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Sample records for strenuous exercise reduce

  1. Slowed response to peripheral visual stimuli during strenuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Ando, Soichi; Komiyama, Takaaki; Kokubu, Masahiro; Sudo, Mizuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Higaki, Yasuki

    2016-07-01

    Recently, we proposed that strenuous exercise impairs peripheral visual perception because visual responses to peripheral visual stimuli were slowed during strenuous exercise. However, this proposal was challenged because strenuous exercise is also likely to affect the brain network underlying motor responses. The purpose of the current study was to resolve this issue. Fourteen participants performed a visual reaction-time (RT) task at rest and while exercising at 50% (moderate) and 75% (strenuous) peak oxygen uptake. Visual stimuli were randomly presented at different distances from fixation in two task conditions: the Central condition (2° or 5° from fixation) and the Peripheral condition (30° or 50° from fixation). We defined premotor time as the time between stimulus onset and the motor response, as determined using electromyographic recordings. In the Central condition, premotor time did not change during moderate (167±19ms) and strenuous (168±24ms) exercise from that at rest (164±17ms). In the Peripheral condition, premotor time significantly increased during moderate (181±18ms, P<0.05) and strenuous exercise (189±23ms, P<0.001) from that at rest (173±17ms). These results suggest that increases in Premotor Time to the peripheral visual stimuli did not result from an impaired motor-response network, but rather from impaired peripheral visual perception. We conclude that slowed response to peripheral visual stimuli during strenuous exercise primarily results from impaired visual perception of the periphery. PMID:27080081

  2. The apoptotic response to strenuous exercise of the gastrocnemius and solues muscle fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Koçtürk, S; Kayatekin, B M; Resmi, H; Açikgöz, O; Kaynak, C; Ozer, E

    2008-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of strenuous exercise on apoptosis of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle fibers and clarify the role of oxidative metabolism in the strenuous exercise-induced apoptosis. The experiment was designed with 49 (n = 49) male, 24-week-old, L. Wistar albino rats. Strenuous exercise model was applied to 42 (n = 42) rats and seven (n = 7) rats served as rested controls. All rats were randomly assigned to one of the following groups (n = 7): rested control (C), immediately after exercise (0 h) and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after exercise. Apoptotic nuclei were shown by single stranded DNA (ssDNA) determination. Oxidative damage in mitochondrial fractions of the muscle tissues was evaluated by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratios. Caspase-9, -8 and -3 activities and the level of cytochrome c (Cyt c) were measured in the cytosolic fractions of muscle tissues to follow mitochondrial-dependent (intrinsic) or ligand-mediated death receptor (extrinsic) pathways of apoptosis. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels were also determined. Based on our results, apoptosis is significantly triggered in muscle fibers by strenuous exercise (P < 0.05). Apoptosis in the soleus muscle tissues mostly depends on the intrinsic pathway and may be triggered by increased oxidative stress. In contrast, extrinsic pathway of apoptosis was predominant in the gastrocnemius muscle and increases of TNF-alpha and IL-6 may play a significant role. PMID:18030491

  3. Plasma Cytokine Profiles in Long-Term Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Hilde G.; Øktedalen, Olav; Opstad, Per-Kristian; Lyberg, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    The open window theory indicates altered immunity 3 to 72 hours after exercise. The J-curve describes the risk of illness in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines before and after long-term strenuous exercise. Fourteen marathon and 16 half-marathon runners and 10 military cadets participating in a military ranger-training course were recruited to this study. Within-subject design was used measuring levels of plasma cytokines before, during, and after exercise. Plasma cytokines were measured using Luminex multiplex technology and ELISA. Comparing pre/post plasma levels both the marathon- and the half-marathon runners showed heavily increased levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IL-8 (P < 0.001). LPS stimulation among the half-marathon runners decreased the postrace levels of IL-6, IL-1b, and TNFα by 45%, 24%, and 43%, respectively (P < 0.01). During the ranger training course the spontaneous and LPS-stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1b, and TNFα changed in a similar fashion as in the half-marathon runners although the fluctuations were smaller. Our study supports the open window and the J-curve theory; the immune system is more activated and the subjects are more threatened to infectious pathogens after intensive physical activity and in the period after exercise.

  4. Effect of Yoga Practice on Levels of Inflammatory Markers After Moderate and Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Doreswamy, Venkatesh; Narasipur, Omkar Subbaramajois; Kunnavil, Radhika; Srinivasamurthy, Nandagudi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives To evaluate the effect of yoga practice and exercise challenge on Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and lipid profile. Materials and Methods Two hundred and eighteen subjects participated in the study. One hundred and nine volunteers (51 males and 58 females) in the age group of 20 to 60 years, who practiced yoga regularly for over five years for a period of one hour daily, performed a bout of moderate exercise and a bout of strenuous exercise as per Standardized Shuttle Walk test protocol. Anthropometrically matched, age matched and gender matched subjects, who did not practice yoga (non-yoga group) were chosen as controls (non-yoga, n=109). The non-yoga group also performed similar exercises. The blood samples of both the groups were collected before and after the exercises. TNF-α and IL-6 was analysed before and after the exercise by Sandwich ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay). Results Resting plasma TNF-α concentration was significantly higher in non-yoga group when compared to yoga group (p<0.05). There was an increase in TNF-α levels in both the groups in response to strenuous exercise. There was no gender difference in TNF-α and IL-6 levels before and after exercise in yoga and non-yoga groups. Conclusion Regular practice of yoga lowers basal TNF-α and IL-6 levels. It also reduces the extent of increase of TNF-α and IL-6 to a physical challenge of moderate exercise and strenuous exercise. There is no significant gender difference in the TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Regular practice of yoga can protect the individual against inflammatory diseases by favourably altering pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. PMID:26266115

  5. Chemokines are elevated in plasma after strenuous exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, K; Rohde, T; Asp, S; Schjerling, P; Pedersen, B K

    2001-03-01

    During the last few years much attention has been paid to the chemokines. Chemokine receptors are necessary to render a target permissive for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high concentrations of chemokines have been shown to protect against the progression of HIV disease towards death. In the present study, we investigated the capability of strenuous exercise to induce elevated plasma concentrations of the chemokines interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta. Eight male athletes completed the Copenhagen Marathon 1997. Blood was sampled before, immediately after the run and every 30 min during a 4 h recovery period. Plasma chemokine concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The IL-8, MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta concentrations all peaked 0.5 h after the run when they were 6.7-fold, 3.5-fold and 4.1-fold increased, respectively. The elevated concentrations of chemokines in plasma after exercise could have implications for HIV-infected individuals; a possibility that needs further investigation. PMID:11320643

  6. Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Wonchung; Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Chounghun

    2015-05-29

    Strenuous exercise is known to cause excessive ROS generation and inflammation. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity in the senescent muscle during high-intensity exercise (HE) are not well studied. Here, we show that HE suppresses up-regulation of mitochondrial function despite increase in mitochondrial copy number, following excessive ROS production, proinflammatory cytokines and NFκB activation. Moreover, HE in the old group resulted in the decreasing of both fusion (Mfn2) and fission (Drp1) proteins that may contribute to alteration of mitochondrial morphology. This study suggests that strenuous exercise does not reverse age-related mitochondrial damage and dysfunction by the increased ROS and inflammation. - Highlights: • Effect of exercise on mitochondrial function of aged skeletal muscles was studied. • Strenuous exercise triggered excessive ROS production and inflammatory cytokines. • Strenuous exercise suppressed mitochondrial function in senescent muscle.

  7. Exercise-Induced Intrapulmonary Arteriovenous Shunt in a Patient Complaining of Dyspnea during Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Jun; Hong, Seong-Eun; Jung, Dong-Min; Choi, Nan-Young; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Park, Seung-Ah; Kim, Soon-Young; Park, Woo-Jung

    2014-01-01

    A 51-year-old highly fit man presented for dyspnea with strenuous aerobic exercise. The patient was asymptomatic and all tests were normal at rest. With increasing exercise intensity, he suddenly complained of dyspnea and showed a severe exercise-induced hypoxemia with an excessive alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. In agitated saline contrast echocardiography at peak exercise, a large amount of left to right shunt was identified after > 5 cardiac cycles, which suggests the presence of exercise-induced intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunt in this patient. PMID:25031800

  8. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study. PMID:26506374

  9. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study. PMID:26506374

  10. Oxygen Consumption in the First Stages of Strenuous Work as a Function of Prior Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutin, Bernard; And Others

    This study examined the extent to which 10 minutes of prior exercise (PE) at a workload adjusted to maintain a heart rate (HR) of 140 beats per minute could facilitate the mobilization of the oxygen transport system in a strenuous criterion task (CT). The control treatment involved completion of the CT following 10 minutes of rest on the…

  11. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Oxidative Damage and Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Strenuous Exercise in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ning-Ning

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol supplementation on oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation induced by strenuous exercise in rats. The rats were randomly divided into five groups: a sedentary control group, an exercise control group, and three treatment exercise groups administered increasing doses of resveratrol (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight). Resveratrol was administered by oral gavage once daily for four weeks. At the end of the four-week period, the rats performed a strenuous exercise on the treadmill, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured. The results showed that resveratrol supplementation had protective effects against strenuous exercise-induced oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation by lowering the levels of LDH, CK, MDA, 4-HNE, and 8-OHdG in the serum or muscle of rats. These beneficial effects are probably owing to the inherent antioxidant activities of resveratrol. PMID:26157555

  12. Mechanics of breathing during strenuous exercise in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Anderson, L; Woakes, A J; Roberts, C; Butler, P J; Snow, D H; Lekeux, P

    1990-12-01

    The changes induced by exercise on the mechanics of breathing, as well as the simultaneous changes occurring in arterial blood gas tensions and in respiratory gas exchange were investigated in 6 healthy thoroughbred horses, performing a treadmill exercise of increasing intensity. Respiratory airflow and tidal volume (VT) were measured with ultrasonic flowmeters. Pleural pressure changes were measured by an oesophageal balloon catheter. Gas concentration of the expired air was analysed with a mass spectrometer; the oxygen consumption (VO2) and the carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were computed breath-by-breath. Arterial blood gas values were obtained by sampling from the carotid artery. Between rest and fast gallop VT, respiratory frequency, expired minute ventilation (VE), VO2, VCO2, total pulmonary resistance (RL), mechanical work of breathing (Wrm) and PaCO2 increased significantly while PaO2 decreased significantly. The Wrm.VO2(-1) ratio in galloping horses increased exponentially with VE. This, together with the relationship between the changes in PaO2 and in PaCO2 and the increase in the ventilatory mechanics parameters, suggests that the mechanics of breathing may be one of the factors constraining further increase in ventilation in exercising healthy horses. PMID:2080318

  13. Sustained strenuous exercise increases intestinal permeability in racing Alaskan sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Willard, Michael D; Williamson, Katherine K; Steiner, Jörg M; Williams, David A

    2005-01-01

    We assessed gastric and intestinal permeability and performed gastroscopy to evaluate the effects of sustained strenuous exercise on the gastrointestinal tract in racing sled dogs. Three teams of racing Alaskan sled dogs were examined approximately 1 week before and 24 hours after the 2003 Iditarod sled dog race (1,100 miles in 10 days). Each examination consisted of the administration of a solution of sucrose, lactulose, and rhamnose to evaluate gastric and intestinal permeability, as well as gastroscopy to visually inspect the gastric mucosa. Of the 54 dogs examined before the race, 16 completed the course and contributed data to the analysis. Sustained strenuous exercise was associated with an increased frequency of gastric erosions or ulcerations seen endoscopically (0% prerace versus 61% postrace). A significant postrace increase occurred in the median lactulose to rhamnose ratio in both serum and urine (0.11 versus 0.165, P = .0363; 0.11 versus 0.165, P = .0090, respectively). No significant differences were found in median serum or urinary sucrose concentrations when pre- and postrace values were compared. No correlation was found between visible gastric lesions and the concentration of sucrose in serum or urine samples obtained 4-5 hours after administration of the sugar solutions. We conclude that sustained strenuous exercise is associated with increased intestinal permeability, but the sucrose permeability test as we performed it did not correlate with visible gastric lesions. PMID:15715045

  14. Effect of strenuous exercise on blood monocytes and their relation to coagulation.

    PubMed

    Osterud, B; Olsen, J O; Wilsgård, L

    1989-08-01

    Changes were explored in the behavior of circulating monocytes and their potential association with the activation of the coagulation system as assessed following strenuous exercise. Twelve men and nine women from the Norwegian national cross country skiing team and 19 men and six women from a level just below that of the national team were studied before and after ski race competition. Mononuclear cells were isolated after incubation of heparinized blood with lipopolysaccharides (LPS; 3 ng.ml-1) for 2 h. After a 50 km race for men, the specific thromboplastin activity of the stimulated monocytes rose from 3.5 x 10(-3)/10(6) cells to 21.4 x 10(-3)/10(6) cells. This probably reflects the mobilization of a new population of monocytes that are more sensitive to such stimuli. Resting top-athlete skiers had monocytes which were significantly less responsive to the LPS stimulus compared to nontrained people. There was an inverse correlation of plasma factor VII and the monocyte responsiveness to in vitro stimulation (r = 0.814; P less than 0.002) from blood drawn after a race. Furthermore, factor VII was significantly reduced after a 50 km race, and a modest decline in the fibrinogen level was also observed (P less than 0.05). It is concluded that endurance ski racing causes white cell mobilization and more active white cells that may induce activation of the coagulation system and account for the involvement of factor VII and fibrinogen. PMID:2674588

  15. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  16. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  17. Melatonin decreases muscular oxidative stress and inflammation induced by strenuous exercise and stimulates growth factor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Dermargos, Alexandre; da Silva Junior, Edenilson Pinto; Weimann, Eleine; Lambertucci, Rafael Herling; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2015-03-01

    Strenuous exercise is detrimental to athletes because of the overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Melatonin, a classic antioxidant, has been shown to exhibit beneficial effects regarding intense exercise and tissue repair. In this study, we evaluated the onset and resolution of inflammation in melatonin-treated and nontreated rats subjected to a strenuous exercise session. We also analyzed the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Control and treated rats were subjected to exhaustive exercise after a period of 10 days of melatonin treatment (20 mg/dL). Plasma and muscle levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-2-alpha/beta (CINC-2α/β), l-selectin, macrophage inflammatory protein-3-alpha (MIP-3α), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured prior to, immediately after, and 2 hr after exercise. Our data revealed decreases in the muscle concentrations of IL-1β (35%), TNF-α (13%), IL-6 (48%), and TBARS (40%) in the melatonin-treated group compared with the control group. We also observed decreases in the plasma concentrations of IL-1β (17%) in the melatonin-treated group. VEGF-α concentrations and SOD activity increased by 179% and 22%, respectively, in the melatonin-treated group compared with the control group. We concluded that muscle inflammation and oxidative stress resulting from exhaustive exercise were less severe in the muscles of melatonin-treated animals than in the muscles of control animals. Thus, melatonin treatment may reverse exercise-induced skeletal muscle inflammation and stimulate growth factor synthesis. PMID:25546615

  18. Antioxidant status in haemoglobin E carriers after acute and chronic strenuous exercises.

    PubMed

    Palasuwan, Attakorn; Soogarun, Suphan; Suksom, Daroonwan; Pitaksathienkul, Chatchadaporn; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Haemoglobin E (HbE), an unstable haemoglobin, is highly susceptible to oxidative damages. We examined how acute or chronic physiological challenge induced by exercise affects antioxidant response in HbE carriers. Two independent studies were conducted in individuals with HbE trait and paired normal Hb. In study 1, sedentary participants were tested in a graded maximal exercise and blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 45 minutes after an acute exercise. Our data showed that erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity failed to recover in HbE carriers after 45 minutes of rest. In study 2, athletes were trained in a 10-week strenuous training and blood samples were collected before and after training period. We found that athletes with HbE carriers showed a larger increase in plasma GPx activity compared to those with normal Hb. These data suggest that HbE carriers could cope with exercise-induced oxidative stress by adjusting endogenous antioxidant markers. PMID:26268260

  19. Left ventricular systolic performance during prolonged strenuous exercise in female triathletes

    PubMed Central

    McGavock, Jonathan; Haykowsky, Mark; Warburton, Darren; Taylor, Dylan; Quinney, Arthur; Welsh, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Background The effect of prolonged strenuous exercise (PSE) on left ventricular (LV) systolic function has not been well studied in younger female triathletes. This study examined LV systolic function prior to, during and immediately following PSE (i.e., 40 km bicycle time trial followed by a 10 km run) in 13 younger (29 ± 6 years) female triathletes. Methods Two-dimensional echocardiographic images were obtained prior to, at 30-minute intervals during and immediately following PSE. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, end-diastolic and end-systolic cavity areas were measured at each time point. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic measures were also combined to obtain LV end-systolic wall stress and myocardial contractility (i.e., systolic blood pressure – end-systolic cavity area relation). Results Subjects exercised at an intensity equivalent to 90 ± 3% of maximal heart rate. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure – end-systolic cavity area relation and fractional area change increased while end-diastolic and end-systolic cavity areas decreased during exertion. Conclusions PSE is associated with enhanced LV systolic function secondary to an increase in myocardial contractility in younger female triathletes. PMID:12713668

  20. Mitochondrial dynamic remodeling in strenuous exercise-induced muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction: regulatory effects of hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhihui; Bai, Liyuan; Yan, Jiong; Li, Yuan; Shen, Weili; Wang, Ying; Wertz, Karin; Weber, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Yan; Liu, Jiankang

    2011-05-15

    Physical exercise is considered to exert a positive effect on health, whereas strenuous or excessive exercise (Exe) causes fatigue and damage to muscle and immune functions. The underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. We designed a protocol to mimic Exe and explore the ensuing cellular damage and involvement of mitochondrial dynamics. We found that Exe was prone to decrease endurance capacity and induce damage to renal function and the immune system. Muscle atrophy markers atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA were increased by Exe, accompanied by increased autophagy and mitochondrial fission in skeletal muscle. Exe caused a decrease in PGC-1α and complex I expression; it also activated JNK and Erk1/2 pathways and consequently induced p53, p21, and MnSOD expression in skeletal muscle. The involvement of oxidant-induced autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction was confirmed in C2C12 myoblasts. Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a natural olive polyphenol, efficiently enhanced endurance capacity and prevented Exe-induced renal and immune system damage. Also, HT treatment inhibited both the Exe-induced increase in autophagy and mitochondrial fission and the decrease in PGC-1α expression. In addition, HT enhanced mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial complex I and II activities in muscle of Exe rats. These results demonstrate that Exe-induced fatigue and damage to muscle and immune functions may be mediated via the regulation of mitochondrial dynamic remodeling, including the downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and upregulation of autophagy. HT supplementation may regulate mitochondrial dynamic remodeling and enhance antioxidant defenses and thus improve exercise capacity under Exe conditions. PMID:21421045

  1. Intravenous pentoxifylline does not enhance the pulmonary haemodynamic efficacy of frusemide in strenuously exercising thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M; Goetz, T E; Rothenbaum, P; Humphrey, S

    2001-07-01

    The present study was carried out to examine whether pentoxifylline administration to horses premedicated with frusemide would attenuate the exercise-induced pulmonary arterial, capillary and venous hypertension to a greater extent than frusemide alone, thereby affecting the occurrence of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH). Using established techniques, we determined right heart and pulmonary vascular pressures in 6 healthy, sound Thoroughbred horses at rest and during exercise performed at maximal heart rate at a workload of 14 m/s on 3.5% uphill grade in the control (no medications), frusemide (250 mg i.v., 4 h pre-exercise)-control, and the frusemide (250 mg i.v., 4 h pre-exercise) + pentoxifylline (8.5 mg/kg bwt i.v., 15 min preexercise) treatments. Sequence of the 3 treatments was randomised for every horse and 7 days were allowed between them. In the control study, galloping at 14 m/s on 3.5% uphill grade elicited significant right atrial as well as pulmonary arterial, capillary and venous hypertension and all horses experienced EIPH as detected by the presence of fresh blood in the trachea on endoscopic examination. Frusemide administration was not attended by changes in heart rate at rest or during exercise. Although in the frusemide-control experiments, a significant reduction in mean pulmonary arterial, capillary and wedge pressures was observed both at rest and during galloping at 14 m/s on 3.5% uphill grade, all horses still experienced EIPH. Pentoxifylline administration to standing horses premedicated with frusemide caused nervousness, muscular fasciculations, sweating and tachycardia. Although these symptoms had largely abated within 15 min, there were no significant changes in the right atrial or pulmonary vascular pressures. Exercise in the frusemide + pentoxifylline experiments also caused significant right atrial as well as pulmonary arterial, capillary and venous hypertension, but these data were not found to be significantly different from the frusemide-control experiments. All horses in the frusemide + pentoxifylline experiments also experienced EIPH. In conclusion, our data indicate that pentoxifylline (8.5 mg/kg bwt i.v., 15 min pre-exercise) is ineffective in modifying the pulmonary haemodynamic effects of frusemide in exercising horses. It should be noted, however, that we did not examine whether erythrocyte plasticity was altered by the administration of pentoxifylline. Since the intravascular force exerted onto the blood-gas barrier of exercising horses premedicated with frusemide remained unaffected by pentoxifylline administration, it is concluded that concomitant pentoxifylline administration is unlikely to offer additional benefit to horses experiencing EIPH. PMID:11469767

  2. Combined effects of sleep deprivation and strenuous exercise on cognitive performances during The North Face Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB).

    PubMed

    Hurdiel, Rmy; Pez, Thierry; Daugherty, Johanna; Girard, Julien; Poussel, Mathias; Poletti, Laurence; Basset, Patrick; Theunynck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of combined sleep deprivation and strenuous exercise on cognitive and neurobehavioral performance among long-distance runners completing one of the most difficult ultramarathons in the world. Seventeen runners participated. Each had a wrist-worn actigraph throughout the race to record their sleep time. In addition, each individual's performance in 10-min response-time tests before and after the race was recorded and a questionnaire enabled participants to report any difficulties they experienced during the competition. During race completion times of 27 to 44 h, combined acute lack of sleep (12 17 min of rest during the race) and strenuous exercise (168.0 km) had marked adverse effects on cognitive performances ranging from mere lengthening of response time to serious symptoms such as visual hallucinations. This study suggests that regardless of rest duration and time in race, cognitive performances of ultramarathoners are adversely affected. PMID:25333827

  3. Near-Infrared Light Therapy to Attenuate Strength Loss After Strenuous Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Christou, Evangelos; Tillman, Mark; George, Steven; Borsa, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Near-infrared (NIR) light therapy is purported to act as an ergogenic aid by enhancing the contractile function of skeletal muscle. Improving muscle function is a new avenue for research in the area of laser therapy; however, very few researchers have examined the ergogenic effects of NIR light therapy and the influence it may have on the recovery process during rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the ergogenic effect of NIR light therapy on skeletal muscle function. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine healthy men (n = 21) and women (n = 18; age = 20.0 0.2 years, height = 169 2 cm, mass = 68.4 1.8 kg, body mass index = 23.8 0.4 kg/m2). Intervention(s): Each participant received active and sham treatments on the biceps brachii muscle on 2 separate days. The order of treatment was randomized. A class 4 laser with a cumulative dose of 360 J was used for the active treatment. After receiving the treatment on each day, participants completed an elbow-flexion resistance-exercise protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were elbow range of motion, muscle point tenderness, and strength (peak torque). Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to assess changes in these measures between treatments at baseline and at follow-up, 48 hours postexercise. Additionally, immediate strength loss postexercise was compared between treatments using a paired t test. Results: Preexercise to postexercise strength loss for the active laser treatment, although small, was less than with the sham treatment (P = .05). Conclusions: Applied to skeletal muscle before resistance exercise, NIR light therapy effectively attenuated strength loss. Therefore, NIR light therapy may be a beneficial, noninvasive modality for improving muscle function during rehabilitation after musculoskeletal injury. However, future studies using higher treatment doses are warranted. PMID:25397864

  4. Pain Catastrophizing Mediates the Relation Between Self-Reported Strenuous Exercise Involvement and Pain Ratings: The Moderating Role of Anxiety Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; McGuire, Lynanne M.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Quinn, Noel B.; Fabian, Lacy A.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Exercise involvement has been shown to have hypoalgesic effects and cognitive factors may partially explain this effect. Particularly, alterations in pain catastrophizing have been found to mediate the positive pain outcomes of multidisciplinary treatments incorporating exercise. Further, recent evidence suggests that exercise involvement and anxiety sensitivity may act together, as interacting factors, to exert an effect on catastrophizing and pain outcomes; however, further research is needed to clarify the nature of this interaction. In this study we developed a model to investigate the cross-sectional associations among self-reported weekly strenuous exercise bouts, anxiety sensitivity, and their interaction with pain catastrophizing and pain responses to the cold pressor task (CPT) in healthy, ethnically diverse young adults (N = 79). Methods Prior to the CPT, participants were asked to complete the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. Following the CPT participants completed a modified version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results At a high level of anxiety sensitivity, controlling for depressive symptoms, CPT immersion time, and sex differences, a bias-corrected (BC), bootstrapped confidence interval revealed that pain catastrophizing significantly mediated the relation between self-reported weekly strenuous exercise bouts and pain response (95% BC Confidence Interval: (−9.558, −0.800) with 1000 resamples). At intermediate and low levels of anxiety sensitivity, no significant mediation effects were found. Conclusions These findings support that for pain catastrophizing to mediate the strenuous exercise-pain response relation, individuals must possess a high level of anxiety sensitivity. PMID:19779141

  5. Clenbuterol administration does not attenuate the exercise-induced pulmonary arterial, capillary or venous hypertension in strenuously exercising Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M; Goetz, T E; Rothenbaum, P; Humphrey, S

    2000-11-01

    The present study was carried out to ascertain whether beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation with clenbuterol would attenuate the pulmonary arterial, capillary and venous hypertension in horses performing high-intensity exercise and, in turn, modify the occurrence of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH). Experiments were carried out on 6 healthy, sound, exercise-trained Thoroughbred horses. All horses were studied in the control (no medications) and the clenbuterol (0.8 pg/kg bwt, i.v.) treatments. The sequence of these treatments was randomised for every horse, and 7 days were allowed between them. Using catheter-tip-transducers whose in-vivo signals were referenced at the point of the left shoulder, right heart/pulmonary vascular pressures were determined at rest, sub-maximal exercise and during galloping at 14.2 m/s on a 3.5% uphill grade--a workload that elicited maximal heart rate and induced EIPH in all horses. In the control experiments, incremental exercise resulted in progressive significant increments in right atrial as well as pulmonary arterial, capillary and venous (wedge) pressures and all horses experienced EIPH. Clenbuterol administration to standing horses caused tachycardia, but significant changes in mean right atrial or pulmonary vascular pressures were not observed. During exercise performed after clenbuterol administration, heart rate as well as right atrial and pulmonary arterial, capillary and wedge pressures also increased progressively with increasing work intensity. However, these values were not found to be statistically significantly different from corresponding data in the control study and the incidence of EIPH remained unaffected. Since clenbuterol administration also does not affect the transpulmonary pressure during exercise, it is unlikely that the transmural force exerted onto the blood-gas barrier of exercising horses is altered following i.v. clenbuterol administration at the recommended dosage. PMID:11093630

  6. VITAMIN E REDUCES MUSCLE DAMAGE AND BIOMARKERS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AFTER EXERCISE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strenuous exercise can cause muscle injury resulting in inflammation and oxidative stress. We examined whether supplementation with vitamin E could reduce this muscle damage and whether there were age-related differences in this response. 16 young (YM, 26.4 ± 3.3 y) and 16 older (OM, 71.1 ± 4.0 y) m...

  7. Comparison of indirect calorimetry and a new breath 13C/12C ratio method during strenuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Romijn, J A; Coyle, E F; Hibbert, J; Wolfe, R R

    1992-07-01

    A new stable isotope method for the determination of substrate oxidation rates in vivo is described and compared with indirect calorimetry at rest and during high-intensity exercise (30 min at 80-85% maximal O2 uptake capacity) in six well-trained cyclists. This method uses the absolute ratios of 13C/12C in expired air, endogenous glucose, fat, and protein in addition to O2 consumption and is independent of CO2 production (VCO2). Carbohydrate and fat oxidation rates at rest, calculated by both methods, were not significantly different. During exercise the breath 13C/12C ratio increased and reached a steady state after 15-20 min. Carbohydrate oxidation rates during exercise were 39.4 +/- 5.2 and 41.7 +/- 5.7 mg.kg-1.min-1 [not significant (NS)], and fat oxidation rates were 7.3 +/- 1.3 and 6.9 +/- 1.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 (NS), using indirect calorimetry, and the breath ratio method, respectively. We conclude that the breath 13C/12C ratio method can be used to calculate substrate oxidation under different conditions, such as the basal state and exercise. In addition, the results obtained by this new method support the validity of the underlying assumption that indirect calorimetry regards VCO2 as a reflection of tissue CO2 production, during exercise in trained subjects, even up to 80-85% maximal O2 uptake. PMID:1636700

  8. Effect of a booster vaccination against influenza and equine herpes virus on cardio-respiratory adjustments to strenuous exercise and training in thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Lekeux, P

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted in order to assess whether exercise- and training-induced cardio-respiratory adjustments are modified during the 10-day period which follows a booster vaccination with an oily adjuvanted inactivated vaccine against influenza and equine herpesvirus-1 (Equiffa). Nine healthy vaccinated thoroughbred horses were used. Six were revaccinated and three were kept as control. All the horses completed a standardised exercise test (SET) that was repeated 4 times, i.e. 10 (SET1) and 2 (SET2) days before revaccination, and 2 (SET3) and 10 (SET4) days after revaccination. During the whole experimental period the horses were trained 6 days per week according to an interval training schedule. Respiratory airflow, tidal volume, respiratory rate and expired minute volume (VE) were measured using a face mask and 2 ultra-sonic pneumotachographs. The oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were obtained on a breath-by-breath basis, using a mass spectrometer. Heart rate (HR) was continuously measured with a polar horse tester. Venous blood was sampled before and after the test and analysed for biochemical determinations. Blood was also sampled before and 21 days after the booster vaccination for circulating antibody titration. The peak VO2, VCO2, ventilatory equivalent (VE/VO2) and oxygen pulse (VO2/HR) were significantly improved by the 3-week training period. The other cardio-respiratory parameters as well as most of the blood parameters remained unchanged throughout the 4 SETs. The revaccination did not impair any of the parameters measured before, during, or after the SETs. All revaccinated horses showed a rise in antibodies against influenza virus type A1 and A2 and EVH-1 compared to the control horses. It was concluded that, in our horses, revaccination with an oily adjuvanted inactivated vaccine against influenza and EVH-1 did not impair their cardiorespiratory and metabolic adjustments to strenuous exercise and intense training, and that the seroconversion due to revaccination was unaffected by the intense daily exercise experienced by the animals in the post-vaccination period. PMID:8237183

  9. Intense Physical Exercise Reduces Overt Attentional Capture.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Francesc; Sanabria, Daniel; Huertas, Florentino; Molina, Enrique; Bennett, Simon

    2015-10-01

    The abrupt onset of a visual stimulus typically results in overt attentional capture, which can be quantified by saccadic eye movements. Here, we tested whether attentional capture following onset of task-irrelevant visual stimuli (new object) is reduced after a bout of intense physical exercise. A group of participants performed a visual search task in two different activity conditions: rest, without any prior effort, and effort, immediately after an acute bout of intense exercise. The results showed that participants exhibited (1) slower reaction time of the first saccade toward the target when a new object was simultaneously presented in the visual field, but only in the rest activity condition, and (2) more saccades to the new object in the rest activity condition than in the effort activity condition. We suggest that immediately after an acute bout of effort, participants improved their ability to inhibit irrelevant (distracting) stimuli. PMID:26524101

  10. Acute Effects of Moderate and Strenuous Running on Trace Element Distribution in the Brain, Liver, and Spleen of Trained Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ergen, Kıvanç; İnce, Hürrem; Düzova, Halil; Karakoç, Yunus; Emre, M. Hanifi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Trace elements such as manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) play key roles in metabolic reactions and are important in many physiological enzymatic processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the acute effects of moderate and strenuous running (treadmill) exercise on the levels of Mn, Co and Cr in the brain, liver, and spleen of trained rats. Study Design: Animal experiment. Material and Methods: Twenty-one Wistar-Albino adult male rats were used in the study. Rats were grouped as control group (no mandated exercise; n=8), moderate exercise group (30 min exercise duration; n=7), and strenuous exercise group (60 min exercise duration; n=6). The levels of Mn, Co, and Cr in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, brain stem, liver, and spleen were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results: Cr levels in liver of rats increased in parallel to the time course of running supporting the exercise training effect on the action of insulin. Compared to the control group, the level of Co significantly decreased in the brain stem of rats in the moderate exercise group (p=0.009) and in the frontal lobe of rats in the strenuous exercise group (p=0.004). In the strenuous exercise group, an examination of the brain stem revealed that the level of Mn significantly decreased (p=0.001), and levels of Co and Cr were apparently depleted to the extent that these elements were no longer detectable. Conclusion: A notable finding is that during or after single bout strenuous exercise, levels of Co decreased in the spleen and particularly decreased in the brain stem of regularly trained rats. From this study, it can be inferred that sportsmen should aware trace element disturbances among the body parts or depletion of some trace elements after single bout of chronic strenuous running exercise. PMID:25207079

  11. Healthy Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Persons at any age can substantially improve their fitness for work and play through appropriate exercise training. Considerable evidence indicates that physical activity is valuable for weight control, modifying lipids and improving carbohydrate tolerance. Less rigorous scientific data are available for associated long-term blood pressure and psychological changes with habitual exercise. Strenuous physical activity most likely reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease and the detrimental impact of certain chronic diseases on health. Adverse effects may result from a training program, but the major concern is the susceptibility to cardiovascular events during and immediately after exertion. To achieve optimal benefits with minimal risk, exercise must be carefully prescribed within the context of overall health and training objectives. Taken altogether, a distinct rationale exists for regular vigorous exercise as an integral part of a personal health maintenance program. PMID:6395501

  12. Does exercise reduce the burden of fractures? A review.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Magnus

    2002-12-01

    The null hypothesis that exercise has no effect on fracture rates in old age cannot be rejected on the basis of any published, randomized, prospective data. The view that exercise reduces the number of fractures is based on prospective and retrospective, observational cohort studies and case-control studies, all hypothesis-generating, not hypothesis-testing. Consistently replicated sampling bias may confirm the finding when evaluating other than randomized prospective studies. Better health, better muscle function, more muscle mass, better coordination may lead to exercise. The causal relationship could be between better health and exercise and better health and fewer fractures, not exercise and fewer fractures. The hypothesis should be tested in prospective, randomized studies evaluating hip, spine and other fragility fractures separately. Blinded studies assessing the effects of exercise can obviously not be done, but open trials can and should be undertaken to increase the level of evidence within the evidence-based system. There are firm data supporting the view that exercise during growth builds a stronger skeleton. Exercise during growth seems to result in high peak BMD and high muscle strength. However, the Achilles heel of exercise is its cessation. Are the skeletal and muscular benefits attained during growth retained after the cessation of exercise and can any residual benefits be found in old age, the period when fragility fractures rise exponentially? Does exercise during adulthood produce any biologically important reduction in surrogate end-points for fractures other than BMD, since BMD can be influenced only marginally by exercise after completion of growth? Recommendations for exercise should be based on evidence, not on opinion. Can continued recreational exercise maintain some of the benefits in BMD and muscle function achieved in youth? What level of recreational exercise is needed to retain these benefits, if not fully, then at least to some extent? Dose-response relationships should be quantified. Furthermore, the effect of exercise on independent, surrogate end-points for fractures, such as bone size, shape, architecture, muscle function, fall frequency and frequency of injurious falls during defined periods in the life cycle must be determined. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence of effect, but if we recommend exercise then should this be to children, adults, elderly, men and women with fractures, all persons? What type of exercise? For how long? Lifelong? If exercise could be implemented for most persons in society, would this reduce the number of fractures? Would the increased costs associated with the efforts to increase the activity level be lower than the reduced costs associated with any reduction in fractures? Our inability to answer these questions must be acknowledged before recommendations are made at the community level. PMID:12553521

  13. Physiological and medical aspects of strenuous mass sport events.

    PubMed

    Vuori, I

    1982-01-01

    This review summarizes the main features to be considered previous to and during the performance of strenuous, prolonged mass sport events. At the present time the best predictors of one's ability to endure the effort are probably not physiological tests but detailed information of one's health status and exercise habits in relation to the type, duration, and intensity of the event. The preparation for high-intensity events lasting 1 1/2 hours or more should include filling of the glycogen stores of the most taxed muscles by proper supercompensation techniques. During and even immediately prior to prolonged activities, largely irrespectively of their intensity, it is advisable to ingest small amounts of easily absorbable carbohydrate, best as fluid, latest after 1 1/2 hours of exercise, and every 20-30 min thereafter. Fluid loss should be kept in minimum by drinking 150-200 ml at a time 3 to 4 times per hour. This is of ultimate importance in warm and hot weather. In cold especially middle-aged and older persons should pay special attention to avoid excessive intensity of effort during the first 15 min of exercise, and to protect the most cold sensitive parts of the body, like head and neck, in order to avoid reflex increase of circulatory stress. Serious health risks of mass sport events have been shown to be small, when factors causing excessive acute, circulatory load are avoided. Therefore, exercise during or shortly after acute or febrile illness, start of exercise without sufficient warm-up especially in cold, sudden or maximal bursts of activity, exercise loaded with strong emotions, exercise after heavy meal or alcohol intake, and smoking during exercise should be avoided. PMID:7149623

  14. Exercise reduces angiotensin II responses in rat femoral veins.

    PubMed

    Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Rossignoli, Patrícia de Souza; Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; de Lábio, Roger William; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques

    2013-06-01

    The control of blood flow during exercise involves different mechanisms, one of which is the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, which contributes to exercise-induced blood flow redistribution. Moreover, although angiotensin II (Ang II) is considered a potent venoconstrictor agonist, little is known about its effects on the venous bed during exercise. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the Ang II responses in the femoral vein taken from sedentary and trained rats at rest or subjected to a single bout of exercise immediately before organ bath experiments. Isolated preparations of femoral veins taken from resting-sedentary, exercised-sedentary, resting-trained and exercised-trained animals were studied in an organ bath. In parallel, the mRNA expression of prepro-endothelin-1 (ppET-1), as well as the ETA and ETB receptors, was quantified by real-time PCR in this tissue. The results show that, in the presence of L-NAME, Ang II responses in resting-sedentary animals were higher compared to the other groups. However, this difference disappeared after co-treatment with indomethacin, BQ-123 or BQ-788. Moreover, exercise reduced ppET-1 mRNA expression. These reductions in mRNA expression were more evident in resting-trained animals. In conclusion, either acute or repeated exercise adapts the rat femoral veins, thereby reducing the Ang II responses. This adaptation is masked by the action of locally produced nitric oxide and involves, at least partially, the ETB- mediated release of vasodilator prostanoids. Reductions in endothelin-1 production may also be involved in these exercise-induced modifications of Ang II responses in the femoral vein. PMID:23528515

  15. Integrating Pilates Exercise into an Exercise Program for 65+ Year-Old Women to Reduce Falls

    PubMed Central

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit; Ozdemir, Recep Ali; Evin, Ruya; Irez, Salih Gokhan; Korkusuz, Feza

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Pilates exercise could improve dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength in order to reduce the number of falls among older women. 60 female volunteers over the age of 65 from a residential home in Ankara participated in this study. Participants joined a 12-week series of 1-hour Pilates sessions three times per week. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength were measured before and after the program. The number of falls before and during the 12-week period was also recorded. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength improved (p < 0. 05) in the exercise group when compared to the non-exercise group. In conclusion, Pilates exercises are effective in improving dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time, and muscle strength as well as decreasing the propensity to fall in older women. Key points Pilates-based exercises improve dynamic balance, reaction time and muscle strength in the elderly. Pilates exercise may reduce the number of falls in elderly women by increasing these fitness parameters. PMID:24149302

  16. Milk consumption following exercise reduces subsequent energy intake in female recreational exercisers.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, Penny; Shaw, Emily; James, Lewis; Stevenson, Emma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of skimmed milk as a recovery drink following moderate-vigorous cycling exercise on subsequent appetite and energy intake in healthy, female recreational exercisers. Utilising a randomised cross-over design, nine female recreational exercisers (19.7 ± 1.3 years) completed a V̇O2peak test followed by two main exercise trials. The main trials were conducted following a standardised breakfast. Following 30 min of moderate-vigorous exercise (65% V̇O2peak), either 600 mL of skimmed milk or 600 mL of orange drink (475 mL orange juice from concentrate, 125 mL water), which were isoenergetic (0.88 MJ), were ingested, followed 60 min later with an ad libitum pasta meal. Absolute energy intake was reduced 25.2% ± 16.6% after consuming milk compared to the orange drink (2.39 ± 0.70 vs. 3.20 ± 0.84 MJ, respectively; p = 0.001). Relative energy intake (in relation to the energy content of the recovery drinks and energy expenditure) was significantly lower after milk consumption compared to the orange drink (1.49 ± 0.72 vs. 2.33 ± 0.90 MJ, respectively; p = 0.005). There were no differences in AUC (× 1 h) subjective appetite parameters (hunger, fullness and desire to eat) between trials. The consumption of skimmed milk following 30 min of moderate-vigorous cycling exercise reduces subsequent energy intake in female recreational exercisers. PMID:25569624

  17. Milk Consumption Following Exercise Reduces Subsequent Energy Intake in Female Recreational Exercisers

    PubMed Central

    Rumbold, Penny; Shaw, Emily; James, Lewis; Stevenson, Emma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of skimmed milk as a recovery drink following moderate–vigorous cycling exercise on subsequent appetite and energy intake in healthy, female recreational exercisers. Utilising a randomised cross-over design, nine female recreational exercisers (19.7 ± 1.3 years) completed a V˙O2peak test followed by two main exercise trials. The main trials were conducted following a standardised breakfast. Following 30 min of moderate-vigorous exercise (65% V˙O2peak), either 600 mL of skimmed milk or 600 mL of orange drink (475 mL orange juice from concentrate, 125 mL water), which were isoenergetic (0.88 MJ), were ingested, followed 60 min later with an ad libitum pasta meal. Absolute energy intake was reduced 25.2% ± 16.6% after consuming milk compared to the orange drink (2.39 ± 0.70 vs. 3.20 ± 0.84 MJ, respectively; p = 0.001). Relative energy intake (in relation to the energy content of the recovery drinks and energy expenditure) was significantly lower after milk consumption compared to the orange drink (1.49 ± 0.72 vs. 2.33 ± 0.90 MJ, respectively; p = 0.005). There were no differences in AUC (× 1 h) subjective appetite parameters (hunger, fullness and desire to eat) between trials. The consumption of skimmed milk following 30 min of moderate-vigorous cycling exercise reduces subsequent energy intake in female recreational exercisers. PMID:25569624

  18. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance in postmyocardial infarction rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youhua; Tian, Zhenjun; Zang, Weijin; Jiang, Hongke; Li, Youyou; Wang, Shengpeng; Chen, Shengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces cardiac dysfunction and insulin resistance (IR). This study examines the effects of MI-related IR on vasorelaxation and its underlying mechanisms, with a specific focus on the role of exercise in reversing the impaired vasorelaxation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Sham, MI, and MI+Exercise. MI+Exercise rats were subjected to 8 weeks of treadmill training. Cardiac contraction, myocardial and arterial structure, vasorelaxation, levels of inflammatory cytokines, expression of eNOS and TNF-α, and activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were determined in aortas. MI significantly impaired endothelial structure and vasodilation (P < 0.05–0.01), as indicated by decreased arterial vasorelaxation to ACh and insulin. MI also attenuated the myocardial contractile response, decreased aortic PI3K/Akt/eNOS expression and phosphorylation by insulin, and increased IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α expression and p38 MAPK activity (P < 0.05–0.01). Exercise improved insulin sensitivity in aortas, facilitated myocardial contractile response and arterial vasorelaxation to ACh and insulin, and increased arterial PI3K/Akt/eNOS activity. Moreover, exercise markedly reversed increased p38 MAPK activity and normalized inflammatory cytokines in post-MI arteries. Inhibition of PI3K with LY-294002, and eNOS with L-NAME significantly blocked arterial vasorelaxation and PI3K/Akt/eNOS phosphorylation in response to insulin. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in response to insulin plays an important role in MI-related IR. The reversal of IR by exercise is most likely associated with normalizing inflammatory cytokines, increasing the activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS, and reducing the activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:25907785

  19. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance in postmyocardial infarction rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Tian, Zhenjun; Zang, Weijin; Jiang, Hongke; Li, Youyou; Wang, Shengpeng; Chen, Shengfeng

    2015-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces cardiac dysfunction and insulin resistance (IR). This study examines the effects of MI-related IR on vasorelaxation and its underlying mechanisms, with a specific focus on the role of exercise in reversing the impaired vasorelaxation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Sham, MI, and MI+Exercise. MI+Exercise rats were subjected to 8 weeks of treadmill training. Cardiac contraction, myocardial and arterial structure, vasorelaxation, levels of inflammatory cytokines, expression of eNOS and TNF-α, and activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were determined in aortas. MI significantly impaired endothelial structure and vasodilation (P < 0.05-0.01), as indicated by decreased arterial vasorelaxation to ACh and insulin. MI also attenuated the myocardial contractile response, decreased aortic PI3K/Akt/eNOS expression and phosphorylation by insulin, and increased IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α expression and p38 MAPK activity (P < 0.05-0.01). Exercise improved insulin sensitivity in aortas, facilitated myocardial contractile response and arterial vasorelaxation to ACh and insulin, and increased arterial PI3K/Akt/eNOS activity. Moreover, exercise markedly reversed increased p38 MAPK activity and normalized inflammatory cytokines in post-MI arteries. Inhibition of PI3K with LY-294002, and eNOS with L-NAME significantly blocked arterial vasorelaxation and PI3K/Akt/eNOS phosphorylation in response to insulin. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in response to insulin plays an important role in MI-related IR. The reversal of IR by exercise is most likely associated with normalizing inflammatory cytokines, increasing the activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS, and reducing the activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:25907785

  20. Diaphragmatic breathing reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martarelli, Daniele; Cocchioni, Mario; Scuri, Stefania; Pompei, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals. PMID:19875429

  1. Exercise based transportation reduces oil consumption and carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    Current abuse and misrepresentation of science hinders society's ability to address climate change. Scientific abuse results, in part, from a widespread perception that curbing emissions will require substantial economic, political, or personal sacrifice. Here I provide one example to illustrate that this perception is false. Simply walking or biking the amount recommended for a healthy lifestyle could reduce carbon emissions up to 11 percent if the distances traveled were substituted for car travel. This level of exercise is also sufficient to eliminate obese and overweight conditions in a few years without draconian diet plans. A reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of roughly 35 percent is possible if the revenue saved through decreased health care spending on obesity is redirected toward carbon abatement. This emissions reduction far exceeds that required by the Kyoto Protocol at no net cost. Finally, widespread substitution of driving with distances traveled during recommended daily exercise would considerably ease societal dependence on oil, which leads not only to climate change but also to air pollution, political and economic instability and habitat degradation. Thus, exercise based transportation constitutes a potentially favorable alternative to the energy and diet plans that are currently under consideration and a substantial step toward dealing with the threat of climate change.

  2. Exercise-training reduces BAT thermogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Larue-Achagiotis, C; Rieth, N; Goubern, M; Laury, M C; Louis-Sylvestre, J

    1995-05-01

    In the energy balance equation, physical activity represents one component of energy expenditure. From various studies it appears that exercise-training does not affect clearly thermogenesis which depends on brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. In the present work we examine how exercise-training can influence food intake and body weight regulation in relation to BAT thermogenesis. The proton conductance of the uncoupling protein of BAT was examined in male adult Wistar trained 2 h/day for 20 days and compared to that of sedentary (2 h of fasting instead of exercise) or control animals. All animals were provided with separate sources of the 3 macronutrients (protein, fat and carbohydrate) containing an identical percentage of vitamins, salt mixture and cellulose powder. At the end of training, rats were placed at 5 degrees C during 10 days, then during 4 days at 28 degrees C. This condition has been demonstrated to favour and amplify BAT responsiveness to moderate modifications of stimulation. The body weight of trained rats became significantly lower than that of the control and sedentary rats and this difference persisted all throughout the experiment. When placed at 5 degrees C, all rats increased their total ingestion: control rats enhanced fat intake, while sedentary and trained rats enhanced carbohydrate ingestion. When placed at 28 degrees C, all rats had identical total energy and that of the 3 items intakes. BAT proton conductance was about 40% lower in the trained compared with the sedentary plus the control rats. This indicated a lower BAT thermogenic activity in the trained animals. It could be concluded that exercise-training in rats induces negative energy balance; the reduced BAT activity could restrain weight loss and overeating. PMID:7610127

  3. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donley, David A.; Fournier, Sara B.; Reger, Brian L.; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E.; Olfert, I. Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 0.6 to 7.2 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 1.8 to 5.6 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 5 to 110 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 1 to 7 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 3 to 15 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 8 to 168 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 1.0 to 19.9 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 1.6 to 26.3 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. PMID:24744384

  4. Selected hormonal and immunological responses to strenuous live-fire firefighting drills.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Petruzzello, S J; Chludzinski, M A; Reed, J J; Woods, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of strenuous live-fire firefighting drills and a 90 min recovery period on selected hormonal, immunological and psychological variables. Apparently healthy, male, professional firefighters (n = 11) performed three trials of standardized firefighting tasks in a live-fire training structure. There was significant leukocytosis immediately post firefighting activity that persisted following recovery, although there was a variable response among the leukocyte subsets. Most notable was the decrease in number and percentage of lymphocytes following 90 min of recovery. Plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol were significantly elevated post firefighting activity and cortisol remained elevated following 90 min of recovery. Elevated cortisol immediately following activity was related to reduced feelings of energy. These data demonstrate the magnitude of the physiological and psychological disruption following strenuous firefighting activity and suggest that immune function may be altered following such activity. This is a finding that may have practical consequences for this group of first responders. PMID:15764306

  5. The impact of different cooling modalities on the physiological responses in firefighters during strenuous work performed in high environmental temperatures.

    PubMed

    Barr, David; Reilly, Thomas; Gregson, Warren

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the impact of ice vests and hand/forearm immersion on accelerating the physiological recovery between two bouts of strenuous exercise in the heat [mean (SD), 49.1(1.3)°C, RH 12 (1)]. On four occasions, eight firefighters completed two 20-min bouts of treadmill walking (5 km h, 7.5% gradient) while wearing standard firefighter protective clothing. Each bout was separated by a 15-min recovery period, during which one of four conditions were administered: ice vest (VEST), hand/forearm immersion (W), ice vest combined with hand/forearm immersion (VEST + W) and control (CON). Core temperature was significantly lower at the end of the recovery period in the VEST + W (37.97 ± 0.23°C) and W (37.96 ± 0.19°C) compared with the VEST (38.21 ± 0.12°C) and CON (38.29 ± 0.25°C) conditions and remained consistently lower throughout the second bout of exercise. Heart rate responses during the recovery period and bout 2 were similar between the VEST + W and W conditions which were significantly lower compared with the VEST and CON which did not differ from each other. Mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the start of bout 2 in the cooling conditions compared with CON; these differences reduced as exercise progressed. These findings demonstrate that hand/forearm immersion (~19°C) is more effective than ice vests in reducing the physiological strain when firefighters re-enter structural fires after short rest periods. Combining ice vests with hand/forearm immersion provides no additional benefit. PMID:21079990

  6. Short-term exercise training in humans reduces AMPK signalling during prolonged exercise independent of muscle glycogen

    PubMed Central

    McConell, Glenn K; Lee-Young, Robert S; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Stepto, Nigel K; Huynh, Ngan N; Stephens, Terry J; Canny, Benedict J; Kemp, Bruce E

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effect of short-term exercise training on skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling and muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans. Eight sedentary males completed 120 min of cycling at 66 ± 1% V˙O2peak, then exercise trained for 10 days, before repeating the exercise bout at the same absolute workload. Participants rested for 72 h before each trial while ingesting a high carbohydrate diet (HCHO). Exercise training significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated exercise-induced increases in skeletal muscle free AMP: ATP ratio and glucose disposal and increased fat oxidation. Exercise training abolished the 9-fold increase in AMPK α2 activity observed during pretraining exercise. Since training increased muscle glycogen content by 93 ± 12% (P < 0.01), we conducted a second experiment in seven sedentary male participants where muscle glycogen content was essentially matched pre- and post-training by exercise and a low CHO diet (LCHO; post-training muscle glycogen 52 ± 7% less than in HCHO, P < 0.001). Despite the difference in muscle glycogen levels in the two studies we obtained very similar results. In both studies the increase in ACCβ Ser221 phosphorylation was reduced during exercise after training. In conclusion, there is little activation of AMPK signalling during prolonged exercise following short-term exercise training suggesting that other factors are important in the regulation of glucose disposal and fat oxidation under these circumstances. It appears that muscle glycogen is not an important regulator of AMPK activation during exercise in humans when exercise is begun with normal or high muscle glycogen levels. PMID:16051629

  7. Prognosis: does exercise training reduce adverse events in heart failure?

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Haykowsky, Mark J F; Taylor, Rod S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) were once discouraged from participating in exercise programs because of concerns regarding safety and the potential for harm to an already damaged myocardium. However, studies over the last 3 decades have provided extensive insights into both the health outcome benefits of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these benefits. Studies on the outcome benefits of exercise training, including mortality and hospitalization, have been convincing. This article reviews the physiologic benefits of exercise training in HF, studies on exercise training in women, results and implications of the HF-ACTION trial, and recent meta-analyses using the Cochrane data base. PMID:25432474

  8. Hormonal responses in strenuous jumping effort.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Tihanyl, J; Rivalta, L; Parlato, G; Tranquilli, C; Pulvirenti, G; Foti, C; Viru, M; Viru, A

    1996-02-01

    In order to test the possibility for rapid responses of blood hormone levels in short-term supramaximal exercises, serum concentrations of corticotropin (ACTH), cortisol (C), total testosterone (tT), free testosterone (fT), growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined by RIA procedures in blood samples obtained before and immediately after a 60-s period of consecutive vertical jumps (Bosco test). The study subjects were 16 Italian professional soccer players. Immediately after exercise, significant increases (p < 0.05) were found in the concentrations of ACTH (by 39%), C (by 14%), TSH (by 20%), fT3 (by 28%), fT4 (by 30%), tT (by 12%), fT (by 13%), and SHBG (by 21%). Significant changes were not detected in the blood levels of GH, IGF-I and PRL. Most pronounced testosterone responses were typical for persons of high jumping performance (the increase of serum tT correlated with average power output, r = 0.61 and jumping height, r = 0.66). The larger the drop in power output during 60-s jumping, the higher was the thyroid response: the difference in jumping height between the first and last 15-s period correlated with increases in TSH (r = 0.52) and in fT4, (r = 0.55). In conclusion, the obtained results indicate that in intense exercise, causing the rapid development of fatigue, rapid increases in serum levels of hormones of the pituitary-adrenocortical, pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid systems occur. PMID:8743723

  9. Exercise at the Extremes: The Amount of Exercise to Reduce Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Molossi, Silvana; Lee, Duck-Chul; Emery, Michael S; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-01-26

    Habitual physical activity and regular exercise training improve cardiovascular health and longevity. A physically active lifestyle is, therefore, a key aspect of primary and secondary prevention strategies. An appropriate volume and intensity are essential to maximally benefit from exercise interventions. This document summarizes available evidence on the relationship between the exercise volume and risk reductions in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the risks and benefits of moderate- versus high-intensity exercise interventions are compared. Findings are presented for the general population and cardiac patients eligible for cardiac rehabilitation. Finally, the controversy of excessive volumes of exercise in the athletic population is discussed. PMID:26796398

  10. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zisser, H; Gong, P; Kelley, C M; Seidman, J S; Riddell, M C

    2011-02-01

    Diet and exercise form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. These are especially important for people living with diabetes mellitus, as they are the most practical non-pharmacological means by which patients may significantly improve their blood glucose levels. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity (both short and long term), lowers blood sugar levels, reduces body fat and improves cardiovascular (CV) function. Because of this, exercise offers enormous benefit to patients with diabetes. Blood glucose levels can significantly drop during and after physical activities, due to the increased utilisation of glucose as a fuel during exercise and the up-regulation of glucose transport into working muscles. Therefore, patients (especially those with type 1 diabetes) must account for the effects of exercise and adjust their medications and nutrition accordingly. Improvements in real-time continuous glucose monitoring and optimisation of basal insulin dosing may offer significant benefit to preventing hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes who regularly exercise. Diverse exercise programmes and devices can also assist patients in monitoring their activities as well as motivating them to achieve their exercise goals. For patients with type 1 diabetes, questions such as how much, how long, how strenuous and what kind of exercise must be addressed in order for healthcare professionals to offer maximum benefit to their patients. Additionally, since patients with type 2 diabetes often have other significant co-morbidities such as obesity and CV disease, care providers must evaluate each patient's risk factors before designing an exercise programme. Several publications in the last year have addressed these issues and may serve as a valuable resource to provide safe and effective recommendations to patients and their healthcare providers. To be included in the Exercise and Diabetes chapter for the 2010 YEARBOOK, we reviewed leading peer-reviewed manuscripts that were published in the period July 2009 to June 2010. PubMed was used in the initial screening of articles. PMID:21323815

  11. Supine Treadmill Exercise in Lower Body Negative Pressure Combined with Resistive Exercise Counteracts Bone Loss, Reduced Aerobic Upright Exercise Capacity and Reduced Muscle Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, Sabine; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to weightlessness leads to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects. Sixteen healthy female subjects participated in a 60-d 6(sup 0) head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non-exercising control group CON or an exercise group EX performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed before and 3-d after BR. Isokinetic KES was measured before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 plus or minus 0.045; POST: 0.646 plus or minus 0.352 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE=0.894 plus or minus 0.059; POST: 0.858 plus or minus 0.057 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON subjects. VO2pk was significantly decreased in the CON after BR (PRE: 38.0 plus or minus 4.8; POST: 29.9 plus or minus 4.2 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute), but not in the EX (PRE: 39.0 plus or minus 2.0; POST: 37.8 plus or minus 1.9 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute). KES was significantly reduced by 30% in Con (PRE: 113 plus or minus 12; POST: 78 plus or minus 8 N-m), but was not different in EX (PRE: 126 plus or minus 25; POST: 115 plus or minus 25 N-m). The combination LBNPex and Rex during 60-d BR protects against cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning and may be efficacious countermeasure for prolonged space flight.

