} depending on the strength of the vertical updraft. The particles are formed by binary nucleation and grow via the condensation of both CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases, with their N{sub 2} mole fraction varying from <10% in the nucleation stage to >30% in the condensation growth stage. The locally occurring CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} binary nucleation mechanism is strong and could potentially be more important than the falling condensation nuclei mechanism assumed in many current models.

  15. RADIATIVE INTERACTION OF SHOCKS WITH SMALL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AS A PRE-STAGE TO STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Erik P. G.; Ziegler, Udo

    2013-03-20

    Cloud compression by external shocks is believed to be an important triggering mechanism for gravitational collapse and star formation in the interstellar medium. We have performed MHD simulations to investigate whether the radiative interaction between a shock wave and a small interstellar cloud can induce the conditions for Jeans instability and how the interaction is influenced by magnetic fields of different strengths and orientation. The simulations use the NIRVANA code in three dimensions with anisotropic heat conduction and radiative heating/cooling at an effective resolution of 100 cells per cloud radius. Our cloud has radius 1.5 pc, has density 17 cm{sup -3}, is embedded in a medium of density 0.17 cm{sup -3}, and is struck by a planar Mach 30 shock wave. The simulations produce dense, cold fragments similar to those of Mellema et al. and Fragile et al. We do not find any regions that are Jeans unstable but do record transient cloud density enhancements of factors {approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} for the bulk of the cloud mass, which then decline and converge toward seemingly stable net density enhancement factors {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4}. Our run with a weak, initial magnetic field ({beta} = 10{sup 3}) perpendicular to the shock normal stands out as producing the most lasting density enhancements. We interpret this field strength as being the compromise between weak internal magnetic pressure preventing compression and sufficiently strong magnetic field to thermally insulate the condensations, thus helping them cool radiatively.

  16. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Cloud Processing: Accretion Reactions Involving Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal in Evaporating Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haan, D. O.; Hastings, W. P.; Corrigan, A. L.; Lee, F. E.; Hanley, S. W.

    2006-12-01

    Glyoxal and methyl glyoxal are dicarbonyl compounds found in atmospheric cloud and fog water, typically at low micromolar concentrations. These two compounds are known to form copolymers under certain industrial conditions by the nucleophilic addition of S, N and O-containing molecules. We report ambient FTIR-ATR and particle chamber data on a range of reactions between glyoxal and S, N and O-containing molecules found in cloudwater, some of which are triggered by droplet evaporation. Liquid-phase formation of adducts between glyoxal and S(IV) is seen to halt sulfur oxidation during droplet drying on the ATR crystal. Formation of glyoxal / S(VI) adducts, however, are not observed by ATR. At neutral or acidic pH, droplet evaporation triggers a reaction between glyoxal and amino acids in the residue left behind, forming imines. Glyoxal reacts under similar conditions with glycol compounds, forming cyclic acetals, but not with sugars, perhaps due to a lack of conformational freedom. Glyoxal is not observed to react with carboxylic acids, either in particle chambers or while drying on an ATR crystal.

  17. The dynamics of the stratospheric polar vortex and its relation to springtime ozone depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent aircraft observations have determined the structure of polar vortices during winter and their relationship to polar ozone depletions, based on high dynamical isolation and the extremely low temperatures required for stratospheric cloud formation. The aircraft data reveal large gradients of potential vorticity and concentrations of conservative trace species at the transition from high-latitude to polar air, implying that the inward mixing of heat and constituents is strongly inhibited, and that the perturbed polar stratospheric chemistry associated with the ozone hole is isolated from the rest of the stratosphere until the vortex breaks up in late spring. It is therefore the overall polar vortex which limits the annual polar ozone depletions' maximum area-coverage.

  18. STAR FORMATION HISTORY IN TWO FIELDS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD BAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cignoni, M.; Cole, A. A.; Tosi, M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A.; Grebel, E. K.

    2012-08-01

    The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper, we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well-tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.

  19. Global aerosol formation and revised radiative forcing based on CERN CLOUD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Sengupta, K.; Dunne, E. M.; Kirkby, J.

