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Sample records for stream sediments stream

  1. ASSESSING STREAM BED STABILITY AND EXCESS SEDIMENTATION IN MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land use and resource exploitation in headwaters catchments?such as logging, mining, and road building?often increase sediment supply to streams, potentially causing excess sedimentation. Decreases in mean substrate size and increases in fine stream bed sediments can lead to inc...

  2. Stream Water and Sediment Phosphorus Equilibrium Concentrations in Ozark Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is broadly available on the fate and transport of dissolved phosphorus (DP) in streams draining agricultural and urban catchments, although in-stream processes might have a substantial influence on downstream transport. This study evaluated sediment-water P equilibrium concentrat...

  3. Suspended sediment in Minnesota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis showed that more than 90 percent of the annual sediment load was carried during 3 to 9 months of the year. On the average, almost 25 percent of the annual sediment load was transported during April. Generally, it was found that less than 4 percent of the average annual load was transported during December, January, and February, which indicates that sampling frequency could be reduced during winter.

  4. Sediment characteristics of Tennessee streams and reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Stanley W.; Carey, William P.

    1984-01-01

    Measured suspended-sediment data and reservoir sedimentation data have been analyzed to determine sediment yields and transport characteristics of Tennessee streams. Measured suspended-sediment is mostly silt and clay size material even in the sand-bed channels of western Tennessee. Unmeasured load accounts for less than 10 percent of the total sediment load in western Tennessee. Unmeasured load in middle and eastern Tennessee streams is believed to be only a small percentage of total load because bed material is generally coarse and quite variable. Sediment of total load because bed material is generally coarse and quite variable. Sediment yields for middle and eastern Tennessee basins generally are less than 800 tons per square mile per year ((tons/mi2)/yr), however, highly disturbed basins can have yields from 1,000 to 3,000 (tons/mi2)/yr. Yields for the heavily agricultural and channelized basins of western Tennessee generally range from 700 to 1,000 (tons/mi2)/yr. Yields for the Hatchie River in western Tennessee are less than 200 (tons/mi2)/yr reflecting the lack of floodplain agriculture and channelization. (USGS)

  5. Stream biogeochemical and suspended sediment responses to permafrost degradation in stream banks in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, Michael N.; Van Horn, David; Sudman, Zachary; McKnight, Diane M.; Welch, Kathleene A.; Lyons, William B.

    2016-03-01

    Stream channels in the McMurdo Dry Valleys are characteristically wide, incised, and stable. At typical flows, streams occupy a fraction of the oversized channels, providing habitat for algal mats. In January 2012, we discovered substantial channel erosion and subsurface thermomechanical erosion undercutting banks of the Crescent Stream. We sampled stream water along the impacted reach and compared concentrations of solutes to the long-term data from this stream ( ˜ 20 years of monitoring). Thermokarst-impacted stream water demonstrated higher electrical conductivity, and concentrations of chloride, sulfate, sodium, and nitrate than the long-term medians. These results suggest that this mode of lateral permafrost degradation may substantially impact stream solute loads and potentially fertilize stream and lake ecosystems. The potential for sediment to scour or bury stream algal mats is yet to be determined, though it may offset impacts of associated increased nutrient loads to streams.

  6. INTERREGIONAL COMPARISONS OF SEDIMENT MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of microbial respiration on fine-grained stream sediments was measured at 369 first to fourth-order streams in the Central Appalachians, Colorado's Southern Rockies, and California's Central Valley in 1994 and 1995. Study streams were randomly selected from the United S...

  7. INTERREGIONAL COMPARISONS OF SEDIMENT MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of microbial respiration on fine-grained stream sediments was measured at 369 first to fourth-order streams in the Central Appalachians, Colorado's Southern Rockies, and California's Central Valley in 1994 and 1995. Study streams were randomly selected from the USEPA's ...

  8. Key stream/sediment exchanges of water and heat near stream mouths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J. E.; Naranjo, R. C.; Niswonger, R. G.; Neilson, B. T.; Allander, K.; Zamora, C.; Smith, D. W.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The section of stream discharging to a lake or other surface-water body is referred to as the stream mouth, a stream reach with rapidly changing hydrologic conditions, leading to unique aquatic and benthic ecology, as well as a visibly active fishery habitat. Of environmental significance, bridges, control structures, channelization and foot traffic are common near stream mouths, warranting comparisons of natural and channelized stream mouths. The present work completes the first investigation focusing specifically on the hydrology of surface-water/sediment exchanges at stream-mouth reaches discharging to lakes and compares these exchanges to those measured along the nearby shoreline in both a qualitative and quantitative manner. Heat and water exchanges for two common types of stream mouths (a natural stream with a summer barrier bar and a channelized stream mouth) are compared with comparable exchanges along the nearby shoreline on the north shore of Lake Tahoe located in the Central Sierra Nevada Mountain Range (CA/NV, US). The study site was selected partially due the abundance of streams discharging into the lake of both a natural and channelized nature (~30 small streams with a large number of both types of stream mouths). Heat and water exchanges were both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct for the three types of hydrologic settings, with (1) cool, low velocity, longitudinal (hyporheic) flowpaths observed below the channelized stream mouth, discharging beneath the warmer, more buoyant lakeshore water, (2) the nearby shoreline receiving relatively warm, higher velocity discharge and (3) for the natural stream mouth, there was strong diurnal temperature pattern in groundwater discharging through the seasonal barrier beach to the lake. Impacts of strong 2013 wave action on exchanges were also distinct for the three settings, with (1) channelization allowing waves to extend well upstream, (2) a lesser invasive impact in the shoreline swash zone exchanges

  9. Impact of agricultural activities on anaerobic processes in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, J. D.; Ludwig, S.; Nelson, L. C.; Porterfield, J.; Sather, K. L.; Songpitak, M.; Spawn, S.; Weigel, B.

    2013-12-01

    Streams draining agriculture watersheds are subject to significant anthropogenic impacts, including sedimentation from soil erosion and high nitrate input from heavy fertilizer application. Sedimentation degrades habitat and can reduce hydrologic exchange between surface and subsurface waters. Disconnecting surface and subsurface flow reduces oxygen input to hyporheic water, increasing the extent of anoxic zones in stream sediments and creating hotspots for anaerobic processes like denitrification and methanogenesis that can be important sources of nitrous oxide and methane, both powerful greenhouse gases. Increased nitrate input may influence greenhouse gas fluxes from stream sediments by stimulating rates of denitrification and potentially reducing rates of methanogenesis, either through direct inhibition or by increasing competition for organic substrates from denitrifying bacteria. We hypothesized that accumulation of fine sediments in stream channels would result in high rates of methanogenesis in stream sediments, and that increased nitrate input from agricultural runoff would stimulate denitrification and reduce rates of methane production. Our work focused on streams in northern and central Minnesota, in particular on Rice Creek, a small stream draining an agricultural watershed. We used a variety of approaches to test our hypotheses, including surveys of methane concentrations in surface waters of streams ranging in sediment type and nitrate concentration, bottle incubations of sediment from several sites in Rice Creek, and the use of functional gene probes and RNA analyses to determine if genes for these processes are present and being expressed in stream sediments. We found higher methane concentrations in surface water from streams with large deposits of fine sediments, but significantly less methane in these streams when nitrate concentrations were high. We also found high potential for both methanogenesis and denitrification in sediment incubations

  10. Effective particle sizes of cohesive sediment in north Mississippi streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the size of cohesive sediment particles transported in streams is important information for predicting how the sediment and contaminants the sediment may be carrying will be transported by the flow. Cohesive sediments (less than 0.062 mm in diameter) generally are not transported in th...

  11. Relating stream-bank erosion to in-stream transport of suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Timothy R.; Beavis, Sara G.; Dietrich, Claude R.; Jakeman, Anthony J.

    1999-04-01

    We seek an improved and quantitative understanding of the sources and transport of sediment and attached phosphorus in upland catchments and downstream reaches of the Namoi River in New South Wales, Australia. Study of the sources of phosphorus and related sediment was motivated by severe problems with blooms of blue-green algae and toxic by-products in the Darling and Namoi Rivers. Using atmospheric fall-out of radionuclides as tracers, Olley et al. (1996) concluded that much of the sediment deposited in the lower reaches came from subsoil rather than topsoil. With this insight, we focus on quantifying sediment sources from stream bank erosion, especially in seasonally erosional reaches of Cox's Creek and the Mooki River.The approach presented here integrates interdecadal aerial photography, interseasonal field measurements of bank erosion processes, continuous monitoring of stream flow and turbidity and event sampling of suspended solids and phosphorus, with an analytical model of in-stream suspended sediment transport. We compare a lateral source term in the calibrated transport model with field-based and aerial measurements of stream bank erosion. Calibration of the in-stream model is illustrated for two reaches of the Mooki River, with the changes in parameter values being related to aspects of the hydraulic geometry and particle size. The processes of stream flow and bank erosion due to undercutting, desiccation, block failure and mass wasting of aggregated particles interact to produce instream fluxes of suspended sediment that are transported and redeposited downstream. The combined approach demonstrated here has potential for predictive spatial modelling of sediment concentrations and loads.

  12. Chemistry of Stream Sediments and Surface Waters in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- This online publication portrays regional data for pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance for stream waters and a multi-element geochemical dataset for stream sediments collected in the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. A series of interpolation grid maps portray the chemistry of the stream waters and sediments in relation to bedrock geology, lithology, drainage basins, and urban areas. A series of box plots portray the statistical variation of the chemical data grouped by lithology and other features.

  13. Salinization Enhances Mobilization of Nutrients from Sediments to Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S.; Kaushal, S.; Hohman, S.; Coplin, J.; Duan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many regions of the U.S. and elsewhere are experiencing increased salinization of freshwater due to the widespread application of road salts. Increased salinization has the potential to release stored nutrients from sediments, decrease biodiversity, and perturb water quality. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the potential effects of road salt (NaCl) on nutrient mobilization from sediments to stream water. Sediments and stream water were incubated from 2 urbanizing watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area. Stream sediment was incubated from 11 routinely monitored streams exhibiting a land use gradient within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (BES LTER) site and Anacostia River watershed. Our results indicate that salinization increased the release of soluble reactive phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen at all sites. The release of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic carbon varied between sites, and these differential responses may be due to: stream sediment composition, organic matter content, and ambient water quality. The magnitude and frequency of road salt application may be amplified in the near future due to the interactive effects of climate variability and urbanization, and our research suggests this can have water quality and ecological implications for freshwater ecosystems. Further research is necessary to elucidate driving mechanisms of changes in sediment biogeochemical cycles in response to salinization and the temporal response of freshwater ecosystems.

  14. Closing the Gap Between Sediment Budgeting and Stream Restoration Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    A wooden boat builder will tell you that the majority of a project work load is often associated with the setup and preparation. The same reality applies to stream restoration intended to achieve watershed sediment yield reductions, with project site selections comprising a substantial share of the activities necessary to achieve long- term basin-wide objectives. Sediment budgeting strategies that have been long standing pursuits of the geomorphology community can directly and indirectly provide support to a framework for stream restoration targeting and benefit assessment. A level of detail suitable to support decisions for the prioritization of stream restoration investments in either headwater or lower alluvial valley reaches can be attained using a suite of data from small pond and reservoir sedimentation assessments, short-term storm sampling, drainage network measurements, and rainfall-runoff modeling. Analyses of hydrograph sediment concentration trends, watershed flow patterns, and channel adjustment mechanics that provide the details necessary for defensible sediment supply and delivery estimates can also guide the selection of strategies to alter them. Examples will be provided from an investigation of first-order watershed sediment production in the Piedmont region of Maryland (USA) to illustrate how stream restoration site targeting and design concepts can be derived from spatially scaled watershed sediment budgeting exercises.

  15. Geochemical results from stream-water and stream-sediment samples collected in Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.; Todd, Andrew S.; Smith, Kathleen S.; DeWitt, Ed; Zeigler, Mathew P.

    2013-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey are studying the relationship between watershed lithology and stream-water chemistry. As part of this effort, 60 stream-water samples and 43 corresponding stream-sediment samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 from locations in Colorado and New Mexico. Sample sites were selected from small to midsize watersheds composed of a high percentage of one rock type or geologic unit. Stream-water and stream-sediment samples were collected, processed, preserved, and analyzed in a consistent manner. This report releases geochemical data for this phase of the study.

  16. Potential for 4-n-nonylphenol biodegradation in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Barber, L.B.; Kolpin, D.W.; McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for in situ biodegradation of 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) was investigated in three hydrologically distinct streams impacted by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the United States. Microcosms were prepared with sediments from each site and amended with [U-ring-14C]4-n-nonylphenol (4-n-NP) as a model test substrate. Microcosms prepared with sediment collected upstream of the WWTP outfalls and incubated under oxic conditions showed rapid and complete mineralization of [U-ring-14C]4- n-NP to 14CO2 in all three systems. In contrast, no mineralization of [U-ring-14C]4-n-NP was observed in these sediments under anoxic (methanogenic) conditions. The initial linear rate of [U-ring-14C]4-n-NP mineralization in sediments from upstream and downstream of the respective WWTP outfalls was inversely correlated with the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of the streambed sediments. These results suggest that the net supply of dissolved oxygen to streambed sediments is a key determinant of the rate and extent of 4-NP biodegradation in stream systems. In the stream systems considered by the present study, dissolved oxygen concentrations in the overlying water column (8–10 mg/L) and in the bed sediment pore water (1–3 mg/L at a depth of 10 cm below the sediment–water interface) were consistent with active in situ 4-NP biodegradation. These results suggest WWTP procedures that maximize the delivery of dissolved oxygen while minimizing the release of BOD to stream receptors favor efficient biodegradation of 4-NP contaminants in wastewater-impacted stream environments.

  17. Sediment fluxes of an Antarctic palaeo-ice stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Kelly; Larter, Robert; Smith, James; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter

    2016-04-01

    New marine-geophysical data (multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution acoustic profiles) acquired in 2014 have been integrated with heritage multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow boomer profiles from Anvers-Hugo Trough, western Antarctic Peninsula. From these datasets we have identified seismic facies relating to ice-stream advance and flow, ice-stream retreat, and post-glacial sedimentation processes. We identify multiple subglacial seismic units forming MSGL and other streamlined landforms at a variety of size scales. This may be indicative of multiple generations of ice-flow through the confluent ice-stream system. We also calculate the sediment volumes of a series of grounding-zone wedges (GZWs) located on the outer and mid-shelf that were produced during several stillstands in the trough as the grounded ice margin retreated through the system during deglaciation around c. 15-13 ka (from published core chronologies). Based on these volumes we consider the likely rates of subglacial sediment delivery by the Anvers Trough palaeo-ice stream and compare these to inferred flux rates from other palaeo- and modern Antarctic ice streams. In addition, we map the post-glacial glacimarine sediment package in the trough. Large mapped sediment thicknesses of this unit across the trough are consistent with high post-glacial sediment accumulation rates reported from cores acquired in the Anvers-Hugo Trough system. Previous authors have attributed this to exceptionally high primary productivity in a calving-bay re-entrant settings produced as ice retreated across the shelf on this part of the Antarctic margin.

  18. EMAP SEDIMENTATION INDEX: LAND USE AND NATURAL HYDRAULIC CONTROLS ON STREAM SEDIMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive erosion, transport and deposition of sediment in streams and rivers is a major problem in surface waters throughout the United States. It is important to have a reliable measure of stream sedimentation that properly accounts for natural controls on the amount of fine p...

  19. Ecoenzymatic Stoichiometry of Stream Sediments with Comparison to Terrestrial Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we extend the development of ecoenzymatic stoichiometry to the surface sediments of stream ecosystems using data collected in a nationwide survey. The data set is larger and more comprehensive than those used in our previous studies. The data include the first broa...

  20. Impacts of biological diversity on sediment transport in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, L. K.; Cardinale, B. J.; Sklar, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade, an increasing number of studies have shown that biological structures (e.g. plant roots) have large impacts on sediment transport, and that physical models that do not incorporate these biological impacts can produce qualitatively incorrect predictions. But while it is now recognized that biological structures influence sediment transport, work to date has focused primarily on the impacts of individual, usually dominant, species. Here, we ask whether competitive interactions cause multi-species communities to have fundamentally different impacts on sediment mobility than single-species systems. We use a model system with caddisfly larvae, which are insects that live in the benthic habitat of streams where they construct silken catchnets across pore spaces between rocks to filter food particles. Because caddisflies can reach densities of 1,000s per m2 with each larva spinning hundreds of silken threads between rocks, studies have shown that caddisflies reduce the probability of bed movement during high discharge events. To test whether streams with multiple species of caddisfly are stabilized any differently than single-species streams, we manipulated the presence or absence of two common species (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in substrate patches (0.15 m2) in experimental stream channels (50-m long x 1-m wide) with fully controlled hydrology at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory. This experiment was designed to extend the scale of previous laboratory mesocosm studies, which showed that critical shear stress is 31% higher in a multi-species flume mesocosm compared to a single-species mesocosm. Under these more realistic field conditions, we found that critical shear stress was, on average, 30% higher in streams with caddisflies vs. controls with no caddisflies. However, no differences were detected between treatments with 2 vs. 1 species. We hypothesize that the minimal effect of diversity on critical shear stress

  1. SEDIMENTATION IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST COASTAL STREAMS -- EVIDENCE FROM REGIONAL SURVEY OF BED SUBSTRATE SIZE AND STABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive erosion, transport and deposition of sediment are major problems in streams and rivers throughout the United States. We examined evidence of anthropogenic sedimentation in Oregon and Washington coastal streams using relatively rapid measurements taken from surveys duri...

  2. Transformation and sorption of fipronil in urban stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunde; Haver, Darren; Oki, Lorence; Gan, Jay

    2008-09-24

    Fipronil is an urban-use insecticide, and the increased use has led to its frequent detections in urban streams. Most studies on the environmental fate of fipronil so far have focused on soils, and little is known about its behavior in sediment-water systems. In this study, we investigated the transformation and sorption of fipronil in urban stream sediments from California, incubated under facultative and anaerobic conditions. Degradation of fipronil in sediments generally followed exponential decay kinetics, and the first-order half-lives of fipronil were only 4.6-18.5 days in anaerobic sediments. The persistence of fipronil under facultative conditions was considerably longer, with half-lives from 25 to 91 days. Sterilization generally decreased the dissipation of fipronil, indicating that microbial activity was an important factor in fipronil transformations in sediments. Under facultative conditions, fipronil sulfide and sulfone were observed, while only fipronil sulfide was detected in anaerobic samples. The sorption coefficient K d consistently increased with organic carbon contents of sediments. In the same sediment, K d usually also increased with contact time, suggesting decreased availability for aged residues. Results from this study showed that the stability of fipronil in sediments depends closely on the oxygen status and that due to the readily conversion of fipronil to the sulfone and sulfide metabolites, the overall risk assessment of fipronil in surface aquatic systems should take into consideration fipronil as well as its metabolites. PMID:18729374

  3. Developing a new stream metric for comparing stream function using a bank-floodplain sediment budget: a case study of three Piedmont streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Gellis, Allen; Noe, Greg

    2013-01-01

    A bank and floodplain sediment budget was created for three Piedmont streams tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. The watersheds of each stream varied in land use from urban (Difficult Run) to urbanizing (Little Conestoga Creek) to agricultural (Linganore Creek). The purpose of the study was to determine the relation between geomorphic parameters and sediment dynamics and to develop a floodplain trapping metric for comparing streams with variable characteristics. Net site sediment budgets were best explained by gradient at Difficult Run, floodplain width at Little Conestoga Creek, and the relation of channel cross-sectional area to floodplain width at Linganore Creek. A correlation for all streams indicated that net site sediment budget was best explained by relative floodplain width (ratio of channel width to floodplain width). A new geomorphic metric, the floodplain trapping factor, was used to compare sediment budgets between streams with differing suspended sediment yields. Site sediment budgets were normalized by floodplain area and divided by the stream's sediment yield to provide a unitless measure of floodplain sediment trapping. A floodplain trapping factor represents the amount of upland sediment that a particular floodplain site can trap (e.g. a factor of 5 would indicate that a particular floodplain site traps the equivalent of 5 times that area in upland erosional source area). Using this factor we determined that Linganore Creek had the highest gross and net (floodplain deposition minus bank erosion) floodplain trapping factor (107 and 46, respectively) that Difficult Run the lowest gross floodplain trapping factor (29) and Little Conestoga Creek had the lowest net floodplain trapping factor (–14, indicating that study sites were net contributors to the suspended sediment load). The trapping factor is a robust metric for comparing three streams of varied watershed and geomorphic character, it promises to be a useful tool for future stream assessments.

  4. Stream processes with heterogeneous bed sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestegaard, Karen L.

    The AGU Erosion and Sedimentation Committee sponsored a daylong session on sediment transport in channels with mixtures of sediment sizes on December 13, 1985, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The morning session contained an interesting set of related theoretical and empirical research on particle motion. Ned Andrews (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Denver, Colo.) began the session by presenting empirical evidence for critical shear stresses required to move bed particles in simple natural channels. He presented work that he has been working on for the past several years (along with Gary Parker of St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Laboratory, Minneapolis, Minn., and other colleagues) that suggests that coarse and fine bed particles have essentially equal mobility because of the hiding of fine particles by larger particles. Pat Wiberg and Jim Smith (both of University of Washington, Seattle) presented a theoretical analysis of the movement of different-sized particles that supported the work presented by Andrews.

  5. MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATING SEDIMENTATION IN STREAM NETWORKS: FOR USE IN SEDIMENT TMDL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling framework that can be used to evaluate sedimentation in stream networks is described. This methodology can be used to determine sediment Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in sediment impaired waters, and provide the necessary hydrodynamic and sediment-related data t...

  6. Sediment fingerprinting to determine the source of suspended sediment in a southern Piedmont stream.

    PubMed

    Mukundan, R; Radcliffe, D E; Ritchie, J C; Risse, L M; McKinley, R A

    2010-01-01

    Thousands of stream miles in the southern Piedmont region are impaired because of high levels of suspended sediment. It is unclear if the source is upland erosion from agricultural sources or bank erosion of historic sediment deposited in the flood plains between 1830 and 1930 when cotton farming was extensive. The objective of this study was to determine the source of high stream suspended sediment concentrations in a typical southern Piedmont watershed using sediment fingerprinting techniques. Twenty-one potential tracers were tested for their ability to discriminate between sources, conservative behavior, and lack of redundancy. Tracer concentrations were determined in potential sediment sources (forests, pastures, row crop fields, stream banks, and unpaved roads and construction sites), and suspended sediment samples collected from the stream and analyzed using mixing models. Results indicated that 137Cs and 15N were the best tracers to discriminate potential sediment sources in this watershed. The delta15N values showed distinct signatures in all the potential suspended sediment sources, and delta15N was a unique tracer to differentiate stream bank soil from upland subsurface soils, such as soil from construction sites, unpaved roads, ditches, and field gullies. Mixing models showed that about 60% of the stream suspended sediment originated from eroding stream banks, 23 to 30% from upland subsoil sources (e.g., construction sites and unpaved roads), and about 10 to 15% from pastures. The results may be applicable to other watersheds in the Piedmont depending on the extent of urbanization occurring in these watersheds. Better understanding of the sources of fine sediment has practical implications on the type of sediment control measures to be adopted. Investment of resources in improving water quality should consider the factors causing stream bank erosion and erosion from unpaved roads and construction sites to water quality impairment. PMID:20830921

  7. Stream invertebrate community functional responses to deposited sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rabeni, C.F.; Doisy, K.E.; Zweig, L.D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated functional responses of benthic invertebrates to deposited sediment in four Missouri USA streams. In each stream, invertebrates were sampled along continuums of deposited sediment (particles <2 mm in size) from 0 to 100% surface cover in reaches of fairly homogeneous substrate composition, current velocity, and water depths. Correlations, graphical representations, and the cumulative response curves of feeding and habit groups provided strong empirical support for distinct community functional changes due to deposited sediment. Feeding groups were more sensitive to deposited sediment than habit groups. Densities of all the feeding groups decreased significantly with increasing deposited sediment, while relative densities of gatherers increased significantly. Taxa richness also decreased significantly for all the feeding groups except for the shredders. Increases in deposited sediment were related to significant density decreases for only the clingers and sprawlers in the habit group, resulting in significant increases in the relative densities of both burrowers and climbers. Clingers, sprawlers, and swimmers also showed significant decreases in taxa richness. ?? Eawag, 2005.

  8. The measurement of total sediment load in alluvial streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, P.C.; Matejka, D.Q.

    1953-01-01

    The measurement of the total sediment load transported by streams that flow in alluvial channels has been a perplexing problem to engineers and geologists for over a century. Until the last decade the development of equipment to measure bed load and suspended load was carried on almost independently, and without primary consideration of the fundamental laws governing the transportation of fluvial sediments. French investigators during the nineteenth century described methods of measurement and a mathematical approach for computing the rate of bed-load movement. The comprehensive laboratory investigations by Gilbert early in this century provided data that are still being used for studies of sediment transport. Detailed laboratory investigations of bed-load movement conducted during the last two decades by a number of investigators have resulted in the development of additional mathematical formulas for computing rates of bed-load movement. Likewise, studies of turbulent flow have provided the turbulence suspension theory for suspended sediment as it is known today.

  9. A new sampler design for measuring sedimentation in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, Lara B.; Welsh, S.A.; Hedrick, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Sedimentation alters aquatic habitats and negatively affects fish and invertebrate communities but is difficult to quantify. To monitor bed load sedimentation, we designed a sampler with a 10.16-cm polyvinyl chloride coupling and removable sediment trap. We conducted a trial study of our samplers in riffle and pool habitats upstream and downstream of highway construction on a first-order Appalachian stream. Sediment samples were collected over three 6-week intervals, dried, and separated into five size-classes by means of nested sieves (U.S. standard sieve numbers 4, 8, 14, and 20). Downstream sediment accumulated in size-classes 1 and 2, and the total amount accumulated was significantly greater during all three sampling periods. Size-classes 3 and 4 had significantly greater amounts of sediment for the first two sampling periods at the downstream site. Differences between upstream and downstream sites narrowed during the 5-month sampling period. This probably reflects changes in site conditions, including the addition of more effective sediment control measures after the first 6-week period of the study. The sediment sampler design allowed for long-term placement of traps without continual disturbance of the streambed and was successful at providing repeat measures of sediment at paired sites. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  10. Biogeochemical and suspended sediment responses to permafrost degradation in stream banks in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, M. N.; Van Horn, D.; Sudman, Z.; McKnight, D. M.; Welch, K. A.; Lyons, W. B.

    2015-09-01

    Stream channels in the McMurdo Dry Valleys are typically wide, incised, and stable. At typical flows, streams occupy a fraction of the oversized channels, providing habitat for algal mats. In January 2012, we discovered substantial channel erosion and subsurface thermomechanical erosion undercutting banks of Crescent Stream. We sampled stream water along the impacted reach and compared concentrations of solutes to the long-term data from this stream (~20 years of monitoring). Thermokarst-impacted stream water demonstrated higher electrical conductivity, and concentrations of chloride, sulfate, sodium, suspended sediments, and nitrate than the long-term medians. These results suggest that this mode of lateral permafrost degradation may substantially impact stream solute loads and potentially fertilize stream and lake ecosystems. The potential for sediment to scour or bury stream algal mats is yet to be determined, though it may offset impacts of associated increased nutrient loads to streams.

  11. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Marysvale, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, T.R.; Vreeland, J.L.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-07-31

    Results of the Marysvale detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 397 stream sediment samples and 160 radiometric readings. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Stream sediments containing significant amounts of soluble uranium (greater than or equal to 16.93 ppM) occur in numerous areas, the most prevalent being in the western portion of the survey area, within and surrounding the Mount Belknap Caldera. Thorium, beryllium, cerium, manganese, molybdenum, niobium, potassium, yttrium, zinc, and zirconium occur in concentrations greater than or equal to 84th percentile in many sediment samples taken from within and surrounding the Mount Belknap Caldera. The uranium and related variables are associated with highly silicic intrusions and extrusions of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, as well as hydrothermal activity which has occurred in the Marysvale volcanic field.

  12. Persistence and sorption of fipronil degradates in urban stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunde; Haver, Darren; Oki, Lorence; Gan, Jay

    2009-07-01

    Fipronil, an increasingly popular insecticide used for urban pest control, is known to readily transform into several degradates that generally have similar or greater toxicity to aquatic organisms than the parent compound. However, knowledge on the fate of these degradates in the environment is obscure. In the present study, degradation kinetics and sorption of desthiofipronil, fipronil sulfide, and fipronil sulfone were investigated in urban stream sediments. All degradates showed enhanced persistence in sediments compared to fipronil under facultative or anaerobic conditions. Under facultative conditions, the estimated half-lives of desthiofipronil, fipronil sulfide, and fipronil sulfone were 217 to 497, 195 to 352, and 502 to 589 d, respectively. Under anaerobic conditions, the corresponding half-lives were over one year in one sediment, while no detectable degradation occurred in the other two sediments after 280 d. Sorption isotherms of fipronil and its degradates in the sediments were linear, with mean K(OC) values of 802, 1,296, 3,684, and 3,543 L/kg for fipronil, desthiofipronil, fipronil sulfide, and fipronil sulfone, respectively, suggesting that the degradates generally have a higher sorption capacity than fipronil. Sorption coefficient K(d) increased up to fourfold over 280 d, suggesting an aging effect on sorption. The inherent toxicity, long persistence, and strong sorption potential highlight the importance for a better understanding of the sediment toxicity of fipronil degradates in surface water bodies. PMID:19215184

  13. EFFECTS OF VEGETATION ON TURBULENCE, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND STREAM MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation, from an individual stem to multiple stems in various configurations, profoundly alters turbulent flows. These alterations influence sediment transport and stream morphology, but depend on complex interactions and relationships between flow, plants and sediment properties. This is illustrated for three case studies that represent a variety of macrophyte patterns and scales in the environment: flows through simulated uniformly distributed plant stems, emergent and submerged; flows with alternating simulated stem patches; and flow around an isolated stem in a flood plain. The emergent case demonstrates that when density is sparse the mean velocity and turbulence intensities vary horizontally around the stems, which would promote a heterogeneous bedform morphology. However, it is still unclear how density, submergence ratio, and flow Reynolds number, in combination, influence interference effects, vortex shedding and dissipation, and velocity, pressure and lift fluctuations that affect sediment entrainment. The submerged case demonstrates significant reduction of the mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulent shear near the bed compared to an unobstructed flow and supports numerous observations that vegetation promotes deposition or stabilizes bed sediments. The case of alternating emergent vegetation patches illustrates how vegetation adjusts the bed promoting scour in open water and deposition within the patches. The isolated stem case illustrates the variety of coherent structures generated, their complex interaction, and their role in specific sediment transport phenomena observed. Additional research is required, however, to quantify thresholds and relationships for flow-vegetation-sediment interactions so that aquatic macrophyte plantings can be used more effectively in water resource management.

  14. Biogeochemistry and Hydrology in Streams Impacted by Legacy Sediments and Urbanization: Implications for Stream Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    The groundwater–surface water interface, consisting of shallow groundwater adjacent to stream channels, is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for other solutes, and a target for restoration activities. Characterizing groundwater-surface water interac...

  15. Occurrence of Organochlorine Pesticides in Stream Bed Sediment and Fish From Selected Streams on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brasher, Anne M.; Anthony, Stephen S.