  12. Reduced exercise capacity in persons with Down syndrome: cause, effect, and management

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Goncalo V; Pereira, Fernando D; Fernhall, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Persons with Down syndrome (DS) have reduced peak and submaximal exercise capacity. Because ambulation is one predictor of survival among adults with DS, a review of the current knowledge of the causes, effects, and management of reduced exercise capacity in these individuals would be important. Available data suggest that reduced exercise capacity in persons with DS results from an interaction between low peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and poor exercise economy. Of several possible explanations, chronotropic incompetence has been shown to be the primary cause of low VO2peak in DS. In contrast, poor exercise economy is apparently dependent on disturbed gait kinetics and kinematics resulting from joint laxity and muscle hypotonia. Importantly, there is enough evidence to suggest that such low levels of physical fitness (reduced exercise capacity and muscle strength) limit the ability of adults with DS to perform functional tasks of daily living. Consequently, clinical management of reduced exercise capacity in DS seems important to ensure that these individuals remain productive and healthy throughout their lives. However, few prospective studies have examined the effects of structured exercise training in this population. Existent data suggest that exercise training is beneficial for improving exercise capacity and physiological function in persons with DS. This article reviews the current knowledge of the causes, effects, and management of reduced exercise capacity in DS. This review is limited to the acute and chronic responses to submaximal and peak exercise intensities because data on supramaximal exercise capacity of persons with DS have been shown to be unreliable. PMID:21206759

  13. The Role of Exercise in Reducing Childhood and Adolescent PTSD, Anxiety, and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motta, Robert W.; McWilliams, Meredith E.; Schwartz, Jennifer T.; Cavera, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the role of physical exercise in reducing childhood and adolescent posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression. A good deal of the existing research on the influence of exercise in reducing negative emotional states and enhancing perceptions of self-efficacy has been conducted with adult samples. Comparatively few…

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome: neonatal hypodynamia (reduced exercise level).

    PubMed

    Reid, G M

    2001-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been described as a silent unexpected death during sleep. Infants with near-miss SIDS have shown a higher heart rate and diminished heart rate variability during sleep. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep rate variability was related to respiration. A decreased heart rate variability was also observed in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or prenatal hypoxia. It was hypothesized that decreased heart rate variability and decreased body measurement during sleep were related to a decreased arousal response. Cardiac output is greater in the supine position. Acetylcholine slows the heart beat. Postural changes modify the acute baroreflex control of the heart rate. The cerebellum also contributes to the reflex anti-orthostatic (supine) cardiovascular response to postural change. Delayed myelination of various areas of the brain occurred in SIDS victims and it was suggested that the defect in central respiratory control could be a motor rather than a sensory problem, and that the search for abnormalities should be extended to regions in the cerebellum and pre-frontal-temporal-limbic systems. The cerebellum exercises control over motor neuron impulses from the cerebral cortex to lower structures. An extended period of neonatal decreased body movement has its counterpart in the astronaut exposed to the deconditioning effect of zero gravity. Hypodynamia induces hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, renal inositoluria and impaired nerve conduction. Myoinositol is 20 times higher in fetal-like tissue than in adults. The insecticide lindane (gammexane) is an inositol antagonist. Lindane administration to neonatal rats induced low levels of specific components of myelin proteins in oligodendrocytes in the brain. The activity of these specific enzymes was reduced in oligodendrocytes in the brain of SIDS victims. It is hypothesized that lindane administration to laboratory neonatal animals is a laboratory model for studying delayed development of the brain in SIDS. PMID:11359347

  15. Clinical Utility of Exercise Training in Heart Failure with Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Asrar Ul Haq, Muhammad; Goh, Cheng Yee; Levinger, Itamar; Wong, Chiew; Hare, David L

    2015-01-01

    Reduced exercise tolerance is an independent predictor of hospital readmission and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). Exercise training for HF patients is well established as an adjunct therapy, and there is sufficient evidence to support the favorable role of exercise training programs for HF patients over and above the optimal medical therapy. Some of the documented benefits include improved functional capacity, quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and dyspnea. Major trials to assess exercise training in HF have, however, focused on heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). At least half of the patients presenting with HF have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and experience similar symptoms of exercise intolerance, dyspnea, and early fatigue, and similar mortality risk and rehospitalization rates. The role of exercise training in the management of HFPEF remains less clear. This article provides a brief overview of pathophysiology of reduced exercise tolerance in HFREF and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), and summarizes the evidence and mechanisms by which exercise training can improve symptoms and HF. Clinical and practical aspects of exercise training prescription are also discussed. PMID:25698883

  16. Reduced catecholamine response to exercise in amenorrheic athletes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have found an array of endocrine disturbances related to energy deprivation in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Purpose: We examined the catecholamine response to exercise in five eumenorrheic (EU) and five amenorrheic (AM) athletes, matched by age (mean T SEM: EU = 29.8 T 2.5 ...

  17. Vitamin D3 Reduces Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress Caused by Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Chung, Chen-Han; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yang, Wan-Ting; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise results in inflammation and oxidative stress, which can damage tissue. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and antiperoxidative activity. Therefore, we aimed to test if vitamin D could reduce the damage caused by exhaustive exercise. Rats were randomized to one of four groups: control, vitamin D, exercise, and vitamin D+exercise. Exercised rats received an intravenous injection of vitamin D (1 ng/mL) or normal saline after exhaustive exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood samples were collected for biochemical testing. Histological examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed on lungs and kidneys after the animals were sacrificed. In comparison to the exercise group, blood markers of skeletal muscle damage, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the vitamin D+exercise group. The exercise group also had more severe tissue injury scores in the lungs (average of 2.4 ± 0.71) and kidneys (average of 3.3 ± 0.6) than the vitamin D-treated exercise group did (1.08 ± 0.57 and 1.16 ± 0.55). IHC staining showed that vitamin D reduced the oxidative product 4-Hydroxynonenal in exercised animals from 20.6% to 13.8% in the lungs and from 29.4% to 16.7% in the kidneys. In summary, postexercise intravenous injection of vitamin D can reduce the peroxidation induced by exhaustive exercise and ameliorate tissue damage, particularly in the kidneys and lungs. PMID:26941574

  18. Vitamin D3 Reduces Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress Caused by Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Chung, Chen-Han; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yang, Wan-Ting; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise results in inflammation and oxidative stress, which can damage tissue. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and antiperoxidative activity. Therefore, we aimed to test if vitamin D could reduce the damage caused by exhaustive exercise. Rats were randomized to one of four groups: control, vitamin D, exercise, and vitamin D+exercise. Exercised rats received an intravenous injection of vitamin D (1 ng/mL) or normal saline after exhaustive exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood samples were collected for biochemical testing. Histological examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed on lungs and kidneys after the animals were sacrificed. In comparison to the exercise group, blood markers of skeletal muscle damage, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the vitamin D+exercise group. The exercise group also had more severe tissue injury scores in the lungs (average of 2.4 ± 0.71) and kidneys (average of 3.3 ± 0.6) than the vitamin D-treated exercise group did (1.08 ± 0.57 and 1.16 ± 0.55). IHC staining showed that vitamin D reduced the oxidative product 4-Hydroxynonenal in exercised animals from 20.6% to 13.8% in the lungs and from 29.4% to 16.7% in the kidneys. In summary, postexercise intravenous injection of vitamin D can reduce the peroxidation induced by exhaustive exercise and ameliorate tissue damage, particularly in the kidneys and lungs. PMID:26941574

  19. Reducing workplace burnout: the relative benefits of cardiovascular and resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Bretland, Rachel Judith; Thorsteinsson, Einar Baldvin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The global burden of burnout cost is in excess of $300 billion annually. Locally, just under half of working Australians experience high levels of occupational burnout. Consequently, burnout interventions are paramount to organisational productivity. Exercise has the potential to provide a multilevel and cost effective burnout intervention. The current study aims to extend the literature by comparing cardiovascular with resistance exercise to assess their relative effectiveness against well-being, perceived stress, and burnout. Design. Participants were 49 (36 females and 13 males) previously inactive volunteers ranging in age from 19 to 68 that completed a four week exercise program of either cardiovascular, resistance, or no exercise (control). Randomised control trial design was employed. Method. Participants were measured against the Subjective Exercise Experience Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results. After four weeks of exercise participants had greater positive well-being and personal accomplishment, and concomitantly less psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Cardiovascular exercise was found to increase well-being and decrease psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Resistance training was noticeably effective in increasing well-being and personal accomplishment and to reduce perceived stress. The present findings revealed large effect sizes suggesting that exercise may be an effective treatment for burnout. However, given a small sample size further research needs to be conducted. Conclusion. Exercise has potential to be an effective burnout intervention. Different types of exercise may assist employees in different ways. Organisations wishing to proactively reduce burnout can do so by encouraging their employees to access regular exercise programs. PMID:25870778

  20. Reducing workplace burnout: the relative benefits of cardiovascular and resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bretland, Rachel Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The global burden of burnout cost is in excess of $300 billion annually. Locally, just under half of working Australians experience high levels of occupational burnout. Consequently, burnout interventions are paramount to organisational productivity. Exercise has the potential to provide a multilevel and cost effective burnout intervention. The current study aims to extend the literature by comparing cardiovascular with resistance exercise to assess their relative effectiveness against well-being, perceived stress, and burnout. Design. Participants were 49 (36 females and 13 males) previously inactive volunteers ranging in age from 19 to 68 that completed a four week exercise program of either cardiovascular, resistance, or no exercise (control). Randomised control trial design was employed. Method. Participants were measured against the Subjective Exercise Experience Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results. After four weeks of exercise participants had greater positive well-being and personal accomplishment, and concomitantly less psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Cardiovascular exercise was found to increase well-being and decrease psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Resistance training was noticeably effective in increasing well-being and personal accomplishment and to reduce perceived stress. The present findings revealed large effect sizes suggesting that exercise may be an effective treatment for burnout. However, given a small sample size further research needs to be conducted. Conclusion. Exercise has potential to be an effective burnout intervention. Different types of exercise may assist employees in different ways. Organisations wishing to proactively reduce burnout can do so by encouraging their employees to access regular exercise programs. PMID:25870778

  1. Exercise training combined with angiotensin II receptor blockade reduces oxidative stress after myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Weiyan; Wan, Wenhan; Ji, Lisa L.; Powers, Anthony S.; Erikson, John M.; Zhang, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and decrease in antioxidant enzymes have been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, treadmill exercise training and losartan treatment began 1 week post-MI and lasted 8 weeks. We evaluated the changes in the mRNA and protein expressions for the enzymatic antioxidants-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase after exercise and losartan treatment in post-MI rats. Our results demonstrated that GPx and catalase mRNA levels were comparable among all the groups, while the mRNA level for manganese SOD (MnSOD) was significantly increased in exercise training with/without losartan treatment as compared to the sedentary MI group. Moreover, the mRNA level for gp91phox was dramatically decreased by a combination of exercise and losartan treatment. The protein levels for MnSOD were significantly elevated by exercise training in combination with losartan treatment. The protein levels for catalase were significantly increased in response to exercise, and it was further augmented by exercise together with losartan treatment. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in plasma were significantly increased in the MI rats, but were decreased by exercise or losartan treatment, indicating that both exercise and losartan may reduce lipid oxidative damage. In addition, catalase and SOD enzymatic activities were significantly enhanced by exercise combined with losartan treatment. Our results suggest that exercise training improves catalase and MnSOD expression and attenuates oxidative stress. These effects are potentiated when combining exercise with angiotensin II receptor blockade. PMID:20660022

  2. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes

    PubMed Central

    Irby, Megan B.; Bond, Dale S.; Lipton, Richard B.; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T.; Penzien, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Overview Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Conclusion Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the many who presently remain suboptimally treated) by providing a new therapeutic avenue as an alternative or augmentative compliment to established interventions for migraine. PMID:26643584

  3. Endurance exercise immediately before sea diving reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Olivier; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Vallee, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have observed that a single bout of exercise can reduce the formation of circulating bubbles on decompression but, according to different authors, several hours delay were considered necessary between the end of exercise and the beginning of the dive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single bout of exercise taken immediately before a dive on bubble formation. 24 trained divers performed open-sea dives to 30 msw depth for 30 min followed by a 3 min stop at 3 msw, under two conditions: (1) a control dive without exercise before (No-Ex), (2) an experimental condition in which subjects performed an exercise before diving (Ex). In the Ex condition, divers began running on a treadmill for 45 min at a speed corresponding to their own ventilatory threshold 1 h before immersion. Body weight, total body fluid volume, core temperature, and volume of consumed water were measured. Circulating bubbles were graded according to the Spencer scale using a precordial Doppler every 30 min for 90 min after surfacing. A single sub-maximal exercise performed immediately before immersion significantly reduces bubble grades (p < 0.001). This reduction was correlated not only to sweat dehydration, but also to the volume of water drunk at the end of the exercise. Moderate dehydration seems to be beneficial at the start of the dive whereas restoring the hydration balance should be given priority during decompression. This suggests a biphasic effect of the hydration status on bubble formation. PMID:21107599

  4. A Dyadic Exercise Intervention to Reduce Psychological Distress Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Heckler, Charles; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Peppone, Luke J.; McMahon, James M.; Morrow, Gary R.; Bowen, Deborah; Mustian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Studies have found disparities in psychological distress between lesbian and gay cancer survivors and their heterosexual counterparts. Exercise and partner support are shown to reduce distress. However, exercise interventions haven't been delivered to lesbian and gay survivors with support by caregivers included. Methods: In this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), ten lesbian and gay and twelve heterosexual survivors and their caregivers were randomized as dyads to: Arm 1, a survivor-only, 6-week, home-based, aerobic and resistance training program (EXCAP©®); or Arm 2, a dyadic version of the same exercise program involving both the survivor and caregiver. Psychological distress, partner support, and exercise adherence, were measured at baseline and post-intervention (6 weeks later). We used t-tests to examine group differences between lesbian/gay and heterosexual survivors and between those randomized to survivor-only or dyadic exercise. Results: Twenty of the twenty-two recruited survivors were retained post-intervention. At baseline, lesbian and gay survivors reported significantly higher depressive symptoms (P = .03) and fewer average steps walked (P = .01) than heterosexual survivors. Post-intervention, these disparities were reduced and we detected no significant differences between lesbian/gay and heterosexual survivors. Participation in dyadic exercise resulted in a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms than participation in survivor-only exercise for all survivors (P = .03). No statistically significant differences emerged when looking across arm (survivor-only vs. dyadic) by subgroup (lesbian/gay vs. heterosexual). Conclusion: Exercise may be efficacious in ameliorating disparities in psychological distress among lesbian and gay cancer survivors, and dyadic exercise may be efficacious for survivors of diverse sexual orientations. Larger trials are needed to replicate these findings. PMID:26652029

  5. Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Chris; Ayres, Bessie; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of ‘natural’ breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping. Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land. Furthermore, the addition of an external breast support garment was able to reduce breast kinematics on land but not in water, suggesting the swimsuit and sports bras were ineffective and improvements in swimwear breast support garments may help to reduce excessive breast motion during aqua aerobic jumping exercises. PMID:26240648

  6. Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise.

    PubMed

    Mills, Chris; Ayres, Bessie; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-06-27

    The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of 'natural' breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping. Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land. Furthermore, the addition of an external breast support garment was able to reduce breast kinematics on land but not in water, suggesting the swimsuit and sports bras were ineffective and improvements in swimwear breast support garments may help to reduce excessive breast motion during aqua aerobic jumping exercises. PMID:26240648

  7. Maternal exercise during pregnancy reduces risk of mammary tumorigenesis in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Ignacio G; Clah, Leon; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Xuanzhu; Larrick, Brienna; Blaize, Nicole; Breslin, Emily; Patel, Neal; Johnson, Diamond; Teegarden, Dorothy; Donkin, Shawn S; Gavin, Timothy P; Newcomer, Sean

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Emerging research indicates that modifying lifestyle factors during pregnancy may convey long-term health benefits to offspring. This study was designed to determine whether maternal exercise during pregnancy leads to reduced mammary tumorigenesis in female offspring. Pregnant rats were randomly assigned to exercised and sedentary groups, with the exercised group having free access to a running wheel and the sedentary group housed with a locked wheel during pregnancy. Female pups from exercised or sedentary dams were weaned at 21 days of age and fed a high fat diet without access to a running wheel. At 6 weeks, all pups were injected with the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Mammary tumor development in all pups was monitored for 15 weeks. Pups from exercised dams had a substantially lower tumor incidence (42.9%) compared with pups from sedentary dams (100%). Neither tumor latency nor histological grade differed between the two groups. These data are the first to demonstrate that exercise during pregnancy potentiates reduced tumorigenesis in offspring. This study provides an important foundation towards developing more effective modes of behavior modification for cancer prevention. PMID:24950432

  8. Late exercise reduces neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Chun-Shu; Stoica, Bogdan A.; Wu, Junfang; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Zhao, Zaorui; Cabatbat, Rainier; Loane, David J.; Faden, Alan I.

    2013-01-01

    Delayed secondary biochemical and cellular changes after traumatic brain injury continue for months to years, and are associated with chronic neuroinflammation and progressive neurodegeneration. Physical activity can reduce inflammation and facilitate recovery after brain injury. Here, we investigated the time-dependent effects, and underlying mechanisms of post-traumatic exercise initiation on outcome after moderate traumatic brain injury using a well-characterized mouse controlled cortical impact model. Late exercise initiation beginning at 5 weeks after trauma, but not early initiation of exercise at 1 week, significantly reduced working and retention memory impairment at 3 months, and decreased lesion volume compared to non-exercise injury controls. Cognitive recovery was associated with attenuation of classical inflammatory pathways, activation of alternative inflammatory responses and enhancement of neurogenesis. In contrast, early initiation of exercise failed to alter behavioral recovery or lesion size, while increasing the neurotoxic pro-inflammatory responses. These data underscore the critical importance of timing of exercise initiation after trauma and its relation to neuroinflammation, and challenge the widely held view that effective neuroprotection requires early intervention. PMID:23313314

  9. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sack, MS, PT Physical Therapist View full profile COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercise An exercise program is another very important step in managing COPD. It is common for people with lung disease ...

  10. Fasting and recovery from exercise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise

    2010-06-01

    Recovery after strenuous exercise involves processes that are dependent on fluid and food intake. Current sports nutrition guidelines provide recommendations for the quantity and timing of consumption of nutrients to optimise recovery issues such as refuelling, rehydration and protein synthesis for repair and adaptation. Recovery of immune and antioxidant systems is important but less well documented. In some cases, there is little effective recovery until nutrients are supplied, while in others, the stimulus for recovery is strongest in the period immediately after exercise. Lack of appropriate nutritional support will reduce adaption to exercise and impair preparation for future bouts. Ramadan represents a special case of intermittent fasting undertaken by many athletes during periods of training as well as important competitive events. The avoidance of fluid and food intake from sunrise to sundown involves prolonged periods without intake of nutrients, inflexibility with the timing of eating and drinking over the day and around an exercise session, and changes to usual dietary choices due to the special foods involved with various rituals. These outcomes will all challenge the athlete's ability to recover optimally between exercise sessions undertaken during the fast or from day to day. PMID:20460259

  11. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F.; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  12. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A H; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2014-11-15

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  13. Exerciser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Mark I exerciser which was added for the second and third Skylab missions, was used for a number of arm and leg exercises. This unit is a modified version of a commercial device. This is an iso-kinetic, or constant velocity, exerciser which retards the speed at which the user is allowed to move. The user applies a maximum effort and the device automatically varies the opposing resistance to maintain speed of translation at a constant preselected value.

  14. Endurance Exercise Accelerates Myocardial Tissue Oxygenation Recovery and Reduces Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tiantian; Xu, Xiaohua; Sandvick, Taylor M.; Hutchinson, Kirk; Wold, Loren E.; Hu, Keli; Sun, Qinghua; Thomas, D. Paul; Ren, Jun; He, Guanglong

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training offers cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, few essential signals have been identified to underscore the protection from injury. In the present study, we hypothesized that exercise-induced acceleration of myocardial tissue oxygenation recovery contributes to this protection. C57BL/6 mice (4 weeks old) were trained on treadmills for 45 min/day at a treading rate of 15 m/min for 8 weeks. At the end of 8-week exercise training, mice underwent 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 60-min or 24-h reperfusion. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was performed to measure myocardial tissue oxygenation. Western immunoblotting analyses, gene transfection, and myography were examined. The oximetry study demonstrated that exercise markedly shortened myocardial tissue oxygenation recovery time following reperfusion. Exercise training up-regulated Kir6.1 protein expression (a subunit of ATP-sensitive K+ channel on vascular smooth muscle cells, VSMC sarc-KATP) and protected the heart from I/R injury. In vivo gene transfer of dominant negative Kir6.1AAA prolonged the recovery time and enlarged infarct size. In addition, transfection of Kir6.1AAA increased the stiffness and reduced the relaxation capacity in the vasculature. Together, our study demonstrated that exercise training up-regulated Kir6.1, improved tissue oxygenation recovery, and protected the heart against I/R injury. This exercise-induced cardioprotective mechanism may provide a potential therapeutic intervention targeting VSMC sarc-KATP channels and reperfusion recovery. PMID:25474642

  15. Dietary nitrate reduces maximal oxygen consumption while maintaining work performance in maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Filip J; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Ekblom, Björn

    2010-01-15

    The anion nitrate-abundant in our diet-has recently emerged as a major pool of nitric oxide (NO) synthase-independent NO production. Nitrate is reduced stepwise in vivo to nitrite and then NO and possibly other bioactive nitrogen oxides. This reductive pathway is enhanced during low oxygen tension and acidosis. A recent study shows a reduction in oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise attributable to dietary nitrate. We went on to study the effects of dietary nitrate on various physiological and biochemical parameters during maximal exercise. Nine healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age 30+/-2.3 years, VO(2max) 3.72+/-0.33 L/min) participated in this study, which had a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Subjects received dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg/day) or placebo (NaCl) for 2 days before the test. This dose corresponds to the amount found in 100-300 g of a nitrate-rich vegetable such as spinach or beetroot. The maximal exercise tests consisted of an incremental exercise to exhaustion with combined arm and leg cranking on two separate ergometers. Dietary nitrate reduced VO(2max) from 3.72+/-0.33 to 3.62+/-0.31 L/min, P<0.05. Despite the reduction in VO(2max) the time to exhaustion trended to an increase after nitrate supplementation (524+/-31 vs 563+/-30 s, P=0.13). There was a correlation between the change in time to exhaustion and the change in VO(2max) (R(2)=0.47, P=0.04). A moderate dietary dose of nitrate significantly reduces VO(2max) during maximal exercise using a large active muscle mass. This reduction occurred with a trend toward increased time to exhaustion implying that two separate mechanisms are involved: one that reduces VO(2max) and another that improves the energetic function of the working muscles. PMID:19913611

  16. Dietary nitrate reduces muscle metabolic perturbation and improves exercise tolerance in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Fulford, Jonathan; Bailey, Stephen J; Blackwell, James R; Winyard, Paul G; Jones, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Exercise in hypoxia is associated with reduced muscle oxidative function and impaired exercise tolerance. We hypothesised that dietary nitrate supplementation (which increases plasma [nitrite] and thus NO bioavailability) would ameliorate the adverse effects of hypoxia on muscle metabolism and oxidative function. In a double-blind, randomised crossover study, nine healthy subjects completed knee-extension exercise to the limit of tolerance (Tlim), once in normoxia (20.9% O2; CON) and twice in hypoxia (14.5% O2). During 24 h prior to the hypoxia trials, subjects consumed 0.75 L of nitrate-rich beetroot juice (9.3 mmol nitrate; H-BR) or 0.75 L of nitrate-depleted beetroot juice as a placebo (0.006 mmol nitrate; H-PL). Muscle metabolism was assessed using calibrated 31P-MRS. Plasma [nitrite] was elevated (P < 0.01) following BR (194 ± 51 nm) compared to PL (129 ± 23 nm) and CON (142 ± 37 nM). Tlim was reduced in H-PL compared to CON (393 ± 169 vs. 471 ± 200 s; P < 0.05) but was not different between CON and H-BR (477 ± 200 s). The muscle [PCr], [Pi] and pH changed at a faster rate in H-PL compared to CON and H-BR. The [PCr] recovery time constant was greater (P < 0.01) in H-PL (29 ± 5 s) compared to CON (23 ± 5 s) and H-BR (24 ± 5 s). Nitrate supplementation reduced muscle metabolic perturbation during exercise in hypoxia and restored exercise tolerance and oxidative function to values observed in normoxia. The results suggest that augmenting the nitrate–nitrite–NO pathway may have important therapeutic applications for improving muscle energetics and functional capacity in hypoxia. PMID:21911616

  17. NO inhalation reduces pulmonary arterial pressure but not hemorrhage in maximally exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Kindig, C A; McDonough, P; Finley, M R; Behnke, B J; Richardson, T E; Marlin, D J; Erickson, H H; Poole, D C

    2001-12-01

    In horses, the exercise-induced elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) is thought to play a deterministic role in exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), and thus treatment designed to lower Ppa might reasonably be expected to reduce EIPH. Five Thoroughbred horses were run on a treadmill to volitional fatigue (incremental step test) under nitric oxide (NO; inhaled 80 ppm) and control (N(2), same flow rate as per NO run) conditions (2 wk between trials; order randomized) to test the hypothesis that NO inhalation would reduce maximal Ppa but that this reduction may not necessarily reduce EIPH. Before each investigation, a microtipped pressure transducer was placed in the pulmonary artery 8 cm past the pulmonic valve to monitor Ppa. EIPH severity was assessed via bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 30 min postrun. Exercise time did not differ between the two trials (P > 0.05). NO administration resulted in a small but consistent and significant reduction in peak Ppa (N(2), 102.3 +/- 4.4; NO, 98.6 +/- 4.3 mmHg, P < 0.05). In the face of lowered Ppa, EIPH severity was significantly higher in the NO trial (N(2), 22.4 +/- 6.8; NO, 42.6 +/- 15.4 x 10(6) red blood cells/ml BAL fluid, P < 0.05). These findings support the notion that extremely high Ppa may reflect, in part, an arteriolar vasoconstriction that serves to protect the capillary bed from the extraordinarily high Ppa evoked during maximal exercise in the Thoroughbred horse. Furthermore, these data suggest that exogenous NO treatment during exercise in horses may not only be poor prophylaxis but may actually exacerbate the severity of EIPH. PMID:11717233

  18. Uric acid reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Waring, W S; Convery, A; Mishra, V; Shenkin, A; Webb, D J; Maxwell, S R J

    2003-10-01

    Uric acid (UA) possesses free-radical-scavenging properties, and systemic administration is known to increase serum antioxidant capacity. However, it is not known whether this protects against oxidative stress. The effects of raising UA concentration were studied during acute aerobic physical exercise in healthy subjects, as a model of oxidative stress characterized by increased circulating 8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha) concentrations. Twenty healthy subjects were recruited to a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, and underwent systemic administration of 0.5 g of UA in 250 ml of 0.1% lithium carbonate/4% dextrose vehicle or vehicle alone as control. Subjects performed high-intensity aerobic exercise for 20 min to induce oxidative stress. Plasma 8-iso-PGF2alpha concentrations were determined at baseline, after exercise and after recovery for 20 min. A single bout of high-intensity exercise caused a significant increase in plasma 8-iso-PGF2alpha concentrations from 35.0 +/- 4.7 pg/ml to 45.6 +/- 6.7 pg/ml (P<0.01). UA administration raised serum urate concentration from 293 +/- 16 to 487 +/- 16 micromol/l (P<0.001), accompanied by increased serum antioxidant capacity from 1786+/-39 to 1899 +/- 45 micromol/l (P<0.01). UA administration abolished the exercise-induced elevation of plasma 8-iso-PGF2alpha concentrations. High UA concentrations are associated with increased serum antioxidant capacity and reduced oxidative stress during acute physical exercise in healthy subjects. These findings indicate that the antioxidant properties of UA are of biological importance in vivo. PMID:12801243

  19. The influence of strenuous muscle stimulation on the menarche.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, F; Ichikawa, Y; Arakawa, M; Chiba, G

    1984-03-01

    Nowadays, the average age at which menarche begins is lowering by three to four years every century, that is, four months every decade, according to both Japanese, and European and American annual changes of the average age. It emerged that the menarche shows a tendency to occur later in female gymnasts, because of the influence of strenuous muscle stimulation, and the fact that a higher level of technic is required in gymnastic games each year. These conclusions have been drawn from replies submitted to a questionnaire distributed among a relatively small number of gymnasts who participated in the competitions including the Inter High School Championship and the World Cup Championship. For example, at the age of 14, the percentage of women who had menstruated is almost 100% among women in general, but only 24% among World Cup Championship gymnasts, the average age at menarche of the latter being later than that of the former by as many as 3 years. At the age of 16, the percentage of women who had menstruated is 100% among women in general, but on the other hand, it is only 60% among World Cup Championship gymnasts, in other words, only a low percentage of women, of the latter group, had menstruated. Finally in our study, we established that the age at menarche of gymnasts is three or five years later than that of women in general. From our study, we concluded that the excessive burden imposed on muscles might cause an abnormal menstrual cycle, and the influence on menstruation would be considerable. PMID:6473975

  20. Hypertension in Children and Adolescents. Part I: Exercising Nonpharmacologic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephen Ra.; Loggie, Jennifer M. H.

    1992-01-01

    Essential hypertension is diagnosed with increasing frequency in children and adolescents. Studies indicate exercise can be a clinically useful treatment, though strenuous exercise may be contraindicated for some. The article discusses the physician's role in diagnosis, nonpharmacologic interventions, exercise safety and effectiveness, and…

  1. Exercise and diet enhance fat oxidation and reduce insulin resistance in older obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Thomas P.J.; Sistrun, Sakita N.; Krishnan, Raj K.; Del Aguila, Luis F.; Marchetti, Christine M.; O'Carroll, Susan M.; O'Leary, Valerie B.; Kirwan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Older, obese, and sedentary individuals are at high risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exercise training improves metabolic anomalies associated with such diseases, but the effects of caloric restriction in addition to exercise in such a high risk group are not known. Changes in body composition and metabolism during a lifestyle intervention were investigated in twenty three older, obese men and women (aged 66 ± 1 years, BMI 33.2 ± 1.4 kg.m−2) with impaired glucose tolerance. All volunteers undertook twelve weeks of aerobic exercise training (5 days per week for 60 min @ 75% VO2max) with either normal caloric intake (eucaloric group, 1901 ± 277 kcal.day−1, n = 12) or a reduced-calorie diet (hypocaloric group, 1307 ± 70 kcal.day−1, n = 11), as dictated by nutritional counseling. Body composition (decreased fat mass; maintained fat-free mass), aerobic fitness (VO2max), leptinemia, insulin sensitivity, and intramyocellular lipid accumulation (IMCL) in skeletal muscle improved in both groups (P < 0.05). Improvements in body composition, leptin and basal fat oxidation were greater in the hypocaloric group. Following the intervention there was a correlation between the increase in basal fat oxidation and the decrease in IMCL (r = −0.53, P = 0.04). In addition, basal fat oxidation was associated with circulating leptin after (r = 0.65, P = 0.0007), but not before the intervention (r = 0.05, P = 0.84). In conclusion, these data show that exercise training improves resting substrate oxidation and creates a metabolic milieu that appears to promote lipid utilization in skeletal muscle, thus facilitating a reversal of insulin resistance. We also demonstrate that leptin sensitivity is improved, but that such a trend may rely on reducing caloric intake in addition to exercise training. PMID:18323464

  2. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain1

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas-Swerts, Fabiana Cristina Taubert; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain. METHOD: quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages: first: pre-test with the application of the questionnaires to the subjects; second: Workplace Exercise taking place twice a week, for 15 minutes, during a period of 10 weeks; third: post-test in which the subjects answered the questionnaires again. For data analysis, the descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistics were used through the Wilcoxon Test. RESULTS: work-related stress was present in the assessed workers, but there was no statistically significant reduction in the scores after undergoing Workplace Exercise. However, there was a statistically significant pain reduction in the neck, cervical, upper, middle and lower back, right thigh, left leg, right ankle and feet. CONCLUSION: the Workplace Exercise promoted a significant pain reduction in the spine, but did not result in a significant reduction in the levels of work-related stress. PMID:25296147

  3. Aerobic exercise training without weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Stickford, Jonathon L; Bhammar, Dharini M; Babb, Tony G

    2016-01-15

    Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common symptom in obesity. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training without weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty-two otherwise healthy obese women participated in a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise training program, exercising 30 min/day at 70-80% heart rate reserve, 4 days/week. Subjects were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60 W cycling: +DOE (n=12, RPB≥4, 37±7 years, 34±4 kg/m(2)) and -DOE (n=10, RPB≤2, 32±6 years, 33±3 kg/m(2)). No significant differences between the groups in body composition, pulmonary function, or cardiorespiratory fitness were observed pre-training. Post-training,peak was improved significantly in both groups (+DOE: 12±7, -DOE: 14±8%). RPB was significantly decreased in the +DOE (4.7±1.0-2.5±1.0) and remained low in the -DOE group (1.2±0.6-1.3±1.0) (interaction p<0.001). The reduction in RPB was not significantly correlated with the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Aerobic exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness and DOE and thus appears to be an effective treatment for DOE in obese women. PMID:26593640

  4. Strong exercise stress exacerbates dermatitis in atopic model mice, NC/Nga mice, while proper exercise reduces it.

    PubMed

    Orita, Kumi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Inoue, Risa; Sato, Eisuke F; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is well known to exacerbate by stress. How the influence of exercise stress on the skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis has not been clarified. The purpose of our research is to investigate how different strength of exercise stress acts on atopic dermatitis. Specific pathogen-free (SPF) and conventional NC/Nga male mice were used for the experiments. Conventional mice but not SPF group spontaneously develop dermal symptom similar to that of patients with atopic dermatitis at their age of 7 weeks. They were given two types of stress, mild (20 m/min for 60 min) or strong exercise (25 m/min for 90 min), using a treadmill four times per day. The dermal symptom of the conventional group was strongly exacerbated by strong exercise but ameliorated by mild exercise. Under the standard experimental conditions, plasma concentrations of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and substance P in conventional mice increased markedly with concomitant exacerbation of the symptom. The plasma concentrations of these proteins elevated after strong exercise but decreased after mild exercise. Under the conventional conditions, plasma levels of β-endorphin increased with time by some mechanisms enhanced by the mild exercise. These observations suggested that exercise-induced stress significantly affect the symptom of atopic dermatitis in a pivotal manner depending on the plasma levels of TGF-β, α-MSH, substance P and β-endorphin. PMID:21087324

  5. Reduced Satellite Cell Numbers and Myogenic Capacity in Aging Can Be Alleviated by Endurance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Shefer, Gabi; Rauner, Gat; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Benayahu, Dafna

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscle regeneration depends on satellite cells, myogenic stem cells that reside on the myofiber surface. Reduced numbers and/or decreased myogenic aptitude of these cells may impede proper maintenance and contribute to the age-associated decline in muscle mass and repair capacity. Endurance exercise was shown to improve muscle performance; however, the direct impact on satellite cells in aging was not yet thoroughly determined. Here, we focused on characterizing the effect of moderate-intensity endurance exercise on satellite cell, as possible means to attenuate adverse effects of aging. Young and old rats of both genders underwent 13 weeks of treadmill-running or remained sedentary. Methodology Gastrocnemius muscles were assessed for the effect of age, gender and exercise on satellite-cell numbers and myogenic capacity. Satellite cells were identified in freshly isolated myofibers based on Pax7 immunostaining (i.e., ex-vivo). The capacity of individual myofiber-associated cells to produce myogenic progeny was determined in clonal assays (in-vitro). We show an age-associated decrease in satellite-cell numbers and in the percent of myogenic clones in old sedentary rats. Upon exercise, there was an increase in myofibers that contain higher numbers of satellite cells in both young and old rats, and an increase in the percent of myogenic clones derived from old rats. Changes at the satellite cell level in old rats were accompanied with positive effects on the lean-to-fat Gast muscle composition and on spontaneous locomotion levels. The significance of these data is that they suggest that the endurance exercise-mediated boost in both satellite numbers and myogenic properties may improve myofiber maintenance in aging. PMID:20967266

  6. Aerobic and Combined Exercise Sessions Reduce Glucose Variability in Type 2 Diabetes: Crossover Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Franciele R.; Umpierre, Daniel; Casali, Karina R.; Tetelbom, Pedro S.; Henn, Nicoli T.; Schaan, Beatriz D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of aerobic (AER) or aerobic plus resistance exercise (COMB) sessions on glucose levels and glucose variability in patients with type 2 diabetes. Additionally, we assessed conventional and non-conventional methods to analyze glucose variability derived from multiple measurements performed with continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Methods Fourteen patients with type 2 diabetes (56±2 years) wore a CGMS during 3 days. Participants randomly performed AER and COMB sessions, both in the morning (24 h after CGMS placement), and at least 7 days apart. Glucose variability was evaluated by glucose standard deviation, glucose variance, mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), and glucose coefficient of variation (conventional methods) as well as by spectral and symbolic analysis (non-conventional methods). Results Baseline fasting glycemia was 139±05 mg/dL and HbA1c 7.9±0.7%. Glucose levels decreased immediately after AER and COMB protocols by ∼16%, which was sustained for approximately 3 hours. Comparing the two exercise modalities, responses over a 24-h period after the sessions were similar for glucose levels, glucose variance and glucose coefficient of variation. In the symbolic analysis, increases in 0 V pattern (COMB, 67.0±7.1 vs. 76.0±6.3, P = 0.003) and decreases in 1 V pattern (COMB, 29.1±5.3 vs. 21.5±5.1, P = 0.004) were observed only after the COMB session. Conclusions Both AER and COMB exercise modalities reduce glucose levels similarly for a short period of time. The use of non-conventional analysis indicates reduction of glucose variability after a single session of combined exercises. Trial Registration Aerobic training, aerobic-resistance training and glucose profile (CGMS) in type 2 diabetes (CGMS exercise). ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00887094. PMID:23536769

  7. Exercise training reduces inflammatory mediators in the intestinal tract of healthy older adult mice.

    PubMed

    Packer, Nicholas; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2012-06-01

    Aging is associated with increased intestinal inflammation and elevated risk of chronic diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and colon cancer; many epidemiologic studies show that regular exercise reduces risk. This study examined the effects of long-term voluntary exercise on inflammatory mediators expressed in the intestine of older (15-16 months), healthy C57BL/6 mice. Animals were assigned to four months of freewheel running (WR; n = 20) or to a "sedentary" no wheel running (NWR; n = 20) control group. Intestinal lymphocytes were harvested and analysed for expression of (1) pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β) and pleiotropic (IL-6) cytokines, and (2) pro-(caspase-3/-7) and anti-(Bcl-2) apoptotic proteins. Training was confirmed by skeletal muscle enzyme activity; stress was assessed by plasma 8-iso-PGF(2α) and corticosterone. The WR mice had a lower expression of TNF-α, caspase-7, and 8-isoprostanes (p < .05) compared to sedentary controls, suggesting that long-term exercise may "protect" the bowel by reducing inflammatory cytokine and apoptotic protein expression. PMID:22647663

  8. Reduced Metaboreflex Control of Blood Pressure during Exercise in Individuals with Intellectual Disability: A Possible Contributor to Exercise Intolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipla, K.; Zafeiridis, A.; Papadopoulos, S.; Koskolou, M.; Geladas, N.; Vrabas, I. S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the hemodynamic responses to isometric handgrip exercise (HG) and examine the role of the muscle metaboreflex in the exercise pressor response in individuals with intellectual disability (IID) and non-disabled control subjects. Eleven males with mild-moderate intellectual disabilities and eleven non-disabled males…

  9. Reduced Metaboreflex Control of Blood Pressure during Exercise in Individuals with Intellectual Disability: A Possible Contributor to Exercise Intolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipla, K.; Zafeiridis, A.; Papadopoulos, S.; Koskolou, M.; Geladas, N.; Vrabas, I. S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the hemodynamic responses to isometric handgrip exercise (HG) and examine the role of the muscle metaboreflex in the exercise pressor response in individuals with intellectual disability (IID) and non-disabled control subjects. Eleven males with mild-moderate intellectual disabilities and eleven non-disabled males

  10. Exercise to reduce the escalation of cocaine self-administration in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Justin J.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Concurrent access to an exercise wheel decreases cocaine self-administration under short access (5 h/day for 5 days) conditions and suppresses cocaine-primed reinstatement in adult rats. Objective The effect of exercise (wheel running) on the escalation of cocaine intake during long access (LgA, 6 h/day for 26 days) conditions was evaluated. Methods Adolescent and adult female rats acquired wheel running, and behavior was allowed to stabilize for 3 days. They were then implanted with an iv catheter and allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg, iv) during 6-h daily sessions for 16 days with concurrent access to either an unlocked or a locked running wheel. Subsequently, for ten additional sessions, wheel access conditions during cocaine self-administration sessions were reversed (i.e., locked wheels became unlocked and vice versa). Results In the adolescents, concurrent access to the unlocked exercise wheel decreased responding for cocaine and attenuated escalation of cocaine intake irrespective of whether the locked or unlocked condition came first. However, cocaine intake increased when the wheel was subsequently locked for the adolescents that had initial access to an unlocked wheel. Concurrent wheel access either before or after the locked wheel access did not reduce cocaine intake in adults. Conclusions Wheel running reduced cocaine intake during LgA conditions in adolescent but not adult rats, and concurrent access to the running wheel was necessary. These results suggest that exercise prevents cocaine seeking and that this effect is more pronounced in adolescents than adults. PMID:22752381

  11. Sex-Role Orientation and the Responses of Men to Exercise Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigation of whether males' gender roles mediated their perception of strenuous physical exercise indicated that, in comparison to "feminine" males, "masculine" males reported lower physical strain, while "androgynous" males had more positive effect and greater endurance. (Author/CB)

  12. The independent and combined effects of exercise training and reducing sedentary behavior on cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kozey Keadle, Sarah; Lyden, Kate; Staudenmayer, John; Hickey, Amanda; Viskochil, Richard; Braun, Barry; Freedson, Patty S

    2014-07-01

    This pilot study examined if the combination of exercise training and reducing sedentary time (ST) results in greater changes to health markers than either intervention alone. Fifty-seven overweight/obese participants (19 males/39 females) (mean ± SD; age, 43.6 ± 9.9 years; body mass index (BMI), 35.1 ± 4.6 kg·m(-2)) completed the 12-week study and were randomly assigned to (i) EX: exercise 5 days·week(-1) for 40 min·session(-1) at moderate intensity; (ii) rST: reduce ST and increase nonexercise physical activity; (iii) EX-rST: combination of EX and rST; and (iv) CON: maintain behavior. Fasting lipids, blood pressure (BP), peak oxygen uptake, BMI, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests were completed pre- and post-intervention. EX and EX-rST increased peak oxygen uptake by ∼10% and decreased systolic BP (both p < 0.001). BMI decreased by -3.3% (95% confidence interval: -4.6% to -1.9%) for EX-rST and -2.2% (-3.5% to 0.0%) for EX. EX-rST significantly increased composite insulin-sensitivity index by 17.8% (2.8% to 32.8%) and decreased insulin area under the curve by 19.4% (-31.4% to -7.3%). No other groups improved in insulin action variables. rST group decreased ST by 7% (∼50 min·day(-1)); however, BP was the only health-related outcome that improved. EX and EX-rST improved peak oxygen uptake and BMI, providing further evidence that moderate-intensity exercise is beneficial. The within-group analysis provides preliminary evidence that exercising and reducing ST may result in improvements in metabolic biomarkers that are not seen with exercise alone, though between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. Future studies, with larger samples, should examine health-related outcomes resulting from greater reductions in ST over longer intervention periods. PMID:24971677

  13. Exercise Training Reduces Peripheral Arterial Stiffness and Myocardial Oxygen Demand in Young Prehypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. METHODS Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120–139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80–89mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18–35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. RESULTS PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm2 and 612±167 dynes s/cm2 (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid–radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral–distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects. PMID:23736111

  14. Circulating ANGPTL8/Betatrophin Is Increased in Obesity and Reduced after Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Sriraman, Devarajan; Cherian, Preethi; AlKhairi, Irina; Elkum, Naser; Behbehani, Kazem; Abubaker, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Objective ANGPTL8 is a liver and adipose tissue produced protein that regulates the level of triglyceride in plasma as well as glucose homeostasis. This study was designed to evaluate the level of ANGPTL8 in obese and non-obese subjects before and after exercise training. Methods A total of 82 non-obese and 62 adult obese were enrolled in this study. Subjects underwent a three months of exercise training. Both full length and C-terminal 139–198 form of ANGPTL8 were measured by ELISA. Results Our data show that the full length ANGPTL8 level was increased in obese subjects (1150.04 ± 108.10 pg/mL) compared to non-obese (775.54 ± 46.12) pg/mL (p-Value = 0.002). C-terminal 139–198 form of ANGPTL8 was also increased in obese subjects 0.28 ± 0.04 ng/mL vs 0.20 ± 0.02 ng/mL in non-obese (p-value = 0.058). In obese subjects, the levels of both forms were reduced after three months of exercise training; full length was reduced from 1150.04 ± 108.10 pg/mL to 852.04 ± 51.95 pg/mL (p-Values 0.015) and c-terminal form was reduced from 0.28 ± 0.04 ng/mL to 0.19 ± 0.03 ng/mL (p-Value = 0.058). Interestingly, full length ANGPTL8 was positively associated with fasting blood glucose (FBG) in non-obese (r = 0.317, p-Value = 0.006) and obese subjects (r = 0.346, p-Value = 0.006) C-terminal 139–198 form of ANGPTL8 on the other hand, did not show any correlation in both groups. Conclusion In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ANGPTL8 was increased in obesity and reduced after exercise training supporting the potential therapeutic benefit of reducing ANGPTL8. The various forms of ANGPTL8 associated differently with FBG suggesting that they have different roles in glucose homeostasis. PMID:26784326

  15. Reducing exercise-induced muscular injury in kendo athletes with supplementation of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Kon, Michihiro; Tanabe, Kai; Akimoto, Takayuki; Kimura, Fuminori; Tanimura, Yuko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kono, Ichiro

    2008-10-01

    Intensive physical exercise may cause muscular injury and increase oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an antioxidant, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), on muscular injury and oxidative stress during exercise training. Eighteen male students, all elite Japanese kendo athletes, were randomly assigned to either a CoQ10 group (n 10) or a placebo group (n 8) in a double-blind manner. Subjects in the CoQ10 group took 300 mg CoQ10 per d for 20 d, while subjects in the placebo group took the same dosage of a placebo. All subjects practised kendo 5.5 h per d for 6 d during the experimental period. Blood samples were taken 2 weeks before, during (1 d, 3 d, 5 d) and 1 week after the training. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration significantly increased in both groups (at 3 d and 5 d). Serum CK (at 3 d), Mb (at 3 d) and lipid peroxide (at 3 d and 5 d) of the CoQ10 group were lower than those of the placebo group. The leucocyte counts in the placebo group significantly increased (at 3 d) and neutrophils significantly increased in both groups (at 3 d and 5 d). Serum scavenging activity against superoxide anion did not change in either group. These results indicate that CoQ10 supplementation reduced exercise-induced muscular injury in athletes. PMID:18284711

  16. Ivabradine reduces myocardial stunning in patients with exercise-inducible ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Maranta, F; Tondi, L; Agricola, E; Margonato, A; Rimoldi, O; Camici, Paolo G

    2015-11-01

    Ivabradine is an effective treatment for angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and for heart failure. Experiments in a canine model have shown that ivabradine reduces both acute left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and post-ischaemic stunning. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ivabradine on LV dysfunction and stunning in patients with CAD and exercise-inducible ischaemia. Fifteen patients with ejection fraction >40 % and heart rate >70 bpm were enrolled. After pharmacologic washout, echocardiography was performed at rest, at peak treadmill exercise and during recovery until return to baseline. After 2 weeks of ivabradine (7.5 mg bid) stress echocardiography was repeated at the same workload achieved during washout. Peak global and segmental (ischaemic vs. remote normal segments) LV longitudinal strain (LS) was assessed by 2D speckle tracking analysis. At washout, LS was significantly impaired in ischaemic compared to remote segments at peak stress and for several minutes during recovery. After ivabradine a smaller, albeit still significant, impairment of LS in ischaemic segments was observed at peak whilst no difference with remote segments was present during recovery. Furthermore, the average global LS value improved significantly after treatment. In conclusion, ivabradine reduces both acute LV dysfunction and stunning in patients with CAD and exercise-inducible ischaemia. We hypothesise that this mechanism might contribute to reduce chronic LV dysfunction in patients with CAD. In this setting the drug might limit the development of hibernating myocardium which is believed to result from repeated episodes of ischaemia and stunning. PMID:26419678

  17. Voluntary exercise reduces the neurotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine in maternally separated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mabandla, Musa Vuyisile; Russell, Vivienne Ann

    2010-01-01

    Maternal separation has been associated with development of anxiety-like behaviour and learning impairments in adult rats. This has been linked to changes in brain morphology observed after exposure to high levels of circulating glucocorticoids during the stress-hyporesponsive period (P4 to P14). In the present study, adult rats that had been subjected to maternal separation (180 min/day for 14 days) during the stress-hyporesponsive period, received unilateral infusions of a small dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 5 μg/4 μl saline) into the medial forebrain bundle. The results showed that voluntary exercise had a neuroprotective effect in both non-stressed and maternally separated rats in that there was a decrease in forelimb akinesia (step test) and limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Maternal separation increased forelimb akinesia and forelimb use asymmetry and reduced the beneficial effect of exercise on forelimb akinesia. It also reduced exploratory behaviour, consistent with anxiety-like behaviour normally associated with maternal separation. Exercise appeared to reduce dopamine neuron destruction in the lesioned substantia nigra when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere. However, this appeared to be due to a compensatory decrease in completely stained tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in the contralateral, non-lesioned substantia nigra. In agreement with reports that maternal separation increases the 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopamine terminals in the striatum, there was a small increase in dopamine neuron destruction when expressed as a percentage of the non-lesioned hemisphere but there was no difference in dopamine cell number, suggesting that exposure to maternal separation did not exacerbate dopamine cell loss. PMID:20206210

  18. Dietary nitrate reduces skeletal muscle oxygenation response to physical exercise: a quantitative muscle functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Rachel; Gray, Stuart R.; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Dawson, Dana; Frenneaux, Michael; He, Jiabao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation (probably via conversion to nitrite) increases skeletal muscle metabolic efficiency. In addition, it may also cause hypoxia‐dependent vasodilation and this has the potential to augment oxygen delivery to exercising skeletal muscle. However, direct evidence for the latter with spatial localization to exercising muscle groups does not exist. We employed quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) to characterize skeletal muscle oxygen utilization and replenishment by assessment of tissue oxygenation maximal change and recovery change, respectively. Eleven healthy subjects were enrolled, of whom 9 (age 33.3 ± 4.4 years, five males) completed the study. Each subject took part in three MRI visits, with dietary nitrate (7cl concentrated beetroot juice) consumed before the third visit. During each visit fMRIs were conducted concurrently with plantar flexion exercise at workloads of 15% and 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). No significant changes were found between visits 1 and 2 in the fMRI measures. A decrease in maximal change was found at 15% MVC in soleus between visits 2 and 3 (5.12 ± 2.36 to 2.55 ± 1.42, P = 0.004) and between visits 1 and 3 (4.43 ± 2.12 to 2.55 ± 1.42, P = 0.043), but not at 25% MVC or within gastrocnemius. There was no difference in recovery change between visits. We found that dietary nitrate supplementation reduces tissue oxygenation alterations during physical exercise in skeletal muscle. This effect is more prominent in muscles with predominantly type 1 fibers and at lower workloads. This indicates that in healthy subjects dietary nitrate predominantly affects skeletal muscle energy efficiency with no change in oxygen delivery. PMID:25052493

  19. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; da Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; de Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats. PMID:25120082

  20. Reduced exercise capacity in early-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Role of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mezzani, Alessandro; Pisano, Fabrizio; Cavalli, Alessandra; Tommasi, Maria Antonietta; Corrà, Ugo; Colombo, Silvia; Grassi, Bruno; Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Morandi, Lucia; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to correlate skeletal muscle mass (SM) with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) descriptors of exercise capacity in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and compare ALS CPET data with those of patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and normal subjects (N). Twenty-four early-stage ALS patients (63±11 years) underwent bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition, resting spirometry, and ramp CPET. Six MM and six N were used as controls (56 ± 7 and 63 ± 4 years, respectively). Results showed that ALS SM index was similar to that of N (9.0±2.1 kg/m(2) vs. 10.4±1.9 kg/m(2), respectively; p = n.s.), whereas peak VO(2)/kg SM was significantly lower (41.5 ± 11.6 ml/kg/min vs. 57.8 ± 7.5 ml/kg/min, respectively; p < 0.01). However, the heart rate/VO(2) slope did not differ between ALS and N, being significantly higher in MM than in both ALS and N (6.1 ± 1.4 beats/ml/kg/min vs. 4.2 ± 1.1 beats/ml/kg/min vs. 3.8 ± 2.0 beats/ml/kg/min, respectively; both p < 0.01), excluding a marked skeletal muscle metabolic impairment in ALS. Neither cardiovascular nor ventilatory dysfunction was detected in ALS. Early-stage ALS patients show a SM similar to N, but with a reduced peak VO(2)/kg SM. Such a reduced peripheral O(2) utilization is consistent with deconditioning as the main cause of impaired exercise capacity in this population. PMID:21830991

  1. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Minett, Geoffrey M; Duffield, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e., team sports) induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness, and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery strategies. The direction of this research narrative on post-exercise recovery differs to the increasing emphasis on the complex interaction between both central and peripheral factors regulating exercise intensity during exercise performance. Given the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in motor-unit recruitment during exercise, it too may have an integral role in post-exercise recovery. Indeed, this hypothesis is indirectly supported by an apparent disconnect in time-course changes in physiological and biochemical markers resultant from exercise and the ensuing recovery of exercise performance. Equally, improvements in perceptual recovery, even withstanding the physiological state of recovery, may interact with both feed-forward/feed-back mechanisms to influence subsequent efforts. Considering the research interest afforded to recovery methodologies designed to hasten the return of homeostasis within the muscle, the limited focus on contributors to post-exercise recovery from CNS origins is somewhat surprising. Based on this context, the current review aims to outline the potential contributions of the brain to performance recovery after strenuous exercise. PMID:24550837

  2. Is recovery driven by central or peripheral factors? A role for the brain in recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise

    PubMed Central

    Minett, Geoffrey M.; Duffield, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged intermittent-sprint exercise (i.e., team sports) induce disturbances in skeletal muscle structure and function that are associated with reduced contractile function, a cascade of inflammatory responses, perceptual soreness, and a delayed return to optimal physical performance. In this context, recovery from exercise-induced fatigue is traditionally treated from a peripheral viewpoint, with the regeneration of muscle physiology and other peripheral factors the target of recovery strategies. The direction of this research narrative on post-exercise recovery differs to the increasing emphasis on the complex interaction between both central and peripheral factors regulating exercise intensity during exercise performance. Given the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in motor-unit recruitment during exercise, it too may have an integral role in post-exercise recovery. Indeed, this hypothesis is indirectly supported by an apparent disconnect in time-course changes in physiological and biochemical markers resultant from exercise and the ensuing recovery of exercise performance. Equally, improvements in perceptual recovery, even withstanding the physiological state of recovery, may interact with both feed-forward/feed-back mechanisms to influence subsequent efforts. Considering the research interest afforded to recovery methodologies designed to hasten the return of homeostasis within the muscle, the limited focus on contributors to post-exercise recovery from CNS origins is somewhat surprising. Based on this context, the current review aims to outline the potential contributions of the brain to performance recovery after strenuous exercise. PMID:24550837

  3. Efficacy of Chinese Eye Exercises on Reducing Accommodative Lag in School-Aged Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Ming; Kang, Meng-Tian; Peng, Xiao-xia; Li, Si-Yuan; Wang, Yang; Li, Lei; Yu, Jing; Qiu, Li-Xin; Sun, Yun-Yun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Sun, Xin; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of Chinese eye exercises on reducing accommodative lag in children by a randomized, double-blinded controlled trial. Methods A total of 190 children aged 10 to 14 years with emmetropia to moderate myopia were included. They were randomly allocated to three groups: standard Chinese eye exercises group (trained for eye exercises by doctors of traditional Chinese medicine); sham point eye exercises group (instructed to massage on non-acupoints); and eyes closed group (asked to close their eyes without massage). Primary outcome was change in accommodative lag immediately after intervention. Secondary outcomes included changes in corrected near and distant visual acuity, and visual discomfort score. Results Children in the standard Chinese eye exercises group had significantly greater alleviation of accommodative lag (-0.10D) than those in sham point eye exercises group (-0.03D) and eyes closed group (0.07D) (P = 0.04). The proportion of children with alleviation of accommodative lag was significantly higher in the standard Chinese eye exercises group (54.0%) than in the sham point eye exercises group (32.8%) and the eyes closed group (34.9%) (P = 0.03). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. Conclusion Chinese eye exercises as performed daily in primary and middle schools in China have statistically but probably clinically insignificant effect in reducing accommodative lag of school-aged children in the short-term. Considering the higher amounts of near work load of Chinese children, the efficacy of eye exercises may be insufficient in preventing myopia progression in the long-term. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01756287 PMID:25742161

  4. Adult scoliosis can be reduced through specific SEAS exercises: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Alessandra; Parzini, Silvana; Negrini, Maria Gabriella; Romano, Michele; Atanasio, Salvatore; Zaina, Fabio; Negrini, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Background It has been known since many years that scoliosis can continue to progress after skeletal maturity: the rate of progression has shown to be linear, and it can be used to establish an individual prognosis. Once there is progression there is an indication for treatment: usually it is proposed a surgical one. There are very few papers on an alternative rehabilitation approach; since many years we propose specific SEAS exercises and the aim of this study is to present one case report on this approach. Case presentation All radiographs have been measured blindly twice using the same protractor by one expert physician whose repeatability error proved to be < 3° Cobb; the average measurement has been used. In this case a 25 years old female scoliosis patient, previously treated from 14 (Risser 1) to 19 years of age with a decrease of the curve from 46° to 37°, showed a progression of 10° Cobb in 6 years. The patient has then been treated with SEAS exercises only, and in one year progression has been reverted from 47° to 28.5°. Conclusion A scoliosis curve is made of different components: the structural bony and ligamentous components, and a postural one that counts up to 9° in children, while it has not been quantified in adults. This case shows that when adult scoliosis aggravates it is possible to intervene with specific exercises (SEAS) not just to get stability, but to recover last years collapse. The reduction of scoliotic curve through rehabilitation presumably does not indicate a reduction of the bone deformity, but rely on a recovery of the upright postural collapse. This reduction can decrease the chronic asymmetric load on the spine and, in the long run, reduce the risks of progression. PMID:19087344

  5. Paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary fibrosis increases exercise metabolic cost, reducing aerobic performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Ana Cristina Rodrigues; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria da Glória; Mendes, Polyana Leite; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Carvalho, Giovanna Marcella Cavalcante; Zin, Walter Araujo; Gripp, Fernando; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2009-12-01

    Rats exposed to the quaternary herbicide paraquat (PQ) exhibit oxidative stress and lung injury. In the present study, we investigated the effect of multiple exposures to PQ on aerobic performance during progressive exercise on a treadmill in rats. PQ was dissolved in saline (SAL) (10 mg/ml) and administered intraperitoneally 7 mg/kg body wt to Wistar rats (n = 5) once a week for one month. Control rats received SAL (0.7 ml/kg body wt., intraperitoneally, n = 5) over the same time period. The animals were submitted to aerobic evaluation on a treadmill using a progressive protocol until fatigue prior to the administration of the first dose of PQ or SAL and repeated at 1 week and 40 days following the last dose of the herbicide. Twenty-four hours after the last performance tests, the animals were sacrificed, lungs removed and divided in two groups: PQ and SAL for histopathological analysis. The animals exposed to PQ exhibited decrease in aerobic performance and mechanical efficiency (ME) as well as increase in oxygen consumption during exercise in comparison to the controls forty days after the last dose of PQ. Lung histologic changes included atelectasis, interstitial edema, and inflammation cells in PQ group. The collagen system fibers, fraction area of alveolar collapse and influx of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells in lung parenchyma were higher in PQ compared to SAL. In conclusion, multiple exposures to PQ induce pulmonary fibrosis, reduce the aerobic performance and mechanical efficiency and increase the metabolic cost of exercise in rats. PMID:19952502

  6. Physical exercise, use of Plantago ovata and aspirin, and reduced risk of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, M; Calle-Purón, M-E; González-Navarro, A; Regidor-Poyatos, E; Soriano, T; Martínez-Hernandez, D; Rojas, V-D; Guinee, V F

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate certain risk and protective factors for colon cancer in our population, we conducted a paired case-control study where cases were all people diagnosed with colon cancer who were registered at the Cancer Data Exchange Systems of the Community of Madrid between January 1995 and December 1996, and controls were randomly taken from electoral lists. The study population consisted of 424 persons. Using SPSS for Windows, variables were adjusted by multiple logistic regression. The results indicate that lack of physical exercise is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.21) as compared with moderate activity 1-2 days a week. The risk decreases linearly with increasing physical exercise, and this association remains after stratifying the analysis for the existence of constipation. The consumption of is associated with a reduced risk of colon cancer in constipated patients, with an OR of 0.094 (0.014-0.639), as is aspirin use, with an OR of 0.980 (0.898-0.999). These results were obtained after adjusting all the ORs for diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, family history and socio-demographic factors such as marital status and educational level. PMID:12394244

  7. Dietary supplementation with the microalga Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta) reduces prolonged exercise-induced oxidative stress in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Simona; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino; Venditti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of ten-day 1% Galdieria sulphuraria dietary supplementation on oxidative damage and metabolic changes elicited by acute exercise (6-hour swimming) determining oxygen consumption, lipid hydroperoxides, protein bound carbonyls in rat tissue (liver, heart, and muscle) homogenates and mitochondria, tissue glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, glutathione content, and rates of H2O2 mitochondrial release. Exercise increased oxidative damage in tissues and mitochondria and decreased tissue content of reduced glutathione. Moreover, it increased State 4 and decreased State 3 respiration in tissues and mitochondria. G. sulphuraria supplementation reduced the above exercise-induced variations. Conversely, alga supplementation was not able to modify the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial release rate of hydrogen peroxide and in liver and heart antioxidant enzyme activities. The alga capacity to reduce lipid oxidative damage without reducing mitochondrial H2O2 release can be due to its high content of C-phycocyanin and glutathione, which are able to scavenge peroxyl radicals and contribute to phospholipid hydroperoxide metabolism, respectively. In conclusion, G. sulphuraria ability to reduce exercise-linked oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction makes it potentially useful even in other conditions leading to oxidative stress, including hyperthyroidism, chronic inflammation, and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25874021

  8. Dietary Supplementation with the Microalga Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta) Reduces Prolonged Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carfagna, Simona; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Pinto, Gabriele; Venditti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of ten-day 1% Galdieria sulphuraria dietary supplementation on oxidative damage and metabolic changes elicited by acute exercise (6-hour swimming) determining oxygen consumption, lipid hydroperoxides, protein bound carbonyls in rat tissue (liver, heart, and muscle) homogenates and mitochondria, tissue glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, glutathione content, and rates of H2O2 mitochondrial release. Exercise increased oxidative damage in tissues and mitochondria and decreased tissue content of reduced glutathione. Moreover, it increased State 4 and decreased State 3 respiration in tissues and mitochondria. G. sulphuraria supplementation reduced the above exercise-induced variations. Conversely, alga supplementation was not able to modify the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial release rate of hydrogen peroxide and in liver and heart antioxidant enzyme activities. The alga capacity to reduce lipid oxidative damage without reducing mitochondrial H2O2 release can be due to its high content of C-phycocyanin and glutathione, which are able to scavenge peroxyl radicals and contribute to phospholipid hydroperoxide metabolism, respectively. In conclusion, G. sulphuraria ability to reduce exercise-linked oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction makes it potentially useful even in other conditions leading to oxidative stress, including hyperthyroidism, chronic inflammation, and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25874021

  9. Voluntary wheel running exercise and dietary lactose concomitantly reduce proportion of secondary bile acids in rat feces.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Masahito; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yajima, Takaji; Hara, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Satoshi

    2010-09-01

    According to epidemiologic studies, a negative correlation exists between exercise amount and subsequent cancer development risk in the large intestine. The proportion of secondary bile acids (SBA) in the large intestine is related to subsequent risk for colorectal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of voluntary wheel running exercise and dietary intervention on bile acid (BA) metabolism in the large intestine. Wistar/ST rats (6 wk old) were divided into two groups, exercise and sedentary, after acclimation. Four days after the animals were assigned to a group, rats in each group were fed diets supplemented with different carbohydrate sources including dextrin, sucrose, and lactose. The wheel running period was 4 wk in the exercise group, whereas rats in the sedentary group remained in individual cages during this period. BA composition in collected feces was analyzed with ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that wheel running exercise decreased plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acids. These decreases were accompanied by a reduction in the proportion of SBA to primary BA (PBA) in feces; however, daily excretion of BA was comparable regardless of wheel running exercise. In addition, ingestion of lactose decreased the SBA-to-PBA ratio and suppressed production of hyodeoxycholic acid in feces. In conclusion, voluntary wheel running exercise, in combination with dietary intervention, could independently reduce the SBA-to-PBA ratio within the large intestine without changing BA excretion. These changes may contribute to the prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:20616226

  10. Capsiate Supplementation Reduces Oxidative Cost of Contraction in Exercising Mouse Skeletal Muscle In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Kazuya; Tonson, Anne; Pecchi, Émilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Fur, Yann; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Chronic administration of capsiate is known to accelerate whole-body basal energy metabolism, but the consequences in exercising skeletal muscle remain very poorly documented. In order to clarify this issue, the effect of 2-week daily administration of either vehicle (control) or purified capsiate (at 10- or 100-mg/kg body weight) on skeletal muscle function and energetics were investigated throughout a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements in mice. Mechanical performance and energy metabolism were assessed strictly non-invasively in contracting gastrocnemius muscle using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 31-phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Regardless of the dose, capsiate treatments markedly disturbed basal bioenergetics in vivo including intracellular pH alkalosis and decreased phosphocreatine content. Besides, capsiate administration did affect neither mitochondrial uncoupling protein-3 gene expression nor both basal and maximal oxygen consumption in isolated saponin-permeabilized fibers, but decreased by about twofold the Km of mitochondrial respiration for ADP. During a standardized in vivo fatiguing protocol (6-min of repeated maximal isometric contractions electrically induced at a frequency of 1.7 Hz), both capsiate treatments reduced oxidative cost of contraction by 30-40%, whereas force-generating capacity and fatigability were not changed. Moreover, the rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis during the post-electrostimulation recovery period remained unaffected by capsiate. Both capsiate treatments further promoted muscle mass gain, and the higher dose also reduced body weight gain and abdominal fat content. These findings demonstrate that, in addition to its anti-obesity effect, capsiate supplementation improves oxidative metabolism in exercising muscle, which strengthen this compound as a natural compound for improving health. PMID:26030806

  11. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis reduces memory interference in humans: opposing effects of aerobic exercise and depression.