    2015-12-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere accounts for 40-70% of global cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is a complex process involving many precursors: sulphuric acid, ions, ammonia, and a wide range of natural and anthropogenic organic molecules. The CLOUD laboratory chamber experiment at CERN allows the contributions of different compounds to be disentangled in a uniquely well-controlled environment. To date, CLOUD has measured over 500 formation rates (Riccobono 2014, Kirkby 2015, Dunne 2015), under conditions representative of the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere. To understand the sensitivity of the climate to anthropogenic atmospheric aerosols, we must quantify historical aerosol radiative forcing. This requires an understanding of pre-industrial aerosol sources. Here we show pre-industrial nucleation over land usually involves organic molecules in the very first steps of cluster formation. The complexity of the organic vapors is a major challenge for theoretical approaches. Furthermore, with fewer sulphuric acid and ammonia molecules available to stabilize nucleating clusters in the pre-industrial atmosphere, ions from radon or galactic cosmic rays were probably more important than they are today. Parameterizations of particle formation rates determined in CLOUD as a function of precursor concentrations, temperature and ions are being used to refine the GLOMAP aerosol model (Spracklen 2005). The model simulates the growth, transport and loss of particles, translating nucleation rates to CCN concentrations. This allows us to better understand the effects of pre-industrial and present-day particle formation. I will present new results on global CCN based on CLOUD data, including estimates of anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing, currently the most uncertain driver of climate change (IPCC 2013). References: Riccobono, F. et al, Science 344 717 (2014); Kirkby, J. et al, in review; Dunne, E. et al, in preparation; Spracklen, D. et al, Atmos

  20. Formation of secondary organic carbon and cloud impact on carbonaceous aerosols at Mount Tai, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Tao; Guo, Jia; Gao, Rui; Xue, Likun; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Xuehua; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols measured at Mount Tai in north China in 2007 were further examined to study the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) and the impact of clouds on carbonaceous species. A constrained EC-tracer method and a multiple regression model showed excellent agreement in estimating SOC concentration. The average concentrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile SOC (SOC NV and SOC SV) were 2.61, 5.58 μg m -3 in spring and 2.81, 10.44 μg m -3 in summer. The total SOC accounted for 57.3% and 71.2% of total organic carbon in spring and summer, respectively, indicating the presence of high loading of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the North China Plain. The fraction of SOC NV increased with photochemical age (as indicated by NO x/NO y ratios) of air mass, whereas SOC SV was also influenced by the dynamic equilibrium between formation and sink. Significant scavenging by clouds of non-volatile organic carbon (OC NV) and elemental carbon (EC) was observed, whereas semi-volatile organic carbon (OC SV) concentrations increased during clouds, suggesting substantial SOA formation through aqueous-phase reactions in clouds. A mass balance model was proposed to quantify the scavenging coefficients for OC NV, EC and formation rates of OC SV in clouds. The scavenging coefficient constant of EC ( KEC) varied from 0.11 to 0.90 h -1, and was higher than that of OC NV ( KNV-OC: 0.07-0.55 h -1), implying internal mixing of EC with more hygroscopic species. The formation rate constant ( JSV-OC) and sink constant ( SSV-OC) of OC SV ranged from 0.09 to 1.39 h -1 and 0.001 to 1.07 h -1, respectively. These field derived parameters could be incorporated into atmospheric models to help close the gap between predicted and observed SOA loadings in the atmosphere.

  1. Magnetically Regulated Star Formation in Three Dimensions: The Case of the Taurus Molecular Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2008-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional MHD simulations of star formation in turbulent, magnetized clouds, including ambipolar diffusion and feedback from protostellar outflows. The calculations focus on relatively diffuse clouds threaded by a strong magnetic field capable of resisting severe tangling by turbulent motions and retarding global gravitational contraction in the cross field direction. They are motivated by observations of the Taurus molecular cloud complex (and, to a lesser extent, Pipe Nebula), which shows an ordered large-scale magnetic field, as well as elongated condensations that are generally perpendicular to the large-scale field. We find that stars form in earnest in such clouds when enough material has settled gravitationally along the field lines that the mass-to-flux ratios of the condensations approach the critical value. Only a small fraction (of order 1% or less) of the nearly magnetically critical, condensed material is turned into stars per local free-fall time, however. The slow star formation takes place in condensations that are moderately supersonic; it is regulated primarily by magnetic fields, rather than turbulence. The quiescent condensations are surrounded by diffuse halos that are much more turbulent, as observed in the Taurus complex. Strong support for magnetic regulation of star formation in this complex comes from the extremely slow conversion of the already condensed, relatively quiescent C18O gas into stars, at a rate 2 orders of magnitude below the maximum, free-fall value. We analyze the properties of dense cores, including their mass spectrum, which resembles the stellar initial mass function.