    2000-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides were heavily used from the mid-1940s to the mid-1980s. The persistence of organochlorine pesticides, their tendency to accumulate in soil, sediment, and biota, and their harmful effects on wildlife brought this class of compounds into disfavor and eventually resulted in restriction or cancellation of most of them in the United States (Nowell and others, 1999). Despite use restrictions, these compounds continue to be detected in sediment and fish tissue samples. This study was undertaken as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The NAWQA program assesses watersheds as integrated systems, focusing on chemical concentrations, physical conditions, and biological status in streams. One component of NAWQA is an occurrence survey of organic contaminants and trace elements in stream bed sediment and fish tissue. The goal of the Oahu stream bed sediment and fish tissue occurrence survey was to determine which organochlorine contaminants are present in streams around the island, and with which land uses they are associated. An understanding of relations between land use and organochlorine compounds will allow land management practices to be designed to reduce the loading of contaminants to streams and nearshore waters.

  16. Macrophyte presence is an indicator of enhanced denitrification and nitrification in sediments of a temperate restored agricultural stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream macrophytes are often removed with their sediments to deepen stream channels, stabilize channel banks, or provide habitat for target species. These sediments may support enhanced nitrogen processing. To evaluate sediment nitrogen processing, identify seasonal patterns, and...

  17. Understanding Stream Channel Sediment Source Contributions For The Paradise Creek Watershed In Northern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittenburg, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Excess sediment from agricultural areas has been a major source of impairment for water bodies, resulting in the implementation of mitigation measures across landscapes. Watershed scale reductions often target upland erosion as key non-point sources for sediment loading. Stream channel dynamics, however, also play a contributing role in sediment loading in the form of legacy sediments, channel erosion and deposition, and buffering during storm events. In-stream contributions are not well understood, and are a potentially important consideration for Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). The objective of this study is to differentiate stream bank and stream bed sediment contributions and better understand the role of legacy sediments. The study area is the Paradise Creek Watershed in northern Idaho. We modeled sediment yield to the channel system using the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, and subsequent channel erosion and deposition using CONCEPTs. Field observations of cross-sections along the channel system over a 5-year period were collected to verify model simulations and to test the hypothesis that the watershed load was composed predominantly of legacy sediments. Our modeling study shows that stream channels contributed to 39% of the total annual sediment load for the basin, with a 19-year time lag between sediments entering the stream to leaving the watershed outlet. Observations from long-term cross sectional data in the watershed, and a sediment fingerprinting analysis will be presented to better understand sediment contributions from within the stream channel system.

  18. THE USE OF GEOMORPHOLOGY AND STREAM STABILITY IN THE ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF STREAM IMPAIRMENT FROM SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of the current condition is critical to the management of streams impaired by sediment and other non-point source stressors, which adversely affect both physical habitat and water quality. Several rating and classification systems based on geomorphic data exist for...

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Data report: Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, W M; Sargent, K A; Cook, J R

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. The following samples were collected: Arkansas-3292 stream sediments, 5121 ground waters, 1711 stream waters; Louisiana-1017 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Misissippi-0 stream sediments, 814 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Missouri-2162 stream sediments, 3423 ground waters 1340 stream waters; Oklahoma-2493 stream sediments, 2751 ground waters, 375 stream waters; and Texas-279 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. The results of mass spectroscopic analysis for He are given for 563 ground water sites in Mississippi. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation.

  20. Transport of reactive chemicals in sediment-laden streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    This paper deals with the transport of chemicals in a turbulent stream when both sorbing suspended load and decay reactions are present. These conditions, which can be found quite commonly in rivers, give rise to interesting behaviour. Important and not trivial processes are added and interact with the classical diffusive, advective, and dispersive mechanisms. Due to the sorption process, the chemical divides into an aqueous and a sorbed phase which follow different evolutions: the aqueous phase is regulated by turbulent diffusion, advection and shear, while the sorbed one undergoes the same fluid dynamic mechanisms but through the evolution of suspended sediment, which is also subjected to sedimentation. The evolutions of the two phases are not separate, as the sorption-desorption exchanges between the aqueous and sorbed phases connect their dynamics. In turn, the decay reactions, being able to modify the concentrations in the two phases, influence the sorption process and therefore the entire transport dynamics. A complex picture results where several nonlinear interactions occur. The main objective of the work is to obtain the one-dimensional partial differential equation that describes the temporal and spatial dynamics of the depth-averaged concentration of the chemical. Due to the existence of three well separated time scales in the whole transport process, the mathematical homogenization theory is adopted to average the two-dimensional model, and the most general case is dealt with in which sediment transport is unsteady while the reactions are nonlinear and different for the aqueous and sorbed phases. Finally, some examples of real cases are discussed where the influence of unsteady suspended sediment dynamics and the nonlinearity of reactions is analyzed, while the role of the several nonlinear differential terms in the model is highlighted.

  1. DENITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS IN SEDIMENTS OF A MID-ATLANTIC INCISED STREAM DEPOSITED WITH DEEP LEGACY SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess legacy sediments deposited in former impounded streams frequently bury Holocene pre-settlement wetlands, decrease in-situ nitrogen removal, and increase nitrogen transport downstream, particularly where deep incised channels limit sediment-water interactions. This has prom...

  2. Bedded Sediment Conditions and Macroinvertebrate Responses in New Mexico Streams: A First Step in Establishing Sediment Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic life protection was the impetus for a New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) effort to define bedded sediment conditions in streams that were natural and tolerable, especially to benthic macroinvertebrates. Sediments were measured using surveys of streambed particles to...

  3. Some statistical relationships between stream sediment and soil geochemistry in northwestern Wisconsin - can stream sediment compositions be used to predict compositions of soils in glaciated terranes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, W.F.; Woodruff, L.G.; Pimley, S.

    2004-01-01

    Mean stream sediment chemical compositions from northwestern Wisconsin in the north central United States, based on more than 800 samples, differ significantly from mean A-horizon and C-horizon soil compositions, based on about 380 samples of each horizon. Differences by a factor greater than 1.5 exist for some elements (Ca, Mn, Mg, P, Ti, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn). A very large database of stream sediment geochemistry exists for the region (more than 2200 samples) and for the U.S. (roughly 400,000 samples), whereas data on the chemistry of soils is much sparser both regionally and nationally. Therefore, we have attempted to quantify trends in compositional differences between stream sediments and nearby soils to test whether the abundant stream sediment data can be used to predict soil compositions. A simple computational technique of adjusting the stream sediment compositions according to the ratio of means of soils and stream sediments was conducted. A variety of techniques of correction and interpolation of data were tested and indicate that repetitive testing of results allows an optimum correction to be achieved. Predicted soil compositions compared to analytically determined soil compositions show a range of results from relatively good correspondence for some elements to rather poor correspondence for others. In general, predictions are best at midranges of compositions. The technique does not predict well more extreme or anomalous values. Thus, this technique appears to be useful for estimating background soil compositions and delineating regional compositional trends in soils in situations where large amounts of stream sediment analyses and smaller amounts of soil analyses are available. The technique also provides probabilistic qualifications on the expected error between predicted and actual soil compositions so that individual users can judge if the technique provides data of sufficient accuracy for specific needs. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impacts of biological diversity on sediment transport in streams (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, L. K.; Cardinale, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    The predominant view in many fields of natural science has long been that the diversity of life on Earth is simply a byproduct of physical variation in the environment. However, over the past several decades researchers have begun to compliment this view with new paradigms that suggest organisms not only respond to their abiotic environment, but also directly control rates of physical processes that define ecosystems. Even so, most of these studies have assumed that 'biology' is uniform - meaning, the influence of life can be described by a single parameter in physical models. But is it reasonable to assume that life can be condensed into a single parameter that describes how all of biology modifies physics? Is the influence of a tree on hillside erosion the same as a grass, or the effect of crab on bioturbation the same as that of a polychaete worm? Or alternatively, must we specifically account for the diversity of life that is perhaps the most striking feature of our planet? Here we present results from a study in which we examined how biological diversity of net-spinning caddisflies (Trichoptera:Hydropsychidae) influences sediment transport in streams. Caddisflies are insects that spend the larval portion of their life-cycle in the benthic habitat of streams where they construct silken catchnets across pore spaces between rocks to filter food particles. Because caddisflies can reach densities of 10,000 or more per m2 with each larva spinning thousands of silken threads between rocks, studies have shown that caddisflies reduce the probability of bed movement during high discharge events. We extended these results by simply asking whether two species have a greater impact on sediment mobility than one species. To address this question, we manipulated the presence of two caddisfly species (Artopsyche and Ceratopsyche) alone and in combination in model flumes having constant densities. After allowing larvae time to construct nets, we measured the force required to

  5. Understanding the controls on deposited fine sediment in the streams of agricultural catchments.

    PubMed

    Naden, P S; Murphy, J F; Old, G H; Newman, J; Scarlett, P; Harman, M; Duerdoth, C P; Hawczak, A; Pretty, J L; Arnold, A; Laizé, C; Hornby, D D; Collins, A L; Sear, D A; Jones, J I

    2016-03-15

    Excessive sediment pressure on aquatic habitats is of global concern. A unique dataset, comprising instantaneous measurements of deposited fine sediment in 230 agricultural streams across England and Wales, was analysed in relation to 20 potential explanatory catchment and channel variables. The most effective explanatory variable for the amount of deposited sediment was found to be stream power, calculated for bankfull flow and used to index the capacity of the stream to transport sediment. Both stream power and velocity category were highly significant (p ≪ 0.001), explaining some 57% variation in total fine sediment mass. Modelled sediment pressure, predominantly from agriculture, was marginally significant (p<0.05) and explained a further 1% variation. The relationship was slightly stronger for erosional zones, providing 62% explanation overall. In the case of the deposited surface drape, stream power was again found to be the most effective explanatory variable (p<0.001) but velocity category, baseflow index and modelled sediment pressure were all significant (p<0.01); each provided an additional 2% explanation to an overall 50%. It is suggested that, in general, the study sites were transport-limited and the majority of stream beds were saturated by fine sediment. For sites below saturation, the upper envelope of measured fine sediment mass increased with modelled sediment pressure. The practical implications of these findings are that (i) targets for fine sediment loads need to take into account the ability of streams to transport/retain fine sediment, and (ii) where agricultural mitigation measures are implemented to reduce delivery of sediment, river management to mobilise/remove fines may also be needed in order to effect an improvement in ecological status in cases where streams are already saturated with fines and unlikely to self-cleanse. PMID:26789373

  6. Using a sediment balance for the assessment of stream quality in the midwestern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment is considered a source of water quality impairment in many streams but is also an essential component of lotic ecosystems. Assessment of water quality impairment related to sediment, in contrast to synthetic chemicals, requires a framework to account for the influence of natural physiographic factors before any impairment can be attributed to anthropogenic factors. A conceptual sediment balance was applied to account for the size and stability fo bed material in a synoptic investigation of 100 streams in the midwestern US conducted collaboratively through the USGS National Water Quality Assessment and US EPA National Aquatic Resource Surveys. Basin slope and water surface gradient serve as indicators of sediment supply and transport capacity, respectively, that are associated with variation in the size of bed material across sites in the investigation. Given this general model, urban development, reservoirs, and agricultural land use emerge as other significant factors influencing the particle size-distribution of stream bed material. Sediment loading, which presumes a monotonic relation between impairment and sediment supply, is an incomplete and potentially misleading description of how anthropogenic factors influence the quality of small streams. A sediment balance provides a better conceptual model for assessing stream quality impairment because it can identify both excess and lack of sediment. A sediment balance provides additional information about whether transport capacity or sediment supply may be causal factors and how management of these factor is likely to influence stream quality.

  7. Modeling the effects of unsaturated, stratified sediments on groundwater recharge from intermittent streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Mark E.; Dreiss, Shirley J.

    1990-03-01

    Unsaturated, stratified sediments beneath intermittent stream channels affect groundwater recharge from these streams. Using four different cases of sediment stratification, we simulate transient, variably saturated flow in a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical cross-section between the stream and the underlying water table. These cases include: homogeneous sediments; low permeability streambed sediments; narrow, low permeability lenses; and extensive, low permeability layers. The permeability of the sediments in these cases greatly affects the timing and rate of channel loss and groundwater recharge. Flow patterns and the style of stream/water table connection are controlled by the location and geometry of low permeability sediments. In cases with homogeneous sediments and narrow, low permeability lenses, stream/water table connection occurs by a saturated column advancing from above. In cases with low permeability streambed sediments and extensive, low permeability layers, connection occurs by a water table mound building from below. The style of stream/water table connection suggests simplified physically based interaction models that may be appropriate for these settings. We compared channel loss and groundwater recharge computed using two simplified models, a Darcian seepage equation and the Green-Ampt infiltration equation, with the results from our 2-D simulations. Simplified models using parameters from the 2-D simulations appear to perform well in cases with homogeneous and low permeability streambed sediments. In cases with low permeability lenses or layers, the simplified models require calibrated parameters to perform well.

  8. Sources of fine sediment stored in agricultural lowland streams, Midwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, Jasmeet; Thompson, A. M.; Karthikeyan, K. G.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2015-05-01

    Agricultural activities can accelerate the offsite transport of productive soil from fields leading to stream water quality degradation. Identification of the nature and relative contribution of different sources to fine-grained sediment (e.g., silts, clays) in streams is important to effectively focus agricultural best management practices in watersheds. Sediment fingerprinting techniques through the use of geochemical tracers are commonly used to differentiate relative contribution from various sources. Research was conducted in lowland streams in the Pleasant Valley watershed in South Central Wisconsin (USA) to identify provenance of fine-grained sediment deposits and evaluate the impact of land use on relative contributions from the following potential sources: cropland, pasture, woodland, and eroding stream banks. Results show that both agriculture (croplands and pastures) and eroding stream banks are primary sources to fine sediment deposits on the stream bed with contributions ranging from 19 to 100% and 0 to 81%, respectively. The increase in area under agricultural land use within a subwatershed results in greater contribution from agriculture (R2 = 0.846, p = 0.0034). Relative contributions from eroding stream banks increased with increasing area under grasslands and woodlands within a subwatershed (R2 = 0.814, p = 0.0055). Subwatersheds with greater mass of fine sediment deposited on the stream bed per unit area should be prioritized for best management practices. The conservation practices should be targeted to stream banks or croplands depending on the dominant source of fine sediment within a subwatershed. Site specific changes in relative contributions from different sources to fine-grained sediment in this watershed highlights the complexities involved in sediment transport dynamics. The nested sampling sites helped determine that sediment dynamics at the subwatershed scale need to be considered for application of targeted conservation techniques.

  9. Data report: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K A; Cook, J R; Fay, W M

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. The following sample types were collected in each state: Illinois - 716 stream sediment, 1046 ground water, 337 stream water; Indiana - 126 stream sediment, 443 ground water, 111 stream water; Kentucky - 4901 stream sediment, 6408 ground water, 3966 stream water; Tennessee - 3309 stream sediment, 3574 ground water, 1584 stream water; Ohio - 1214 stream sediment, 2049 ground water, 1205 stream water. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. Supplementary analyses by other techniques are reported for U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn. These analyses were made on 248 sediment samples from Tennessee. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation.

  10. Cytoplasmic streaming affects gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation in maize coleoptiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Leopold, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Living maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile cells were observed using a horizontal microscope to determine the interaction between cytoplasmic streaming and gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation. Sedimentation is heavily influenced by streaming which may (1) hasten or slow the velocity of amyloplast movement and (2) displace the plastid laterally or even upwards before or after sedimentation. Amyloplasts may move through transvacuolar strands or through the peripheral cytoplasm which may be divided into fine cytoplasmic strands of much smaller diameter than the plastids. The results indicate that streaming may contribute to the dynamics of graviperception by influencing amyloplast movement.

  11. Biotransformation of caffeine, cotinine, and nicotine in stream sediments: Implications for use as wastewater indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Barber, L.B.; Kolpin, D.W.; McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2007-01-01

    Microbially catalyzed cleavage of the imadazole ring of caffeine was observed in stream sediments collected upstream and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in three geographically separate stream systems. Microbial demethylation of the N-methyl component of cotinine and its metabolic precursor, nicotine, also was observed in these sediments. These findings indicate that stream sediment microorganisms are able to substantially alter the chemical structure and thus the analytical signatures of these candidate waste indicator compounds. The potential for in situ biotransformation must be considered if these compounds are employed as markers to identify the sources and track the fate of wastewater compounds in surface-water systems.

  12. Land Use Influences on Phosphorus (P) Release and Retention by Stream and Ditch Sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High P levels in surface waters can cause algae blooms and increase water treatment costs in reservoirs used for potable water. Sediments can buffer soluble P concentrations in ditches and streams that feed into these reservoirs. Our study area included ditches and streams that serve as the headwate...

  13. Are Stream and Ditch P Concentrations Related to Sediment P Status and Land Use?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High P levels in surface waters can cause algae blooms and increase water treatment costs in reservoirs used for potable water. Sediments can buffer soluble P concentrations in ditches and streams that feed into these reservoirs. Our study area included ditches and streams that serve as the headwate...

  14. Geomorphic and chemical controls on sediment denitrification in restored urban streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, A. K.; McMillan, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    In the Southeastern United States, recent endeavors in stream restoration address bank destabilization, catastrophic flooding, and water quality issues resulting from urban stream syndrome. Several projects in the city of Charlotte, North Carolina are underway with goals of stabilizing stream banks, improving local water quality and enhancing ecological functions. Restoration of natural stream pattern and profile provides an opportunity to mitigate eutrophication by enhancing nitrogen uptake and removal in stream sediments. Four restored headwater streams, and a degraded and reference stream were included in this study to examine sediment denitrification rates. Several environmental factors (e.g. NO3¬ concentration, dissolved organic carbon, sediment carbon) as well as proximity to engineered grade-control structures, riffles, and pools are examined as possible drivers affecting nitrogen removal. We used an acetylene block method to measure denitrification rates using slurries of stream sediments from different locations in each reach, including steps, riffles, and pools. Although average denitrification rates were variable (ranging from 64 to 864 μmol N hr-1 m-2), restored streams had the highest denitrification rates, especially those with a restored floodplain. At the NO3-concentrations typically observed in these streams during baseflow, (0.50 ±0.2 ¬ mg/L), NO3- availability appears to be the primary limiting factor for denitrification rates. Generally, sediments collected immediately downstream of grade control structures had highest rates of NO3- removal, which we hypothesize is linked to deposition and burial of benthic organic material, enhancing development of active microbial populations at anaerobic microsites. Laboratory experiments amended with NO3- and labile carbon as glucose showed that while NO3- was likely primarily controlling rates, labile carbon increased denitrification rates with NO3- saturation at approximately 1 mg/L.

  15. Evaluation of a fine sediment removal tool in spring-fed and snowmelt driven streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.; Sutphin, Zach; Sechrist, Juddson D.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of fine-grained sediments impairs the structure and function of streams, so removing fine sediments may be required to achieve restoration objectives. There has been little work on methods of removing excess sediment or on the efficacy of the methods. We used a 4-year before-after-control-impact design in southeastern Idaho streams to test a fine sediment removal system (FSRS) manufactured by Streamside Environmental LLC. The FSRS agitates fine sediment in the substrate with clean pump water and then vacuums the sediment out of the stream with a second pump. Our objectives were: 1) to test if the FSRS can selectively remove fine sediment; 2) to monitor the bio-physical responses in FSRS treated and downstream waters; and 3) to compare the bio-physical responses to the FSRS in spring-fed and snowmelt driven stream reaches. The FSRS removed ~ 14 metric tons of sediment from the two treated reaches. More than 90% of this sediment was < 2 mm, indicating that the FSRS selected for fine sediment in both stream types. Sustained effects of removing this sediment were confined to substrate improvements in treated reaches. Embeddedness in the spring-fed reach decreased and subsurface grain size in spring-fed and snowmelt driven reaches increased. We did not detect any sustained invertebrate or fish responses in treated reaches or any detrimental bio-physical responses in downstream waters. These results indicate that the FSRS reduced fine sediment levels but sediment removal did not reverse the impacts of sediment accumulation to stream biota within our monitoring time frame.

  16. Pb isotopes and toxic metals in floodplain and stream sediments from the Volturno river basin, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVivo, B.; Somma, R.; Ayuso, R.A.; Calderoni, G.; Lima, A.; Pagliuca, S.; Sava, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present results of a stratigraphic and environmental geochemistry study of the eastern sector of the Volturno river basin (Italy) using stream sediment and floodplain drill core samples. The cores, dated back to 7,000 years B.P., have been used to evaluate background (baseline) values. Pb isotopic compositions and toxic metal abundances have been determined to discriminate natural versus anthropogenic sources. The Pb isotopic compositions of the stream sediments overlap the values of Pb in petrol. The results from both stream sediment and drill core samples plot along a mixing line between the field that characterizes the volcanic rocks outcropping in the area (the natural component) and the Pb isotopic composition of petrol used in western Europe. Results suggest a prevalent contribution of the natural component for the Pb in the drill core samples and a prevailing anthropogenic component for the Pb isotopic compositions in the active stream sediments samples.

  17. Evaluation of Deposited Sediment and Macroinvertebrate Metrics Used to Quantify Biological Response to Excessive Sedimentation in Agricultural Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Andrew B.; Culp, Joseph M.; Benoy, Glenn A.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate which macroinvertebrate and deposited sediment metrics are best for determining effects of excessive sedimentation on stream integrity. Fifteen instream sediment metrics, with the strongest relationship to land cover, were compared to riffle macroinvertebrate metrics in streams ranging across a gradient of land disturbance. Six deposited sediment metrics were strongly related to the relative abundance of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera and six were strongly related to the modified family biotic index (MFBI). Few functional feeding groups and habit groups were significantly related to deposited sediment, and this may be related to the focus on riffle, rather than reach-wide macroinvertebrates, as reach-wide sediment metrics were more closely related to human land use. Our results suggest that the coarse-level deposited sediment metric, visual estimate of fines, and the coarse-level biological index, MFBI, may be useful in biomonitoring efforts aimed at determining the impact of anthropogenic sedimentation on stream biotic integrity.

  18. ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC/SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR STREAM NETWORKS: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes a new sediment transport model and the supporting post-processor, and sampling procedures for sediments in streams. Specifically, the following items are described herein:

    EFDC1D - This is a new one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment tr...

  19. Stream Sediment Sources in Midwest Agricultural Basins with Land Retirement along Channel.

    PubMed

    Williamson, T N; Christensen, V G; Richardson, W B; Frey, J W; Gellis, A C; Kieta, K A; Fitzpatrick, F A

    2014-09-01

    Documenting the effects of agricultural land retirement on stream-sediment sources is critical to identifying management practices that improve water quality and aquatic habitat. Particularly difficult to quantify are the effects from conservation easements that commonly are discontinuous along channelized streams and ditches throughout the agricultural midwestern United States. Our hypotheses were that sediment from cropland, retired land, stream banks, and roads would be discernible using isotopic and elemental concentrations and that source contributions would vary with land retirement distribution along tributaries of West Fork Beaver Creek in Minnesota. Channel-bed and suspended sediment were sampled at nine locations and compared with local source samples by using linear discriminant analysis and a four-source mixing model that evaluated seven tracers: In, P, total C, Be, Tl, Th, and Ti. The proportion of sediment sources differed significantly between suspended and channel-bed sediment. Retired land contributed to channel-bed sediment but was not discernible as a source of suspended sediment, suggesting that retired-land material was not mobilized during high-flow conditions. Stream banks were a large contributor to suspended sediment; however, the percentage of stream-bank sediment in the channel bed was lower in basins with more continuous retired land along the riparian corridor. Cropland sediments had the highest P concentrations; basins with the highest cropland-sediment contributions also had the highest P concentrations. Along stream reaches with retired land, there was a lower proportion of cropland material in suspended sediment relative to sites that had almost no land retirement, indicating less movement of nutrients and sediment from cropland to the channel as a result of land retirement. PMID:25603248

  20. Sediment contributions from floodplains and legacy sediments to Piedmont streams of Baltimore County, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Mitchell; Miller, Andrew; Baker, Matthew; Gellis, Allen

    2015-04-01

    Disparity between watershed erosion rates and downstream sediment delivery has remained an important theme in geomorphology for many decades, with the role of floodplains in sediment storage as a common focus. In the Piedmont Province of the eastern USA, upland deforestation and agricultural land use following European settlement led to accumulation of thick packages of overbank sediment in valley bottoms, commonly referred to as legacy deposits. Previous authors have argued that legacy deposits represent a potentially important source of modern sediment loads following remobilization by lateral migration and progressive channel widening. This paper seeks to quantify (1) rates of sediment remobilization from Baltimore County floodplains by channel migration and bank erosion, (2) proportions of streambank sediment derived from legacy deposits, and (3) potential contribution of net streambank erosion and legacy sediments to downstream sediment yield within the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont. We calculated measurable gross erosion and deposition rates within the fluvial corridor along 40 valley segments from 18 watersheds with drainage areas between 0.18 and 155 km2 in Baltimore County, Maryland. We compared stream channel and floodplain morphology from lidar-based digital elevation data collected in 2005 with channel positions recorded on 1:2400 scale topographic maps from 1959-1961 in order to quantify 44-46 years of channel change. Sediment bulk density and particle size distributions were characterized from streambank and channel deposit samples and used for volume to mass conversions and for comparison with other sediment sources. Average annual lateral migration rates ranged from 0.04 to 0.19 m/y, which represented an annual migration of 2.5% (0.9-4.4%) channel width across all study segments, suggesting that channel dimensions may be used as reasonable predictors of bank erosion rates. Gross bank erosion rates varied from 43 to 310 Mg/km/y (median = 114) and were

  1. CONNECTICUT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named streams in Connecticut. It includes two Shapefiles with line and polygon features. Both Shapefiles should be used together. The polygon shapefile fills in open water streams such as the Connecticut River as well as Long Island Sound. T...

  2. Stream Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J.

    Stream processors, like other multi core architectures partition their functional units and storage into multiple processing elements. In contrast to typical architectures, which contain symmetric general-purpose cores and a cache hierarchy, stream processors have a significantly leaner design. Stream processors are specifically designed for the stream execution model, in which applications have large amounts of explicit parallel computation, structured and predictable control, and memory accesses that can be performed at a coarse granularity. Applications in the streaming model are expressed in a gather-compute-scatter form, yielding programs with explicit control over transferring data to and from on-chip memory. Relying on these characteristics, which are common to many media processing and scientific computing applications, stream architectures redefine the boundary between software and hardware responsibilities with software bearing much of the complexity required to manage concurrency, locality, and latency tolerance. Thus, stream processors have minimal control consisting of fetching medium- and coarse-grained instructions and executing them directly on the many ALUs. Moreover, the on-chip storage hierarchy of stream processors is under explicit software control, as is all communication, eliminating the need for complex reactive hardware mechanisms.

  3. Uncertanity Analysis in Parameter Estimation of Coupled Bacteria-Sediment Fate and Transport in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoudieh, A.; Le, T.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    E. coli is widely used as an fecal indicator bacteria in streams. It has been shown that the interaction between sediments and the bacteria is an important factor in determining its fate and transport in water bodies. In this presentation parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis of a mechanistic model of bacteria-sediment interaction respectively using a hybrid genetic algorithm and Makov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach will be presented. The physically-based model considers the advective-dispersive transport of sediments as well as both free-floating and sediment-associated bacteria in the water column and also the fate and transport of bacteria in the bed sediments in a small stream. The bed sediments are treated as a distributed system which allows modeling the evolution of the vertical distribution of bacteria as a result of sedimentation and resuspension, diffusion and bioturbation in the sediments. One-dimensional St. Venant's equation is used to model flow in the stream. The model is applied to sediment and E. coli concentration data collected during a high flow event in a small stream historically receiving agricultural runoff. Measured total suspended sediments and total E. coli concentrations in the water column at three sections of the stream are used for the parameter estimation. The data on the initial distribution of E. coli in the sediments was available and was used as the initial conditions. The MCMC method is used to estimate the joint probability distribution of model parameters including sediment deposition and erosion rates, critical shear stress for deposition and erosion, attachment and detachment rate constants of E. coli to/from sediments and also the effective diffusion coefficients of E. coli in the bed sediments. The uncertainties associated with the estimated parameters are quantified via the MCMC approach and the correlation between the posterior distribution of parameters have been used to assess the model adequacy and

  4. A reconnaissance of stream sediment in the Erie-Niagara basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, R.J.; La Sala, A.M., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    This reconnaissance study of erosion and deposition of sediment in the Erie-Niagara basin indicates that the highest sediment yields, on the order of 1,000 tons per square mile per year, occur in streams that drain upland areas. In contrast, for example, from the lowland part of the Tonawanda Creek basin, the annual sediment yields are on the order of 100 tons per square mile per year. The estimated average annual sediment yields of streams in the basin range from 50 tons per square mile for Little Tonawanda Creek at Linden, to 1,500 tons per square mile for Cazenovia Creek at Ebenezer. These estimates are based on measured instantaneous sediment discharge at selected stream stations, the sediment loads of which ranged from 1,100 tons per year for Little Tonawanda Creek at Linden to 610,000 tons per year for Cattaraugus Creek at Gowanda. The accuracy of the estimates of average annual sediment discharge could be considerably improved by the collection of additional data. Nevertheless, the estimates are believed to be indicative of the magnitude of sediment yields and provide a general description of stream-sediment movement in the study area. Peak suspended-sediment concentrations in the range of 2,600 to 5,300 ppm (parts per million) were observed at three stations in the Cattaraugus Creek basin, as well as at Buffalo Creek at Gardenville, Cazenovia Creek at Ebenezer, and Cayuga Creek near Lancaster.

  5. Ecological impacts of lead mining on Ozark streams: Toxicity of sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Allert, A.L.; Poulton, B.C.; Schmitt, C.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the toxicity of sediments downstream of lead-zinc mining areas in southeast Missouri, using chronic sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and pore-water toxicity tests with the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests conducted in 2002 documented reduced survival of amphipods in stream sediments collected near mining areas and reduced survival and reproduction of daphnids in most pore waters tested. Additional amphipod tests conducted in 2004 documented significant toxic effects of sediments from three streams downstream of mining areas: Strother Creek, West Fork Black River, and Bee Fork. Greatest toxicity occurred in sediments from a 6-km reach of upper Strother Creek, but significant toxic effects occurred in sediments collected at least 14 km downstream of mining in all three watersheds. Toxic effects were significantly correlated with metal concentrations (nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead) in sediments and pore waters and were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity risks based on sediment quality guidelines, although ammonia and manganese may also have contributed to toxicity at a few sites. Responses of amphipods in sediment toxicity tests were significantly correlated with characteristics of benthic invertebrate communities in study streams. These results indicate that toxicity of metals associated with sediments contributes to adverse ecological effects in streams draining the Viburnum Trend mining district.