    PubMed

    Déry, Nicolas; Pilgrim, Malcolm; Gibala, Martin; Gillen, Jenna; Wojtowicz, J Martin; Macqueen, Glenda; Becker, Suzanna

    2013-01-01

    Since the remarkable discovery of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus, considerable effort has been devoted to unraveling the functional significance of these new neurons. Our group has proposed that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs. To test this theory, we implemented a recognition task containing some objects that were repeated across trials as well as some objects that were highly similar, but not identical, to ones previously observed. The similar objects, termed lures, overlap substantially with previously viewed stimuli, and thus, may require hippocampal neurogenesis in order to avoid catastrophic interference. Lifestyle factors such as aerobic exercise and stress have been shown to impact the local neurogenic microenvironment, leading to enhanced and reduced levels of DG neurogenesis, respectively. Accordingly, we hypothesized that healthy young adults who take part in a long-term aerobic exercise regime would demonstrate enhanced performance on the visual pattern separation task, specifically at correctly categorizing lures as "similar." Indeed, those who experienced a proportionally large change in fitness demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in their ability to correctly identify lure stimuli as "similar." Conversely, we expected that those who score high on depression scales, an indicator of chronic stress, would exhibit selective deficits at appropriately categorizing lures. As expected, those who scored high on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were significantly worse than those with relatively lower BDI scores at correctly identifying lures as "similar," while performance on novel and repeated stimuli was identical. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information. PMID:23641193

  12. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis reduces memory interference in humans: opposing effects of aerobic exercise and depression

    PubMed Central

    Déry, Nicolas; Pilgrim, Malcolm; Gibala, Martin; Gillen, Jenna; Wojtowicz, J. Martin; MacQueen, Glenda; Becker, Suzanna

    2013-01-01

    Since the remarkable discovery of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian hippocampus, considerable effort has been devoted to unraveling the functional significance of these new neurons. Our group has proposed that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs. To test this theory, we implemented a recognition task containing some objects that were repeated across trials as well as some objects that were highly similar, but not identical, to ones previously observed. The similar objects, termed lures, overlap substantially with previously viewed stimuli, and thus, may require hippocampal neurogenesis in order to avoid catastrophic interference. Lifestyle factors such as aerobic exercise and stress have been shown to impact the local neurogenic microenvironment, leading to enhanced and reduced levels of DG neurogenesis, respectively. Accordingly, we hypothesized that healthy young adults who take part in a long-term aerobic exercise regime would demonstrate enhanced performance on the visual pattern separation task, specifically at correctly categorizing lures as “similar.” Indeed, those who experienced a proportionally large change in fitness demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in their ability to correctly identify lure stimuli as “similar.” Conversely, we expected that those who score high on depression scales, an indicator of chronic stress, would exhibit selective deficits at appropriately categorizing lures. As expected, those who scored high on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were significantly worse than those with relatively lower BDI scores at correctly identifying lures as “similar,” while performance on novel and repeated stimuli was identical. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information. PMID:23641193

  13. Resistance exercise increases AMPK activity and reduces 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Hans C; Fujita, Satoshi; Cadenas, Jerson G; Chinkes, David L; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2006-10-15

    Resistance exercise is a potent stimulator of muscle protein synthesis and muscle cell growth, with the increase in protein synthesis being detected within 2-3 h post-exercise and remaining elevated for up to 48 h. However, during exercise, muscle protein synthesis is inhibited. An increase in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity has recently been shown to decrease mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling to key regulators of translation initiation. We hypothesized that the cellular mechanism for the inhibition of muscle protein synthesis during an acute bout of resistance exercise in humans would be associated with an activation of AMPK and an inhibition of downstream components of the mTOR pathway (4E-BP1 and S6K1). We studied 11 subjects (seven men, four women) before, during, and for 2 h following a bout of resistance exercise. Muscle biopsy specimens were collected at each time point from the vastus lateralis. We utilized immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting methods to measure muscle AMPKalpha2 activity, and mTOR-associated upstream and downstream signalling proteins, and stable isotope techniques to measure muscle fractional protein synthetic rate (FSR). AMPKalpha2 activity (pmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1)) at baseline was 1.7 +/- 0.3, increased immediately post-exercise (3.0 +/- 0.6), and remained elevated at 1 h post-exercise (P < 0.05). Muscle FSR decreased during exercise and was significantly increased at 1 and 2 h post-exercise (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at Thr37/46 was significantly reduced immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05). We conclude that AMPK activation and a reduced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 may contribute to the inhibition of muscle protein synthesis during resistance exercise. However, by 1-2 h post-exercise, muscle protein synthesis increased in association with an activation of protein kinase B, mTOR, S6K1 and eEF2. PMID:16873412

  14. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  15. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances strength performance and reduces perceived exertion and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Parkhouse, Natalie; Cook, Kathryn; Smith, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of caffeine ingestion in enhancing aerobic performance is well established. However, despite suggestions that caffeine may enhance resistance exercise performance, research is equivocal on the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on resistance exercise performance. It has also been suggested that dampened perception of perceived exertion and pain perception might be an explanation for any possible enhancement of resistance exercise performance due to caffeine ingestion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of caffeine ingestion on repetitions to failure, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise to failure. Eleven resistance trained individuals (9 males, 2 females, mean age±SD=26.4±6.4 years), took part in this double-blind, randomised cross-over experimental study whereby they ingested a caffeinated (5 mg kg(-1)) or placebo solution 60 minutes before completing a bout of resistance exercise. Experimental conditions were separated by at least 48 hours. Resistance exercise sessions consisted of bench press, deadlift, prone row and back squat exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Results indicated that participants completed significantly greater repetitions to failure, irrespective of exercise, in the presence of caffeine (p=0.0001). Mean±S.D of repetitions to failure was 19.6±3.7 and 18.5±4.1 in caffeine and placebo conditions, respectively. There were no differences in peak heart rate or peak blood lactate values across conditions (both p >0.05). RPE was significantly lower in the caffeine compared to the placebo condition (p=0.03) and was significantly higher during lower body exercises compared to upper body exercises irrespective of substance ingested (p=0.0001). For muscle pain perception, a significant condition by exercise interaction (p=0.027) revealed that muscle pain perception was lower in the caffeine condition, irrespective of exercise. With caffeine, pain perception was significantly higher in the deadlift and back squat compared to the bench press. However, with placebo, pain perception was significantly higher for the deadlift and back squat compared to the prone row only. Therefore, acute caffeine ingestion not only enhances resistance exercise performance to failure but also reduces perception of exertion and muscle pain. PMID:23834545

  16. Short-Term Aerobic Exercise Reduces Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, and Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Kenneth M.; Lockhart, Chris; Cuff, Darcye; Potter, Tiffany F.; Meneilly, Graydon S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The relationship between increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular mortality is well established in type 2 diabetes. We examined whether aerobic exercise could reduce arterial stiffness in older adults with type 2 diabetes complicated by comorbid hypertension and hyperlipidemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 36 older adults (mean age 71.4 ± 0.7 years) with diet-controlled or oral hypoglycemic–controlled type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia were recruited. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an aerobic group (3 months vigorous aerobic exercise) and a nonaerobic group (no aerobic exercise). Exercise sessions were supervised by a certified exercise trainer three times per week, and a combination of cycle ergometers and treadmills was used. Arterial stiffness was measured using the Complior device. RESULTS When the two groups were compared, aerobic training resulted in a decrease in measures of both radial (−20.7 ± 6.3 vs. +8.5 ± 6.6%, P = 0.005) and femoral (−13.9 ± 6.7 vs. +4.4 ± 3.3%, P = 0.015) pulse-wave velocity despite the fact that aerobic fitness as assessed by Vo2max did not demonstrate an improvement with training (P = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that a relatively short aerobic exercise intervention in older adults can reduce multifactorial arterial stiffness (type 2 diabetes, aging, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia). PMID:19509011

  17. Serum free light chains are reduced in endurance trained older adults: Evidence that exercise training may reduce basal inflammation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Jennifer L J; Phillips, Anna C; Drayson, Mark T; Campbell, John P

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, free light chains (FLCs) are used as key serum biomarkers in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell malignancies, but polyclonal FLCs can also be used as an accurate real-time indicator of immune-activation and inflammation. The primary aim of the present study was to assess the effects of exercise training status on serum FLCs in older adults, and secondly, to examine if training status moderated serum FLC responses to acute exercise. Kappa and lambda serum FLC levels were measured in 45 healthy older adults (aged ≥60years) who were either sedentary, physically active or endurance trained. FLCs were measured at baseline and in response to an acute bout of submaximal exercise. The endurance trained group had significantly lower levels of kappa and lambda serum FLCs compared with physically active or sedentary elderly adults; these effects were independent of age, BMI and renal function. There was no significant difference in whole immunoglobulins between groups. Exercise training status had no effect on serum FLC responses to acute exercise, which were marginal. In conclusion, endurance training was associated with lower FLC levels compared with less physically active individuals. These findings suggest that long-term endurance training may be beneficial in reducing basal inflammation in older adults as well as elevated FLCs present in inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, often associated with ageing. FLCs may serve as a useful biomarker for monitoring the efficacy of exercise intervention studies in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:26921802

  18. Development of Countermeasures and Exercise Protocols to Reduce the Effects of Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Pandurang M.

    2000-01-01

    I have helped scientists at NASA-JSC in analyzing data from many projects. Some of the major ones are: (1) cardiovascular responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) following bed rest, (2) the effects of dietary sodium, (3) in-flight cycle exercise mitigates reduced oxygen consumption at submaximal heart rates following space flight, (4) exercise thermoregulation after 13 days of head down bed rest, and (5) bed rest induced orthostatic intolerance. Many of the projects have now been completed and some of them are in the process of being published and others have been presented at national meetings. These projects have helped me be a true statistician and given me a real-life perspective of how interesting and complicated data can be. As a by-product of of these involvements I have been able to write and publish some methodological research that have applications in NASA and elsewhere. For instance, while I was at JSC, I happened to meet Dr. Al Feiveson and got into a discussion of the Space Shuttle Reliability. This led us to rethink about the way the data on the accelerated life testing of space shuttle pressure vessels had been analyzed. This has resulted in a major statistical paper and the paper has appeared in one of the top journals in the field of Statistics. A review of the paper by the editor of the journal was published in AmStatNews, a copy is attached with this report. I have presented these findings at the national/international statistics conference and at other places. I have also written another paper on reliability and a paper on calibration techniques that have applications in the engineering and the biomedical branches of NASA. Further, I am currently in the process of writing at least two more papers that have direct applications in NASA related studies.

  19. Reduced ventricular flow propagation velocity in elite athletes is augmented with the resumption of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Louise H; Arnolda, Leonard F; Deague, Jenny A; Playford, David; Maurogiovanni, Antonio; O'Driscoll, Gerard; Green, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Chronic exercise induces physiological enlargement of the left ventricle (athlete's heart), but the effects of current and long-term exercise training on diastolic function have not been investigated. Echocardiography and Doppler imaging were used to assess left ventricular (LV) dimensions and indices of diastolic filling in 22 elite athletes at the end of their off-season (baseline) and, subsequently, following 3 and 6 months of training. Twelve matched controls were also studied at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Compared to controls at baseline, athletes exhibited significantly higher LV mass (235.7 7.1 g versus 178.1 14.5 g, P < 0.01) and reduced flow propagation velocity (VP: 50.21 1.7 versus 72.2 3.6 cm s?1, P < 0.01), a measure of diastolic function. Three months of training further increased LV mass in athletes (253.2 7.1 g; P < 0.01 versus baseline), and significantly increased their VP (66.7 2.5 cm s?1; P < 0.05 versus baseline). These trends for increased mass and diastolic filling persisted following 6 months of training (LV mass 249.0 8.7 g P < 0.05 versus baseline; VP 75.7 3.0 cm s?1; P < 0.01 versus baseline, and P = 0.01 versus 3 months). This study suggests that following a period of relative inactivity the rate of ventricular relaxation during early diastole may be slowed in athletes who exhibit ventricular hypertrophy, whilst resumption of training increases the speed of ventricular relaxation in the presence of further hypertrophy of the left ventricle. PMID:15661822

  20. Aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular changes of small mesenteric and coronary arteries in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Fernanda R; Briones, Ana M; García-Redondo, Ana B; Galán, María; Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; Avendaño, Maria S; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Fernandes, Tiago; Vassallo, Dalton V; Oliveira, Edilamar M; Salaices, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Regular physical activity is an effective non-pharmacological therapy for prevention and control of hypertension. We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise training in vascular remodelling and in the mechanical and functional alterations of coronary and small mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Experimental Approach Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), SHR and SHR trained on a treadmill for 12 weeks were used to evaluate vascular structural, mechanical and functional properties. Key Results Exercise did not affect lumen diameter, wall thickness and wall/lumen ratio but reduced vascular stiffness of coronary and mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise also reduced collagen deposition and normalized altered internal elastic lamina organization and expression of MMP-9 in mesenteric arteries from SHR. Exercise did not affect contractile responses of coronary arteries but improved the endothelium-dependent relaxation in SHR. In mesenteric arteries, training normalized the increased contractile responses induced by U46619 and by high concentrations of acetylcholine. In vessels from SHR, exercise normalized the effects of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and the NOS inhibitor l-NAME in vasodilator or vasoconstrictor responses, normalized the increased O2− production and the reduced Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression and increased NO production. Conclusions and Implications Exercise training of SHR improves endothelial function and vascular stiffness in coronary and small mesenteric arteries. This might be related to the concomitant decrease of oxidative stress and increase of NO bioavailability. Such effects demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the vascular system and could contribute to a reduction in blood pressure. PMID:22994554

  1. Evidence for the role of isometric exercise training in reducing blood pressure: potential mechanisms and future directions.

    PubMed

    Millar, Philip J; McGowan, Cheri L; Cornelissen, Vronique A; Araujo, Claudio G; Swaine, Ian L

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension, or the chronic elevation in resting arterial blood pressure (BP), is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and estimated to affect ~1 billion adults worldwide. The goals of treatment are to lower BP through lifestyle modifications (smoking cessation, weight loss, exercise training, healthy eating and reduced sodium intake), and if not solely effective, the addition of antihypertensive medications. In particular, increased physical exercise and decreased sedentarism are important strategies in the prevention and management of hypertension. Current guidelines recommend both aerobic and dynamic resistance exercise training modalities to reduce BP. Mounting prospective evidence suggests that isometric exercise training in normotensive and hypertensive (medicated and non-medicated) cohorts of young and old participants may produce similar, if not greater, reductions in BP, with meta-analyses reporting mean reductions of between 10 and 13 mmHg systolic, and 6 and 8 mmHg diastolic. Isometric exercise training protocols typically consist of four sets of 2-min handgrip or leg contractions sustained at 20-50 % of maximal voluntary contraction, with each set separated by a rest period of 1-4 min. Training is usually completed three to five times per week for 4-10 weeks. Although the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations remain to be fully clarified, improvements in conduit and resistance vessel endothelium-dependent dilation, oxidative stress, and autonomic regulation of heart rate and BP have been reported. The clinical significance of isometric exercise training, as a time-efficient and effective training modality to reduce BP, warrants further study. This evidence-based review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of isometric exercise training on resting BP. PMID:24174307

  2. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important and requires further investigation. PMID:27096389

  3. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90–100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important and requires further investigation. PMID:27096389

  4. Examining exercise dependence symptomatology from a self-determination perspective.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Jemma; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Duda, Joan L

    2006-11-01

    Background Pulling from Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985), this study examined whether individuals classified as 'nondependent-symptomatic' and 'nondependent-asymptomatic' for exercise dependence differed in terms of reported levels of exercise-related psychological need satisfaction, self-determined versus controlling motivation and exercise behavior. In addition, we examined the type of motivational regulations predicting exercise behavior among these different groups, and their role as mediators between psychological need satisfaction and behavioral outcomes. Methods Participants (N = 339) completed measures of exercise-specific psychological need satisfaction, motivational regulations, exercise behavior and exercise dependence. Results Nondependent-symptomatic individuals reported higher levels of competence need satisfaction and all forms of motivational regulation, compared to nondependent-asymptomatic individuals. Introjected regulation approached significance as a positive predictor of strenuous exercise behavior for symptomatic individuals. Identified regulation was a positive predictor of strenuous exercise, and completely mediated the relationship between competence need satisfaction and strenuous exercise behavior, for asymptomatic individuals. Conclusions The findings reinforce the applicability of SDT to understanding the quantity and quality of engagement in exercise. PMID:17035261

  5. Preliminary study of an exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep among long-term haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Radha; Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Singh, Surindar Kaur Surat; Lim, Soo Kun; Chinna, Karuthan; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Fatigue and quality of sleep are the main factors that contribute to a poor quality of life among patients on long-term haemodialysis. Studies have also emphasised the importance of exercise for improving the wellbeing of dialysis patients. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a predialysis low-to-moderate-intensity exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep disorders among long-term haemodialysis patients. METHODS In this quasi-experimental study, an exercise programme was conducted three times a week for 12 weeks before long-term haemodialysis patients underwent dialysis at two centres. The patients were categorised into either the exercise group (n = 28) or control group (n = 27). The latter was asked to maintain their current lifestyles. Assessments of fatigue and sleep disorder levels were performed for both groups using self-reported questionnaires at baseline and after intervention. The patients’ perception of the exercise programme was also determined using self-reported questionnaires. RESULTS Paired sample t-test indicated improvements in fatigue level in the exercise group (mean fatigue score: post-treatment 40.5 ± 7.9 vs. pre-treatment 30.0 ± 10.9). Improvements in sleep disorders were also observed in the exercise group (mean score: post-treatment 7.6 ± 3.3 vs. pre-treatment 10.1 ± 3.8). However, sleep quality deteriorated in the control group (mean score: post-treatment 10.7 ± 2.9 vs. pre-treatment 9.3 ± 2.9). CONCLUSION Simple low-to-moderate-intensity exercise is effective for improving fatigue, sleep disorders and the overall quality of life among haemodialysis patients. PMID:25273932

  6. Beta-alanine supplementation reduces acidosis but not oxygen uptake response during high-intensity cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Baguet, Audrey; Koppo, Katrien; Pottier, Andries; Derave, Wim

    2010-02-01

    The oral ingestion of beta-alanine, the rate-limiting precursor in carnosine synthesis, has been shown to elevate the muscle carnosine content. Carnosine is thought to act as a physiologically relevant pH buffer during exercise but direct evidence is lacking. Acidosis has been hypothesised to influence oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise. The present study aimed to investigate whether oral beta-alanine supplementation could reduce acidosis during high-intensity cycling and thereby affect oxygen uptake kinetics. 14 male physical education students participated in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Subjects were supplemented orally for 4 weeks with 4.8 g/day placebo or beta-alanine. Before and after supplementation, subjects performed a 6-min cycling exercise bout at an intensity of 50% of the difference between ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO(2peak). Capillary blood samples were taken for determination of pH, lactate, bicarbonate and base excess, and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics were determined with a bi-exponential model fitted to the averaged breath-by-breath data of three repetitions. Exercise-induced acidosis was significantly reduced following beta-alanine supplementation compared to placebo, without affecting blood lactate and bicarbonate concentrations. The time delay of the fast component (Td(1)) of the oxygen uptake kinetics was significantly reduced following beta-alanine supplementation compared to placebo, although this did not reduce oxygen deficit. The parameters of the slow component did not differ between groups. These results indicate that chronic beta-alanine supplementation, which presumably increased muscle carnosine content, can attenuate the fall in blood pH during high-intensity exercise. This may contribute to the ergogenic effect of the supplement found in some exercise modes. PMID:19841932

  7. Lack of Nrf2 reduces voluntary exercise in mice: influences of sex and diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise is generally accepted to increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the adaptations occurring during exercise are not well understood. The Nrf2/antioxidant response element pathway adapts cells to elevated ROS. We tested...

  8. Treadmill exercise reduces self-administration of morphine in male rats.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mahmoud; Alaei, Hojjat Allah; Naderi, Asieh; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Zahed, Reza

    2009-06-01

    Exercise can activate the same pathways as morphine. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of short-term and mid-term exercises on the self-administration of morphine in rats. Male Wistar rats were initially trained to receive small pellets of food by pressing the active lever in self-administration apparatus. Rats were divided into 4 groups: Saline, Morphine, Exercise 1 (11 days) and Exercise 2 (30 days). Their jugular vein was cannulated. The animals were placed in self-administration apparatus and allowed to self-administer morphine (0.5mg per infusion all test groups) or saline (Saline group) during consecutive days, for 2h/sessions. In the group 1 the rats were running before each session of self-administration and of group Exercise 2, 30 days before surgery as well as before each session. The pressing numbers of active and passive levers in each group and among different groups were compared. The number of active lever pressing of Morphine group was significantly higher than Saline group (p<0.001). In Exercise 1 and Exercise 2 groups, the number of active lever pressing was significantly lower than Morphine group (p<0.001). As exercise can activate many neurotransmitter systems involved in the addiction process and increase the release of endorphins, it is likely that could decrease the morphine self-administration in this experimental setup. PMID:19131225

  9. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on the Inflammatory Response to eccentric strength exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jouris, Kelly B.; McDaniel, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) have anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not known if omega-3 supplementation attenuates exercise-induced inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that omega-3 supplementation reduces inflammation that is induced by eccentric arm curl exercise. Healthy adult men and women (n=11; 35 ± 10 y) performed eccentric biceps curls on two occasions, once after 14d of dietary omega-3 restriction (control trial) and again after 7d of 3,000 mg/d omega-3 supplementation (omega-3 trial). Before and 48 h after eccentric exercise, signs of inflammation was assessed by measuring soreness ratings, swelling (arm circumference and arm volume), and temperature (infrared skin sensor). Arm soreness increased (p < 0.0001) in response to eccentric exercise; the magnitude of increase in soreness was 15% less in the omega-3 trial (p = 0.004). Arm circumference increased after eccentric exercise in the control trial (p = 0.01) but not in the omega-3 trial (p = 0.15). However, there was no difference between trials (p = 0.45). Arm volume and skin temperature did not change in response to eccentric exercise in either trial. These findings suggest that omega-3 supplementation decreases soreness, as a marker of inflammation, after eccentric exercise. Based on these findings, omega-3 supplementation could provide benefits by minimizing post-exercise soreness and thereby facilitate exercise training in individuals ranging from athletes undergoing heavy conditioning to sedentary subjects or patients who are starting exercise programs or medical treatments such as physical therapy or cardiac rehabilitation. Key points Dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to reduce inflammation in numerous inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and Chrohn’s disease. Although strenuous exercise is known to cause acute increases in inflammation, it is not clear if omega-3 fatty acid supplementation attenuates this adverse response to exercise. Our research demonstrates that 3000 mg·d-1 omega-3 fatty acid supplementation minimizes the severe, delayed-onset muscle soreness that results from strenuous eccentric strength exercise. This information, along with a plethora of information showing that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has other health benefits, demonstrates that a readily available over the counter nutritional supplement (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids) reduces delayed-onset soreness caused by strenuous strength exercise. This information has obvious relevance to athletic populations but also to other groups such as physical therapy patients and newly admitted cardiac rehabilitation patients, as muscle soreness, if left unchecked, can slow the progress in adapting to a new exercise program. Furthermore, as inflammation is known to be involved in the pathogenesis if numerous diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, it is likely prudent for individuals to use inflammation-attenuating interventions, such as omega-3 supplementation, to keep inflammatory responses to physical activity at a minimum. PMID:24150614

  10. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on the Inflammatory Response to eccentric strength exercise.

    PubMed

    Jouris, Kelly B; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Weiss, Edward P

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) have anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not known if omega-3 supplementation attenuates exercise-induced inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that omega-3 supplementation reduces inflammation that is induced by eccentric arm curl exercise. Healthy adult men and women (n=11; 35 ± 10 y) performed eccentric biceps curls on two occasions, once after 14d of dietary omega-3 restriction (control trial) and again after 7d of 3,000 mg/d omega-3 supplementation (omega-3 trial). Before and 48 h after eccentric exercise, signs of inflammation was assessed by measuring soreness ratings, swelling (arm circumference and arm volume), and temperature (infrared skin sensor). Arm soreness increased (p < 0.0001) in response to eccentric exercise; the magnitude of increase in soreness was 15% less in the omega-3 trial (p = 0.004). Arm circumference increased after eccentric exercise in the control trial (p = 0.01) but not in the omega-3 trial (p = 0.15). However, there was no difference between trials (p = 0.45). Arm volume and skin temperature did not change in response to eccentric exercise in either trial. These findings suggest that omega-3 supplementation decreases soreness, as a marker of inflammation, after eccentric exercise. Based on these findings, omega-3 supplementation could provide benefits by minimizing post-exercise soreness and thereby facilitate exercise training in individuals ranging from athletes undergoing heavy conditioning to sedentary subjects or patients who are starting exercise programs or medical treatments such as physical therapy or cardiac rehabilitation. Key pointsDietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to reduce inflammation in numerous inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and Chrohn's disease.Although strenuous exercise is known to cause acute increases in inflammation, it is not clear if omega-3 fatty acid supplementation attenuates this adverse response to exercise.Our research demonstrates that 3000 mg·d-1 omega-3 fatty acid supplementation minimizes the severe, delayed-onset muscle soreness that results from strenuous eccentric strength exercise.This information, along with a plethora of information showing that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has other health benefits, demonstrates that a readily available over the counter nutritional supplement (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids) reduces delayed-onset soreness caused by strenuous strength exercise.This information has obvious relevance to athletic populations but also to other groups such as physical therapy patients and newly admitted cardiac rehabilitation patients, as muscle soreness, if left unchecked, can slow the progress in adapting to a new exercise program.Furthermore, as inflammation is known to be involved in the pathogenesis if numerous diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, it is likely prudent for individuals to use inflammation-attenuating interventions, such as omega-3 supplementation, to keep inflammatory responses to physical activity at a minimum. PMID:24150614

  11. A Single Bout of Aerobic Exercise Reduces Anxiety Sensitivity But Not Intolerance of Uncertainty or Distress Tolerance: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been posited for the anxiolytic effects of exercise, including reductions in anxiety sensitivity through interoceptive exposure. Studies on aerobic exercise lend support to this hypothesis; however, research investigating aerobic exercise in comparison to placebo, the dose-response relationship between aerobic exercise anxiety sensitivity, the efficacy of aerobic exercise on the spectrum of anxiety sensitivity and the effect of aerobic exercise on other related constructs (e.g. intolerance of uncertainty, distress tolerance) is lacking. We explored reductions in anxiety sensitivity and related constructs following a single session of exercise in a community sample using a randomized controlled trial design. Forty-one participants completed 30 min of aerobic exercise or a placebo stretching control. Anxiety sensitivity, intolerance of uncertainty and distress tolerance were measured at baseline, post-intervention and 3-day and 7-day follow-ups. Individuals in the aerobic exercise group, but not the control group, experienced significant reductions with moderate effect sizes in all dimensions of anxiety sensitivity. Intolerance of uncertainty and distress tolerance remained unchanged in both groups. Our trial supports the efficacy of aerobic exercise in uniquely reducing anxiety sensitivity in individuals with varying levels of the trait and highlights the importance of empirically validating the use of aerobic exercise to address specific mental health vulnerabilities. Aerobic exercise may have potential as a temporary substitute for psychotherapy aimed at reducing anxiety-related psychopathology. PMID:25874370

  12. My gut feeling says rest: Increased intestinal permeability contributes to chronic diseases in high-intensity exercisers.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, Jason M; Wessells, Robert J; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and many of these conditions are linked to chronic inflammation. One potential cause of chronic inflammation is an increased intestinal epithelial permeability. Recent studies have demonstrated that parasympathetic stimulation via the efferent abdominal vagus nerve increases the expression and proper localization of tight junction proteins and decreases intestinal epithelial permeability. This finding may provide a novel approach for treating and preventing many chronic conditions. Importantly, physical activity is associated with increased resting parasympathetic (vagal) activity and lower risk of chronic diseases. However, high intensity long duration exercise can be harmful to overall health. Specifically, individuals who frequently exercise strenuously and for longer time intervals have the same mortality rates as sedentary individuals. This may be explained, in part, by longer periods of reduced vagal activity as vagal activity is markedly reduced both during and after intense exercise. We hypothesize that one mechanism by which exercise provides its health benefits is by increasing resting vagal activity and decreasing intestinal epithelial permeability, thus decreasing chronic inflammation. Additionally, we hypothesize that long periods of reduced vagal activity in individuals who exercise at high intensities and for longer durations, decrease the integrity of the intestinal barrier, putting them at greater risk of chronic inflammation and a host of chronic diseases. Thus, this hypothesis provides a conceptual link between the well-established benefits of frequent exercise and the paradoxical deleterious effects of prolonged, high-intensity exercise without adequate rest. PMID:26415977

  13. Load Variation Influences on Joint Work During Squat Exercise in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Fincke, Renita S.; Logan, Rachel L.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance exercises that load the axial skeleton, such as the parallel squat, are incorporated as a critical component of a space exercise program designed to maximize the stimuli for bone remodeling and muscle loading. Astronauts on the International Space Station perform regular resistance exercise using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). Squat exercises on Earth entail moving a portion of the body weight plus the added bar load, whereas in microgravity the body weight is 0, so all load must be applied via the bar. Crewmembers exercising in microgravity currently add approx.70% of their body weight to the bar load as compensation for the absence of the body weight. This level of body weight replacement (BWR) was determined by crewmember feedback and personal experience without any quantitative data. The purpose of this evaluation was to utilize computational simulation to determine the appropriate level of BWR in microgravity necessary to replicate lower extremity joint work during squat exercise in normal gravity based on joint work. We hypothesized that joint work would be positively related to BWR load.

  14. Acute exercise induces cortical inhibition and reduces arousal in response to visual stimulation in young children.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Mierau, Julia; Hense, Andreas; Hense, Johannes; Strüder, Heiko K

    2014-05-01

    Physical exercise is known to induce a range of transient or sustained psychophysiological effects including stress reduction and improvements in cognitive performance. Previous studies in the area have focused on adults and there has been little research on the relationship between physical exercise and brain function in young children. This study examined the relationship between cortical oscillations, arousal and cognitive performance following physical exercise in 5/6-year preschoolers. Participants completed two counterbalanced sessions of 45 min exercise or a control condition. Electroencephalography (EEG) was measured at rest with the eyes closed and the eyes open, as well as during cognitive performance in a task requiring attention and reaction speed. This was done before (PRE) and after (POST) each session once the participants' heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-exercise values. The percentage change in spectral power from PRE to POST (Δ) differed significantly between conditions. Specifically, Δ alpha-1 power differed significantly between exercise (+5%) and the control condition (-5.9%) with the eyes-open, but not with the eyes-closed. This effect did not significantly differ between cortical regions (i.e., it was global). Further, Δ beta-1 and Δ beta-2 power differed significantly between exercise (beta-1: -10.8%, beta-2: -23.8%) and the control condition (beta-1: -4.3%, beta-2: -5.3%) at frontal sites independent of visual input. Despite significant changes in resting state EEG, cognitive performance and task-related EEG remained unaffected by exercise. The results were interpreted to indicate cortical inhibition and attenuation of arousal in response to visual stimulation following exercise in young children. PMID:24412583

  15. Intensive training and reduced volume increases muscle FXYD1 expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise in athletes.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Martin; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Christensen, Peter M; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the effect of intensive training in combination with marked reduction in training volume on phospholemman (FXYD1) expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (10-12 × ∼30-s sprints) two or three times per week and aerobic high-intensity training (4-5 × 3-4 min at 90-95% of peak aerobic power output) 1-2 times per week for 7 wk and reduced the training volume by 70%. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and during a repeated high-intensity exercise protocol, and protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Expression of FXYD1 (30%), actin (40%), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (12%), phospholamban (PLN) (16%), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) γ/δ (25%) was higher (P< 0.05) than before the training intervention. In addition, after the intervention, nonspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation was higher (P< 0.05) at rest and during exercise, mainly achieved by an increased FXYD1 Ser-68 phosphorylation, compared with before the intervention. CaMKII, Thr-287, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 Thr-56 phosphorylation at rest and during exercise, overall PKCα/β, Thr-638/641, and mTOR Ser-2448 phosphorylation during repeated intense exercise as well as resting PLN Thr-17 phosphorylation were also higher (P< 0.05) compared with before the intervention period. Thus, a period of high-intensity training with reduced training volume increases expression and phosphorylation levels of FXYD1, which may affect Na(+)/K(+)pump activity and muscle K(+)homeostasis during intense exercise. Furthermore, higher expression of CaMKII and PLN, as well as increased phosphorylation of CaMKII Thr-287 may have improved intracellular Ca(2+)handling. PMID:26791827

  16. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  17. Cardiorespiratory responses and reduced apneic time to cold-water face immersion after high intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidou, Sylvia; Soultanakis, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Apnea after exercise may evoke a neurally mediated conflict that may affect apneic time and create a cardiovascular strain. The physiological responses, induced by apnea with face immersion in cold water (10°C), after a 3-min exercise bout, at 85% of VO2max,were examined in 10 swimmers. A pre-selected 40-s apnea, completed after rest (AAR), could not be met after exercise (AAE), and was terminated with an agonal gasp reflex, and a reduction of apneic time, by 75%. Bradycardia was evident with immersion after both, 40-s of AAR and after AAE (P<0.05). The dramatic elevation of, systolic pressure and pulse pressure, after AAE, were indicative of cardiovascular stress. Blood pressure after exercise without apnea was not equally elevated. The activation of neurally opposing functions as those elicited by the diving reflex after high intensity exercise may create an autonomic conflict possibly related to oxygen-conserving reflexes stimulated by the trigeminal nerve, and those elicited by exercise. PMID:26343750

  18. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  19. Reduced ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation after progressive resistance exercise in growing adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Nokleby, Jessica J; Thicke, Bethany M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate moderate intensity progressive resistance exercise (PRE) in growing adolescent rats and its effect on muscle hypertrophy (defined as an increase in fiber cross-sectional area [CSA]). We hypothesized that in adolescent animals moderate intensity PRE would increase (a) fiber CSA; (b) myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content; and (c) expression and phosphorylation of cell signaling molecules involved in translational regulation, compared with that in age-matched sedentary (SED) controls. In the PRE group, 3-week-old male rats were trained to climb a vertical ladder as a mode of PRE training such that by 10 weeks all animals in the PRE group had progressed to carry an additional 80% of their body weight per climb. In agreement with our hypotheses, we observed that 10 weeks of moderate PRE in adolescent animals was sufficient to increase the CSA of muscle fibers and increase MyHC content. The average muscle fiber CSA increased by >10%, and the total MyHC content increased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the PRE group compared with that in the SED animals. Concurrently, we investigated sustained changes in the expression and phosphorylation of key signaling molecules that are previously identified regulators of hypertrophy in adult animal models. Contrary to our hypotheses, expression and phosphorylation of the translational regulators mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt were not increased in the PRE group. In addition, we observed that the ratio of phosphorylated-to-unphosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) was reduced over sixfold in PRE animals (p < 0.05) and that total rpS6 protein levels were unchanged between PRE and SED animals (p > 0.05). We conclude that moderate intensity PRE is sufficient to induce muscle hypertrophy in adolescent animals, whereas the signaling mechanisms associated with muscle hypertrophy may differ between growing adolescents and adults. PMID:22614147

  20. Exercise training reduces cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ovariectomized rats submitted to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Simone Alves de; Claudio, Erick Roberto Gonçalves; Mengal, Vinícius; Mengal, Vinícius Franskoviaky; Oliveira, Suelen Guedes de; Merlo, Eduardo; Podratz, Priscila Lang; Gouvêa, Sônia Alves; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; de Abreu, Gláucia Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether exercise training (ET) prevents or minimizes cardiac dysfunction and pathological ventricular remodeling in ovariectomized rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) and to examine the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Ovariectomized Wistar rats were subjected to either MI or fictitious surgery (Sham) and randomly divided into the following groups: Control, OVX+SHAMSED, OVX+SHAMET, OVX+MISED and OVX+MIET. ET was performed on a motorized treadmill (5x/wk, 60 min/day, 8 weeks). Cardiac function was assessed by ventricular catheterization and Dihydroethidium fluorescence (DHE) was evaluated to analyze cardiac oxidative stress. Histological analyses were made to assess collagen deposition, myocyte hypertrophy and infarct size. Western Blotting was performed to analyze the protein expression of catalase and SOD-2, as well as Gp91phox and AT1 receptor (AT1R). MI-trained rats had significantly increased in +dP/dt and decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared with MI-sedentary rats. Moreover, oxidative stress and collagen deposition was reduced, as was myocyte hypertrophy. These effects occurred in parallel with a reduction in both AT1R and Gp91phox expression and an increase in catalase expression. SOD-2 expression was not altered. These results indicate that ET improves the functional cardiac parameters associated with attenuation of cardiac remodeling in ovariectomized rats subjected to MI. The mechanism seems to be related to a reduction in the expression of both the AT1 receptor and Gp91phox as well as an increase in the antioxidant enzyme catalase, which contributes to a reduction in oxidative stress. Therefore, ET may be an important therapeutic target for the prevention of heart failure in postmenopausal women affected by MI. PMID:25551214

  1. Aerobic exercise but not resistance exercise reduces intrahepatic lipid content and visceral fat and improves insulin sensitivity in obese adolescent girls: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Deldin, Anthony R.; White, David; Kim, YoonMyung; Libman, Ingrid; Rivera-Vega, Michelle; Kuk, Jennifer L.; Sandoval, Sandra; Boesch, Chris; Arslanian, Silva

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear whether regular exercise alone (no caloric restriction) is a useful strategy to reduce adiposity and obesity-related metabolic risk factors in obese girls. We examined the effects of aerobic (AE) vs. resistance exercise (RE) alone on visceral adipose tissue (VAT), intrahepatic lipid, and insulin sensitivity in obese girls. Forty-four obese adolescent girls (BMI ?95th percentile, 1218 yr) with abdominal obesity (waist circumference 106.5 11.1 cm) were randomized to 3 mo of 180 min/wk AE (n = 16) or RE (n = 16) or a nonexercising control group (n = 12). Total fat and VAT were assessed by MRI and intrahepatic lipid by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Intermuscular AT (IMAT) was measured by CT. Insulin sensitivity was evaluated by a 3-h hyperinsulinemic (80 mUm2min?1) euglycemic clamp. Compared with controls (0.13 1.10 kg), body weight did not change (P > 0.1) in the AE (?1.31 1.43 kg) and RE (?0.31 1.38 kg) groups. Despite the absence of weight loss, total body fat (%) and IMAT decreased (P < 0.05) in both exercise groups compared with control. Compared with control, significant (P < 0.05) reductions in VAT (??15.68 7.64 cm2) and intrahepatic lipid (??1.70 0.74%) and improvement in insulin sensitivity (?0.92 0.27 mgkg?1min?1 per ?U/ml) were observed in the AE group but not the RE group. Improvements in insulin sensitivity in the AE group were associated with the reductions in total AT mass (r = ?0.65, P = 0.02). In obese adolescent girls, AE but not RE is effective in reducing liver fat and visceral adiposity and improving insulin sensitivity independent of weight loss or calorie restriction. PMID:24045865

  2. Individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and reductions in exercise performance when perfusion pressure is reduced: evidence for vasodilator phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Robert F; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Moynes, Jackie S; Poitras, Veronica J; Walsh, Jeremy J; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether cardiovascular compensatory response phenotypes exist in the face of a reduced perfusion pressure challenge to exercising muscle oxygen delivery (O2D), and whether these responses might be exercise intensity (EI) dependent. Ten healthy men (19.5 ± 0.4 yr) completed two trials of progressive forearm isometric handgrip exercise to exhaustion (24.5 N increments every 3.5 min) in each of forearm above and below heart level [forearm arterial perfusion pressure (FAPP) difference of 29.5 ± 0.97 mmHg]. At the end of each EI, measurements of forearm blood flow (FBF; ml/min) via brachial artery Doppler and echo ultrasound, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; mmHg) via finger photoplethysmography, and exercising forearm venous effluent via antecubital vein catheter revealed distinct cardiovascular response groups: n = 6 with compensatory vasodilation vs. n = 4 without compensatory vasodilation. Compensatory vasodilators were able to blunt the perfusion pressure-evoked reduction in submaximal O2D in the arm-above-heart condition, whereas nonvasodilators did not (-22.5 ± 13.6 vs. -65.4 ± 14.1 ml O2/min; P < 0.05), and in combination with being able to increase O2 extraction, nonvasodilators defended submaximal V̇o2 and experienced less of an accumulated submaximal O2D deficit (-80.7 ± 24.7 vs. -219.1 ± 36.0 ml O2/min; P < 0.05). As a result, the compensatory vasodilators experienced less of a compromise to peak EI than nonvasodilators (-24.5 ± 3.5 N vs. -52.1 ± 8.9 N; P < 0.05). In conclusion, in the forearm exercise model studied, vasodilatory response phenotypes exist that determine individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and the degree to which aerobic metabolism and exercise performance are compromised. PMID:24970851

  3. Effects of Short-Term Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Markers of Inflammation after Eccentric Strength Exercise in Women

    PubMed Central

    Corder, Katherine E.; Newsham, Katherine R.; McDaniel, Jennifer L.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive (pain inhibiting) effects. Because strenuous exercise often results in local inflammation and pain, we hypothesized that DHA supplementation attenuates the rise in markers of local muscle inflammation and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occur after eccentric strength exercise. Twenty-seven, healthy women (33 ± 2 y, BMI 23.1±1.0 kg·m-2) were randomized to receive 9d of 3000 mg/d DHA or placebo in a double-blind fashion. On day 7 of the supplementation period, the participants performed 4 sets of maximal-effort eccentric biceps curl exercise. Before and 48h after the eccentric exercise, markers of inflammation were measured including measures of muscle soreness (10-point visual analog pain scale, VAS), swelling (arm circumference), muscle stiffness (active and passive elbow extension), skin temperature, and salivary C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. As expected, muscle soreness and arm circumference increased while active and passive elbow extension decreased. The increase in soreness was 23% less in the DHA group (48h increase in VAS soreness ratings: 4.380.4 vs. 5.600.5, p=0.02). Furthermore, the number of subjects who were able to achieve full active elbow extension 48h after eccentric exercise was greater in the DHA group (71% vs. 15%, p = 0.006), indicating significantly less muscle stiffness. No between-group differences were observed for passive elbow extension (p = 0.78) or arm swelling (p = 0.75). Skin temperature and salivary CRP concentrations did not change from baseline to 48h after exercise in either group. These findings indicate that short-term DHA supplementation reduces exercise-induced muscle soreness and stiffness. Therefore, in addition to other health benefits that n-3 fatty acids have been associated with, DHA supplementation could be beneficial for improving tolerance to new and/or strenuous exercise programs and thereby might facilitate better training adaptations and exercise adherence. Key points Seven days of 3000 mg/day supplementation with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) attenuates the delayed onset muscle soreness and stiffness, and protects against the loss of joint range of motion that is caused by strenuous eccentric exercise. This benefit was observed in women, and supports the findings from other studies that were conducted on men or a combination of men and women The benefits from algae-derived DHA appear to be similar to those reported in other studies that used a combination of DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) derived from fish oil The findings of better recovery from strenuous exercise with DHA supplementation, paired with other research which demonstrated that DHA and EPA protect against chronic diseases suggest that DHA is an attractive option These findings have relevance to athletic populations, in that DHA would be expected to facilitate recovery and allow for better performance during training and competition. However, DHA supplementation might also benefit non-athletic populations, such as individuals starting new exercise programs and patient populations that are prone to muscle soreness (e.g. physical therapy patients). PMID:26957941

  4. Effects of Short-Term Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Markers of Inflammation after Eccentric Strength Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Corder, Katherine E; Newsham, Katherine R; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R; Weiss, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive (pain inhibiting) effects. Because strenuous exercise often results in local inflammation and pain, we hypothesized that DHA supplementation attenuates the rise in markers of local muscle inflammation and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occur after eccentric strength exercise. Twenty-seven, healthy women (33 ± 2 y, BMI 23.1±1.0 kg·m(-2)) were randomized to receive 9d of 3000 mg/d DHA or placebo in a double-blind fashion. On day 7 of the supplementation period, the participants performed 4 sets of maximal-effort eccentric biceps curl exercise. Before and 48h after the eccentric exercise, markers of inflammation were measured including measures of muscle soreness (10-point visual analog pain scale, VAS), swelling (arm circumference), muscle stiffness (active and passive elbow extension), skin temperature, and salivary C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. As expected, muscle soreness and arm circumference increased while active and passive elbow extension decreased. The increase in soreness was 23% less in the DHA group (48h increase in VAS soreness ratings: 4.380.4 vs. 5.600.5, p=0.02). Furthermore, the number of subjects who were able to achieve full active elbow extension 48h after eccentric exercise was greater in the DHA group (71% vs. 15%, p = 0.006), indicating significantly less muscle stiffness. No between-group differences were observed for passive elbow extension (p = 0.78) or arm swelling (p = 0.75). Skin temperature and salivary CRP concentrations did not change from baseline to 48h after exercise in either group. These findings indicate that short-term DHA supplementation reduces exercise-induced muscle soreness and stiffness. Therefore, in addition to other health benefits that n-3 fatty acids have been associated with, DHA supplementation could be beneficial for improving tolerance to new and/or strenuous exercise programs and thereby might facilitate better training adaptations and exercise adherence. Key pointsSeven days of 3000 mg/day supplementation with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) attenuates the delayed onset muscle soreness and stiffness, and protects against the loss of joint range of motion that is caused by strenuous eccentric exercise.This benefit was observed in women, and supports the findings from other studies that were conducted on men or a combination of men and womenThe benefits from algae-derived DHA appear to be similar to those reported in other studies that used a combination of DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) derived from fish oilThe findings of better recovery from strenuous exercise with DHA supplementation, paired with other research which demonstrated that DHA and EPA protect against chronic diseases suggest that DHA is an attractive optionThese findings have relevance to athletic populations, in that DHA would be expected to facilitate recovery and allow for better performance during training and competition. However, DHA supplementation might also benefit non-athletic populations, such as individuals starting new exercise programs and patient populations that are prone to muscle soreness (e.g. physical therapy patients). PMID:26957941

  5. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-06-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function ("Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle" [1], "Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle" [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE), low-intensity (LE) and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE). Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice" [3]. PMID:27222846

  6. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function (“Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle” [1], “Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle” [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE), low-intensity (LE) and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE). Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice” [3]. PMID:27222846

  7. Exercise increases the frequency of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells, but reduces hematopoietic colony-forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, Julia Maria; Pekovits, Karin; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Fuchs, Robert; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Hofmann, Peter; Sedlmayr, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Mueller, Wolfram

    2012-11-01

    Circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CPCs) may be triggered by physical exercise and/or normobaric hypoxia from the bone marrow. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of physical exercise and normobaric hypoxia on CPC number and functionality in the peripheral blood as well as the involvement of oxidative stress parameters as possibly active agents. Ten healthy male subjects (25.34.4 years) underwent a standardized cycle incremental exercise test protocol (40 W+20 W/min) under either normoxic (FiO2 ?0.21) or hypoxic conditions (FiO2<0.15, equals 3,500?m, 3?h xposure) within a time span of at least 1 week. Blood was drawn from the cubital vein before and 10, 30, 60, and 120?min after exercise. The number of CPCs in the peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry (CD34/CD45-positive cells). The functionality of cells present was addressed by secondary colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) assays. To determine a possible correlation between the mobilization of CPCs and reactive oxygen species, parameters for oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were obtained. Data showed a significant increase of CPC release under normoxic as well as hypoxic conditions after 10?min of recovery (P<0.01). Most interestingly, although CD34+/CD45dim cells increased in number, the proliferative capacity of CPCs decreased significantly 10?min after cessation of exercise (P<0.05). A positive correlation between CPCs and MDA/MPO levels turned out to be significant for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions (P<0.05/P<0.01). Hypoxia did not provoke an additional effect. Although the CPC frequency increased, the functionality of CPCs decreased significantly after exercise, possibly due to the influence of increased oxidative stress levels. PMID:22616638

  8. Prior regular exercise improves clinical outcome and reduces demyelination and axonal injury in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Danielle; Brambilla, Roberta; Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie; Karmally, Shaffiat; Dellarole, Anna; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Bethea, John R

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that forced exercise modulates inflammation and is therapeutic acutely for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the long-term benefits have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effects of preconditioning exercise on the clinical and pathological progression of EAE. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an exercised (Ex) or unexercised (UEx) group and all of them were induced for EAE. Mice in the Ex group had an attenuated clinical score relative to UEx mice throughout the study. At 42 dpi, flow cytometry analysis showed a significant reduction in B cells, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells infiltrating into the spinal cord in the Ex group compared to UEx. Ex mice also had a significant reduction in myelin damage with a corresponding increase in proteolipid protein expression. Finally, Ex mice had a significant reduction in axonal damage. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a prolonged and forced preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. In this study, we show that a program of 6 weeks of preconditioning exercise promoted a significant reduction of cells infiltrating into the spinal cord, a significant reduction in myelin damage and a significant reduction in axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice at 42 dpi. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. PMID:26364732

  9. Intense Exercise during the First Two Trimesters of Unapparent Pregnancy: Case Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gloria C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This report presents nonexperimental retrospective data on the weights, menstrual cycle intervals, pregnancy symptoms, and running programs of two women who exercised intensely during their first two trimesters. Although these two cases suggest that strenuous anaerobic exercise during pregnancy is not harmful, more studies are needed. (IAH)

  10. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity and indices of plasmatic oxidative damage after acute physical exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Berzosa, C; Gómez-Trullén, E M; Piedrafita, E; Cebrián, I; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Miana-Mena, F J; Fuentes-Broto, L; García, J J

    2011-06-01

    Optimal levels of membrane fluidity are essential for numerous cell functions including cell growth, solute transport and signal transduction. Since exercise enhances free radical production, our aim was to evaluate in healthy male subjects the effects of an acute bout of maximal and submaximal exercise on the erythrocyte membrane fluidity and its possible relation to the oxidative damage overproduction due to exercise. Subjects (n = 34) performed three cycloergometric tests: a continuous progressive exercise, a strenuous exercise until exhaustion and an acute bout of exercise at an intensity corresponding to 70% of maximal work capacity for 30 min. Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after these exercises. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HDA) concentrations and carbonyl content of plasmatic proteins were used as an index of lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. Exercise produced a dramatic drop in the erythrocyte membrane fluidity as compared to resting time, but this was not accompanied by significant changes in the plasmatic MDA and 4-HDA concentrations. The highest erythrocyte membrane rigidity was detected immediately after strenuous exercise until exhaustion was performed. Protein carbonyl levels were higher after exhaustive exercises than at rest. Continuous progressive and strenuous exercises until exhaustion, but not submaximal workload, resulted in a significant enhanced accumulation of carbonylated proteins in the plasma. These findings are consistent with the idea that exercise exaggerates oxidative damage, which may contribute, at least partially, to explain the rigidity in the membrane of the erythrocytes due to acute exercise. PMID:21116825

  11. A Comparison of Exercise and Meditation in Reducing Physiological Response to Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of brief treadmill exercise and meditation with a placebo-control treatment for reduction in several physiological and psychological measures of stress, anxiety, and tension before and after a written final examination in 48 high-test anxiety subjects. The subjects, 24 men and 24 women,

  12. A Comparison of Exercise and Meditation in Reducing Physiological Response to Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of brief treadmill exercise and meditation with a placebo-control treatment for reduction in several physiological and psychological measures of stress, anxiety, and tension before and after a written final examination in 48 high-test anxiety subjects. The subjects, 24 men and 24 women,…

  13. Exercise in heart failure patients supported with a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mette Holme; Gustafsson, Finn

    2015-04-01

    After implantation of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD), exercise capacity in heart failure patients remains reduced with peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) values averaging from 11 to 20 ml/kg/min. Total cardiac output in CF-LVAD patients during exercise is predominantly determined by pump speed, the pressure difference across the pump, and in some cases ejection through the aortic valve. Fixed pump speed utilized in CF-LVADs may provide insufficient support, resulting in a moderate cardiac output increase during increased physical strain. Ongoing studies are evaluating whether pump speed changes in response to varied loading conditions may enable LVADs to provide sufficient support even during strenuous exercise. In the currently used devices, evidence suggests that focus on optimizing non-cardiac peripheral parameters is vital. Extra-cardiac potentially reversible factors are anemia with low oxygen-carrying capacity, obesity and general deconditioning with low muscle mass. In addition, exercise training in CF-LVAD patients can improve peak VO2. To design interventions to improve functional capacity in patients treated with modern durable LVADs, a detailed understanding of exercise physiology in a continuous-flow circulatory system is necessary. In this review we address the different components of exercise physiology in LVAD patients and point out potential solutions or areas of future research. PMID:25577562

  14. Triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise improves session volume load and reduces muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen P; Mabon, Tom; Pryde, Mitchell; Feebrey, Sarah; Cannon, Jack

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise would enhance muscular performance, produce a more favorable anabolic profile, and reduce biochemical markers of muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. Fifteen male strength-trained athletes completed two acute lower-body resistance exercise sessions to fatigue 7 days apart. After a 4-hour fast, participants consumed either a multinutrient supplement (Musashi 1-2-3 Step System, Notting Hill, Australia) (SUPP) or placebo (PLA) beverage preexercise (PRE), during (DUR), and immediately postexercise (IP). Session volume loads were calculated as kilograms × repetitions. Lower-body peak power was measured using unloaded repeated countermovement jumps, and blood samples were collected to assess biochemistry, serum hormones, and muscle damage markers at PRE, DUR, IP, 30 minutes postexercise (P30), and 24 hours postexercise (P24h). The SUPP demonstrated increased glucose concentrations at DUR and IP compared with at PRE (P < .01), whereas PLA demonstrated higher glucose at P30 compared with at PRE (P < .001). Session volume load was higher for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). Cortisol increased at DUR, IP, and P30 compared with at PRE in both treatments (P < .05); however, SUPP also displayed lower cortisol at P24h compared with at PRE and PLA (P < .01). The total testosterone response to exercise was higher for PLA compared with SUPP (P < .01); however, total creatine kinase and C-reactive protein responses to exercise were lower for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). These data indicate that although triphasic multinutrient supplementation did not produce a more favorable anabolic profile, it improved acute resistance exercise performance while attenuating muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. PMID:23684439

  15. Whole-body cryostimulation as an effective way of reducing exercise-induced inflammation and blood cholesterol in young men.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Ewa; Olek, Robert A; Grzywacz, Tomasz; Kaczor, Jan J; Antosiewicz, Jędrzej; Skrobot, Wojciech; Kujach, Sylwester; Laskowski, Radosław

    2014-03-01

    Inflammation may accompany obesity and a variety of diseases, or result from excessive exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of whole-body cryostimulation on the inflammatory response induced by eccentric exercise under laboratory conditions. The study also sought to establish if cold treatment changes the lipid profile and modifies energy expenditure in young people. Eighteen healthy and physically active, college-aged men volunteered to participate in the experiment. They were divided into two subgroups: CRY- submitted to whole-body cryostimulation, and CONT- a control group. Both groups performed eccentric work to induce muscle damage. Blood samples were collected before and 24 h after the exercise. Over the five days that followed, the CRY group was exposed to a series of 10 sessions in a cryogenic chamber (twice a day, for 3 min, at a temperature of -110̊C). After this period of rest, both groups repeated a similar eccentric work session, following the same schedule of blood collection. The perceived pain was noted 24h after each session of eccentric workout. A 30-minute step up/down work-out induced delayed-onset muscle soreness in both groups. The five-day recovery period accompanied by exposure to cold significantly enhanced the concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. It also led to a pronounced reduction in levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, and reduced muscle damage. The values for IL-10 before the second bout of eccentric exercise in the CRY group were 2.0-fold higher in comparison to baseline, whereas in the CONT group, the concentration remained unchanged. Furthermore, blood concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β fell significantly in the CRY group. The main finding of this study was that a series of 10 sessions of whole body cryostimulation significantly reduced the inflammatory response induced by eccentric exercise. The lipid profile was also improved, but there was no effect on energy expenditure during the exercise. PMID:24998353

  16. Process Evaluation of Workplace Interventions with Physical Exercise to Reduce Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zebis, Mette K.