  2. Implications of Observed High Supersaturation for TTL Cloud Formation and Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric

    2004-01-01

    In situ measurements of water vapor concentration made during the CRYSTAL-FACE and Pre-AVE missions indicate higher than expected supersaturations in both clear and cloudy air near the cold tropical tropopause: (1) steady-state ice supersaturations of 20-30% were measured within cirrus at T < 200 K; (2) supersaturations exceeding 100% (near water saturation) were observed under cloud-free conditions near 187 K. The in-cloud measurements challenge the conventional belief that any water vapor in excess of ice saturation should be depleted by crystal growth given sufficient time. The high clear-sky supersaturations imply that thresholds for ice nucleation due to homogeneous freezing of aerosols (or any other mechanism) are much higher than those inferred from laboratory measurements. We will use simulations of Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) transport and cloud formation throughout the tropics to show that these effects have important implications for TTL cloud frequency and freeze-drying of air crossing the tropical tropopause cold trap.

  3. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION IN A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD (BRC 5) OF IC 1805

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Naoya; Miao, Jingqi; Sugitani, Koji; Kawahara, Kentaro; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Makoto; Pickles, Andrew J.

    2013-08-20

    We report recent optical, near-infrared (NIR), and millimeter observations which have revealed some new features of the bright-rimmed cloud BRC 5 associated with W4. With slitless spectroscopy, we detected 17 H{alpha} emission stars around the cloud; 4 are near the surface of the cloud, and 1 is toward IRAS 02252+6120. NIR photometry shows that the central H{alpha} emission star, together with one bright infrared source, has large NIR excesses and Class I spectral energy distributions. These two Class I objects are associated with the 2.9 mm continuum peaks and with a bipolar outflow, and are in between two separate, elongated C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) cores. The C{sup 18}O cores and the two Class I sources are aligned along a line at position angle {approx}240 Degree-Sign , somewhat less than perpendicular to the direction of UV radiation from the OB stars. Most of the detected H{alpha} emission stars, all T Tauri candidates, are located within {approx}3' of the cloud on the exciting star side. An estimate of the age of the stars based on a color-magnitude diagram suggests that these T Tauri candidates have ages of {approx}1 Myr or less, but are more evolved objects than the central young stellar objects. This age sequence suggests sequential star formation within the BRC 5 cloud. The {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) emission shows three elongated structures, which indicates the asymmetric structure toward the UV incident axis. We present our exploratory simulation results by using a smoothed particle hydrodynamic code that suggests that the asymmetrical BRC 5 structure could possibly result from the evolution of a preexisting prolate molecular cloud subject to radiation-driven implosion (RDI). Our best-fit prolate cloud has an initial mass of {approx}400 M{sub Sun }, an axial ratio of {approx}1.7, and a semi-major axis of {approx}1.6 pc, pointing away from the ionization flux by an angle of 15 Degree-Sign . The simulated cloud structure not only closely matches the observed

  4. Importance of Chemical Composition of Ice Nuclei on the Formation of Arctic Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, Setigui Aboubacar; Girard, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in the Arctic weather and climate system but interactions between aerosols, clouds and radiation remain poorly understood. Consequently, it is essential to fully understand their properties and especially their formation process. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing reveal the existence of two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. TICs-1 are composed by non-precipitating small (radar-unseen) ice crystals of less than 30 μm in diameter. The second type, TICs-2, are detected by radar and are characterized by a low concentration of large precipitating ice crystals ice crystals (>30 μm). To explain these differences, we hypothesized that TIC-2 formation is linked to the acidification of aerosols, which inhibits the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN). As a result, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions, resulting to a lower concentration of larger ice crystals. Water vapor available for deposition being the same, these crystals reach a larger size. Current weather and climate models cannot simulate these different types of ice clouds. This problem is partly due to the parameterizations implemented for ice nucleation. Over the past 10 years, several parameterizations of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation on IN of different chemical compositions have been developed. These parameterizations are based on two approaches: stochastic (that is nucleation is a probabilistic process, which is time dependent) and singular (that is nucleation occurs at fixed conditions of temperature and humidity and time-independent). The best approach remains unclear. This research aims to better understand the formation process of Arctic TICs using recently developed ice nucleation parameterizations. For this purpose, we have implemented these ice nucleation parameterizations into the Limited Area version of the Global Multiscale Environmental Model