  6. Impacts of Permafrost Degradation on Stream Geomorphology and Sediment Transport in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, M. N.; Sudman, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica are a unique ice-free landscape that supports complex, microbially dominated ecosystems despite the harsh environment (<10 cm water equivalent/yr, -18°C mean air temperature). Recent observations suggest that this region is nearing a threshold of rapid landscape change. One such observation was the recent discovery of extensive thermokarst development (permafrost thaw features) along the banks of Crescent Stream in Taylor Valley. In 2012, a large stretch of the West Branch of Crescent Stream had significant bank failures, while the adjacent East Branch was unaffected. The objective of this study was to determine the rate of land surface change occurring on the stream bank, and the impacts of the sediment loading on the stream bed material. Three annually repeated terrestrial LiDAR scans were compared to determine the rates of ground surface change due to thermokarst degradation on the stream bank. The areal extent of the thermokarst was shown to be decreasing, however the average vertical erosion rate remained constant. Field measurements including, pebble counts, fine sediment counts, and sieve samples were collected and analyzed to determine the effects of the introduction of fine sediment on the stream bed material. The bed sediment of the thermokarst-impacted branch was consistently finer than the adjacent unaffected branch. The fine material introduced to the stream altered the bed material composition, which consequently increased the mobility of the of the bed material. These changes imposed on the stream have implications for stream morphology, endemic algal mat communities, and downstream aquatic systems.

  7. Identification of multiple mercury sources to stream sediments near Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Patrick M; Blum, Joel D; Demers, Jason D; Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C; Peryam, John

    2014-04-01

    Sediments were analyzed for total Hg concentration (THg) and isotopic composition from streams and rivers in the vicinity of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) in Oak Ridge, TN (USA). In the stream directly draining Y12, where industrial releases of mercury (Hg) have been documented, high THg (3.26 to 60.1 μg/g) sediments had a distinct Hg isotopic composition (δ(202)Hg of 0.02 ± 0.15‰ and Δ(199)Hg of -0.07 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n = 12) compared to sediments from relatively uncontaminated streams in the region (δ(202)Hg = -1.40 ± 0.06‰ and Δ(199)Hg of -0.26 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n = 6). Additionally, several streams that are nearby but do not drain Y12 had sediments with intermediate THg (0.06 to 0.21 μg/g) and anomalous δ(202)Hg (as low as -5.07‰). We suggest that the low δ(202)Hg values in these sediments provide evidence for the contribution of an additional Hg source to sediments, possibly derived from atmospheric deposition. In sediments directly downstream of Y12 this third Hg source is not discernible, and the Hg isotopic composition can be largely explained by the mixing of low THg sediments with high THg sediments contaminated by Y12 discharges. PMID:24588770

  8. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Effects of legacy sediment removal on hydrology and biogeochemistryin a first order stream in Pennsylvania, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historic forest conversion to agriculture and associated stream impoundments built for hydropower led to extensive burial of valley bottoms throughout the mid-Atlantic region of the US. These so-called legacy sediments are sources of nutrient and sediment pollutant loads to down...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGICALLY BASED SEDIMENT CRITERIA IN MOUNTAIN STREAMS OF THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment has long been recognized as a leading cause of impairment of biological condition in rivers and streams of the United States. Recently, federal and state agencies have shown increased interest in developing sediment criteria to maintain or improve habitat quality for the...

  11. A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Carollo, C.

    1974-01-01

    A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils is described. Samples can be obtained within a stratigraphic interval of 2-3 cm, to a depth of 60-80 cm, and with little or no contamination of the samples by sediment or air. ?? 1974.

  12. Impact of landscape disturbance on the quality of terrestrial sediment carbon in temperate streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, James F.; Ford, William I.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown the super saturation of fluvial networks with respect to carbon dioxide, and the concept that the high carbon dioxide is at least partially the result of turnover of sediment organic carbon that ranges in age from years to millennia. Currently, there is a need for more highly resolved studies at stream and river scales that enable estimates of terrestrial carbon turnover within fluvial networks. Our objective was to develop a new isotope-based metric to estimate the quality of sediment organic carbon delivered to temperate streams and to use the new metric to estimate carbon quality across landscape disturbance gradients. Carbon quality is defined to be consistent with in-stream turnover and our metric is used to measure the labile or recalcitrant nature of the terrestrial-derived carbon within streams. Our hypothesis was that intensively-disturbed landscapes would tend to produce low quality carbon because deep, recalcitrant soil carbon would be eroded and transported to the fluvial system while moderately disturbed or undisturbed landscapes would tend to produce higher quality carbon from well-developed surface soils and litter. The hypothesis was tested by applying the new carbon quality metric to 15 temperate streams with a wide range of landscape disturbance levels. We find that our hypothesis premised on an indirect relationship between the extent of landscape disturbance and the quality of sediment carbon in streams holds true for moderate and high disturbances but not for un-disturbed forests. We explain the results based on the connectivity, or dis-connectivity, between terrestrial carbon sources and pathways for sediment transport. While pathways are typically un-limited for disturbed landscapes, the un-disturbed forests have dis-connectivity between labile carbon of the forest floor and the stream corridor. Only in the case when trees fell into the stream corridor due to severe ice storms did the quality of sediment carbon

  13. Intermediate conditions: The Goldilocks hypothesis defines sediment transport processes and pothole forms in bedrock streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, J.; Wohl, E. E.; Buffington, J. M.; Yager, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that unique attributes of bedrock rivers (bedforms, sculpted forms, variation in alluvial patches) limit the extent to which sediment transport equations, developed for alluvial rivers, can be applied in bedrock streams. Without accurate prediction of sediment transport processes in these systems, fluvial incision models that parameterize incision via abrasion are insufficient. Potholes are noted features of enhanced local incision and sediment accumulation in many bedrock rivers. A detailed understanding of pothole erosion can thereby contribute to better parameterization of incision models for bedrock streams. We provide field evidence from the Ocoee River, TN for a feedback relationship between incision via potholes, bedrock bedforms, and sediment cover, invoking the tools vs. cover relationship in the vertical dimension. In all four stream reaches, the likelihood of pothole occurrence tends to be greatest at intermediate bed elevations, suggesting that channel hydraulics, tools, and erosion are optimized in these locations. In contrast, sediment tends to accumulate at lower elevations, oversupplying tools and effectively "shutting off" incision within potholes; at higher elevation, flow contraction and acceleration do not allow for tools to accumulate and abrade bedrock surfaces. We link our field observations to results from flume experiments, which suggest that sediment mobility within potholes is maximized by the combination of intermediate sediment fill volumes (expressed as a percentage of total pothole volume) and intermediate reach-averaged hydraulics (expressed non-dimensionally using the Froude number). The Froude number in the flume experiments provides a surrogate for the local hydraulics implicated as a factor in pothole formation at intermediate bed elevations in the field. Although complex bedrock bed topography, roughness and resulting turbulent flow patterns affect sediment mobility and incision in bedrock streams, results

  14. The influence of cave stream sediments on the transport behavior of karst springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Winkler, G.; Woessner, W.; Birk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Spring response to recharge in karst systems is influenced by the complex distribution of the rock mass hydraulic properties, fracture systems, and the presence of conduits. In addition the exchange of karst water with unconsolidated sediments in conduits may also further influence spring responses. To evaluate the effects of cave streams and sediments on solute transport in karst systems a small scale tracer experiment using fluorescein as an artificial tracer and water temperature as a natural tracer was conducted within the hyporheic zone of the active cave stream Schmelzbach. This interior stream drains parts of the Lurbach Karst System (Semriach-Peggau, Styria, Austria). The main goal of the experiment was to investigate if measurable cave stream hyporheic exchange (with the stream bottom sediments) occurs and the degree to which this process alters the transport of conservative tracers. One hundred meters downstream of the tracer injection point three cross sections of monitoring wells (9 in total along a distance of approximately 25 m) were constructed and fitted with two vertically isolated activated charcoal bags, 10 cm and 30 cm below the streambed surface. PVC monitoring wells were installed along the three cross sections using hand driven steel pipes as a temporary casing. In two of these wells temperature sensors were placed at different depths within the saturated bed sediment to investigate how post tracer test stream flood events impacted the timing and rate of stream water penetration into the bed sediments. The tracer breakthrough curve was measured with a fluorimeter located 100 m from the injection point. The results show a sharp peak and a modest tailing of the breakthrough. A one-dimensional advection dispersion model that accounts for mass transfer and storage of tracer in immobile fluid zones such as pools or sediments provides a good fit to the measured breakthrough curve. The model results suggest that immobile fluid zones amount to 40% of

  15. Use of Ground-Based LiDAR to Assess Potential Sediment Loss from Stream Banks in Grazed Pastures.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal grazing on lands near streams has the potential to contribute sediment and nutrients to surface waters. To minimize the impact, we must understand the effects of grazing systems on stream bank erosion. In this study, we used six 12-ha grass pastures that were each bisected by a 141-m stream s...

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples.

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes quadrangle, Alaska, are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and Laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  18. High concentration suspended sediment measurments using acontinuous fiber optic in-stream transmissometer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Chris G.; Laycak, Danny T.; Hoppes, William; Tran,Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2004-05-26

    Suspended sediment loads mobilized during high flow periods in rivers and streams are largely uncharacterized. In smaller and intermittent streams, a large storm may transport a majority of the annual sediment budget. Therefore monitoring techniques that can measure high suspended sediment concentrations at semi-continuous time intervals are needed. A Fiber optic In-stream Transmissometer (FIT) is presented for continuous measurement of high concentration suspended sediment in storm runoff. FIT performance and precision were demonstrated to be reasonably good for suspended sediment concentrations up to 10g/L. The FIT was compared to two commercially available turbidity devices and provided better precision and accuracy at both high and low concentrations. Both turbidity devices were unable to collect measurements at concentrations greater than 4 g/L. The FIT and turbidity measurements were sensitive to sediment particle size. Particle size dependence of transmittance and turbidity measurement poses the greatest problem for calibration to suspended sediment concentration. While the FIT was demonstrated to provide acceptable measurements of high suspended sediment concentrations, approaches to real-time suspended sediment detection need to address the particle size dependence in concentration measurements.

  19. Recent and historic sediment dynamics along Difficult Run, a suburban Virginia Piedmont stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Noe, Gregory B.; Schenk, Edward R.; Benthem, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended sediment is one of the major concerns regarding the quality of water entering the Chesapeake Bay. Some of the highest suspended-sediment concentrations occur on Piedmont streams, including Difficult Run, a tributary of the Potomac River draining urban and suburban parts of northern Virginia. Accurate information on catchment level sediment budgets is rare and difficult to determine. Further, the sediment trapping portion of sediment budget represents an important ecosystem service that profoundly affects downstream water quality. Our objectives, with special reference to human alterations to the landscape, include the documentation and estimation of floodplain sediment trapping (present and historic) and bank erosion along an urbanized Piedmont stream, the construction of a preliminary sediment balance, and the estimation of legacy sediment and recent development impacts. We used white feldspar markers to measure floodplain sedimentation rates and steel pins to measure erosion rates on floodplains and banks, respectively. Additional data were collected for/from legacy sediment thickness and characteristics, mill pond impacts, stream gaging station records, topographic surveying, and sediment density, texture, and organic content. Data were analyzed using GIS and various statistical programs. Results are interpreted relative to stream equilibrium affected by both post-colonial bottomland sedimentation (legacy) and modern watershed hardening associated with urbanization. Six floodplain/channel sites, from high to low in the watershed, were selected for intensive study. Bank erosion ranges from 0 to 470 kg/m/y and floodplain sedimentation ranges from 18 to 1369 kg/m/y (m refers to meters of stream reach). Upstream reaches are net erosional, while downstream reaches have a distinctly net depositional flux providing a watershed sediment balance of 2184 kg/m/y trapped within the system. The amounts of both deposition and erosion are large and suggest

  20. Suspended sediment and stream discharge in Bloody Run and Sny Magill watershed, water year 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Eash, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected in the Bloody Run and Sny Magill watersheds in Clayton County, Iowa during the 1992 Water Year (October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992) to provide data on suspended sediment and stream discharge from these watersheds.  Suspended-sediment samples were collected daily during normal flow and several times during rainstorms.  Stream stage was recorded continuously and stream-discharge measurements were made monthly to develop a stage-discharge relation.  Data on drainage-basin morphology and precipitation were quantified to help understand the variability in sediment and stream discharge.  The total suspended-sediment discharge for Water Year 1992 was 2,720 tons at site BR1 on Bloody Run and 1,940 tons at site SN1 on Sny Magill Creek  The daily median suspended-sediment discharge was 1.1 tons at both sites BR1 and SN1.  The maximum daily mean stream discharge (205 cubic feet per second) at site BR1 on Bloody Run occurred on November 1, 1991.  The median daily discharge at BR1 for the 1992 Water year was 24 cubic feet per second or 0.70 cubic feet per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2).  The maximum daily mean stream discharge at site SN1 on Sny Magill Creek was 90 cubic feet per second which occurred on April 20, 1992.  The median daily discharge at site SN1 for the 1992 Water Year was 15 cubic feet per second or 0.54 ft3/s/mi2.

  1. Contaminant trends in reservoir sediment cores as records of influent stream quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Mahler, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    When reconstructing water-quality histories from lake and reservoir cores, it is sometimes assumed that the chemical signatures in the cores reflect historical water quality in the influent streams. To investigate this assumption, concentrations of metals, PAHs, and organochlorine compounds in sediment cores were compared to those associated with an influent-stream suspended sediment for three reservoirs in Fort Worth, TX, and two reservoirs in Boston, MA, U.S.A., and interpreted in light of land-use and regulation histories. In evaluating relations between suspended sediments and cores, three levels of preservation were indicated: (1) influent concentrations and historical trends are preserved in cores (metals at all sites; some organic contaminants at some sites); (2) some loss occurs during transport and initial deposition but relative historical trends are preserved in cores (some organic contaminants at some sites); and (3) neither stream concentrations nor relative historical trends are preserved (dieldrin and p,p???-DDT). The degree of preservation of influent concentration histories varied between lakes, particularly for PAHs. The results support the use of sediment cores to infer streamwater-quality histories for many contaminants but indicate that reservoir-bottom sediment samples might underestimate concentrations of organic contaminants in some streams.

  2. Biodegradation and attenuation of steroidal hormones and alkylphenols by stream biofilms and sediments.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Bradley, Paul M

    2011-05-15

    Biodegradation of select endocrine-disrupting compounds (17β-estradiol, estrone, 17α-ethynylestradiol, 4-nonylphenol, 4-nonylphenolmonoexthoylate, and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate) was evaluated in stream biofilm, sediment, and water matrices collected from locations upstream and downstream from a wastewater treatment plant effluent discharge. Both biologically mediated transformation to intermediate metabolites and biologically mediated mineralization were evaluated in separate time interval experiments. Initial time intervals (0-7 d) evaluated biodegradation by the microbial community dominant at the time of sampling. Later time intervals (70 and 185 d) evaluated the biodegradation potential as the microbial community adapted to the absence of outside energy sources. The sediment matrix was more effective than the biofilm and water matrices at biodegrading 4-nonylphenol and 17β-estradiol. Biodegradation by the sediment matrix of 17α-ethynylestradiol occurred at later time intervals (70 and 185 d) and was not observed in the biofilm or water matrices. Stream biofilms play an important role in the attenuation of endocrine-disrupting compounds in surface waters due to both biodegradation and sorption processes. Because sorption to stream biofilms and bed sediments occurs on a faster temporal scale (<1 h) than the potential to biodegrade the target compounds (50% mineralization at >185 d), these compounds can accumulate in stream biofilms and sediments. PMID:21520955

  3. Biodegradation and attenuation of steroidal hormones and alkylphenols by stream biofilms and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Barber, Larry B.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation of select endocrine-disrupting compounds (17β-estradiol, estrone, 17α-ethynylestradiol, 4-nonylphenol, 4-nonylphenolmonoexthoylate, and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate) was evaluated in stream biofilm, sediment, and water matrices collected from locations upstream and downstream from a wastewater treatment plant effluent discharge. Both biologically mediated transformation to intermediate metabolites and biologically mediated mineralization were evaluated in separate time interval experiments. Initial time intervals (0–7 d) evaluated biodegradation by the microbial community dominant at the time of sampling. Later time intervals (70 and 185 d) evaluated the biodegradation potential as the microbial community adapted to the absence of outside energy sources. The sediment matrix was more effective than the biofilm and water matrices at biodegrading 4-nonylphenol and 17β-estradiol. Biodegradation by the sediment matrix of 17α-ethynylestradiol occurred at later time intervals (70 and 185 d) and was not observed in the biofilm or water matrices. Stream biofilms play an important role in the attenuation of endocrine-disrupting compounds in surface waters due to both biodegradation and sorption processes. Because sorption to stream biofilms and bed sediments occurs on a faster temporal scale (<1 h) than the potential to biodegrade the target compounds (50% mineralization at >185 d), these compounds can accumulate in stream biofilms and sediments.

  4. Sedimentation in Pacific Northwest Coastal Streams -- Evidence from Regional Surveys of Bed Substrate Size and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, P. R.; Faustini, J. M.; Larsen, D. P.

    2003-12-01

    We examined evidence of anthropogenic sedimentation in Oregon and Washington coastal streams using relatively rapid measurements taken from surveys during summer low flows (probability sample, n= 104 reaches). We inferred bankfull channel dimensions from evidence at low flow and compared bed substrate geometric mean diameter (Dgm) with critical diameter (D*cbf) calculated from estimated bed shear stress at bankfull flow stage. We derived an index of Relative Bed Stability, RBS* = Dgm / D*cbf, based on a modified Shield's criterion for incipient motion that includes adjustments to bed shear stress for energy dissipated by large wood and channel irregularities. D*cbf averaged 56 percent of unadjusted values, and Dgm ranged from silt to boulder size. Log10[RBS*] in streams relatively undisturbed by humans was generally between -0.7 and +0.5, showing approximate balance between observed and mobile substrates, but declined to low values (-1.5 to -3.0) in streams with substantial riparian and basin disturbances. Streams draining soft sedimentary lithology showed greater apparent response to these disturbances than did those draining hard basalt lithology. The association of low RBS* with land disturbance, and the stronger absolute values of correlation of Dgm (negative) than D*cbf (zero or positive) with land disturbance in this region strongly suggest that activities including road building, land-clearing, logging and agriculture have augmented sediment supplies and increased fine sediments in stream beds.

  5. Urban Stream Ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban watersheds characteristically have high impervious surface cover, resulting in high surface runoff and low infiltration following storms. In response, urban streams experience “flashy” stormflows, reduced baseflows, bank erosion, channel widening, and sedimentation. Urban ...

  6. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, O.; Motooka, J.M.; Church, S.E.; Bailey, E.A.; Arbogast, B.F.; Willson, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented detailing analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska.

  7. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motooka, J.M.; Adrian, B.M.; Church, S.E.; McDougal, C.M.; Fife, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska.

  8. The stability of surficial fine sediment deposits in lowland chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Robert C.; Wotton, Roger; Droppo, Ian; Davies, Grieg; Wharton, Geraldene

    2010-05-01

    Lowland chalk streams in the UK are experiencing increased deposition of fine sediment due to changes in land-use practices, channel modifications, and groundwater abstraction. The fine sediment is linked to benthic habitat degradation, the obstruction of surface-groundwater flow, and the storage of contaminants, such as pesticides and heavy metals. While research has been conducted on the provenance, transport, deposition, and storage of fine sediment in chalk streams, none has expressly investigated erosion. Therefore a key step is missing in our understanding of sediment dynamics in these systems. A yearlong field survey was conducted in two reaches in the Frome-Piddle Catchment (Dorset, England) to quantify the stability of surficial fine sediment deposits. Sediment stability is dependent on both hydrodynamic conditions and sediment erodibility, so water flow velocities and in situ erodibility measurements were recorded. These measurements were paired with sediment cores for analysis of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediment. The results indicate that hydrodynamic conditions vary spatially and temporally as a result of the distinctive annual hydrograph and seasonal macrophyte growth. Sediment erodibility exhibits seasonal variations, with low thresholds for erosion in winter and high thresholds in spring and late summer. Consequently, the stability of fine sediment deposits varies substantially over space and time, which has important implications for sediment transport models.

  9. Chemical characterization of sediment "Legacy P" in watershed streams - implications for P loading under land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audette, Yuki; O'Halloran, Ivan; Voroney, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Transfer of dissolved phosphorus (P) in runoff water via streams is regulated mainly by both stream sediment P adsorption and precipitation processes. The adsorption capacity of stream sediments acting as a P sink was a great benefit to preserving water quality in downstream lakes in the past, as it minimized the effects of surplus P loading from watershed streams. However, with long-term continued P loading the capacity of the sediments to store P has diminished, and eventually converted stream sediments from P sinks to sources of dissolved P. This accumulation of 'legacy P' in stream sediments has become the major source of dissolved P and risk to downstream water quality. Agricultural best management practices (BMP) for P typically attempt to minimize the transfer of P from farmland. However, because of the limitation in sediment P adsorption capacity, adoption of BMPs, such as reduction of external P loading, may not result in an immediate improvement in water quality. The goal of the research is to chemically characterize the P forms contributing to legacy P in stream sediments located in the watershed connecting to Cook's Bay, one of three basins of Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada. This watershed receives the largest amount of external P loading and has the highest rate of sediment build-up, both of which are attributed to agriculture. Water samples were collected monthly at six study sites from October 2015 for analysis of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, total P, dissolved reactive P, particulate P, total N, NH4-N, NO3-N, TOC and other elements including Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, S, Na, K and Zn. Sediment core samples were collected in November 2015 and will continue to be collected in March, July and October 2016. Various forms of P in five vertical sections were characterized by sequential fractionation and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy techniques. Pore water, sediment texture and clay identification were performed. The concentration of total P in water samples

  10. Origin of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in stream sediments of Maine, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; McHugh, J.B.; Hessin, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of stream and sediment-pore waters largely explain the genesis of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in Maine. Waters of two small streams near Jackman, Maine, were studied in terms of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved Mn, total dissolved Fe, and ferrous and ferric Fe. Pyrite Creek has profuse concretions and coatings of Mn-Fe-oxides, whereas West Pyrite Creek has only sparse Mn-Fe-oxide stains. Pyrite Creek drains boggy terrain and West Pyrite Creek drains well-drained terrain. In West Pyrite Creek, stream and subjacent pore waters have chemical characteristics that do not differ greatly. However, dissolved Mn, ferrous Fe, dissolved oxygen, and in situ Eh measurements show that a steep Eh gradient exists between stream and subjacent pore waters of Pyrite Creek. The steep Eh gradient is manifested by the common zonation of coatings and stains on rocks in stream sediment. The bottom zone has no deposition of oxides, the middle zone is red and consists mostly of Fe-oxides, and the upper zone is black or dark-brown and consists of Mn-oxides with varying amounts of Fe-oxides. The zonation agrees with theoretical predictions of oxide stability as one moves from a reducing to an oxidizing environment. At locations where concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form, pore waters are depleted of oxygen because of abundant decaying organic material in the stream sediment. The pore waters are charged with dissolved Mn and Fe because mechanically deposited Mn-Fe-oxides are remobilized due to the low-Eh conditions. Groundwaters also contribute dissolved Mn and Fe. Stream waters, on the other hand, are oxygenated and the high-Eh conditions result in low concentrations of dissolved Mn and Fe in stream waters because of the insolubility of Mn-Fe-oxides in high-Eh environments. Therefore, concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form at the interface between pore and stream waters because Mn- and Fe-rich pore waters, which are undersaturated with respect to Mn-Fe-oxides, mix with

  11. Identification of multiple mercury sources to stream sediments near Oak Ridge, TN, USA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Demers, Jason D.; Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C.; Peryam, John

    2014-03-03

    In this paper, sediments were analyzed for total Hg concentration (THg) and isotopic composition from streams and rivers in the vicinity of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) in Oak Ridge, TN (USA). In the stream directly draining Y12, where industrial releases of mercury (Hg) have been documented, high THg (3.26 to 60.1 μg/g) sediments had a distinct Hg isotopic composition (δ202Hg of 0.02 ± 0.15‰ and Δ199Hg of -0.07 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=12) compared to sediments from relatively uncontaminated streams in the region (δ202Hg = -1.40 ± 0.06‰ and Δ199Hg of –0.26 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD,more » n=6). Additionally, several streams that are nearby but do not drain Y12 had sediments with intermediate THg (0.06 to 0.21 μg/g) and anomalous δ202Hg (as low as -5.07‰). We suggest that the low δ202Hg values in these sediments provide evidence for the contribution of an additional Hg source to sediments, possibly derived from atmospheric deposition. In sediments directly downstream of Y12 this third Hg source is not discernible and the Hg isotopic composition can be largely explained by the mixing of low THg sediments with high THg sediments contaminated by Y12 discharges.« less

  12. Identification of multiple mercury sources to stream sediments near Oak Ridge, TN, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Demers, Jason D.; Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C.; Peryam, John

    2014-03-03

    In this paper, sediments were analyzed for total Hg concentration (THg) and isotopic composition from streams and rivers in the vicinity of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) in Oak Ridge, TN (USA). In the stream directly draining Y12, where industrial releases of mercury (Hg) have been documented, high THg (3.26 to 60.1 μg/g) sediments had a distinct Hg isotopic composition (δ202Hg of 0.02 ± 0.15‰ and Δ199Hg of -0.07 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=12) compared to sediments from relatively uncontaminated streams in the region (δ202Hg = -1.40 ± 0.06‰ and Δ199Hg of –0.26 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=6). Additionally, several streams that are nearby but do not drain Y12 had sediments with intermediate THg (0.06 to 0.21 μg/g) and anomalous δ202Hg (as low as -5.07‰). We suggest that the low δ202Hg values in these sediments provide evidence for the contribution of an additional Hg source to sediments, possibly derived from atmospheric deposition. In sediments directly downstream of Y12 this third Hg source is not discernible and the Hg isotopic composition can be largely explained by the mixing of low THg sediments with high THg sediments contaminated by Y12 discharges.

  13. Sediment transport and siltation of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels in chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.; Sear, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Deposition rates of fine sediment into brown trout spawning gravels were measured at monthly intervals for a period of one year in a small channel of the River Test, Hampshire. Data were also collected on stream discharge, water depth, flow velocity and suspended sediment concentrations. Deposition rates followed a seasonal pattern and were maximal during periods of high discharge in the late winter/early spring when suspended sediment concentrations were high. The material deposited in the spawning gravels included silts and fine sands (<250 m) that were transported in suspension and coarser fragments of low density tufa-like material that were transported as bed load. The ecological implications of fine sediment deposition for salmonid egg survival in chalk streams are considered.

  14. Copper and cobalt in aquatic mosses and stream sediments from the Idaho Cobalt Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, J.A.; Modreski, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of stream sediments and aquatic mosses were collected from nine sites across several mineralized zones at the southeasternmost extension of the Idaho Cobalt Belt. Because the steepness of the terrain and the attendant high flow rate of the streams made it difficult to obtain adequate sediment samples, mosses were considered as an alternative sampling medium. The results not only showed that the Cu and Co content of the mosses correlated almost perfectly with that of the sediments, but that the contrast between samples taken from mineralized and background areas was greater in mosses, especially for Co. Maximum concentrations of 35,000 ??g/g Cu and 2000 ??g/g Co were observed in the ash of mosses, compared to maximum concentrations of 1700 ??g/g and 320 ??g/g, respectively, in the associated sediments. Species identification was considered unimportant, which should dispel some reluctance to use mosses in mineral exploration. ?? 1984.

  15. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    This manual provides teachers with some knowledge of ecological study methods and techniques used in collecting data when plants and animals are studied in the field. Most activities deal with the interrelatedness of plant and animal life to the structure and characteristics of a stream and pond. Also included in this unit plan designed for the…

  16. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a science curriculum reform effort aimed at enabling students to collect original data concerning an environmental parameter such as water quality on a yearly basis. Students track the overall health of the stream by analyzing both biotic and abiotic factors. (DDR)

  17. Adjusting stream-sediment geochemical maps in the Austrian Bohemian Massif by analysis of variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.C.; Hausberger, G.; Schermann, O.; Bohling, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Austrian portion of the Bohemian Massif is a Precambrian terrane composed mostly of highly metamorphosed rocks intruded by a series of granitoids that are petrographically similar. Rocks are exposed poorly and the subtle variations in rock type are difficult to map in the field. A detailed geochemical survey of stream sediments in this region has been conducted and included as part of the Geochemischer Atlas der Republik O??sterreich, and the variations in stream sediment composition may help refine the geological interpretation. In an earlier study, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied to the stream-sediment data in order to minimize unwanted sampling variation and emphasize relationships between stream sediments and rock types in sample catchment areas. The estimated coefficients were used successfully to correct for the sampling effects throughout most of the region, but also introduced an overcorrection in some areas that seems to result from consistent but subtle differences in composition of specific rock types. By expanding the model to include an additional factor reflecting the presence of a major tectonic unit, the Rohrbach block, the overcorrection is removed. This iterative process simultaneously refines both the geochemical map by removing extraneous variation and the geological map by suggesting a more detailed classification of rock types. ?? 1995 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  18. Aerobic mineralization of MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol by stream-bed sediment microorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the stream-bed sediments at two gasoline- contaminated groundwater sites demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenates, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Up to 73% of [U-14C]-MTBE and 84% of [U-14C]-TBA were degraded to 14CO2 under mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions. No significant mineralization was observed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that, under the mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions characteristic of stream-bed sediments, microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE and TBA delivered to surface water bodies by contaminated groundwater or by other sources.Microorganisms indigenous to the stream-bed sediments at two gasoline-contaminated groundwater sites demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenates, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Up to 73% of [U-14C]-MTBE and 84% of [U-14C]-TBA were degraded to 14CO2 under mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions. No significant mineralization was observed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that, under the mixed aerobic/anaerobic conditions characteristic of stream-bed sediments, microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE and TBA delivered to surface water bodies by contaminated groundwater or by other sources.

  19. Metal speciation and attenuation in stream waters and sediments contaminated by landfill leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettler, Vojtěch; Matura, Marek; Mihaljevič, Martin; Bezdička, Petr

    2006-02-01

    The degree of metal contamination (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cd) has been investigated in the vicinity of an old unmonitored municipal landfill in Prague, Czech Republic, where the leachate is directly drained into a surface stream. The water chemistry was coupled with investigation of the stream sediment ( aqua regia extract, sequential extraction, voltammetry of microparticles) and newly formed products (SEM/EDS, XRD). The MINTEQA2 speciation-solubility calculation showed that the metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni) are mainly present as carbonate complexes in leachate-polluted surface waters. These waters were oversaturated with respect to Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, calcite (CaCO3) and other carbonate phases. Three metal attenuation mechanisms were identified in leachate-polluted surface waters: (i) spontaneous precipitation of metal-bearing calcite exhibiting significant concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Ni); (ii) binding to Fe(III) oxyhydroxides (mainly goethite, FeOOH) (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni); and (iii) preferential bonding to sediment organic matter (Cu). These processes act as the key scavenging mechanisms and significantly decrease the metal concentrations in leachate-polluted water within 200 m from the direct leachate outflow into the stream. Under the near-neutral conditions governing the sediment/water interface in the landfill environment, metals are strongly bound in the stream sediment and remain relatively immobile.

  20. Bed Stability and sedimentation associated with human disturbances in Pacific Northwest streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate anthropogenic sedimentation in United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest coastal streams, we applied an index of relative bed stability (LRBS*) to summer low flow survey data collected using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessme...