    2014-01-01

    Process evaluation is important to explain success or failure of workplace interventions. This study performs a summative process evaluation of workplace interventions with physical exercise. As part of a randomized controlled trial 132 office workers with neck and shoulder pain were to participate in 10 weeks of elastic resistance training five times a week at the workplace; the 2 min group performed a single set of lateral raise to failure, and the 12 min group performed 5-6 sets with 8–12 repetitions. Participants received a single instructional session together with a training diary and manual at baseline (100% dose delivered and 100% dose received), and 59 and 57 participants, respectively, replied to the process evaluation questionnaire at 10-week follow-up. Results showed that in the 2 and 12 min groups, respectively, 82% and 81% of the participants completed more than 30 training sessions. However, two-thirds of the participants would have preferred more than a single exercise to vary between. In the 12 versus 2 min group more participants experienced the training sessions as too long (30% versus 5%). Most participants (67–92%) found the training diary and manual helpful, adequacy in a single instructional session, and satisfaction with the type of training. Among those with low adherence, lack of time (51%) and difficulties in starting exercising after illness (26%) were common barriers for regular training. Among those with low adherence, 52% felt that five training sessions per week were too much, and 29% would rather have trained a completely different kind of exercise. In conclusion, resistance training at the workplace is generally well received among office workers with neck-shoulder pain, but a one-size-fits-all approach is not feasible for all employees. PMID:25574172

  17. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  18. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    PubMed

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  19. Experimentally Manipulated Somatic Information and Somatization Tendencies and their Impact on Physical Symptom Reporting and Performance in a Physically Strenuous Task

    PubMed Central

    CASTO, KATHLEEN; LECCI, LEN

    2012-01-01

    This study attempts to determine whether the presentation of an experimentally manipulated somatic experience during a physically strenuous task can influence physical performance and symptom reporting. The study also compares the relative influence of experimentally manipulated somatic information (state somatization) with stable individual differences in the tendency to amplify physical symptoms (trait somatization) on performance and symptom reporting. 194 participants completed standardized measures of somatization tendencies, state anxiety, neuroticism and conscientiousness. Participants where then given a mock physical exam, with individuals randomly assigned to receive either favorable or unfavorable somatic information. All participants then had their body mass index assessed and completed a rigorous exercise task, with quantification of performance. Physiological measures of blood pressure and pulse were also assessed before and after the exercise task. The experimentally manipulated presentation of somatic information predicted both performance and physical symptoms, even after controlling for BMI, neuroticism, conscientiousness, and state anxiety. Moreover, expected performance uniquely and significantly predicted performance above and beyond condition, anxiety, BMI, neuroticism, and conscientiousness. Somatosensory amplification tendencies also predicted symptom endorsement, but not performance. Findings suggest that both state and trait expectations with respect to somatic experiences influence symptom reporting and to a lesser extent performance, even after controlling for variables known to strongly influence each of these outcomes. Results are consistent with the cognitive-perceptual and the cognitive-appraisal models of somatic interpretation.

  20. Individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and reductions in exercise performance when perfusion pressure is reduced: evidence for vasodilator phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Robert F.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Moynes, Jackie S.; Poitras, Veronica J.; Walsh, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether cardiovascular compensatory response phenotypes exist in the face of a reduced perfusion pressure challenge to exercising muscle oxygen delivery (O2D), and whether these responses might be exercise intensity (EI) dependent. Ten healthy men (19.5 ± 0.4 yr) completed two trials of progressive forearm isometric handgrip exercise to exhaustion (24.5 N increments every 3.5 min) in each of forearm above and below heart level [forearm arterial perfusion pressure (FAPP) difference of 29.5 ± 0.97 mmHg]. At the end of each EI, measurements of forearm blood flow (FBF; ml/min) via brachial artery Doppler and echo ultrasound, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; mmHg) via finger photoplethysmography, and exercising forearm venous effluent via antecubital vein catheter revealed distinct cardiovascular response groups: n = 6 with compensatory vasodilation vs. n = 4 without compensatory vasodilation. Compensatory vasodilators were able to blunt the perfusion pressure-evoked reduction in submaximal O2D in the arm-above-heart condition, whereas nonvasodilators did not (−22.5 ± 13.6 vs. −65.4 ± 14.1 ml O2/min; P < 0.05), and in combination with being able to increase O2 extraction, nonvasodilators defended submaximal V̇o2 and experienced less of an accumulated submaximal O2D deficit (−80.7 ± 24.7 vs. −219.1 ± 36.0 ml O2/min; P < 0.05). As a result, the compensatory vasodilators experienced less of a compromise to peak EI than nonvasodilators (−24.5 ± 3.5 N vs. −52.1 ± 8.9 N; P < 0.05). In conclusion, in the forearm exercise model studied, vasodilatory response phenotypes exist that determine individual susceptibility to hypoperfusion and the degree to which aerobic metabolism and exercise performance are compromised. PMID:24970851

  1. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Garrido, Nuno; Cavaco, Braulio; Quaresma, Luís; Reis, Victor Machado

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twenty-three healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years) participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control) in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1) a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics); 2) aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics); 3) resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min); and 4) a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises); totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (−10.83 ± 2.13 vs. −2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009), 20th min (−11.26 ± 2.13 vs. −3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009) and 30th min of recovery (−10.87 ± 2.39 vs. −0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004). A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion. PMID:25713644

  2. Can a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise acutely reduce blood pressure?

    PubMed

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Garrido, Nuno; Cavaco, Braulio; Quaresma, Luís; Reis, Victor Machado

    2014-09-29

    This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twenty-three healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years) participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control) in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1) a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics); 2) aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics); 3) resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min); and 4) a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises); totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (-10.83 ± 2.13 vs. -2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009), 20th min (-11.26 ± 2.13 vs. -3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009) and 30th min of recovery (-10.87 ± 2.39 vs. -0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004). A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion. PMID:25713644

  3. Both Physical Exercise and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Reduce the Facing-the-Viewer Bias in Biological Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Heenan, Adam; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2014-01-01

    Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1) or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2) would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2) would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1) or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2), and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our results provide further support that the facing-the-viewer bias for biological motion stimuli is related to the sociobiological relevance of such stimuli. PMID:24987956

  4. Anti-ischemic effects of ivabradine, a selective heart rate-reducing agent, in exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Bidouard, Jean-Pierre; Lesage, Ludovic; Reure, Hélène; Péglion, Jean-Louis

    2003-11-01

    The effects of ivabradine, a novel heart rate-reducing agent that inhibits the cardiac pacemaker current If, were compared with those of the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol, in a model of exercise-induced regional myocardial ischemia in pigs. Five Yucatan micropigs were chronically instrumented to measure hemodynamics, regional myocardial contractility, and local electrograms, and a fixed stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery was induced using a clip. Each animal underwent three experiments on different days, each consisting of two treadmill exercise sessions, 4 hours apart. Ivabradine 5 mg/kg, propranolol 5 mg/kg, or vehicle was administered orally 3 hours before the second exercise session. Exercises before treatment and after vehicle produced reproducible hemodynamic changes and regional myocardial ischemia in the area perfused by the stenosed coronary artery, indicated by ST segment shift and regional contractile dysfunction. Ivabradine and propranolol were equipotent in reducing heart rate at rest and limiting tachycardia during exercise. Ivabradine, unlike propranolol, did not reduce left ventricular contractility at rest or during exercise, and did not increase atrio-ventricular conduction time. Both compounds reduced the exercise-induced ST segment shift in the ischemic region by approximately 80%, but ivabradine preserved systolic shortening to a significantly greater degree than propranolol (P < 0.05). PMID:14576519

  5. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible. PMID:25993596

  6. Pushing to the limits: the dynamics of cognitive control during exhausting exercise.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Cyril; Davranche, Karen; Easthope, Christopher S; Colson, Serge S; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Radel, Rémi

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating concurrent changes in cognitive control and cerebral oxygenation (Cox) during steady intense exercise to volitional exhaustion. Fifteen participants were monitored using prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy and electromyography of the thumb muscles during the completion of an Eriksen flanker task completed either at rest (control condition) or while cycling at a strenuous intensity until exhaustion (exercise condition). Two time windows were matched between the conditions to distinguish a potential exercise-induced evolutive cognitive effect: an initial period and a terminal period. In the initial period, Cox remained unaltered and, contrary to theoretical predictions, exercise did not induce any deficit in selective response inhibition. Rather, the drop-off of the delta curve as reaction time lengthened suggested enhanced efficiency of cognitive processes in the first part of the exercise bout. Shortly before exhaustion, Cox values were severely reduced - though not characteristic of a hypofrontality state - while no sign of deficit in selective response inhibition was observed. Despite this, individual's susceptibility to making fast impulsive errors increased and less efficient online correction of incorrect activation was observed near exhaustion. A negative correlation between Cox values and error rate was observed and is discussed in terms of cerebral resources redistribution. PMID:25576908

  7. High-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis reduces glucagon receptor content in rat hepatocytes: potential interaction with acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Alexandre; Unson, Cecilia G; Lavoie, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Studies have revealed that high-fat (HF) diets promote hyperglycaemia, whole-body insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Recently, hepatic glucagon resistance has been shown to occur in rats fed a HF diet. More precisely, diet-induced obesity (DIO) reduces the number of hepatic plasma membrane glucagon receptors (GR), which results in a diminished response to glucagon during a hyperglucagonaemic clamp. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that a HF-DIO is associated with a desensitization and destruction of the hepatic GR. We also hypothesized that a single bout of endurance exercise would modify the GR cellular distribution under our DIO model. Male rats were either fed a standard (sd) or a HF diet for two weeks. Each group was subdivided into a non-exercised (Rest) and an acute exercised (EX) group. The HF diet resulted in a reduction of total hepatic GR (55%) and hepatic plasma membrane GR protein content (20%). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in endosomal and lysosomal GR content with the feeding of a HF diet. The reduction of GR plasma membrane as well as the increase in endosomal GR was strongly correlated with an increase of PKC-α, suggesting a role of PKC-α in GR desensitization. EX increased significantly PKC-α protein content in both diets, suggesting a role of PKC-α in EX-induced GR desensitization. The present results suggest that liver lipid infiltration plays a role in reducing glucagon action in the liver through a reduction in total cellular and plasma membrane GR content. Furthermore, the GR desensitization observed in our in vivo model of HF diet-induced hepatic steatosis and in EX individuals may be regulated by PKC-α. PMID:17053032

  8. Melatonin Reduces Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Stanozolol in Rats Exposed to Swimming Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa dos Santos, Gustavo; Machado Rodrigues, Marcelo José; Gonçalves, Estela Maria; Cintra Gomes Marcondes, Maria Cristina; Areas, Miguel Arcanjo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are nominated for clinical use to promote protein synthesis in many therapeutic conditions. However, the indiscriminate use of AAS is related to hazardous cardiac disturbances and oxidative stress. We designed a study to investigate whether prolonged treatment with high doses of stanozolol modifies the activities of some antioxidant enzymes in the heart in sedentary and trained rats and whether this treatment causes alterations of cardiovascular parameters. In addition, the effectiveness of melatonin as an antioxidant and as a modulator of the cardiovascular side effects of stanozolol (STA) treatment was analyzed. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into the following six groups: sedentary (S), stanozolol sedentary (SS), stanozolol-melatonin sedentary (SMS), trained (T), stanozolol trained (ST) and stanozolol-melatonin trained (SMT). The stanozolol-treatment rats received 5 mg.kg−1 by subcutaneous injection before each exercise session (5 d.wk−1, i.e., 25 mg.kg−1.wk−1), while control groups received only saline solution injection. The melatonin-treatment groups received intraperitoneal injections of melatonin (10 mg.kg−1), 5 d.wk−1 for 6 wk. Electrocardiography, blood pressure and antioxidant enzyme activity measurements were performed at the end of the experimental period for cardiac function and molecular assessment. Results: This is the first time that the in vivo effects of melatonin treatment on stanozolol-induced cardiovascular side effects have been studied. Stanozolol induced bradycardia and significantly increased cardiac superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Trained stanozolol-treated rats experienced an increase in blood pressure and relative heart weight, and they developed left cardiac axis deviation. Although melatonin did not prevent cardiac hypertrophy in exercised stanozolol-treated animals, it maintained blood pressure and cardiac catalase activity, and it prevented stanozolol-induced cardiac electrical axis deviation. Conclusion: In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, chronic stanozolol administration induced mild cardiovascular side effects that were partly attenuated by melatonin treatment. However, these results showed that the combination of melatonin and exercise could minimize the stanozolol side effects in the cardiovascular system. PMID:25610273

  9. Voluntary Exercise Can Ameliorate Insulin Resistance by Reducing iNOS-Mediated S-Nitrosylation of Akt in the Liver in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Hideko; Kaneki, Masao; Goto, Sataro; Shimokado, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary exercise can ameliorate insulin resistance. The underlying mechanism, however, remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the liver plays an important role in hepatic insulin resistance in the setting of obesity. In this study, we tried to verify our hypothesis that voluntary exercise improves insulin resistance by reducing the expression of iNOS and subsequent S-nitrosylation of key molecules of glucose metabolism in the liver. Twenty-one Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 18 non-diabetic control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were randomly assigned to a sedentary group or exercise group subjected to voluntary wheel running for 20 weeks. The voluntary exercise significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR in the OLETF rats. In addition, the exercise decreased the amount of iNOS mRNA in the liver in the OLETF rats. Moreover, exercise reduced the levels of S-nitrosylated Akt in the liver, which were increased in the OLETF rats, to those observed in the LETO rats. These findings support our hypothesis that voluntary exercise improves insulin resistance, at least partly, by suppressing the iNOS expression and subsequent S-nitrosylation of Akt, a key molecule of the signal transduction pathways in glucose metabolism in the liver. PMID:26172834

  10. Impacts of dietary antioxidants and flight training on post-exercise oxidative damage in adult parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Coffey, J S; Bann, D; Alexander, L; Arnold, K E

    2010-01-01

    After intense physical activity animals generally experience a rise in metabolic rate, which is associated with a proliferation of pro-oxidants. If unchecked, these pro-oxidants can cause damage to DNA and peroxidation of lipids in cell walls. Two factors are thought to ameliorate post-exercise oxidative damage, at least in mammals: dietary antioxidants and exercise training. So far it is unknown whether birds benefit similarly from exercise training, although a positive effect of dietary antioxidants on take-off flight has been indicated. In this experiment, we maintained captive wildtype budgerigars Melopsittacus undulatus on enhanced (EQ) or reduced quality (RQ) diets differing in levels of the dietary antioxidants retinol, vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol for 12 months. Birds were then regularly trained to perform take-off escape flights, a strenuous and biologically relevant form of exercise. For these adult budgerigars, regular exercise training improved escape flight performance, particularly in males on the EQ diet. In terms of oxidative damage, post-exercise levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, were significantly decreased after 9 weeks of flight training than after a single exercise session. Thus, individuals achieved faster escape flights with lower oxidative damage, after training. Also, birds that were fatter for their skeletal size initially had higher post-exercise MDA levels than thinner birds, but this relationship was broken by 9 weeks of flight training. Interestingly, there was no impact of diet quality on levels of MDA, suggesting that improved protection against oxidative damage for all birds was due to an up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant systems. Given their diversity, bird species provide rich research opportunities for investigating the interactions between exercise training, pro-oxidants production and antioxidant defences. PMID:19800412

  11. Muscle Physiology Changes Induced by Every Other Day Feeding and Endurance Exercise in Mice: Effects on Physical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Bies, Elizabeth; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Peña Amaro, José; Berral de la Rosa, Francisco J.; Carrión, Ángel M.; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Every other day feeding (EOD) and exercise induce changes in cell metabolism. The aim of the present work was to know if both EOD and exercise produce similar effects on physical capacity, studying their physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects on muscle. Male OF-1 mice were fed either ad libitum (AL) or under EOD. After 18 weeks under EOD, animals were also trained by using a treadmill for another 6 weeks and then analyzed for physical activity. Both, EOD and endurance exercise increased the resistance of animals to extenuating activity and improved motor coordination. Among the groups that showed the highest performance, AL and EOD trained animals, ALT and EODT respectively, only the EODT group was able to increase glucose and triglycerides levels in plasma after extenuating exercise. No high effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities or protein levels neither on coenzyme Q levels were found in gastrocnemius muscle. However, exercise and EOD did increase β-oxidation activity in this muscle accompanied by increased CD36 levels in animals fed under EOD and by changes in shape and localization of mitochondria in muscle fibers. Furthermore, EOD and training decreased muscle damage after strenuous exercise. EOD also reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in muscle. Our results indicate that EOD improves muscle performance and resistance by increasing lipid catabolism in muscle mitochondria at the same time that prevents lipid peroxidation and muscle damage. PMID:21085477

  12. Exercise reduces GABA synaptic input onto NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons via NK1 receptor internalization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tabor, Jocelyn; Bonham, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    A single bout of mild to moderate exercise can lead to a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive subjects, namely post-exercise hypotension (PEH). The full expression of PEH requires a functioning baroreflex, hypertension and activation of muscle afferents (exercise), suggesting that interactions in the neural networks regulating exercise and blood pressure result in this fall in blood pressure. The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the first brain site that receives inputs from nerves carrying blood pressure and muscle activity information, making it an ideal site for integrating cardiovascular responses to exercise. During exercise, muscle afferents excite NTS GABA neurons via substance P and microinjection of a substance P-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) antagonist into the NTS attenuates PEH. The data suggest that an interaction between the substance P NK1-R and GABAergic transmission in the NTS may contribute to PEH. We performed voltage-clamping on NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). All animals were sacrificed within 30 min and the patch-clamp recordings were performed 2-8 hr after the sham/exercise protocol. The data showed that a single bout of exercise reduces 1) the frequency but not the amplitude of GABA spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPCs), 2) endogenous substance P influence on sIPSC frequency, and 3) sIPSC frequency response to exogenous application of substance P. Furthermore, immunofluorescence labeling in NTS show an increased substance P NK1-R internalization on GABA neurons. The data suggest that exercise-induced NK1-R internalization results in a reduced intrinsic inhibitory input to the neurons in the baroreflex pathway. PMID:19261870

  13. Exercise training reduces resting heart rate via downregulation of the funny channel HCN4.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Alicia; Bucchi, Annalisa; Johnsen, Anne Berit; Logantha, Sunil Jit R J; Monfredi, Oliver; Yanni, Joseph; Prehar, Sukhpal; Hart, George; Cartwright, Elizabeth; Wisloff, Ulrik; Dobryznski, Halina; DiFrancesco, Dario; Morris, Gwilym M; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Endurance athletes exhibit sinus bradycardia, that is a slow resting heart rate, associated with a higher incidence of sinus node (pacemaker) disease and electronic pacemaker implantation. Here we show that training-induced bradycardia is not a consequence of changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system but is caused by intrinsic electrophysiological changes in the sinus node. We demonstrate that training-induced bradycardia persists after blockade of the autonomous nervous system in vivo in mice and in vitro in the denervated sinus node. We also show that a widespread remodelling of pacemaker ion channels, notably a downregulation of HCN4 and the corresponding ionic current, If. Block of If abolishes the difference in heart rate between trained and sedentary animals in vivo and in vitro. We further observe training-induced downregulation of Tbx3 and upregulation of NRSF and miR-1 (transcriptional regulators) that explains the downregulation of HCN4. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for the potentially pathological heart rate adaptation to exercise training. PMID:24825544

  14. Mechanistic studies on reduced exercise performance and cardiac deconditioning with simulated zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research is to study the physiological mechanisms associated with the exercise performance of rats subjected to conditions of simulated weightlessness. A secondary purpose is to study related physiological changes associated with other systems. To facilitate these goals, a rodent suspension model was developed (Overton-Tipton) and a VO2 max testing procedure was perfected. Three methodological developments occurred during this past year deserving of mention. The first was the refinement of the tail suspension model so that (1) the heat dissipation functions of the caudal artery can be better utilized, and (2) the blood flow distribution to the tail would have less external constriction. The second was the development on a one-leg weight bearing model for use in simulated weightlessness studies concerned with change in muscle mass, muscle enzyme activity, and hind limb blood flow. The chemical body composition of 30 rats was determined and used to develop a prediction equation for percent fat using underwater weighing procedures to measure carcass specific gravity and to calculate body density, body fat, and fat free mass.

  15. Exercise reduces appetite and traffics excess nutrients away from energetically efficient pathways of lipid deposition during the early stages of weight regain

    PubMed Central

    Steig, Amy J.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Giles, Erin D.; Higgins, Janine A.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Mahan, Chad; Melanson, Edward L.; Wyatt, Holly R.; Eckel, Robert H.; Hill, James O.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of regular exercise on energy balance, fuel utilization, and nutrient availability, during weight regain was studied in obese rats, which had lost 17% of their weight by a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet. Weight reduced rats were maintained for 6 wk with and without regular treadmill exercise (1 h/day, 6 days/wk, 15 m/min). In vivo tracers and indirect calorimetry were then used in combination to examine nutrient metabolism during weight maintenance (in energy balance) and during the first day of relapse when allowed to eat ad libitum (relapse). An additional group of relapsing, sedentary rats were provided just enough calories to create the same positive energy imbalance as the relapsing, exercised rats. Exercise attenuated the energy imbalance by 50%, reducing appetite and increasing energy requirements. Expenditure increased beyond the energetic cost of the exercise bout, as exercised rats expended more energy to store the same nutrient excess in sedentary rats with the matched energy imbalance. Compared with sedentary rats with the same energy imbalance, exercised rats exhibited the trafficking of dietary fat toward oxidation and away from storage in adipose tissue, as well as a higher net retention of fuel via de novo lipogenesis in adipose tissue. These metabolic changes in relapse were preceded by an increase in the skeletal muscle expression of genes involved in lipid uptake, mobilization, and oxidation. Our observations reveal a favorable shift in fuel utilization with regular exercise that increases the energetic cost of storing excess nutrients during relapse and alterations in circulating nutrients that may affect appetite. The attenuation of the biological drive to regain weight, involving both central and peripheral aspects of energy homeostasis, may explain, in part, the utility of regular exercise in preventing weight regain after weight loss. PMID:21715696

  16. Reduced exercise time in competitive simulations consequent to low level ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.

    1986-08-01

    Ten highly trained endurance athletes were studied to determine the effects of exposure to low ozone (O/sub 3/) concentrations on simulated competitive endurance performance and associated physiological and subjective symptom responses. Each subject was randomly exposed to filtered air (FA), and to 0.12, 0.18, and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ while performing a 1 h competitive simulation protocol on a bicycle ergometer. Endurance performance was evaluated by the number of subjects unable to complete rides (last 30 min at an intense work load of approximately 86% VO/sub 2/max). All subjects completed the FA exposure, whereas one, five, and seven subjects did not complete the 0.12, 0.18, and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in the inability of subjects to complete the competitive simulations with increasing O/sub 3/ concentration, including a significant difference between the 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ and FA exposure. Significant decreases (P less than 0.05) were also observed following the 0.18 and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively, in forced vital capacity (-7.8 and -9.9%), and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (-5.8 and -10.5%). No significant O/sub 3/ effect was observed for exercise respiratory metabolism or ventilatory pattern responses. However, the number of reported subjective symptoms increased significantly following the 0.18 and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ protocols. These data demonstrate significant decrements in simulated competitive endurance performance and in pulmonary function, with accompanying enhanced subjective symptoms, following exposure to low O/sub 3/ levels commonly observed in numerous metropolitan environments during the summer months.

  17. BP Neural Network Model-based Physical Exercises and Dietary Habits Relationships Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingwei; Zhang, Xuesheng; Sun, Yi

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous progress of society, increment of social pressure, people have paid little and little attentions to physical exercises and dietary necessity. Take Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Shijiazhuang and Baotou university students as research objects, targeted at physical exercises time and dietary habits, it starts investigation. Make principal component analysis of investigation results, results indicates that cereal intake is principal component in dietary habits; strenuous exercise time and general physical exercise time are the principal components in physical exercise. Utilize BP neural network model, analyze these seven cities’ physical exercises and dietary habits conditions, the result indicates that except for Shenzhen, all the other six cities haven’t reached the standard.

  18. Exercise at old age: does it increase or alleviate oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Ji, L L

    2001-04-01

    Aging is associated with increased free radical generation in the skeletal muscle that can cause oxidative modification of protein, lipid, and DNA. Physical activity has many well-established health benefits, but strenuous exercise increases muscle oxygen flux and elicits intracellular events that can lead to increased oxidative injury. The paradox arises as to whether exercise would be advisable to aged population. Research evidence indicates that senescent organisms are more susceptible to oxidative stress during exercise because of the age-related ultrastructural and biochemical changes that facilitate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Aging also increases the incidence of muscle injury, and the inflammatory response can subject senescent muscle to further oxidative stress. Furthermore, muscle repair and regeneration capacity is reduced at old age that could potentially enhance the accrual of cellular oxidative damage. Predeposition of certain age-related pathologic conditions may exacerbate the risks. In spite of these risks, the elderly who are physically active benefit from exercise-induced adaptation in cellular antioxidant defense systems. Improved muscle mechanics, strength, and endurance make them less vulnerable to acute injury and chronic inflammation. Many critical questions remain regarding the relationship of aging and exercise as we enter a new millennium. For example, how does aging alter exercise-induced intracellular and intercellular mechanisms that generate ROS? Can acute and chronic exercise modulate the declined gene expression of metabolic and antioxidant enzymes seen at old age? Does exercise prevent age-dependent muscle loss (sarcopenia)? What kinds of antioxidant supplementation, if any, do aged people who are physically active need? Answers to these questions require highly specific research in both animals and humans. PMID:11795515

  19. Special feature for the Olympics: effects of exercise on the immune system: exercise and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K

    2000-10-01

    Strenuous exercise induces increased levels in a number of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, naturally occurring cytokine inhibitors and chemokines. Thus, increased plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-1 receptor antagonist, TNF receptors, IL-10, IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 are found after strenuous exercise. The concentration of IL-6 increases up to 100-fold after a marathon race. The increase in IL-6 is tightly related to the duration of the exercise and there appears to be a logarithmic relationship. Furthermore, the increase in IL-6 is related to the intensity of exercise. Given the facts that IL-6, more than any other cytokine, is produced in large amounts in response to exercise, that IL-6 is produced locally in the skeletal muscle in response to exercise and that IL-6 is known to have growth factor abilities, it is likely that IL-6 plays a beneficial role and may be involved in mediating exercise-related metabolic changes. PMID:11050536

  20. Randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of aerobic exercise in reducing metabolic risk in healthy older people: The Hertfordshire Physical Activity Trial

    PubMed Central

    Finucane, Francis M; Horton, Jessica; Purslow, Lisa R; Savage, David B; Brage, Soren; Besson, Herv; Horton, Kenneth; Rolfe, Ema De Lucia; Sleigh, Alison; Sharp, Stephen J; Martin, Helen J; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus; Ekelund, Ulf; Griffin, Simon J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2009-01-01

    Background While there are compelling observational data confirming that individuals who exercise are healthier, the efficacy of aerobic exercise interventions to reduce metabolic risk and improve insulin sensitivity in older people has not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, while low birth weight has been shown to predict adverse health outcomes later in life, its influence on the response to aerobic exercise is unknown. Our primary objective is to assess the efficacy of a fully supervised twelve week aerobic exercise intervention in reducing clustered metabolic risk in healthy older adults. A secondary objective is to determine the influence of low birth weight on the response to exercise in this group. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 100 participants born between 19311939, from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study and randomly assign them to no intervention or to 36 fully supervised one hour sessions on a cycle ergometer, over twelve weeks. Each participant will undergo detailed anthropometric and metabolic assessment pre- and post-intervention, including muscle biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, objective measurement of physical activity and sub-maximal fitness testing. Discussion Given the extensive phenotypic characterization, this study will provide valuable insights into the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise as well as the efficacy, feasibility and safety of such interventions in this age group. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN60986572 PMID:19545359

  1. Effects of exercise training together with tamoxifen in reducing mammary tumor burden in mice: Possible underlying pathway of miR-21.

    PubMed

    Khori, Vahid; Amani Shalamzari, Sadegh; Isanejad, Amin; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Shaban; Khodayari, Saeed; Khodayari, Hamid; Shahbazi, Shirin; Zahedi, Ali; Sohanaki, Hamid; Khaniki, Mahmood; Mahdian, Reza; Saffari, Mojtaba; Fayad, Raja

    2015-10-15

    Exercise training has an anti-tumor effect and can reduce tumor growth; however, the exact underlying mechanisms of its protective effects are still obscure. MicroRNA (miR)-21 is a predictor in cancer survival, and has a potential use as an indicator of therapeutic outcome in breast malignancies. Forty-eight female BALB/c mice were equally divided into six groups to investigate the effects of interval exercise training with tamoxifen on miR-21 expression and its possible assumed mechanisms in an estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer model. ELISA, immunohistochemistry, western blot, qRT-PCR assays were performed at the end of the study. Tumor size was significantly declined in exercise training and tamoxifen groups compared to tumor group (P<0.05). Expression of miR-21 was significantly down-regulated in trained and tamoxifen treated mice in comparison with tumor group (P<0.05). Exercise training was as effective as tamoxifen treatment in decreasing serum estradiol and ER-α expression (P<0.05). Exercise training and tamoxifen reduced tumor IL-6 levels, NF-kB and STAT3 expressions, and up-regulated TPM1 and PDCD4 expressions (P<0.05). Both exercise and tamoxifen had synergistic effects in reducing miR-21 and Bcl-2, and up-regulating PDCD4 expression. Results showed that interval exercise training may reduce mammary tumor burden in mice through possible underlying pathway of miR-21. PMID:26300395

  2. Exercise Trajectories of Women from Entry to a 6-Month Cardiac Rehabilitation Program to One Year after Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Heather M.; Blanchard, Chris; Gunn, Elizabeth; Kodis, Jennifer; Walker, Steven; Toner, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is associated with reduced mortality and morbidity. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective intervention for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, women are less likely to engage in, or sustain, regular physical activity. Objectives were to (1) describe women's guidelines-based levels of physical activity during and after CR and (2) determine the physical activity trajectories of women from entry to CR to one year after CR. Methods and Results. A prospective, longitudinal study of 203 women with CVD enrolled in a 6-month CR program. Physical activity was measured using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LSI), focusing on moderate-strenuous activity. Data were analyzed using latent class growth analysis (LCGA) and logistic regression. Mean scores on the LSI showed women to be “active” at all follow-up points. LCGA revealed a two-class model, respectively, called “inactive relapsers” and “moderately active relapsers.” Predictors of the “moderately active relapsers” class were employment status and diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Conclusions. Women achieved the recommended physical activity levels by the end of CR and sustained them until one year after CR. LCGA allowed us to determine the class trajectories associated with moderate-strenuous activity and, from these, to identify implications for targeted intervention. PMID:24151580

  3. Multiple short bouts of exercise over 12-h period reduce glucose excursions more than an energy-matched single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrup, ME; Fairchild, TJ; Keslacy, S; Weinstock, RS; Kanaley, JA

    2014-01-01

    Objective Long, uninterrupted bouts of sedentary behavior are thought to negatively influence postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined the effects of a 1-h bout of morning exercise versus intermittent walking bouts of short duration on glucose excursions and insulin secretion over 12-h. Materials/Methods Eleven young, obese individuals (18–35y, BMI>30kg/m2) with impaired glucose tolerance were studied on three 12-h study days: 1) sedentary behavior (SED); 2) sedentary behavior with 1-h morning exercise (EX) at 60–65% VO2peak; and 3) sedentary behavior with 12-hourly, 5-min intervals of exercise (INT) at 60–65% VO2peak. Meals (1046 kJ/meal) were provided every 2-h. Blood samples were collected every 10 min and measured for glucose, insulin, and c-peptide concentrations. Results Glucose iAUC (12-h) was attenuated in the INT and SED conditions compared to the EX condition (P<0.05). Glucose concentrations were higher in the EX compared to the SED condition for ~150 min (20% of the study day), and comparison of the EX-INT study days revealed that glucose concentrations were greater for ~ 240 minutes (~1/3 of the 12-h day). In the SED condition, the 12-h insulin iAUC was ~15% higher (P<0.05) compared to the INT and EX conditions. Insulin production rate was found to increase ~20% with INT exercise vs. the SED and EX condition (P<0.05). Conclusions Short, frequent periods of exercise attenuated glucose excursions and insulin concentrations in obese individuals to a greater degree than an equal amount of exercise performed continuously in the morning. PMID:24439242

  4. Does progressive resistance and balance exercise reduce falls in residential aged care? Randomized controlled trial protocol for the SUNBEAM program

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Jennifer; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Goodall, Stephen; Henwood, Timothy; Clemson, Lindy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls are common among older adults. It is reported that approximately 60% of residents of aged care facilities fall each year. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden for health care providers and the health system. Among community dwelling older adults, exercise appears to be an effective countermeasure, but data are limited and inconsistent among studies in residents of aged care communities. This trial has been designed to evaluate whether the SUNBEAM program (Strength and Balance Exercise in Aged Care) reduces falls in residents of aged care facilities. Research question Is the program more effective and cost-effective than usual care for the prevention of falls? Design Single-blinded, two group, cluster randomized trial. Participants and setting 300 residents, living in 20 aged care facilities. Intervention Progressive resistance and balance training under the guidance of a physiotherapist for 6 months, then facility-guided maintenance training for 6 months. Control Usual care. Measurements Number of falls, number of fallers, quality of life, mobility, balance, fear of falling, cognitive well-being, resource use, and cost-effectiveness. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis The number of falls will be analyzed using a Poisson mixed model. A logistic mixed model will be used to analyze the number of residents who fall during the study period. Intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion This study addresses a significant shortcoming in aged care research, and has potential to impact upon a substantial health care problem. Outcomes will be used to inform care providers, and guide health care policies. PMID:24591821

  5. The prevalence of lymphoedema in women who attended an information and exercise class to reduce the risk of breast cancer-related upper limb lymphoedema.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, E; Purushotham, A

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer-related upper limb lymphoedema (BCRL) affects approximately 20 % of women undergoing axillary intervention. Women who attended a "reducing your risk of lymphoedema" class, including exercise instruction, anecdotally reported positive BCRL outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine BCRL outcomes and perceived benefit for attendees at a "reducing your risk of lymphoedema" class between 2000 and 2005. A cross-sectional study was conducted in two parts: (1) self-report questionnaire regarding lymphoedema status and benefit received from class and exercise programme; (2) clinical evaluation and objective measurement to confirm BCRL. 46 women completed questionnaires; 40 continued to clinical evaluation and objective measurement. BCRL prevalence defined as ≥10 % excess limb volume was only 5 %, although clinician judgement identified 23 % with arm lymphoedema and 8 % with lymphoedema limited to the hand. Clinician judgement correlated highly with patient self-report (Kappa = 0.833, p = 0.000). All women found the class beneficial, reporting increased confidence to return to normal life and a wide range of activities/exercise. We conclude that prevalence of BCRL should be determined by both clinical judgement and objective measurement to avoid underestimation. The benefit of group education with a lymphoedema expert and of exercise instruction should be further explored, and the potential for exercise to reduce BCRL prevalence should be examined. PMID:26759760

  6. Exercise as an Intervention to Reduce Study-Related Fatigue among University Students: A Two-Arm Parallel Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Juriena D.; van Hooff, Madelon L. M.; Geurts, Sabine A. E.; Kompier, Michiel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many university students experience high levels of study-related fatigue. This high prevalence, and the negative impact of fatigue on health and academic performance, call for prevention and reduction of these symptoms. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate to what extent an exercise intervention is effective in reducing three indicators of study-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and need for recovery). Effects of exercise on secondary outcomes (sleep quality, self-efficacy, physical fitness, and cognitive functioning) were also investigated. Methods Participants were students with high levels of study-related fatigue, currently not exercising or receiving other psychological or pharmacological treatments, and with no medical cause of fatigue. They were randomly assigned to either a six-week exercise intervention (low-intensity running three times a week, n = 49) or wait list (no intervention, n = 48). All participants were measured before the intervention (T0), and immediately after the intervention (T1). Exercisers were also investigated 4 weeks (T2) and 12 weeks (T3) after the intervention. Results Participants in the exercise condition showed a larger decrease in two of the three indicators of study-related fatigue (i.e., overall fatigue and need for recovery) as compared to controls. Additionally, sleep quality and some indicators of cognitive functioning improved more among exercisers than among controls. No effects were found for self-efficacy, and physical fitness. The initial effects of the exercise intervention lasted at follow-up (T2 and T3). At 12-week follow up (T3), 80% of participants in the exercise condition still engaged in regular exercise, and further enhancements were seen for emotional exhaustion, overall fatigue, and sleep quality. Conclusions These results underline the value of low-intensity exercise for university students with high levels of study-related fatigue. The follow-up effects that were found in this study imply that the intervention has the potential to promote regular exercise and accompanying beneficial effects in the longer run. Trial Registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR4412 PMID:27031610

  7. Carbohydrate ingestion reduces skeletal muscle acetylcarnitine availability but has no effect on substrate phosphorylation at the onset of exercise in man

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Heigenhauser, G J F; Stellingwerff, Trent; Hargreaves, Mark; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of reduced acetylcarnitine availability on oxidative metabolism during the transition from rest to steady-state exercise. Eight male subjects completed two randomised exercise trials at 68 % of the peak rate of O2 uptake (V̇O2,peak). On one occasion subjects ingested 1 g (kg body mass)−1 glucose 75 min prior to exercise (CHO), whereas the other trial acted as a control (CON). Muscle samples were obtained pre- and 75 min post-ingestion, and following 1 and 10 min of exercise. Plasma glucose and insulin were elevated (P < 0.05), and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) were lower at the onset of exercise in CHO. Acetylcarnitine (CON, 4.8 ± 1.8; CHO, 1.5 ± 0.9 mmol (kg dry mass (d.m.))−1, P < 0.05) and acetyl CoA (CON, 13.2 ± 2.3; CHO, 6.3 ± 0.6 μmol (kg d.m.)−1, P < 0.05) were lower at rest, whereas pyruvate dehydrogenase activation (PDHa) was greater in CHO compared with CON (CON, 0.78 ± 0.07; CHO, 1.44 ± 0.19 mmol min−1 (kg wet mass (w.m.))−1). Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was significantly elevated during exercise in CHO. The acetyl groups increased at similar rates at the onset of exercise (1 min) and there was no difference in substrate phosphorylation as determined from lactate accumulation and phosphocreatine degradation between trials. Subsequently, oxidative metabolism during the transition from rest to steady-state exercise was not affected by prior carbohydrate ingestion. Although exercise resulted in the rapid activation of PDH in both trials, PDHa was greater at 1 min in CHO (CON, 2.36 ± 0.22; CHO, 2.91 ± 0.18 mmol min−1 (kg w.m.)−1). No differences in muscle metabolite levels and PDHa were observed after 10 min of moderate exercise between trials. In summary, at rest, carbohydrate ingestion induced multiple metabolic changes which included decreased acetylcarnitine availability and small increases in PDHa. The prior changes in PDHa and acetylcarnitine availability had no effect on substrate phosphorylation and oxidative metabolism at the onset of exercise. These data suggest that acetylcarnitine availability is unlikely to be the site of metabolic inertia during the transition from rest to steady-state moderate intensity exercise. PMID:12411537

  8. Daily exercise reduces fat, protein and body mass in male but not female rats.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R N; Chandler, M P; Lemon, P W; DiCarlo, S E

    1997-07-01

    This study was designed to compare the estimated energy balance, linear growth (body and bone lengths) and body composition (all components including body mass, total body water, fat, protein and ash) response to daily spontaneous running (DSR) in young male and female rats. We tested the hypothesis that due to gender differences in energy efficiency, DSR would reduce linear growth and body composition more in male rats. Fourteen male and sixteen female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sedentary (SED) control (male 7, female 8) or DSR (male 7, female 8) group. The DSR rats were allowed to run spontaneously in running wheels while SED rats remained in standard rat cages for 9 weeks. Body mass, running distance and food intake were measured over the nine week period. Subsequently, chemical analysis was performed to measure carcass content of water, protein, fat and ash. Linear growth was assessed by measures of body and bone lengths. The estimated energy balance of the DSR rats was computed and compared between genders. Estimated energy balance was significantly more negative in females than males due to significantly greater DSR distance. Body and bone lengths were similar among the SED and DSR female and SED and DSR male rats. However, whole body mass, fat mass and protein mass were significantly lower only in DSR males. These results demonstrate that DSR reduced body mass, body fat and protein mass in male rats but not in female rats despite a more negative estimated energy balance in female rats. These findings suggest that females are better protected from an energy deficit due to DSR. Possible mechanisms include gender-specific hormonal responses. PMID:9226349

  9. Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is accompanied by localized oxidative stress / inflammation which, in the short-term at least, is associated with impaired muscular performance. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to reduce excessive oxidative stress; however, their effectiveness in facilitating recovery following EIMD is not clear. Blueberries demonstrate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study we examine the effect of New Zealand blueberries on EIMD after strenuous eccentric exercise. Methods In a randomized cross-over design, 10 females consumed a blueberry smoothie or placebo of a similar antioxidant capacity 5 and 10 hours prior to and then immediately, 12 and 36 hours after EIMD induced by 300 strenuous eccentric contractions of the quadriceps. Absolute peak and average peak torque across the knee, during concentric, isometric, and eccentric actions were measured. Blood biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation were assessed at 12, 36 and 60 hours post exercise. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. Results A significant (p < 0.001) decrease in isometric, concentric and eccentric torque was observed 12 hours following exercise in both treatment groups. During the 60 hour recovery period, a significant (p = 0.047) interaction effect was seen for peak isometric tension suggesting a faster rate of recovery in the blueberry intervention group. A similar trend was observed for concentric and eccentric strength. An increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers was also observed in both treatment groups following EIMD. Although a faster rate of decrease in oxidative stress was observed in the blueberry group, it was not significant (p < 0.05) until 36 hours post-exercise and interestingly coincided with a gradual increase in plasma antioxidant capacity, whereas biomarkers for inflammation were still elevated after 60 hours recovery. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the ingestion of a blueberry smoothie prior to and after EIMD accelerates recovery of muscle peak isometric strength. This effect, although independent of the beverage’s inherent antioxidant capacity, appears to involve an up-regulation of adaptive processes, i.e. endogenous antioxidant processes, activated by the combined actions of the eccentric exercise and blueberry consumption. These findings may benefit the sporting community who should consider dietary interventions that specifically target health and performance adaptation. PMID:22564864

  10. Exercise-training in young Drosophila melanogaster reduces age-related decline in mobility and cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicole; Gosangi, Babina; Devilla, Shawn; Arking, Robert; Wessells, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Declining mobility is a major concern, as well as a major source of health care costs, among the elderly population. Lack of mobility is a primary cause of entry into managed care facilities, and a contributing factor to the frequency of damaging falls. Exercise-based therapies have shown great promise in sustaining mobility in elderly patients, as well as in rodent models. However, the genetic basis of the changing physiological responses to exercise during aging is not well understood. Here, we describe the first exercise-training paradigm in an invertebrate genetic model system. Flies are exercised by a mechanized platform, known as the Power Tower, that rapidly, repeatedly, induces their innate instinct for negative geotaxis. When young flies are subjected to a carefully controlled, ramped paradigm of exercise-training, they display significant reduction in age-related decline in mobility and cardiac performance. Fly lines with improved mitochondrial efficiency display some of the phenotypes observed in wild-type exercised flies. The exercise response in flies is influenced by the amount of protein and lipid, but not carbohydrate, in the diet. The development of an exercise-training model in Drosophila melanogaster opens the way to direct testing of single-gene based genetic therapies for improved mobility in aged animals, as well as unbiased genetic screens for loci involved in the changing response to exercise during aging. PMID:19517023

  11. Protective effects of polysaccharide from Euphorbia kansui (Euphorbiaceae) on the swimming exercise-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Farong; Lu, Shunqing; Yu, Fahong; Feng, Shutao; McGuire, Peter M; Li, Rende; Wang, Rui

    2006-10-01

    The present study examined the effects of derivatives of galactosides and glucosides in a polysaccharide extract from Euphorbia kansui (Euphorbiaceae) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in mice. Exhaustive swimming exercise significantly increases the degree of lipid peroxidation in terms of malondialdehyde content and reduces the antioxidant activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Our findings revealed that chronic oral treatment with the extract elevates enzymatic activities of SOD and GPx accompanied by a corresponding decrease in malondialdehyde. The antioxidative activities of these compounds against exercise-induced oxidative stress are correlated with various activities such as reducing the production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, enhancing antioxidative defenses, and increasing the production of SOD and GPx activity and expression in different tissues. These compounds may be involved in glycogen metabolism to meet the requirement of working skeletal muscles and act as antioxidants by terminating the chain reaction of lipid peroxidation to maintain the morphological stability of mitochondria in spinal motor neurons. These observations suggest that E. kansui has antioxidative and antifatigue properties and can be given as prophylactic and (or) therapeutic supplements for increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and preventing lipid peroxidation during strenuous exercise. PMID:17218972

  12. The Respiratory Exchange Ratio is Associated with Fitness Indicators Both in Trained and Untrained Men: A Possible Application for People with Reduced Exercise Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Jiménez, Arnulfo; Hernández-Torres, Rosa P.; Torres-Durán, Patricia V.; Romero-Gonzalez, Jaime; Mascher, Dieter; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Juárez-Oropeza, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) indirectly shows the muscle’s oxidative capacity to get energy. Sedentarism, exercise and physically active lifestyles modify it. For that reason, this study evaluates the associations between RER during sub-maximum exercise and other well established fitness indicators (body fat, maximum heart rate, maximum O2 uptake, workload, and lactate threshold), in physically active trained and untrained men. Methods: The RER, O2 uptake and blood lactate were measured in eight endurance trained and eight untrained men (age, 22.9 ± 4.5 vs. 21.9 ± 2.8 years; body mass, 67.1 ± 5.4 vs. 72.2 ± 7.7 kg; body fat, 10.6 ± 2.4% vs. 16.6 ± 3.8% and maximum O2 uptake, 68.9 ± 6.3 vs. 51.6 ± 5.8 ml•kg−1•min−1), during maximum exercise test and during three different sub-maximum exercises at fixed workload: below, within or above the lactate threshold. Results: Endurance trained men presented higher O2 uptake, lower blood lactate concentrations and lower RER values than those in untrained men at the three similar relative workloads. Even though with these differences in RER, a strong association (p < 0.05) of RER during sub-maximum exercise with the other well established fitness indicators was observed, and both maximum O2 uptake and lactate threshold determined more than 57% of its variance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that RER measurement under sub-maximum exercise conditions was well correlated with other established physical fitness indicators, despite training condition. Furthermore, the results suggest that RER could help obtain an easy approach of fitness status under low exercise intensity and could be utilized in subjects with reduced exercise tolerance. PMID:21157516

  13. [Mechanism of the immunomodulating action of extracorporeally essentiale-modified syngeneic erythrocytes during strenuous exertion].

    PubMed

    Laskova, I L; Iakhontov, Iu O

    1996-01-01

    Exercise induces splenocytes to release a factor inhibiting the productive phase of immunogenesis that activates the formation of non-T-antigen-dependent and T-antigen-dependent suppressors. The administration of essential-modified erythrocytes to animals performing exercises make splenocytes to release a factor stimulating the cooperation of T and B lymphocytes and inhibiting the formation of non-T-antigen-specific and T-antigen-specific suppressors. The factor resulted from the essential-modified red blood cells depresses the influence of the factor released during exercise. PMID:8754142

  14. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E (VE) and vitamin C (VC) blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial (MT) function and induces insulin resistance ...

  15. Twenty-Four Hour Total and Dietary Fat Oxidation in Lean, Obese and Reduced-Obese Adults with and without a Bout of Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Kealey, Elizabeth H.; Schmidt, Stacy L.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Bessesen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that obese and reduced-obese individuals have decreased oxidative capacity, which contributes to weight gain and regain. Recent data have challenged this concept. Objective To determine (1) whether total and dietary fat oxidation are decreased in obese and reduced-obese adults compared to lean but increase in response to an acute exercise bout and (2) whether regular physical activity attenuates these metabolic alterations. Design We measured 24-hr total (whole-room calorimetry) and dietary fat (14C-oleate) oxidation in Sedentary Lean (BMI = 21.5±1.6; n = 10), Sedentary Obese (BMI = 33.6±2.5; n = 9), Sedentary Reduced-Obese (RED-SED; BMI = 26.9±3.7; n = 7) and in Physically Active Reduced-Obese (RED-EX; BMI = 27.3±2.8; n = 12) men and women with or without an acute exercise bout where energy expended during exercise was not replaced. Results Although Red-SED and Red-EX had a similar level of fatness, aerobic capacity and metabolic profiles were better in Red-EX only compared to Obese subjects. No significant between-group differences were seen in 24-hr respiratory quotient (RQ, Lean: 0.831±0.044, Obese: 0.852±0.023, Red-SED: 0.864±0.037, Red-EX: 0.842±0.039), total and dietary fat oxidation. A single bout of exercise increased total (+27.8%, p<0.0001) and dietary (+6.6%, p = 0.048) fat oxidation across groups. Although exercise did not impact RQ during the day, it decreased RQ during sleep (p = 0.01) in all groups. Red-EX oxidized more fat overnight than Red-SED subjects under both resting (p = 0.036) and negative energy balance (p = 0.003) conditions, even after adjustment for fat-free mass. Conclusion Obese and reduced-obese individuals oxidize as much fat as lean both under eucaloric and negative energy balance conditions, which does not support the hypothesis of reduced oxidative capacity in these groups. Reduced-obese individuals who exercise regularly have markers of metabolic health similar to those seen in lean adults. Both the acute and chronic effects of exercise were primarily observed at night suggesting an important role of sleep in the regulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:24714529

  16. Spectroscopy and imaging of oxygen delivery to tissue under strenuous conditions (NIR in athletes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko; Long, Hong; Xie, Chunhua; Ma, XuHui; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Luo, Qingming

    2000-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the dynamics of muscle oxygen utilization can readily be measured using dual wavelength hemoglobin oximetry. This method can be used for muscle training exercise and also for evaluation of exercise performance where the anaerobic threshold must be avoided. It was shown that CW imaging technology gives images along the surface of the muscle while the time resolved spectroscopy gives images transverse to the muscle.

  17. Exercise and smoking habits among Swedish postmenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Frisk, J; Brynhildsen, J; Ivarsson, T; Persson, P; Hammar, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess exercise habits and their relation to smoking habits and social and medical factors in postmenopausal women. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a questionnaire to all 1324 55-56 year old women in Linköping, Sweden. RESULTS: Response rate was 85%. About a third of the women took part in some kind of quite strenuous exercise for at least one hour a week. After a quarter worked out once a week; fewer did swimming and jogging. One in four women smoked. Women who used hormone replacement therapy, who were not smoking and who had a physically light occupation more often took part in strenuous sports. Women who had been treated for malignancies or with back problems exercised to the same extent as women in the general population. CONCLUSION: About a third of the post-menopausal women exercised on a regular basis, if exercise involved in getting to and from work was not counted. Since regular physical exercise has many health benefits, more women should be encouraged to take part in regular physical exercise. Factors probably associated with level of education and general awareness of the importance of a healthy lifestyle positively influenced the likelihood of these women to be physically active on a regular basis. A previous malignant disease or current back problems did not prevent women from taking part in exercise on a regular basis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9298557

  18. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    PubMed

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory. PMID:26454156

  19. Exercise does not activate the β3 adrenergic receptor-eNOS pathway, but reduces inducible NOS expression to protect the heart of obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Adrien; Battault, Sylvain; Belaidi, Elise; Tanguy, Stephane; Rosselin, Marie; Boulghobra, Doria; Meyer, Gregory; Gayrard, Sandrine; Walther, Guillaume; Geny, Bernard; Durand, Gregory; Cazorla, Olivier; Reboul, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with higher cardiac vulnerability to ischemia-reperfusion (IR). The cardioprotective effect of regular exercise has been attributed to β3-adrenergic receptor (β3AR) stimulation and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. Here, we evaluated the role of the β3AR-eNOS pathway and NOS isoforms in exercise-induced cardioprotection of C57Bl6 mice fed with high fat and sucrose diet (HFS) for 12 weeks and subjected or not to exercise training during the last 4 weeks (HFS-Ex). HFS animals were more sensitive to in vivo and ex vivo IR injuries than control (normal diet) and HFS-Ex mice. Cardioprotection in HFS-Ex mice was not associated with increased myocardial eNOS activation and NO metabolites storage, possibly due to the β3AR-eNOS pathway functional loss in their heart. Indeed, a selective β3AR agonist (BRL37344) increased eNOS activation and had a protective effect against IR in control, but not in HFS hearts. Moreover, iNOS expression, nitro-oxidative stress (protein s-nitrosylation and nitrotyrosination) and ROS production during early reperfusion were increased in HFS, but not in control mice. Exercise normalized iNOS level and reduced protein s-nitrosylation, nitrotyrosination and ROS production in HFS-Ex hearts during early reperfusion. The iNOS inhibitor 1400 W reduced in vivo infarct size in HFS mice to control levels, supporting the potential role of iNOS normalization in the cardioprotective effects of exercise training in HFS-Ex mice. Although the β3AR-eNOS pathway is defective in the heart of HFS mice, regular exercise can protect their heart against IR by reducing iNOS expression and nitro-oxidative stress. PMID:27164904

  20. Supraglottoplasty as treatment of exercise induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO).

    PubMed

    Mehlum, Camilla Slot; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Godballe, Christian; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-04-01

    Breathing difficulties during exertion may be caused by exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). The diagnosis depends on visualization of the larynx during exercise, i.e. by continuous laryngoscopic exercise (CLE) test. In case of severe supraglottic collapse and pronounced symptoms during strenuous exertion, surgical treatment (supraglottoplasty) has been suggested. The aims of this study were to evaluate outcome and patient satisfaction after supraglottoplasty for EILO and to compare our results with previously reported data. During the period December 2010 to October 2013, 17 patients diagnosed with moderate to severe supraglottic EILO were treated by supraglottoplasty with microlaryngoscopic laser technique at our institutions. The severity of patients symptoms (VAS score) and CLE scores was evaluated pre- and postoperatively. We found a decrease in patients symptoms from median 80 points VAS score preoperatively to 20 points postoperatively (p < 0.001) and a decrease in CLE sum score from median 4.0 points to 2.5 points (p < 0.05). Several previous studies have recommended surgery for selected patients with supraglottic involvement, but these have mainly been based on case reports or on very few patients. This study is the second larger-scale study that documents the positive effect of supraglottoplasty as treatment of EILO in terms of reduced respiratory symptoms and decreased laryngeal obstruction assessed by post-operative CLE test. We suggest that surgery is a well-tolerated and effective treatment option for selected EILO patients with moderate to severe supraglottic obstruction during exercise and a high level of physical activity. PMID:26541712

  1. The 24-h Energy Intake of Obese Adolescents Is Spontaneously Reduced after Intensive Exercise: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Calorimetric Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Thivel, David; Isacco, Laurie; Montaurier, Christophe; Boirie, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical exercise can modify subsequent energy intake and appetite and may thus be of particular interest in terms of obesity treatment. However, it is still unclear whether an intensive bout of exercise can affect the energy consumption of obese children and adolescents. Objective To compare the impact of high vs. moderate intensity exercises on subsequent 24-h energy intake, macronutrient preferences, appetite sensations, energy expenditure and balance in obese adolescent. Design This randomized cross-over trial involves 15 obese adolescent boys who were asked to randomly complete three 24-h sessions in a metabolic chamber, each separated by at least 7 days: (1) sedentary (SED); (2) Low-Intensity Exercise (LIE) (40% maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max); (3) High-Intensity Exercise (HIE) (75%VO2max). Results Despite unchanged appetite sensations, 24-h total energy intake following HIE was 6–11% lower compared to LIE and SED (p<0.05), whereas no differences appeared between SED and LIE. Energy intake at lunch was 9.4% and 8.4% lower after HIE compared to SED and LIE, respectively (p<0.05). At dinner time, it was 20.5% and 19.7% lower after HIE compared to SED and LIE, respectively (p<0.01). 24-h energy expenditure was not significantly altered. Thus, the 24-h energy balance was significantly reduced during HIE compared to SED and LIE (p<0.01), whereas those of SED and LIE did not differ. Conclusions In obese adolescent boys, HIE has a beneficial impact on 24-h energy balance, mainly due to the spontaneous decrease in energy intake during lunch and dinner following the exercise bout. Prescribing high-intensity exercises to promote weight loss may therefore provide effective results without affecting appetite sensations and, as a result, food frustrations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01036360 PMID:22272251

  2. Aerobic exercise training-induced changes in serum adropin level are associated with reduced arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Shumpei; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Sato, Koji; Fujita, Satoshi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2015-11-15

    Aging-induced arterial stiffening is reduced by aerobic exercise training, and elevated production of nitric oxide (NO) participates in this effect. Adropin is a regulator of endothelial NO synthase and NO release, and circulating adropin level decreases with age. However, the effect of habitual aerobic exercise on circulating adropin levels in healthy middle-aged and older adults remains unclear. We sought to determine whether serum adropin level is associated with exercise training-induced changes in arterial stiffness. First, in a cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between serum adropin level and both arterial stiffness and cardiorespiratory fitness in 80 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (65.6 ± 0.9 yr). Second, in an intervention study, we examined the effects of 8-wk aerobic exercise training on serum adropin level and arterial stiffness in 40 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (67.3 ± 1.0 yr) divided into two groups: aerobic exercise training and sedentary controls. In the cross-sectional study, serum adropin level was negatively correlated with carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.437, P < 0.001) and positively correlated with plasma NOx level (r = 0.493, P < 0.001) and cardiorespiratory fitness (r = 0.457, P < 0.001). Serum adropin levels were elevated after the 8-wk aerobic exercise training intervention, and training-induced changes in serum adropin level were correlated with training-induced changes in carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.399, P < 0.05) and plasma NOx level (r = 0.623, P < 0.001). Thus the increase in adropin may participate in the exercise-induced reduction of arterial stiffness. PMID:26371163

  3. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats.