  5. What Controls the Arctic Lower Stratosphere Temperature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The temperature of the Arctic lower stratosphere is critical for understanding polar ozone levels. As temperatures drop below about 195 K, polar stratospheric clouds form, which then convert HCl and ClONO2 into reactive forms that are catalysts for ozone loss reactions. Hence, the lower stratospheric temperature during the March period is a key parameter for understanding polar ozone losses. The temperature is basically understood to be a result of planetary waves which drive the polar temperature away from a cold "radiative equilibrium" state. This is demonstrated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis calculations of the heat flux and the mean polar temperature. The temperature during the March period is fundamentally driven by the integrated impact of large scale waves moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere during the January through February period. We will further show that the recent cold years in the northern polar vortex are a result of this weakened wave driving of the stratosphere.

  6. Balloon-borne measurements of aerosol, condensation nuclei, and cloud particles in the stratosphere at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Harder, J. W.; Hereford, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the vertical profile of particles with condensation nuclei counters and eight channel aerosol detectors at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in 1987 verified observations made in 1986 concerning the absence of upwelling in the polar vortex and the presence of a condensation nuclei layer in conjunction with the ozone hole region. New observations of a bimodal aerosol size distribution, consisting of a large-particle mode mixed in with the small-particle sulfate mode, at temperatures below -79 C are consistent with the presence of nitric acid-water particles at low concentrations. Higher concentrations of large particles were observed in association with nacreous clouds. An unusual particle layer which contained enhanced concentrations of both the small-particle (sulfate) mode and the large-particle (nitric acid) mode was detected at temperatures below -85 C, suggesting simultaneous nucleation and growth phenomena. The vortex condensation nuclei layer was observed to form at the same time as the ozone hole, indicating that formation of the layer is triggered by photochemical processes and may be important in controlling ozone depletion above 22 km.

  7. Seasonal variability of heterogeneous ice formation in stratiform clouds over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Patric; Kunz, Clara; Baars, Holger; Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Senf, Fabian; Engelmann, Ronny; Althausen, Dietrich; Artaxo, Paulo

    2015-07-01

    Based on 11 months of polarization lidar observations in the Amazon Basin near Manaus, Brazil (2.3°S, 60°W), the relationship between temperature and heterogeneous ice formation efficiency in stratiform clouds was evaluated in the cloud top temperature range between -40 and 0°C. Between -30 and 0°C, ice-containing clouds are a factor of 1.5 to 2 more frequent during the dry season. Free-tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles revealed a twofold to tenfold increase in aerosol load during the dry season and a Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate—Interim Implementation reanalysis data set implies that the aerosol composition during the dry season is strongly influenced by biomass burning aerosol, whereas other components such as mineral dust do not vary strongly between the seasons. The injection of smoke accompanied by the likely dispersion of biological material, soil dust, or ash particles was identified as a possible source for the increased ice formation efficiency during the dry season.

  8. Flow-driven cloud formation and fragmentation: results from Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, Fabian; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2011-07-01

    The fragmentation of shocked flows in a thermally bistable medium provides a natural mechanism to form turbulent cold clouds as precursors to molecular clouds. Yet because of the large density and temperature differences and the range of dynamical scales involved, following this process with numerical simulations is challenging. We compare two-dimensional simulations of flow-driven cloud formation without self-gravity, using the Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code VINE and the Eulerian grid code PROTEUS. Results are qualitatively similar for both methods, yet the variable spatial resolution of the SPH method leads to smaller fragments and thinner filaments, rendering the overall morphologies different. Thermal and hydrodynamical instabilities lead to rapid cooling and fragmentation into cold clumps with temperatures below 300 K. For clumps more massive than 1 M⊙ pc-1, the clump mass function has an average slope of -0.8. The internal velocity dispersion of the clumps is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their relative motion, rendering it subsonic with respect to the internal sound speed of the clumps but supersonic as seen by an external observer. For the SPH simulations most of the cold gas resides at temperatures below 100 K, while the grid-based models show an additional, substantial component between 100 and 300 K. Independent of the numerical method, our models confirm that converging flows of warm neutral gas fragment rapidly and form high-density, low-temperature clumps as possible seeds for star formation.