  1. Net methylmercury production in 2 contrasting stream sediments and associated accumulation and toxicity to periphyton.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Jaclyn E; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Costello, David M; Burton, G Allen

    2016-07-01

    Periphyton uptake of bioaccumulative methylmercury (MeHg) may be an important entryway into the food web of many stream ecosystems where periphyton can be dominant primary producers. The net production of MeHg in stream sediment, its bioaccumulation in periphyton, and the potential toxicity of divalent Hg (Hg[II]) and MeHg in sediment to periphyton were investigated with a 67-d in situ incubation experiment using chemical exposure substrates containing either a fine-grained, organic-rich or a sandy, low-organic sediment, each amended with varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Methylmercury was produced in sediment, and concentrations increased with greater amounts of added Hg(II); however, the net production of MeHg was inhibited in the highest Hg(II) treatments of both sediments. The range of total Hg concentrations that inhibited MeHg production was between approximately 80 000 ng Hg and 350 000 ng Hg per gram of organic matter for both sediments. Periphyton colonizing substrates accumulated MeHg in proportion to the concentration in sediment, but periphyton exposed to the sandy sediment accumulated approximately 20-fold more than those exposed to the organic-rich sediment relative to sediment MeHg concentrations. Toxicity of either Hg(II) or MeHg to periphyton was not observed with either periphyton organic content, net primary production, or respiration as endpoints. These results suggest that in situ production and bioaccumulation of MeHg in stream ecosystems can vary as a function of sediment characteristics and Hg(II) loadings to the sediment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1759-1765. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26636557

  2. Sediment Transport in Streams in the Umpqua River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Onions, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    This report presents tables of suspended-sediment data collected from 1956 to 1967 at 10 sites in the Umpqua River basin. Computations based on these data indicate that average annual suspended-sediment yields at these sites range from 137 to 822 tons per square mile. Because available data for the Umpqua River basin are generally inadequate for accurate determinations of sediment yield and for the definition of characteristics of fluvial sediments, recommendations are made for the collection and analysis of additional sediment data.

  3. Dynamic Sediment Modeling in Iowa Streams and Rivers: A Case Study at Walnut Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Skopec, M.

    2004-12-01

    Deep channel bed incision and severe channel bank erosion, which have strong effects on the evolution of channel and watershed morphology, are becoming serious problems in natural rivers and streams in Iowa as a result of wide distribution of loess soil material, agricultural activity, river training and human intervention. Consequent high sediment concentration can also cause low water quality and jeopardize aquatic habitat. Dynamic modeling of sediment transport in rivers and streams provides a useful tool for monitoring, controlling and forecasting the morphology change and water quality in channels and watersheds. In order to gain insight into sediment transport process, a dynamic sediment model is built for a 7-mile segment of Walnut Creek in Jasper County, Iowa. This creek was intensively surveyed by Iowa Geological Survey Bureau (IGSB) as part of the Walnut Creek Nonpoint Source Monitoring Project. Besides channel geometry data from the survey, hydraulic and sediment data were collected at two gauges upstream and downstream operated by USGS. A software GSTARS3 developed by USGS is adopted to model both channel bed incision and bank erosion which are typical phenomena in Iowa. The dynamic sediment model is calibrated using channel bathymetry data from recent survey conducted by IGSB. Finally, based on forecasting of flow and sediment discharge time series at the upstream and stage time series at the downstream, a sediment forecasting model is developed to see if the stream can go back to the clarity and morphology of original creek. The study on this small surveyed and controlled creek will benefit our research in other Iowa rivers and streams.

  4. Recreational stream crossing effects on sediment delivery and macroinvertebrates in southwestern Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Kathryn R; Aust, W Michael; Copenheaver, Carolyn A

    2014-09-01

    Trail-based recreation has increased over recent decades, raising the environmental management issue of soil erosion that originates from unsurfaced, recreational trail systems. Trail-based soil erosion that occurs near stream crossings represents a non-point source of pollution to streams. We modeled soil erosion rates along multiple-use (hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding) recreational trails that approach culvert and ford stream crossings as potential sources of sediment input and evaluated whether recreational stream crossings were impacting water quality based on downstream changes in macroinvertebrate-based indices within the Poverty Creek Trail System of the George Washington and Jefferson National Forest in southwestern Virginia, USA. We found modeled soil erosion rates for non-motorized recreational approaches that were lower than published estimates for an off-road vehicle approach, bare horse trails, and bare forest operational skid trail and road approaches, but were 13 times greater than estimated rates for undisturbed forests and 2.4 times greater than a 2-year old clearcut in this region. Estimated soil erosion rates were similar to rates for skid trails and horse trails where best management practices (BMPs) had been implemented. Downstream changes in macroinvertebrate-based indices indicated water quality was lower downstream from crossings than in upstream reference reaches. Our modeled soil erosion rates illustrate recreational stream crossing approaches have the potential to deliver sediment into adjacent streams, particularly where BMPs are not being implemented or where approaches are not properly managed, and as a result can negatively impact water quality below stream crossings. PMID:25037482

  5. Recreational Stream Crossing Effects on Sediment Delivery and Macroinvertebrates in Southwestern Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Kathryn R.; Aust, W. Michael; Copenheaver, Carolyn A.

    2014-09-01

    Trail-based recreation has increased over recent decades, raising the environmental management issue of soil erosion that originates from unsurfaced, recreational trail systems. Trail-based soil erosion that occurs near stream crossings represents a non-point source of pollution to streams. We modeled soil erosion rates along multiple-use (hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding) recreational trails that approach culvert and ford stream crossings as potential sources of sediment input and evaluated whether recreational stream crossings were impacting water quality based on downstream changes in macroinvertebrate-based indices within the Poverty Creek Trail System of the George Washington and Jefferson National Forest in southwestern Virginia, USA. We found modeled soil erosion rates for non-motorized recreational approaches that were lower than published estimates for an off-road vehicle approach, bare horse trails, and bare forest operational skid trail and road approaches, but were 13 times greater than estimated rates for undisturbed forests and 2.4 times greater than a 2-year old clearcut in this region. Estimated soil erosion rates were similar to rates for skid trails and horse trails where best management practices (BMPs) had been implemented. Downstream changes in macroinvertebrate-based indices indicated water quality was lower downstream from crossings than in upstream reference reaches. Our modeled soil erosion rates illustrate recreational stream crossing approaches have the potential to deliver sediment into adjacent streams, particularly where BMPs are not being implemented or where approaches are not properly managed, and as a result can negatively impact water quality below stream crossings.

  6. TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTING PROCESSES IN THE ALLUVIAL SEDIMENTS OF A HEADWATER STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical fluxes between catchments and streams are influenced by biochemical processes in the groundwater-stream water (GW-SW) ecotone, the interface between stream surface water and groundwater. Terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) that are utilized in respiration of ...

  7. E. coli transport to stream water column from bottom sediments to the stream water column in base flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Stocker, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    E. coli as an indicator bacterium is commonly used to characterize microbiological water quality, to evaluate surface water sources for microbiological impairment, and to assess management practices that lead to the decrease of pathogens and indicator influx in surface water sources for recreation and irrigation. Bottom sediments present a large reservoir of fecal indicator bacteria that are known to be released to water column during high flow events caused by rainstorms and snowmelt. The objective of this work was to see if the influx of E. coli from sediments to water occurs also during base flow periods when groundwater rather than runoff provides the major water input to the stream. The experiment was carried out at the first-order creek in Maryland flowing in the riparian zone in base flow conditions. An inert tracer was released to creek water from the manifold for 5 hours. Streamflow and concentrations of E. coli and tracer were monitored in water 10 m below tracer release location, and at the downstream location at 450 m from the release location. The tracer mass recovered at the downstream location was close to the released tracer mass. We then could directly compare the total numbers of E. coli in volumes of water containing tracer at the upstream (release) location and the downstream location. There was a substantial (3 to 6 times) increase in flow between the upstream and downstream locations as well as the substantial increase in the E. coli total numbers in water (14 to 26 times). The average E. coli influx from the bottom sediment was about 400 cells m-2s-1. Although this value is about 2 to 5 times less than published E. coli release rates during high flow events, it still can substantially change the microbial water quality assessment without any input from animal agriculture or manure application. Interesting research objectives include finding out whether the transport of E. coli from bottom sediment to water column during the base flow periods

  8. Blake Plateau: control of Miocene sedimentation patterns by large- scale shifts of the Gulf Stream axis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinet, P.R.; Popenoe, P.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of buried channel networks within Cenozoic sequences of the Blake Plateau and their correlation with global sea-level oscillations indicate that the Gulf Stream axis shifted landward against the Florida-Hatteras Slope during sea-level highstands and seaward across the central Blake Plateau during sea-level lowstands. A sedimentation model incorporating axial shifts of the Gulf Stream successfully predicts the Miocene stratigraphy of the Florida-Hatteras Slope and Blake Plateau as defined by seismic and drill-hole data. -Authors Cenozoic sequences Blake Plateau sea level oscillations North Atlantic

  9. Geochemical features of rocks, stream sediments, and soils of the Fiume Grande Valley (Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollaro, Carmine; Marini, Luigi; de Rosa, Rosanna; Settembrino, Paolo; Scarciglia, Fabio; Vecchio, Giuseppe

    2007-04-01

    The role of both natural weathering and anthropogenic pollution in controlling the distribution of major oxides and several trace elements in soils, stream sediments, and rocks of the Fiume Grande catchment was evaluated. The contents of major oxides and trace elements in soils appear to be governed by weathering and pedogenetic processes, although the use of fertilizers in agriculture could also partly affect K2O and P2O5 contents. Stream sediments have concentrations of major oxides (except CaO) very similar to soils, as relevant amounts of soil materials are supplied to the stream channels by erosive phenomena. In contrast, stream sediments have concentrations of Cr, Co, Ni, Zn, As, and Pb significantly higher than those of soils, probably due to different conditions and rates of mobility of these elements within the three considered matrices and/or disposal of wastes in the drainage network. Comparison of the concentrations of PHEs in soils with the maximum admissible contents established by the Italian law shows that these limits are too restrictive in some cases and too permissive in other ones. The approach of setting these limits with no consideration for the local geological geochemical framework may lead to improper management of the territory and its resources.

  10. Toxicity and genotoxicity of water and sediment from streams on dotted duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    PubMed

    Factori, R; Leles, S M; Novakowski, G C; Rocha, C L S C; Thomaz, S M

    2014-11-01

    Most rivers are used as a source to supply entire cities; the quality of water is directly related to the quality of tributaries. Unfortunately men have neglected the importance of streams, which receive domestic and industrial effluents and transport nutrients and pesticides from rural areas. Given the complexity of the mixtures discharged into these water bodies, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of water and sediment of ten tributaries of Pirapó River, in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. To this end, the free-floating macrophyte Landoltia punctata (G. Meyer) Les & D.J.Crawford was used as test organism in microcosm, and the toxicity of water and sediment samples was evaluated by the relative growth rate, dry/fresh biomass ratio, and genotoxic effects (comet assay). Samples of water and sediment of each stream were arranged in microcosms with L. punctata. Seven days later, plants were collected for analysis. Nutrient levels were higher than the reference location, indicating eutrophication, but the results indicated a toxic effect for only three streams, and a genotoxic effect for all streams. PMID:25627585

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, may field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Yakutat NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Yakutat NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Skagway NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Skagway NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  15. Metagenome of a microbial community inhabiting a metal-rich tropical stream sediment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patrícia S; Reis, Mariana P; Ávila, Marcelo P; Leite, Laura R; de Araújo, Flávio M G; Salim, Anna C M; Oliveira, Guilherme; Barbosa, Francisco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the metagenome and functional composition of a microbial community in a historically metal-contaminated tropical freshwater stream sediment. The sediment was collected from the Mina Stream located in the Iron Quadrangle (Brazil), one of the world's largest mining regions. Environmental DNA was extracted and was sequenced using SOLiD technology, and a total of 7.9 Gbp was produced. A taxonomic profile that was obtained by comparison to the Greengenes database revealed a complex microbial community with a dominance of Proteobacteria and Parvarcheota. Contigs were recruited by bacterial and archaeal genomes, especially Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and their presence implicated them in the process of N cycling in the Mina Stream sediment (MSS). Functional reconstruction revealed a large, diverse set of genes for ammonium assimilation and ammonification. These processes have been implicated in the maintenance of the N cycle and the health of the sediment. SEED subsystems functional annotation unveiled a high degree of diversity of metal resistance genes, suggesting that the prokaryotic community is adapted to metal contamination. Furthermore, a high metabolic diversity was detected in the MSS, suggesting that the historical arsenic contamination is no longer affecting the prokaryotic community. These results expand the current knowledge of the microbial taxonomic and functional composition of tropical metal-contaminated freshwater sediments. PMID:25742617

  16. Metagenome of a Microbial Community Inhabiting a Metal-Rich Tropical Stream Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Patrícia S.; Reis, Mariana P.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Leite, Laura R.; de Araújo, Flávio M. G.; Salim, Anna C. M.; Oliveira, Guilherme; Barbosa, Francisco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the metagenome and functional composition of a microbial community in a historically metal-contaminated tropical freshwater stream sediment. The sediment was collected from the Mina Stream located in the Iron Quadrangle (Brazil), one of the world’s largest mining regions. Environmental DNA was extracted and was sequenced using SOLiD technology, and a total of 7.9 Gbp was produced. A taxonomic profile that was obtained by comparison to the Greengenes database revealed a complex microbial community with a dominance of Proteobacteria and Parvarcheota. Contigs were recruited by bacterial and archaeal genomes, especially Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and their presence implicated them in the process of N cycling in the Mina Stream sediment (MSS). Functional reconstruction revealed a large, diverse set of genes for ammonium assimilation and ammonification. These processes have been implicated in the maintenance of the N cycle and the health of the sediment. SEED subsystems functional annotation unveiled a high degree of diversity of metal resistance genes, suggesting that the prokaryotic community is adapted to metal contamination. Furthermore, a high metabolic diversity was detected in the MSS, suggesting that the historical arsenic contamination is no longer affecting the prokaryotic community. These results expand the current knowledge of the microbial taxonomic and functional composition of tropical metal-contaminated freshwater sediments. PMID:25742617

  17. Upland disturbance affects headwater stream nutrients and suspended sediments during baseflow and stormflow

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, Jeffrey N

    2006-01-01

    Because catchment characteristics determine sediment and nutrient inputs to streams, upland disturbance can affect stream chemistry. Catchments at the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) experience a range of upland disturbance intensities due to spatial variability in the intensity of military training. We used this disturbance gradient to investigate the effects of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on stream chemistry. During baseflow, mean total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and mean inorganic suspended sediment (ISS) concentration increased with catchment disturbance intensity (TSS: R 2 = 0.7, p = 0.005, range = 4.0-10.1 mg L-1; ISS: R 2 = 0.71, p = 0.004, range = 2.04-7.3 mg L-1); dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R 2 = 0.79, p = 0.001, range = 1.5-4.1 mg L-1) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration (R 2 = 0.75, p = 0.008, range = 1.9-6.2 {micro}g L-1) decreased with increasing disturbance intensity; and ammonia (NH4 +), nitrate (NO3 -), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were unrelated to disturbance intensity. The increase in TSS and ISS during storms was positively correlated with disturbance (R 2 = 0.78 and 0.78, p = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively); mean maximum change in SRP during storms increased with disturbance (r = 0.7, p = 0.04); and mean maximum change in NO3 - during storms was marginally correlated with disturbance (r = 0.58, p = 0.06). Soil characteristics were significant predictors of baseflow DOC, SRP, and Ca2+, but were not correlated with suspended sediment fractions, any nitrogen species, or pH. Despite the largely intact riparian zones of these headwater streams, upland soil and vegetation disturbances had clear effects on stream chemistry during baseflow and stormflow conditions.

  18. Improving sediment transport measurements in the Erlenbach stream using a moving basket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Turowski, Jens; Hegglin, Ramon; Fritschi, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    In the Erlenbach stream, a prealpine torrent in Switzerland, sediment transport has been monitored for more than 25 years. Sediment transporting flood events in the Erlenbach are typically of short duration with a rapid rise of discharge during summer thunderstorms, thus hampering on-site measurements. On average there are more than 20 bedload transport events per year. Near the confluence with the main valley river, there is a stream gauging station and a sediment retention basin with a capacity of about 2,000 m3. The basin is surveyed at regular intervals and after large flood events. In addition, sediment transport has been continuously monitored with a piezoelectric bedload impact sensor (PBIS) array since 1986. The sensor array is mounted flush with the surface of a check dam immediately upstream of the retention basin. The PBIS system was developed to continuously measure the intensity of bedload transport and its relation to stream discharge. To standardize the sensors, the piezoelectric crystals were replaced by geophones in 2000. The geophone measuring system has also been employed at a number of other streams. In 2008, the measuring system in the Erlenbach stream has been enhanced with an automatic system to obtain bedload samples. Movable, slot-type cubic metal baskets are mounted on a rail at the downstream wall of the large check dam above the retention basin. The metal baskets can be moved automatically and individually into the flow according to flow and bedload transport conditions (i.e. geophone recordings). The basket is stopped at the centerline of the approach flow channel of the overflow section to obtain a sediment sample during a limited time interval. The wire mesh of the basket has a spacing of 10 mm to sample all sediment particles coarser than this size (which is about the limiting grain size detected by the geophones). The weight increase due to the collected sediment is measured by weighing cells located in the basket supporting

  19. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vondracek, Bruce C.; Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  20. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of Northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  1. Insecticide concentrations in stream sediments of soy production regions of South America.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Lisa; Bonetto, Carlos; Resh, Vincent H; Buss, Daniel Forsin; Fanelli, Silvia; Marrochi, Natalia; Lydy, Michael J

    2016-03-15

    Concentrations of 17 insecticides were measured in sediments collected from 53 streams in soy production regions of South America (Argentina in 2011-2014, Paraguay and Brazil in 2013) during peak application periods. Although environmental regulations are quite different in each country, commonly used insecticides were detected at high frequencies in all regions. Maximum concentrations (and detection frequencies) for each sampling event ranged from: 1.2-7.4ng/g dw chlorpyrifos (56-100%); 0.9-8.3ng/g dw cypermethrin (20-100%); 0.42-16.6ng/g dw lambda-cyhalothrin (60-100%); and, 0.49-2.1ng/g dw endosulfan (13-100%). Other pyrethroids were detected less frequently. Banned organochlorines were most frequently detected in Brazil. In all countries, cypermethrin and/or lambda-cyhalothrin toxic units (TUs), based on Hyalella azteca LC50 bioassays, were occasionally>0.5 (indicating likely acute toxicity), while TUs for other insecticides were <0.5. All samples with total insecticide TU>1 were collected from streams with riparian buffer width<20m. A multiple regression analysis that included five landscape and habitat predictor variables for the Brazilian streams examined indicated that buffer width was the most important predictor variable in explaining total insecticide TU values. While Brazil and Paraguay require forested stream buffers, there were no such regulations in the Argentine pampas, where buffer widths were smaller. Multiple insecticides were found in almost all stream sediment samples in intensive soy production regions, with pyrethroids most often occurring at acutely toxic concentrations, and the greatest potential for insecticide toxicity occurring in streams with minimum buffer width<20m. PMID:26780136

  2. ASSESSING RELATIVE BED STABILITY AND EXCESS FINE SEDIMENTS IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess fine sedimentation is recognized as a leading cause of water quality impairment in surface waters in the United States. We developed an index of Relative Bed Stability (RBS) that factors out natural controls on streambed particle size to allow evaluation of the role of hu...

  3. Streambanks: A net source of sediment and phosphorus to streams and rivers.

    PubMed

    Fox, Garey A; Purvis, Rebecca A; Penn, Chad J

    2016-10-01

    Sediment and phosphorus (P) are two primary pollutants of surface waters. Many studies have investigated loadings from upland sources or even streambed sediment, but in many cases, limited to no data exist to determine sediment and P loading from streambanks on a watershed scale. The objectives of this paper are to review the current knowledge base on streambank erosion and failure mechanisms, streambank P concentrations, and streambanks as P loading sources and then also to identify future research needs on this topic. In many watersheds, long-term loading of soil and associated P to stream systems has created a source of eroded soil and P that may interact with streambank sediment and be deposited in floodplains downstream. In many cases streambanks were formed from previously eroded and deposited alluvial material and so the resulting soils possess unique physical and chemical properties from adjacent upland soils. Streambank sediment and P loading rates depend explicitly on the rate of streambank migration and the concentration of P stored within bank materials. From the survey of literature, previous studies report streambank total P concentrations that consistently exceeded 250 mg kg(-1) soil. Only a few studies also reported water soluble or extractable P concentrations. More research should be devoted to understanding the dynamic processes between different P pools (total P versus bioavailable P), and sorption or desorption processes under varying hydraulic and stream chemistry conditions. Furthermore, the literature reported that streambank erosion and failure and gully erosion were reported to account for 7-92% of the suspended sediment load within a channel and 6-93% of total P. However, significant uncertainty can occur in such estimates due to reach-scale variability in streambank migration rates and future estimates should consider the use of uncertainty analysis approaches. Research is also needed on the transport rates of dissolved and sediment

  4. Effects of Crayfish and Fish on Sediment Accumulation and Macroinvertebrate Community Structure in a Temperate Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, T. D.; Creed, R. P.

    2005-05-01

    A variety of large taxa can act as ecosystem engineers in stream communities. These taxa are often found in the same stream. We used an enclosure/exclosure experiment to evaluate the individual and combined effects of a crayfish and a benthic-feeding fish on sediment accumulation and macroinvertebrate abundance in a temperate stream. There were 5 treatments in the experiment: 1) central stoneroller enclosure, 2) crayfish enclosure, 3) crayfish plus central stoneroller enclosure, 4) manually brushing the substrate, and 5) a control. The brushed treatment allowed us to separate the consumptive effects of the crayfish and central stonerollers from the indirect effects resulting from their bioturbation. The control contained significantly more sediment than the other 4 treatments indicating that both crayfish and central stonerollers acted as ecosystem engineers. Reduction in sediment abundance had negative effects on the abundance of 2 genera while three taxa were more abundant in sediment-free substrata. Macroinvertebrate abundance in the brushed treatment was not different from the 3 treatments with crayfish or central stonerollers suggesting that the main effects of consumers in this experiment were indirect. Our results demonstrate that both crayfish and central stonerollers can influence lotic community structure by acting as ecosystem engineers.

  5. Meta-analysis: abundance, behavior, and hydraulic energy shape biotic effects on sediment transport in streams.

    PubMed

    Albertson, L K; Allen, D C

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of studies have emphasized the need to bridge the disciplines of ecology and geomorphology. A large number of case studies show that organisms can affect erosion, but a comprehensive understanding of biological impacts on sediment transport conditions is still lacking. We use meta-analysis to synthesize published data to quantify the effects of the abundance, body size, and behavior of organisms on erosion in streams. We also explore the influence of current velocity, discharge, and sediment grain size on the strength of biotic effects on erosion. We found that species that both increase erosion (destabilizers) and decrease erosion (stabilizers) can alter incipient sediment motion, sediment suspension, and sediment deposition above control conditions in which the organisms were not present. When abundance was directly manipulated, these biotic effects were consistently stronger in the higher abundance treatment, increasing effect sizes by 66%. Per capita effect size and per capita biomass were also consistently positively correlated. Fish and crustaceans were the most studied organisms, but aquatic insects increased the effect size by 550 x compared to other types of organisms after accounting for biomass. In streams with lower discharge and smaller grain sizes, we consistently found stronger biotic effects. Taken collectively, these findings provide synthetic evidence that biology can affect physical processes in streams, and these effects can be mediated by hydraulic energy. We suggest that future studies focus on understudied organisms, such as biofilms, conducting experiments under realistic field conditions, and developing hypotheses for the effect of biology on erosion and velocity currents in the context of restoration to better understand the forces that mediate physical disturbances in stream ecosystems. PMID:26236846

  6. Wastewater micropollutants as tracers of sewage contamination: analysis of combined sewer overflow and stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Aboulfadl, K; Darwano, H; Madoux-Humery, A-S; Guérineau, H; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Dorner, S

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive method was developed to measure the sediment concentration of 10 wastewater micropollutants selected as potential sanitary tracers of sewage contamination and include: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (acetaminophen - ACE and diclofenac - DIC), an anti-epileptic drug (carbamazepine - CBZ), a β-blocker (atenolol - ATL), a stimulant (caffeine - CAF), a bronchodilator (theophylline - THEO), steroid hormones (progesterone - PRO and medroxyprogesterone - MedP), an artificial sweetener (aspartame - APM) and personal care products (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide - DEET). Natural sediments (combined sewer overflow and stream sediments) were extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction followed by solid-phase extraction. Analyses were performed using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation in positive mode (APCI+) with a total analysis time of 4.5 min. Method detection limits were in the range of 0.01 to 15 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) for the compounds of interest, with recoveries ranging from 75% to 156%. Matrix effects were observed for some compounds, never exceeding |±18%|. All results displayed a good degree of reproducibility and repeatability, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 23% for all compounds. The method was applied to an investigation of stream and combined sewer overflow sediment samples that differed in organic carbon contents and particle size distributions. Acetaminophen, caffeine and theophylline (as confounded with paraxanthine) were ubiquitously detected at 0.13-22 ng g(-1) dw in stream bed sediment samples and 98-427 ng g(-1) dw in combined sewer overflow sediment samples. Atenolol (80.5 ng g(-1) dw) and carbamazepine (54 ng g(-1) dw) were quantified only in combined sewer overflow sediment samples. The highest concentrations were recorded for DEET (14 ng g(-1) dw) and progesterone (11.5 ng g(-1) dw) in stream bed and combined

  7. Heavy metal accumulations in water, sediment, and some cyprinid species in Porsuk Stream (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Köse, Esengül; Çiçek, Arzu; Uysal, Kazim; Tokatlı, Cem; Emiroğlu, Özgür; Arslan, Naime

    2015-03-01

    Porsuk Stream is one of Turkey's most important river systems and also one of the most important branches of the Sakarya River. It provides drinking and utility water for two Turkish cities (Kütahya and Eskişehir) with a total population of one million. In this study, water, sediment, and some tissues (liver, gill, and muscle) of five cyprinid fish species were collected seasonally (2010-2011) from eight stations on the Porsuk Stream, and the zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) levels of collected samples were determined. The data observed were evaluated with national and international quality criteria. Based on the data observed, it was determined that the Porsuk Stream is affected by significant inorganic pollution from the Kütahya and Eskişehir Provinces. It was also determined that the Porsuk Dam Lake has an important cleaning capacity and that the water and sediment quality of the Porsuk Stream improves after the output of the dam lake. PMID:25842529

  8. Runoff and Sediment Delivery from Bare and Graveled Forest Road Approaches to Stream Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Aust, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forested watersheds are typically associated with high quality water yield, yet forest roads and trails can adversely impact water quality draining forested watersheds. Increased stream sedimentation from forest road stream crossings often represents the most significant water quality threat associated with forestry operations. Quantification of sediment delivery rates is essential for the prescription of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that adequately address forest road stormwater runoff. Two different field experiments were implemented in the Virginia Piedmont to achieve the objectives of quantifying sediment delivery from forest roads where the road meets the stream (the road approach) and evaluating the sediment reduction efficacy of partially graveling road approaches. A forest operational experiment that included sediment traps and differential leveling was used to measure sediment delivery from five bare and four fully graveled road approaches for one year (August 2011 through July 2012). Rainfall simulation experiments were performed on six additional approaches to measure stormwater runoff volume, infiltration, and sediment delivery for 10 to 50-minute rain events with rainfall recurrence intervals of < 1 to 5-year return periods. Rainfall simulations were performed on newly-reopened bare approaches, with subsequent simulations on partially graveled approaches. The sediment trap study provides annual sediment delivery rates for bare and fully graveled road approaches. The rainfall simulation experiments characterize sediment delivery during storm events and provide an evaluation of different levels of Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation (i.e. ¼ to full gravel coverage) to minimize sediment inputs from road approaches. Sediment delivery from both experiments was related to rainfall amount, timing, and intensity, as well as road approach characteristics such as length, slope, and percentage of bare soil through stepwise multiple regression

  9. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part II, Stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two stream-sediment samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, Montana, were sieved into two size fractions (50 ppm for the fine fraction) were encountered in samples from the Warm Springs Creek drainage area, along Prickly Pear Creek near Welmer and Golconda Creeks and along Muskrat Creek. All groups showed a significant correlation at the 99 percent confidence level (r between 0.73 and 0.77) between U and Th. Uranium was found to correlate significantly only with Th (as mentioned above) and with -Ni in the fine fraction of the volcanics group. U correlates significantly with -Al2O3, Ba, organic C, -K2O, -Sr and Y in both size fractions for the Boulder batholith. Correlations between U and each of several elements differ for the fine and coarse fractions of the Boulder batholith group, suggesting that the U distribution in these stream sediments is in large part controlled by grain size. Correlations were found between U and CaO, Cr, Fe203, -Na2O, Sc, -SiO2, TiO2, Yb and Zr in the coarse fraction but not in the fine fraction. U correlates weakly (to the 90% confidence level, crc<.37) with -Co and -Cu in the fine but not the coarse fraction. These results are compared to a previous study in the northern Absaroka mountains. Correlation coefficients between all other elements determined from these samples are also shown in Tables 12 to 15.

  10. Subglacial Sediment Transport of a Marine Ice Stream During the Late Glacial Maximum, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygard, A.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.; Lekens, W.; Clark, C.; Bigg, G.

    2006-12-01

    By means of high-resolution seismic and core data we have quantified the flux of sediment transported subglacially by the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This was achieved by mapping the volume of sediment deposited during the last NCIS phase on the North Sea Fan, a glacial fan located on the continental slope at the outlet of the Norwegian Channel, northern North Sea. The North Sea Fan is dominated by glacigenic debris flows sourced from subglacial till brought to the shelf break by the NCIS, which drained a major part of the southwestern Fennoscandian Ice Sheet. 800 km3 of sediment was brought to the shelf edge by the NCIS between 20.0 and 19.0 cal. ka BP, which gives an annual flux of 8000 m3 pr. metre width of the ice stream front. This equates to a total of 1.1 Gt of sediment per year and is comparable to the present sediment flux from the worlds largest rivers. To explain the extreme sediment flux the NCIS must have flowed with high velocity (several kilometres/year) and/or the subglacial sediment transport must have occurred in a thick layer (several metres).