    PubMed

    Picklo, Matthew J; Thyfault, John P

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  4. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Picklo, Matthew J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  5. Etiology of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, P M; Sayers, S P

    1999-06-01

    Muscle damage is caused by strenuous and unaccustomed exercise, especially exercise involving eccentric muscle contractions, where muscles lengthen as they exert force. Damage can be observed both directly at the cellular level and indirectly from changes in various indices of muscle function. Several mechanisms have been offered to explain the etiology of the damage/repair process, including mechanical factors such as tension and strain, disturbances in calcium homeostasis, the inflammatory response, and the synthesis of stress proteins (heat shock proteins). Changes in muscle function following eccentric exercise have been observed at the cellular level as an impairment in the amount and action of transport proteins for glucose and lactate/H+, and at the systems level as an increase in muscle stiffness and a prolonged loss in the muscle's ability to generate force. This paper will briefly review factors involved in the damage/repair process and alterations in muscle function following eccentric exercise. PMID:10364418

  6. Oxidative stress, exercise, and antioxidant supplementation.

    PubMed

    Urso, Maria L; Clarkson, Priscilla M

    2003-07-15

    Cells continuously produce free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of metabolic processes. These free radicals are neutralized by an elaborate antioxidant defense system consisting of enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and numerous non-enzymatic antioxidants, including vitamins A, E and C, glutathione, ubiquinone, and flavonoids. Exercise can produce an imbalance between ROS and antioxidants, which is referred to as oxidative stress. Dietary antioxidant supplements are marketed to and used by athletes as a means to counteract the oxidative stress of exercise. Whether strenuous exercise does, in fact, increase the need for additional antioxidants in the diet is not clear. This review examines the markers used to determine oxidative stress in blood and muscle samples (e.g. lipid peroxidation, expired pentane, malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes, congugated dienes, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG)), the changes in oxidative stress markers induced by exercise, and whether athletes require antioxidant supplements. PMID:12821281

  7. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  8. Supraspinal fatigue after normoxic and hypoxic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; González-Alonso, José; Ali, Leena; Ross, Emma Z; Romer, Lee M

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate cerebral O2 availability has been proposed to be an important contributing factor to the development of central fatigue during strenuous exercise. Here we tested the hypothesis that supraspinal processes of fatigue would be increased after locomotor exercise in acute hypoxia compared to normoxia, and that such change would be related to reductions in cerebral O2 delivery and tissue oxygenation. Nine endurance-trained cyclists completed three constant-load cycling exercise trials at ∼80% of maximal work rate: (1) to the limit of tolerance in acute hypoxia; (2) for the same duration but in normoxia (control); and (3) to the limit of tolerance in normoxia. Throughout each trial, prefrontal cortex tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAV) were assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler sonography, respectively. Cerebral O2 delivery was calculated as the product of arterial O2 content and MCAV. Before and immediately after each trial, twitch responses to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation were obtained to assess neuromuscular and cortical function, respectively. Exercise time was reduced by 54% in hypoxia compared to normoxia (3.6 ± 1.3 vs. 8.1 ± 2.9 min; P < 0.001). Cerebral O2 delivery, cerebral oxygenation and maximum O2 uptake were reduced whereas muscle electromyographic activity was increased in hypoxia compared to control (P < 0.05). Maximum voluntary force and potentiated quadriceps twitch force were decreased below baseline after exercise in each trial; the decreases were greater in hypoxia compared to control (P < 0.001), but were not different in the exhaustive trials (P > 0.05). Cortical voluntary activation was also decreased after exercise in all trials, but the decline in hypoxia (Δ18%) was greater than in the normoxic trials (Δ5–9%) (P < 0.05). The reductions in cortical voluntary activation were paralleled by reductions in cerebral O2 delivery. The results suggest that curtailment of exercise performance in acute severe hypoxia is due, in part, to failure of drive from the motor cortex, possibly as a consequence of diminished O2 availability in the brain. PMID:22473785

  9. Supraspinal fatigue after normoxic and hypoxic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Stuart; González-Alonso, José; Ali, Leena; Ross, Emma Z; Romer, Lee M

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate cerebral O₂ availability has been proposed to be an important contributing factor to the development of central fatigue during strenuous exercise. Here we tested the hypothesis that supraspinal processes of fatigue would be increased after locomotor exercise in acute hypoxia compared to normoxia, and that such change would be related to reductions in cerebral O₂ delivery and tissue oxygenation. Nine endurance-trained cyclists completed three constant-load cycling exercise trials at ∼80% of maximal work rate: (1) to the limit of tolerance in acute hypoxia; (2) for the same duration but in normoxia (control); and (3) to the limit of tolerance in normoxia. Throughout each trial, prefrontal cortex tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAV) were assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy and trans-cranial Doppler sonography, respectively. Cerebral O₂ delivery was calculated as the product of arterial O₂ content and MCAV. Before and immediately after each trial, twitch responses to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation were obtained to assess neuromuscular and cortical function, respectively. Exercise time was reduced by 54%in hypoxia compared to normoxia (3.6 ± 1.3 vs. 8.1 ± 2.9 min; P<0.001). Cerebral O₂ delivery,cerebral oxygenation and maximum O₂ uptake were reduced whereas muscle electromyographic activity was increased in hypoxia compared to control (P <0.05).Maximum voluntary force and potentiated quadriceps twitch force were decreased below baseline after exercise in each trial;the decreases were greater in hypoxia compared to control (P<0.001), but were not different in the exhaustive trials (P>0.05). Cortical voluntary activation was also decreased after exercise in all trials, but the decline in hypoxia (Δ18%) was greater than in the normoxic trials (Δ5-9%)(P <0.05). The reductions in cortical voluntary activation were paralleled by reductions in cerebral O₂ delivery. The results suggest that curtailment of exercise performance in acute severe hypoxia is due, in part, to failure of drive from the motor cortex, possibly as a consequence of diminished O₂ availability in the brain. PMID:22473785

  10. Air Quality and Exercise-Related Health Benefits from Reduced Car Travel in the Midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Spak, Scott N.; Holloway, Tracey; Stone, Brian; Mednick, Adam C.; Patz, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automobile exhaust contains precursors to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), posing health risks. Dependency on car commuting also reduces physical fitness opportunities. Objective: In this study we sought to quantify benefits from reducing automobile usage for short urban and suburban trips. Methods: We simulated census-tract level changes in hourly pollutant concentrations from the elimination of automobile round trips ≤ 8 km in 11 metropolitan areas in the upper midwestern United States using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Next, we estimated annual changes in health outcomes and monetary costs expected from pollution changes using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Benefits Mapping Analysis Program (BenMAP). In addition, we used the World Health Organization Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT) to calculate benefits of increased physical activity if 50% of short trips were made by bicycle. Results: We estimate that, by eliminating these short automobile trips, annual average urban PM2.5 would decline by 0.1 µg/m3 and that summer ozone (O3) would increase slightly in cities but decline regionally, resulting in net health bene-fits of $4.94 billion/year [95% confidence interval (CI): $0.2 billion, $13.5 billion), with 25% of PM2.5 and most O3 bene-fits to populations outside metropolitan areas. Across the study region of approximately 31.3 million people and 37,000 total square miles, mortality would decline by approximately 1,295 deaths/year (95% CI: 912, 1,636) because of improved air quality and increased exercise. Making 50% of short trips by bicycle would yield savings of approximately $3.8 billion/year from avoided mortality and reduced health care costs (95% CI: $2.7 billion, $5.0 billion]. We estimate that the combined benefits of improved air quality and physical fitness would exceed $8 billion/year. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that significant health and economic benefits are possible if bicycling replaces short car trips. Less dependence on automobiles in urban areas would also improve health in downwind rural settings. PMID:22049372

  11. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  12. It is Highly Unlikely that the Development of an Abdominal Wall Hernia can be Attributable to a Single Strenuous Event

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Pathak; Poston, Graeme J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is a commonly held belief that the development of a hernia can be attributed to a single strenuous or traumatic event. Hence, many litigants are successful in compensation claims, causing mounting financial burdens on employers, the courts, insurance companies and the tax-payer. However, there is very little scientific evidence to support this assertion. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether there was any causal link in this process. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 133 new patients with 135 abdominal herniae of all varieties (115 inguinal, 3 femoral, 9 umbilical, 4 incisional, and 4 ventral or epigastric), of which 25 were recurrent received structured questionnaires on arrival in the surgical clinic. These questionnaires covered all possible aetiological factors for hernia development (type of work, COAD, smoking, pregnancy, obesity, chronic bladder outflow obstruction, previous surgery including appendicectomy), in addition to any possible attribution to a single strenuous or traumatic event. We then reviewed the GP records in the surgery of all patients who answered positively to the latter possible cause. RESULTS In the study group, 119 (89%) reported a gradual onset of symptoms. Of the 15 (12 male, 3 female; 11%) who believed that their hernia might be related to a single strenuous or traumatic event, 5 had no other aetiological factors. However, not one of the 15 was found to have contemporaneous forensic medical evidence to support their possible claim. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that we are unable to find any clinical evidence to support the hypothesis that a hernia might develop as the result of one single strenuous or traumatic event. While we accept that this mechanism might still possibly occur, we believe that, at best, it is extremely uncommon. If a medical expert is preparing a report on such a case in a claim for personal injury, then they have a duty to the court to examine carefully all the contemporaneous medical records. If no clinical evidence exists to support the claim, then they have a duty to the court not to support the plaintiff's claim. PMID:16551411

  13. Vasodepressor effects of exercise are accompanied by reduced circulating ouabainlike immunoreactivity and normalization of nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Y; Kimura, Y; Nishimura, N; Hara, K; Mori, T; Okuda, K; Munakata, M; Masuda, M; Murakami, T; Takahashi, H

    1997-04-01

    Our object was to evaluate the effects of regular mild exercise on blood pressure and on circulating level of ouabainlike factors (OLF) and of nitrate anion, an endproduct of nitric oxide (NO) in humans. We measured plasma ouabainlike immunoreactivity (OLI) and nitrate ions (NO3.) before and after mild exercise for 3 months' duration in 16 patients with essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, or hyperlipidemia. Plasma OLI was measured using an amplified ELISA system with anti-ouabain antibody and biotinyl-tyramide. Serum NO3. was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an anion-exchange column. With the reverse phase HPLC system with an octa decylsilyl silicagel column, the elution volume of plasma OLI of a healthy volunteer matched that of authentic ouabain in a gradient elution system of acetonitrile/H2O. Plasma OLI levels decreased significantly by about 34% after mild exercise, and NO3. levels tended to be within the reference interval in normal volunteers. Body weight, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, serum triglyceride and acetylcholine esterase (a marker of the fatty liver) were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) after 3 months of regular mild exercise. The plasma OLI level was significantly correlated with plasma NO3., there was a trend toward a correlation with diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.06) before and after regular exercise. Regular mild exercise led to a decrease in plasma levels of OLI, and acetylcholine esterase activity and blood pressure in adult patients. Results suggest that changes in OLF production contribute to the blood pressure regulation seen in patients who exercise regularly. PMID:9107442

  14. Reduced cortical BACE1 content with one bout of exercise is accompanied by declines in AMPK, Akt, and MAPK signaling in obese, glucose-intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, R E K; Baumeister, P; Peppler, W T; Wright, D C; Little, J P

    2015-11-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are significant risk factors in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. A variety of cellular mechanisms, such as altered Akt and AMPK and increased inflammatory signaling, contribute to neurodegeneration. Exercise training can improve markers of neurodegeneration, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single bout of exercise on markers of neurodegeneration and inflammation in brains from mice fed a high-fat diet. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a low (LFD; 10% kcal from lard)- or a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from lard) for 7 wk. HFD mice underwent an acute bout of exercise (treadmill running: 15 m/min, 5% incline, 120 min) followed by a recovery period of 2 h. The HFD increased body mass and glucose intolerance (both P < 0.05). This was accompanied by an approximately twofold increase in the phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and GSK in the cortex (P < 0.05). Following exercise, there was a decrease in beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1; P < 0.05) and activity (P < 0.001). This was accompanied by a reduction in AMPK phosphorylation, indicative of a decline in cellular stress (P < 0.05). Akt and ERK phosphorylation were decreased following exercise in HFD mice to a level similar to that of the LFD mice (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that a single bout of exercise can reduce BACE1 content and activity independent of changes in adiposity. This effect is associated with reductions in Akt, ERK, and AMPK signaling in the cortex. PMID:26404616

  15. Exercise Eases Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_156634.html Exercise Eases Low Back Pain Review of studies shows exercise, with or without ... News) -- Exercise may reduce your risk of low back pain, Australian researchers report. They reviewed 23 studies that ...

  16. Resistance Versus Aerobic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Jane E.; Kenny, Glen P.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Riddell, Michael C.; Balaa, Nadia; Malcolm, Janine; Boulay, Pierre; Khandwala, Farah; Sigal, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In type 1 diabetes, small studies have found that resistance exercise (weight lifting) reduces HbA1c. In the current study, we examined the acute impacts of resistance exercise on glycemia during exercise and in the subsequent 24 h compared with aerobic exercise and no exercise. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twelve physically active individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c 7.1 ± 1.0%) performed 45 min of resistance exercise (three sets of seven exercises at eight repetitions maximum), 45 min of aerobic exercise (running at 60% of Vo2max), or no exercise on separate days. Plasma glucose was measured during and for 60 min after exercise. Interstitial glucose was measured by continuous glucose monitoring 24 h before, during, and 24 h after exercise. RESULTS Treatment-by-time interactions (P < 0.001) were found for changes in plasma glucose during and after exercise. Plasma glucose decreased from 8.4 ± 2.7 to 6.8 ± 2.3 mmol/L (P = 0.008) during resistance exercise and from 9.2 ± 3.4 to 5.8 ± 2.0 mmol/L (P = 0.001) during aerobic exercise. No significant changes were seen during the no-exercise control session. During recovery, glucose levels did not change significantly after resistance exercise but increased by 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/L (P = 0.023) after aerobic exercise. Mean interstitial glucose from 4.5 to 6.0 h postexercise was significantly lower after resistance exercise versus aerobic exercise. CONCLUSIONS Resistance exercise causes less initial decline in blood glucose during the activity but is associated with more prolonged reductions in postexercise glycemia than aerobic exercise. This might account for HbA1c reductions found in studies of resistance exercise but not aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23172972

  17. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for this given population due to some limitations impaired the power of our study. PMID:26683943

  18. Quantification of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage with bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T S; Fedde, M R; Gaughan, E M; Langsetmo, I; Erickson, H H

    1998-07-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH) causes serious economic losses in the horse racing industry. Endoscopic examination indicates that 40-90% of horses exhibit EIPH following sprint exercise, but the limitations of the endoscope prevent diagnosis in many horses. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was utilised to detect red blood cells (RBCs) in the terminal airways in 6 horses. Two lavages were performed at weekly intervals prior to exercise, one within 90 min after exercise, and 5 at weekly intervals after exercise. The horses were exercised strenuously at 12.5-14.6 m/s on a treadmill (3 degree incline). Heart rates ranged from 192-207 beats/min, and mean pulmonary arterial pressures (mPAP) ranged from 80-102 mmHg. Neither epistaxis nor endoscopic evidence of EIPH was seen in any of the 6 horses following exercise. However, the number of RBCs in the lavage fluid increased significantly over control values immediately after exercise in all horses but returned to control values by one week after exercise. Haemosiderophages in the BAL fluid did not increase until one week after exercise and remained elevated for 3 weeks after exercise. Twenty per cent of the total population of alveolar macrophages contained haemosiderin. A positive relationship occurred between the number of RBCs in the lavage fluid and mPAP; the amount of haemorrhage increased as the mPAP exceeded 80 to 90 mmHg. The results with BAL used as the diagnostic tool, suggest that all strenuously exercised horses may exhibit EIPH; the amount of haemorrhage appears to be associated with the magnitude of the high pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:9705109

  19. Long-Term Exercise and Bone Mineral Density Changes in Postmenopausal Women-Are There Periods of Reduced Effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Engelke, Klaus; von Stengel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise can prevent fractures in postmenopausal women. However, even with careful adaptation of the exercise program to subjects' changing bone, health, and fitness status, effectivity may still decrease over the time. This could be specifically the case where the limitations of higher age collide with the specification of the exercise program. Thus, the aim of this study was to monitor bone mineral density (BMD) changes over a 16-year period of supervised exercise. Our hypothesis was that BMD differences at lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) between exercisers (EG) and nontraining controls (CG) increased throughout the intervention with significant differences for each of the four 4-year observation periods. Sixty-seven (EG, n = 39 versus CG, n = 28) initially early-postmenopausal osteopenic women of the Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study (EFOPS) with complete BMD data sets for baseline (1998) and 4-, 8-, 12-, and 16-year follow-up were included in the analysis. The exercise protocol initially focused on a high-intensity strategy that addressed bone but increasingly shifted to a more comprehensive intervention. LS-BMD differences between the EG and CG continuously increased (year 4: 2.4% (95%- Confidence Interval 1.0% to 3.8%), year 8: 3.1% (1.6% to 4.7%), year 12: 3.9% (1.9% to 5.8), year 16: 4.5% (2.5% to 6.6%). Correspondingly, rising differences for FN-BMD (0.9% (-0.2% to 2.1%) versus 1.9% (0.4% to 3.3%) versus 2.0% (0.5% to 3.8%) versus 3.0% (1.0% to 5.0%)) were observed. However, in contrast to our hypothesis, group differences within the four 4-year periods were not consistently significant (LS, p = 0.001 to 0.097; FN, p = 0.026 to 0.673); further, BMD kinetics among the groups varied between LS and FN. Of particular importance, significant differences (p ≤ 0.030) for both regions were still found in the final period. We conclude that exercise-even when adapted for subjects' decreasing bone, health, and fitness status-is consistently effective in favorably affecting BMD in (initially) early-postmenopausal osteopenic women without any leveling-off effect after 16 years of exercise. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26234411

  20. Exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion-induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Deng, Wenqian; Yuan, Qiongjia; Yang, Huijun

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect and mechanism of exercise preconditioning on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced cerebral infarction via rat model; Sixty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups at random: ischemia reperfusion group (IR, n=24), sham group (sham, n=12) and exercise preconditioning group (EP, n=24). Group EP carried out moderate exercise preconditioning for 4 weeks (swimming with non-weight bearing, 60 minutes/day, 6 days/week), Rats in Group EP and IR were established cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury model by Zea Longa's thread method. The cerebral infarct volume in rat of different group was evaluated after 2%TTC staining, expression of HIF-1α in rats' brain was detected by real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochmeistry method and western blot. No cerebral infarction and significant expression of HIF-1α in Group sham. Compared with Group IR, there was smaller infarct volume and stronger HIF-1α expression in Group EP (P<0.05). Moderate exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α. PMID:25796156

  1. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking. PMID:14971437

  2. Metabolic Cost of Experimental Exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the type and duration of activity during decompression was well documented, the metabolic cost of 1665 subject-exposures with 8 activity profiles from 17 altitude decompression sickness (DCS) protocols at Brooks City-Base, TX from 1983-2005 was not determined. Female and male human volunteers (30 planned, 4 completed) performed activity profiles matching those 8 activity profiles at ground level with continuous monitoring of metabolic cost. A Cosmed K4b2 Cardio Pulmonary Exercise Testing device was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2) during the profiles. The results show levels of metabolic cost to the females for the profiles tested varied from 4.3 to 25.5 ml/kg/min and from 3.0 to 12.0 ml/kg/min to the males. The increase in VO2 from seated rest to the most strenuous of the 8 activity profiles was 3.6-fold for the females and 2.8-fold for the males. These preliminary data on 4 subjects indicate close agreement of oxygen uptake for activity performed during many subject-exposures as published earlier. The relatively low average oxygen uptake required to perform the most strenuous activity may imply the need for adjustment of modeling efforts using metabolic cost as a risk factor. Better definition of metabolic cost during exposure to altitude, a critical factor in DCS risk, may allow refinement of DCS prediction models.

  3. Reduced energy intake and moderate exercise reduce mammary tumor incidence in virgin female BALB/c mice treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Teer, Patricia; Keith, Robert E.; White, Marguerite T.; Strahan, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The concurrent effects of diet (standard AIN-76A, restricted AIN-76A and high-fat diet) and moderate rotating-drum treadmill exercise on the incidence of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary carcinomas in virgin female BALB/cMed mice free of murine mammary tumor virus are evaluated. Analyses show that, although energy intake was related to mammary tumor incidence, neither body weight nor dietary fat predicted tumor incidence.

  4. Active Intervention Program Using Dietary Education and Exercise Training for Reducing Obesity in Mexican American Male Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sukho; Misra, Ranjita; Kaster, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 10-week active intervention program (AIP), which incorporates dietary education with exercise training, among 30 healthy Mexican American male children, aged 8-12 years, in Laredo, Texas. Participants were randomly divided into 3 groups: education (EDU), dietary education to participants and parents and…

  5. A 12-week aerobic exercise program reduces hepatic fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese, Hispanic adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity-related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, only limited data are available on the effects of exercise programs on insulin resistance, and visceral, hepatic, and intramyocellular fat accumulation. We hypothesized t...

  6. Minimally Supervised Multi-Modal Exercise to Reduce Falls Risk among Economically and Educationally Disadvantaged Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Taís L.; Alexander, Neil B.; Nyquist, Linda V.; Montagnini, Marcos L.; Santos, Angela C. S.; Rodrigues, Giselle H. P.; Negrão, Carlos E.; Trombetta, Ivani C.; Wajngarten, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the benefit of providing exercise to underprivileged older adults at risk for falls. Economically and educationally disadvantaged older adults with previous falls (mean age 79.06, SD= 4.55) were randomized to four months of multi-modal exercise provided as fully supervised center-based (FS, n =45) or as minim ally supervised home-based (MS, n = 42) or to non-exercise controls (C, n= 32). Comparing groups on the mean change in fall-relevant mobility task performance between baseline and four months and compared to the change in C, both FS and MS had significantly greater reduction in Timed Up and Go F(2,73)= 5.82, p =.004, η2partial = 0.14 and increase in Tandem Walk Speed F (2,73)= 7.71, p <.001 η2partial = 0.17. Change in performance did not statistically differ between FS and MS. In community dwelling economically and educationally disadvantaged older adults with a history of falls, minimally supervised home-based and fully supervised center-based exercise programs may be equally effective in improving fall-relevant functional mobility. PMID:22952201

  7. Effect of exercise intensity on cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 concentration during recovery from exhaustive exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, M; Ulusoy, Ö; Cırrık, S; Hindistan, I E; Ozkaya, Y Gül

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible role of moderate and strenuous swimming training on plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IL-6 (interleukin-6) levels during recovery from exhaustive exercise in rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sedentary control (C), moderately trained (MT) and strenuously trained (ST). MT rats underwent swimming exercise for one hour/day and 5 days/week for 8 weeks. Animals in the ST group began swimming with 1 h/day and swimming duration was progressively increased by 30 min/wk, reaching 2.5 h/day by week 4 and stayed constant for an additional 4 weeks. After all animals underwent an acute exhaustive swimming exercise, animals were divided into 3 groups, and decapitated immediately, 24 and 48 hours after exhaustion to obtain tissue samples. Muscle citrate synthase activity, plasma and CSF IL-6 levels were determined. The citrate synthase activity was found to be higher in MT and ST groups compared to the C group. Although plasma IL-6 levels were found unaltered among all groups, the CSF IL-6 concentration was found to be increased 24 hours after exhaustive exercise of the ST group. We conclude that exercise training intensity is an important factor determining cerebrospinal IL-6 concentration after exhaustive exercise. PMID:24311225

  8. The role of exercise in thermogenesis and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Richard, D; Rivest, S

    1989-04-01

    The role of exercise training in energy balance has been reviewed. Recent well-conducted studies showed that exercise may increase energy expenditure not only during the period of exercise itself but during the postexercise period as well. This notion of excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), which has been a controversial issue for many years, is now becoming a generally well-accepted concept, the consensus being that EPOC takes place following prolonged and strenuous exercise bouts. Besides, the role of EPOC in long-term energy balance remains to be determined. Long-term energy balance studies carried out in rats show that exercise affects energy balance by altering food intake and promoting energy expenditure. In male rats exercise causes a marked decrease in energy intake which contributes, in association with the expenditure of exercise itself, to retard lean and fat tissue growth. From the suppressed deposition of lean body mass, decreases in basal metabolic rate can be predicted in males. In female rats, exercise does not affect food intake; the lower energy gain of exercise-trained females results from the elevated expenditure rate associated with exercise itself. In both male and female rats, there is no evidence that exercise training affects energy expenditure other than during exercise itself unless the habitual feeding pattern of the rats is radically modified. The interactive effects of diet and exercise, which have to be further investigated in long-term energy balance, emerge as a promising area of research. PMID:2667733

  9. Exercise-Associated Changes in the Corticosterone Response to Acute Restraint Stress: Evidence for Increased Adrenal Sensitivity and Reduced Corticosterone Response Duration

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Brendan D; Beierle, Jacob A; Toufexis, Donna J; Hammack, Sayamwong E; Falls, William A

    2014-01-01

    Exercise promotes stress resistance and is associated with reduced anxiety and reduced depression in both humans and in animal models. Despite the fact that dysfunction within the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly linked to both anxiety and depressive disorders, the evidence is mixed as to how exercise alters the function of the HPA axis. Here we demonstrate that 4 weeks of voluntary wheel running was anxiolytic in C57BL/6J mice and resulted in a shorter time to peak corticosterone (CORT) and a more rapid decay of CORT following restraint stress. Wheel running was also associated with increased adrenal size and elevated CORT following systemic administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Finally, the HPA-axis response to peripheral or intracerebroventricular administration of dexamethasone did not suggest that wheel running increases HPA-axis negative feedback through GR-mediated mechanisms. Together these findings suggest that exercise may promote stress resilience in part by insuring a more rapid and shortened HPA response to a stressor thus affecting overall exposure to the potentially negative effects of more sustained HPA-axis activation. PMID:24280995

  10. Effectiveness of exercise programs to reduce falls in older people with dementia living in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Elissa; Cavalheri, Vinicius; Adams, Richard; Oakley Browne, Colleen; Bovery-Spencer, Petra; Fenton, Audra M; Campbell, Bruce W; Hill, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise programs to reduce falls in older people with dementia who are living in the community. Method Peer-reviewed articles (randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and quasi-experimental trials) published in English between January 2000 and February 2014, retrieved from six electronic databases – Medline (ProQuest), CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE and Scopus – according to predefined inclusion criteria were included. Where possible, results were pooled and meta-analysis was conducted. Results Four articles (three RCT and one single-group pre- and post-test pilot study) were included. The study quality of the three RCTs was high; however, measurement outcomes, interventions, and follow-up time periods differed across studies. On completion of the intervention period, the mean number of falls was lower in the exercise group compared to the control group (mean difference [MD] [95% confidence interval {CI}] =−1.06 [−1.67 to −0.46] falls). Importantly, the exercise intervention reduced the risk of being a faller by 32% (risk ratio [95% CI] =0.68 [0.55–0.85]). Only two other outcomes were reported in two or more of the studies (step test and physiological profile assessment). No between-group differences were observed in the results of the step test (number of steps) (MD [95% CI] =0.51 [−1.77 to 2.78]) or the physiological profile assessment (MD [95% CI] =−0.10 [−0.62 to 0.42]). Conclusion Findings from this review suggest that an exercise program may potentially assist in preventing falls of older people with dementia living in the community. However, further research is needed with studies using larger sample sizes, standardized measurement outcomes, and longer follow-up periods, to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:25709416

  11. EXERCISE-INDUCED LOWERING OF CHEMERIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK AND GLUCOSE-STIMULATED INSULIN SECRETION IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    MALIN, S.K.; NAVANEETHAN, S.D.; MULYA, A.; HUANG, H.; KIRWAN, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of exercise on chemerin in relation to changes in fat loss, insulin action, and dyslipidemia in older adults. Participants Thirty older (65.9±0.9yr) obese adults (BMI:34.5±0.7kg/m2). Setting Single-center, Cleveland Clinic. Design Prospective clinical trial. Intervention Twelve-weeks of exercise training (60minutes/day, 5day/week at ~85% HRmax). Subjects were instructed to maintain habitual nutrient intake. Measurements Plasma chemerin was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was assessed using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinic clamp with glucose kinetics. First-phase and total glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was calculated from an oral glucose tolerance test. Fasting blood lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides), total/visceral fat (dual-x-ray absorptiometry and computerized tomography) and cardiorespiratory fitness (treadmill test) were also tested pre and post intervention. Results Exercise increased fitness and reduced total/visceral fat, blood lipids, and first-phase GSIS (P<0.05). Training also increased peripheral insulin sensitivity and lowered basal/insulin-related hepatic glucose production (P<0.01). The intervention reduced chemerin (87.1±6.0 vs. 78.1±5.8ng/ml; P=0.02), and the reduction correlated with decreased visceral fat (r=0.50, P=0.009), total body fat (r=0.42, P=0.02), cholesterol (r=0.38, P=0.04), triglycerides (r=0.36, P=0.05), and first-phase and total GSIS (r=0.39, P=0.03 and r=0.43, P=0.02, respectively). Conclusions Lower chemerin appears to be an important hormone involved in cardiometabolic risk and GSIS reduction following exercise in older adults. PMID:24950152

  12. Putting the benefits and risks of aerobic exercise in perspective.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Barry A; Billecke, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although considerable epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that structured exercise, increased lifestyle activity, or both are cardioprotective, the absolute and relative risk of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal complications appear to increase transiently during vigorous physical activity. The estimated relative risk of exercise-related cardiac events ranges from 2.1 to 56 and is highest among habitually sedentary individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease who were performing unaccustomed vigorous physical exertion. Moreover, an estimated 7 million Americans receive medical attention for sports and recreation-related injuries each year. These risks, and their modulators, should be considered when endorsing strenuous leisure time or exercise interventions. If the current mantra "exercise is medicine" is embraced, underdosing and overdosing are possible. Thus, exercise may have a typical dose-response curve with a plateau in benefit or even adverse effects, in some individuals, at more extreme levels. PMID:22777331

  13. Human T lymphocyte migration towards the supernatants of human rhinovirus infected airway epithelial cells: influence of exercise and carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Walker, Gary J; Gleeson, Michael; Wallace, Fiona A; Hewitt, Colin R A

    2009-01-01

    Physical stress induces a marked redistribution of T lymphocytes that may be influenced by carbohydrate (CHO) availability, yet the effect of these on T lymphocyte migration towards infected tissue is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of strenuous exercise and CHO ingestion on subsequent ex vivo lymphocyte migration towards the supernatants of a Human Rhinovirus (HRV)-infected bronchial epithelial cell line. In a randomised, cross-over, double-blind design, 7 trained males ran for 2 h at 60% VO2peak on two occasions with regular ingestion of either a 6.4% w/v glucose and maltodextrin solution (CHO trial) or placebo solution (PLA trial). Plasma glucose concentration was higher on CHO than PLA after exercise (P<0.05). Migration of CD4+ and CD8+ cells and their CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ subpopulations towards supernatants from HRV-infected cells decreased following exercise (main effect for exercise, P<0.01 for CD4+, CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+; P<0.05 for CD8+, CD8+CD45RA+ and CD8+CD45RO+). Migration of CD4+ cells and CD4+CD45RA+ cells was approximately 35% and approximately 30% higher, respectively, on CHO than PLA at 1 h post-exercise (interaction, P<0.05 for both) and was higher on CHO than PLA for all other subpopulations (P<0.05, main effect for trial). There was little effect of exercise or CHO on migration of these cells towards uninfected (control) cell supernatants or on the proportion of these cells within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell population. The findings of this study suggest that physical stress reduces T cell migration towards HRV-infected cell supernatants and that ingestion of CHO can lessen this effect. PMID:19957874

  14. The effect of dietary control and carbohydrate supplementation on the immune and hormonal responses to rowing exercise.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Christopher M; Syrotuik, Daniel G; Field, Catherine J; Bell, Gordon J

    2006-10-01

    To determine the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on the immune and stress hormone responses to 1 h of strenuous rowing exercise, 22 male subjects were randomly assigned to a placebo (PLA, n = 11) or carbohydrate (CHO, n = 11) group. Subjects completed 3 d of modified dietary intake, a standardized pre-exercise meal, and consumed either a carbohydrate beverage (1 g.kg body mass(-1)) or a non-caloric placebo drink before, during, and after a 1 h rowing trial. Increases were observed in adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol, blood leukocytes, neutrophils, and natural killer cell concentrations and activity, whereas the ability of peripheral blood monouclear cells (PBMCs) to respond (interleukin-2 (IL-2) production) to stimulation was reduced 5 min after exercise in both groups (p < 0.05). Lymphocytes were also elevated, but in the PLA group only (p < 0.05). One hour after exercise, blood leukocytes remained elevated owing to increased neutrophil concentrations, whereas a number of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD3+/4+, CD3+/8+, CD20+, CD25+, CD4+/25+, CD8+/25+) and the ability of PBMCs to respond to stimulation (IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production) were lower than resting values in both groups (p < 0.05). Carbohydrate supplementation to athletes in the post-prandial state undergoing a 1 h rowing trial resulted in attenuation of the post-exercise increase in peripheral blood lymphocyte concentration, but had little effect on the ability of PBMCs to produce cytokines following stimulation, natural killer cell activity, stress hormone concentrations, exercise performance, or self-reported incidence of illness during the 14 d period following the experimental trial. PMID:17111013

  15. Acute Schmorl's Node during Strenuous Monofin Swimming: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paterakis, Konstantinos N.; Brotis, Alexandros G.; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Karachalios, Theofilos; Fountas, Kostas N.; Karantanas, Apostolos

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This case report describes an acute Schmorl's node (SN) in an elite monofin athlete during exercise. The patient presented with severe back pain and leg numbness and was managed successfully with conservative treatment. Objective The aim of our communication was to describe a rare presentation of a common pathological condition during an intense sport. Background Swimming is not generally considered to be a sport activity that leads to spinal injuries. SNs are usually asymptomatic lesions, incidentally found on imaging studies. There is no correlation between swimming and symptomatic SN formation. Case Report A 16-year-old monofin elite athlete suffered from an acute nonradiating back pain during extreme exercise. His back pain was associated with a fracture of the superior L5 end plate and an acute SN at the L5 vertebral body with perilesional bone marrow edema. The pain resolved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bed rest. The athlete had an excellent outcome and returned to his training activities 6 months after his incident. Conclusion SN should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe back pain, especially in sport-related injuries. SNs present with characteristic imaging findings. Due to the benign nature of these lesions, surveillance-only management may be the best course of action. PMID:24353963

  16. Capillary ultrastructure and mitochondrial volume density in skeletal muscle in relation to reduced exercise capacity of patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Baum, Oliver; Torchetti, Eleonora; Malik, Corinna; Hoier, Birgitte; Walker, Meegan; Walker, Philip J; Odriozola, Adolfo; Graber, Franziska; Tschanz, Stefan A; Bangsbo, Jens; Hoppeler, Hans; Askew, Christopher D; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-05-15

    Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most commonly reported symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Impaired limb blood flow is a major casual factor of lower exercise tolerance in PAD but cannot entirely explain it. We hypothesized that IC is associated with structural changes of the capillary-mitochondria interface that could contribute to the reduction of exercise tolerance in IC patients. Capillary and mitochondrial morphometry were performed after light and transmission electron microscopy using vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 14 IC patients and 10 age-matched controls, and peak power output (PPO) was determined for all participants using an incremental single-leg knee-extension protocol. Capillary density was lower (411 ± 90 mm(-2) vs. 506 ± 95 mm(-2); P ≤ 0.05) in the biopsies of the IC patients than in those of the controls. The basement membrane (BM) around capillaries was thicker (543 ± 82 nm vs. 423 ± 97 nm; P ≤ 0.01) and the volume density of mitochondria was lower (3.51 ± 0.56% vs. 4.60 ± 0.74%; P ≤ 0.01) in the IC patients than the controls. In the IC patients, a higher proportion of capillaries appeared with collapsed slit-like lumen and/or swollen endothelium. PPO was lower (18.5 ± 9.9 W vs. 33.5 ± 9.4 W; P ≤ 0.01) in the IC patients than the controls. We suggest that several structural alterations in skeletal muscle, either collectively or separately, contribute to the reduction of exercise tolerance in IC patients. PMID:27009051

  17. Reduced large elastic artery stiffness with regular aerobic exercise in middle-aged and older adults: potential role of suppressed nuclear factor ? B signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kristen L.; Donato, Anthony J.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Walker, Ashley E.; Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Ballak, Dov B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aortic pulse-wave velocity (aPWV) increases with age and is a strong independent predictor of incident cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in healthy middle-aged and older adults. aPWV is lower in middle-aged and older adults who perform regular aerobic exercise than in their sedentary peers. As exercise is associated with reduced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that suppression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor ? B (NF?B) may mediate this process. Methods aPWV was measured in young sedentary [n =10, blood pressure (BP) 108 3/59 2 mmHg; mean SEM], middle-aged and older sedentary (n =9, 124 7/73 5 mmHg) and middle-aged and older aerobic exercise-trained (n =12, 110 4/67 2 mmHg) healthy, nonhypertensive men and women. Results Baseline aPWV increased with age [626 14 (young sedentary) vs. 859 49 (middle-aged and older sedentary) cm/s, P <0.001] but was 20% lower in middle-aged and older trained (686 30 cm/s) than in middle-aged and older sedentary (P <0.005). Short-term (4 days 25004500 mg) treatment with the NF?B inhibitor salsalate (randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design) reduced aPWV (to 783 44 cm/s, P <0.05) without changing BP (P =0.40) or heart rate (P =0.90) in middle-aged and older sedentary, but had no effect in young sedentary (623 19) or middle-aged and older trained (699 30). Following salsalate treatment, aPWV no longer was significantly different in middle-aged and older sedentary vs. middle-aged and older trained (P =0.29). The reduction in aPWV with salsalate administration was inversely related to baseline (placebo) aPWV (r = ?0.60, P <0.001). Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that suppressed NF?B signalling may partially mediate the lower aortic stiffness in middle-aged and older adults who regularly perform aerobic exercise. Because aPWV predicts incident cardiovascular events in this population, this suggests that tonic suppression of NF?B signalling in middle-aged and older exercising adults may potentially lower cardiovascular risk. PMID:26378681

  18. Reduced reward-driven eating accounts for the impact of a mindfulness-based diet and exercise intervention on weight loss: Data from the SHINE randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mason, Ashley E; Epel, Elissa S; Aschbacher, Kirstin; Lustig, Robert H; Acree, Michael; Kristeller, Jean; Cohn, Michael; Dallman, Mary; Moran, Patricia J; Bacchetti, Peter; Laraia, Barbara; Hecht, Frederick M; Daubenmier, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Many individuals with obesity report over eating despite intentions to maintain or lose weight. Two barriers to long-term weight loss are reward-driven eating, which is characterized by a lack of control over eating, a preoccupation with food, and a lack of satiety; and psychological stress. Mindfulness training may address these barriers by promoting awareness of hunger and satiety cues, self-regulatory control, and stress reduction. We examined these two barriers as potential mediators of weight loss in the Supporting Health by Integrating Nutrition and Exercise (SHINE) randomized controlled trial, which compared the effects of a 5.5-month diet and exercise intervention with or without mindfulness training on weight loss among adults with obesity. Intention-to-treat multiple mediation models tested whether post-intervention reward-driven eating and psychological stress mediated the impact of intervention arm on weight loss at 12- and 18-months post-baseline among 194 adults with obesity (BMI: 30-45). Mindfulness (relative to control) participants had significant reductions in reward-driven eating at 6 months (post-intervention), which, in turn, predicted weight loss at 12 months. Post-intervention reward-driven eating mediated 47.1% of the total intervention arm effect on weight loss at 12 months [β = -0.06, SE(β) = 0.03, p = .030, 95% CI (-0.12, -0.01)]. This mediated effect was reduced when predicting weight loss at 18 months (p = .396), accounting for 23.0% of the total intervention effect, despite similar weight loss at 12 months. Psychological stress did not mediate the effect of intervention arm on weight loss at 12 or 18 months. In conclusion, reducing reward-driven eating, which can be achieved using a diet and exercise intervention that includes mindfulness training, may promote weight loss (clinicaltrials.gov registration: NCT00960414). PMID:26867697

  19. Intra-Articular Corticosteroids in Addition to Exercise for Reducing Pain Sensitivity in Knee Osteoarthritis: Exploratory Outcome from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie; Bandak, Elisabeth; Ellegaard, Karen; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100 participants with clinical and radiographic knee OA that were randomized to one intra-articular injection on the knee with either 1 ml of 40 mg/ml methylprednisolone (corticosteroid) dissolved in 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml) or 1 ml isotonic saline (placebo) mixed with 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml). Two weeks after the injections all participants undertook a 12-week supervised exercise program. Main outcomes were changes from baseline in pressure-pain sensitivity (pressure-pain threshold [PPT] and temporal summation [TS]) assessed using cuff pressure algometry on the calf. These were exploratory outcomes from a randomized controlled trial. Results A total of 100 patients were randomized to receive either corticosteroid (n = 50) or placebo (n = 50); 45 and 44, respectively, completed the trial. Four participants had missing values for PPT and one for TS at baseline; thus modified intention-to-treat populations were analyzed. The mean group difference in changes from baseline at week 14 was 0.6 kPa (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.8; P = 0.626) for PPT and 384 mm×sec (95% CI: -2980 to 3750; P = 0.821) for TS. Conclusions These results suggest that adding intra-articular corticosteroid injection 2 weeks prior to an exercise program does not provide additional benefits compared to placebo in reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. Trial Registration EU clinical trials (EudraCT): 2012-002607-18 PMID:26871954

  20. Aerobic Exercise and Weight Loss Reduce Vascular Markers of Inflammation and Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Alice S.; Ge, Shealinna; Blumenthal, Jacob B.; Serra, Monica C.; Prior, Steven J.; Goldberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives To examine the relationships of plasma and tissue markers of systemic and vascular inflammation to obesity and insulin resistance and determine the effects of aerobic exercise training+weight loss (AEX+WL) and weight loss (WL) on these biomarkers. Design Prospective controlled study. Participants Seventy-seven overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women. Interventions Six months, 3d/wk AEX+WL (n=37) or WL (n=40). Measurements Total body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, abdominal computed tomography scans, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, adipose tissue biopsies (n=28), and blood for Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, and soluble forms of intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1) and vascular CAM-1 (sVCAM-1), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA). Results Body weight, %fat, visceral fat, triglyceride levels and systolic blood pressure decreased comparably after WL and AEX+WL (P<0.05). VO2max increased 16% after AEX+WL (P<0.001). Insulin resistance decreased in both groups (P<0.01). Glucose utilization increased 10% (P< 0.05) after AEX+WL and 8% with WL (P=0.07). AEX+WL and WL decreased CRP by 29% and 21%, (P<0.05). SAA levels decreased two-fold more after AEX+WL (?19%, P<0.05) than with WL (?9%, P=0.08). Plasma sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels did not change; however, women with the greatest reduction in plasma sICAM-1 levels had the greatest reductions in fasting glucose, insulin and insulin resistance (P<0.05). Gluteal ICAM mRNA levels decreased 27% after AEX+WL (P<0.05) and did not change after WL. Conclusion Obesity and insulin resistance worsen markers of systemic and vascular inflammation. A reduction in plasma sICAM-1 is important to improve insulin sensitivity. CRP and SAA and tissue ICAM decrease with exercise and weight loss, suggesting that exercise training is a necessary component of lifestyle modification in obese postmenopausal women. PMID:24635342

  1. Exploring effects of a natural combination medicine on exercise-induced inflammatory immune response: A double-blind RCT.

    PubMed

    Pilat, C; Frech, T; Wagner, A; Krüger, K; Hillebrecht, A; Pons-Kühnemann, J; Scheibelhut, C; Bödeker, R-H; Mooren, F-C

    2015-08-01

    Traumeel (Tr14) is a natural, combination drug, which has been shown to modulate inflammation at the cytokine level. This study aimed to investigate potential effects of Tr14 on the exercise-induced immune response. In a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, healthy, untrained male subjects received either Tr14 (n = 40) or placebo (n = 40) for 24 h after a strenuous experimental exercise trial on a bicycle (60 min at 80%VO2 max). A range of antigen-stimulated cytokines (in vitro), white blood cell count, lymphocyte activation and apoptosis markers, and indicators of muscle damage were assessed up to 24 h following exercise. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCI ) was compared between both groups. The Tr14 group showed a reduced exercise-induced leukocytosis and neutrocytosis (P < 0.01 for both), a higher AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-1β and IL-1α (absolute and per monocyte, all P < 0.05), a lower AUCI score of antigen-stimulated GM-CSF (P < 0.05) and by trend a lower AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-2 and IL-4 as well as a higher AUCI score of antigen-stimulated IL-6 (all P < 0.1). Tr14 might promote differentiated effects on the exercise-induced immune response by (a) decreasing the inflammatory response of the innate immune system; and (b) augmenting the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. PMID:24924232

  2. Exercise modulates synaptic acetylcholinesterase at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Blotnick, E; Anglister, L

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase plays a major role in neuromuscular transmission and is regulated by neuromuscular activity. Since fast-twitch motor units are recruited with increased motor demand, we examined acetylcholinesterase regulation in rat leg muscles following treadmill training. Total acetylcholinesterase and specifically the membrane-bound tetramer increased in exercised fast-, but not slow-twitch muscles, while other isoforms remained unchanged. Synaptic acetylcholinesterase increased markedly in neuromuscular junctions of trained fibers, without concomitant changes in synaptic acetylcholine receptor, thus elevating synaptic acetylcholinesterase/receptor ratios. Electron microscopy showed that acetylcholinesterase increased in postjunctional folds and primary cleft, where it was added adjacent to the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Thus, although the primary acetylcholinesterase at the neuromuscular junction is the collagen-tailed asymmetric isoform associated with synaptic basal lamina, physiological demands such as strenuous exercise, or potentially pathological conditions, can selectively recruit the membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase tetramer to the synapse for optimal synaptic transmission. PMID:26820598

  3. Biphasic response of cardiodynamic adaptations to swimming exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic Tosic, Jelica T; Jakovljevic, Vladimir Lj; Zivkovic, Vladimir V; Srejovic, Ivan M; Valdevit, Zoran J; Radovanovic, Dragan S; Djuric, Dragan M; Ahmetovic, Zlatko K; Peric, Dusan B; Cankovic, Marija B; Jovanovic, Maja S; Djordjevic, Dusica Z

    2015-07-01

    The aim of research was to assess exercise-induced changes in mechanics of hearts isolated from rats, as well as time-course of those changes. Wistar rats (n = 42) were divided into control, moderately trained (swimming 1 hour, 5 days a week for 9 or 12 weeks) and strenuously trained (swimming 2, 3 and 4 times a day for an hour in weeks 10, 11 and 12, respectively) groups. After sacrificing, hearts (weight: 1480.82 ± 145.38 mg) were isolated and perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was gradually increased (from 40 to 120 cm H(2)O) in order to establish coronary autoregulation. Parameters of cardiac contractility were recorded: maximum and minimum rate of change of pressure in the left ventricle (dp/dt max and dp/dt min), systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressure (SLVP and DLVP), heart rate (HR) and coronary flow (CF). Nine weeks of moderate exercise induced slight depression of coronary function (decrease of dp/dt max, dp/dt min, SLVP and DLVP), while 3 additional weeks of moderate training improved hearts function, but not to the extent that the strenuous training program did. The results of our study add evidence about beneficial effects of regular moderate exercise on heart, and furthermore, show that exercising frequently, if the intensity stays within moderate range, may not have detrimental effects on cardiodynamics. PMID:25816361

  4. Daily Oxygen/O₃ Treatment Reduces Muscular Fatigue and Improves Cardiac Performance in Rats Subjected to Prolonged High Intensity Physical Exercise.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, C; Trotta, M C; Maisto, R; Siniscalco, D; Luongo, M; Mascolo, L; Alfano, R; Accardo, M; Rossi, C; Ferraraccio, F; D'Amico, M

    2015-01-01

    Rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of O2 and running on a treadmill covered an average distance of 482.8 ± 21.8 m/week as calculated during 5-week observation. This distance was increased in rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of an oxygen/O3 mixture at a dose of 100; 150; and 300 μg/kg with the maximum increase being +34.5% at 300 μg/kg and still present after stopping the administration of oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 decreased the mean arterial blood pressure (-13%), the heart rate (-6%), the gastrocnemius and cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis and reduced by 49% the left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness measurements. Systolic and diastolic functions were improved in exercised oxygen/O3 rats compared to O2 rats. Oxygen/O3 treatment led to higher MPI index starting from the dose of 150 μg/kg (p < 0.05) and more effective (+14%) at a dose of 300 μg/kg oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 dose-dependently increased the expression of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD and GPx1 and of eNOS compared to the exercised O2 rats. The same doses resulted in decrease of LDH levels, CPK, TnI, and nitrotyrosine concentration in the heart and gastrocnemius tissues, arguing a beneficial effect of the ozone molecule against the fatigue induced by a prolonged high intensity exercise. PMID:26265981

  5. Daily Oxygen/O3 Treatment Reduces Muscular Fatigue and Improves Cardiac Performance in Rats Subjected to Prolonged High Intensity Physical Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, C.; Trotta, M. C.; Maisto, R.; Siniscalco, D.; Luongo, M.; Mascolo, L.; Alfano, R.; Accardo, M.; Rossi, C.; Ferraraccio, F.; D'Amico, M.

    2015-01-01

    Rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of O2 and running on a treadmill covered an average distance of 482.8 ± 21.8 m/week as calculated during 5-week observation. This distance was increased in rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of an oxygen/O3 mixture at a dose of 100; 150; and 300 μg/kg with the maximum increase being +34.5% at 300 μg/kg and still present after stopping the administration of oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 decreased the mean arterial blood pressure (−13%), the heart rate (−6%), the gastrocnemius and cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis and reduced by 49% the left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness measurements. Systolic and diastolic functions were improved in exercised oxygen/O3 rats compared to O2 rats. Oxygen/O3 treatment led to higher MPI index starting from the dose of 150 μg/kg (p < 0.05) and more effective (+14%) at a dose of 300 μg/kg oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 dose-dependently increased the expression of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD and GPx1 and of eNOS compared to the exercised O2 rats. The same doses resulted in decrease of LDH levels, CPK, TnI, and nitrotyrosine concentration in the heart and gastrocnemius tissues, arguing a beneficial effect of the ozone molecule against the fatigue induced by a prolonged high intensity exercise. PMID:26265981

  6. Early increasing-intensity treadmill exercise reduces neuropathic pain by preventing nociceptor collateral sprouting and disruption of chloride cotransporters homeostasis after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, Víctor M; Modol, Laura; Navarro, Xavier; Cobianchi, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Activity treatments, such as treadmill exercise, are used to improve functional recovery after nerve injury, parallel to an increase in neurotrophin levels. However, despite their role in neuronal survival and regeneration, neurotrophins may cause neuronal hyperexcitability that triggers neuropathic pain. In this work, we demonstrate that an early increasing-intensity treadmill exercise (iTR), performed during the first week (iTR1) or during the first 2 weeks (iTR2) after section and suture repair of the rat sciatic nerve, significantly reduced the hyperalgesia developing rapidly in the saphenous nerve territory and later in the sciatic nerve territory after regeneration. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in sensory neurons and spinal cord was reduced in parallel. iTR prevented the extension of collateral sprouts of saphenous nociceptive calcitonin gene-related peptide fibers within the adjacent denervated skin and reduced NGF expression in the same skin and in the L3 dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Injury also induced Na⁺-K⁺-2Cl⁻ cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) upregulation in DRG, and K⁺-Cl⁻ cotransporter 2 (KCC2) downregulation in lumbar spinal cord dorsal horn. iTR normalized NKCC1 and boosted KCC2 expression, together with a significant reduction of microgliosis in L3-L5 dorsal horn, and a reduction of BDNF expression in microglia at 1 to 2 weeks postinjury. These data demonstrate that specific activity protocols, such as iTR, can modulate neurotrophins expression after peripheral nerve injury and prevent neuropathic pain by blocking early mechanisms of sensitization such as collateral sprouting and NKCC1/KCC2 disregulation. PMID:26090759

  7. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Topp, Robert; Behm, David G

    2013-12-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral shoulder served as a passive control. Two hours later, the contralateral resting shoulder received the other treatment. The participants rated the intensity of soreness (scale 0-10), and a blinded examiner took measures of pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the upper trapezius immediately before treatment and 0, 10, 20, and 60 minutes after treatment 48 hours posteccentric exercise. Immediately before treatment, the intensity of soreness was 5.0 (SD 2.2) and PPT was 138 (SD 78) kPa. In response to treatment, a significant treatment by time interaction was found for the intensity of soreness (p < 0.001) and PPT (p < 0.05). Compared with control, both active exercise and massage significantly reduced the intensity of soreness and increased PPT (i.e., reduced pain sensitivity). For both types of treatment, the greatest effect on perceived soreness occurred immediately after treatment, whereas the effect on PPT peaked 20 minutes after treatment. In conclusion, active exercise using elastic resistance provides similar acute relief of muscle soreness as compared with that using massage. Coaches, therapists, and athletes can use either active warm-up or massage to reduce DOMS acutely, for example, to prepare for competition or strenuous work, but should be aware that the effect is temporary, that is, the greatest effects occurs during the first 20 minutes after treatment and diminishes within an hour. PMID:23524365

  8. A strenuous experimental journey searching for spectroscopic evidence of a bridging nickel-iron-hydride in [NiFe] hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for a hydride bridge in the Ni-R form of [NiFe] hydrogenase has been obtained using iron-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The Ni-H-Fe wag mode at 675 cm(-1) is the first spectroscopic evidence for a bridging hydride in Ni-R as well as the first iron-hydride-related NRVS feature observed for a biological system. Although density function theory (DFT) calculation assisted the determination of the Ni-R structure, it did not predict the Ni-H-Fe wag mode at ? 675 cm(-1) before NRVS. Instead, the observed Ni-H-Fe mode provided a critical reference for the DFT calculations. While the overall science about Ni-R is presented and discussed elsewhere, this article focuses on the long and strenuous experimental journey to search for and experimentally identify the Ni-H-Fe wag mode in a Ni-R sample. As a methodology, the results presented here will go beyond Ni-R and hydrogenase research and will also be of interest to other scientists who use synchrotron radiation for measuring dilute samples or weak spectroscopic features. PMID:26524296

  9. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jassil, Friedrich C.; Manning, Sean; Lewis, Neville; Steinmo, Siri; Kingett, Helen; Lough, Fiona; Pucci, Andrea B. F.; Cheung, W. H.; Finer, Nicholas; Walker, Judith; Doyle, Jaqueline; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2) completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT), physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL) outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p = 0.043), increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p = 0.043), increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p = 0.034), reduced consumption of ready meals (p = 0.034), and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p = 0.039). The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p = 0.027). Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted. PMID:26199740

  10. Individualizing Exercise: Some Biomechanical and Physiological Reminders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Kathy D.; Darby, Lynn A.

    1998-01-01

    It is important to individualize exercise programs to safely achieve exercise goals. The article reviews several key points to help exercise leaders individualize new exercise programs or rejuvenate routine workouts, focusing on cardiorespiratory and muscular training. The article emphasizes that individualizing exercise programs reduces injury,…

  11. Exercise, Lymphokines, Calories, and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of epidemiological studies suggesting that exercise reduces the risk of cancer concludes that exercise may help defend against cancer by preventing obesity, stimulating lymphokines, and/or facilitating other healthful changes in behavior. (Author/CB)

  12. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine prevents exercise-induced intestinal lymphocyte apoptosis by maintaining intracellular glutathione levels and reducing mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Quadrilatero, J; Hoffman-Goetz, L

    2004-07-01

    Intense exercise leads to post-exercise lymphocytopenia and immunosuppression, possibly by triggering lymphocyte apoptosis. To test the role of oxidative stress on exercise-induced lymphocyte apoptosis, we administered the antioxidant N-acetyl--cysteine (NAC) and measured apoptosis in intestinal lymphocytes (IL) from exhaustively exercised animals. Eighty-seven female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive NAC (1 g/kg) or saline 30 min prior to treadmill exercise for 90 min at 2degrees slope (30 min at 22 m min(-1), 30 min at 25 m min(-1), and 30 min at 28 m min(-1)) and sacrificed immediately (Imm) or 24 hours (24 h) after cessation of exercise. Control mice (nonexercised) were exposed to treadmill noise and vibration without running. Exercise increased IL phosphatidylserine externalization (p<0.001), mitochondrial membrane depolarization (p<0.05), and decreased intracellular glutathione concentrations (p<0.05) immediately following exercise in saline relative to nonexercised mice. At 24 h post-exercise, saline injected mice had fewer total (p<0.001) and CD3+ (p<0.005) IL compared to nonexercised animals. NAC injection in mice maintained intracellular glutathione levels, prevented phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and loss of IL immediately and 24 h after exercise. These data suggest that lymphocyte apoptosis precedes post-exercise lymphocytopenia and may be due to oxidative stress. PMID:15184067

  13. The beneficial effects of exercise on cartilage are lost in mice with reduced levels of ECSOD in tissues.

    PubMed

    Pate, Kathryn M; Sherk, Vanessa D; Carpenter, R Dana; Weaver, Michael; Crapo, Silvia; Gally, Fabienne; Chatham, Lillian S; Goldstrohm, David A; Crapo, James D; Kohrt, Wendy M; Bowler, Russell P; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Regan, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased mechanical damage to joint cartilage. We have previously found that extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) is decreased in OA joint fluid and cartilage, suggesting oxidant damage may play a role in OA. We explored the effect of forced running as a surrogate for mechanical damage in a transgenic mouse with reduced ECSOD tissue binding. Transgenic mice heterozygous (Het) for the human ECSOD R213G polymorphism and 129-SvEv (wild-type, WT) mice were exposed to forced running on a treadmill for 45 min/day, 5 days/wk, over 8 wk. At the end of the running protocol, knee joint tissue was obtained for histology, immunohistochemistry, and protein analysis. Sedentary Het and WT mice were maintained for comparison. Whole tibias were studied for bone morphometry, finite element analysis, and mechanical testing. Forced running improved joint histology in WT mice. However, when ECSOD levels were reduced, this beneficial effect with running was lost. Het ECSOD runner mice had significantly worse histology scores compared with WT runner mice. Runner mice for both strains had increased bone strength in response to the running protocol, while Het mice showed evidence of a less robust bone structure in both runners and untrained mice. Reduced levels of ECSOD in cartilage produced joint damage when joints were stressed by forced running. The bone tissues responded to increased loading with hypertrophy, regardless of mouse strain. We conclude that ECSOD plays an important role in protecting cartilage from damage caused by mechanical loading. PMID:25593283

  14. HIGHER MODIFIED BECK DEPRESSION INVENTORY SCORES ARE ASSOCIATED WITH BODY, EATING, AND EXERCISE COMPARISONS BUT DECREASED EXERCISE AMOUNTS.