  9. Molecular Clouds and Massive Star Formation in the Norma Spiral Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, P.; Bronfman, L.; May, J.

    2006-06-01

    The Norma spiral arm in the Southern Galaxy contains the most massive molecular clouds as well as the most FIR luminous regions of massive star formation in the Galactic disk. The tangent region of this arm, at a well defined distance of ≈ 4.5 kpc from the Sun, is ideal to study in detail the process of massive star formation in GMCs (Bronfman et al. 1988, ApJ, 324, 248). We present maps of the major GMCs in ^{12}CO and C^{18}O obtained with the Nanten 4-m telescope, at a resolution of 2.5 arcmin. We have obtained also CS (2-1) and CS(5-4) maps of several OB star formation regions embedded in these GMCs (Bronfman et al. 1996, A&AS, 115, 81). What is the contribution from embedded OB stars to the total FIR emission from these GMCs? What is the fraction of cloud molecular gas involved in massive star formation?

  10. The Effect of Metallicity on the Molecular Gas and Star Formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Meixner, Margaret; Rubio, Monica; HERITAGE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds afford a unique view of the low metallicity star-forming interstellar medium, providing the nearest laboratories to study processes relevant to star formation at high redshifts. We use dust-based molecular gas maps based on the HERITAGE Herschel data (Meixner et al. 2013) to evaluate molecular gas depletion times as a function of spatial scale. We compare galaxy-scale analytic star formation models to our observations and find that successfully predicting the trends in the low metallicity data requires the inclusion of a diffuse neutral medium. However, the analytic models do not capture the scatter observed, which computer simulations suggest is driven primarily by the time-averaging effect of star formation rate tracers. The averaging of the scatter in the molecular gas depletion time as a function of scale size suggests that the drivers of the star formation process in these galaxies operate on large scales. Analyzing mid-IR spectroscopy from Spitzer in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), we find that the modeling of the mid-infrared H2 line emission gives temperatures, column densities, and fractions of warm H2 that are similar to nearby galaxies. On small (~ few pc) scales in the SMC, we study the effect of metallicity on the structure of photodissociation regions using [CII] and [OI] spectroscopy combined with new ALMA ACA maps of 12CO and 13CO. We find that the effect of metallicity is more prominent in the lower column density gas, a likely consequence of enhanced photodissociation.

  11. A proposed chemical scheme for HCCO formation in cold dense clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelam, V.; Loison, J.-C.; Hickson, K. M.; Ruaud, M.

    2015-10-01

    The ketenyl radical (HCCO) has recently been discovered in two cold dense clouds with a non-negligible abundance of a few 10-11 (compared to H2). Until now, no chemical network has been able to reproduce this observation. We propose here a chemical scheme that can reproduce HCCO abundances together with HCO, H2CCO and CH3CHO in the dark clouds Lupus-1A and L486. The main formation pathway for HCCO is the OH + CCH → HCCO + H reaction as suggested by Agúndez et al. but with a much larger rate coefficient than used in current models. Since this reaction has never been studied experimentally or theoretically, this larger value is based on a comparison with other similar systems.

  12. Lidar remote sensing of cloud formation caused by low-level jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jia; Felton, Melvin; Lei, Liqiao; McCormick, M. Patrick; Delgado, Ruben; St. Pé, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    In May 2014, the East Hampton Roads Aerosol Flux campaign was conducted at Hampton University to examine small-scale aerosol transport using aerosol, Raman, and Doppler lidars and rawindsonde launches. We present the results of analyses performed on these high-resolution planetary boundary layer and lower atmospheric measurements, with a focus on the low-level jets (LLJs) that form in this region during spring and summer. We present a detailed case study of a LLJ lasting from evening of 20 May to morning of 21 May using vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter, wind speed and direction, water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, and turbulence structure. We show with higher resolution than in previous studies that enhanced nighttime turbulence triggered by LLJs can cause the aerosol and water vapor content of the boundary layer to be transported vertically and form a well-mixed region containing the cloud condensation nuclei that are necessary for cloud formation.