  11. Modeling wood dynamics, jam formation, and sediment storage in a gravel-bed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, B. C.; Hassan, M. A.; Davidson, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In small and intermediate sized streams, the interaction between wood and bed material transport often determines the nature of the physical habitat, which in turn influences the health of the stream's ecosystem. We present a stochastic model that can be used to simulate the effects on physical habitat of forest fires, climate change, and other environmental disturbances that alter wood recruitment. The model predicts large wood (LW) loads in a stream as well as the volume of sediment stored by the wood; while it is parameterized to describe gravel bed streams similar to a well-studied field prototype, Fishtrap Creek, British Columbia, it can be calibrated to other systems as well. In the model, LW pieces are produced and modified over time as a result of random tree-fall, LW breakage, LW movement, and piece interaction to form LW jams. Each LW piece traps a portion of the annual bed material transport entering the reach and releases the stored sediment when the LW piece is entrained and moved. The equations governing sediment storage are based on a set of flume experiments also scaled to the field prototype. The model predicts wood loads ranging from 70 m3/ha to more than 300 m3/ha, with a mean value of 178 m3/ha: both the range and the mean value are consistent with field data from streams with similar riparian forest types and climate. The model also predicts an LW jam spacing that is consistent with field data. Furthermore, our modeling results demonstrate that the high spatial and temporal variability in sediment storage, sediment transport, and channel morphology associated with LW-dominated streams occurs only when LW pieces interact and form jams. Model runs that do not include jam formation are much less variable. These results suggest that river restoration efforts using engineered LW pieces that are fixed in place and not permitted to interact will be less successful at restoring the geomorphic processes responsible for producing diverse, productive

  12. A quantitative study of sediment delivery and stream pollution from different forest road types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Gary J.; Noske, Philip J.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify, and enable the prediction of, sediment delivery and water pollution impacts from a spectrum of forest roads. Ten 100-200 m long sections of forest road were selected to incorporate a wide range of the key physical site factors that are likely to affect the rate of sediment generation. Each road section was permanently instrumented for 1 year to measure rainfall and runoff continuously. Suspended load, bedload, and traffic were integrated measurements over 2- to 3-week site-service intervals. Total annual sediment load (normalized for slope) varied about 25-fold, from 216 mg m-2 per millimetre of rain for a high-quality gravel surfaced road with minimal traffic to 5373 mg m-2 per millimetre of rain for an unsurfaced road on an erodible subsoil with moderate light-vehicle traffic. For the seven gravel-surfaced roads in this study, truck traffic (axles/week) explained 97% of the variation in annual sediment delivery (per unit of rainfall) from the road. Equations are proposed that allow annual sediment delivery rates to be estimated when net rainfall, road slope, road area, and truck traffic are known. Roads produce runoff rapidly and were found to deliver sediment for about the same duration as rainfall is falling, in this study varying between 5 and 10% of the time. The patterns of sediment delivery measured from the experimental roads (frequency, duration, and intensity) in this study are similar to levels that have been shown to alter the composition of in-stream macroinvertebrate communities in small (e.g. <10 l s-1), clean, mountain streams. However, in larger well-mixed streams (e.g. >500 l s-1), dilution is sufficient to prevent concentrations reaching critical levels that are likely to result in biological impacts. Copyright

  13. Multivariate statistical analysis of stream sediments for mineral resources from the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Beyth, M.; McInteer, C.; Broxton, D.E.; Bolivar, S.L.; Luke, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    Multivariate statistical analyses were carried out on Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the Craig quadrangle, Colorado, to support the National Uranium Resource Evaluation and to evaluate strategic or other important commercial mineral resources. A few areas for favorable uranium mineralization are suggested for parts of the Wyoming Basin, Park Range, and Gore Range. Six potential source rocks for uranium are postulated based on factor score mapping. Vanadium in stream sediments is suggested as a pathfinder for carnotite-type mineralization. A probable northwest trend of lead-zinc-copper mineralization associated with Tertiary intrusions is suggested. A few locations are mapped where copper is associated with cobalt. Concentrations of placer sands containing rare earth elements, probably of commercial value, are indicated for parts of the Sand Wash Basin.

  14. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Corpus Christi NTMS quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-31

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Corpus Christi Quadrangle, Texas, are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 119 groundwater samples and 57 stream sediment samples. Also included is a brief discussion on the geology and hydrology of the quadrangle. Groundwater data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur primarily in a trend in western Nueces County. With one exception, waters in the trend are produced from the Evangeline aquifer and have high values for selenium and strontium. Owing to urbanization, low topographic relief, and the presence of Recent-to-Pleistocene surface material, stream sediment data were found to be less than optimum for the determination of the potential for uranium mineralization, and variation in uranium concentrations between units may simply reflect lithologic differences.

  15. Uraniam hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Wiseman NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wiseman NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (198a) into stream sediment samples.

  16. Using stream sediment lithology to explore the roles of abrasion and channel network structure in shaping downstream sediment yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Smith, M. E.; Pitlick, J.

    2012-12-01

    Both the flux and characteristics of stream sediment evolve downstream in response to variations in sediment supply, abrasion rate, and channel network structure. We use a simple erosion-abrasion mass balance to model the downstream evolution of sediment flux in two adjacent watersheds draining differing mixtures of soft and resistant rock types in the northern Rocky Mountains. Measurements of bed sediment grain size and lithology are used in conjunction with measured bed load and suspended load sediment fluxes to constrain the model. The results show that the downstream evolution in bed load flux and composition can be strongly influenced by subtle differences in underlying geology, which shapes both the abrasion characteristics and travel path lengths of individual rock types. In the Big Wood basin, abrasion rapidly reduces the size of soft sedimentary and volcanic rocks exposed in headwater areas, concentrating resistant granitic rocks in the stream bed and depressing bed load in favor of suspended load. Alternatively, in the North Fork Big Lost basin, volcanic and sedimentary lithologies are exposed throughout the catchment, and the bed material becomes dominated by erodible but resistant quartzitic sandstones. The result is a much higher bed load flux best modeled with modest abrasion rates. In both cases, the best-fit model can reproduce within 5% the composition of the stream bed substrate using realistic erosion and abrasion parameters. The results also demonstrate a strong linkage between modern hillslopes and channel systems even in these formerly glaciated landscapes, as the sediment signature of the primary streams reflects the systematic tapping of distinct source areas. While this work shows promise, measurement of the spatial patterns in the size and composition of bed and suspended load fluxes at locations throughout a channel network would better elucidate that relative importance of supply, sorting, and abrasion processes.

  17. Relationships of sedimentation and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in headwater streams using systematic longitudinal sampling at the reach scale.

    PubMed

    Longing, S D; Voshell, J R; Dolloff, C A; Roghair, C N

    2010-02-01

    Investigating relationships of benthic invertebrates and sedimentation is challenging because fine sediments act as both natural habitat and potential pollutant at excessive levels. Determining benthic invertebrate sensitivity to sedimentation in forested headwater streams comprised of extreme spatial heterogeneity is even more challenging, especially when associated with a background of historical and intense watershed disturbances that contributed unknown amounts of fine sediments to stream channels. This scenario exists in the Chattahoochee National Forest where such historical timber harvests and contemporary land-uses associated with recreation have potentially affected the biological integrity of headwater streams. In this study, we investigated relationships of sedimentation and the macroinvertebrate assemblages among 14 headwater streams in the forest by assigning 30, 100-m reaches to low, medium, or high sedimentation categories. Only one of 17 assemblage metrics (percent clingers) varied significantly across these categories. This finding has important implications for biological assessments by showing streams impaired physically by sedimentation may not be impaired biologically, at least using traditional approaches. A subsequent multivariate cluster analysis and indicator species analysis were used to further investigate biological patterns independent of sedimentation categories. Evaluating the distribution of sedimentation categories among biological reach clusters showed both within-stream variability in reach-scale sedimentation and sedimentation categories generally variable within clusters, reflecting the overall physical heterogeneity of these headwater environments. Furthermore, relationships of individual sedimentation variables and metrics across the biological cluster groups were weak, suggesting these measures of sedimentation are poor predictors of macroinvertebrate assemblage structure when using a systematic longitudinal sampling design

  18. Metal contamination of active stream sediments in upper Weardale, northern Pennine Orefield, UK.

    PubMed

    Lord, R A; Morgan, P A

    2003-03-01

    In the Upper Weardale area the headwaters of the River Wear bisect the Northern Pennine Orefield, where Pb-Zn-F-Ba vein-type mineralisation has been exploited since the Roman Conquest. The area contains evidence of open pit, underground and hydraulic mining of base metal ores, associated mineral processing and smelting, exploitation of ironstones during the industrial revolution, recent extraction of fluorite and active quarrying. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of modern sediment contamination arising from these past activities. Samples of active stream sediments were collected from all major drainage channels at 1 km intervals. The sediments were analysed for Pb, Zn, Ba, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Cr, As, Sb, Ag and compared to data from earlier regional geochemical surveys of low order drainage samples using ArcView software. The significance of contamination levels was assessed using the Ontario aquatic sediment quality guidelines. Our results indicate widespread contamination of some major drainages by Pb, Mn, Zn and As at concentration levels anticipated to significantly affect use of the sediments by benthic organisms. Furthermore, Pb contamination shows persistence in stream sediments downstream towards agricultural areas of the floodplain and drinking water abstraction points, above which interaction with colliery mine water discharges may occur. PMID:12901084

  19. Substrate, sediment, and slope controls on bedrock channel geometry in postglacial streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbread, Katie; Jansen, John; Bishop, Paul; Attal, Mikaël.

    2015-05-01

    The geometry of channels controls the erosion rate of rivers and the evolution of topography following environmental change. We examine how sediment, slope, and substrate interact to constrain the development of channels following deglaciation and test whether theoretical relationships derived from streams reacting to tectonic uplift apply in these settings. Using an extensive data set of channel geometry measurements from postglacial streams in the Scottish Highlands, we find that a power law width-drainage area scaling model accounts for 81% of the spatial variation in channel width. Substrate influences channel form at the reach scale, with bedrock channels found to be narrower and deeper than alluvial channels. Bedrock channel width does not covary with slope, which may be due to downstream variations in sediment flux. Bedrock channel width-to-depth ratios increase with discharge (or area) and sediment flux, consistent with increasing bed cover promoting lateral widening. We find steep, wide, and shallow bedrock channels immediately below lakes, which we interpret as the result of limited erosion due to a lack of sediment "tools." Where sediment supply is sufficient to exceed transport capacity, alluvial channels develop wider, shallower geometries constrained primarily by flow hydraulics. Our results indicate that simple scaling models of channel width with drainage area are applicable at regional scale, but locally, channel width varies with substrate, and in the case of bedrock channels, with sediment flux.

  20. Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol, estrone and testosterone in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Gray, James L.; Kolpin, Dana W.; McMahon, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and testosterone (T) was investigated in three wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) affected streams in the United States. Relative differences in the mineralization of [4-14C] substrates were assessed in oxic microcosms containing saturated sediment or water-only from locations upstream and downstream of the WWTP outfall in each system. Upstream sediment demonstrated significant mineralization of the “A” ring of E2, E1, and T, with biodegradation of T consistently greater than that of E2 and no systematic difference in E2 and E1 biodegradation. “A” ring mineralization also was observed in downstream sediment, with E1 and T mineralization being substantially depressed relative to upstream samples. In marked contrast, E2 mineralization in sediment immediately downstream from the WWTP outfalls was more than double that in upstream sediment. E2 mineralization was observed in water, albeit at insufficient rate to prevent substantial downstream transport. The results indicate that, in combination with sediment sorption processes which effectively scavenge hydrophobic contaminants from the water column and immobilize them in the vicinity of the WWTP outfall, aerobic biodegradation of reproductive hormones can be an environmentally important mechanism for nonconservative (destructive) attenuation of hormonal endocrine disruptors in effluent-affected streams.

  1. Sediment data for streams near Mount St. Helens, Washington; Volume 1, 1980 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, Randal L.; Ritter, John R.; Knott, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents fluvial sediment data collected primarily in response to the eruption of Mount St. Helens. To monitor the sediment transported by streams in the Mount St. Helens area and the particle-size distributions of the sediment, the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey initially established 18 fluvial sediment stations. In this report, concentrations and discharges of suspended sediment are given for 16 fluvial-sediment stations (5 are in the Toutle River basin) and for 11 miscellaneous sampling sites. Also included are particle-size distributions of suspended sediment and bed material, water discharge, and water temperature for many of the sediment samples. Daily sediment discharges for the period May 18 to September 30 were calculated for Toutle River at Highway 99 near Castle Rock and Cowlitz River at Castel Rock. Over 150 million tons of sediment are estimated to have passed the Toutle River at Highway 99 station on May 18-19, 1980. High concentrations of suspended sediment persisted at several stations throughout the spring and summer of 1980. (USGS)

  2. Combined use of rapid bioassessment protocols and sediment quality triad to assess stream quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Bogenrieder, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological conditions at five stations on a small southeastern stream were evaluated using the Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBP) and the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) to assess potential biological impacts of a municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) on downstream resources. Physical habitat, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish assemblages were impaired at Stations 1 and 2 (upstream of the WWTF), suggesting that the degraded physical habitat was adversely impacting the fish and benthic populations. The SQT also demonstrated that Stations 1 and 2 were degraded, but the factors responsible for the impaired conditions were attributed to the elevated concentrations of polycylclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals (Mn, Pb) in the sediments. The source of contaminants to the upper reaches of the stream appears to be storm-water runoff from the city center. Increased discharge and stabilized base flow contributed by the WWTF appeared to benefit the physically-altered stream system. Although the two assessment procedures demonstrated biological impairment at the upstream stations, the environmental factors identified as being responsible for the impairment were different: the RBP provided insight into contributions associated with the physical habitat and the SQT contributed information on contaminants and sediment quality. Both procedures are important in the identification of physical and chemical factors responsible for environmental impairment and together they provide information critical to the development of appropriate management options for mitigation.

  3. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Measuring Stream Bank Erosion within Legacy Sediments: Data Processing and Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starek, M. J.; Mitasova, H.; Wegmann, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Land clearing for agricultural purposes following European settlement of America resulted in upland erosion rates 50-400 times above long-term geologic rates in much of the North Carolina Piedmont region. A considerable amount of the eroded sediment was subsequently aggraded on floodplains and impounded in the slackwater ponds behind milldams. This trapped "legacy" sediment is commonly mistaken for natural floodplain deposition and has remained largely unrecognized as a potential source of accelerated sediment erosion contributing to modern water quality impairment. In this study, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is utilized to monitor stream bank evolution along a reach that has breached a former millpond. Due to the unique surface geometry and orientation of the stream bank, vegetation occlusion, and true 3D structure of the point cloud, a systematic data processing approach is implemented to compute the change in sediment volume between repeat TLS surveys. The processing approach consists of the following four steps: 1) segmentation of the stream bank point cloud; 2) transformation of the point cloud such that the xy plane is parallel to the trend of the bank; 3) filter vegetation by selecting local lowest point within a grid cell; 4) smooth high frequency noise 5) generate bare earth digital elevation model (DEM). From the DEMs, change in volume was quantified for a 13 m x 3.5 m section of the stream bank providing an estimate on erosion rates and slumping between surveys. The major mechanisms for the observed changes are freeze-thaw events and fluvial entrainment. To evaluate the surface evolution between the distinct sedimentary layers (legacy vs non-legacy) that comprise the stream bank, elevation change is modeled as a continuous trivariate function z = f(x,y,t) where x,y is horizontal location, t is time, and z is a first-surface referenced elevation. Hence, z=0 for all x,y at t=0, time of first survey. The filtered, transformed, and first

  4. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  5. Regional Geochemical Results from Analyses of Stream-Water, Stream-Sediment, Soil, Soil-Water, Bedrock, and Vegetation Samples, Tangle Lakes District, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Gough, L.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Lee, G.K.; Vohden, James; O'Neill, J. M.; Kerin, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    We report chemical analyses of stream-water, stream-sediment, soil, soil-water, bedrock, and vegetation samples collected from the headwaters of the Delta River (Tangle Lakes District, Mount Hayes 1:250,000-scale quadrangle) in east-central Alaska for the period June 20-25, 2006. Additionally, we present mineralogic analyses of stream sediment, concentrated by panning. The study area includes the southwestward extent of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Delta River Mining District (Bittenbender and others, 2007), including parts of the Delta River Archeological District, and encompasses an area of about 500 km2(approximately bordered by the Denali Highway to the south, near Round Tangle Lake, northward to the foothills of the Alaska Range (fig. 1). The primary focus of this study was the chemical characterization of native materials, especially surface-water and sediment samples, of first-order streams from the headwaters of the Delta River. The impetus for this work was the need, expressed by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources (ADNR), for an inventory of geochemical and hydrogeochemical baseline information about the Delta River Mining District. This information is needed because of a major upturn in exploration, drilling, and general mineral-resources assessments in the region since the late 1990s. Currently, the study area, called the 'MAN Project' area is being explored by Pure Nickel, Inc. (http://www.purenickel.com/s/MAN_Alaska.asp), and includes both Cu-Au-Ag and Ni-Cu-PGE (Pt-Pd-Au-Ag) mining claims. Geochemical data on surface-water, stream-sediment, soil, soil-water, grayleaf willow (Salix glauca L.), and limited bedrock samples are provided along with the analytical methodologies used and panned-concentrate mineralogy. We are releasing the data at this time with only minimal interpretation.

  6. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Beaumont NTMS Quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-29

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Beaumont Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Statistical data and areal distributions for uranium and uranium-related variables are presented for 707 groundwater and 619 stream sediment samples. Also included is a discussion on geologic factors considered significant in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization. Groundwater data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur primarily in a trend through the west central section of the quadrangle. Waters in this area are produced feom the Jasper aquifer, units that are defined as being part of the Burkeville confining system, and the Evangeline aquifer and have high values for arsenic, calcium, magnesium, and strontium. A smaller trend of high uranium values is located in the south central section of the quadrangle where waters are mainly produced from the Chicot aquifer. Stream sediment data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur in sediments from the northern third and southeastern section of the quadrangle. In the northern trend of high uranium values, the sediments are derived from the Jackson Group and the Fleming and Catahoula Formations. Uranium appears to be associated with resistate and/or heavy minerals. Sediments that compose the southeastern trend are derived from the Beaumont Formation.

  7. Magnetic Characterization of Stream-Sediments From Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, Affected by Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, M. A.; Sinito, A. M.; Bidegain, J. C.; Gogorza, C. S.; Jurado, S.

    2001-12-01

    A wide urban area from Northeast of Buenos Aires Province is exposed to an important anthropogenic influence, mainly due to industrial activity. In this two water streams were chosen: one of them (Del Gato stream, G) next to La Plata City and the another one (El Pescado stream, P) on the outskirts of the city. Both streams have similar characteristics, although the first one (G) has a higher input of pollutants (fluvial effluents, fly ashes, solid wastes, etc.) than the last one (P). Sediments analyzed in this work are limes from continental origin of PostPampeano (Holocene). Although, some cores were affected by sandy-limy sediments with mollusc valves from Querandino Sea (Pleistocene - later Holocene) and limy sediments of chestnut color with calcareous concretions from the Ensenadense. Magnetic measurements and geochemical studies were carried out on the samples. Among the magnetic parameters, specific susceptibility (X), X frequency-dependence (Xfd%), X temperature-dependence, Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM), Saturation IRM (SIRM), coercivity of remanence (Bcr), S ratio and SIRM/X ratio, Anhysteric Remanent Magnetization (ARM), Magnetic and Thermal Demagnetization were studied. The magnetic characteristics for both sites indicate the predominance of magnetically soft minerals on G site and relatively hard minerals on P site. Magnetite is the main magnetic carrier, Pseudo Single Domain and Single Domain grains were found. Chemical studies show (in some cases) a high concentration for some heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe) on the upper 22-cm. Contents of heavy metals and ARM were correlated. Very good correlation (R> 0.81) is found for Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe and the sum (of Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni), and a weaker correlation for Pb.

  8. Stream-sediment geochemistry in mining-impacted streams : sediment mobilized by floods in the Coeur d'Alene-Spokane River system, Idaho and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, Stephen E.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Ikramuddin, Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    below the confluence of the North and South Forks, and then increase again downstream of the gradient flattening below Cataldo. Metal contents of suspended sediment in the Spokane River below Coeur d'Alene Lake were comparable to those of suspended sediment in the main stem of the Coeur d'Alene River above the lake during the 1997 spring runoff, but with somewhat higher Zn contents. Daily suspended-sediment loads were about 100 times larger in the 1996 flood (50-100-year recurrence interval) than in the smaller 1997 floods (2-5-year recurrence intervals). Significant differences in metal ratios and contents are also apparent between the two flood types. The predominant source of suspended sediment in the larger 1996 flood was previously deposited, metal-enriched flood-plain sediment, identified by its Zn/Pb ratio less than 1. Suspended sediment in the smaller 1997 floods had metal ratios distinct from those of the flood-plain deposits and was primarily derived from metal-enriched sediment stored within the stream channel, identified by a Zn/Pb ratio greater than 1. Sediment deposited during overbank flooding on the immediate streambank or natural levee of the river typically consists of sandy material with metal ratios and contents similar to those of the sandy streambed sediment in the adjacent river reach. Samples of overbank deposits in backlevee marshes collected after the 1996 flood have metal ratios similar to those of peak-flow suspended sediment in the same river reach, but generally lower metal contents.

  9. Enrichment of Arsenic in Surface Water, Stream Sediments and Soils in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shehong; Wang, Mingguo; Yang, Qiang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jianming; Zheng, Baoshan; Zheng, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in sedimentary deposits in China, Southern, and Southeast Asia down gradient from the Tibetan plateau contain elevated As concentrations on a regional scale. To ascertain the possibility of source region As enrichment, samples of water (n=86), stream sediment (n=77) and soil (n=73) were collected from the Singe Tsangpo (upstream of the Indus River), Yarlung Tsangpo (upstream of the Brahmaputra River) and other drainage basins in Tibet in June of 2008. The average arsenic concentration in stream waters, sediments and soils was 58±70 μg/L (n=39, range 2-252 μg/L), 42±40 mg/kg (n=37, range 12-227 mg/kg), and 44±27mg/kg (n=28, range 12-84 mg/kg) respectively for the Singe Tsangpo and was 11±17 μg/L (n=30, range 2-83 μg/L), 28±11 mg/kg (n=28, range 2-61 mg/kg), and 30±34 mg/kg (n=21, range 6-173 mg/kg) respectively for the Yarlung Tsangpo. A dug well contained 195 μg/L of As. In addition to elevated As levels in surface and shallow groundwater of Tibet, hot spring and alkaline salt lake waters displayed very high As levels, reaching a maximum value of 5,985 μg/L and 10,626 μg/L As, respectively. The positive correlation between [As] and [Na]+[K] in stream waters indicates that these surface water arsenic enrichments are linked to the hot springs and/or salt lakes. Further, 24% of As in stream sediment is reductively leachable, with bulk As displaying a positive correlation with stream water As, suggesting sorption from stream water. In contrast, the fraction of reductively leachable As is negligible for soils and several rock samples, suggesting that As in them are associated with unweathered minerals. Whether the pronounced As anomaly found in Tibet affects the sedimentary As content in deltas downstream or not requires further study. PMID:24367140

  10. Effects of themokarst on sediment deposition rates in two arctic headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, J.; Flinn, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has revealed increased permafrost degradation and incidences of thermokarst features as products of a changing arctic climate. These features have important implications for aquatic ecosystems across the landscape, as increased frequencies of such features are expected to increase sediment load into affected streams. We examined two headwater streams impacted by thermokarst failures near Toolik Lake Field Station in Northern Alaska, USA. Samples were collected using 3” diameter PVC traps nested in the substrate which were then partitioned into four individual size classes (2mm, 1mm, >250um and <250um) and normalized for period of deployment. Each individual size fraction was collected within a reference and impacted reach at each site, dried for a 24hr period to quantify dry mass, then ashed in a muffle furnace to quantify ash-free dry mass. Rates of sedimentation were quantified as grams*m-2*d-1. Data collected in summer 2010 revealed a significant input of total sediment deposited in areas impacted by thermokarst failures relative to reference reaches which were unaffected. We observed a near doubling of total sedimentation rates in the impacted reaches compared to our reference reaches (p<0.01). There was a significant increase in the amount of organic matter delivered to the impacted sites (p<0.01). However, this increase contributes to only a small fraction (~10-15%) of the total composition of sediment delivered to impacted reaches. Inorganic deposits were insignificant within affected reaches, which we attribute to large variability within each trap, as a possible consequence of varying geomorphology between each study stream. The largest inputs of organic matter were deposited in the form of VFPOM (<250um), while inorganic deposits were variable across all class sizes. The results from our study indicate thermokarst failures have a significant impact on sedimentation rates in headwater streams. We predict this may have various ecological

  11. Trace elements in bed sediments of the San Joaquin River and its tributary streams, California, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, D.G.; Gilliom, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Bed sediments were sampled at 24 sites on the San Joaquin River, California and its tributaries in October 1985 to assess the distribution of trace elements and factors affecting their concentrations. The proportion of less than 62-micrometer sediment was significantly (alpha = 0.05) correlated with organic-carbon concentrations. Bed sediments from tributaries originating in the Sierra Nevada were much coarser than sediments in streams draining the Coast Range and western valley. Selenium concentrations in water have been measured. Interrelations among trace elements were examined using principal component analysis. 57% of the variance was accounted for in the first two principal components, which together show a distinct separation between sites dominated by Coast Range sediments and sites dominated by Sierra Nevada sediments. The third and fourth components accounted for 21% of the variance and distinguished the mixed-source sediments of the intermittent upper San Joaquin River from other parts of the river system. Generally, elements in bed sediments of the San Joaquin River and its tributaries were similar in concentration to elements in San Joaquin Valley soils, and concentrations were far below hazardous waste criteria. Concentrations were lower than in sediments from some polluted urban rivers and water more comparable to other rural agricultural rivers. 35 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. The Role of Alkalinity Inputs in the Composition of Sediments in AN Acid Mine Drainage Remediated Stream: Hewett Fork, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.; Korenowsky, R. K.; Kruse, N.; Bowman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Hewett Fork, a tributary of Raccoon Creek in SE Ohio, is severely impacted by acid mine drainage. This stream is being actively treated using a calcium oxide doser. In this work, we report the results of our investigations into the chemical effect of remediation in the stream throughout an evaluation of the chemical composition of its sediments. Results show that the grain size of the sediments is finer in the areas where high alkalinity loads enter the stream, at the output from the doser and downstream of the confluence with alkaline tributaries. The composition of heavy metals (magnesium, aluminum, calcium, nickel, zinc, manganese, potassium, lead, chromium, copper, cobalt and arsenic) is higher in concentration in the fine-grained sediments where alkalinity enters the stream, forming two peaks of high sediment concentration along the stream, one at the doser and the second after the confluence with alkaline tributaries. Iron has a different behavior with a higher sediment concentration downstream from the doser at the areas where the grain size is larger, due to the kinetics of the oxidation process for the formation of iron (III) minerals. These results suggest that in remediation of acid-mine-drainage impacted streams, alkalinity inputs along and oxidation processes are important for the storage of heavy metals in the sediments.

  13. Testing ecological tradeoffs of a new tool for removing fine sediment in a spring-fed stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam; Sechrist, Juddson D.; Marczak, Laurie B

    2014-01-01

    Excessive fine sediment is a focus of stream restoration work because it can impair the structure and function of streams, but few methods exist for removing sediment in spring-fed streams. We tested a novel method of sediment removal with the potential to have minimal adverse effects on the biological community during the restoration process. The Sand Wand system, a dredgeless vacuum developed by Streamside Technologies, was used to experimentally remove fine sediment from Kackley Springs, a spring creek in southeastern Idaho. We assessed the effects of the Sand Wand on stream physical habitat and macroinvertebrate composition for up to 60 days after the treatment. We documented changes in multiple habitat variables, including stream depth, median particle size, and the frequency of embedded substrate in stream reaches that were treated with the Sand Wand. We also found that macroinvertebrate composition was altered even though common macroinvertebrate metrics changed little after the treatment. Our results suggest that the Sand Wand was effective at removing fine sediments in Kackley Springs and did minimal harm to macroinvertebrate function, but the Sand Wand was not ultimately effective in improving substrate composition to desired conditions. Additional restoration techniques are still needed to decrease the amount of fine sediment.

  14. Relationship of manganese-iron oxides and associated heavy metals to grain size in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of ammonium citrate-leachable lead, zinc and cadmium among size fractions in stream sediments is strongly influenced by the presence of hydrous Mn-Fe oxides in the form of coatings on sediment grains. Distribution curves showing leachable metals as a function of particle size are given for eight samples from streams in New York State. These show certain features in common; in particular two concentrations of metals, one in the finest fractions, and a second peak in the coarse sand and gravel fraction. The latter can be explained as a result of the increasing prevalence and thickness of oxide coatings with increasing particle size, with the oxides serving as collectors for the heavy metals. The distribution of Zn and Cd in most of the samples closely parallels that of Mn; the distribution of Pb is less regular and appears to be related to Fe in some samples and Mn in others. The concentration of metals in the coarse fractions due to oxide coatings, combined with the common occurrence of oxide deposition in streams of glaciated regions, raises the possibility of using coarse materials for geochemical surveys and environmental heavy-metal studies. ?? 1975.

  15. Interparticle migration of metal cations in stream sediments as a factor in toxics transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Bhatia, N.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of metal cations by stream sediments is an important process affecting the movement of released contaminants in the environment. The ability of cations to desorb from one sediment particle and subsequently sorb to another can greatly affect metal transport rates but rates for this process have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the rate at which sorbed metals can migrate from contaminated sediment particles to uncontaminated sediment particles as a function of the concentration of the contaminating solution and the duration of the contact with the contaminating solution. Samples of small sediment particles were exposed to solutions containing cobalt, after which they were rinsed and combined with larger uncontaminated sediment particles in the presence of stream water. Initial concentrations of the contaminating solution ranged from 1ng/l to 1000mg/l and exposures to the contaminating solution ranged from 6h to 14 days. The rate of the migration increased with increasing concentrations in the contaminating solution and with decreasing times of exposure to the contaminating solution. Under the conditions of these experiments, the time required for the migration to reach equilibrium was on the order of months or longer. In separate experiments, the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of cobalt were measured as a function of concentration of the contaminating solution. The time required to reach adsorption equilibrium increased with increasing concentration in the contaminating solution. Times to sorption equilibrium were on the order of months. Desorption was much slower than adsorption and, together with intraparticle diffusion, probably controls the rate of migration from contaminated to uncontaminated sediment. The results of this study show that interparticle migration of metal cations can proceed at significant rates that are strongly influenced by the length of time that the metal has been in contact with the sediment

  16. In-Stream Sediment Dynamics for predicted environmental concentration calculations of plant protection products in the FOCUSSW Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehmel, Alexander; Erzgräber, Beate; Gottesbüren, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The exposure assessment for the EU registration procedure of plant protection products (PPP), which is based on the 'Forum for the co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their use' (FOCUS), currently considers only periods of 12-16 months for the exposure assessment in surface water bodies. However, in a recent scientific opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) it is argued that in a multi-year exposure assessment, the accumulation of PPP substances in river sediment may be a relevant process. Therefore, the EFSA proposed to introduce a sediment accumulation factor in order to account for enrichment of PPP substances over several years in the sediment. The calculation of this accumulation factor, however, would consider degradation in sediment as the only dissipation path, and does not take into account riverine sediment dynamics. In order to assess the influence of deposition and the possible extent of substance accumulation in the sediment phase, the hydraulic model HEC-RAS was employed for an assessment of in-stream sediment dynamics of the FOCUS stream scenarios. The model was parameterized according to the stream characteristics of the FOCUS scenarios and was run over a period of 20 years. The results show that with the distribution of grain sizes and the ranges of flow velocity in the FOCUS streams the main sediment process in the streams is transport. First modeling results suggest that about 80% of the eroded sediment mass from the adjacent field are transported to the downstream end of the stream and out of the system, while only about 20% are deposited in the river bed. At the same time, only about 30% of in-stream sediment mass stems from the adjacent field and is associated with PPP substance, while the remaining sediment consists of the substance-free base sediment concentration regarded in the scenarios. With this, the hydraulic modelling approach is able to support the development of a meaningful sediment accumulation factor by

  17. Sources of fine-grained sediment to streams using fallout radionuclides in the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A.; Fuller, C. C.; Van Metre, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial sediment is a major factor in aquatic habitat degradation. Understanding the sources of this sediment is a necessary component of management plans and policies aimed at reducing sediment inputs. Because of the time intensive framework of most sediment-source studies, spatial interpretations are often limited to the study watershed. To address sediment sources on a larger scale, the U.S. Geological Survey- National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program as part of the Midwest Stream Quality Assessment, used fallout radioisotopes (excess lead-210, cesium-137, and beryllium-7) to determine the source ((upland (surface runoff) or channel derived)) of fine-grained (<0.063 mm) bed sediment in the Cornbelt Ecoregion. The study area encompassed parts of 11 states in the Midwestern United States covering 648,239 km2 of the United States. Sampling occurred in July and August of 2013, in conjunction with water chemistry, aquatic-habitat and ecological community assessments. Ninety-nine watersheds were sampled, the majority of which were predominately agricultural, with contributing areas ranging between 6.7 to 5,893 km2. Using the ratio of beryllium-7 to excess lead-210, the percent of upland to channel-derived sediment was estimated. Results indicate that sediment sources vary among the 99 watersheds. Channel sediment is an important source presumably from bank erosion. Upland sediment was not the dominant source of sediment in many of these agricultural watersheds. Suspended-sediment samples collected over an 8-week period for 3 watersheds also show that the percent of upland versus channel sediment varies spatially and temporally.