    PubMed

    Knepp, Michael M; Yoza, Jeffrey J; Quandt, Emily A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has indicated that exercise can lead to decreased depression symptoms. The relationship of depression with right frontal lobe activity and self-image (body, eating, and exercise) were investigated as reasons why depressive symptoms might lead to decreased exercise. 120 college students (79 women) completed design fluency tasks followed by a set of questionnaires on depression and exercise. High (M = 23.03, SD = 5.92) and low quartiles (M = 3.11, SD = 1.59) were created using the Modified Beck Depression Inventory (mBDI) for primary analyses. The group with higher mBDI scores produced fewer unique designs (suggesting lower right frontal activity) and was more likely to make comparisons based on body shape, eating, and exercise. The group with higher mBDI scores reported significantly less strenuous and moderate exercise. These findings indicate that the relationship between exercise and depression could work in both directions. While exercise can be used as a potential treatment to decrease depression, increased depressive symptoms could be a hindrance to exercise. PMID:25938448

  15. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  16. The regulation of carbohydrate and fat metabolism during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Holloszy, J O; Kohrt, W M; Hansen, P A

    1998-09-15

    The rate of carbohydrate utilization during prolonged, strenuous exercise is closely geared to the energy needs of the working muscles. In contrast, fat utilization during exercise is not tightly regulated, as there are no mechanisms for closely matching availability and metabolism of fatty acids to the rate of energy expenditure. As a result, the rate of fat oxidation during exercise is determined by the availability of fatty acids and the rate of carbohydrate utilization. Blood glucose and muscle glycogen are essential for prolonged strenuous exercise, and exhaustion can result either from development of hypoglycemia or depletion of muscle glycogen. Both absolute and relative (i.e. % of maximal O2 uptake) exercise intensities play important roles in the regulation of substrate metabolism. The absolute work rate determines the total quantity of fuel required, while relative exercise intensity plays a major role in determining the proportions of carbohydrate and fat oxidized by the working muscles. As relative exercise intensity is increased, there is a decrease in the proportion of the energy requirement derived from fat oxidation and an increase in that provided by carbohydrate oxidation. During moderately strenuous exercise of an intensity that can be maintained for 90 minutes or longer ( approximately 55-75% of VO2max), there is a progressive decline in the proportion of energy derived from muscle glycogen and a progressive increase in plasma fatty acid oxidation. The adaptations induced by endurance exercise training result in a marked sparing of carbohydrate during exercise, with an increased proportion of the energy being provided by fat oxidation. The mechanisms by which training decreases utilization of blood glucose are not well understood. However, the slower rate of glycogenolysis can be explained on the basis of lower concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in trained, as compared to untrained, muscles during exercise of the same intensity. The lower Pi level is a consequence of the increase in muscle mitochondria induced by endurance exercise training. A large increase in muscle glycogen concentration, far above the level found in the well-fed sedentary state, occurs in response to carbohydrate feeding following glycogen depleting exercise. It was recently found that this muscle "glycogen supercompensation" is markedly enhanced by endurance exercise training that induces an increase in the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. PMID:9740552

  17. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance.

    PubMed

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A L

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (-24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the recovery of EMGRMS and performance. The reduction of surface electromyogram MPF, MdPF and burst duration due to fatigue is associated but not caused by muscle acidification and lactate accumulation. Despite metaboreflex stimulation, muscle activation and power output recovers partly in ischemia indicating that metaboreflex activation has a minor impact on sprint performance. PMID:26793117

  18. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the recovery of EMGRMS and performance. The reduction of surface electromyogram MPF, MdPF and burst duration due to fatigue is associated but not caused by muscle acidification and lactate accumulation. Despite metaboreflex stimulation, muscle activation and power output recovers partly in ischemia indicating that metaboreflex activation has a minor impact on sprint performance. PMID:26793117

  19. Acute hypervolaemia improves arterial oxygen pressure in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, Gerald S; Walley, Keith R; Hunte, Garth S; McKenzie, Donald C; Sexsmith, George P; Russell, James A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of acute plasma volume expansion on arterial blood-gas status during 6.5 min strenuous cycling exercise comparing six athletes with and six athletes without exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH). We hypothesized that plasma volume expansion could improve arterial oxygen pressure in a homogeneous sample of athletes - those with EIAH. In this paper we have extended the analysis and results of our recently published surprising findings that lengthening cardiopulmonary transit time did not improve arterial blood-gas status in a heterogeneous sample of endurance cyclists. One 500 ml bag of 10 % Pentastarch (infusion condition) or 60 ml 0.9 % saline (placebo) was infused prior to exercise in a randomized, double-blind fashion on two different days. Power output, cardiac output, oxygen consumption and arterial blood gases were measured during strenuous exercise. Cardiac output and oxygen consumption were not affected by acute hypervolaemia. There were group x condition interaction effects for arterial oxygen pressure and alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference, suggesting that those with hypoxaemia experienced improved arterial oxygen pressure (+4 mmHg) and lower alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (-2 mmHg) with infusion. In conclusion, acute hypervolaemia improves blood-gas status in athletes with EIAH. The impairment of gas exchange occurs within the first minute of exercise, and is not impaired further throughout the remaining duration of exercise. This suggests that arterial oxygen pressure is only minimally mediated by cardiac output. PMID:12861344

  20. Posture Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search You are here Home » Posture Exercises Posture Exercises When a person develops kyphosis, the posture becomes ... and strengthen the back. Try the following two exercises to keep your spine more limber and flexible. ...

  1. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Improve Exercise Capacity and Reduce Dyspnea During Functional Activities in People with Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and pulmonary rehabilitation on levels of dyspnea during functional activities in patients with diffuse emphysema. Methods: Fifteen subjects who had undergone LVRS participated in this study. A visual analog scale (VAS) Activity Dyspnea Scales (VADS) measurement tool developed for this study was determined reliable in 10 subjects. The VADS was used to assess changes in dyspnea with functional activity in 10 subjects prior to and following the interventions of LVRS and pulmonary rehabilitation. Results: Results of this study indicate that LVRS followed by pulmonary rehabilitation significantly reduces levels of dyspnea during functional activities. Conclusion: The VADS developed for this study is a valid and reliable method of assessing changes in levels of dyspnea during functional activities in the LVRS population. PMID:20467532

  2. Alcohol Ingestion Impairs Maximal Post-Exercise Rates of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following a Single Bout of Concurrent Training

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Evelyn B.; Camera, Donny M.; Areta, José L.; Burke, Louise M.; Phillips, Stuart M.; Hawley, John A.; Coffey, Vernon G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The culture in many team sports involves consumption of large amounts of alcohol after training/competition. The effect of such a practice on recovery processes underlying protein turnover in human skeletal muscle are unknown. We determined the effect of alcohol intake on rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following strenuous exercise with carbohydrate (CHO) or protein ingestion. Methods In a randomized cross-over design, 8 physically active males completed three experimental trials comprising resistance exercise (8×5 reps leg extension, 80% 1 repetition maximum) followed by continuous (30 min, 63% peak power output (PPO)) and high intensity interval (10×30 s, 110% PPO) cycling. Immediately, and 4 h post-exercise, subjects consumed either 500 mL of whey protein (25 g; PRO), alcohol (1.5 g·kg body mass−1, 12±2 standard drinks) co-ingested with protein (ALC-PRO), or an energy-matched quantity of carbohydrate also with alcohol (25 g maltodextrin; ALC-CHO). Subjects also consumed a CHO meal (1.5 g CHO·kg body mass−1) 2 h post-exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 2 and 8 h post-exercise. Results Blood alcohol concentration was elevated above baseline with ALC-CHO and ALC-PRO throughout recovery (P<0.05). Phosphorylation of mTORSer2448 2 h after exercise was higher with PRO compared to ALC-PRO and ALC-CHO (P<0.05), while p70S6K phosphorylation was higher 2 h post-exercise with ALC-PRO and PRO compared to ALC-CHO (P<0.05). Rates of MPS increased above rest for all conditions (∼29–109%, P<0.05). However, compared to PRO, there was a hierarchical reduction in MPS with ALC-PRO (24%, P<0.05) and with ALC-CHO (37%, P<0.05). Conclusion We provide novel data demonstrating that alcohol consumption reduces rates of MPS following a bout of concurrent exercise, even when co-ingested with protein. We conclude that alcohol ingestion suppresses the anabolic response in skeletal muscle and may therefore impair recovery and adaptation to training and/or subsequent performance. PMID:24533082

  3. Exercise-induced stimulation of murine macrophage chemotaxis: role of corticosterone and prolactin as mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, E; Forner, M A; Barriga, C

    1997-01-01

    1. Exercise provokes changes in the immune system, including macrophage activity. Chemotaxis is a necessary function of macrophages if they are to reach the focus of infection and strenuous acute exercise may modulate chemotaxis. However, the precise mechanisms remain unknown. 2. Three experiments were performed in the present study. (1) The effect of strenuous acute exercise (swimming until exhaustion) on the chemotactic capacity of macrophages was evaluated. (2) Peritoneal macrophages from control mice were incubated with plasma from exercised mice or control (no exercise) mice. The differences in the resulting chemotactic capacity were measured. (3) Changes in the concentration of plasma corticosterone and prolactin after exercise were also measured, and the effect of incubation with the post-exercise levels of plasma corticosterone and prolactin on the chemotactic capacity of the peritoneal macrophages was then studied in vitro. 3. Exercise induced an increase in the macrophage chemotaxis index (103 +/- 8 vs. 47 +/- 11 in controls). Incubation with plasma from exercised mice led to an increased level of chemotaxis (68 +/- 18 vs. 40 +/- 6 with plasma from controls). Incubation with concentrations of corticosterone and prolactin similar to those observed in plasma immediately after exercise (corticosterone, 0.72 mumol l-1; prolactin, 88 pmol l-1) raised the chemotactic capacity with respect to that following incubation with the basal concentrations of the hormones in control animals (90 +/- 9 vs. 37 +/- 4 for corticosterone; 72 +/- 9 vs. 41 +/- 4 for prolactin). 4. It is concluded that corticosterone and prolactin may mediate the increased chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages induced by exercise. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9051584

  4. Bi-Directional Relationship Between Self-Regulation and Improved Eating: Temporal Associations With Exercise, Reduced Fatigue, and Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Johnson, Ping H; Porter, Kandice J

    2015-01-01

    Severely obese men and women (body mass index ≥ 35 ≤ 55 kg/m(2); M(age) = 44.8 years, SD = 9.3) were randomly assigned to a 6-month physical activity support treatment paired with either nutrition education (n = 83) or cognitive-behavioral nutrition (n = 82) methods for weight loss. Both groups had significant improvements in physical activity, fatigue, self-regulation for eating, and fruit and vegetable intake. Compared to those in the nutrition education group, participants in the behavioral group demonstrated greater overall increases in fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity. These group differences were associated with changes that occurred after Month 3. Increased physical activity predicted reduced fatigue, β = -.19, p =.01. A reciprocal relationship between the mediators of that relationship, which were changes in self-regulation and fruit and vegetable intake, was identified. There was significantly greater weight loss over six months in the behavioral nutrition group when contrasted with the nutrition education group. Self-regulation for eating and fruit and vegetable intake were significant predictors of weight loss over both three and six months. Findings enabled a better understanding of psychosocial effects on temporal aspects of weight loss and may lead to more effective behavioral treatments for weight loss. PMID:26047256

  5. Water Exercise Causes Ripples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Water exercise provides benefits independently of participants' skill levels, and reduces the likelihood of injury from overuse syndromes and heat-related problems. The advantages of water resistance exercises for athletes and for elderly, overweight, or physically disabled people are discussed. (MT)

  6. Exercise that induces substantial muscle glycogen depletion impairs subsequent anaerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, V; Hinchcliff, K W; Geor, R J; Lauderdale, M A

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model of muscle glycogen depletion and to study the effect of this model on aerobic and anaerobic capacity of horses. The maximal rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD), muscle glycogen concentration and blood lactate concentration of 6 fit Standardbred horses were measured on 3 occasions 7 days apart (Trials 1, 2 and 3). Between Trials 2 and 3, strenuous exercise intended to deplete muscle glycogen was performed by exercising horses on the treadmill on 3 consecutive days. Strenuous exercise resulted in reduction of muscle glycogen concentration by at least 55% (from mean +/- s.e. 155.1 +/- 5.6 mmol/kg, wet weight, before Trial 2 to 55.4 +/- 5.5 mmol/kg before Trial 3; P < 0.05). VO2max was similar in Trials 2 and 3 (140.4 +/- 5.4 ml O2/kg bwt and 141.8 ml +/- 6.2 ml O2/kg, respectively). Run time to fatigue during a single high-speed exercise test (253.9 +/- 33.3 s and 153.8 +/- 16.4 s, P < 0.05), accumulated oxygen deficit (95 +/- 13.2 ml O2/kg and 35 +/- 13.9 ml O2/kg, P < 0.05) and blood lactate concentration at the end of the sprint (17 +/- 1.2 mmol/l and 10.5 +/- 1.1 mmol/l, P < 0.05) were less during Trial 3 than Trial 2. These data suggested that repeated strenuous exercise that causes muscle glycogen depletion results in impairment of anaerobic, but not aerobic, metabolism. PMID:10659271

  7. Influence of Exercise and Intra-articular Site on Canals in Articular Calcified Cartilage of Equine Third Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Herdan, C L; Nicholson, C L; Firth, E C

    2016-05-01

    The third carpal bone (C3) responds to exercise by adaptive modeling of bone and articular calcified cartilage along the dorsal load path. Canals penetrating articular calcified cartilage, thought to contain vascular tissue, are reported in numerous species. Their significance remains unclear. Our objective was to determine if the number of canals was significantly different in strenuously exercised and control young horses and in a site of intermittent high loading compared to sites sustaining lower habitual loads. Volumetric bone mineral density in the radial facet of C3 of strenuously exercised and gently exercised (control) 19-month-old thoroughbred horses (n= 6/group) was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The hyaline cartilage was corroded to expose the surface of articular calcified cartilage. The number of canals penetrating the articular calcified cartilage surface in en face scanning electron microscopy images was compared in 4 regions. Volumetric bone mineral density of C3 was significantly greater (P= .004) in strenuously exercised horses. There were 2 morphologically distinct groups of canals and significantly fewer (P= .006) large canals in the dorsal than in the palmar aspect of C3 in control but not in exercised horses. Roughly circular depressions in the articular calcified cartilage surface around apparently forming canals were visible in some samples and have not been previously described in the literature. The canals may be evidence of chondroclastic activity reaching the interface of hyaline and calcified cartilage. Further work is needed to elucidate the relationships between presence of canals and the responses to exercise and to joint disease. PMID:26169383

  8. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  9. Diabetes and exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... your weight. Exercise can also help lower your blood sugar without medicines . It reduces your risk of heart ... Make sure you call your doctor if your blood sugar gets too low or too high during the ...

  10. COPD: benefits of exercise training.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    In patients with stable, moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), general exercise training, including limb exercises, provides sustained improvement in various quality of life domains, compared with care without pulmonary rehabilitation. After a COPD exacerbation, exercise training appears to reduce the risk of hospitalisation in the following months by at least half. Few studies have evaluated the adverse effects of exercise training in COPD, but based on the data available in 2015, its harm-benefit balance appears favourable. PMID:27152405

  11. Exercise in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajeswaran, P.; Vishnupriya, R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise has attracted increased interest in rehabilitation of oncological patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and summarize the evidence of physical exercise in preventing cancer, its ability in attenuating the effect of cancer and its treatments and to provide guidelines for exercise prescription Review of recent literature by electronic search of MEDline (Pub Med), Cancer lit, Cochrane libraries, CINAHL were done using Keywords and the variables were identified and systematically evaluated. There is strong evidence for reduced risk of colorectal and breast cancer with possible association for prostate, endometrial and lung cancer with increasing physical activity. Exercise helps cancer survivors cope with and recover from treatment; exercise may improve the health of long term cancer survivors and extend survival. Physical exercise will benefit throughout the spectrum of cancer. However, an understanding of the amount, type and intensity of exercise needed has not been fully elucidated. There is sufficient evidence to promote exercise in cancer survivors following careful assessment and tailoring on exercise prescription. PMID:20596305

  12. β-glucan reduces exercise-induced stress through downregulation of c-Fos and c-Jun expression in the brains of exhausted rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeok; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Jae-Deung; Seo, Jin-Hee

    2014-05-01

    Immediate-early genes are involved in acute stress responses in the central nervous system. β-glucan stimulates innate immune defenses, exerts an anti-tumor response and increases resistance to a wide variety of types of infection. To date, the effect of β-glucan on the expression of immediate-early genes under stressful conditions has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effects of β-glucan on the expression of the oncogenes c-Fos and c-Jun in the hypothalamus, dentate gyrus and dorsal raphe in rats following exhaustive treadmill running were investigated. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n=10 in each group) as follows: Control, exercise, exercise and 50 mg/kg β-glucan treatment, exercise and 100 mg/kg β-glucan treatment, and exercise and 200 mg/kg β-glucan treatment. Rats in the β-glucan‑treated groups were administered β-glucan at the respective dose once per day for seven days. Rats in the exercise groups performed treadmill running once per day for six days. On the seventh day of the experiment, the time to exhaustion in response to treadmill running was determined for the exercise groups. The expression of c-Fos and c-Jun in the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe and hippocampus was enhanced by exhaustive treadmill running. Administration of β-glucan resulted in an increase in the time to exhaustion and the suppression of the exercise-induced increment in c-Fos and c-Jun expression. In conclusion, β-glucan may exert an alleviating effect on exercise-induced stress through the suppression of c-Fos and c-Jun expression in the brains of exhausted rats. PMID:24604295

  13. Effect of prior high-intensity exercise on exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M; Goetz, T E; Hassan, A S

    2001-06-01

    Strenuously exercising horses exhibit arterial hypoxemia and exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), the latter resulting from stress failure of pulmonary capillaries. The present study was carried out to examine whether the structural changes in the blood-gas barrier caused by a prior bout of high-intensity short-term exercise capable of inducing EIPH would affect the arterial hypoxemia induced during a successive bout of exercise performed at the same workload. Two sets of experiments, double- and single-exercise-bout experiments, were carried out on seven healthy, sound Thoroughbred horses. Experiments were carried out in random order, 7 days apart. In the double-exercise experiments, horses performed two successive bouts (each lasting 120 s) of galloping at 14 m/s on a 3.5% uphill grade, separated by an interval of 6 min. Exertion at this workload induced arterial hypoxemia within 30 s of the onset of galloping as well as desaturation of Hb, a progressive rise in arterial PCO2, and acidosis as exercise duration increased from 30 to 120 s. In the single-exercise-bout experiments, blood-gas/pH data resembled those from the first run of the double-exercise experiments, and all horses experienced EIPH. Thus, in the double-exercise experiments, before the horses performed the second bout of galloping at 14 m/s on a 3.5% uphill grade, stress failure of pulmonary capillaries had occurred. Although arterial hypoxemia developed during the second run, arterial PO2 values were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in the first run. Thus prior exercise not only failed to accentuate the severity of arterial hypoxemia, it actually diminished the magnitude of exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia. The decreased severity of exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia in the second run was due to an associated increase in alveolar PO2, as arterial PCO2 was significantly lower than in the first run. Thus our data do not support a role for structural changes in the blood-gas barrier related to the stress failure of pulmonary capillaries in causing the exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia in horses. PMID:11356804

  14. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chipkin, S R; Klugh, S A; Chasan-Taber, L

    2001-08-01

    As rates of diabetes mellitus and obesity continue to increase, physical activity continues to be a fundamental form of therapy. Exercise influences several aspects of diabetes, including blood glucose concentrations, insulin action and cardiovascular risk factors. Blood glucose concentrations reflect the balance between skeletal muscle uptake and ambient concentrations of both insulin and counterinsulin hormones. Difficulties in predicting the relative impact of these factors can result in either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Despite the variable impact of exercise on blood glucose, exercise consistently improves insulin action and several cardiovascular risk factors. Beyond the acute impact of physical activity, long-term exercise behaviors have been repeatedly associated with decreased rates of type 2 diabetes. While exercise produces many benefits, it is not without risks for patients with diabetes mellitus. In addition to hyperglycemia, from increased hepatic glucose production, insufficient insulin levels can foster ketogenesis from excess concentrations of fatty acids. At the opposite end of the glucose spectrum, hypoglycemia can result from excess glucose uptake due to either increased insulin concentrations, enhanced insulin action or impaired carbohydrate absorption. To decrease the risk for hypoglycemia, insulin doses should be reduced prior to exercise, although some insulin is typically still needed. Although precise risks of exercise on existing diabetic complications have not been well studied, it seems prudent to consider the potential to worsen nephropathy or retinopathy, or to precipitate musculoskeletal injuries. There is more substantive evidence that autonomic neuropathy may predispose patients to arrhythmias. Of clear concern, increased physical activity can precipitate a cardiac event in those with underlying CAD. Recognizing these risks can prompt actions to minimize their impact. Positive actions that are part of exercise programs for diabetic patients emphasize SMBG, foot care and cardiovascular functional assessment. SMBG provides critical information on the impact of exercise and is recommended for all patients before, during and after exercise. More frequent monitoring (and for longer periods following exercise) is recommended for those with hypoglycemia unawareness or those performing high-intensity exercise. Preventing the sequelae of an exercise-induced severe hypoglycemic reaction can be as simple as carrying glucose tablets or gel, a diabetic identification bracelet or card, or exercising with an individual who is aware of the circumstances. In addition to blood glucose concentrations, proper foot care is critical to people with diabetes who exercise and includes considering type of shoe, type of exercise, inspection of skin surfaces and appropriate evaluation and treatment of lesions (calluses and others). Those with severe neuropathy can consider alternatives to weight-bearing exercises. Precipitation of clinical CAD is of great concern for all diabetic patients participating in exercise activities. Although a sufficiently sensitive and specific screening test for coronary disease has not been identified, those planning an exercise program of moderate intensity or greater should be evaluated. Initial cardiac assessment should include exercise testing as well as identifying risk for autonomic neuropathy. In addition to noting maximal heart rate and blood pressure as well as ischemic changes, exercise tolerance testing can identify anginal thresholds and patients with asymptomatic ischemia. Those without symptoms should be counseled regarding target pulse rates to avoid inducing ischemia. Ischemic changes need to be evaluated for either further diagnostic testing or pharmacological intervention. For patients with diabetes mellitus, the overall benefits of exercise are clearly significant. Clinicians and patients must work together to maximize these benefits while minimizing risks for negative consequences. Identifying and preventing potential problems beforehand can reduce adverse outcomes and promote this important approach to healthy living. PMID:11570119

  15. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... overdoing it for almost anyone. Much like with eating disorders, many people who engage in compulsive exercise do ... compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany an eating disorder, the two often go hand in hand. In ...

  16. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise, especially when it is combined with an eating disorder, can cause serious and permanent health problems, and in extreme cases, death. Because compulsive exercise is closely related to eating disorders, help can be found at community agencies specifically ...

  17. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether acute strenuous exercise (1600- to 2500-m race) would elicit an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters. Blood levels of several inflammatory markers [serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen, white blood cell count (WBC), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron levels decreased 12 to 14 h after racing and haptoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts, and iron levels were decreased 2 and/or 7 d after racing. Concentrations of CK, AST, SAA, and fibrinogen were unaltered in response to racing. Acute strenuous exercise did not elicit an acute phase reaction. The observed acute increase in hemoglobin levels and decreases in haptoglobin and iron levels may have been caused by exercise-induced hemolysis, which indicates that horses might experience a condition similar to athlete’s anemia in humans. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of the hematological and blood-biochemical changes elicited by acute exercise in Standardbred trotters in the present study warrant further investigation. PMID:24688170

  18. Work of breathing in exercising ponies.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Lekeux, P

    1989-01-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate the changes in the mechanical work of breathing induced by the increase of ventilation in ponies exercising on a treadmill. Airflow, tidal volume (VT) and oesophageal pressure were simultaneously recorded in eight ponies (four to six years old and weighing 258 +/- 11 kg) before, during and after standardised exercise. Respiratory frequency, VT and minute volume (Ve) for each phase of the experimental protocol were calculated from the collected data. The pressure-volume diagrams were traced and the work per cycle (Wrm) was estimated by measuring the area enclosed in the loop. The work per minute (Wrm) and the work per litre of ventilation (Wrm litre-1) were also calculated. From rest to fast trot Wrm litre-1, Wrm and Wrm had increased 8.1, 13.0 and 55.6 times, respectively. The relationships between Ve and Wrm litre-1 was linear and that between Ve and Wrm curvilinear. Results suggested that the mechanical cost of the work of breathing could be a limiting or at least a constraining factor of the increase of ventilation during strenuous exercise in ponies. PMID:2922505

  19. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  20. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.

  1. Reduced susceptibility to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in resistance-trained men is not linked to resistance training-related neural adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Beck, TW; Wages, NP

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of maximal concentric vs. eccentric exercise on the isometric strength of the elbow flexor, as well as the biceps brachii muscle electromyographic (EMG) responses in resistance-trained (RT) vs. untrained (UT) men. Thirteen RT men (age: 24 ± 4 years; height: 180.2 ± 7.7 cm; body weight: 92.2 ± 16.9 kg) and twelve UT men (age: 23 ± 4 years; height: 179.2 ± 5.0 cm; body weight: 81.5 ± 8.6 kg) performed six sets of ten maximal concentric isokinetic (CON) or eccentric isokinetic (ECC) elbow flexion exercise in two separate visits. Before and after the exercise interventions, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed for testing isometric strength. In addition, bipolar surface EMG signals were detected from the biceps brachii muscle during the strength testing. Both CON and ECC caused isometric strength to decrease, regardless of the training status. However, ECC caused greater isometric strength decline than CON did for the UT group (p = 0.006), but not for the RT group. Both EMG amplitude and mean frequency significantly decreased and increased, respectively, regardless of the training status and exercise intervention. Resistance-trained men are less susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, but this advantage is not likely linked to the chronic resistance training-induced neural adaptations. PMID:26424922

  2. What are the dietary protein requirements of physically active individuals? New evidence on the effects of exercise on protein utilization during post-exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Roger A; Parkington, Jascha

    2002-01-01

    Exercise and physical activity increase energy expenditure up to 10-fold. This brief review will focus on the effect of exercise on protein requirements. Evidence has accumulated that amino acids are oxidized as substrates during prolonged submaximal exercise. In addition, studies have determined that both endurance and resistance training exercise increase skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown in the post-exercise recovery period. Studies using nitrogen balance have further confirmed that protein requirements for individuals engaged in regular exercise are increased. The current recommended intakes of protein for strength and endurance athletes are 1.6 to 1.7 g/kg and 1.2 to 1.4 g/kg per day, respectively. Presently, most athletes consume an adequate amount of protein in their diet. The timing and nutritional content of the post-exercise meal, although often overlooked, are known to have synergistic effects on protein accretion after exercise. New evidence suggests that individuals engaging in strenuous activity consume a meal rich in amino acids and carbohydrate soon after the exercise bout or training session. PMID:12380246

  3. Nasal strips do not affect pulmonary gas exchange, anaerobic metabolism, or EIPH in exercising Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Goetz, T E; Manohar, M; Hassan, A S; Baker, G J

    2001-06-01

    The present study was carried out to examine whether nasal strip application would improve the exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia, diminish anaerobic metabolism, and modify the incidence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) in horses. Two sets of experiments, control and nasal strip experiments, were carried out on seven healthy, sound, exercise-trained Thoroughbred horses in random order, 7 days apart. Simultaneous measurements of core temperature, arterial and mixed venous blood gases/pH, and blood lactate and ammonia concentrations were made at rest, during submaximal and near-maximal exercise, and during recovery. In both treatments, whereas submaximal exercise caused hyperventilation, near-maximal exercise induced significant arterial hypoxemia, desaturation of Hb, hypercapnia, and acidosis. However, O2 content increased significantly with exercise in both treatments, while the mixed venous blood O2 content decreased as O2 extraction increased. In both treatments, plasma ammonia and blood lactate concentrations increased significantly with exercise. Statistically significant differences between the control and the nasal strip experiments could not be discerned, however. Also, all horses experienced EIPH in both treatments. Thus our data indicated that application of an external nasal dilator strip neither improved the exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia nor diminished anaerobic metabolism or the incidence of EIPH in Thoroughbred horses performing strenuous exercise. PMID:11356805

  4. Prior maximal exercise decreases pulmonary diffusing capacity during subsequent exercise.

    PubMed

    Baldi, J C; Dacey, M J; Lee, M J; Coast, J R

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary diffusion (DLCO) increases during exercise due to greater pulmonary capillary volume (Vc) and membrane diffusing capacity (DM). However, after heavy exercise there is a reduction in resting DLCO. It is unclear whether this post-exercise effect will attenuate the normal increase in DLCO, Vc and DM during subsequent exercise and whether this affects SpO2 (pulse oximeter). DLCO, Vc, DM, cardiac output and SpO2 were measured at rest, moderate (~70% VO2peak) and heavy (~90 VO2peak) exercise in 9 subjects during 2 sessions separated by ~90?min. DLCO, Vc and DM increased during exercise (P<0.05). DLCO (P<0.05) and Vc (P<0.10), but not DM or SpO2 were lower in session 2 compared to the first. Reductions in DLCO and Vc appeared to be smallest during rest (1-4%) and greatest at high-intensity exercise (8-20%), but the interaction was not significant. SpO2 decreased by 4.9% and 5.1% from rest to high-intensity exercise during the first and second exercise bout, but these changes were not different. These data confirm that a bout of high-intensity exercise reduces DLCO and Vc, and may indicate that these changes are exacerbated during subsequent high-intensity exercise. Despite these changes, SpO2 was not affected by previous exercise. PMID:24838265

  5. Back Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Thirty patients with low back pain were referred for examination by their doctors after 3 or more weeks of treatment. Whether back exercise instruction had been given, who had given it, what it was, and whether the patients actually followed the instruction was noted. Some type of back exercise had been taught to 22 patients, but only three out of the 30 patients had persisted with all the back exercises taught. The back exercises patients actually do and the role of exercise in low back pain should be evaluated further. PMID:21221344

  6. A 12 WEEKS EXERCISE PROGRAM RESULTED IN REDUCED VISCERAL FAT AND FASTING INSULIN BUT NOT TOTAL AND INTRAMYOCELLULAR FAT IN HISPANIC OBESE ADOLESCENTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The high prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a serious public health concern. Weight loss is known to improve insulin sensitivity but is difficult to achieve. The independent effects of exercise on body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in the absence of overall w...

  7. A Controlled Intervention to Promote a Healthy Body Image, Reduce Eating Disorder Risk and Prevent Excessive Exercise among Trainee Health Education and Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE & PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an "at-risk" population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year…

  8. A Controlled Intervention to Promote a Healthy Body Image, Reduce Eating Disorder Risk and Prevent Excessive Exercise among Trainee Health Education and Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two interventions on body image, eating disorder risk and excessive exercise among 170 (65% female) trainee health education and physical education (HE & PE) teachers of mean (standard deviation) age 21.6 (2.3) who were considered an "at-risk" population for poor body image and eating disorders. In the first year

  9. Treadmill exercise ameliorates symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder through reducing Purkinje cell loss and astrocytic reaction in spontaneous hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyo-Soon; Park, Mi-Sook; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Hyun-Bae; Kim, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder of cognition. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on Purkinje cell and astrocytic reaction in the cerebellum of the ADHD rat. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYR) weighing 210± 10 g were used. The animals were randomly divided into four groups (n= 15): control group, ADHD group, ADHD and methylphenidate (MPH)-treated group, ADHD and treadmill exercise group. The rats in the MPH-treated group as a positive control received 1 mg/kg MPH orally once a day for 28 consecutive days. The rats in the treadmill exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day for 28 days. Motor coordination and balance were determined by vertical pole test. Immunohistochemistry for the expression of calbindinD-28 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the cerebellar vermis and Western blot for GFAP, Bax, and Bcl-2 were conducted. In the present results, ADHD significantly decreased balance and the number of calbindin-positive cells, while GFAP expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the cerebellum were significantly increased in the ADHD group compared to the control group (P< 0.05, respectively). In contrast, treadmill exercise and MPH alleviated the ADHD-induced the decrease of balance and the number of calbindine-positive cells, and the increase of GFAP expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the cerebellum (P< 0.05, respectively). Therefore, the present results suggested that treadmill exercise might exert ameliorating effect on ADHD through reduction of Purkinje cell loss and astrocytic reaction in the cerebellum. PMID:24678501

  10. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    There are alarming increases in the incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of these diseases is significantly reduced by appropriate lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity. However, the exact mechanisms by which exercise influences the development and progression of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this paper we review some important exercise-induced changes in cardiac, vascular, and blood tissues and discuss recent clinical trials related to the benefits of exercise. We also discuss the roles of boosting antioxidant levels, consequences of epicardial fat reduction, increases in expression of heat shock proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, mitochondrial adaptation, and the role of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial potassium channels in the contributing to the cardioprotection offered by exercise. In terms of vascular benefits, the main effects discussed are changes in exercise-induced vascular remodeling and endothelial function. Exercise-induced fibrinolytic and rheological changes also underlie the hematological benefits of exercise. PMID:22701195

  11. Aging Reduces the Activation of the mTORC1 Pathway after Resistance Exercise and Protein Intake in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Role of REDD1 and Impaired Anabolic Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Francaux, Marc; Demeulder, Bénédicte; Naslain, Damien; Fortin, Raphael; Lutz, Olivier; Caty, Gilles; Deldicque, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the anabolic resistance observed in elderly people. Nine young (22 ± 0.1 years) and 10 older (69 ± 1.7 years) volunteers performed a one-leg extension exercise consisting of 10 × 10 repetitions at 70% of their 3-RM, immediately after which they ingested 30 g of whey protein. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at rest in the fasted state and 30 min after protein ingestion in the non-exercised (Pro) and exercised (Pro+ex) legs. Plasma insulin levels were determined at the same time points. No age difference was measured in fasting insulin levels but the older subjects had a 50% higher concentration than the young subjects in the fed state (p < 0.05). While no difference was observed in the fasted state, in response to exercise and protein ingestion, the phosphorylation state of PKB (p < 0.05 in Pro and Pro+ex) and S6K1 (p = 0.059 in Pro; p = 0.066 in Pro+ex) was lower in the older subjects compared with the young subjects. After Pro+ex, REDD1 expression tended to be higher (p = 0.087) in the older group while AMPK phosphorylation was not modified by any condition. In conclusion, we show that the activation of the mTORC1 pathway is reduced in skeletal muscle of older subjects after resistance exercise and protein ingestion compared with young subjects, which could be partially due to an increased expression of REDD1 and an impaired anabolic sensitivity. PMID:26784225

  12. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can even provide quick and significant ...

  13. Some Exercises Reflecting Green Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yu-Min; Wang, Yong-Cheng; Geng, Zhi-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Some exercises to introduce students to the concept of green chemistry are given. By doing these exercises, students develop an appreciation for the role of green chemistry on feedstock substitution, milder reaction conditions, reduced environmental exposure, and resource conservation.

  14. [Asthma and exercise].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J

    2002-09-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is defined as the clinical occurrence of shortness of breath, cough or wheeze that occurs typically 5-15 minutes after the cessation of the exercise. In most patients with EIA, bronchoconstriction is followed by a refractory period, during which repeated exertion causes less bronchoconstriction. The occurrence of this type of asthma is influenced by the intensity and the duration of exercise. It is now generally believed that EIA affects all patients with asthma if challenged with exercise of sufficient intensity. The estimate prevalence varies from 7 to 15% in the general population. EIA appears also to affect 3-14% of athletes. It is now clear that hyperventilation and hypertonicity of airway-lining fluid provide the stimulus for EIA with release of constrictor mediators. Recently, incidence of new diagnoses of asthma is associated with heavy exercise in communities with high concentrations of ozone, thus, air pollution and outdoor exercise could contribute to the development of asthma in children. Beta-agonists and/or disodium cromoglycate remain the preferred first-line therapy for EIA but now antileukotrienes provide an attractive therapeutic alternative. General recommendations can help reduce its severity: warm-up; breath through mask when exercising in cold, dry conditions; in recent years some reports have suggested that training and conditioning may help athletes and non-athletes with asthma have fewer symptoms after exercise, increase the threshold of exercise necessary to induce airway obstruction and finally improve their well-being. Scuba diving stays an absolute contra-indication if asthma. PMID:12422436

  15. Increased objectively assessed vigorous-intensity exercise is associated with reduced stress, increased mental health and good objective and subjective sleep in young adults.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Brand, Serge; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    The role of physical activity as a factor that protects against stress-related mental disorders is well documented. Nevertheless, there is still a dearth of research using objective measures of physical activity. The present study examines whether objectively assessed vigorous physical activity (VPA) is associated with mental health benefits beyond moderate physical activity (MPA). Particularly, this study examines whether young adults who accomplish the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) vigorous-intensity exercise recommendations differ from peers below these standards with regard to their level of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, perceived pain, and subjective and objective sleep. A total of 42 undergraduate students (22 women, 20 men; M=21.24years, SD=2.20) volunteered to take part in the study. Stress, pain, depressive symptoms, and subjective sleep were assessed via questionnaire, objective sleep via sleep-EEG assessment, and VPA via actigraphy. Meeting VPA recommendations had mental health benefits beyond MPA. VPA was associated with less stress, pain, subjective sleep complaints and depressive symptoms. Moreover, vigorous exercisers had more favorable objective sleep pattern. Especially, they had increased total sleep time, more stage 4 and REM sleep, more slow wave sleep and a lower percentage of light sleep. Vigorous exercisers also reported fewer mental health problems if exposed to high stress. This study provides evidence that meeting the VPA standards of the ACSM is associated with improved mental health and more successful coping among young people, even compared to those who are meeting or exceeding the requirements for MPA. PMID:24905432

  16. Can Lifestyle Interventions Do More than Reduce Diabetes Risk? Treating Depression in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes with Exercise and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Doyle, Todd; Kushnick, Michael; Shubrook, Jay; Merrill, Jennifer; Rabideau, Erin; Schwartz, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic of metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes is global in scope and comprehensive in its impact on individuals, health care systems, and societies. One in four patients with diabetes will experience depression in their lifetime. Comorbid depression is associated with poorer outcomes, greater functional disability, and early mortality. Prior studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of exercise as an efficacious form of treatment for depression in the general population. Few studies have evaluated this strategy in patients with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Program ACTIVE (Appalachians Coming Together to Increase Vital Exercise) was designed to treat depression among adults with type 2 diabetes by pairing aerobic activity with individual cognitive behavioral therapy. This combination treatment approach has been shown to be feasible to implement in a rural environment and promising in terms of depression, diabetes, and cardiovascular outcomes. Data from this study suggest that exercise can be used to achieve multiple benefits for adults with type 2 diabetes. Future work to compare this approach to singular treatment strategies for adults at risk for type 2 diabetes is needed. PMID:22350739

  17. Timed-daily ingestion of whey protein and exercise training reduces visceral adipose tissue mass and improves insulin resistance: the PRISE study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Baur, Daniel; Connelly, Scott; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of timed ingestion of supplemental protein (20-g servings of whey protein, 3×/day), added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults and subsequently randomized to either whey protein only (P; n = 24), whey protein and resistance exercise (P + RT; n = 27), or a whey protein and multimode exercise training program [protein and resistance exercise, intervals, stretching/yoga/Pilates, endurance exercise (PRISE); n = 28]. Total and regional body composition and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity [homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], plasma lipids and adipokines, and feelings of hunger and satiety (visual analog scales) were measured before and after the 16-wk intervention. All groups lost body weight, fat mass (FM), and abdominal fat; however, PRISE lost significantly (P < 0.01) more body weight (3.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.1 ± 0.7 kg, P + RT) and FM (2.8 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.5 kg, P + RT) and gained (P < 0.05) a greater percentage of lean body mass (2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 and 0.6 ± 0.4%, P + RT and P, respectively). Only P + RT (0.1 ± 0.04 kg) and PRISE (0.21 ± 0.07 kg) lost VAT mass (P < 0.05). Fasting glucose decreased only in P + RT (5.1 ± 2.5 mg/dl) and PRISE (15.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl), with the greatest decline occurring in PRISE (P < 0.05). Similarly, HOMA-IR improved (0.6 ± 0.3, 0.6 ± 0.4 units), and leptin decreased (4.7 ± 2.2, 4.7 ± 3.1 ng/dl), and adiponectin increased (3.8 ± 1.1, 2.4 ± 1.1 μg/ml) only in P + RT and PRISE, respectively, with no change in P. In conclusion, we find evidence to support exercise training and timed ingestion of whey protein added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults, independent of caloric restriction on total and regional body fat distribution, insulin resistance, and adipokines. PMID:24833780

  18. Application of bioreactance for cardiac output assessment during exercise in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Adrian; Hull, James H; Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Brodie, David; Ansley, Lesley

    2010-07-01

    In patients with cardiac failure, bioreactance-based cardiac output (CO) monitoring provides a valid non-invasive method for assessing cardiac performance during exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this technique during strenuous exercise in healthy, trained individuals. Fourteen recreational cyclists, mean (SD) age of 34 (8) years and relative peak oxygen uptake of (VO(2)) 56 (6) ml kg(-1) min(-1), underwent incremental maximal exercise testing, whilst CO was recorded continuously using a novel bioreactance-based device (CO(bio)). The CO(bio) was evaluated against relationship with VO(2), theoretical calculation of arterial-venous oxygen difference (C(a - v) O(2)) and level of agreement with an inert gas rebreathing method (CO(rb)) using a Bland-Altman plot. Bioreactance-based CO measurement was practical and straightforward in application, although there was intermittent loss of electrocardiograph signal at high-intensity exercise. At rest and during exercise, CO(bio) was strongly correlated with VO(2) (r = 0.84; P < 0.001), however, there was evidence of systematic bias with CO(bio) providing lower values than CO(rb); mean bias (limits of agreement) -19% (14.6 to -53%). Likewise, calculated (C(a - v) O(2)) was greater when determined using CO(bio) than CO(rb) (P < 0.001), although both devices provided values in excess of those reported in invasive studies. Bioreactance-based determination of CO provides a pragmatic approach to the continuous assessment of cardiac performance during strenuous exercise in trained individuals. Our findings, however, suggest that further work is needed to refine the key measurement determinants of CO using this device to improve measurement accuracy in this setting. PMID:20336309

  19. Cardiovascular exercise in the U.S. space program: Past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alan D.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2010-04-01

    Exercise deconditioning during space flight may impact a crewmember's ability to perform strenuous or prolonged tasks during and after a spaceflight mission. In this paper, we review the cardiovascular exercise data from U.S. spaceflights from the Mercury Project through International Space Station (ISS) expeditions and potential implications upon current and future missions. During shorter spaceflights (<16 days), the heart rate (HR) response to exercise testing and maximum oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) are not changed. The submaximal exercise HR responses during longer duration flights are less consistent, and VO 2 max has not been measured. Skylab data demonstrated no change in the exercise HR response during flight which would be consistent with no change in VO 2 max; however, during ISS flight exercise HR is elevated early in the mission, but approaches preflight levels later during the missions, perhaps due to performance of exercise countermeasures. An elevated exercise HR is consistently observed after both short and long duration spaceflight, and crewmembers appear to recover at rates which are affected by the length of the mission.

  20. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations is of importance for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise physiology. Increases of cfDNA due to exercise are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome and might be related to, or trigger adaptations of, immune function induced by strenuous exercise. At the same time, exercise provides a practicable model for studying the phenomenon of cfDNA that is described to be of pathophysiological relevance for different topics in clinical medicine like autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review, we are summarizing the current knowledge of exercise-based acute and chronic alterations in cfDNA levels and their physiological significance. The effects of acute exercise on cfDNA concentrations have been investigated in resistance exercises and in continuous, stepwise and interval endurance exercises of different durations. cfDNA concentrations peaked immediately after acute exercise and showed a rapid return to baseline levels. Typical markers of skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase, uric acid, C-reactive protein) show delayed kinetics compared with the cfDNA peak response. Exercise parameters such as intensity, duration or average energy expenditure do not explain the extent of increasing cfDNA concentrations after strenuous exercise. This could be due to complex processes inside the human organism during and after physical activity. Therefore, we hypothesize composite effects of different physiological stress parameters that come along with exercise to be responsible for increasing cfDNA concentrations. We suggest that due to acute stress, cfDNA levels increase rapidly by a spontaneous active or passive release mechanism that is not yet known. As a result of the rapid and parallel increase of cfDNA and lactate in an incremental treadmill test leading to exhaustion within 15-20 minutes, it is unlikely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by typical necrosis or apoptosis of cells in acute exercise settings. Recently, rapid DNA release mechanisms of activated immune-competent cells like NETosis (pathogen-induced cell death including the release of neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) have been discovered. cfDNA accumulations might comprise a similar kind of cell death including trap formation or an active release of cfDNA. Just like chronic diseases, chronic high-intensity resistance training protocols induced persistent increases of cfDNA levels. Chronic, strenuous exercise protocols, either long-duration endurance exercise or regular high-intensity workouts, induce chronic inflammation that might lead to a slow, constant release of DNA. This could be due to mechanisms of cell death like apoptosis or necrosis. Yet, it has neither been implicated nor proven sufficiently whether cfDNA can serve as a marker for overtraining. The relevance of cfDNA with regard to overtraining status, performance level, and the degree of physical exhaustion still remains unclear. Longitudinal studies are required that take into account standardized and controlled exercise, serial blood sampling, and large and homogeneous cohorts of different athletic achievement. Furthermore, it is important to establish standardized laboratory procedures for the measurement of genomic cfDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We introduce a new hypothesis based on acute exercise and chronic exposure to stress, and rapid active and passive chronic release of cfDNA fragments into the circulation. PMID:22694348

  1. [Exercise training in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, F; Grabs, V; Halle, M

    2014-06-01

    Exercise training in patients with chronic stable heart failure (HF) is a recommended and broadly accepted treatment strategy that is an integral part of an evidence-based management involving pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. There is ample scientific evidence that exercise training in HF with reduced (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) improves exercise capacity, HF symptoms and quality of life. This is due to an improvement of central hemodynamics, endothelial function, neurohumoral activation, skeletal muscle structure and function as well as a decrease in inflammatory markers. The largest randomized, controlled HF-ACTION study (Heart Failure-A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of exercise TraiNing) demonstrated that exercise training results in a modest improvement of all-cause mortality and hospitalizations in HFrEF, depending on adequate compliance. Outcome data in HFpEF are lacking. Besides compliance, efficacy of exercise training is dependent on the intensity and type of exercise. Resistance and high intensity endurance training in addition to a standard aerobic exercise seem to be superior in improving the clinical status of HF patients. In the future, individualized exercise programs will help to improve long-term adherence to exercise training. PMID:24817538

  2. Exercise and activity for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    An exercise weight-loss program that works needs to be fun and keep you motivated. It helps to have a specific goal. Your goal might be managing a health condition, reducing ... to be with other people. Exercise classes or exercising with ...

  3. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise. PMID:26229538

  4. Exercise Physiologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... kinesiology, and nutrition, as well as clinical work. Education Exercise physiologists typically need at least a bachelor’s ... the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education Typical level of education that most workers need ...

  5. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  6. Exercise counteracts the effects of short-term overfeeding and reduced physical activity independent of energy imbalance in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Richardson, Judith D; Betts, James A; Thompson, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity can affect many aspects of metabolism but it is unclear to what extent this relies on manipulation of energy balance. Twenty-six active men age 25 ± 7 years (mean ± SD) were randomly assigned either to consume 50% more energy than normal by over-consuming their habitual diet for 7 days whilst simultaneously restricting their physical activity below 4000 steps day−1 to induce an energy surplus (SUR group; n= 14) or to the same regimen but with 45 min of daily treadmill running at 70% of maximum oxygen uptake (SUR+EX group; n= 12). Critically, the SUR+EX group received additional dietary energy intake to account for the energy expended by exercise, thus maintaining a matched energy surplus. At baseline and follow-up, fasted blood samples and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and oral glucose tolerance tests conducted. Insulinaemic responses to a standard glucose load increased 2-fold from baseline to follow-up in the SUR group (Δ17 ± 16 nmol (120 min) l−1; P= 0.002) whereas there was no change in the SUR+EX group (Δ1 ± 6 nmol (120 min) l−1). Seven of 17 genes within adipose tissue were differentially expressed in the SUR group; expression of SREBP-1c, FAS and GLUT4 was significantly up-regulated and expression of PDK4, IRS2, HSL and visfatin was significantly down-regulated (P≤ 0.05). The pAMPK/AMPK protein ratio in adipose tissue was significantly down-regulated in the SUR group (P= 0.005). Vigorous-intensity exercise counteracted most of the effects of short-term overfeeding and under-activity at the whole-body level and in adipose tissue, even in the face of a standardised energy surplus. PMID:24167223

  7. Exercise counteracts the effects of short-term overfeeding and reduced physical activity independent of energy imbalance in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Richardson, Judith D; Betts, James A; Thompson, Dylan

    2013-12-15

    Physical activity can affect many aspects of metabolism but it is unclear to what extent this relies on manipulation of energy balance. Twenty-six active men age 25 ± 7 years (mean ± SD) were randomly assigned either to consume 50% more energy than normal by over-consuming their habitual diet for 7 days whilst simultaneously restricting their physical activity below 4000 steps day(-1) to induce an energy surplus (SUR group; n = 14) or to the same regimen but with 45 min of daily treadmill running at 70% of maximum oxygen uptake (SUR+EX group; n = 12). Critically, the SUR+EX group received additional dietary energy intake to account for the energy expended by exercise, thus maintaining a matched energy surplus. At baseline and follow-up, fasted blood samples and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and oral glucose tolerance tests conducted. Insulinaemic responses to a standard glucose load increased 2-fold from baseline to follow-up in the SUR group (17 ± 16 nmol (120 min) l(-1); P = 0.002) whereas there was no change in the SUR+EX group (1 ± 6 nmol (120 min) l(-1)). Seven of 17 genes within adipose tissue were differentially expressed in the SUR group; expression of SREBP-1c, FAS and GLUT4 was significantly up-regulated and expression of PDK4, IRS2, HSL and visfatin was significantly down-regulated (P ≤ 0.05). The pAMPK/AMPK protein ratio in adipose tissue was significantly down-regulated in the SUR group (P = 0.005). Vigorous-intensity exercise counteracted most of the effects of short-term overfeeding and under-activity at the whole-body level and in adipose tissue, even in the face of a standardised energy surplus. PMID:24167223

  8. Effects of polyphenolic antioxidants on exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ruiz, J M; Villegas García, J A; López, F J; Vidal-Guevara, M L; Zafrilla, P

    2006-06-01

    Polyphenols are of increasing interest to consumers and food manufacturers for several reasons. Commonly referred to as antioxidants (they are the most abundant antioxidants in our diets), they may prevent various oxidative stress-related diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammation and others. Physical activity is known to induce oxidative stress in individuals after intensive exercise. In this study, the effect of the flavonoid contents (which are the most abundant polyphenols) was investigated, as the only antioxidant in a replacement drink designed for sportsmen on various oxidative stress biomarkers after two identical trials of sub-maximal aerobic exercise, in a group of 30 sportsmen. In one of the trials, the cyclists consumed the antioxidant supplement (with 2.3g polyphenols/trial), and in another they consumed a placebo. Blood samples were collected both at rest and after exercise immediately and 45 minutes (min) later, for measurements of plasmatic indices of oxidative stress: lipid oxidation (TBARS), total antioxidant status (TAS); protein oxidation (carbonyl groups, CO) and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) enzymes for each trial. All values were adjusted for changes in plasma volume. No changes were detected in plasma TAS and LDH after exercise or after the polyphenolic supplement. CK and TBARS increased after exercise in both tests. However, in response to strenuous exercise, the polyphenol-supplemented test showed a smaller increase in plasma TBARS and CK than the placebo test. CO increased by 12% in response to the placebo test, whereas it decreased by 23% in the polyphenol-supplement test. This may indicate that the antioxidant supplement offered protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress. PMID:16426710

  9. Exercise after heart transplantation: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Nytrøen, Kari; Gullestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    While life expectancy is greatly improved after a heart transplant, survival is still limited, and compared to the general population, the exercise capacity and health-related quality of life of heart transplant recipients are reduced. Increased exercise capacity is associated with a better prognosis. However, although several studies have documented positive effects of exercise after heart transplantation (HTx), little is known about the type, frequency and intensity of exercise that provides the greatest health benefits. Moreover, the long-term effects of exercise on co-morbidities and survival are also unclear. Exercise restrictions apply to patients with a denervated heart, and for decades, it was believed that the transplanted heart remained denervated. This has since been largely disproved, but despite the new knowledge, the exercise restrictions have largely remained, and up-to-date guidelines on exercise prescription after HTx do not exist. High-intensity, interval based aerobic exercise has repeatedly been documented to have superior positive effects and health benefits compared to moderate exercise. This applies to both healthy subjects as well as in several patient groups, such as patients with metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease or heart failure. However, whether the effects of this type of exercise are also applicable to heart transplant populations has not yet been fully established. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of the current knowledge about the exercise capacity and effect of exercise among heart transplant recipients and to discuss future exercise strategies. PMID:24392312

  10. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  11. [Lipid metabolism and exercise].