  13. Simulations of the Vertical Redistribution of HNO3 by NAT or NAD PSCs: The Sensitivity to the Number of Cloud Particles Formed and the Cloud Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Toon, Owen B.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent satellite and in situ measurements have indicated that limited denitrification can occur in the Arctic stratosphere. In situ measurements from the SOLVE campaign indicate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) composed of small numbers (about 3 x 10^ -4 cm^-3) of 10-20 micron particles (probably NAT or NAD). These observations raise the issue of whether low number density NAT PSCs can substantially denitrify the air with reasonable cloud lifetimes. In this study, we use a one dimensional cloud model to investigate the verticle redistribution of HNO3 by NAT/NAD PSCs. The cloud formation is driven by a temperature oscillation which drops the temperature below the NAT/NAD formation threshold (about 195 K) for a few days. We assume that a small fraction of the available aerosols act as NAT nuclei when the saturation ratio of HNO3 over NAT(NAD) exceeds 10(l.5). The result is a cloud between about 16 and 20 km in the model, with NAT/NAD particle effective radii as large as about 10 microns (in agreement with the SOLVE data). We find that for typical cloud lifetimes of 2-3 days or less, the net depletion of HNO3 is no more than 1-2 ppbv, regardless of the NAT or NAD particle number density. Repeated passes of the air column through the cold pool build up the denitrification to 3-4 ppbv, and the cloud altitude steadily decreases due to the downward transport of nitric acid. Increasing the cloud lifetime results in considerably more effective denitrification, even with very low cloud particle number densities. As expected, the degree of denitrification by NAT clouds is much larger than that by NAD Clouds. Significant denitrification by NAD Clouds is only possible if the cloud lifetime is several days or more. The clouds also cause a local maximum HNO3 mixing ratio at cloud base where the cloud particles sublimate.

  14. Importance of Physico-Chemical Properties of Aerosols in the Formation of Arctic Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, S. A.; Girard, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in the Arctic weather and climate system but interactions between aerosols, clouds and radiation are poorly understood. Consequently, it is essential to fully understand their properties and especially their formation process. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing reveal the existence of two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. TIC-1 are composed by non-precipitating very small (radar-unseen) ice crystals whereas TIC-2 are detected by both sensors and are characterized by a low concentration of large precipitating ice crystals. It is hypothesized that TIC-2 formation is linked to the acidification of aerosols, which inhibit the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN). As a result, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions, resulting to a smaller concentration of larger ice crystals. Over the past 10 years, several parameterizations of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation have been developed to reflect the various physical and chemical properties of aerosols. These parameterizations are derived from laboratory studies on aerosols of different chemical compositions. The parameterizations are also developed according to two main approaches: stochastic (that nucleation is a probabilistic process, which is time dependent) and singular (that nucleation occurs at fixed conditions of temperature and humidity and time-independent). This research aims to better understand the formation process of TICs using a newly-developed ice nucleation parameterizations. For this purpose, we implement some parameterizations (2 approaches) into the Limited Area version of the Global Multiscale Environmental Model (GEM-LAM) and use them to simulate ice clouds observed during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Arctic Cloud (ISDAC) in Alaska. We use both approaches but special attention is focused on the new parameterizations of the singular approach. Simulation

  15. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  16. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. ); Anderson, J.G.; Toohey, D.W. ); Fahey, D.W.; Kawa, S.R. ); Jones, R.L. ); McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. )

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO{sub 2}) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO{sub 3}, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  17. Rate of formation of the ClO dimer in the polar stratosphere: Implications for ozone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, S.P.; Friedl, R.R.; Yung, Y.L. )

    1989-09-08

    The gas-phase recombination of chlorine monoxide (ClO) has been investigated under the conditions of pressure and temperature that prevail in the Antarctic stratosphere during the period of maximum ozone (O{sub 3}) disappearance. Measured rate constants are less than one-half as great as the previously accepted values. One-dimensional model calculations based on the new rate data indicate that currently accepted chemical mechanisms can quantitatively account for the observed O{sub 3} losses in late spring (17 September to 7 October). A qualitative assessment indicates that the existing mechanisms can only account for at most one-half of the measured O{sub 3} depletion in the early spring (28 August to 17 September), indicating that there may be additional catalytic cycles, besides those currently recognized, that destroy O{sub 3}. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Saharan dust and heterogeneous ice formation: Eleven years of cloud observations at a central European EARLINET site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Mattis, I.; Wandinger, U.; Tesche, M.; Engelmann, R.; Müller, D.; PéRez, C.; Haustein, K.