  18. From streets to streams: assessing the toxicity potential of urban sediment by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Selbig, William R.; Roger T. Bannerman; Roger T. Bannerman

    2013-01-01

    Urban sediment can act as a transport mechanism for a variety of pollutants to move towards a receiving water body. The concentrations of these pollutants oftentimes exceed levels that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Many treatment structures are designed to capture coarse sediment but do not work well to similarly capture the fines. This study measured concentrations of select trace metals and PAHs in both the silt and sand fractions of urban sediment from four sources: stormwater bed, stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Concentrations were used to assess the toxic potential of sediment based on published sediment quality guidelines. All sources of sediment showed some level of toxic potential with stormwater bed sediment the highest followed by stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Both metal and PAH concentration distributions were highly correlated between the four sampling locations suggesting the presence of one or perhaps only a few sources of these pollutants which remain persistent as sediment is transported from street to stream. Comparison to other forms of combustion- and vehicle-related sources of PAHs revealed coal tar sealants to have the strongest correlation, in both the silt and sand fractions, at all four sampling sites. This information is important for environmental managers when selecting the most appropriate Best Management Practice (BMP) as a way to mitigate pollution conveyed in urban stormwater from source to sink.

  19. Total and Methyl Mercury Distribution in Water, Sediment, and Fish tissue in New England Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, A. T.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Conditions that are conducive to the methylation of mercury are of particular concern because methyl mercury (MeHg) is the most toxic mercury species and is rapidly bioaccumulated and biomagnified in wildlife and man. The New England Coastal Basins study unit, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment program, has evaluated relations between concentrations of total mercury (HgT) and MeHg in stream water and bed sediment, and HgT in fish tissue at sites with a variety of watershed characteristics. Fifty-five stream sites from Rhode Island to Maine were sampled for water and bed sediment during 1998 - 2000. A subset of 27 sites was sampled for fish tissue. Sediment, water, and fish tissue samples were collected during summer low flow conditions within a week of each other to show patterns of MeHg accumulation and partitioning relative to site and watershed conditions. Concentrations of HgT in water and bed sediment ranged from 1 to 13 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and from 7 to 3,100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) dry weight, respectively. Concentrations of MeHg in water and sediment ranged from 0.04 to 1.8 ng/L and from 1 to 38 ng/g dry weight, respectively, and were positively correlated with concentrations of organic carbon. Methylation efficiency, as estimated by MeHg/HgT, ranged from 0.003 to 0.282 for sediment and water samples, with a median value of 0.071. Methylation efficiency was highest at sampling sites with low urbanization and high organic carbon concentrations. HgT concentrations in fish tissue (mixed sunfish species) ranged from 42 to 349 ng/g wet weight and were positively correlated with concentrations of MeHg in water and bed sediment. A positive relation was not observed between HgT concentrations in fish tissue and HgT concentrations in water and bed sediment. These preliminary results indicate a high potential for mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms in New England streams.

  20. Contrasting Landscape Influences on Sediment Supply and Stream Restoration Priorities in Northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) and Coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Jordan; Hogan, Daniel; Palm, Daniel; Lundquist, Hans; Nilsson, Christer; Beechie, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Sediment size and supply exert a dominant control on channel structure. We review the role of sediment supply in channel structure, and how regional differences in sediment supply and landuse affect stream restoration priorities. We show how stream restoration goals are best understood within a common fluvial geomorphology framework defined by sediment supply, storage, and transport. Landuse impacts in geologically young landscapes with high sediment yields (e.g., coastal British Columbia) typically result in loss of instream wood and accelerated sediment inputs from bank erosion, logging roads, hillslopes and gullies. In contrast, northern Sweden and Finland are landscapes with naturally low sediment yields caused by low relief, resistant bedrock, and abundant mainstem lakes that act as sediment traps. Landuse impacts involved extensive channel narrowing, removal of obstructions, and bank armouring with boulders to facilitate timber floating, thereby reducing sediment supply from bank erosion while increasing export through higher channel velocities. These contrasting landuse impacts have pushed stream channels in opposite directions (aggradation versus degradation) within a phase-space defined by sediment transport and supply. Restoration in coastal British Columbia has focused on reducing sediment supply (through bank and hillslope stabilization) and restoring wood inputs. In contrast, restoration in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) has focused on channel widening and removal of bank-armouring boulders to increase sediment supply and retention. These contrasting restoration priorities illustrate the consequences of divergent regional landuse impacts on sediment supply, and the utility of planning restoration activities within a mechanistic sediment supply-transport framework.

  1. A study of the effects of implementing agricultural best management practices and in-stream restoration on suspended sediment, stream habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrates at three stream sites in Surry County, North Carolina, 2004-2007-Lessons learned

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Douglas G.; Ferrell, G.M.; Harned, Douglas A.; Cuffney, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of agricultural best management practices and in-stream restoration on suspended-sediment concentrations, stream habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were examined in a comparative study of three small, rural stream basins in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces of North Carolina and Virginia between 2004 and 2007. The study was designed to assess changes in stream quality associated with stream-improvement efforts at two sites in comparison to a control site (Hogan Creek), for which no improvements were planned. In the drainage basin of one of the stream-improvement sites (Bull Creek), several agricultural best management practices, primarily designed to limit cattle access to streams, were implemented during this study. In the drainage basin of the second stream-improvement site (Pauls Creek), a 1,600-foot reach of the stream channel was restored and several agricultural best management practices were implemented. Streamflow conditions in the vicinity of the study area were similar to or less than the long-term annual mean streamflows during the study. Precipitation during the study period also was less than normal, and the geographic distribution of precipitation indicated drier conditions in the southern part of the study area than in the northern part. Dry conditions during much of the study limited opportunities for acquiring high-flow sediment samples and streamflow measurements. Suspended-sediment yields for the three basins were compared to yield estimates for streams in the southeastern United States. Concentrations of suspended sediment and nutrients in samples from Bull Creek, the site where best management practices were implemented, were high compared to the other two sites. No statistically significant change in suspended-sediment concentrations occurred at the Bull Creek site following implementation of best management practices. However, data collected before and after channel stabilization at the Pauls

  2. Distribution, speciation, and transport of mercury in stream-sediment, stream-water, and fish collected near abandoned mercury mines in southwestern Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Theodorakos, P.M.; Bailey, E.A.; Turner, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of total Hg, Hg (II), and methylmercury were measured in stream-sediment, stream-water, and fish collected downstream from abandoned mercury mines in south-western Alaska to evaluate environmental effects to surrounding ecosystems. These mines are found in a broad belt covering several tens of thousands of square kilometers, primarily in the Kuskokwim River basin. Mercury ore is dominantly cinnabar (HgS), but elemental mercury (Hg(o)) is present in ore at one mine and near retorts and in streams at several mine sites. Approximately 1400 t of mercury have been produced from the region, which is approximately 99% of all mercury produced from Alaska. These mines are not presently operating because of low prices and low demand for mercury. Stream-sediment samples collected downstream from the mines contain as much as 5500 ??g/g Hg. Such high Hg concentrations are related to the abundance of cinnabar, which is highly resistant to physical and chemical weathering, and is visible in streams below mine sites. Although total Hg concentrations in the stream-sediment samples collected near mines are high, Hg speciation data indicate that concentrations of Hg (II) are generally less than 5%, and methylmercury concentrations are less than 1% of the total Hg. Stream waters below the mines are neutral to slightly alkaline (pH 6.8-8.4), which is a result of the insolubility of cinnabar and the lack of acid- generating minerals such as pyrite in the deposits. Unfiltered stream-water samples collected below the mines generally contain 500-2500 ng/l Hg; whereas, corresponding stream-water samples filtered through a 0.45-??m membrane contain less than 50 ng/l Hg. These stream-water results indicate that most of the Hg transported downstream from the mines is as finely- suspended material rather than dissolved Hg. Mercury speciation data show that concentrations of Hg (II) and methylmercury in stream-water samples are typically less than 22 ng/l, and generally less than

  3. Non-Additive Increases in Sediment Stability Are Generated by Macroinvertebrate Species Interactions in Laboratory Streams

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  4. Grain size bias in cosmogenic nuclide studies of stream sediment in steep terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Claire E.; Riebe, Clifford S.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Shuster, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides in stream sediment are widely used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. A key assumption is that sampled sediment is representative of erosion from the entire catchment. Here we show that the common practice of collecting a narrow range of sizes—typically sand—may not yield a representative sample when the grain size distribution of sediment produced on slopes is spatially variable. A grain size bias arises when some parts of the catchment produce sand more readily than others. To identify catchments that are prone to this bias, we used a forward model of sediment mixing and erosion to explore the effects of catchment relief and area across a range of altitudinal gradients in sediment size and erosion rate. We found that the bias increases with increasing relief, because higher-relief catchments have a larger fraction of high elevations that are underrepresented in the sampled sand when grain size increases with altitude. The bias also increases with catchment area, because sediment size reduction during transport causes an underrepresentation of more distal, higher elevations within the catchment. Our analysis indicates that grain size bias may be significant at many sites where cosmogenic nuclides have been used to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. We discuss how to quantify and account for the bias using cosmogenic nuclides and detrital thermochronometry in multiple sediment sizes.

  5. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Watertown NTMS Quadrangle, South Dakota; Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-29

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Watertown Quadrangle are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 711 groundwater and 603 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that high uranium concentrations are derived predominantly from glacial aquifers of variable water composition located on the Coteau des Prairies. Elements associated with high uranium values in these waters include barium, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, selenium, sulfate, and total alkalinity. Low uranium values were observed in waters originating from the Cretaceous Dakota sandstone whose water chemistry is characterized by high concentrations of boron, sodium, and chloride. Stream sediment data indicate that high uranium concentrations are scattered across the glacial deposits of the Coteau des Prairies. A major clustering of high uranium values occurs in the eastern portion of the glaciated quadrangle and is associated with high concentrations of selenium, lithium, iron, arsenic, chromium, and vanadium. The sediment data suggest that the drift covering the Watertown Quadrangle is compositionally homogeneous, although subtle geochemical differences were observed as a result of localized contrasts in drift source-rock mineralogy and modification of elemental distributions by contemporaneous and postglacial hydrologic processes.

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.

  7. Subglacial Water and Sediment Transport across the Grounding Zone of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, Knut; Horgan, Huw; Jacobel, Robert; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Alley, Richard; Muto, Atsuhiro; Craig, Brian; Dalla-Santa, Kevin; Gobel, Rebecca; Keisling, Benjamin; Synder, Lauren

    2013-04-01

    Much of the threshold behavior of marine ice sheets is thought to result from processes occurring at the grounding zone, where the ice sheet transitions into the ice shelf. At short time scales (decades to centuries) grounding zone behavior is likely to be influenced by processes not included in the current generation of ice sheet models. Here we report on two such processes: the flow of subglacial water from beneath the ice sheet, and the associated transport, and deposition, of sediment. We present a ground-based geophysical study across the grounding zone of a major West Antarctic Ice Stream (Whillans Ice Stream). Using a combination of active-source seismology and radio-echo sounding (RES) data, we image the outlet of a large subglacial drainage system. This drainage system deposits sediment, the lithology of which we determine with seismic amplitude analysis, into a thin (< 15 m) ocean water column. RES reflectivity indicates that subglacial deformation, subglacial water flow, and this ocean water column likely transport sediment along the base of the ice sheet and eventually the ice shelf. These findings have implications for the evolution of grounding zones and the basal melt of ice shelves; knowledge of both of which is required if well-informed models are to provide accurate estimates of future sea level rise.

  8. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Wichita Uplift Region, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, T.R.; Switek, J.; Rutledge, D.A.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.

    1980-02-29

    Results of the Wichita Uplift detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 540 groundwater and 425 stream sediment samples. Radiometric analyses for uranium, thorium, and potassium are reported for 135 rock samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are provided. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. For groundwater samples, evidence provided by a weighted sums analysis of uranium, arsenic, and molybdenum and by areal distribution of selenium indicates three areas with potential for uranium mineralization. One area is located along the Jackson-Tillman county line just north of the Red River and another area is located to the north in east central Jackson County. Favorability is indicated by high values for uranium, arsenic, and molybdenum and nearby wells with high selenium values. Another promising area occurs in Kiowa and Greer Counties. Groundwater with high values for the uranium weighted sums model and selenium in this area have high values for salinity indicators, suggesting that the groundwaters are influenced by brines from local oil fields. The stream sediment data indicate that the most promising area for potential uranium mineralization is the southern Wichita Mountains area. The deposits consist of heavy and residual mineral placers. High concentrations of uranium-bearing minerals in stream sediments in this region may indicate vein-type or pegmatite deposits in granites in the southern Wichita Mountains, and suggest that the Wichita Uplift area may act as a good source environment for uranium.

  9. Physical and chemical characteristics of the Subglacial Lake Whillans sediment cores, Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, T. O.; Powell, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment recovered from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) is well-homogenized, structureless diamict; typical subglacial till. Based on theoretical estimates, the basal ice above SLW should be below the pressure melting point preventing melt-out of debris from basal ice. Therefore, the lake floor diamict likely formed through deformation while the ice stream was grounded at the drill site. Using satellite altimetry, Fricker, et al. (2007) inferred that SLW experiences short (~7 month) discharge events, lowering the ice surface and lake water level by between 1 and 4 m. The lake 'lowstands' are separated by longer periods of gradual recharge, but over the period of a lowstand the ice stream is suspected to touch down and couple with the lake floor, potentially shearing new till into the lake. The lack of sorted sediment or erosional lags indicates water flow during discharge/recharge events has had a low current velocity with quiescent conditions in the lake. The most notable variability in the cores is a uniformly weak, critical porosity horizon extending to ~50 cm depth above more consolidated till. We interpret the weak upper horizon as the product of shear deformation and decreasing effective pressure experienced during the final stages of grounding prior to a lake recharge event (see generally, the undrained plastic bed model of Tulaczyk et al. (2000)). The presence of this weak layer illustrates the importance of hydrology in modulating till rheology and is an example of how subglacial sediments can preserve archives of hydrologic conditions at the glacial bed. Fricker, H.A., T. Scambos, R. Bindschadler and L. Padman. 2007. An active subglacial water system in West Antarctica mapped from space. Science, 315(5818), 1544-1548. Tulaczyk S, Kamb WB, Engelhardt HF. 2000. Basal mechanics of Ice Stream B, West Antarctica. 2. Undrained plastic bed model. J. Geophys. Res. 105:483-94.

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Beaver NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Martell, C.J.; Maassen, L.W.

    1981-11-01

    The report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) protion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  11. Biodegradation of 17β-Estradiol, Estrone and Testosterone in Stream Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. M.; Chapelle, F. H.; Barber, L. B.; McMahon, P. B.; Gray, J. L.; Kolpin, D. W.

    2009-12-01

    The potentials for in situ biodegradation of 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and testosterone (T) were investigated in three, hydrologically-distinct, WWTP-impacted streams in the United States. Relative differences in the mineralization of [4-14C] substrates were assessed in oxic microcosms containing sediment or water-only from locations upstream and downstream of the WWTP outfall in each system. Upstream samples provided insight into the biodegradative potential of sediment microbial communities that were not under the immediate impact of WWTP effluent. Upstream sediment from all three systems demonstrated significant mineralization of the “A” ring of E2, E1 and T, with the potential of T biodegradation consistently greater than of E2 and no systematic difference in the potentials of E2 and E1. Downstream samples provided insight into the impacts of effluent on reproductive hormone biodegradation. Significant “A” ring mineralization was also observed in downstream sediment, with the potentials for E1 and T mineralization being substantially depressed relative to upstream samples. In marked contrast, the potentials for E2 mineralization immediately downstream of the WWTP outfalls were more than double that of upstream samples. E2 mineralization was also observed in water, albeit at insufficient rate to prevent substantial downstream transport in the water column. The results of this study indicate that, in combination with sediment sorption processes which effectively scavenge hydrophobic contaminants from the water column and immobilize them in the vicinity of the WWTP outfall, aerobic biodegradation of reproductive hormones can be an environmentally important mechanism for non-conservative (destructive) attenuation of hormonal endocrine disruptors in effluent-impacted streams.

  12. Aluminum forms in stream sediment: Relation to bedrock geology and water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Zeiler, M.A.; Mulholland, P.J.; Elwood, J.W.; Cook, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal gradients in sediment and water chemistry were characterized in a high elevation stream in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, to elucidate the geochemical behavior of aluminum across gradients in pH (4.5 to 6.5) and elevation (1120 to 1895 m). Observed gradients are driven in part by the presence of pyritic bedrock, which occurs at higher elevations and yields acidity when exposed to oxidation by landslide activity. Exchangeable Al in sediment (estimated using potassium chloride) varied in response to monomeric Al in streamwater and thus decreased downstream. Organic Al in sediment (estimated using sodium pyrophosphate) did not vary in proportion to the organic carbon content of sediment. Amorphous Al in sediment (estimated as the difference between oxalate- and pyrophosphate-extractable Al) and Al extractable with acidified streamwater (pH 4.5) was lowest at the more acidic sites. These results suggest that increases in soluble Al in downstream reaches during episodic pH depressions could be due in part to the release of adsorbed and/or precipitated Al in sediment.

  13. Methanogenic archaea diversity in hyporheic sediments of a small lowland stream.

    PubMed

    Brablcová, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Badurová, Pavlína; Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Rulík, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Abundance and diversity of methanogenic archaea were studied at five localities along a longitudinal profile of a Sitka stream (Czech Republic). Samples of hyporheic sediments were collected from two sediment depths (0-25 cm and 25-50 cm) by freeze-core method. Methanogen community was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing method. The proportion of methanogens to the DAPI-stained cells varied among all localities and depths with an average value 2.08 × 10(5) per g of dry sediment with the range from 0.37 to 4.96 × 10(5) cells per g of dry sediment. A total of 73 bands were detected at 19 different positions on the DGGE gel and the highest methanogen diversity was found at the downstream located sites. There was no relationship between methanogen diversity and sediment depth. Cluster analysis of DGGE image showed three main clusters consisting of localities that differed in the number and similarity of the DGGE bands. Sequencing analysis of representative DGGE bands revealed phylotypes affiliated with members belonging to the orders Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales. The knowledge about occurrence and diversity of methanogenic archaea in freshwater ecosystems are essential for methane dynamics in river sediments and can contribute to the understanding of global warming process. PMID:25460192

  14. Evaluation of a hydrograph-shifting method for estimating suspended-sediment loads in Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, L.R.; Mansue, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrograph-shifting method for estimating monthly and annual suspended-sediment loads was applied to suspended-sediment records for 12 streams in Illinois. Transport equations for each station were developed and synthetic sediment-discharge hydrographs were then generated by using these transport equations and records of daily streamflow. Hydrographs were shifted to measured values of daily sediment discharge selected to represent weekly, biweekly, and monthly sampling frequencies. Estimates of monthly suspended-sediment load ranged from 16 to 326 percent of measured values. Estimates of annual suspended-sediment loads ranged from 41 to 136 percent of measured values. (The method provides a reasonable means of estimating annual loads for most sites.) An experiment designed to measure the subjectivity of the method showed it to be more dependent on the particular days selected as control points than on the person applying the method. An evaluation of the effect of the length of record used to develop transport equations was not conclusive. Although standard errors of estimate showed no improvement, the comparison of estimated loads with measured loads showed slight improvement when 1 or 2 years of data were added to the data used to develop transport equations. (USGS)

  15. Spatial patterns and variations of suspended sediment transport in the upper- and mid-stream Yarlung Tsangpo River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaonan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-04-01

    The Yarlung Tsangpo River (YL River), flowing from west to east across the southern section of the Tibetan Plateau, is the longest river and as well an important activity center for Tibet Autonomous Region of China. The suspended sediment in the river is an important proxy for regional erosional severity and ecological environment. However, the sediment transport in the river is rarely reported under data scarcity due to the harsh climate conditions, high elevation, and intensive area. Under the interaction of monsoon climate and topography variability, what are the spatial patterns and variations of the suspended sediment in the YL River and how to explain the spatial pattern and variation? Based on the analysis of monthly discharge and suspended sediment concentration data from four mainstream stations, spatial patterns and variations of suspended sediment in the upper- and mid-stream YL River are studied. The results of spatial distribution analysis show that high erosion intensity occurred in the upper area of the mid-stream reaches while there is a large deposition area located at the end of middle stream. On the whole, the annual sediment yield transported at the end of mid-stream is 1043 *104 t with average specific sediment yield of 54.4 t/km2/yr which illustrates that the sediment contribution is at a relative low level from the upper- and mid-stream YL River. The sediment transport mainly occurs in the three months of Jul. to Sep., as just the time of rainy season, flood season, and intensive melting time period of glaciers, accounting for 79%~93% of the annual gross yield (more concentrated for upstream). Finally, the spatial variations of suspended sediment are comprehensively analyzed and explained in terms of the sediment rating curve, climate, hydrology, and riverbed morphology characteristics.

  16. Phosphorus source-sink relationships of stream sediments in the Rathbun Lake watershed in southern Iowa, USA.

    PubMed

    Hongthanat, Najphak; Kovar, John L; Thompson, Michael L; Russell, James R; Isenhart, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    The surface waters of Rathbun Lake watershed in southern Iowa are impacted by agricultural sources of sediments and nutrients, including phosphorus (P). Because stream sediments often play an important role in regulating P concentrations in stream water, we investigated sediment-water column P relationships in four creeks within the watershed and then evaluated the relationship between sediment properties and indicators of the risk of P loss. Based on Mehlich-3-extractable P (17 to 68 mg kg(-1)) and degree of P saturation (2 to 12 %), stream bank and bed sediments at the four sites were unlikely to serve as major sources of P. However, equilibrium P concentrations, which ranged from 0.02 to 0.12 mg L(-1), indicated that bed sediments could release P to the water column depending on dissolved P (DP) concentrations in the stream water and the time of year. The likelihood of P desorption from the sediments increased with increasing pH (r = 0.92, p < 0.01) and sand content (r = 0.78, p < 0.05), but decreased with clay content (r = -0.72, p < 0.05) and iron (Fe) (r = -0.93, p < 0.001) associated with organic matter. From these results, we speculate that changes in land use within the riparian areas may, at least initially, have little effect on P concentrations in the streams. Low concentrations of DP relative to total P (TP) in these streams, however, suggest that P loads to Rathbun Lake can be reduced if P inputs from eroded bank sediments are controlled. PMID:27393193

  17. Linking the field to the stream: soil erosion and sediment yield in a rural catchment, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, M. L.; Taboada-Castro, M. M.; Palleiro-Suarez, L.; Taboada-Castro, M. T.

    2009-04-01

    Quantifying the linkages between field erosion, fluvial response and catchment sediment yield remains problematic, among other reasons, because of the re-deposition of eroded sediment within the catchment, which is controlled by the spatial organization of the land use and the connectivity between sediment sources and the stream network. This paper presents the results of an integrated study that considered the relationship between erosion and stream sediment yield in an agroforestry catchment (16 km2) in NW Spain. The geology consists of basic metamorphic schist. The relieve of the area is steeper, the mean slope is approximately 19%. Main soil types are classified as Umbrisol and Cambisol. Soils are acidic and rich in organic matter. The soil texture is silt and silt-loam. Land cover consists of a mixture of forest (65%) and agricultural fields (mainly grassland, pasture and maize). The study combined measurements of soil erosion by concentrate flow and sediment deposition at field scale with sediment yield measured at the catchment outlet. The hydrological data and water samples were obtained at the catchment outlet. Stream water level was monitored continuously and converted to discharge using a rating curve. The sampling for suspended sediments was supplemented by an automatic sampler. Suspended sediment load was calculated from the suspended sediment concentrations and discharge data. Eroded volume was calculated from cross-sections (measured at specific points, where the section changed abruptly) and length of the channel segments. The total sediment delivered to stream was determined as the difference between all erosion features (rills and gullies) and the sediment volumes that were deposited on the fields. The results showed that in the catchment during the period winter 2007/08 soil erosion by concentrate flow, i.e. rills and ephemeral gullies, occurred on unprotected crop field. Erosion by concentrate flow was highly discontinuous within the catchment

  18. Contrasting landscape influences on sediment supply and stream restoration priorities in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) and coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jordan; Hogan, Daniel; Palm, Daniel; Lundquist, Hans; Nilsson, Christer; Beechie, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Sediment size and supply exert a dominant control on channel structure. We review the role of sediment supply in channel structure, and how regional differences in sediment supply and land use affect stream restoration priorities. We show how stream restoration goals are best understood within a common fluvial geomorphology framework defined by sediment supply, storage, and transport. Land-use impacts in geologically young landscapes with high sediment yields (e.g., coastal British Columbia) typically result in loss of in-stream wood and accelerated sediment inputs from bank erosion, logging roads, hillslopes and gullies. In contrast, northern Sweden and Finland are landscapes with naturally low sediment yields caused by low relief, resistant bedrock, and abundant mainstem lakes that act as sediment traps. Land-use impacts involved extensive channel narrowing, removal of obstructions, and bank armouring with boulders to facilitate timber floating, thereby reducing sediment supply from bank erosion while increasing export through higher channel velocities. These contrasting land-use impacts have pushed stream channels in opposite directions (aggradation versus degradation) within a phase-space defined by sediment transport and supply. Restoration in coastal British Columbia has focused on reducing sediment supply (through bank and hillslope stabilization) and restoring wood inputs. In contrast, restoration in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) has focused on channel widening and removal of bank-armouring boulders to increase sediment supply and retention. These contrasting restoration priorities illustrate the consequences of divergent regional land-use impacts on sediment supply, and the utility of planning restoration activities within a mechanistic sediment supply-transport framework. PMID:21132293

  19. A comparative study of stream water and stream sediment as geochemical exploration media in the Rio Tanama porphyry copper district, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Learned, R.E.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    To test the relative effectiveness of stream water and sediment as geochemical exploration media in the Rio Tanama porphyry copper district of Puerto Rico, we collected and subsequently analyzed samples of water and sediment from 29 sites in the rivers and tributaries of the district. Copper, Mo, Pb, Zn, SO42-, and pH were determined in the waters; Cu, Mo, Pb, and Zn were determined in the sediments. In addition, copper in five partial extractions from the sediments was determined. Geochemical contrast (anomaly-to-background quotient) was the principal criterion by which the effectiveness of the two media and the five extractions were judged. Among the distribution patterns of metals in stream water, that of copper most clearly delineates the known porphyry copper deposits and yields the longest discernable dispersion train. The distribution patterns of Mo, Pb, and Zn in water show little relationship to the known mineralization. The distribution of SO42- in water delineates the copper deposits and also the more extensive pyrite alteration in the district; its recognizable downstream dispersion train is substantially longer than those of the metals, either in water or sediment. Low pH values in small tributaries delineate areas of known sulfide mineralization. The distribution patterns of copper in sediments clearly delineate the known deposits, and the dispersion trains are longer than those of copper in water. The partial determinations of copper related to secondary iron and manganese oxides yield the strongest geochemical contrasts and longest recognizable dispersion trains. Significantly high concentrations of molybdenum in sediments were found at only three sites, all within one-half km downstream of the known copper deposits. The distribution patterns of lead and zinc in sediments are clearly related to the known primary lead-zinc haloes around the copper deposits. The recognizable downstream dispersion trains of lead and zinc are shorter than those of

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Point Hope NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Shettel, Jr., D. L.; Langfeldt, S. L.; Hardy, L. C.; D'Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Point Hope NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appenidx A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Survey Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Survey Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Table Mountain NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Table Mountain NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.

  3. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Rapid City NTMS Quadrangle, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-30

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Rapid City Quadrangle are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 417 groundwater and 477 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that the most promising areas for uranium mineralization are in the central portion of the quadrangle in the Pierre Shale. Three main clusters of groundwater samples with high uranium values occur here. Associated with the high uranium concentrations are high values for calcium, potassium, magnesium, strontium, and specific conductance. Stream sediment data indicate high concentrations of uranium are usually found in the Pierre Shale. Scattered samples occur in the Graneros Shale and in the Paleozoic and Precambrian units of the Black Hills. Arsenic, cobalt, and yttrium are associated with the areas of high uranium concentration. No areas are indicated with strong potential for uranium mineralization.

  4. Characterization of Archaeal Community in Contaminated and Uncontaminated Surface Stream Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Porat, Iris; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Mosher, Jennifer J; Brandt, Craig C; Yang, Zamin; Brooks, Scott C; Liang, Liyuan; Drake, Meghan M; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Archaeal communities from mercury and uranium-contaminated freshwater stream sediments were characterized and compared to archaeal communities present in an uncontaminated stream located in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The distribution of the Archaea was determined by pyrosequencing analysis of the V4 region of 16S rRNA amplified from 12 streambed surface sediments. Crenarchaeota comprised 76% of the 1,670 archaeal sequences and the remaining 24% were from Euryarchaeota. Phylogenetic analysis further classified the Crenarchaeota as a Freshwater Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota group, Group I3, Rice Cluster VI and IV, Marine Group I and Marine Benthic Group B; and the Euryarchaeota into Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Rice Cluster III, Marine Benthic Group D, Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 1 and Eury 5. All groups were previously described. Both hydrogen- and acetate-dependent methanogens were found in all samples. Most of the groups (with 60% of the sequences) described in this study were not similar to any cultivated isolates, making it difficult to discern their function in the freshwater microbial community. A significant decrease in the number of sequences, as well as in the diversity of archaeal communities was found in the contaminated sites. The Marine Group I, including the ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus, was the dominant group in both mercury and uranium/nitrate-contaminated sites. The uranium-contaminated site also contained a high concentration of nitrate, thus Marine Group I may play a role in nitrogen cycle.

  5. Map showing abundance and distribution of arsenic in oxide residues of stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Grimes, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Stream-sediment sampling in the Medford 1o x 2o quadrangle was undertaken to provide to aid in assessment of the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of copper in the oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) of stream sediments and in the minus-0.18-mm sieve fraction of selected stream sediments collected in the quadrangle. 

  6. Map showing abundance and distribution of copper in oxide residues of stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    Stream-sediment sampling in the Medford 1o x 2o quadrangle was undertaken to provide to aid in assessment of the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of copper in the oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) of stream sediments and in the minus-0.18-mm sieve fraction of selected stream sediments collected in the quadrangle. 