    PubMed

    Lacour, J R

    2001-06-30

    A high level of physical activity is associated with a lower cardiovascular risk in adult and elderly subjects. Several mechanisms are involved. Physical activity induces an increase in energy output. The contribution of fats to muscle energy metabolism increases with exercise duration. It decreases with exercise intensity. EPOC contributes by about 10% to the total energy cost of exercise. This supplementary energy expenditure is principally covered with fat oxidation, this being related to GH release. Part of energy expended during intermittent exercise is supplied by fat oxidation. The used lipids are taken from the muscular triacylglycerol stores and from the circulating FFA and lipoprotein triacylglycerols. Hydrolysis of triacylglycerols is achieved by LPL. Endurance training induces an increased contribution from fat to the exercise energy need. This results from increased muscle capillary density, enhanced activity of LPL and of the enzymes controlling beta-oxydation. The increased energy expenditure results in a reduced fat mass, which accounts for a decreased plasma triacylglycerol level. Endurance activity requiring approximately an expenditure of 60 kJ.kg-1 per week usually produces favourable lipoprotein changes. Level of post-prandial lipemia is lowered. These alterations disappear within the first two days of recovery. PMID:11505866

  12. Combined exercise training reduces fatigue and modulates the cytokine profile of T-cells from multiple sclerosis patients in response to neuromediators.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga-Filho, Helcio; Sacramento, Priscila M; Ferreira, Thais B; Hygino, Joana; Abreu, Jorge Eduardo Canto; Carvalho, Sonia Regina; Wing, Ana Cristina; Alvarenga, Regina Maria Papais; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2016-04-15

    Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), a classical Th1- and Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. There is no effective pharmacological treatment for fatigue, but some reports point towards beneficial effects of physical activity on management of the fatigue in MS patients. As both MS and fatigue have been associated with dysregulated cytokine network production, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity program consisting of a 12-week series of combining Pilates and aerobic exercises on fatigue severity, determined by FSS, and cytokine production, quantified by ELISA, by T cells from MS patients (n=08) with low disability (EDSS≤2). The results showed decrease in FSSs in all patients at the end of physical activity intervention. Regarding the cytokines, a significant reduction of IL-22 release was observed in polyclonally-activated T cells form MS patients post-training follow-up. Interestingly, while the physical activity attenuated the ability of dopamine in up-regulating Th17-related cytokines, it enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of serotonin, evidenced by high IL-10 production. In summary, all results suggest that programmed physical activity has beneficial effects on management of fatigue in MS patients, and it could be related, at least in part, to its ability in regulating neuroimmune parameters into T cell compartment. PMID:27049568

  13. [Insulin and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Louis-Sylvestre, J

    1987-04-01

    Secretion of some pituitary hormones and sympatho-adrenal activity increase very early during exercise. Sympathetic activation is of major importance in cardiovascular adaptation, thermoregulation, etc. Furthermore among the hormonal consequences of such activation those related to insulin are capital. In animal and human subjects basal insulin level decrease during prolonged and progressive exercise. With habitual exercise, both basal and stimulated insulin levels are reduced. It seems that the reduced basal level could be due to alpha-adrenergic inhibition of the islets of Langerhans, while the reduced stimulated response could be the consequence of increased clearance. In trained subjects, in spite of reduced insulin secretion tolerance to glucose is normal due to increased sensitivity to insulin. Sensitivity to insulin is particularly enhanced at the muscular tissue level; it is accompanied by increased hexokinase and glycogen synthetase activity. As a consequence glucose uptake remains optimal at the muscular level. In the liver, both insulin sensitivity and glucokinase activity are reduced, so that glucose is spared and the muscular glycogen store can be restored. At the adipocyte level, metabolic adaptations are such that triglyceride turnover is greatly increased, favouring fuel supply and resaturation of stores. PMID:3297835

  14. Exercise after myocardial infarction: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carson, P; Phillips, R; Lloyd, M; Tucker, H; Neophytou, M; Buch, N J; Gelson, A; Lawton, A; Simpson, T

    1982-07-01

    Six weeks after acute myocardial infarction, 303 men were randomly divided into exercise and control groups. The exercise group attended the hospital gymnasium twice weekly for a three-month supervised exercise course. Both groups were exercise tested before and after the course and at subsequent follow-up. The exercise group increased their physical fitness greatly compared with the control group. Eight per cent of the exercise group died during the period of follow-up, compared with 14 per cent of the control group; this difference is not significant. There was an apparent improvement in mortality in those with inferior MI who completed the exercise course, which was not seen in those with MI in other sites. For many patients after MI progressive exercise is safe, improves physical fitness and may reduce mortality for those after inferior MI. PMID:7050369

  15. Induction and adaptation of chaperone-assisted selective autophagy CASA in response to resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Anna; Gehlert, Sebastian; Leciejewski, Barbara; Schiffer, Thorsten; Bloch, Wilhelm; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) is a tension-induced degradation pathway essential for muscle maintenance. Impairment of CASA causes childhood muscle dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. However, the importance of CASA for muscle function in healthy individuals has remained elusive so far. Here we describe the impact of strength training on CASA in a group of healthy and moderately trained men. We show that strenuous resistance exercise causes an acute induction of CASA in affected muscles to degrade mechanically damaged cytoskeleton proteins. Moreover, repeated resistance exercise during 4 wk of training led to an increased expression of CASA components. In human skeletal muscle, CASA apparently acts as a central adaptation mechanism that responds to acute physical exercise and to repeated mechanical stimulation. PMID:25714469

  16. Visual system effects of exercise on Mauna Kea at 2,200 and 4,200 meters altitude.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, E T; Gagliano, D L; Santiago-Marini, J

    1997-03-01

    Field exercise studies were performed at two altitudes (2,200 and 4,200 m) in 2 successive years using different sets of young male volunteers. Visual function indices were measured both at sea level and during a strenuous exercise regime at altitude. Volunteers were grouped in the first study by initial rest period (2 days vs. no rest) and in the second by diet (supplemental carbohydrates vs. Meals Ready to Eat rations only). Overall results showed no effect according to grouping, a decrease in average visual acuity at the higher altitude overall, and a decrease in electroretinographic (ERG) photopic flicker responses at moderate altitude. It is concluded that heavy exercise at these altitudes may not have operationally significant effects on ground troops in night vision or target recognition, although the change in ERG parameters does indicate a shift in retinal cone physiology that may have subtler effects. PMID:9121665

  17. No effect of a 30-h period of sleep deprivation on leukocyte trafficking, neutrophil degranulation and saliva IgA responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, J S Costa; Cartner, Louise; Oliver, Samuel J; Laing, Stewart J; Walters, Robert; Bilzon, James L J; Walsh, Neil P

    2009-02-01

    A one night period without sleep is not uncommon amongst athletes travelling across time zones and military personnel during training and operations. However, the effect of one night without sleep on immune indices in response to strenuous exercise remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of one night without sleep on immune indices in response to subsequent strenuous exercise. Using a repeated measures cross-over design, on one occasion eleven male participants slept normally (CON) and on another they were sleep deprived for 30 h (SDEP). After 30 h participants performed 30 min steady state (SS) treadmill exercise at 60% VO2max followed by a 30 min treadmill time trial (TT). Blood and saliva samples were collected at 0 h, 30 h, post-SS, post-TT, 2 h post-TT and 18 h post-TT. Circulating leukocyte and T-lymphocyte subset counts, bacterially-stimulated neutrophil degranulation, saliva secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) and plasma cortisol were determined. No trial x time interactions were observed for immune indices and plasma cortisol. A leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and lymphocytosis was observed post-TT compared with 30 h (P < 0.01). Also, at post-TT compared with 30 h an increase in circulating T-lymphocyte CD3 + (55%) and CD8 + (67%) counts (P < 0.05), a decrease in neutrophil degranulation (20%; P < 0.05) and an increase in S-IgA concentration (83%) was observed (P < 0.01). Plasma cortisol concentration increased post-TT (62%) compared with post-SS (P < 0.01). In conclusion, a 30 h period of sleep deprivation does not alter leukocyte trafficking, neutrophil degranulation or S-IgA responses either at rest or after submaximal and strenuous exercise. PMID:19018559

  18. Metformin and Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Boulé, Normand G.; Robert, Cheri; Bell, Gordon J.; Johnson, Steven T.; Bell, Rhonda C.; Lewanczuk, Richard Z.; Gabr, Raniah Q.; Brocks, Dion R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of metformin on the acute metabolic response to submaximal exercise, the effect of exercise on plasma metformin concentrations, and the interaction between metformin and exercise on the subsequent response to a standardized meal. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this randomized crossover study. Metformin or placebo was given for 28 days, followed by the alternate condition for 28 days. On the last 2 days of each condition, participants were assessed during a nonexercise and a subsequent exercise day. Exercise took place in the morning and involved a total of 35 min performed at three different submaximal intensities. RESULTS Metformin increased heart rate and plasma lactate during exercise (both P ≤ 0.01) but lowered respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.03) without affecting total energy expenditure, which suggests increased fat oxidation. Metformin plasma concentrations were greater at several, but not all, time points on the exercise day compared with the nonexercise day. The glycemic response to a standardized meal was reduced by metformin, but the reduction was attenuated when exercise was added (metformin × exercise interaction, P = 0.05). Glucagon levels were highest in the combined exercise and metformin condition. CONCLUSIONS This study reveals several ways by which metformin and exercise therapies can affect each other. By increasing heart rate, metformin could lead to the prescription of lower exercise workloads. Furthermore, under the tested conditions, exercise interfered with the glucose-lowering effect of metformin. PMID:21602430

  19. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence with Weight Loss, a Vanguard Trial: The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Cheryl L.; Byers, Tim E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Elias, Anthony; Krontiras, Helen; Liu, Jingxia; Naughton, Michael; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Wyatt, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer among women in developed countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and mortality in both pre-and postmenopausal women. Co-morbid medical conditions are common among breast cancer survivors. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is a 4-year randomized clinical trial of 693 overweight/obese women aged ≥21 years diagnosed with any early stage breast cancer (stages I[≥1 cm]-III) within the previous five years, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving sustained weight loss and to examine the impact of weight loss on quality of life and co-morbidities, and to enable future exploration of biochemical mechanisms linking obesity to lower likelihood of disease-free survival. This trial is strategically designed as a vanguard for a fully-powered trial of women who will be evaluated for breast cancer recurrence and disease-free survival. Participants were recruited between 2010 and 2012 at four sites, had completed initial therapies, and had a body mass index between 25 and 45 kg/m2. The intervention featured a group-based cognitive-behavioral weight loss program with telephone counseling and tailored newsletters to support initial weight loss and subsequent maintenance, with the goal of 7% weight loss at two years. This study has high potential to have a major impact on clinical management and outcomes after a breast cancer diagnosis. This trial initiates the effort to establish weight loss support for overweight or obese breast cancer survivors as a new standard of clinical care. PMID:23266440

  20. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  1. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  2. Validation of a stages of exercise change questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dannecker, Erin A; Hausenblas, Heather A; Connaughton, Daniel P; Lovins, Timm R

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine evidence for the validity of a stages of change measure of the Transtheoretical Model for exercise behavior. Participants were 152 university students (53.3% women, 71.6% Caucasian, M age = 19.18 years) who completed processes of change, self-efficacy, decisional balance, stages of change, and exercise behavior questionnaires as well as a maximal treadmill test. Participants in the action and maintenance stages had the highest strenuous (PC/C/P < A/M) and moderate (PC/C < A/M) self-reported exercise behavior. Those in the maintenance stage had the highest estimated aerobic fitness (PC/P < MA). The differences between the early stages (PC, C, and P) and the later stages (A and M) as described by the first function were primarily due to the behavioral process of change. The differences between the extreme stages (PC and M) and the middle stages (C, P, and A) were due to the experiential processes of change and the pros of decisional balance. The hypothesized patterns of stage differences were partially supported. Failure to obtain full support may have been due to methodological issues or inherent difficulties in detecting evidence for the validity of stages of change measures. PMID:14510288

  3. Exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D A

    1993-05-01

    Bronchoconstriction associated with exercise can occur in nearly all individuals with asthma and in 35-40% of those with allergic rhinitis/hay fever symptoms. This represents approximately 12-15% of the population. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by transient airflow obstruction typically 5-15 min after cessation of physical exertion. Symptoms may include chest tightness, breathlessness, coughing, and/or wheezing. Some individuals may experience delayed bronchoconstriction (late phase response) 6-10 h after completing exercise. Approximately 40-50% of those with asthma exhibit a "refractory period", i.e., diminished bronchoconstriction to exercise performed within 2 h. The pathophysiology of EIA is related to thermal events within the intrathoracic airways. Alterations in the temperature of the airways and/or osmolarity in the epithelial lining fluid cause release of mediators in the airways and the development of bronchoconstriction. Although EIA can be strongly suspected by an appropriate history, pulmonary function testing is necessary to make a specific diagnosis. Measurement of lung function is an important first diagnostic test. If there is no evidence of airflow obstruction at rest, then either bronchoprovocation testing or exercise challenge testing is indicated. Nonpharmacologic therapy includes "warm-up" exercise prior to training or competition to induce a "refractory period" and to prevent/reduce bronchoconstriction. An inhaled beta 2-adrenergic agonist, e.g., albuterol, is usually effective for preventing/treating EIA. Cromolyn sodium is an alternative class of medication that inhibits both the early and late phase responses. Other bronchodilator agents are available if combination therapy with an inhaled beta 2-adrenergic agonist and cromolyn sodium is not effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8492682

  4. [Exercise addiction].

    PubMed

    Petit, A; Lejoyeux, M

    2013-01-01

    Socially valorised, sport like other forms of behaviour, can take on an addictive aspect. A review of the English and French literatures from 1979 to 2012 was conducted, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following key words alone or combined :sport, dependence, exercise, addiction. Exercise dependence is defined as a craving for physical activity that leads to extreme exercise intensity and generates physiological and psychological symptoms. Measurement scales have been proposed to make the diagnosis. No epidemiological studies have examined the prevalence of exercise dependence in the general population, although some studies suggest a frequency ranging from 10 to 80%. Disorders begin with a search for pleasure in physical effort, which then gives way to an obsession for sport resulting in a need to practice a sport more and more frequently and intensely. This addiction is more common among alcohol and illicit drug addicts than among the general population, while the rate of eating disorders can reach 40%. Personality traits most often associated are perfectionism, extraversion, and sensation seeking, while possible links between sporting activity and intensive doping will be discussed. PMID:23888586

  5. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  6. Neuroendocrine mediators in the modulation of phagocytosis by exercise: physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Neuroendocrine mediation of the effects of exercise on macrophage and neutrophil phagocytosis, the organism's first line of defense against external aggression, is reviewed. Exercise modulates the immune system via the actions of "stress hormones". Although stress had long been regarded as generally immunosuppressive, it is now accepted that this is not always true. Indeed exercise-induced stress stimulates the "phagocytic process" of phagocytes. One of the new physiological interpretations emerging from recent studies is that the general stimulation of phagocytosis and other innate mechanisms during strenuous physical activity may counterbalance the decreased lymphoid activity, preventing the entry and survival of microorganisms in situations where the specific responses are depressed. In some cases this behaviour is also medicated by "stress hormones", unlike in lymphocytes in which glucocorticoids and catecholamines both are immunosuppressive. The mediatory role of glucocorticoids in macrophages may also differ between the non-specific functions, like chemotaxis and phagocytosis, and the more specific ones, like antigen-presentation. Neutrophils and monocytes may be stimulated by catecholamines or sympathetic signals, and variations in phagocytosis and catecholamines have been proposed as a good "neuroimmuno-endocrinological marker" in athletes. Other hormones (prolactin, GH, endorphins, thyroid hormones) in general also contribute to the effects of exercise-stress on phagocytosis. This review focuses on a physiological interpretation of the immune response to exercise which differs markedly from the classical immunosuppression-centered view. More studies on in vivo variations of stress hormones during exercise are needed. PMID:14686096

  7. Endurance Exercise Diverts the Balance between Th17 Cells and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bdolach, Nir; Hazan-Halevi, Inbal; Kay, Sigi; Berr, Idit; Reches, Adi; Harishanu, Yair; Grisaru, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Endurance, marathon-type exertion is known to induce adverse changes in the immune system. Increased airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation are well documented in endurance athletes and endurance exercise is considered a major risk factor for asthma in elite athletes. Yet, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still to be deduced. We studied the effect of strenuous endurance exercise (marathon and half-ironman triathlon) on CD4+ lymphocyte sub-populations and on the balance between effector and regulatory CD4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of trained athletes, Endurance exercise induced a significant increase in Th17 cells and a sustained decrease in peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Tregs). While interleukin (IL)-2 levels remained undetectable, post-race serum IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF) β levels were significantly elevated. Treg levels in sedentary controls' decreased in vitro after incubation with athletes' post-exercise serum, an effect that was attenuated by supplements of IL-2 or anti IL-6 neutralizing antibodies. Our data suggest that exercise-induced changes in serum cytokine levels promote alterations in Tregs and Th17 cell populations, which may divert the subtle balance in the immune system towards inflammation. This may explain allergic and autoimmune phenomena previously reported in endurance athletes and contribute to our understanding of exercise-related asthma. PMID:24130669

  8. Exercise with prebreathe appears to increase protection from decompression sickness: Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Fischer, Michele D.; Heaps, Cristine L.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1994-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Space Shuttle involves one hour of prebreath with 100% oxygen, decompression of the entire Shuttle to 10.2 psia for at least 12 hours, and another prebreath for 40 minutes before decompression to the 4.3 psia suit pressure. We are investigating the use of a one-hour prebreathe with 100% oxygen beginning with a ten-minute strenuous exercise period as an alternative for the staged decompression schedule described above. The 10-minute exercise consists of dual-cycle ergometry performed at 75% of the subject's peak oxygen uptake to increase denitrogenation efficiency by increasing ventilation and perfusion. The control exposures were preceded by a one-hour prebreathe with 100% oxygen while resting in a supine position. The twenty-two male subjects were exposed to 4.3 psia for 4 hours while performing light to moderate exercise. Preliminary results from 22 of the planned 26 subjects indicate 76% DCS following supine, resting prebreathe and 38% following prebreathe with exercise. The staged decompression schedule has been shown to result in 23% DCS which is not significantly different from the exercise-enhanced prebreathe results. Prebreathe including exercise appears to be comparable to the protection afforded by the more lengthy staged decompression schedule. Completion of the study later this year will enable planned statistical analysis of the results.

  9. Exercise Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Sharman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of apparent ‘normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men or ≥190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ≥110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a ‘hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory ‘masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE. PMID:26587435

  10. Exercise Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Sharman, James E

    2014-05-01

    Irrespective of apparent 'normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ?210 mm Hg in men or ?190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ?110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a 'hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory 'masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE. PMID:26587435

  11. Regular physical exercise: way to healthy life.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Nessa, A; Hossain, M A

    2010-01-01

    Any bodily activity or movement that enhances and maintains overall health and physical fitness is called physical exercise. Habit of regular physical exercise has got numerous benefits. Exercise is of various types such as aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise and flexibility exercise. Aerobic exercise moves the large muscle groups with alternate contraction and relaxation, forces to deep breath, heart to pump more blood with adequate tissue oxygenation. It is also called cardiovascular exercise. Examples of aerobic exercise are walking, running, jogging, swimming etc. In anaerobic exercise, there is forceful contraction of muscle with stretching, usually mechanically aided and help to build up muscle strength and muscle bulk. Examples are weight lifting, pulling, pushing, sprinting etc. Flexibility exercise is one type of stretching exercise to improve the movements of muscles, joints and ligaments. Walking is a good example of aerobic exercise, easy to perform, safe, effective, does not require any training or equipment and less chance of injury. Regular 30 minutes brisk walking in the morning with 150 minutes per week is a good exercise. Regular exercise improves the cardiovascular status, reduces the risk of cardiac disease, high blood pressure and cerebrovascular disease. It reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity, helps in glycemic control, prevents obesity and diabetes mellitus. It is helpful for relieving anxiety, stress, brings a sense of well being and overall physical fitness. Global trend is mechanization, labor savings and leading to epidemic of long term chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases etc. All efforts should be made to create public awareness promoting physical activity, physically demanding recreational pursuits and providing adequate facilities. PMID:20046192

  12. Human pharmacology of a performance-enhancing dietary supplement under resting and exercise conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Christine A; Duan, Minjing; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal

    2008-01-01

    AIMS Dietary supplements (DS) promoted to enhance athletic performance often contain herbal sympathomimetics such as Citrus aurantium (synephrine) and caffeine. We aimed to characterize the pharmacology of a performance-enhancing DS in the setting of exercise. METHODS Ten healthy adults (three women) aged 20–31 years participated in a three-arm, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Subjects ingested one dose of DS (Ripped Fuel Extreme Cut® with 21 mg synephrine and 304 mg caffeine by analysis) under resting conditions and 1 h prior to moderately intense exercise (30 min on cycle ergometer at 75–80% HRmax), with a placebo (PLC)/exercise control. Plasma synephrine and caffeine concentrations were measured over 12 h, and vital signs, serum electrolytes, oxygen consumption and perceived exercise exertion were monitored. RESULTS No significant adverse events occurred. Synephrine and caffeine pharmacokinetics were unaffected by exercise. Post-exercise diastolic blood pressure was higher after DS (peak mean 71.7 ± 8.7 mmHg) than PLC (63.0 ± 4.9 mmHg) (p = 0.007). There were no substantial treatment-related differences in post-exercise HR, systolic blood pressure, or temperature. Postprandial plasma glucose increased to 121.0 ± 31.6 mg dl−1 with DS and exercise vs. 103.7 ± 25.5 mg dl−1 with PLC and exercise (P = 0.004). No treatment differences in exercise-related oxygen consumption, serum lactate, or insulin were observed. Exercise was rated less difficult with DS than PLC (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Blood pressure and plasma glucose increased post-exercise with DS use, which could be detrimental in some people. Exercise was perceived as less strenuous after DS, presumably due to the stimulant effects of caffeine. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Performance-enhancing dietary supplements have not been clinically tested for safety or efficacy. In clinical trials performed under resting conditions, performance-enhancing supplements raise blood pressure and affect glucose homeostasis. The effect of exercise on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of stimulant herbals is unknown. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Supplement-induced effects on blood pressure and glucose levels are not ameliorated by exercise.Exercise does not affect the kinetics of stimulant ingredients, caffeine and synephrine.Performance-enhancing supplement use modestly improves exercise tolerance. PMID:18341680

  13. Appearance-based exercise motivation moderates the relationship between exercise frequency and positive body image.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Tylka, Tracy L

    2014-03-01

    Individuals with a positive body image appreciate their bodies, hold an internal perspective of their bodies, and are satisfied with the functionality of their bodies. Research shows that positive body image is more complex than the absence of body dissatisfaction. Although exercise reduces women's body dissatisfaction, very little research has explored how, or even whether, exercise is associated with positive body image. Therefore, we examined whether exercise frequency was positively related to three aspects of positive body image (body appreciation, internal body orientation, and functional body satisfaction) among 321 college women. Appearance-based exercise motivation (the extent exercise is pursued to influence weight or shape) was hypothesized to moderate these associations. Hierarchical moderated regression analyses showed that exercise frequency was related to higher positive body image, but high levels of appearance-based exercise motivation weakened these relationships. Thus, messages promoting exercise need to de-emphasize weight loss and appearance for positive body image. PMID:24529336

  14. Acute Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Stress Triggers an Inflammatory Response in the Myocardium via NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation with Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Miao, Weiguo; Ma, Jingfen; Xv, Zhen; Bo, Hai; Li, Jianyu; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that acute strenuous exercise can induce a range of adverse reactions including oxidative stress and tissue inflammation. However, little is currently known regarding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of the inflammatory response in the myocardium during acute heavy exercise. This study evaluated the mitochondrial function, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins to investigate the regulation and mechanism of mitochondrial stress regarding the inflammatory response of the rat myocardium during acute heavy exercise. The results indicated that the mitochondrial function of the myocardium was adaptively regulated to meet the challenge of stress during acute exercise. The exercise-induced mitochondrial stress also enhanced ROS generation and triggered an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins including Beclin1, LC3, and Bnip3 were all significantly upregulated during acute exercise, which suggests that mitophagy was stimulated in response to the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the myocardium. Taken together, our data suggest that, during acute exercise, mitochondrial stress triggers the rat myocardial inflammatory response via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and activates mitophagy to minimize myocardial injury. PMID:26770647

  15. Effects of Pulse Current on Endurance Exercise and Its Anti-Fatigue Properties in the Hepatic Tissue of Trained Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaowei; Zhu, Lvgang; Huang, Changlin; Huang, Tao; Zuo, Xincheng; Gao, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is synonymous with a wide spectrum of familiar physiological conditions, from pathology and general health, to sport and physical exercise. Strenuous, prolonged exercise training causes fatigue. Although several studies have investigated the effects of electrical stimulation frequency on muscle fatigue, the effects of percutaneous pulse current stimulation on fatigue in the hepatic tissue of trained rats is still unclear. In order to find an effective strategy to prevent fatigue or enhance recovery, the effects of pulse current on endurance exercise and its anti-fatigue properties in exercised rats were studied. Rats were subjected to one, three or five weeks of swimming exercise training. After exercise training, rats in the treated group received daily applications of pulse current. All rats were sacrificed after one, three or five weeks of swimming exercise, and the major biochemical indexes were measured in serum and liver. The results demonstrate that pulse current could prolong the exhaustion swimming time, as well as decrease serum ALT, AST and LD levels and liver MDA content. It also elevated serum LDH activity, liver SOD activity and glycogen content. Furthermore, pulse current increased the expression of Bcl-2 and decreased the expression of Bax. Taken together, these results show that pulse current can elevate endurance capacity and facilitate recovery from fatigue. PMID:24116026

  16. Acute Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Stress Triggers an Inflammatory Response in the Myocardium via NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation with Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiying; Miao, Weiguo; Ma, Jingfen; Xv, Zhen; Li, Jianyu; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that acute strenuous exercise can induce a range of adverse reactions including oxidative stress and tissue inflammation. However, little is currently known regarding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of the inflammatory response in the myocardium during acute heavy exercise. This study evaluated the mitochondrial function, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins to investigate the regulation and mechanism of mitochondrial stress regarding the inflammatory response of the rat myocardium during acute heavy exercise. The results indicated that the mitochondrial function of the myocardium was adaptively regulated to meet the challenge of stress during acute exercise. The exercise-induced mitochondrial stress also enhanced ROS generation and triggered an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, the mitochondrial autophagy-related proteins including Beclin1, LC3, and Bnip3 were all significantly upregulated during acute exercise, which suggests that mitophagy was stimulated in response to the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the myocardium. Taken together, our data suggest that, during acute exercise, mitochondrial stress triggers the rat myocardial inflammatory response via NLRP3 inflammasome activation and activates mitophagy to minimize myocardial injury. PMID:26770647

  17. Exercise-induced lactate accumulation regulates intramuscular triglyceride metabolism via transforming growth factor-β1 mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Nikooie, Rohollah; Samaneh, Sajadian

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism regulating the utilization of intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) during high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and post-exercise recovery period remains elusive. In this study, the acute and long-term effects of HIIT on transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) abundance in rat skeletal muscle and role of lactate and TGF-β1 in IMTG lipolysis during post-exercise recovery period were examined. TGF-β1 and Adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) abundance as well as total lipase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle significantly increased to a maximum value 10 h after acute bout of HIIT. Inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling by intramuscular injection of SB431542 30 min prior to the acute exercise attenuated ATGL abundance and total lipase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle in response to acute exercise. Intramuscular acute injection of lactate increased TGF-β1 and ATGL abundance in the gastrocnemius muscle and there were a significant increase in Muscle TGF-β1 and ATGL abundance after 5 weeks of HIIT/lactate treatment. These results indicate that exercise-induced lactate accumulation regulates intramuscular triglyceride metabolism via transforming growth factor-β1 mediated pathways during post-exercise recovery from strenuous exercise. PMID:26522131

  18. Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Transgenic Wheat (Triticum aestivum) with Reduced Levels of ω5-Gliadins, the Major Sensitizing Allergen in Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Susan B; Tanaka, Charlene K; Pineau, Florence; Lupi, Roberta; Drouet, Martine; Beaudouin, Etienne; Morisset, Martine; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-10-28

    The ω5-gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which ω5-gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interference. Sera from 7 of 11 WDEIA patients showed greatly reduced levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to ω5-gliadins in both transgenic lines. However, these sera also showed low levels of reactivity to other gluten proteins. Sera from three patients showed the greatest reactivity to proteins other than ω5-gliadins, either high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), α-gliadins, or non-gluten proteins. The complexity of immunological responses among these patients suggests that flour from the transgenic lines would not be suitable for individuals already diagnosed with WDEIA. However, the introduction of wheat lacking ω5-gliadins could reduce the number of people sensitized to these proteins and thereby decrease the overall incidence of this serious food allergy. PMID:26447559

  19. Exercise May Lower Heart Disease Risk in Depressed People: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_156628.html Exercise May Lower Heart Disease Risk in Depressed People: Study Regular activity linked ... News) -- Exercise may reduce the chances of developing heart disease for people with depression, a new study suggests. ...

  20. Exercise Is Good for You, Even in Polluted Cities: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158686.html Exercise Is Good for You, Even in Polluted Cities: ... the same time as supporting physical activity." Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes and ...

  1. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlicher, Sarah E.; Drake, Joshua C.; Peelor, Frederick F.; Biela, Laurie M.; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using 2H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training. PMID:25614602

  2. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Ehrlicher, Sarah E; Drake, Joshua C; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-04-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using (2)H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training. PMID:25614602

  3. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term studies on…

  4. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes. PMID:12834577

  5. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... reduce the pressure in your nose. Avoid strenuous exercise for the first 2 weeks after surgery. Also ...

  6. Exercise-Induced Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Exercise-induced Urticaria Overview What is exercise-induced urticaria? Exercise-induced urticaria is a condition that causes hives and other allergic symptoms. It can occur during ...

  7. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  8. Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise videos/DVDs made for older people. • Add music to the exercises if it helps the person with Alzheimer’s disease. Dance to the music if possible. • Break exercises into simple, easy-to- ...

  9. Exercise and Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... strength training and some cardiovascular exercise is weight bearing. This means that, during exercise, your body is ... women. Water aerobics, however, is not a weight-bearing exercise and will not help prevent osteoporosis. Glossary ...

  10. Food-dependent, exercise-induced gastrointestinal distress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among athletes strenuous exercise, dehydration and gastric emptying (GE) delay are the main causes of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints, whereas gut ischemia is the main cause of their nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and (blood) diarrhea. Additionally any factor that limits sweat evaporation, such as a hot and humid environment and/or body dehydration, has profound effects on muscle glycogen depletion and risk for heat illness. A serious underperfusion of the gut often leads to mucosal damage and enhanced permeability so as to hide blood loss, microbiota invasion (or endotoxemia) and food-born allergen absorption (with anaphylaxis). The goal of exercise rehydration is to intake more fluid orally than what is being lost in sweat. Sports drinks provide the addition of sodium and carbohydrates to assist with intestinal absorption of water and muscle-glycogen replenishment, respectively. However GE is proportionally slowed by carbohydrate-rich (hyperosmolar) solutions. On the other hand, in order to prevent hyponatremia, avoiding overhydration is recommended. Caregiver's responsibility would be to inform athletes about potential dangers of drinking too much water and also advise them to refrain from using hypertonic fluid replacements. PMID:21955383

  11. Work, exercise, and space flight. 3: Exercise devices and protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William

    1989-01-01

    Preservation of locomotor capacity by earth equivalent, exercise in space is the crucial component of inflight exercise. At this time the treadmill appears to be the only way possible to do this. Work is underway on appropriate hardware but this and a proposed protocol to reduce exercise time must be tested. Such exercise will preserve muscle, bone Ca(++) and cardiovascular-respiratory capacity. In addition, reasonable upper body exercise can be supplied by a new force generator/measurement system-optional exercise might include a rowing machine and bicycle ergometer. A subject centered monitoring-evaluation program will allow real time adjustments as required. Absolute protection for any astronaut will not be possible and those with hypertrophied capacities such as marathoners or weight lifters will suffer significant loss. However, the program described should return the crew to earth with adequate capacity of typical activity on earth including immediate ambulation and minimal recovery time and without permanent change. An understanding of the practical mechanics and biomechanics involved is essential to a solution of the problem.

  12. Astragalus membranaceus improves exercise performance and ameliorates exercise-induced fatigue in trained mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2014-01-01

    Astragalus membranaceus (AM) is a popular "Qi-tonifying" herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group) for treatment: (1) sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control); (2) exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control); and (3) exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1) or (4) 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5). Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training. PMID:24595275

  13. High altitude, prolonged exercise, and the athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Yorck O; Garvican, Laura A; Christian, Ryan; Lobigs, Louisa M; Qi, Jiliang; Fan, Rongyun; He, Yingying; Wang, Hailing; Gore, Christopher J; Ma, Fuhai

    2015-01-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) detects blood doping in athletes through longitudinal monitoring of erythropoietic markers. Mathematical algorithms are used to define individual reference ranges for these markers for each athlete. It is unclear if altitude and exercise can affect the variables included in these calculations in a way that the changes might be mistaken for blood manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the simultaneous strenuous exercise and low to high altitude exposure on the calculation algorithms of the ABP. 14 sea level (SL) and 11 altitude native (ALT) highly trained athletes participated in a 14-day cycling stage race taking place at an average altitude of 2496 m above sea level (min. 1014 m, max. 4120 m), race distances ranged between 96 and 227 km per day. ABP blood measures were taken on days -1,3,6,10,14 (SL) and -1,9,15 (ALT) of the race. Four results from three samples of two different SL athletes exceeded the individual limits at the 99% specificity threshold and one value at 99.9%. In ALT, three results from three samples of three different athletes were beyond the individual limits at 99%, one at 99.9%. The variations could be explained by the expected physiological reaction to exercise and altitude. In summary, the abnormalities observed in the haematological ABP´s of well-trained athletes during extensive exercise at altitude are limited and in line with expected physiological changes. PMID:25252093

  14. RNA sequencing of the exercise transcriptome in equine athletes.

    PubMed

    Capomaccio, Stefano; Vitulo, Nicola; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Barcaccia, Gianni; Albiero, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Michela; Campagna, Davide; Valle, Giorgio; Felicetti, Michela; Silvestrelli, Maurizio; Cappelli, Katia

    2013-01-01

    The horse is an optimal model organism for studying the genomic response to exercise-induced stress, due to its natural aptitude for athletic performance and the relative homogeneity of its genetic and environmental backgrounds. Here, we applied RNA-sequencing analysis through the use of SOLiD technology in an experimental framework centered on exercise-induced stress during endurance races in equine athletes. We monitored the transcriptional landscape by comparing gene expression levels between animals at rest and after competition. Overall, we observed a shift from coding to non-coding regions, suggesting that the stress response involves the differential expression of not annotated regions. Notably, we observed significant post-race increases of reads that correspond to repeats, especially the intergenic and intronic L1 and L2 transposable elements. We also observed increased expression of the antisense strands compared to the sense strands in intronic and regulatory regions (1 kb up- and downstream) of the genes, suggesting that antisense transcription could be one of the main mechanisms for transposon regulation in the horse under stress conditions. We identified a large number of transcripts corresponding to intergenic and intronic regions putatively associated with new transcriptional elements. Gene expression and pathway analysis allowed us to identify several biological processes and molecular functions that may be involved with exercise-induced stress. Ontology clustering reflected mechanisms that are already known to be stress activated (e.g., chemokine-type cytokines, Toll-like receptors, and kinases), as well as "nucleic acid binding" and "signal transduction activity" functions. There was also a general and transient decrease in the global rates of protein synthesis, which would be expected after strenuous global stress. In sum, our network analysis points toward the involvement of specific gene clusters in equine exercise-induced stress, including those involved in inflammation, cell signaling, and immune interactions. PMID:24391776

  15. The role of antioxidant vitamins and enzymes in the prevention of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, J C; van Doornen, L J; Kemper, H C

    1996-03-01

    A growing amount of evidence indicates that free radicals play an important role as mediators of skeletal muscle damage and inflammation after strenuous exercise. It has been postulated that the generation of oxygen free radicals is increased during exercise as a result of increases in mitochondrial oxygen consumption and electron transport flux, inducing lipid peroxidation. The literature suggests that dietary antioxidants are able to detoxify the peroxides produced during exercise, which could otherwise result in lipid peroxidation, and that they are capable of scavenging peroxyl radicals and therefore may prevent muscle damage. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes also play a protective role in the process of lipid peroxidation. The studies reviewed (rodent and human) show significant increases of malondialdehyde (a product of lipid peroxidation) after exercise to exhaustion, and also favourable changes in plasma antioxidant levels and in antioxidant enzyme activity. In trained individuals and trained rats, the antioxidant enzyme activity increases markedly. In this way, the increased oxidative stress induced by exercise is compromised by increased antioxidant activity, preventing lipid peroxidation. Human studies have shown that dietary supplementation with antioxidant vitamins has favourable effects on lipid peroxidation after exercise. Although several points of discussion still exist, the question whether antioxidant vitamins and antioxidant enzymes play a protective role in exercise-induced muscle damage can be answered affirmatively. The human studies reviewed indicate that antioxidant vitamin supplementation can be recommended to individuals performing regular heavy exercise. Moreover, trained individuals have an advantage compared with untrained individuals, as training results in increased activity of several major antioxidant enzymes and overall antioxidant status. However, future studies are needed in order to be able to give more specific information and recommendations on this topic. PMID:8776010

  16. Exercise Responses after Inactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1986-01-01

    The exercise response after bed rest inactivity is a reduction in the physical work capacity and is manifested by significant decreases in oxygen uptake. The magnitude of decrease in maximal oxygen intake V(dot)O2max is related to the duration of confinement and the pre-bed-rest level of aerobic fitness; these relationships are relatively independent of age and gender. The reduced exercise performance and V(dot)O2max following bed rest are associated with various physiological adaptations including reductions in blood volume, submaximal and maximal stroke volume, maximal cardiac output, sceletal muscle tone and strength, and aerobic enzyme capacities, as well as increases in venous compliance and submaximal and maximal heart rate. This reduction in physiological capacity can be partially restored by specific countermeasures that provide regular muscular activity or orhtostatic stress or both during the bed rest exposure. The understanding of these physiological and physical responses to exercise following bed rest inactivity has important implications for the solution to safety and health problems that arise in clinical medicine, aerospace medicine, sedentary living, and aging.

  17. alpha-Lipoic acid modulates thiol antioxidant defenses and attenuates exercise-induced oxidative stress in standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Susanna; Oksala, Niku; Hyyppä, Seppo; Sen, Chandan K; Radak, Zsolt; Laaksonen, David E; Szabó, Bernadett; Jakus, Judit; Atalay, Mustafa

    2009-08-01

    Several micronutrient supplementation strategies are used to cope with oxidative stress, although their benefits have recently been questioned. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of DL-alpha-lipoic acid (LA) in response to acute exercise and during recovery in horses. Six standardbred trotters were tested on the treadmill before and after 5-week LA supplementation (25 mg/kg body weight/day). According to electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, strenuous aerobic exercise increased significantly free radical formation in the gluteus medius muscle, which was prevented by LA supplementation. The activities of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in muscle were significantly increased in LA-treated horses, but neither LA nor exercise affected muscle thioredoxin activity. LA increased the concentration of total glutathione in muscle at rest and during recovery. Treatment with LA blunted the exercise-induced increase in plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity and decreased the post-exercise levels of lipid hydroperoxides in plasma and malondialdehyde in plasma and in muscle. These findings suggest that LA enhances thiol antioxidant defences and decreases exercise-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle. PMID:19548154

  18. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  19. Epigenetic adaptation to regular exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ling, Charlotte; Rönn, Tina

    2014-07-01

    Regular exercise has numerous health benefits, for example, it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. It has also been shown that the risk of type 2 diabetes can be halved in high-risk groups through nonpharmacological lifestyle interventions involving exercise and diet. Nevertheless, the number of people living a sedentary life is dramatically increasing worldwide. Researchers have searched for molecular mechanisms explaining the health benefits of regular exercise for decades and it is well established that exercise alters the gene expression pattern in multiple tissues. However, until recently it was unknown that regular exercise can modify the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in humans. This review will focus on recent progress in the field of regular exercise and epigenetics. PMID:24632002

  20. Exercise, free radicals and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C E; Vollaard, N B; Choueiri, T; Wilson, M T

    2002-04-01

    This article reviews the role of free radicals in causing oxidative stress during exercise. High intensity exercise induces oxidative stress and although there is no evidence that this affects sporting performance in the short term, it may have longer term health consequences. The mechanisms of exercise-induced oxidative stress are not well understood. Mitochondria are sometimes considered to be the main source of free radicals, but in vitro studies suggest they may play a more minor role than was first thought. There is a growing acceptance of the importance of haem proteins in inducing oxidative stress. The release of metmyoglobin from damaged muscle is known to cause renal failure in exercise rhabdomyolysis. Furthermore, levels of methaemoglobin increase during high intensity exercise, while levels of antioxidants, such as reduced glutathione, decrease. We suggest that the free-radical-mediated damage caused by the interaction of metmyoglobin and methaemoglobin with peroxides may be an important source of oxidative stress during exercise. PMID:12023865

  1. Exercise-related hypoglycemia in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Younk, Lisa M; Mikeladze, Maia; Tate, Donna; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-01-01

    Current recommendations are that people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus exercise regularly. However, in cases in which insulin or insulin secretagogues are used to manage diabetes, patients have an increased risk of developing hypoglycemia, which is amplified during and after exercise. Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia blunt autonomic nervous system, neuroendocrine and metabolic defenses (counter-regulatory responses) against subsequent episodes of falling blood glucose levels during exercise. Likewise, antecedent exercise blunts counter-regulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia. This can lead to a vicious cycle, by which each episode of either exercise or hypoglycemia further blunts counter-regulatory responses. Although contemporary insulin therapies cannot fully mimic physiologic changes in insulin secretion, people with diabetes have several management options to avoid hypoglycemia during and after exercise, including regularly monitoring blood glucose, reducing basal and/or bolus insulin, and consuming supplemental carbohydrates. PMID:21339838

  2. Leptin treatment reduces body fat but does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis in lean hypoleptinemic women

    PubMed Central

    Brinkoetter, Mary; Magkos, Faidon; Vamvini, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Animal studies in vivo indicate that leptin treatment in extremely leptin-sensitive ob/ob mice reduces body weight exclusively by reducing fat mass and that it increases muscle mass by downregulating myostatin expression. Data from human trials are limited. Therefore, we aimed at characterizing the effects of leptin administration on fat mass, lean body mass, and circulating regulators of muscle growth in hypoleptinemic and presumably leptin-sensitive human subjects. In an open-label, single-arm trial, seven lean, strenuously exercising, amenorrheic women with low leptin concentrations (≤5 ng/ml) were given recombinant methionyl human leptin (metreleptin; 0.08 mg·kg−1·day−1) for 10 wk. In a separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, seven women were given metreleptin (initial dose: 0.08 mg·kg−1·day−1 for 3 mo, increased thereafter to 0.12 mg·kg−1·day−1 if menstruation did not occur), and six were given placebo for 9 mo. Metreleptin significantly reduced total body fat by an average of 18.6% after 10 wk (P < 0.001) in the single-arm trial and by 19.5% after 9 mo (placebo subtracted; P for interaction = 0.025, P for metreleptin = 0.004) in the placebo-controlled trial. There were no significant changes in lean body mass (P ≥ 0.33) or in serum concentrations of myostatin (P ≥ 0.35), follistatin (P ≥ 0.30), and activin A (P ≥ 0.20) whether in the 10-wk trial or the 9-mo trial. We conclude that metreleptin administration in lean hypoleptinemic women reduces fat mass exclusively and does not affect lean body mass or the myostatin-follistatin-activin axis. PMID:21505147

  3. Dietary carbohydrates and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Evans, W J; Hughes, V A

    1985-05-01

    Antecedent diet can greatly influence both substrate utilization during exercise and exercise performance itself. A number of studies have convincingly demonstrated that short-term (three to seven days) adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet results in greatly reduced liver and muscle glycogen stores. While carbohydrate utilization after such a diet is reduced, the limited glycogen stores can severely limit endurance exercise performance. High carbohydrate diets on the other hand expand carbohydrate stores which can limit performance. However, long-term adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet can greatly alter muscle and whole body energy metabolism to drastically limit the oxidation of limited carbohydrate stores with no adverse effect on performance. Glycogen loading techniques can result in supercompensation of muscle stores. Exercise induced depletion of muscle glycogen is the most important single factor in this phenomenon. Following the exercise a low carbohydrate diet for two to three days after which a high carbohydrate diet is eaten seemingly has the same effect on increasing muscle glycogen stores as simply eating a high carbohydrate diet. The form of the dietary carbohydrate during glycogen loading should be high in complex carbohydrates; however, the type of dietary starch that effects the greatest rate of resynthesis has not been investigated. Rapid resynthesis of glycogen following exercise is at least in part due to increased insulin sensitivity. The enhanced glucose transport caused by the increased sensitivity provides substrate for glycogen synthase. How rapidly this enhanced sensitivity returns to pre-exercise levels in humans is uncertain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3993621

  4. Exercise Versus +Gz Acceleration Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J. M.; Evans, J. M.; Knapp, C. F.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Decreased working capacity and "orthostatic" intolerance are two major problems for astronauts during and after landing from spaceflight in a return vehicle. The purpose was to test the hypotheses that (1) supine-passive-acceleration training, supine-interval-exercise plus acceleration training, and supine exercise plus acceleration training will improve orthostatic tolerance (OT) in ambulatory men; and that (2) addition of aerobic exercise conditioning will not influence this enhanced OT from that of passive-acceleration training. Seven untrained men (24-38 yr) underwent 3 training regimens (30 min/d x 5d/wk x 3wk on the human-powered centrifuge - HPC): (a) Passive acceleration (alternating +1.0 Gz to 50% Gzmax); (b) Exercise acceleration (alternating 40% - 90% V02max leg cycle exercise plus 50% of HPCmax acceleration); and (c) Combined intermittent exercise-acceleration at 40% to 90% HPCmax. Maximal supine exercise workloads increased (P < 0.05) by 8.3% with Passive, by 12.6% with Exercise, and by 15.4% with Combined; but maximal V02 and HR were unchanged in all groups. Maximal endurance (time to cessation) was unchanged with Passive, but increased (P < 0.05) with Exercise and Combined. Resting pre-tilt HR was elevated by 12.9% (P < 0.05) only after Passive training, suggesting that exercise training attenuated this HR response. All resting pre-tilt blood pressures (SBP, DBP, MAP) were not different pre- vs. post-training. Post-training tilt-tolerance time and HR were increased (P < 0.05) only with Passive training by 37.8% and by 29.1%, respectively. Thus, addition of exercise training attenuated the increased Passive tilt tolerance. Resting (pre-tilt) and post-tilt cardiac R-R interval, stroke volume, end-diastolic volume, and cardiac output were all uniformly reduced (P < 0.05) while peripheral resistance was uniformly increased (P < 0.05) pre-and post-training for the three regimens indicating no effect of any training regimen on those cardiovascular variables. Plasma volume (% delta) was uniformly decreased by 8% to 14% (P < 0.05) at tilt-tolerance pre- vs. post-training for all regimens indicating no effect of these training regimens on the level of vascular fluid shifts.

  5. WATER EXERCISE COMPARED TO LAND EXERCISE OR STANDARD CARE IN FEMALE CANCER SURVIVORS WITH SECONDARY LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, H; Enblom, A; Dunberger, G; Nyberg, T; Bergmark, K

    2015-06-01

    There are few studies showing that physical exercise can improve secondary lymphedema. We hypothesized that water exercise would be more effective than land exercise in reducing limb volume. Secondary objectives were joint movement, BMI, daily function, well-being, and body image. Limb volume was measured with circumference or was volumetric. Well-being and body image were measured with a study-specific questionnaire and daily function with DASH and HOOS questionnaires. Eighty-eight eligible patients with secondary lymphedema after breast or gynecological cancer participated in this controlled clinical intervention study. There was a higher proportion of women who participated in water exercises who reduced their secondary arm limb volume (p = 0.029), and there were also significant differences for BMI (p = 0.047) and self-reported frequency of swelling (p = 0.031) in the water exercise group after intervention. Women with arm lymphedema in the land exercise group improved DASH scores (p = 0.047) and outer rotation in the shoulder (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that to reduce objective and self-reported swelling, lymphedema patients may be offered water exercise training while to improve daily shoulder function, land exercises are preferred. To guide female cancer survivors with lymphedema to effective exercise resulting in reduced limb volume and improved function, adequate evidenced-based programs are needed. PMID:26714371

  6. Classroom Exercises Utilizing Precipitation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Fred

    Precipitation data for Macomb (Illinois) for the period 1912-1981 were the bases for developing classroom exercises that offered college students experience in collecting such data. After students collected the data, they reduced them to manageable proportions, and then examined average long-term relations which may have emerged among yearly,…

  7. Physical exercise in women with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, H R; Ellertsen, B; Grønningsaeter, H; Nakken, K O; Løyning, Y; Ursin, H

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen women with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy were given physical exercise (aerobic dancing with strength training and stretching) for 60 min, twice weekly, for 15 weeks. Seizure frequency was recorded by the patients for 3-7 months before the intervention, during the intervention period, and for 3 months after the intervention. Medication and other known seizure-influencing factors were kept as constant as possible. Self-reported seizure frequency was significantly reduced during the intervention period. The exercise also led to reduced level of subjective health complaints, such as muscle pains, sleep problems, and fatigue. The exercise reduced plasma cholesterol ratio and increased maximum O2 uptake. Because most of the patients were unable to continue the exercise on their own after the intervention period, the exercise effects were not maintained during the follow-up period. The patients were not unwilling to continue the exercise, but it was not sufficient to offer them the possibility of continuing similar types of exercise. We believe that 15 weeks is too short a time to establish a life-style change and that continued physical exercise for these patients requires a well-organized and supportive program, requiring experienced and dedicated instructors. PMID:7988519

  8. Ammonia and IMP in different skeletal muscle fibers after exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R A; Dudley, G A; Terjung, R L

    1980-12-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) deamination, estimated from inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) accumulation, was studied in the different skeletal muscle fiber types of untrained rats anesthetized with ether immediately after 4 min of treadmill running at 45 or 60 m/min. The adenylosuccinate synthetase-inhibitor hadacidin was administered (200 mg/kg ip) before exercise to block IMP reamination and, therefore, to provide a better assessment of IMP formation. The increases in blood ammonia after exercise (2.5- and 5-fold, respectively) were highly correlated (r = 0.93) with the increases in blood lactate levels (6- and 11-fold). At both speeds, IMP increased in fast-twitch but not in slow-twitch (soleus) muscle. Of the fast muscles, the increase in IMP was greatest (up to 4 mumol/g wet wt) in the white vastus lateralis (fast twitch, glycolytic), intermediate in the plantaris (mixed fibers), and lowest in the red vastus lateralis (fast twitch, oxidative glycolytic). The increases in IMP were coincident with nearly equivalent decreases in ATP. Hadacidin treatment resulted in a greater IMP accumulation after exercise in both fast-twitch types but not in the soleus. The results indicate that fast-twitch muscle fibers, particularly the fast-twitch glycolytic fibers, are the source of the ammonia produced during strenuous exercise. PMID:7440292

  9. Plasma beta-endorphin response of thoroughbred horses to maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Franchimont, P; Lekeux, P

    1994-11-19

    Ten horses underwent a standardised strenuous treadmill exercise test, before, during and after which measurements were made of plasma beta-endorphin and cortisol concentrations, blood lactate, glucose, haemoglobin and pH, the activities of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate amino-transferase, and heart rate, oxygen uptake and expired minute volume. The correlations between the exercise-induced response of beta-endorphin and the changes observed in the other physiological measurements were examined. There was a large variation in the beta-endorphin response of the horses to exercise. The increase in beta-endorphin was correlated significantly and inversely with the treadmill velocity at which maximal oxygen uptake was reached. It was also significantly and directly correlated with the heart rate during recovery, the increase in plasma lactate concentration and the change in blood pH, indicating that the exercise-induced increase in beta-endorphin concentration was smaller in horses with a higher aerobic capacity. PMID:7871689

  10. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy on recovery after hamstring damaging exercise: a crossover study.

    PubMed

    Fonda, B; Sarabon, N

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on biochemical, pain, and performance parameters during the 5-day recovery period after damaging exercise for hamstrings. Participants completed a bout of damaging exercise for the hamstring muscles on two separate occasions (control and experimental condition) separated by 10 weeks. During the control condition, subjects received no treatment after the damaging exercise. The experimental condition consisted of WBC everyday during the recovery period. WBC included single 3-min daily exposures to low temperatures (-140 to -19 °C) in the cryo-cabin. During the recovery period, subjects were tested for biochemical markers, perceived pain sensation, and physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal isometric torque production, and maximally explosive isometric torque production). Majority of the observed variables showed statistically significant time effects (P < 0.05) in control group, which indicates the presence of muscle damage. Significant interaction between the control and WBC condition was evident for the rate of torque development (P < 0.05). Pain measures substantially differed between the WBC and the control condition after the exercise. Results of this study are not completely supportive of the use of WBC for recovery enhancement after strenuous training. PMID:23614691

  11. Differentiating Exercise-Induced Cardiac Adaptations From Cardiac Pathology: The "Grey Zone" of Clinical Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonathan H; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-04-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodelling (EICR) refers to the cardiac structural and functional adaptations that occur in response to the hemodynamic stress of strenuous exercise. Differentiating physiological cardiac hypertrophy as a result of EICR from structural cardiac pathology may be challenging in clinical practice because of the phenotypic crossover between extreme forms of the "hearts of athletes" and mild forms of cardiomyopathy. This structural phenotypic overlap equates to a grey zone of clinical uncertainty. Specifically, asymptomatic athletes presenting with extreme left ventricular (LV) dilatation, LV wall thickening, or right ventricular (RV) dilatation require a systematic and integrative diagnostic approach to achieve accurate clinical differentiation. The combination of a careful clinical history and examination, appropriately used multimodality cardiac imaging, functional exercise testing, ambulatory rhythm monitoring, and occasional detraining typically provides the necessary data for diagnostic purposes and sports participation recommendations. Further clinical distinction of the hearts of athletes from cardiac pathology may emerge from future clinical and translational research efforts establishing exercise-related biomarker profiles and mechanisms underlying EICR adaptations. PMID:26875013

  12. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  13. [The adaptive changes of homeostasis under the influence of high-intensity physical exercises].

    PubMed

    Rybina, I L; Mikheev, A A; Nekhvyadovich, A I

    2016-01-01

    The present article was designed to report the results of the investigation into various non-specific adaptive reactions of the organism (NARO) based on the determination of the ratio of lymphocyte to neutrophil levels in the blood of the athletes under conditions of high-intensity training. We evaluated the frequency of different types of adaptive responses in the biathlon skiers at different stages of their annual training cycle. The study has demonstrated the relationship between metabolic changes under the influence of training and the type of adaptive responses. It is concluded that the adaptive stress responses are associated with the increased "metabolic cost" paid for the performance of strenuous exercises which can be a cause of slowdown of the adaptive processes and lead to overtraining. PMID:27030564

  14. Overcoming Barriers to Exercise: No More Excuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... cost exercise programs in your area. Increasing your energy Regular, moderate physical activity can help reduce fatigue ... become active, you’re likely to have more energy than before. As you do more, you also ...

  15. Postpartum Exercise and Lactation.

    PubMed

    Bane, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    Many women who are breastfeeding also want to participate in exercise, but have concerns about the safety of their newborn. The following chapter reviews issues related to postpartum exercise and lactation. The goals of the chapter are to help clinicians understand the benefits of exercise, examine the impact of postpartum exercise on breastfeeding, and provide practical recommendations for exercise during the postpartum period in women who are breastfeeding. PMID:26398298

  16. Left ventricular mechanics and arterial-ventricular coupling following high-intensity interval exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Anita T.; Bredin, Shannon S. D.; Phillips, Aaron A.; Koehle, Michael S.; Glier, Melissa B.; Devlin, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    High-intensity exercise induces marked physiological stress affecting the secretion of catecholamines. Sustained elevations in catecholamines are thought to desensitize cardiac beta receptors and may be a possible mechanism in impaired cardiac function following strenuous exercise. In addition, attenuated arterial-ventricular coupling may identify vascular mechanisms in connection with postexercise attenuations in ventricular function. Thirty-nine normally active (NA) and endurance-trained (ET) men and women completed an echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function before and after an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise (15 bouts of 1:2 min work:recovery cycling: 100% peak power output and 50 W, respectively). Following exercise, time to peak twist and peak untwisting velocity were delayed (P < 0.01) but did not differ by sex or training status. Interactions for sex and condition (rest vs. exercise) were found for longitudinal diastolic strain rate (men, 1.46 ± 0.19 to 1.28 ± 0.23 s−1 vs. women, 1.62 ± 0.25 to 1.63 ± 0.26 s−1; P = 0.01) and arterial elastance (men 2.20 ± 0.65 to 3.24 ± 1.02 mmHg·ml−1·m−2 vs. women 2.51 ± 0.61 to 2.93 ± 0.68 mmHg·ml−1·m−2; P = 0.04). No cardiac variables were found associated with catecholamine levels. The change in twist mechanics was associated with baseline aortic pulse-wave velocity (r2 = 0.27, P = 0.001). We conclude that males display greater reductions in contractility in response to high-intensity interval exercise, independent of catecholamine concentrations. Furthermore, a novel association of arterial stiffness and twist mechanics following high-intensity acute exercise illustrates the influence of vascular integrity on cardiac mechanics. PMID:24052036

  17. The effect of exercise and training status on platelet activation: do cocoa polyphenols play a role?

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Quinn, H; Mok, M; Southgate, R J; Turner, A H; Li, D; Sinclair, A J; Hawley, J A

    2006-09-01

    Sedentary and trained men respond differently to the same intensity of exercise, this is probably related to their platelet reactivity and antioxidant capacity. There is growing interest in the utilization of antioxidant-rich plant extracts as dietary food supplements. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute bout of sub maximal exercise on platelet count and differential response of platelet activation in trained and sedentary subjects and to observe if cocoa polyphenols reverse the effect of exercise on platelet function. The practical significance of this study was that many sedentary people engage in occasional strenuous exercise that may predispose them to risk of heart disease. Fasting blood samples were collected from 16 male subjects, pre and post 1-h cycling exercise at 70% of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) before and after consumption of cocoa or placebo. Agonist stimulated citrated whole blood was utilized for measuring platelet aggregation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and platelet activation. Baseline platelet count (221 +/- 33 x 10(9)/L) and ATP release (1.4 +/- 0.6 nmol) increased significantly (P < 0.05) after exercise in all subjects. Baseline platelet numbers in the trained were higher (P < 0.05) than in the sedentary (235 +/- 37 vs. 208 +/- 34 x 10(9)/L), where as platelet activation in trained was lower (P < 0.05) than sedentary (51 +/- 6 vs. 59 +/- 5%). Seven days of cocoa polyphenol supplementation had little effect on any of the parameters measured. We conclude that trained subjects show decreased activation of stimulated platelets when compared to the sedentary subjects and short-term cocoa polyphenol supplementation did not decrease platelet activity in response to exercise independent of prior training status. PMID:16973496

  18. Arginine vasopressin, fluid balance and exercise: is exercise-associated hyponatraemia a disorder of arginine vasopressin secretion?

    PubMed

    Hew-Butler, Tamara

    2010-06-01

    The ability of the human body to regulate plasma osmolality (POsm) within a very narrow and well defined physiological range underscores the vital importance of preserving water and sodium balance at rest and during exercise. The principle endocrine regulator of whole body fluid homeostasis is the posterior pituitary hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Inappropriate AVP secretion may perpetuate either slow or rapid violation of these biological boundaries, thereby promoting pathophysiology, morbidity and occasional mortality. In the resting state, AVP secretion is primarily regulated by changes in POsm (osmotic regulation). The osmotic regulation of AVP secretion during exercise, however, may possibly be enhanced or overridden by many potential non-osmotic factors concurrently stimulated during physical activity, particularly during competition. The prevalence of these highly volatile non-osmotic AVP stimuli during strenuous or prolonged physical activity may reflect a teleological mechanism to promote water conservation during exercise. However, non-osmotic AVP secretion, combined with high fluid availability plus sustained fluid intake (exceeding fluid output), has been hypothesized to lead to an increase in both the incidence and related deaths from exercise-associated hyponatraemia (EAH) in lay and military populations. Inappropriately, high plasma AVP concentrations ([AVP](p)) associated with low blood sodium concentrations facilitate fluid retention and sodium loss, thereby possibly reconciling both the water intoxication and sodium loss theories of hyponatraemia that are currently under debate. Therefore, given the potential for a variety of exercise-induced non-osmotic stimuli for AVP secretion, hydration strategies must be flexible, individualized and open to change during competitive events to prevent the occurrence of rare, but life-threatening, EAH. This review focuses on the potential osmotic and non-osmotic stimuli to AVP secretion that may affect fluid homeostasis during physical activity. Recent laboratory and field data support: (i) stimulatory effects of exercise intensity and duration on [AVP](p); (ii) possible relationships between changes in POsm with changes in both sweat and urinary osmolality; (iii) alterations in the AVP osmoregulatory set-point by sex steroid hormones; (iv) differences in [AVP](p) in trained versus untrained athletes; and (v) potential inter-relationships between AVP and classical (aldosterone, atrial natriuretic peptide) and non-classical (oxytocin, interleukin-6) endocrine mediators. The review concludes with a hypothesis on how sustained fluid intakes beyond the capacity for fluid loss might possibly facilitate the development of hyponatraemia if exercise-induced non-osmotic stimuli override 'normal' osmotic suppression of AVP when hypo-osmolality exists. PMID:20524712

  19. Astronauts Exercising in Space Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    To minimize the effects of weightlessness and partial gravity, astronauts use several counter measures to maintain health and fitness. One counter measure is exercise to help reduce or eliminate muscle atrophy and bone loss, and to improve altered cardiovascular function. This video shows astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) using the stationary Cycle/ Ergometer Vibration Isolation System (CVIS), the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS), and the resistance exercise device. These technologies and activities will be crucial to keeping astronauts healthy and productive during the long missions to the Moon. Mars, and beyond.

  20. An Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Post Exercise Lactate, Glutamate and Glutamine Change in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Andrea; Thomas, Adam G.; Rawlings, Nancy B.; Near, Jamie; Nichols, Thomas E.; Clare, Stuart; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J.