    2010-10-01

    More than 2300 observed cloud layers were analyzed to investigate the impact of aged Saharan dust on heterogeneous ice formation. The observations were performed with a polarization/Raman lidar at the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network site of Leipzig, Germany (51.3°N, 12.4°E) from February 1997 to June 2008. The statistical analysis is based on lidar-derived information on cloud phase (liquid water, mixed phase, ice cloud) and cloud top height, cloud top temperature, and vertical profiles of dust mass concentration calculated with the Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling system. Compared to dust-free air masses, a significantly higher amount of ice-containing clouds (25%-30% more) was observed for cloud top temperatures from -10°C to -20°C in air masses that contained mineral dust. The midlatitude lidar study is compared with our SAMUM lidar study of tropical stratiform clouds at Cape Verde in the winter of 2008. The comparison reveals that heterogeneous ice formation is much stronger over central Europe and starts at higher temperatures than over the tropical station. Possible reasons for the large difference are discussed.

  19. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  20. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  1. Stratospheric Heterogeneous Chemistry and Microphysics: Model Development, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: define the chemical and physical processes leading to stratospheric ozone change that involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCS) and the reactions occurring on the surfaces of PSC particles; study the formation processes, and the physical and chemical properties of PSCS, that are relevant to atmospheric chemistry and to the interpretation of field measurements taken during polar stratosphere missions; develop quantitative models describing PSC microphysics and heterogeneous chemical processes; assimilate laboratory and field data into these models; and calculate the extent of chemical processing on PSCs and the impact of specific microphysical processes on polar composition and ozone depletion. During the course of the project, a new coupled microphysics/physical-chemistry/ photochemistry model for stratospheric sulfate aerosols and nitric acid and ice PSCs was developed and applied to analyze data collected during NASA's Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition-II (AASE-II) and other missions. In this model, detailed treatments of multicomponent sulfate aerosol physical chemistry, sulfate aerosol microphysics, polar stratospheric cloud microphysics, PSC ice surface chemistry, as well as homogeneous gas-phase chemistry were included for the first time. In recent studies focusing on AASE measurements, the PSC model was used to analyze specific measurements from an aircraft deployment of an aerosol impactor, FSSP, and NO(y) detector. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observations for particle volumes as well as NO(y) concentrations, thus confirming the importance of supercooled sulfate/nitrate droplets in PSC formation. The same model has been applied to perform a statistical study of PSC properties in the Northern Hemisphere using several hundred high-latitude air parcel trajectories obtained from Goddard. The rates of ozone depletion along trajectories with different meteorological histories are presently

  2. Discovery of star formation in the extreme outer galaxy possibly induced by a high-velocity cloud impact

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near-infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of 'Digel Cloud 1' at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius R {sub G} = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar densities are ∼5 and ∼3 pc{sup –2}, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also that the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest the possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of the Cloud 1 molecular cloud.

  3. Laser-induced supersaturation and snow formation in a sub-saturated cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jingjing; Leisner, Tomas; Sun, Haiyi; Sridharan, Aravindan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2014-12-01

    Calculation of the saturation ratio inside vortices formed below the filament in a sub-saturation zone in a cloud chamber was given. By mixing the air with a large temperature gradient, supersaturation was sustained inside the vortices. This led to precipitation and snow formation when strong filaments were created using short focal length lenses ( f = 20 and 30 cm). However, when longer filaments were formed with the same laser pulse energy but longer focal length lenses ( f = 50 and 80 cm), only condensation (mist) was observed. The lack of precipitation was attributed to the weaker air flow, which was not strong enough to form strong vortices below the filament to sustain precipitation.

  4. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2016-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as