  7. Sediment fining processes in a mountain stream at multiple time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Mathys, Nicolle; Klotz, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    Downstream fining of sediment is observed in most gravel bed rivers, and is attributed to two mechanisms. The first one is an apparent fining that results from a collective effect called selective sorting: smaller grains travel further downstream while larger grains deposit preferentially upstream. The second one is generally referred to as abrasion and encompasses all the fining processes that affect each grain during its travel along the stream. The latter type of processes is dominant in the mountainous streams of the Draix observatory and is the focus of this study. Draix catchments are characterized by hard climatic conditions with winter frost and storm-induced floods, and a very erodible lithology (marl). During the floods, at the time scale of a few minutes, sediment size is reduced by surface abrasion and fragmentation due to the collisions between grains. In between the floods, at the time scale of a few weeks to months, sediments that remain exposed on bars at low flow are affected by weathering due to frost/thaw and wetting/drying alternations, which also reduces their size. Using field measurements, we measured the global sediment fining rate that results from both short-term (flood) and long-term (low flow) processes. The very high value obtained (51%/km) reflects the combination of the soft lithology with hard climatic conditions. We then combined various field and laboratory experiments to quantify the efficiency of each fining process (surface abrasion and fragmentation during a flood, frost/thaw weathering and wetting/drying weathering). Results indicate that short-term and long-term processes are equally efficient and that both are needed to explain the in-situ global fining rates. We finally propose a simplified model to describe the observed fining patterns, which we use to predict the system response to changes in the hydrological or climatic regime.

  8. Hydraulics and sediment transport processes in a pool-riffle rocky mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    Sediment transport processes related to varying channel-bed morphology were investigated from April to November, 1993 along a 1 km pool-riffle and step-pool reach of North Saint Vrain Creek, a small mountain stream in the Northern Colorado Rocky Mountains. Three hundred sixteen 16-256 mm tracer particles placed in two separate pool-riffle-pool sequences, forty-three direct bedload measurements at three separate cross-sections in discharges ranging between 0.27-8.8 m3/s, and indirect velocity measurements at thirteen cross-sections in 23 discharges ranging between 0.23-9.2 m3/s are used to assess sediment sorting patterns and sediment transport capacity variations. An investigation of secondary flow features and wave patterns provides preliminary evidence of turbulent controls on sediment entrainment and transport, and was used to develop a conceptual model of bedload transport and channel-bed maintenance on North Saint Vrain Creek. Recirculating eddy systems provide a means to constrict flow in pools, leading to modeled velocity-reversals at high flows. Tracer particle depositional evidence also indicates higher sediment transport capacities in pools versus riffles at high flow. Modeled hydraulic conditions and depositional evidence of tracers indicates that high-flow recirculating-eddy-influenced velocity-reversals and associated turbulence may provide the primary pool maintenance processes in this channel.

  9. Geochemical orientation survey of stream sediment, stream water, and ground water near uranium prospects, Monticello area, New York. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, A. W.; Smith, A. T.; Wesolowski, D.

    1982-08-01

    A detailed geochemical test survey has been conducted in a 570 sq km area around six small copper-uranium prospects in sandstones of the Devonian Catskill Formation near Monticello in southern New York state. This report summarizes and interprets the data for about 500 stream sediment samples, 500 stream water samples, and 500 ground water samples, each analyzed for 40 to 50 elements. The groundwater samples furnish distinctive anomalies for uranium, helium, radon, and copper near the mineralized localities, but the samples must be segregated into aquifers in order to obtain continuous well-defined anomalies. Two zones of uranium-rich water (1 to 16 parts per billion) can be recognized on cross sections; the upper zone extends through the known occurrences. The anomalies in uranium and helium are strongest in the deeper parts of the aquifers and are diluted in samples from shallow wells. In stream water, copper and uranium are slightly anomalous, as in an ore factor derived from factor analysis. Ratios of copper, uranium, and zinc to conductivity improve the resolution of anomalies. In stream sediment, extractable uranium, copper, niobium, vanadium, and an ore factor furnish weak anomalies, and ratios of uranium and copper to zinc improve the definition of anomalies. The uranium/thorium ratio is not helpful. Published analyses of rock samples from the nearby stratigraphic section show distinct anomalies in the zone containing the copper-uranium occurrences. This report is being issued without the normal detailed technical and copy editing, to make the data available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Reconnaissance Evaluation program.

  10. Stream bank erosion as a source of sediment and phosphorus in grazed pastures of the Rathbun Lake Watershed in southern Iowa, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing of riparian areas can have a major impact on stream banks and stream integrity if improperly managed. The goals of this study were to determine the sediment and phosphorus (P) losses from stream bank soils under varying cattle stocking rates and to identify additional factors that ...

  11. Modeling dune-induced hyporheic exchange and nutrient reactions in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardini, L.; Boano, F.; Cardenas, M. B.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of water across the streambed plays an important role in the ecology of fluvial environments, since it assures the connections of surface and subsurface waters, which have very different peculiarities. Water-borne chemicals are also involved in the process: they enter the sediments with the water and they are transformed into oxidized or reduced substances by biogeochemical reactions, mediated by the hyporheic microbiota. In particular, organic substances can be used as electron donors in a series of redox reactions, with different electron acceptors, e.g., oxygen and nitrate. Nitrification and other secondary reactions also occur as soon as water enters the streambed. These pore-scale transformations concur to affect subsurface solute concentrations and, consequently, the chemistry of upwelling water and the quality of the stream environment. The exchange with the hyporheic zone occurs in response to variations in bed topography, with a very wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For instance, small-scale exchanges are mainly induced by river bed forms, like ripples and dunes, while large-scale exchanges depend on larger geomorphological features. In this work we focus on small-scale exchange induced by the presence of dunes on the streambed, investigating the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes and their effects on solute spatial distribution in the sediments. We numerically simulate the turbulent water flow and the pressure distribution on the streambed and then we evaluate the coupled flow field and biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone in steady-state conditions. Four representative reactive compounds are taken into account: dissolved organic carbon (DOC), oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Sensitivity analyses are also performed to analyze the influence of hydrological and chemical properties of the system on solute reaction rates. The results demonstrate that the stream water quality can strongly

  12. Data on Mercury in Water, Bed Sediment, and Fish from Streams Across the United States, 1998-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Chasar, Lia C.; Scudder, Barbara C.; Moran, Patrick W.; Hitt, Kerie J.; Brigham, Mark E.; Lutz, Michelle A.; Wentz, Dennis A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) and Toxic Substances Hydrology Programs conducted the National Mercury Pilot Study in 1998 to examine relations of mercury (Hg) in water, bed sediment and fish in streams across the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. Water and bed-sediment samples were analyzed for total Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and other constituents; fish were analyzed for THg. Similar sampling was conducted at additional streams across the country in 2002 and 2004-05. This report summarizes sample collection and processing protocols, analytical methods, environmental data, and quality-assurance data for stream water, bed sediment, and fish for these national studies. To extend the geographic coverage of the data, this report also includes four regional USGS Hg studies conducted during 1998-2001 and 2004. The environmental data for these national and regional Hg studies are provided in an electronic format.

  13. Impact of climate change and anthropogenic activities on stream flow and sediment discharge in the Wei River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Geissen, V.; Ritsema, C. J.; Mu, X.-M.; Wang, F.

    2013-03-01

    Reduced stream flow and increased sediment discharge are a major concern in the Yellow River basin of China, which supplies water for agriculture, industry and the growing populations located along the river. Similar concerns exist in the Wei River basin, which is the largest tributary of the Yellow River basin and comprises the highly eroded Loess Plateau. Better understanding of the drivers of stream flow and sediment discharge dynamics in the Wei River basin is needed for development of effective management strategies for the region and entire Yellow River basin. In this regard we analysed long-term trends for water and sediment discharge during the flood season in the Wei River basin, China. Stream flow and sediment discharge data for 1932 to 2008 from existing hydrological stations located in two subcatchments and at two points in the Wei River were analysed. Precipitation and air temperature data were analysed from corresponding meteorological stations. We identified change-points or transition years for the trends by the Pettitt method and, using double mass curves, we diagnosed whether they were caused by precipitation changes, human intervention, or both. We found significant decreasing trends for stream flow and sediment discharge during the flood season in both subcatchments and in the Wei River itself. Change-point analyses further revealed that transition years existed and that rapid decline in stream flow began in 1968 (P < 0.01), and that sediment discharge began in 1981 (P < 0.01) in the main river. In the two subcatchments, the transition years were 1985 (P < 0.01) and 1994 (P < 0.05) for water discharge, and 1978 and 1979 for sediment discharge (P < 0.05), respectively. The impact of precipitation or human activity on the reduction amount after the transition years was estimated by double mass curves of precipitation vs. stream flow (sediment). For reductions in stream flow and sediment discharge, the contribution rate of human activity was found

  14. Assessment of the environmental conditions of the Sarno river basin (south Italy): a stream sediment approach.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Stefano; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Lima, Annamaria; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2013-06-01

    The Sarno river basin covers an area of 500 km(2) collecting the waters of Solofrana and Cavaiola tributaries. Originally it manly represents a source of livelihood for inhabitants by fishing and transporting goods; currently, the Sarno river, still partially used for irrigation, is affected by an extreme environmental degradation as a result of uncontrolled outflow of industrial waste. Within the framework of a wider geochemical prospecting project aiming at characterizing the whole territory of the Campania region, 89 stream sediment samples with a sampling density of 1 sample per 5 km(2) were collected in the river basin and analyzed by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in order to assess the environmental conditions at a regional scale. A GIS-aided technique, based on both the actual distribution of potentially harmful elements and their regional background values, was used to generate the maps of the contamination factors and of the contamination degrees for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn. Furthermore, a factor analysis was performed to assess the nature and the extent of contamination sources for the river sediments. Results showed that the Sarno river basin could be divided in two "environmental status" units: one, low contaminated, corresponding to the hilly and mountain areas, and the second, from moderately to very highly contaminated, corresponding to the economically developed areas of the valley floor characterized by a high population density. This work was developed within a project that aims to investigate the relationships between environmental pollution and human health by analyzing environmental media (stream sediments, water, soil and vegetation) together with human hair of resident population. In this context, the spatial correlation between the extremely compromised environmental conditions of developed areas and the incidence rate of liver cancer in the same area was also explored posing the need of a careful costs

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Bettles NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.; Shettel, Jr., D. L.; Langfeldt, S. L.; Hardy, L. C.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Bettles NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  16. Trace elements and organic contaminants in stream sediments from the Red River of the North Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, M.E.; Tornes, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    To assess the presence and distribution of a variety of hydro-phobic chemicals in streams in the Red River of the North Basin, bottom sediments were analyzed for trace elements, organochlorines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Glaciolacustrine clays and carbonate minerals are common in fine sediments of the region, and can help explain the distribution of many elements. Aluminum (Al), an indicator of glaciolacustrine clay minerals, correlates strongly (r>0.75, p<0.05) with Cr, Co, Fe, La, Li, K, Sc, and Ti; and moderately (0.55streams. Organochlorines detected are limited to traces of DDT and its metabolites (mostlyp,p'-DDE). Fourteen PAHs, which are constituents of fossil fuels and of combustion byproducts, were detected in at least halfthe sediment samples; pyrene and fluoranthene were detected in about 90 percent of samples. The contaminants detected in this study were present at low levels, likely indicative of diffuse or remote sources; they occur widely in the environment. 

  17. Suspended sediment dynamics in a steep, glacier-fed mountain stream, Place Creek, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G.; Moore, R. D.

    2003-06-01

    This study examined suspended sediment concentration (SSC) during the ablation seasons of 2000 and 2001 in Place Creek, Canada, a steep, glacier-fed mountain stream. Comparison of stream flow in Place Creek with that in an adjacent, almost unglacierized catchment provided a rational basis for separating the ablation seasons into nival, nival-glacial, glacial and autumn recession subseasons. Distinct groupings of points in plots of electrical conductivity against discharge supported the validity of the subseasonal divisions in terms of varying hydrological conditions. Relationships between SSC and discharge (Q) varied between the two study seasons, and between subseasons. Hysteresis in the SSC-Q relationship was evident at both event and weekly time-scales. Some suspended sediment released from pro-glacial Place Lake (the source of Place Creek) appeared to be lost to channel storage at low flows, especially early in the ablation season, with re-entrainment at higher flows. Multiple regression models were derived for the subseasons using predictor variables including Q, Q2, the change in Q over the previous 3 h, cumulative discharge over the ablation season, total precipitation over the previous 24 h and SSC measured at 1500 hours as an index value for each day. The models produced adjusted R2 values ranging from 0·71 to 0·91, and provided tentative insights into the differences in SSC dynamics amongst subseasons. Introduction of the index value of SSC significantly improved the model fit during the nival-glacial and glacial subseasons for both years, as it adjusts the model to the current condition of sediment supply.

  18. Effect of dissolved organic carbon quality on microbial decomposition and nitrification rates in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strauss, E.A.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Microbial decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contributes to overall stream metabolism and can influence many processes in the nitrogen cycle, including nitrification. Little is known, however, about the relative decomposition rates of different DOC sources and their subsequent effect on nitrification. 2. In this study, labile fraction and overall microbial decomposition of DOC were measured for leaf leachates from 18 temperate forest tree species. Between 61 and 82% (mean, 75%) of the DOC was metabolized in 24 days. Significant differences among leachates were found for labile fraction rates (P < 0.0001) but not for overall rates (P = 0.088). 3. Nitrification rates in stream sediments were determined after addition of 10 mg C L-1 of each leachate. Nitrification rates ranged from below detection to 0.49 ??g N mL sediment-1 day-1 and were significantly correlated with two independent measures of leachate DOC quality, overall microbial decomposition rate (r = -0.594, P = 0.0093) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (r = 0.469, P = 0.0497). Both correlations suggest that nitrification rates were lower in the presence of higher quality carbon. 4. Nitrification rates in sediments also were measured after additions of four leachates and glucose at three carbon concentrations (10, 30, and 50 mg C L-1). For all carbon sources, nitrification rates decreased as carbon concentration increased. Glucose and white pine leachate most strongly depressed nitrification. Glucose likely increased the metabolism of heterotrophic bacteria, which then out-competed nitrifying bacteria for NH4+. White pine leachate probably increased heterotrophic metabolism and directly inhibited nitrification by allelopathy.

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeldt, S. L.; Hardy, L. C.; D'Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.; Shettel, Jr., D. L.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, L. C.; D'Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.; Shettel, Jr., D. L.; Langfeldt, S. L.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  2. ALAWAT: A spatially allocated watershed model for approximating stream, sediment, and pollutant flows in Hawaii, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, William; Fox, Jefferson

    1995-07-01

    The Ala Wai Canal Watershed Model (ALAWAT) is a planning-level watershed model for approximating direct runoff, streamflow, sediment loads, and loads for up to five pollutants. ALAWAT uses raster GIS data layers including land use, SCS soil hydrologic groups, annual rainfall, and subwatershed delineations as direct model parameter inputs and can use daily total rainfall from up to ten rain gauges and streamflow from up to ten stream gauges. ALAWAT uses a daily time step and can simulate flows for up to ten-year periods and for up to 50 subwatersheds. Pollutant loads are approximated using a user-defined combination of rating curve relationships, mean event concentrations, and loading/washoff parameters for specific subwatersheds, land uses, and times of year. Using ALAWAT, annual average streamflow and baseflow relationships and urban suspended sediment loads were approximated for the Ala Wai Canal watershed (about 10,400 acres) on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Annual average urban suspended sediments were approximated using two methods: mean event concentrations and pollutant loading and washoff. Parameters for the pollutant loading and washoff method were then modified to simulate the effect of various street sweeping intervals on sediment loads.

  3. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  4. A spatially referenced regression model (SPARROW) for suspended sediment in streams of the conterminous U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, Gregory E.; Smith, Richard A.; Alexander, Richard B.; Gray, John R.

    2001-01-01

    meter resolution land-use information from the National Land Cover Data set (NLCD) (U.S. Geological Survey, 2000a). More than 76,000 reservoirs from the National Inventory of Dams (NID) (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1996) are identified as potential sediment sinks. Other, non-anthropogenic sources and sinks are identified using soil information from the State Soil Survey Geographic (STATSGO) data base (Schwarz and Alexander, 1995) and spatial coverages representing surficial rock type and vegetative cover. The SPARROW model empirically relates these diverse spatial datasets to estimates of long-term, mean annual sediment flux computed from concentration and flow measurements collected over the period 1985-95 from more than 400 monitoring stations maintained by the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (Alexander and others, 1998), the National Water Quality Assessment Program, and U.S. Geological Survey District offices (Turcios and Gray, in press). The calibrated model is used to estimate sediment flux for over 60,000 stream segments included in the River Reach File 1 (RF1) stream network (Alexander and others, 1999). SPARROW uses statistical methods to calibrate a simple, structural model of riverine water quality, one that imposes mass balance in accounting for changes in contaminant flux. As applied here, the mass-balance approach facilitates the interpretation of model results in terms of physical processes affecting sediment transport, and makes possible the estimation of various rates of sediment generation and loss associated with stream channels and features of the landscape. The statistical approach provides a basis for assessing the error of these inferred rates and of the error in extrapolated estimates of sediment flux made for streams in the RF1 network. An important implication of the holistic modeling approach adopted in this analysis is that estimates of sediment production and loss are based on, and therefore consistent with, measurements of

  5. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part II—sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, Nile E.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Sibley, Paul K.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroids are hydrophobic compounds that have been observed to accumulate in sediments (Laskowski 2002). Toxicity of pyrethroids in field-collected sediment from small urban streams (Weston et al. 2005; Holmes et al. 2008; Ding et al. 2010; Domagalski et al. 2010) or with pyrethroids spiked into sediment (Amweg et al. 2006; Hintzen et al. 2009) have been evaluated primarily in 10 day lethality tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. However, the sublethal effects in long-term exposures to pyrethroids in sediment have not been evaluated, and the distribution of pyrethroids sediments has not typically been evaluated in wadeable streams (Gilliom et al. 2006). This article is the second in a series that describe the results of a study of the distribution and toxicity of pyrethroids and other co-occurring trace elements and organic contaminants (PCBs, PAHs, OC pesticides) in stream sediments from 7 metropolitan areas across the United States (Moran et al. 2012). The study evaluated 98 sediment samples collected from streams ranging from undeveloped to highly urban and differs from previous studies by sampling larger wadeable streams and avoiding point sources (such as storm drains) and other inflows (Gilliom et al. 2006). Part 1 of the series characterizes sediment contaminants in relation to urbanization and other factors in the 7 metropolitan study areas (Nowell et al. 2012). Part 2 (this article) evaluates relationships between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity in 28 day whole-sediment exposures conducted with the amphipod H. azteca and in 10 day whole-sediment exposure conducted with the midge Chironomus dilutus (USEPA U

  6. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (<62.5 μm) sediment from the hyporheic zone of polar glacial streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica (Wright and Taylor Valleys) exhibit a wide range (2.5–70.6 m2/g) of surface area values. Samples from one (Delta Stream, Taylor Valley) of the four sampled stream transects exhibit high values (up to 70.6 m2/g), which greatly exceed surface area values from three temperate proglacial streams (0.3–12.1 m2/g). Only Clark stream in Wright Valley exhibits a robust trend with distance, wherein surface area systematically decreases (and particle size increases) in the mud fraction downstream, interpreted to reflect rapid dissolution processes in the weathering environment. The remaining transects exhibit a range in variability in surface area distributions along the length of the channel, likely related to variations in eolian input to exposed channel beds, adjacent snow drifts, and to glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  7. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  8. Processes and Rates of Sediment and Wood Accumulation in Headwater Streams of the Oregon Coast Range, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, C. L.; Gresswell, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow in unlogged basins in the central Oregon Coast Range. Changes in sediment and wood storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 135 years post-disturbance. The volume of wood in the channel was strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow, and the accumulation rate was linear. The pattern of sediment accumulation was non-linear and appeared to increase as the storage capacity of the channel increased through time. Wood recruited from the local hillslopes and riparian areas functioned to store the majority sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for a longer period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential for storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  9. Element geochemical analysis of the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment in desert stream flash floods.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream. PMID:25089295

  10. Element Geochemical Analysis of the Contribution of Aeolian Sand to Suspended Sediment in Desert Stream Flash Floods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream. PMID:25089295

  11. Measuring and modeling the flux of fecal bacteria across the sediment-water interface in a turbulent stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley B.; Litton-Mueller, Rachel M.; Ahn, Jong H.

    2011-05-01

    Sediments are a pervasive source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans and may constitute a long-term reservoir of human disease. Previous attempts to quantify the flux of FIB across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are limited to extreme flow events, for which the primary mechanism of bacterial release is disruption and/or erosion of the sediment substrate. Here we report measurements of FIB flux across the SWI in a turbulent stream that is not undergoing significant erosion. The stream is formed by the steady discharge of bacteria-free disinfected and highly treated wastewater effluent to an earthen channel harboring high concentrations of FIB in the sediment from in situ growth. The flux j″ of FIB across the SWI, estimated from mass balance on FIB measurements in the water column, scales linearly with the concentration of bacteria in sediment pore fluids Cpore over a 3 decade change in both variables: ? The magnitude of the observed mass transfer velocity (? m s-1) is significantly larger than values predicted for either the diffusion of bacteria across a concentration boundary layer (? m s-1) or sweep and eject fluid motions at the SWI (? m s-1) but is similar to the flux of water between the stream and its hyporheic zone estimated from dye injection experiments. These results support the hypothesis that hyporheic exchange controls the trafficking of bacteria, and perhaps other types of particulate organic matter, across the SWI in turbulent streams.

  12. Assessment of pathogen levels in stream water column and bed sediment of Merced River Watershed in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddella, V. K.; Pandey, P.; Biswas, S.; Lewis, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mitigating pathogen levels in surface water is crucial for protecting public health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), approximately 480,000 km of rivers/streams are contaminated in the U.S., and a major cause of contamination is elevated levels of pathogen/pathogen indicator. Many of past studies showed considerably higher pathogen levels in sediment bed than that of the stream water column in rivers. In order to improve the understanding of pathogen levels in rivers in California, we carried out an extensive pathogen monitoring study in four different watersheds (Bear Creek, Ingalsbe, Maxwell, and Yosemite watersheds) of Merced River. Stream water and streambed sediment samples were collected from 17 locations. Pathogen levels (E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes) were enumerated in streambed sediment and water column. In addition, the impacts of heat stress on pathogen survival were assessed by inoculating pathogens into the water and sediment samples for understanding the pathogen survival in stream water column and streambed sediment. The pathogen enumeration (in water column and sediment bed) results indicated that the E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes levels were non-detectable in the water column and streambed sediment. The results of heat stress (50◦ C for 180 minutes) test indicated a pathogen decay at one order of magnitude (108 cfu/ml to 107 cfu/ml). Nonetheless, higher pathogen levels (1.13 × 107 cfu/ml) after the heat stress study showed potential pathogen survival at higher temperature. Preliminary results of this study would help in understanding the impacts of elevated temperature on pathogen in stream environment. Further studies are required to test the long-term heat-stress impacts on pathogen survival.

  13. The relationship of lithology and watershed characteristics to fine sediment deposition in streams of the Oregon coast range.

    PubMed

    Sable, K A; Wohl, E

    2006-05-01

    Lithology is one of many factors influencing the amount, grain size distribution, and location of fine sediment deposition on the bed of mountain stream channels. In the Oregon Coast Range, 18 pool-riffle stream reaches with similar slope and intact riparian area and relatively unaffected by logjams were surveyed for assessment of fine sediment deposition. Half of the streams were in watersheds underlain by relatively erodible sandstone. The other half were underlain by a more resistant basalt. Channel morphology, hydraulic variables, particle size, relative pool volume of fine sediment (V*), and wood characteristics were measured in the streams. A significantly higher amount of fine sediment was deposited in the sandstone channels than in the basalt channels, as indicated by V*. Grab samples of sediment from pools also were significantly finer grained in the sandstone channels. Geographic information systems (GIS) software was used to derive several variables that might correlate with fine sediment deposition. These variables were combined with those derived from field data to create multiple linear regression models to be used for further exploration of the type and relative influence of factors affecting fine sediment deposition. Lithology appeared to be significant in some of these models, but usually was not the primary driver. The results from these models indicate that V* at the reach scale is best explained by stream power per unit area and by the volume of wood perpendicular to the flow per channel area (R(2) = 0.46). Findings show that V* is best explained using only watershed scale variables, including negative correlations with relief ratio and basin precipitation index, and positive correlations with maximum slope and circularity. PMID:16508797

  14. Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol, estrone, and testosterone in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Barber, L.B.; McMahon, P.B.; Gray, J.L.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The release of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent poses a significant threat to the ecology of surface water receptors, due to impacts on the hormonal control, sexual development, reproductive success and community structure of the indigenous aquatic organisms and associated wildlife. Among the EDCs commonly observed in WWTP effluent, the natural [e.g., 17??-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1)] and synthetic [e.g., ethynylestradiol (EE2)] estrogens are particular concerns owing to their high endocrine reactivity in both in vitro and in vivo laboratory models. These reproductive hormones have been identified as the primary cause of estrogenic effects in wastewater effluent, with greater than 95% of the estrogen receptor agonist activity in effluent attributed to this contaminant group. The potentials for in situ biodegradation of 17??-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and testosterone (T) were investigated in three, hydrologically-distinct, WWTP-impacted streams in the United States. Relative differences in the mineralization of [4-14C] substrates were assessed in oxic microcosms containing sediment or water-only from locations upstream and downstream of the WWTP outfall in each system. Upstream samples provided insight into the biodegradative potential of sediment microbial communities that were not under the immediate impact of WWTP effluent. Upstream sediment from all three systems demonstrated significant mineralization of the "A" ring of E2, E1 and T, with the potential of T biodegradation consistently greater than of E2 and no systematic difference in the potentials of E2 and E1. Downstream samples provided insight into the impacts of effluent on reproductive hormone biodegradation. Significant "A" ring mineralization was also observed in downstream sediment, with the potentials for E1 and T mineralization being substantially depressed relative to upstream samples. In marked contrast, the potentials for E2

  15. Multivariate statistical analysis of stream-sediment geochemistry in the Grazer Paläozoikum, Austria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, L.; Davis, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Austrian reconnaissance study of stream-sediment composition — more than 30000 clay-fraction samples collected over an area of 40000 km2 — is summarized in an atlas of regional maps that show the distributions of 35 elements. These maps, rich in information, reveal complicated patterns of element abundance that are difficult to compare on more than a small number of maps at one time. In such a study, multivariate procedures such as simultaneous R-Q mode components analysis may be helpful. They can compress a large number of variables into a much smaller number of independent linear combinations. These composite variables may be mapped and relationships sought between them and geological properties. As an example, R-Q mode components analysis is applied here to the Grazer Paläozoikum, a tectonic unit northeast of the city of Graz, which is composed of diverse lithologies and contains many mineral deposits.

  16. Analysis of stream sediment reconnaissance data for mineral resources from the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Beyth, M.; Broxton, D.; McInteer, C.; Averett, W.R.; Stablein, N.K.

    1980-06-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis to support the National Uranium Resource Evaluation and to evaluate strategic and other commercially important mineral resources was carried out on Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado. The analysis suggests that: (1) the southern Colorado Mineral Belt is an area favorable for uranium mineral occurrences; (2) carnotite-type occurrences are likely in the nose of the Gunnison Uplift; (3) uranium mineral occurrences may be present along the western and northern margins of the West Elk crater; (4) a base-metal mineralized area is associated with the Uncompahgre Uplift; and (5) uranium and base metals are associated in some areas, and both are often controlled by faults trending west-northwest and north.

  17. Delineation of geochemical anomalies based on stream sediment data utilizing fractal modeling and staged factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Peyman; Mirzaei, Misagh; Yousefi, Mahyar; Adib, Ahmad; Khalajmasoumi, Masoumeh; Zarifi, Afshar Zia; Foster, Patrick; Yasrebi, Amir Bijan

    2016-07-01

    Recognition of significant geochemical signatures and separation of geochemical anomalies from background are critical issues in interpretation of stream sediment data to define exploration targets. In this paper, we used staged factor analysis in conjunction with the concentration-number (C-N) fractal model to generate exploration targets for prospecting Cr and Fe mineralization in Balvard area, SE Iran. The results show coexistence of derived multi-element geochemical signatures of the deposit-type sought and ultramafic-mafic rocks in the NE and northern parts of the study area indicating significant chromite and iron ore prospects. In this regard, application of staged factor analysis and fractal modeling resulted in recognition of significant multi-element signatures that have a high spatial association with host lithological units of the deposit-type sought, and therefore, the generated targets are reliable for further prospecting of the deposit in the study area.

  18. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-05-31

    Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.

  19. Incision rates of headwater streams: Determination by paleomagnetic dating of clastic cave sediments in valley walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sasowsky, I.D.; White, W.B. . Dept. of Geosciences); Schmidt, V.A. . Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science)

    1992-01-01

    Incision rates of headwater streams which downcut through carbonate rocks can be inferred by correlating surface channels to associated subsurface drainage and the conduit fragments that remain as the channel deepens. Stream-deposited sediments from caves in the valley walls can be sampled for paleomagnetic polarity. Using these data, a local paleomagnetic column is constructed and matched with the global paleomagnetic record which then provides time markers for the sediments. The morphological characteristics of the caves are used to relate paleo-drainage in the karst to previous elevations of the surface channel. A test case was made in a headwater basin in the Western Cumberland Plateau Escarpment, the East Fork of the Obey River in northcentral Tennessee. The basin has a relief of 300m and an area of 523 km[sup 2]. Four extensive caves in the valley walls provided 118 paleomagnetic samples. Samples were step-demagnetized in an alternating field from 10 to 100 mT, and gave well-clustered normal and reversed field directions. NRM intensities were between 8 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] and 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] kA/m. Construction of a local paleomagnetic polarity column revealed that two normal and one reversed sedimentary sequences were present in the caves. The age of the uppermost (oldest) cave level was placed at 0.91 Ma, yielding an incision rate for the basin of 0.06 m/ka. This rate is consistent with rates of incision determined for other basins in the eastern US using different methods.

  20. Assessing Pb,Zn,Cd contamination in stream sediments of south east Tehran (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdadi, S.; Fayazi, F.; Yaghoobpour, A.; Rahmani, F.; Moslempour, M.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing Pb,Zn,Cd contamination in stream sediments of south east Tehran (Iran) 31 sediment samples collected from south east of Tehran around cement plant (Bibi shahrbanoo mountain) were analyzed by ICP for Pb, Zn, Cd. The samples were also investigated for mineralogy using X-ray analysis.The clay mineral assemblage encountered in the analyzed samples is composed of vermiculite, dickite, montmorillonite and kaolinite.The non-clay minerals of the mud-sized fraction are composed mainly of quartz and calcite and dolomite as major minerals with albite, hematite, muscovite as minor minerals. The measured metals correlated positively with the determined physiochemical factors such as pH, clay content, organic matter content, and carbonate content. According to the index of geoaccumulation, the sediments of the study area are considered to be strongly to very strongly polluted with respect to Pb, strongly polluted with respect to Zn, and moderatly to strongly polluted with recpect to Cd.The calculation of enrichment factors shows that the source of Pb and Zn is from antropogenic activites such as cement plant and vehicle exhausts and Cd from natural source.

  1. Methanogenic archaea diversity in hyporheic sediments of a small lowland stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brablcova, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Rulík, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Abundance and diversity of methanogenic archaea were studied at five localities along a longitudinal profile of a Sitka stream (Czech Republic). Samples of hyporheic sediments were collected from two sediment depths (0-25 cm and 25-50 cm) by freeze-core method. Methanogen community was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing method. The proportion of methanogens to the DAPI-stained cells varied among all localities and depths with an average value 2.08 × 105 per g of dry sediment. A total of 73 bands were detected at 19 different positions on the DGGE gel and the highest methanogen diversity was found at the downstream located sites. Cluster analysis of DGGE image showed three main clusters consisting of localities that differed in the number and similarity of the DGGE bands. Sequencing analysis of representative DGGE bands revealed phylotypes affiliated with members belonging to the orders Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales. The authors are thankful to the European Social Fund and state budget of the Czech Republic for providing the financial support during this study. This work is a part of the POSTUP II project CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0041, which is mutually financed by the previously stated funding agencies.

  2. Inventory of miscellaneous streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.D.

    1998-08-14

    Miscellaneous streams discharging to the soil column on the Hanford Site are subject to requirements of several milestones identified in Consent Order No. DE 9INM-177 (Ecology and DOE 1991). The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Stream (DOE/RL-93-94) provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of miscellaneous streams to satisfy one of the Section 6.0 requirements of the Consent Order. One of the commitments (Activity 6-2.2) established in the plan and schedule is to annually update, the miscellaneous streams inventory. This document constitutes the 1998 revision of the miscellaneous streams inventory. Miscellaneous stream discharges were grouped into four permitting categories (Table 1). The first miscellaneous streams Permit (ST 4508) was issued May 30, 1997, to cover wastewater discharges from hydrotesting, maintenance, and construction activities. The second miscellaneous streams Permit (ST4509) covers discharges from cooling water and condensate discharges. The third permit application for category three waste streams was eliminated by recategorizing waste streams into an existing miscellaneous streams permit or eliminating stream discharges. Elimination of the third categorical permit application was approved by Ecology in January 1997 (Ecology 1997). The fourth permit application, to cover storm water, is due to Ecology in September 1998. Table 1 provides a history of the miscellaneous streams permitting activities.

  3. Measurement of sediment loads during flash flood events: 14 years of results from a six stream monitoring network on the southern Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Topping, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    In in arid and semi-arid environments, short-duration, high-intensity rainfall events—flash floods—are the primary driver of sediment transport in ephemeral streams. The spatial and temporal variability of these rainfall events results in episodic and irregular stream flow and resultant sediment transport. As a result of limited-flow durations, measuring discharge and collecting suspended-sediment samples on ephemeral streams in arid regions is difficult and time-consuming. Because of these limitations, few sediment-monitoring programs on ephemeral streams have been developed; some examples of sediment-monitoring gages and gaging networks constructed on arid ephemeral streams include Walnut Gulch, United States, Nahal Yael, Israel, and the Luni River Basin, India. The difficulty in making measurements of discharge and suspended-sediment concentration on arid ephemeral streams has led many researchers to use methods such as regional sediment-yield equations, sediment-rating curves, and peak discharge to total-sediment load relations. These methods can provide a cost-effective estimation of sediment yield from ungaged tributaries. However, these approaches are limited by, among other factors, time averaging, hysteresis, and differences in local and regional geology, rainfall, and vegetation. A monitoring network was established in 2000 on six ephemeral tributaries of the Colorado River in lower Glen and upper Marble canyons. Results from this monitoring network show that annual suspended-sediment loads for individual streams can vary by 5 orders of magnitude while the annual suspended-sediment load for the entire network may vary annually by 2 orders of magnitude, suspended-sediment loads during an individual flood event do not typically correlate with discharge, and local geology has a strong control on the sediment yield of a drainage basin. Comparing our results to previous estimates of sediment load from these drainages found that previous, indirect, methods

  4. Sediment-associated pesticides in an urban stream in Guangzhou, China: implication of a shift in pesticide use patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Sun, Baoquan; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide use patterns in China have changed in recent years; however, the study of the environmental fate of current-use pesticides (CUPs) and their ecotoxicological significance in aquatic ecosystems is limited. In the present study, sediments were collected from an urban stream in the Chinese city of Guangzhou. Sediment-associated legacy organochlorine pesticides and CUPs-including organophosphates, pyrethroids, fipronil, and abamectin-were analyzed. Additionally, the relative toxicity of the sediments was evaluated with 10-d bioassays using Chironomus dilutus. Fifteen of 16 sediments collected from the stream were acutely toxic to C. dilutus, with 81% of the samples causing 100% mortality. Abamectin, fipronil, and pyrethroids (mainly cypermethrin) were identified as the principal contributors to the noted toxicity in the midges, with median predicted toxic units of 1.63, 1.63, and 1.03, respectively. Sediments taken from downstream sites, where residential and industrial regions were located, had elevated CUP concentrations and sediment toxicity compared with upstream sites. The present study is the first of its kind to link sediment CUPs, fipronil, and abamectin concentrations with toxicity in urban streams in China with a focus on shifting pesticide usage patterns. PMID:23377859

  5. Nitrate reduction in sediments of lowland tropical streams draining swamp forest in Costa Rica: An ecosystem perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Pringle, C.M.; Triska, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate reduction and denitrification were measured in swamp forest streams draining lowland rain forest on Costa Rica's Atlantic slope foothills using the C2H2-block assay and sediment-water nutrient fluxes. Denitrification assays using the C2H2-block technique indicated that the full suite of denitrifying enzymes were present in the sediment but that only a small fraction of the functional activity could be expressed without adding NO3/-. Under optimal conditions, denitrification enzyme activity averaged 15 nmoles cm-3 sediment h-1. Areal NO3/- reduction rates measured from NO3/- loss in the overlying water of sediment- water flux chambers ranged from 65 to 470 umoles m-2 h-1. Oxygen loss rates accompanying NO3/-depletion averaged 750 umoles m-2 h-1. Corrected for denitrification of NO3/- oxidized from NH4/+ in the sediment, gross NO3/- reduction rates increase by 130 umoles m-2 h-1, indicating nitrification may be the predominant source of NO3/- for NO3/- reduction in swamp forest stream sediments. Under field conditions approximately 80% of the increase in inorganic N mass along a 1250-m reach of the Salto River was in the form of NO3/- with the balance NH4/+. Scrutiny of potential inorganic N sources suggested that mineralized N released from the streambed was a major source of the inorganic N increase. Despite significant NO3/- reduction potential, swamp forest stream sediments appear to be a source of inorganic N to downstream communities.

  6. Geochemistry of stream-sediment samples from the Santa Renia Fields and Beaver Peak quadrangles, northern Carlin Trend, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Kotlyar, Boris B.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.; Singer, Donald A.; Edstrom, Sven A.

    1999-01-01

    A broad west-to-east increase of many metal concentrations has been found in stream sediments during a reconnaissance investigation conducted in conjunction with geologic studies in the Santa Renia Fields and Beaver Peak 7–1/2 minute quadrangles near the northern end of the Carlin trend of gold deposits in the Tuscarora Mountains. This regional increase in metal concentrations coincides with a dramatic change in landform wherein high concentrations of metals in stream sediments appear to correlate directly with areas of high elevations and steep slopes in the Beaver Peak quadrangle. Robust erosion combined with high flow rates in streams from these higher elevations are envisaged to have contributed significantly to increased metal concentrations in the stream sediments by an enhanced presence of minerals with high specific gravities and a correspondingly diminished presence of minerals with low specific gravities. Minerals with low specific gravities probably have been preferentially flushed down stream because of high transporting capacities for sediment by streams in the Beaver Peak quadrangle. In addition, the Carlin trend, a generally northwest-alignment of gold deposits in the Santa Renia Fields quadrangle, is well outlined by arsenic concentrations that include a maximum of approximately 54 parts per million. Further, a weakly developed distal-to-proximal metal zonation towards these gold deposits appears to be defined respectively in plots showing distributions of thallium, arsenic, antimony, and zinc. A broad area of high metal concentrations—including sharply elevated abundances of Ag, As, Au, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, P, Sb, Sc, Te, V, and especially Zn—near the southeast corner of the Beaver Peak quadrangle primarily could be the result of stratiform mineralized rocks in the Ordovician Vinini Formation or Devonian Slaven Chert, or the result of a subsequent Mesozoic or Tertiary epigenetic overprint.

  7. Rapid Sediment Erosion and Drumlin Formation Observed Beneath a Fast-Flowing Antarctic Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Murray, T.; Nicholls, K. W.; Makinson, K.; Adalgeirsdottir, G.; Behar, A. E.

    2005-12-01

    What happens beneath a glacier affects both the way it flows and the landforms left behind when it retreats. Unfortunately, although the subglacial environment is one of the most critical to understanding ice flow and the processes of bedform formation, it is also the most difficult to study. As part of the RABID project on Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica in 2004/05, seismic reflection data were acquired at the same geographic location as identical surveys conducted 7 and 13 years previously. Analysis of the data from all 3 seismic surveys gives both the bed topography and an indication of the bed material and basal conditions. In particular, we can distinguish between places where the bed is soft, water-saturated sediments, probably deforming pervasively with the motion of the overlying ice, and those where the bed, whilst still sedimentary, is harder and the ice flow is probably dominated by basal sliding. Over the six years between the first and second surveys, 6 m of sediment was eroded from a region of the bed approximately 500 m wide. This occurs in one of the basal sliding areas. Typical interpreted and modelled subglacial erosion rates from all glacial environments are normally of the order of 0.1-100 mm/a. Our minimum observed rate of 1 m/a is remarkably high, particularly for a glacier which appears to have been in overall steady-state for at least many hundreds of years, and probably much longer. Over the seven years between the second and third surveys, further major changes occurred at the ice stream bed. The previous erosion ceased. Subsequently, a large mound of deforming sediment over-rode this same area of the glacier bed. This mound is 10 m high, 100 m wide and at least a few hundred metres long. This is a very short time for the formation of such a large feature, only 7 years previously nothing of its kind existed at this location. We interpret these dimensions and sediment characteristics as an actively-forming drumlin. Our results are the

  8. The impacts of thermokarst on sediment, organic matter, and macroinvertebrate community dynamics in arctic headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinn, M.; Kampman, J.; Larouche, J. R.; Bowden, W. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has documented changes in arctic climate that influence permafrost degradation and the incidence of thermokarst formation. In 2009 and 2010, we examined several thermokarst failures on headwater streams near Toolik Lake, AK, and the Kelly River area of the Noatak National Preserve, AK, USA. We quantified significant differences between reference (upstream) and impacted stream reaches affected by these thermokarst features. Sediment deposition at Toolik in 2009, measured with sediment traps, showed no differences in the organic fractions; however, the inorganic fraction was ~2x higher (P<0.05) in the impacted reaches. In 2010, when discharge was lower and less flashy, the pattern reversed and only organic fractions varied between the impacted and reference reach. The patterns of benthic organic matter and fine sediment (stovepipe core) generally showed a 2-fold increase in the impacted reaches indicating that impacts may have a legacy over several years. Significant increases of ammonium (P<0.05) and benthic chlorophyll-a (P<0.01, rock scrubs) were significantly higher in the impacted reaches and increased sharply downstream of the thermokarst, especially in late summer (2009). Benthic macroinvertebrates showed a variable response in abundance and biomass in the impacted reaches. Collector-gatherers (Diptera, Chironomidae) abundance and biomass doubled in the impacted reaches by late summer, mostly due to Dicrotopus, Psudokiefferiella, and Rheotanytarsus. Nemoura (Plecoptera, Nemouridae), a shredding stonefly, abundance and biomass were over 5x higher in the impacted reaches (P<0.01). The increase in the collector-gatherer group was offset by a significant decrease in grazers. Baetis (Ephemeroptera, Baetidae) and Orthocladius (Diptera, Chironomidae) showed a 3-fold decrease in the impacted reaches (P<0.05). Results from several years of research indicate that thermokarst failures result in impacts that respond on different temporal scales. High

  9. Stream-sediment geochemistry in mining-impacted streams: Prichard, Eagle, and Beaver creeks, northern Coeur d'Alene Mining District, northern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, Stephen E.; Wallis, John C.; Briggs, Paul H.; Brown, Zoe Ann

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of one aspect of an integrated watershed-characterization study that was undertaken to assess the impacts of historical mining and milling of silver-lead-zinc ores on water and sediment composition and on aquatic biota in streams draining the northern part of the Coeur d?Alene Mining District in northern Idaho. We present the results of chemical analyses of 62 samples of streambed sediment, 19 samples of suspended sediment, 23 samples of streambank soil, and 29 samples of mine- and mill-related artificial- fill material collected from the drainages of Prichard, Eagle, and Beaver Creeks, all tributaries to the North Fork of the Coeur d?Alene River. All samples were sieved into three grain-size fractions (<0.063, 0.063?0.25, and 0.25?1.0 mm) and analyzed for 40 elements after four-acid digestion by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry and for mercury by continuous- flow cold-vapor atomic-absorption spectrometry in the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory in Denver, Colo. Historical mining of silver-lead-zinc ores in the headwater reaches of the Prichard Creek, Eagle Creek, and Beaver Creek drainages has resulted in enrichments of lead, zinc, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, silver, copper, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, iron and manganese in streambed sediment. Using samples collected from the relatively unimpacted West Fork of Eagle Creek as representative of background compositions, streambed sediment in the vicinity of the mines and millsites has Pb and Zn contents of 20 to 100 times background values, decreasing to 2 to 5 times background values at the mouth of the each stream, 15 to 20 km downstream. Lesser enrichments (<10 times background values) of mercury and arsenic also are generally associated with, and decrease downstream from, historical silver-lead-zinc mining in the drainages. However, enrichments of arsenic and, to a lesser extent, mercury also are areally associated with the lode gold deposits along

  10. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  11. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H. J. H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  12. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion and precipitation runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A two-year grazing study was conducted to quantify effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisecte...

  13. Anthropogenic sedimentation in Pacific Northwest streams inferred from Aquatic Habitat Survey datausing a relative bed stability index

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated anthropogenic sedimentation in U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal streams using an index of relative bed stability (LRBS*) based on low flow survey data collected using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) fiel...

  14. Use of fish functional traits to associate in-stream suspended sediment transport metrics with biological impairment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of ecological integrity due to sediment is a major cause of water quality impairment in the United States. Numeric criteria for total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) must be generated and attained to regain ecological integrity of listed streams. Current assessment protocols lack a means to link te...

  15. Human impacts to mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the stream, or aquatic and riparian communities. Examples include channelization, construction of grade-control structures or check dams, removal of beavers, and placer mining. Human effects can also result from activities within the watershed that indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water, sediment, and contaminants into the channel. Deforestation, cropping, grazing, land drainage, and urbanization are among the land uses that indirectly alter stream processes. An overview of the relative intensity of human impacts to mountain streams is provided by a table summarizing human effects on each of the major mountainous regions with respect to five categories: flow regulation, biotic integrity, water pollution, channel alteration, and land use. This table indicates that very few mountains have streams not at least moderately affected by land use. The least affected mountainous regions are those at very high or very low latitudes, although our scientific ignorance of conditions in low-latitude mountains in particular means that streams in these mountains might be more altered than is widely recognized. Four case studies from northern Sweden (arctic region), Colorado Front Range (semiarid temperate region), Swiss Alps (humid temperate region), and Papua New Guinea (humid tropics) are also used to explore in detail the history and effects on rivers of human activities in mountainous regions. The overview and case studies indicate that mountain streams must be managed with particular attention to upstream/downstream connections, hillslope

  16. Regex-Stream

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-01

    Log files are typically semi-or un-structured. To be useable, they need to be parsed into a standard, structured format. Regex-Stream facilitates parsing text files into structured data (JSON) in streams of data.

  17. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  18. Determining Relative Contributions of Eroded Landscape Sediment and Bank Sediment to the Suspended Load of Streams and Wetlands Using 7Be and 210Pbxs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Matisoff, G.; Whiting, P.; Kuhnle, R.

    2005-12-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides, 7Be and 210Pbxs, have been used individually as tracers of sediment particles throughout watersheds. However, use of the two radionuclides together enables eliciting information regarding the major contributors of fine sediment to the suspended load of a stream or wetland. We report on a study that uses these radionuclides to quantify the relative proportion of eroded surface soils, bank material and resuspended bed sediment in the fine suspended sediment load of the Goodwin Creek, MS, and Old Woman Creek, OH watersheds. The eroded surface soil has a unique radionuclide signature relative to the bed sediments in Old Woman Creek and the bank material along Goodwin Creek that allows for the quantification of the relative proportions of the different sediments in the sediment load. In Old Woman Creek, the different signatures are controlled by the differential decay of the two radionuclides. In Goodwin Creek, the different signatures are due to different erosion processes controlling the sediment delivery to streams, namely sheet erosion and bank collapse. The eroded surface soils will have higher activities of the 7Be and 210Pbxs than bed/bank sediments. The fine suspended sediment, which is a mixture of eroded surface soils and resuspended bed sediment or collapsed bank sediment, will have an intermediate radionuclide signature quantified in terms of the relative proportion from both sediments. A simple two-end member mixing model is used to determine the relative proportions of both sediments to the total fine sediment load.

  19. The dark side of the hyporheic zone: Depth profiles of nitrogen and its processing in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, R.S.; Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Strauss, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    1.Although it is well known that sediments can be hot spots for nitrogen transformation in streams, many previous studies have confined measurements of denitrification and nitrate retention to shallow sediments (<5cm deep). We determined the extent of nitrate processing in deeper sediments of a sand plains stream (Emmons Creek) by measuring denitrification in core sections to a depth of 25cm and by assessing vertical nitrate profiles, with peepers and piezometers, to a depth of 70cm. 2.Denitrification rates of sediment slurries based on acetylene block were higher in shallower core sections. However, core sections deeper than 5cm accounted for 68% of the mean depth-integrated denitrification rate. 3.Vertical hydraulic gradient and vertical profiles of pore water chloride concentration suggested that deep ground water upwelled through shallow sediments before discharging to the stream channel. The results of a two-source mixing model based on chloride concentrations suggested that the hyporheic zone was very shallow (<5cm) in Emmons Creek. 4.Vertical profiles showed that nitrate concentration in shallow ground water was about 10-60% of the nitrate concentration of deep ground water. The mean nitrate concentrations of deep and shallow ground water were 2.17 and 0.73mgNO3-NL-1, respectively. 5.Deep ground water tended to be oxic (6.9mgO2L-1) but approached anoxia (0.8mgO2L-1) after passing through shallow, organic carbon-rich sediments, which suggests that the decline in the nitrate concentrations of upwelling ground water was because of denitrification. 6.Collectively, our results suggest that there is substantial nitrate removal occurring in deep sediments, below the hyporheic zone, in Emmons Creek. Our findings suggest that not accounting for nitrate removal in deep sediments could lead to underestimates of nitrogen processing in streams and catchments. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A spatially referenced regression model (SPARROW) for suspended sediment in streams of the Conterminous U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, Gregory E.; Smith, Richard A.; Alexander, Richard B.; Gray, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Suspended sediment has long been recognized as an important contaminant affecting water resources. Besides its direct role in determining water clarity, bridge scour and reservoir storage, sediment serves as a vehicle for the transport of many binding contaminants, including nutrients, trace metals, semi-volatile organic compounds, a nd numerous pesticides (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000a). Recent efforts to addr ess water-quality concerns through the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) process have iden tified sediment as the single most prevalent cause of impairment in the Nation’s streams a nd rivers (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000b). Moreover, sediment has been identified as a medium for the tran sport and sequestration of organic carbon, playing a potentia lly important role in understa nding sources and sinks in the global carbon budget (Stallard, 1998). A comprehensive understanding of sediment fate a nd transport is considered essential to the design and implementation of effective plans for sediment management (Osterkamp and others, 1998, U.S. General Accounting Office, 1990). An exte nsive literature addr essing the problem of quantifying sediment transport has produced a nu mber of methods for estimating its flux (see Cohn, 1995, and Robertson and Roerish, 1999, for us eful surveys). The accuracy of these methods is compromised by uncertainty in the concentration measurements and by the highly episodic nature of sediment movement, particul arly when the methods are applied to smaller basins. However, for annual or decadal flux es timates, the methods are generally reliable if calibrated with extended periods of data (Robertson and Roerish, 1999). A substantial literature also supports the Universal Soil Loss Equation (U SLE) (Soil Conservation Service, 1983), an engineering method for estimating sheet and rill erosion, although the empirical credentials of the USLE have recently been questioned (Tri mble and Crosson, 2000

  1. Dispersion of U-series natural radionuclides in stream sediments from Edale, UK.

    PubMed

    Siddeeg, Saifeldin M; Bryan, Nicholas D; Livens, Francis R

    2014-05-01

    The spatial distribution of (238)U-series radionuclides, specifically 238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra, has been determined in stream sediments from Edale, Derbyshire, United Kingdom, to explore the behaviour of U-series radionuclides during weathering. For uranium and thorium, two different extraction methods were used, total dissolution with HNO3/HF in a microwave and leaching with aqua regia. This was followed by radiochemical separation using extraction chromatography, then alpha spectrometry measurement. The total radium contents in the sediments were measured using gamma spectrometry, while the leached fraction was measured in the same way as for uranium and thorium. The total sediment content of uranium and thorium ranges from ∼10 up to ∼200 Bq kg(-1), while the radium specific activity lies between ∼15 and 180 Bq kg(-1). In the aqua regia extractions, the uranium and thorium contents are in the range of ∼5 to ∼100 Bq kg(-1), while the radium specific activities are similar to those measured by total dissolution. All the radionuclides show no correlation with organic matter content. The activity ratios 234U/238U, 230Th/238U and 226Ra/238U were used to determine the degree of radioactive disequilibrium. The data show disequilibrium in most of the sediments, with activity ratios of 234U/238U, 230Th/238U and 226Ra/238U>1, inconsistent with evolution through straightforward weathering processes. Multivariate cluster analysis based on five variables, the specific activities of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra and loss on ignition, was employed to group the data and identify five distinct clusters. There seems to be a link between high radionuclide concentrations and proximity to landslips. PMID:24562972

  2. Do We Know Enough about Controlling Sediment to Mitigate Damage to Stream Ecosystems?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stream and river ecosystems have suffered extensive degradation and billions are expended annually on restoration efforts. However, few of these projects are monitored and restoration effectiveness is often unknown. Consequently, there is a poor scientific foundation for restoration designs. Sinc...

  3. Invertebrate colonization of leaves and roots within sediments of intermittent coastal plain streams across hydrologic phases

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared benthic invertebrate assemblages colonizing three types of buried substrates (leaves, roots and plastic roots) among three intermittent Coastal Plain streams over a one year period. Invertebrate density was significantly lower in root litterbags than in plastic root l...

  4. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program: the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.H.

    1980-08-01

    From early 1975 to mid 1979, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) participated in the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory was initially responsible for collecting, analyzing, and evaluating sediment and water samples from approximately 200,000 sites in seven western states. Eventually, however, the NURE program redefined its sampling priorities, objectives, schedules, and budgets, with the increasingly obvious result that LLNL objectives and methodologies were not compatible with those of the NURE program office, and the LLNL geochemical studies were not relevant to the program goal. The LLNL portion of the HSSR program was consequently terminated, and all work was suspended by June 1979. Of the 38,000 sites sampled, 30,000 were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and automated chloride-sulfate analyses (SC). Data from about 13,000 sites have been formally reported. From each site, analyses were published of about 30 of the 60 elements observed. Uranium mineralization has been identified at several places which were previously not recognized as potential uranium source areas, and a number of other geochemical anomalies were discovered.

  5. Gamma activity of stream sediment feldspars as ceramic raw materials and their environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Ibrahim, Tarek; Saad, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In situ gamma spectrometric measurements have been performed to characterise the natural radiation that emitted from the stream sediment feldspars in Wadi El Missikat and Wadi Homret El Gergab, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The measurements of potassium (K, %), equivalent uranium (eU, ppm) and equivalent thorium (eTh, ppm) were converted into specific activities and equivalent dose rate. The average specific activities were 1402 Bq kg(-1) for K, 113 Bq kg(-1) for eU and 108 Bq kg(-1) for eTh in Wadi El Missikat, while they were 1240, 104 and 185 Bq kg(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The calculated outdoor average effective dose rates was 1.1 mSv y(-1) in wadi El Missikat and 1.3 mSv y(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The terrestrial-specific activities and effective dose rate levels of the natural radioactivity in the two areas lie within the international recommended limits for occupational feldspar quarry workers. On the other hand, these results indicated that irradiation is higher than the allowable level for members of the public. Therefore, quarrying the feldspar sediments from these locations as ceramic raw materials may yield an undesired impact on the environment, especially through the indoor applications. PMID:22171098

  6. Overview of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) for uranium is currently being conducted throughout the conterminous United States and Alaska. The HSSR is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This ambitious geochemical reconnaissance program is conducted by four Department of Energy laboratories: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Savannah River Laboratory. The program is based on an extensive review of world literature, reconnaissance work done in other countries, and pilot studies conducted by each laboratory. Sample-collection methods and sample density are determined to optimize the probability of detecting potential uranium mineralization. To achieve this aim, each laboratory has developed independent standardized field collection procedures that are designed for its section of the country. Field parameters such as pH, conductivity, climate, geography, and geology are recorded at each site. Most areas are sampled at densities of one sample site per 10 to 23 km/sup 2/. The HSSR program has helped to improve existing hydrogeochemical reconnaissance exploration techniques. In addition to providing industry with data that may help to identify potential uranium districts and to extend known uranium provinces, the HSSR also provides multielement analytical data that can be used in water quality, soil, sediment, environmental, and base-metal exploration studies.

  7. Pyrethroid insecticides in bed sediments from urban and agricultural streams across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are hydrophobic compounds that partition to streambed sediments and have been shown to cause toxicity to non-target organisms; their occurrence is well documented in parts of California, but there have been limited studies in other urban and agricultural areas across the United States. To broaden geographic understanding of pyrethroid distributions, bed sediment samples were collected and analyzed from 36 streams in 25 states, with about 2/3 of the sites in urban areas and 1/3 in agricultural areas. At least one pyrethroid (of the 14 included in the analysis) was detected in 78% of samples. Seven pyrethroids were detected in one or more samples. Bifenthrin was the most frequently detected (58% of samples), followed by permethrin (31%), resmethrin (17%), and cyfluthrin (14%). The other three detected pyrethroids (cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and delta/tralomethrin) were found in two or fewer of the samples. Concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 180 ng g-1 dry weight. The number of pyrethroids detected were higher in the urban samples than in the agricultural samples, but the highest concentrations of individual pyrethroids were split between urban and agricultural sites. The pyrethroids detected in the agricultural areas generally followed use patterns. Predicted toxicity was greater for urban areas and attributed to bifenthrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin, while in agricultural areas the toxicity was mainly attributed to bifenthrin.

  8. Overview of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-07-01

    A Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) for uranium is currently being conducted throughout the conterminous United States and Alaska. The HSSR is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This ambitious geochemical reconnasissance program is conducted by four Department of Energy Laboratories: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and Savannah River Laboratory. Each laboratory was assigned a geographic region of the United States. The program is based on an extensive review of world literature, reconnaissance work done in other countries, and pilot studies conducted by each laboratory. Sample-collection methods and sample density are determined to optimize the probability of detecting potential uranium mineralization. To achieve this aim, each laboratory has developed independent standardized field collection procedures that are designed for its section of the country. Field parameters such as pH, conductivity, climate, geography, and geology are recorded at each site. Most areas are sampled at densities of one sample site per 10 to 23 km/sup 2/. The HSSR program has helped to improve existing hydrogeochemical reconnaissance exploration techniques. In addition to providing industry with data that may help to identify potential uranium districts and to extend known uranium provinces, the HSSR also provides multielement analytical data that can be used in water quality, soil, sediment, environmental, and base-metal exploration studies.

  9. Bacterial biomass, metabolic state, and activity in stream sediments: relation to environmental variables and multiple assay comparisons.

    PubMed

    Bott, T L; Kaplan, L A

    1985-08-01

    Bacterial biomass, metabolic condition, and activity were measured over a 16-month period in the surface sediments of the following four field sites with differing dissolved organic matter regimes: a woodlot spring seep, a meadow spring seep, a second-order stream, and a third-order stream. Total bacterial biomass was measured by lipid phosphate and epifluorescence microscopic counts (EMC), and viable biomass was measured by C most probable number, EMC with 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride reduction, and ATP. Bacterial metabolic condition was determined from the percentage of respiring cells, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and adenylate energy charge. Activity measures included C-lipid synthesis, P-phospholipid synthesis, the rate of uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon, and respiration, from which biosynthesis was calculated (dissolved organic carbon uptake corrected for respiration). Total bacterial biomass (from EMC) ranged from 0.012 to 0.354 mug of C/mg of dry sediment and was usually lowest in the third-order stream. The percentage of cells respiring was less than 25% at all sites, indicating that most bacteria were dormant or dead. Adenylate energy charge was measured only in the third-order stream and was uniformly low. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were greater in the woodlot spring seep than in the second- and third-order streams. Uptake of algal lysate dissolved organic carbon ranged from undetectable levels to 166 mg of C . m . h. Little community respiration could be attributed to algal lysate metabolism. Phospholipid synthesis ranged from 0.006 to 0.354 pmol . mg of dry sediment . h. Phospholipid synthesis rates were used to estimate bacterial turnover at the study sites. An estimated 375 bacterial generations per year were produced in the woodlot spring seep, and 67 per year were produced in the third-order stream. PMID:16346867

  10. Landscape geomorphic characteristic impacts on greenhouse gas fluxes in exposed stream and riparian sediments.

    PubMed

    Vidon, Philippe; Serchan, Satish

    2016-07-13

    While excessive releases of greenhouse gases (GHG: N2O, CO2, CH4) to the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuel remains a concern, we also need to better quantify GHG emissions from natural systems. This study investigates GHG fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface in a series of 7 stream reaches (riparian zones + exposed streambed sediment) across a range of geomorphic locations from headwaters reaches to lowland wetland reaches. When riparian fluxes (RZ) are compared to fluxes from in-stream locations (IS) under summer baseflow conditions, total CO2-equivalent (CO2eq) emissions are approximately 5 times higher at RZ locations than at IS locations, with most CO2eq driven by CH4 production at RZ locations where wet conditions dominate (headwater wetlands, lowland wetlands). On a gas-by-gas basis, no clear differences in N2O fluxes between RZ and IS locations were observed regardless of locations (headwater vs. lowland reaches), while CO2 fluxes were significantly larger at RZ locations than IS locations. Methane fluxes were significantly higher in wetland-influenced reaches than other reaches for both RZ and IS locations. However, GHG fluxes were not consistently correlated to DOC, DO, NO3(-), NH4(+), or water temperature, stressing the limitations of using water quality parameters to predict GHG emissions at the floodplain scale, at least during summer baseflow conditions. As strategies are developed to further constrain GHG emission for whole watersheds, we propose that approaches linking landscape geomorphic characteristics to GHG fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface offer a promising avenue to successfully predict GHG emissions in floodplains at the watershed scale. PMID:27306099