    2015-01-01

    During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolize lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a) track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise, and (b) to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field MRS as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise. PMID:26732236

  1. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Ribeiro, Diogo Farias; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently. Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood. Method A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models. Results Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01). Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01) or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01) elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02), though aerobic training did not. The cumulative results of the seven studies with a total of 230 participants in exercise training analysis did not demonstrate a significant impact on homocysteine levels in the blood (-0.56 μmol/L, 95% CI: -1.61 to 0.50, p = .23). Conclusions Current evidence demonstrates that acute exercise increases homocysteine levels in the blood independent of exercise duration and intensity. Resistance, but not aerobic training decreases plasma homocysteine levels. PMID:26986570

  2. Exercises for the torso performed in a standing posture: spine and hip motion and motor patterns and spine load.

    PubMed

    McGill, Stuart M; Karpowicz, Amy; Fenwick, Chad M J; Brown, Stephen H M

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the muscle activity, spine motion, spine load, and stiffness during several movement-based or "functional" exercises and to assess the effect of technique change. Eight subjects, all healthy men from a university population, were instrumented to obtain surface electromyography of selected trunk and hip muscles, together with video analysis and electromagnetic lumbar spine position sensor to track spine posture. Exercises included a walkout in the sagittal plane that compared an upright form against a wall with those performed on the floor, overhead cable pushes, lateral cable walkouts, the good morning exercise, and the bowler's squat. Generally, muscle activation levels were quite modest even though the tasks were quite strenuous in many cases. Even though similar joint moments were required in different exercises, the pattern of activity between muscles was different. Abdominal bracing increased spine stiffness at the expense of more spine load. Thus, muscle activity seems to be constrained in "functional" exercises. There are several possible reasons for this. Single muscles cannot be activated to 100% of the maximum voluntary contraction in functional exercises because this would upset the balance of moments about the 3 orthopedic axes of the spine, or it would upset the balance of stiffening muscles around the spine required to ensure stability of the spinal column. The one exception was the floor walkout, which resulted in full activation of the rectus abdominis; however, this was a sagittal plane task without the joint moment constraints of multiplanar exercise. Therefore, maximal muscle activity is observed during single-plane tasks, but muscle activation levels were constrained during functional tasks. Thus, strength training muscles may not help in "functional multiplanar" tasks. These data can be used to assist decisions regarding the selection of exercises, specifically choices regarding the starting challenge, progression, exercise form, and possibly corrective technique for those who have spine concerns, or those simply looking for performance enhancement. PMID:19258883

  3. Physical Exercise as Therapy for Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Lina E.; Villareal, Dennis T.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies demonstrate that regular physical exercise extends longevity and reduces the risk of physical disability. Decline in physical activity with aging is associated with a decrease in exercise capacity that predisposes to frailty. Frailty syndrome includes lowered activity level, poor exercise tolerance, and loss of lean body and muscle mass. Poor exercise tolerance is related to aerobic endurance. Aerobic endurance training can significantly improve peak oxygen consumption by ~10–15%. Resistance training is the best way to increase muscle strength and mass. Although the increase in muscle mass in response to resistance training may be attenuated in frail older adults, resistance training can significantly improve muscle strength, particularly in institutionalized patients by ~110%. Because both aerobic and resistance training target specific components of frailty, studies combining aerobic and resistance training provide the most promising evidence with respect to successfully treating frailty. At the molecular level, exercise reduces frailty by decreasing muscle inflammation, increasing anabolism, and increasing muscle protein synthesis. More studies are needed to determine which exercises are best suited, most effective, and safe for this population. Based on the available studies, an individualized multicomponent exercise program that includes aerobic activity, strength exercises, and flexibility is recommended to treat frailty. PMID:26524568

  4. Physical Exercise as Therapy for Frailty.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Lina E; Villareal, Dennis T

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies demonstrate that regular physical exercise extends longevity and reduces the risk of physical disability. Decline in physical activity with aging is associated with a decrease in exercise capacity that predisposes to frailty. The frailty syndrome includes a lowered activity level, poor exercise tolerance, and loss of lean body and muscle mass. Poor exercise tolerance is related to aerobic endurance. Aerobic endurance training can significantly improve peak oxygen consumption by ∼10-15%. Resistance training is the best way to increase muscle strength and mass. Although the increase in muscle mass in response to resistance training may be attenuated in frail older adults, resistance training can significantly improve muscle strength, particularly in institutionalized patients, by ∼110%. Because both aerobic and resistance training target specific components of frailty, studies combining aerobic and resistance training provide the most promising evidence with respect to successfully treating frailty. At the molecular level, exercise reduces frailty by decreasing muscle inflammation, increasing anabolism, and increasing muscle protein synthesis. More studies are needed to determine which exercises are best suited, most effective, and safe for this population. Based on the available studies, an individualized multicomponent exercise program that includes aerobic activity, strength exercises, and flexibility is recommended to treat frailty. PMID:26524568

  5. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  6. Self-regulation strategies may enhance the acute effect of exercise on smoking delay.

    PubMed

    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis; Pappa, Vassiliki; Tsiami, Anastasia; Tzatzaki, Theodora; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zourbanos, Nikos; Goudas, Marios; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined the acute effect of a moderate intensity aerobic exercise session combined with self-regulation on smoking delay in physically inactive smokers. Participants were 11 adults (5 males and 6 females) that completed three experimental conditions: control, exercise, and exercise using self-regulation strategies (SR). Following the experimental treatment smoking for the two exercise conditions delayed significantly more than for the control condition; in addition exercise SR delayed smoking marginally more that the plain exercise condition. Findings supported previous research that acute exercise reduces cravings to smoke, and suggests that the use of self-regulation strategies may strengthen exercise for smoking cessation interventions. PMID:26851493

  7. [Physical exercise training for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Wienbergen, H; Hambrecht, R

    2012-08-01

    Clinical application of physical exercise has developed into an evidence-based therapeutic option for cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease (CAD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). In CAD regular physical exercise training partially corrects endothelial dysfunction and leads to an economization of left ventricular function. Meta-analyses have shown a reduction of angina pectoris symptoms and a decrease of total and cardiovascular mortality by regular aerobic exercise training. Endurance training for CHF reduces cardiac afterload by correcting peripheral endothelial dysfunction und leads to a better left ventricular function. In addition exercise training reduces the adrenergic tone and the stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in CHF. Exercise training provides positive effects on the metabolism and function of skeletal muscle (e.g. reduced inflammation and oxidative stress). Supervised regular physical exercise training in CHF is safe and has improved the morbidity in clinical studies. Thus aerobic exercise training is an important component of therapeutic management of stable CAD and CHF with a class 1a recommendation in the current guidelines. PMID:22760599

  8. Exercise, natural immunity, and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Goetz, L

    1994-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to reduce the growth of primary tumors and to enhance certain aspects of host natural immunity. The question of whether these are independent phenomena or are casually related has not been systematically evaluated. This paper presents information concerning the methodological difficulties in studying proposed relationships between exercise and cancer, focusing specifically on tumor metastasis, the process by which malignant cells disseminate to distant organs and establish new colonies. This paper also focuses on how natural immune processes and tumor cells exert bidirectional influences on each other. It is suggested that the direction of the impact of exercise on the control of metastatic spread of neoplastic cells will reflect, in part, the sensitivity of the specific tumor to cytolysis by natural immune mechanisms, the route of dissemination, the timing of exercise relative to tumor exposure, and whether exercise acts as a distress or eustress state. PMID:8164532

  9. Exercise detraining: Applicability to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    Physical training exposes the various systems of the body to potent physiologic stimuli. These stimuli induce specific adaptations that enhance an individual's tolerance for the type of exercise encountered in training. The level of adaptation and the magnitude of improvement in exercise tolerance is proportional to the potency of the physical training stimuli. Likewise, our bodies are stimulated by gravity, which promotes adaptations of both the cardiovascular and skeletal muscles. Exposure to microgravity removes normal stimuli to these systems, and the body adapts to these reduced demands. In many respects the cessation of physical training in athletes and the transition from normal gravity to microgravity represent similar paradigms. Inherent to these situations is the concept of the reversibility of the adaptations induced by training or by exposure to normal gravity. The reversibility concept holds that when physical training is stopped (i.e., detraining) or reduced, or a person goes from normal gravity to microgravity, the bodily systems readjust in accordance with the diminished physiologic stimuli. The focus of this chapter is on the time course of loss of the adaptations to endurance training as well as on the possibility that certain adaptations persist, to some extent, when training is stopped. Because endurance exercise training generally improves cardiovascular function and promotes metabolic adaptations within the exercising skeletal musculature, the reversibility of these specific adaptations is considered. These observations have some applicability to the transition from normal to microgravity.

  10. Exercise by prescription.

    PubMed

    Browne, D

    1997-02-01

    General Practitioners (GPs) see over 90% of their practice population in three years. Over 50% of the adult population is below the perceived level of physical activity as recognised by the Allied Dunbar Physical Activity score (Allied Dunbar, Health Education Authority and Sports Council, 1992). Physical fitness levels in adolescents and children are declining, while the incidence of obesity is increasing. GPs, with their Primary Health Care Team, are in a unique position to be able to discuss the health benefits of regular physical activity with their patients during the consultation and offer, if appropriate, a prescription for a course of physical activity to a local leisure centre or community activity centre. Many communities have facilities for physical activity. These include leisure centres, schools, village and church halls, the home and the general practice surgery. A directory of resources for physical activity for all age groups should be available in the surgery waiting room area. A community co-ordinator can network community facilities and resources to meet individual need. The co-ordinator can be funded by the general practice surgery, Health Authority, Local Authority, Parish or District Council. An agreed protocol for exercise prescription referrals to suitable community facilities can benefit patient health care for a variety of medical, surgical, social and mental conditions. Auditing exercise prescriptions shows a health benefit, with improved quality of living and reduced prescription medicines. PMID:9050296

  11. Effect of intense wrestling exercise on leucocytes and adhesion molecules in adolescent boys

    PubMed Central

    Nemet, D; Mills, P; Cooper, D

    2004-01-01

    Background: In adults, exercise is a powerful and natural stimulator of immune cells and adhesion molecules. Far less is known about exercise responses during childhood and adolescence and whether or not exercise in "real life" activities of healthy adolescents influences immune responses. Objective: To determine if strenuous exercise leads to significant changes in leucocyte number and adhesion molecule expression in adolescent boys. Methods: Eleven healthy, high school boys, aged 14–18.5 years, performed a single, typical, 1.5 hour wrestling practice session. Blood was sampled before and after the session. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate changes in immune responses. Results: The exercise led to significant (p<0.05) and robust increases in granulocytes, monocytes, and all lymphocyte subpopulations. The most significant changes were observed for natural killer cells (p<0.0005). The number of T cytotoxic and T helper cells expressing CD62L increased significantly (p<0.002 and p<0.0005 respectively), as did the number of T cytotoxic and T helper cells not expressing CD62L (p<0.003 and p<0.009 respectively). The density of CD62L on lymphocytes decreased significantly with exercise (p<0.0005), whereas CD11a (p<0.01) and CD54 (p<0.01) increased. Conclusions: The data show that an intense wrestling bout in adolescent boys leads to profound stimulation of the immune system. The role of these common changes in overall immune status and the development of the immune and haemopoietic systems has yet to be determined. PMID:15039250

  12. Assessing exercise limitation using cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Stickland, Michael K; Butcher, Scott J; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Bhutani, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation ([Formula: see text] = cardiac output × arterial-venous O(2) content difference). In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O(2) content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO(2). Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O(2) pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance. PMID:23213518

  13. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  14. Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Cynthia L.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the need for exercise intensity to become physically fit, concluding that intensity is not important for improving health, only for improving performance. What is important is routinely performing some sort of exercise. (GLR)

  15. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  16. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main ... jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using ...

  17. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  18. Exercise and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar down. Cardiovascular exercise means increasing oxygenation and heart rate while moving large muscle groups continuously for at least 30 minutes. Activities such as brisk walking, jogging, dancing, bicycling or swimming can be considered cardiovascular exercise. ...

  19. Easy Exercises for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... third component of well-rounded exercise. Check out yoga as one way to stay flexible. You can ... Sports and Exercise Safety Stretching Dynamic Stretching (Video) Yoga Welcome Home Yoga (Video) Study Break Yoga (Video) ...

  20. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... put you in a better mood. When you exercise, your brain releases chemicals called endorphins (say: en-DOR-finz), which may make you feel happier. It's just another reason why exercise is cool! Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD ...

  1. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... doing more exercise! In athletes, another problem called vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) can occur, and seems a lot like exercise-induced asthma. The vocal cords are located in the throat, at the opening ...

  2. Exercise and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in calcium and vitamin D. Include regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. Stop smoking. Limit how ... be stronger if you are physically active. Weight-bearing exercises, done three to four times a week, ...

  3. Exercising with Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with osteoarthritis benefit from regular exercise and physical activity. For people with osteoarthritis, regular exercise can help: l Maintain healthy and strong muscles l Preserve joint mobility l Maintain range of motion l Improve sleep ...

  4. Skeletal muscle vasodilatation during maximal exercise in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, Jose A L; Lundby, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Maximal exercise vasodilatation results from the balance between vasoconstricting and vasodilating signals combined with the vascular reactivity to these signals. During maximal exercise with a small muscle mass the skeletal muscle vascular bed is fully vasodilated. During maximal whole body exercise, however, vasodilatation is restrained by the sympathetic system. This is necessary to avoid hypotension since the maximal vascular conductance of the musculature exceeds the maximal pumping capacity of the heart. Endurance training and high-intensity intermittent knee extension training increase the capacity for maximal exercise vasodilatation by 20–30%, mainly due to an enhanced vasodilatory capacity, as maximal exercise perfusion pressure changes little with training. The increase in maximal exercise vascular conductance is to a large extent explained by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and vascular remodelling. The vasodilatory capacity during maximal exercise is reduced or blunted with ageing, as well as in chronic heart failure patients and chronically hypoxic humans; reduced vasodilatory responsiveness and increased sympathetic activity (and probably, altered sympatholysis) are potential mechanisms accounting for this effect. Pharmacological counteraction of the sympathetic restraint may result in lower perfusion pressure and reduced oxygen extraction by the exercising muscles. However, at the same time fast inhibition of the chemoreflex in maximally exercising humans may result in increased vasodilatation, further confirming a restraining role of the sympathetic nervous system on exercise-induced vasodilatation. This is likely to be critical for the maintenance of blood pressure in exercising patients with a limited heart pump capacity. PMID:23027820

  5. Physical activity, exercise, depression and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    There is a general belief that physical activity and exercise have positive effects on mood and anxiety and a great number of studies describe an association of physical activity and general well-being, mood and anxiety. In line, intervention studies describe an anxiolytic and antidepressive activity of exercise in healthy subjects and patients. However, the majority of published studies have substantial methodological shortcomings. The aim of this paper is to critically review the currently available literature with respect to (1) the association of physical activity, exercise and the prevalence and incidence of depression and anxiety disorders and (2) the potential therapeutic activity of exercise training in patients with depression or anxiety disorders. Although the association of physical activity and the prevalence of mental disorders, including depression and anxiety disorders have been repeatedly described, only few studies examined the association of physical activity and mental disorders prospectively. Reduced incidence rates of depression and (some) anxiety disorders in exercising subjects raise the question whether exercise may be used in the prevention of some mental disorders. Besides case series and small uncontrolled studies, recent well controlled studies suggest that exercise training may be clinically effective, at least in major depression and panic disorder. Although, the evidence for positive effects of exercise and exercise training on depression and anxiety is growing, the clinical use, at least as an adjunct to established treatment approaches like psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy, is still at the beginning. Further studies on the clinical effects of exercise, interaction with standard treatment approaches and details on the optimal type, intensity, frequency and duration may further support the clinical administration in patients. Furthermore, there is a lack of knowledge on how to best deal with depression and anxiety related symptoms which hinder patients to participate and benefit from exercise training. PMID:18726137

  6. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  7. Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega-5 gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The omega-5 gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which omega-5 gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interfe...

  8. Exercise oscillatory ventilation: Mechanisms and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Bishnu P; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-03-26

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing (PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF. PMID:27022457

  9. Exercise oscillatory ventilation: Mechanisms and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Bishnu P; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing (PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF. PMID:27022457

  10. Antenatal Depression: A Rationale for Studying Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Shivakumar, Geetha; Brandon, Anna R.; Snell, Peter G.; Santiago-Muoz, Patricia; Johnson, Neysa L.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in pregnancy, or antenatal depression poses unique treatment challenges and has serious consequences for mothers, unborn babies, and families when untreated. This review presents current knowledge on exercise during pregnancy, antidepressant effects of exercise, and the rationale for the specific study of exercise for antenatal depression. Method A systematic literature review was performed using English language articles published in Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1985 to January 2010. Results There is a broad literature supporting the antidepressant effects of exercise, but a paucity of studies specifically for antenatal depression. A small number of observational studies have reported that regular physical activities improve self-esteem and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression during pregnancy. To date, there have not been randomized controlled studies of exercise for the treatment of MDD in pregnant women. Conclusions Systematic studies are needed to assess exercise as a treatment alternative for MDD during pregnancy. In consideration of the benefits of exercise for the mother and baby, and the burden of depression, studies are needed to determine the role of exercise for pregnant women with depression. PMID:21394856

  11. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: 1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and 2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  12. Cell-derived microparticles after exercise in individuals with G6PD Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Makamas; Nantakomol, Duangdao; Suksom, Daroonwan; Palasuwan, Attakorn

    2015-07-16

    Glucose-6-phospate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient cells are sensitive to oxidative damage leading to the formation of microparticles (MPs). Therefore, we examined the concentration of MPs and changes in the antioxidant balance after an acute strenuous exercise (SEx) and moderate-intensity exercise (MEx). Eighteen healthy females (18-24 years) with G6PD normal and eighteen age-matched females with G6PD Viangchan (871G>A) were tested by running on a treadmill at their maximal oxygen uptake for SEx and at 75% of their maximal heart rate for MEx. It was found that SEx triggered the release of total microparticles (TTMPs) above baseline levels and remained significantly higher 45 minutes after the exercise in G6PD normal individuals. However, SEx-induced increase in TTMPs was significantly higher in G6PD Viangchan as compared to G6PD normal. In contrast, MEx did not to alter the release of TTMPs in both G6PD normal and Viangchan. Moreover, TTMPs concentrations were inversely correlated with G6PD activity (r =-0.82, P <  0.05) but positively correlated with MDA concentrations (r = 0.74, P <  0.05). Using cell specific antibodies, we determined that MPs were mainly derived from platelets and erythrocytes. Altogether, the present study indicates that G6PD Viangchan may participate in MEx without higher MPs concentration and oxidative stress compared with G6PD normal. PMID:25171589

  13. Exercise, Aging and Longevity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stanley P.; Cundiff, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether or not a lifelong program of exercise actually has a bearing on longevity is discussed. The effects of exercise on the aging process, and the longevity-exercise relationship are reviewed. The conflicting evidence on the subject is presented. (JL)

  14. [Exercise and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Murillo García, Serafín; Novials Sardà, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The recommendations about physical exercise in people with diabetes have changed in parallel with the development of knowledge and treatments of the disease. Before the discovery of insulin, exercise was considered a dangerous activity, usually discouraged by the increased risk of ketosis that resulted. In contrast, today, exercise is a basic activity included within the recommended healthy lifestyle for patients with diabetes. PMID:21776934

  15. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,

  16. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  17. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  18. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  19. A Group Leadership Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John; Stafford, Jeff

    A group leadership exercise that incorporates the elements of leadership and other aspects of interaction within small groups can be useful in a basic communication course. The exercise is designed around three basic leadership styles: laissez-faire, democratic, and authoritarian. The exercise is conducted in the following way: (1) the class…

  20. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  1. Chinese eye exercises.

    PubMed

    Roy, F H

    1980-01-01

    Eye exercises are regularly performed by the Chinese children in this highly regimented society. These exercises, based on acupuncture points, are used by children who are approximately 6 to 13 years of age. Chinese eye exercises are reported to be beneficial for myopia, a common Oriental ocular problem. I know of no scientific study that either proves or disproves this. PMID:7391914

  2. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  3. [Exercise and the male reproductive system].

    PubMed

    Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan

    2006-09-01

    In contrast to the effect of exercise training on the menstrual cycle in female athletes, the effect of physical activity on the male reproductive system is described far less extensively in the scientific literature. The male reproductive system consists of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit and the testes. The testes are responsible for the production of sperm and androgens, mainly testosterone. Androgens are responsible for the development of secondary male characteristics, muscle and bone growth, production of red blood cells, sex drive and other behavioral aspects. The effect of physical activity on the male reproductive axis depends on the intensity and duration of the activity, the fitness level of the individual, and his nutritional status. A single bout of short and intensive aerobic and anaerobic exercise usually increases serum testosterone level. Prolonged moderate to intense exercise (> 2 hours) leads to an initial increase followed by a decline to or below the baseline levels. Exercise training frequently results in a decrease of serum testosterone, and may rarely be associated with reduced libido, sperm production and fertility. In addition, the reduced testosterone levels may attenuate the exercise-associated muscle hypertrophy, reduce the repair of muscle damage, reduce post exercise muscle rehabilitation and may play an important role in the development of over-training syndrome. Other consequences include decreased bone density and a possible effect on mood and behavior. Surprisingly, even in the medically well-supervised elite athletes, changes in testosterone levels and their effects on performance and health are rarely evaluated. PMID:17078431

  4. Exercise and Quadriceps Muscle Cooling Time

    PubMed Central

    Long, Blaine C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Brucker, Jody B; Demchak, Timothy J; Stone, Marcus B

    2005-01-01

    Context: Cryotherapy is commonly used for a variety of purposes; however, the body's response to cryotherapy immediately postexercise is unknown. Objective: To investigate the effect of prior exercise on crushed-ice–bag treatment of a large muscle group. Design: 2 × 3 repeated-measures design on depth (1 cm and 2 cm below adipose tissue) and treatment (exercise followed by ice, exercise followed by no ice, and no exercise followed by ice). Setting: Sports Injury Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Six physically active, uninjured male volunteers. Intervention(s): For the 2 exercise conditions, subjects rode a stationary cycle ergometer at 70% to 80% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, as calculated by the Karvonen method. For the no-exercise condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. The cryotherapy treatment consisted of a 1-kg ice bag applied to the anterior mid thigh. For the no-ice condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time required for the intramuscular temperatures at the 1-cm and 2-cm depths below adipose tissue to return to pre-exercise baseline and time required to cool the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature. Results: The time to cool the rectus femoris to the pre-exercise temperature using a crushed-ice–bag treatment was reduced by approximately 40 minutes (P < .001). The ice bag cooled the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to the pre-exercise temperature within 7 minutes (P = .38), but the 2-cm tissue depth took nearly 13.5 minutes longer to cool than the 1-cm depth when no ice was applied (P = .001). The 1-cm depth cooled to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature about 8 minutes sooner than the 2-cm depth, regardless of whether the tissue was exercised or not (P < .001). Exercise shortened the cooling time to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature by approximately 13 minutes (P = .05). Conclusions: Exercise before cooling with a crushed-ice bag enhanced the removal of intramuscular heat. PMID:16404445

  5. Nutritional interventions to promote post-exercise muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koopman, René; Saris, Wim H M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-01-01

    Resistance exercise is a powerful stimulus to augment muscle protein anabolism, as it can improve the balance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown. However, the intake of food during post-exercise recovery is necessary for hypertrophy to occur. Therefore, athletes need to ingest protein following exercise to attain a positive protein balance and maximise their skeletal muscle adaptive response. The interaction between exercise and nutrition is not only important for athletes, but is also of important clinical relevance in the elderly. Exercise interventions combined with specific nutritional modulation provide an effective strategy to counteract or reduce the loss of skeletal muscle mass with aging. PMID:17887813

  6. Endurance exercise training in myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kathleen J; McPherron, Alexandra C

    2010-09-01

    The growth factor myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Mstn(-/-) muscles are hypertrophied, stronger, and more glycolytic than Mstn(+/+) muscles, suggesting that they might not perform endurance exercise as well as Mstn(+/+) mice. Indeed, it has previously been shown that treadmill exercise training reduces triceps weight in Mstn(-/-) mice. To analyze the response of Mstn(-/-) muscle to endurance exercise in detail, we carried out endurance training over 4 weeks to examine muscle mass, histology, and oxidative enzyme activity. We found that muscle mass was reduced with training in several muscles from both genotypes, with no evidence of muscle damage. Citrate synthase activity was increased with training in control and mutant mice. Non-trained Mstn(-/-) mice did, however, have lower maximal exercise capacity compared with Mstn(+/+) mice. These results show that Mstn(-/-) muscle retains the metabolic plasticity necessary to adapt normally to endurance training. PMID:20544938

  7. Exercise Prescription: Principles and Current Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1983-01-01

    Exercise prescriptions must be both safe and effective, while maximizing patient compliance. Safety can be threatened by physical injury, cardiac emergencies and environmental hazards. Risk can be reduced by individualizing the prescription, although the stress ECG contributes little to the prevention of the exercise catastrophe. Effectiveness of a prescription must be gauged by development of aerobic power and muscular strength, reduction of obesity, improvement of flexibility and control of coronary risk factors. The variability of patient response limits the potential for accurate laboratory prescription of exercise; fine tuning must depend upon the patient's immediate reactions. PMID:21283273

  8. Exercise in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Abresch, R Ted; Carter, Gregory T; Han, Jay J; McDonald, Craig M

    2012-08-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the benefits and contraindications of exercise on individuals with neuromuscular diseases (NMDs). Specific exercise prescriptions for individuals with NMDs do not exist because the evidence base is limited. Understanding the effect of exercise on individuals with NMDs requires the implementation of a series of multicenter, randomized controlled trials that are sufficiently powered and use reliable and valid outcome measures to assess the effect of exercise interventions-a major effort for each NMD. In addition to traditional measures of exercise efficacy, outcome variables should include measures of functional status and health-related quality of life. PMID:22938880

  9. Exercise, Stress Resistance, and Central Serotonergic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders in humans and prevents serotonin-dependent behavioral consequences of stress in rodents. Evidence reviewed herein is consistent with the hypothesis that exercise increases stress resistance by producing neuroplasticity at multiple sites of the central serotonergic system, which all help to limit the behavioral impact of acute increases in serotonin during stressor exposure. PMID:21508844

  10. Exercise and Sports Science Australia position statement on exercise and falls prevention in older people.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Anne; Sherrington, Catherine; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2011-11-01

    Falls affect a significant number of older Australians and present a major challenge to health care providers and health systems. The purpose of this statement is to inform and guide exercise practitioners and health professionals in the safe and effective prescription of exercise for older community-dwelling people with the goal of preventing falls. Falls in older people are not random events but can be predicted by assessing a number of risk factors. Of particular importance are lower limb muscle strength, gait and balance, all of which can be improved with appropriate exercise. There is now extensive evidence to demonstrate that many falls are preventable, with exercise playing a crucial role in prevention. Research evidence has identified that programs which include exercises that challenge balance are more effective in preventing falls than those which do not challenge balance. It is important for exercise to be progressively challenging, ongoing and of sufficient dose to maximise its benefits in reducing falls. Other (non-exercise) interventions are necessary for certain people with complex medical conditions or recent hospitalisation and risk factors relating to vision and the use of psychotropic medications. Qualified exercise professionals are well placed to implement the research evidence and to prescribe and supervise specific exercise aimed at preventing falls in both healthy older community-dwelling people and those with co-morbidities. PMID:21570910

  11. Exercise and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Orla; Cronin, Owen; Clarke, Siobhan F; Murphy, Eileen F; Molloy, Micheal G; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is linked with poor health, most commonly obesity and associated disorders, the corollary being that exercise offers a preventive strategy. However, the scope of exercise biology extends well beyond energy expenditure and has emerged as a great ‘polypill’, which is safe, reliable and cost-effective not only in disease prevention but also treatment. Biological mechanisms by which exercise influences homeostasis are becoming clearer and involve multi-organ systemic adaptations. Most of the elements of a modern lifestyle influence the indigenous microbiota but few studies have explored the effect of increased physical activity. While dietary responses to exercise obscure the influence of exercise alone on gut microbiota, professional athletes operating at the extremes of performance provide informative data. We assessed the relationship between extreme levels of exercise, associated dietary habits and gut microbiota composition, and discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may exert a direct or indirect influence on gut microbiota. PMID:25800089

  12. Regular physical activity and reduced occurrence of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Calle-Pascual, A L; Martin-Alvarez, P J; Reyes, C; Calle, J R

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of regular non-strenuous physical exercise on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, we have studied a cohort of 372 Type 2 diabetic patients (152 males and 220 females, mean age: 63.59 +/- 0.70 years, evolution time: 10.31 +/- 0.4 years, M +/- SEM). One hundred and ninety seven (52.9%) presented normo-albuminuria, 124 (33.3%) microalbuminuria and 51 (13.7%) proteinuria. These three groups were different with regard to evolution time, weight, BMI, waist-hip ratio, Hb1Ac value, prevalence of hypertension and physical activity level. 132 (35.4%) patients had a regular exercise-induced caloric expenditure under 500 kcal/wk whereas 122 (32.7%) were between 500 and 1.000 kcal/wk and 118 (31.7%) over 1.000 kcal/wk. Prevalence of normo-albuminuric patients was 40.1%, 52.4% and 67.7% respectively (p < 0.01). Prevalence of normo-albuminuric patients remained significatively higher in the patient with the greater physical activity level when adjusted to systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, evolution time and HbA1c value. Our results stress the fact that regular non-strenuous physical activity may have a protective effect on the appearance of microalbuminuria in Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Whether the cardiovascular protective influence of exercise in these patients depends on such an effect remains unknown. On the basis of this cross-sectional evidence, a longitudinal study is now under way. PMID:8405621

  13. Daily Supine LBNP Treadmill Exercise Maintains Upright Exercise Capacity During 14 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andy C.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan R.; Fortney, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ballard, R. E.; William, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity or bed rest reduces upright exercise capacity. Exercise modes, durations, and intensities which will effectively and efficiently counteract such deconditioning are presently unresolved. We that daily supine treadmill interval training with lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would prevent reduction in upright exercise capacity during 14 days of 6 deg. head-down bed rest (BR). Eight healthy male subjects underwent two 14 day BR protocols separated by 3 months. In a crossover design, subjects either remained at strict BR or performed 40 min of daily exercise consisting of supine walking and running at intensities varying from 40-80% of pre-BR upright peak oxygen uptake (VO2). LBNP during supine exercise was used to provide 1.0 to 1.2 times body weight of footward force. An incremental upright treadmill test to measure submaximal and peak exercise responses was given pre- and post-BR. In the non-exercise condition, peak VO2 and time to exhaustion were reduced 16 +/- 4% and 10 +/- 1% (p less than 0.05), respectively, from pre-BR. With LBNP exercise these variables were not significantly different (NS) from pre-BR. During submaximal treadmill speeds after BR, heart rate was higher (11 +/- 11 bpm, p less than 0.05) and respiratory exchange ratio was elevated (p less than 0.05) in the no exercise condition. Both were maintained at pre-BR levels in the LBNP exercise condition (NS from pre-BR). Since this supine treadmill interval training with addition of LBNP maintained upright exercise responses and capacity during BR, this countermeasure may also be effective during space flight.

  14. Neurochemical and behavioural indices of exercise reward are independent of exercise controllability.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jonathan J; Fedynska, Sofiya; Ghasem, Parsa R; Wieman, Tyler; Clark, Peter J; Gray, Nathan; Loetz, Esteban; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2016-05-01

    Brain reward circuits are implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. Exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related disorders, but the contribution of exercise reward to stress resistance is unknown. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability; both voluntary running (VR) and forced running (FR) protect rats against the anxiety-like and depression-like behavioural consequences of stress. Voluntary exercise is a natural reward, but whether rats find FR rewarding is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of dopamine (DA) and striatal reward circuits to exercise reward is not well characterized. Adult, male rats were assigned to locked wheels, VR, or FR groups. FR rats were forced to run in a pattern resembling the natural wheel running behavior of rats. Both VR and FR increased the reward-related plasticity marker ΔFosB in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, and increased the activity of DA neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area, as revealed by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and pCREB. Both VR and FR rats developed conditioned place preference (CPP) to the side of a CPP chamber paired with exercise. Re-exposure to the exercise-paired side of the CPP chamber elicited conditioned increases in cfos mRNA in direct-pathway (dynorphin-positive) neurons in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens in both VR and FR rats, and in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area of VR rats only. The results suggest that the rewarding effects of exercise are independent of exercise controllability and provide insight into the DA and striatal circuitries involved in exercise reward and exercise-induced stress resistance. PMID:26833814

  15. Intention to Exercise in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simon S.; Doyle, Geoffrey; Pascoe, Thomas; Douglas, James A; Jorgensen, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and serious health issue that is strongly associated with excess weight. Exercise may be an effective mechanism for reducing the severity of OSA both in association with, and independent of, reduction in body weight. As such, increased exercise has been suggested as a potential intervention for OSA, particularly for patients with mild to moderate clinical severity. However, it is unknown how ready to engage in exercise patients with OSA are. Self-reported exercise intention was assessed in 206 consecutive patients attending a large tertiary sleep disorders service in Australia. Classification of the patients by Stage of Change, a construct of the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change, was supported by differences between the groups in level of habitual self-reported exercise. Cluster analysis identified 4 potential patient types, with differing profiles in perceived costs and benefits of exercise, and exercise-related self-efficacy. The validity of these patient clusters was also supported by differences between the groups in current self-reported exercise levels. The results may help to identify patients who are more likely to engage in increased exercise, and to identify barriers to exercise in patients less inclined to increase their exercise. Citation: Smith SS; Doyle G; Pascoe T et al. Intention to exercise in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(7):689694. PMID:18198801

  16. Effect of breathing frequency and airflow on pulmonary function in high-intensity equine exercise.

    PubMed

    Bayly, W M; Redman, M J; Sides, R H

    1999-07-01

    It has been postulated that the hypoxaemia and hypercapnoea that characterize strenuous equine exercise are partly due to flow limitations imposed by high breathing frequencies (fb), and that gas exchange would be improved if fb could be lowered. To evaluate this possibility, 6 Thoroughbred horses underwent 4 incremental treadmill exercise tests at inclines of 0, 5, 10 and 25%, respectively. In the test, horses were given a warm-up for 2 min, then ran sequentially for 1 min each at 60, 100 and 115% VO2max. Oxygen consumption (VO2), blood gas tensions (PaO2, PaCO2), fb, tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (Ve), transpulmonary pressure (Ptp), peak inspiratory and expiratory airflows (VI, VE) and work of breathing (Wrm) were determined during the last 15 s of exercise at each intensity. The only effect of fb on PaO2 was seen at 60% VO2max. Also, maximal transpulmonary pressure difference (delta Ptpmax), and peak VI, and VE on a 25% slope were lower than those recorded at the other 3 inclines at 60% VO2max. At 100 and 115% VO2max, the effect of fb was less clear. While fb still differed, the only effects of fb at 100% VO2max were on delta Ptpmax. At 115% VO2max, fb on a 25% incline was lower than that for 0 and 5% slopes. The only other difference noted at this intensity was in VT on 10% slope. However, there was no difference between VTS recorded at inclines of 0, 5 or 25% at 115% VO2max. There was no effect of fb or exercise intensity on Ve at 100 or 115% VO2max. There was no change in PaO2, fb, VT, delta Ptpmax or VI and VE as exercise intensity increased from 60-115% VO2max on slopes of 0, 5 or 10%. However, for exercise on the 25% incline (i.e. with lower fb), each of these parameters increased (or decreased for PaO2) from 60-100%, but not from 100-115% VO2max. Failure of peak airflow and VT to increase when intensity increased was associated with the development of hypoxaemia and hypercapnoea, regardless of slope or fb. It is concluded that while a low fb may have some beneficial effect on gas exchange during submaximal exercise at approximately 60% VO2max, this effect disappears as exercise intensity increases. There appear to be limits to the peak airflows that can be generated by horses during strenuous exercise, and these limits may be reached regardless of fb. Flow limitation per se may play a greater role in the development of exercise-induced hypoxaemia and hypercapnoea in horses than dose fb. PMID:10659215

  17. Ingesting a pre-workout supplement containing caffeine, B-vitamins, amino acids, creatine, and beta-alanine before exercise delays fatigue while improving reaction time and muscular endurance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the pre-workout supplement Assault™ (MusclePharm, Denver, CO, USA) on upper and lower body muscular endurance, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, and choice reaction time in recreationally-trained males. Subjective feelings of energy, fatigue, alertness, and focus were measured to examine associations between psychological factors and human performance. Methods Twelve recreationally-trained males participated in a 3-week investigation (mean +/- SD, age: 28 +/- 5 y, height: 178 +/- 9 cm, weight: 79.2 +/- 15.7 kg, VO2max: 45.7 +/- 7.6 ml/kg/min). Subjects reported to the human performance laboratory on three separate occasions. All participants completed a baseline/familiarization day of testing that included a maximal graded exercise test for the determination of aerobic capacity (VO2max), one-rep maximum (1-RM) for bench and leg press to determine 75% of 1-RM, choice reaction tests, and intermittent critical velocity familiarization. Choice reaction tests included the following: single-step audio and visual, one-tower stationary protocol, two-tower lateral protocol, three-tower multi-directional protocol, and three-tower multi-directional protocol with martial arts sticks. Subjects were randomly assigned to ingest either the supplement (SUP) or the placebo (PL) during Visit 2. Subjects were provided with the cross-over treatment on the last testing visit. Testing occurred 20 min following ingestion of both treatments. Results Significant (p < 0.05) main effects for the SUP were observed for leg press (SUP: 13 ± 6 reps, PL: 11 ± 3 reps), perceived energy (SUP: 3.4 ± 0.9, PL: 3.1 ± 0.8), alertness (SUP: 4.0 ± 0.7, PL: 3.5 ± 0.8), focus (SUP: 4.1 ± 0.6, PL: 3.5 ± 0.8), choice reaction audio single-step (SUP: 0.92 ± 0.10 s, PL: 0.97 ± 0.11 s), choice reaction multi-direction 15 s (SUP: 1.07 ± 0.12 s, PL: 1.13 ± 0.14 s), and multi-direction for 30 s (SUP: 1.10 ± 0.11 s, PL: 1.14 ± 0.13 s). Conclusions Ingesting the SUP before exercise significantly improved agility choice reaction performance and lower body muscular endurance, while increasing perceived energy and reducing subjective fatigue. These findings suggest that the SUP may delay fatigue during strenuous exercise. PMID:22463603

  18. PTH Signaling During Exercise Contributes to Bone Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Joseph D.; Mohamed, Fatma; Kohn, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Improving the structural integrity of bone reduces fracture risk and development of osteoporosis later in life. Exercise can increase the mechanical properties of bone, and this increase is often attributed to the dynamic loading created during exercise. However, the increase in systemic PTH levels during exercise gives reason to hypothesize that PTH signaling also regulates bone adaptation in response to exercise. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to establish the impact PTH signaling has on bone adaptation during exercise by inhibiting PTH signaling with PTH(7-34) and the second aim was to determine if increasing PTH levels during exercise with PTH(1-34) can augment bone adaptation. Thirty minutes after a single bout of running on a treadmill, mice exhibited a two-fold increase in systemic PTH levels. Under the same exercise regimen, the influence of PTH signaling on bone adaptation during exercise was then evaluated in mice after 21 consecutive days of exercise and treatment with PTH(7-34), PTH(1-34), or vehicle. Exercise alone caused a significant increase in trabecular bone volume with adaptation to a more plate-like structure, which was inhibited with PTH(7-34) during exercise. Changes in structural and tissue-level mechanical properties during exercise occurred in the absence of significant changes to cortical bone geometry. Inhibition of PTH signaling during exercise attenuated the changes in structural-level mechanical properties, but not tissue-level properties. Enhanced PTH signaling during exercise with PTH(1-34) increased trabecular and cortical bone volume, but had little effect on the structural and tissue-level mechanical properties compared to exercise alone. Our study is the first to demonstrate that bone adaptation during exercise is not only a function of the dynamic loading, but also PTH release, and that PTH signaling contributes differently at the structural and tissue-levels. PMID:25529455

  19. THE ECONOMICS OF INTENSE EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, David O.; Jena, Anupam B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of exercise, the time required for exercise is widely understood as a major reason for low levels of exercise in the US. Intensity of exercise can change the time required for a given amount of total exercise but has never been studied from an economic perspective. We present a simple model of exercise behavior which suggests that the intensity of exercise should increase relative to time spent exercising as wages increase, holding other determinants of exercise constant. Our empirical results identify an association between income and exercise intensity that is consistent with the hypothesis that people respond to increased time costs of exercise by increasing intensity. More generally, our results suggest that time costs may be an important determinant of exercise patterns and that factors that can influence the time costs of exercise, such as intensity, may be important concerns in designing interventions to promote exercise. PMID:20371127

  20. Relationship of pulmonary arterial pressure to pulmonary haemorrhage in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, I; Meyer, M R; Erickson, H H

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH) is characterised by blood in the airways after strenuous exercise and results from stress failure of the pulmonary capillaries. The purpose of this experiment was to establish a threshold value of transmural pulmonary arterial pressure at which haemorrhage occurs in the exercising horse. Five geldings, age 4-14 years, were run in random order once every 2 weeks at 1 of 4 speeds (9, 11, 13, 15 m/s); one day with no run was used as a control. Heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and oesophageal pressure were recorded for the duration of the run. Transmural pulmonary arterial pressure was estimated by electronic subtraction of the oesophageal pressure from the intravascular pulmonary arterial pressure. Within 1 h of the run, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the red and white blood cells in the fluid were quantified. Red cell counts in the lavage fluid from horses running at 9, 11 and 13 m/s were not significantly different from the control value, but after runs at 15 m/s, red cell counts were significantly (P<0.05) higher. White cell counts were not different from control values at any speed. Analysis of red cell count vs. transmural pulmonary arterial pressure indicated that haemorrhage occurs at approximately 95 mmHg. Red cell lysis in the lavage fluid was also apparent at transmural pulmonary arterial pressures above 90 mmHg. We conclude that, in the exercising horse, a pulmonary arterial pressure threshold exists above which haemorrhage occurs, and that pressure is often exceeded during high speed sprint exercise. PMID:11037258

  1. Combined carbohydrate-protein supplementation improves competitive endurance exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Andrew J; Murgatroyd, Scott R; McNab, Alison; Whyte, Laura J; Easton, Chris

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory-based studies have demonstrated that adding protein (PRO) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement can improve thermoregulatory capacity, exercise performance and recovery. However, no study has investigated these effects in a competitive sporting context. This study assessed the effects of combined CHO-PRO supplementation on physiological responses and exercise performance during 8 days of strenuous competition in a hot environment. Twenty-eight cyclists participating in the TransAlp mountain bike race were randomly assigned to fitness-matched placebo (PLA 76 g L(-1) CHO) or CHO-PRO (18 g L(-1) PRO, 72 g L(-1) CHO) groups. Participants were given enough supplements to allow ad libitum consumption. Physiological and anthropometric variables were recorded pre- and post-exercise. Body mass decreased significantly from race stage 1 to 8 in the PLA group (-0.75 ± 0.22 kg, P = 0.01) but did not change in the CHO-PRO group (0.42 ± 0.42 kg, P = 0.35). Creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were substantially elevated during the race, but were not different between groups (P = 0.82, P = 0.44, respectively). Urine osmolality was significantly higher in the CHO-PRO versus the PLA group (P = 0.04) and the rise in tympanic temperature from pre- to post-exercise was significantly less in CHO-PRO versus PLA (P = 0.01). The CHO-PRO group also completed the 8 stages significantly quicker than the PLA group (2,277 ± 127 vs. 2,592 ± 68 min, respectively, P = 0.02). CHO-PRO supplementation therefore appears to prevent body mass loss, enhance thermoregulatory capacity and improve competitive exercise performance despite no effect on muscle damage. PMID:21259024

  2. Physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Sculley, Dean V; Hodson, Jacob A; Dascombe, Ben J

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise or subsequent cardiovascular and perceptual responses. Twelve resistance-trained young men (age, 25.3 ± 4.3 years; height, 179.0 ± 4.5 cm; body mass, 83.4 ± 9.1 kg) were tested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat and deadlift. Following this, participants completed 3 separate randomized trials of 5 × 5 repetitions at 80% 1RM, with 3 minutes rest between sets, in normoxia (NORM; fraction of inspired oxygen [FIO2] = 0.21), moderate-level hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.16), or high-level hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.13) by a portable hypoxic unit. Peak and mean force and power variables were monitored during exercise. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed immediately following each set. No differences in force or power variables were evident between conditions. Similar trends were evident in these variables across each set and across the exercise session in each condition. SpO2 was lower in hypoxic conditions than in NORM, whereas HR was higher following sets performed in hypoxia. There were no differences between conditions in RPE. These results indicate that a hypoxic stimulus during high-intensity resistance exercise does not alter physical performance during repetitions and sets or affect how strenuous exercise is perceived to be. This novel training strategy can be used without adversely affecting the physical training dose experienced and may provide benefits over the equivalent training in NORM. PMID:25226332

  3. Acute effects of aerobic exercise on mood.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Cox, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-two female students participated in a single-session experiment during which they carried out two 8-min trials of high-intensity exercise and two 8-min trials of low-intensity exercise. One high- and one low-exercise trial were accompanied by music; the other two trials were accompanied by metronome. Mood was assessed with a modification of the Profile of Mood States before and immediately after each trial. The purpose of the experiment was disguised to reduce the influence of subject expectations on mood responses. Participants were divided into fit and unfit groups based on heart rate responses during high-exercise trials. Overall, high-intensity exercise led to increases in tension/anxiety and fatigue, whereas positive mood changes (vigor and exhilaration) were seen following low-intensity exercise only. No group differences in mood responses were observed. Explanations of these results are considered in light of other literature concerning the acute effects of exercise on mood. PMID:3168978

  4. Resistance exercise training and the orthostatic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, J. P.; Bamman, M. M.; Yelle, J. M.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Rowe, R. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Lee, S. M.; Spector, E. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been suggested to increase blood volume, increase the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor cardiac reflex response (BARO), and decrease leg compliance, all factors that are expected to improve orthostatic tolerance. To further test these hypotheses, cardiovascular responses to standing and to pre-syncopal limited lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were measured in two groups of sedentary men before and after a 12-week period of either exercise (n = 10) or no exercise (control, n = 9). Resistance exercise training consisted of nine isotonic exercises, four sets of each, 3 days per week, stressing all major muscle groups. After exercise training, leg muscle volumes increased (P < 0.05) by 4-14%, lean body mass increased (P = 0.00) by 2.0 (0.5) kg, leg compliance and BARO were not significantly altered, and the maximal LBNP tolerated without pre-syncope was not significantly different. Supine resting heart rate was reduced (P = 0.03) without attenuating the heart rate or blood pressure responses during the stand test or LBNP. Also, blood volume (125I and 51Cr) and red cell mass were increased (P < 0.02) by 2.8% and 3.9%, respectively. These findings indicate that intense resistance exercise increases blood volume but does not consistently improve orthostatic tolerance.

  5. Delta Opioid Receptors: The Link between Exercise and Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana P.; Verdoorn, Karine S.; Daliry, Anissa; Powers, Scott K.; Ortenzi, Victor H.; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role of opioid receptor (OR) subtypes as a mechanism by which endurance exercise promotes cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Wistar rats were randomly divided into one of seven experimental groups: 1) control; 2) exercise-trained; 3) exercise-trained plus a non-selective OR antagonist; 4) control sham; 5) exercise-trained plus a kappa OR antagonist; 6) exercise-trained plus a delta OR antagonist; and 7) exercise-trained plus a mu OR antagonist. The exercised animals underwent 4 consecutive days of treadmill training (60 min/day at ∼70% of maximal oxygen consumption). All groups except the sham group were exposed to an in vivo myocardial IR insult, and the myocardial infarct size (IS) was determined histologically. Myocardial capillary density, OR subtype expression, heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity were measured in the hearts of both the exercised and control groups. Exercise training significantly reduced the myocardial IS by approximately 34%. Pharmacological blockade of the kappa or mu OR subtypes did not blunt exercise-induced cardioprotection against IR-mediated infarction, whereas treatment of animals with a non-selective OR antagonist or a delta OR antagonist abolished exercise-induced cardioprotection. Exercise training enhanced the activities of myocardial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase but did not increase the left ventricular capillary density or the mRNA levels of HSP72, SOD, and catalase. In addition, exercise significantly reduced the protein expression of kappa and delta ORs in the heart by 44% and 37%, respectively. Together, these results indicate that ORs contribute to the cardioprotection conferred by endurance exercise, with the delta OR subtype playing a key role in this response. PMID:25415192

  6. Exercise compliance and the gym ball: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Larry G

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation and exercise are recommended by chiropractors for treatment and prevention of low back problems. Many patients stop their exercise program with improvement in their symptoms. The success of exercises for the prevention of low back pain is dependent on several factors, one being continued compliance to the program. Only a small percentage of the general population do regular exercise; therefore, it is essential that patients recognize the importance of regular exercise in reducing the recurrence of their low back pain. This case study shows how the use of a gym ball appears to have improved compliance and reduced the incidence of low back pain for one patient with a history of re-occurring low back pain and a poor record of exercise compliance. The question must be asked, is this an case incident or is use of the gym ball an appropriate treatment for low back pain?

  7. Increasing blood flow to exercising muscle attenuates systemic cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-11-15

    Reducing blood flow to working muscles during dynamic exercise causes metabolites to accumulate within the active muscles and evokes systemic pressor responses. Whether a similar cardiovascular response is elicited with normal blood flow to exercising muscles during dynamic exercise remains unknown, however. To address that issue, we tested whether cardiovascular responses are affected by increases in blood flow to active muscles. Thirteen healthy subjects performed dynamic plantarflexion exercise for 12 min at 20%, 40%, and 60% of peak workload (EX20, EX40, and EX60) with their lower thigh enclosed in a negative pressure box. Under control conditions, the box pressure was the same as the ambient air pressure. Under negative pressure conditions, beginning 3 min after the start of the exercise, the box pressure was decreased by 20, 45, and then 70 mmHg in stepwise fashion with 3-min step durations. During EX20, the negative pressure had no effect on blood flow or the cardiovascular responses measured. However, application of negative pressure increased blood flow to the exercising leg during EX40 and EX60. This increase in blood flow had no significant effect on systemic cardiovascular responses during EX40, but it markedly attenuated the pressor responses otherwise seen during EX60. These results demonstrate that during mild exercise, normal blood flow to exercising muscle is not a factor eliciting cardiovascular responses, whereas it elicits an important pressor effect during moderate exercise. This suggests blood flow to exercising muscle is a major determinant of cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise at higher than moderate intensity. PMID:26377556

  8. Post-Plyometric Exercise Hypotension and Heart Rate in Normotensive Individuals: Influence of Exercise Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Rahimzadeh, Mehdi; Moradkhani, Amir-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of high, moderate and low intensity plyometric exercise on the post-exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate responses. Methods Ten healthy normotensive men (age, 21.1±0.9 years; height, 175.8±6 cm; and body mass, 69.1±13.6 kg) volunteered to participate in this study and were evaluated for three non-consecutive days in depth jump exercise from 20-cm box (low intensity [LI]), 40-cm box (moderate intensity [MI]) and 60-cm box (high intensity [HI]) for 5 sets of 20 repetitions. After each exercise session, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured every 10 min for a period of 90 min. Results No significant differences were observed among post-exercise SBP, DBP and HR when the protocols (LI, MI and HI) were compared. The LI and HI protocols showed greater reduction in SBP at 40th-70th min of post-exercise (~9%), whereas the LI and MI protocols indicated greater reduction in DBP at 10th-50th min of post exercise (~10%). In addition, the change in the DBP for HI was not significant and the increases in the HR were similar for all intensities. Conclusion It can be concluded that a plyometric exercise (PE) can reduce SBP and DBP post-exercise and therefore we can say that PE has significant effects for reducing BP and HR or post-exercise hypotension. PMID:24799997

  9. Aging, Functional Capacity and Eccentric Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Mandy L.; Willems, Mark E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that ultimately induces a decline in our physiological functioning, causing a decreased health-span, quality of life and independence for older adults. Exercise participation is seen as a way to reduce the impact of aging through maintenance of physiological parameters. Eccentric exercise is a model that can be employed with older adults, due to the muscle’s ability to combine high muscle force production with a low energy cost. There may however be a risk of muscle damage before the muscle is able to adapt. The first part of this review describes the process of aging and how it reduces aerobic capacity, muscle strength and therefore functional mobility. The second part highlights eccentric exercise and the associated muscle damage, in addition to the repeated bout effect. The final section reviews eccentric exercise interventions that have been completed by older adults with a focus on the changes in functional mobility. In conclusion, eccentric endurance exercise is a potential training modality that can be applied to older adults for improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity and functional ability. However, further research is needed to assess the effects on aerobic capacity and the ideal prescription for eccentric endurance exercise. PMID:24307968

  10. Knowledge of carbohydrate consumption does not alter natural killer cell activity following an acute bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Brian K; Hutchison, Alexander T; Kueht, Michael L

    2008-10-01

    Carbohydrate consumption during strenuous aerobic exercise reportedly minimizes post-exercise suppression of the innate immune system. One of the most common measurements of innate immunity is natural killer cell activity (NKCA). It is not known whether actual carbohydrate consumption or merely the knowledge of carbohydrate consumption mediates alteration in NKCA. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if knowledge of carbohydrate beverage could result in alteration of RPE and NKCA, independent of actual carbohydrate intake. We recruited 11 male and female endurance athletes and randomly assigned them to either a correct or false knowledge of carbohydrate intake, such that in the false group, subjects were informed that they were receiving the carbohydrate beverage (CHO), but actually received a placebo (PLA) beverage. CHO and PLA beverages were matched to be similar in taste and appearance. Subjects completed 60 min of cycle ergometry (74% of VO2 peak). Venous blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 2 h after (2H) exercise and used to determine plasma glucose concentration, leukocyte total and differential counts, and NKCA. Data were statistically analyzed using a 3-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p < 0.05). We did not find a significant effect of knowledge of drink type on leukocyte count, leukocyte differential, or NKCA. Drink type did not significantly alter leukocyte total, differential counts, or NKCA. There was a significant effect of exercise on NKCA. Knowledge of drink type does not alter innate immunity following exercise as assessed by leukocyte counts and NKCA. PMID:18923577

  11. Do physical exercise and reading reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease? a cross-sectional study on factors associated with Parkinson’s disease in elderly Chinese veterans

    PubMed Central

    Zou, YM; Tan, JP; Li, N; Yang, JS; Yu, BC; Yu, JM; Zhao, YM; Wang, LN

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors for and factors protecting against Parkinson’s disease (PD) in elderly Chinese veterans. Methods Using a database containing detailed information on the health status of the nervous system in elderly Chinese veterans, univariate and multivariate analyses of factors that may be associated with PD were performed. Univariate analysis of qualitative data was done using the Pearson Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests, and the Mann–Whitney U nonparametric test was used for univariate analysis of quantitative data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for and factors protecting against PD in elderly Chinese veterans. Results A total of 9,676 elderly Chinese veterans were enrolled, including 228 cases with PD and 183 cases with Parkinson’s syndrome, with 9,265 non-PD subjects serving as controls. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.343, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.028–1.755) and medical history of essential tremor (OR 1.228, 95% CI 1.081–1.396) were identified as independent risk factors for PD, with age being the most important risk factor. Physical exercise (OR 0.478, 95% CI 0.355–0.643) and reading (OR 0.513, 95% CI 0.357–0.735) were identified as independent factors protecting against PD, and physical exercise showed better protection against PD relative to reading. Smoking, alcohol use, anemia, cerebral trauma, education level, and electromagnetic field exposure showed no association with PD. Conclusion Physical exercise and reading may be independent factors that protect against PD among elderly Chinese veterans, while advancing age and medical history of essential tremor may be independent risk factors for PD. This study was cross-sectional, so further research is needed to confirm its results. PMID:25834444

  12. Exercise for the Overweight Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Janis A.

    1990-01-01

    Exercise can help patients maintain lean body mass during weight loss. Although exercise is not extremely useful in shedding excess pounds, it helps keep off weight lost through calorie restriction. This article discusses the specifics of exercise prescription, types of exercise, motivation to exercise, and special problems such as diabetes. (SM)

  13. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  14. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  15. Exercise in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension that is occurring in increasing frequency across the global population. Although there is some controversy about its diagnostic criteria, oxidative stress, which is defined as imbalance between the production and inactivation of reactive oxygen species, has a major pathophysiological role in all the components of this disease. Oxidative stress and consequent inflammation induce insulin resistance, which likely links the various components of this disease. We briefly review the role of oxidative stress as a major component of the metabolic syndrome and then discuss the impact of exercise on these pathophysiological pathways. Included in this paper is the effect of exercise in reducing fat-induced inflammation, blood pressure, and improving muscular metabolism. PMID:22829955

  16. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  17. Exercise enhances memory consolidation in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, Shikha; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W; Cotman, Carl W

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to reduce age-related losses in cognitive function including learning and memory, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. Memory formation occurs in stages that include an initial acquisition phase, an intermediate labile phase, and then a process of consolidation which leads to long-term memory formation. An effective way to examine the mechanism by which exercise improves memory is to introduce the intervention (exercise), post-acquisition, making it possible to selectively examine memory storage and consolidation. Accordingly we evaluated the effects of post-trial exercise (10 min on a treadmill) on memory consolidation in aged canines both right after, an hour after, and 24 h after acute exercise training in concurrent discrimination, object location memory (OLM), and novel object recognition tasks. Our study shows that post-trial exercise facilitates memory function by improving memory consolidation in aged animals in a time-dependent manner. The improvements were significant at 24 h post-exercise and not right after or 1 h after exercise. Aged animals were also tested following chronic exercise (10 min/day for 14 consecutive days) on OLM or till criterion were reached (for reversal learning task). We found improvements from a chronic exercise design in both the object location and reversal learning tasks. Our studies suggest that mechanisms to improve overall consolidation and cognitive function remain accessible even with progressing age and can be re-engaged by both acute and chronic exercise. PMID:24550824

  18. Exercise enhances memory consolidation in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Snigdha, Shikha; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W.; Cotman, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to reduce age-related losses in cognitive function including learning and memory, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. Memory formation occurs in stages that include an initial acquisition phase, an intermediate labile phase, and then a process of consolidation which leads to long-term memory formation. An effective way to examine the mechanism by which exercise improves memory is to introduce the intervention (exercise), post-acquisition, making it possible to selectively examine memory storage and consolidation. Accordingly we evaluated the effects of post-trial exercise (10 min on a treadmill) on memory consolidation in aged canines both right after, an hour after, and 24 h after acute exercise training in concurrent discrimination, object location memory (OLM), and novel object recognition tasks. Our study shows that post-trial exercise facilitates memory function by improving memory consolidation in aged animals in a time-dependent manner. The improvements were significant at 24 h post-exercise and not right after or 1 h after exercise. Aged animals were also tested following chronic exercise (10 min/day for 14 consecutive days) on OLM or till criterion were reached (for reversal learning task). We found improvements from a chronic exercise design in both the object location and reversal learning tasks. Our studies suggest that mechanisms to improve overall consolidation and cognitive function remain accessible even with progressing age and can be re-engaged by both acute and chronic exercise. PMID:24550824

  19. "Exercise is Medicine": curbing the burden of chronic disease and physical inactivity.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Jeff S; Law, Jen; Lancashire, Bill; Fassett, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    An exercise program designed to improve fitness is essential for most adults. Exercise decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, depression, and anxiety. Most fail to achieve recommended exercise levels. Only 1.3% of Australian general practice (GP) consultations provide exercise counseling and advice. Australia provides Medicare reimbursement for consultations with Accredited Exercise Physiologists through allied health care plans initiated through primary care. Exercise Is Medicine is an initiative to equip primary care providers with resources, education, and strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. The objective of Exercise Is Medicine is to improve the health and well-being of our nation. We describe Exercise Is Medicine and encourage primary care providers to discuss physical activity and exercise with their patients and provide them with resources to encourage this activity and referral pathways to train exercise professionals. This will assist primary care providers in treating their patients. PMID:23572372

  20. Exercise and knee osteoarthritis: benefit or hazard?

    PubMed Central

    Bosomworth, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine whether physical exercise constitutes a benefit or a risk in the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, ACP Journal Club, and Cochrane databases were searched from registry inception to January 2009 using MeSH headings or text words, including osteoarthritis, arthritis and knee and exercise, physical training, and run. Reference lists from retrieved articles, citation listings when available, and related articles suggested in PubMed were also evaluated. For individuals without osteoarthritis, strong level II evidence was found (limited by problems with blinding and randomization); for those with pre-existing knee osteoarthritis, robust level I evidence was available. MAIN MESSAGE Knee osteoarthritis is a major contributor to disability in seniors, and patients have expressed concern that continued exercise might lead to knee symptoms in later years. Studies done on subjects self-selected for exercise and followed for substantial periods of time show no evidence of accelerated development of osteoarthritis, provided injury is avoided. Further, there is good evidence for reduced pain and disability with exercise in this cohort compared with controls. Patients with established osteoarthritis are shown to derive uniform benefit to physical functioning, with reduction of pain and disability, using aerobic, muscle strengthening, aquatic, or physiotherapy-based exercise modalities. CONCLUSION Provided trauma is avoided, moderate exercise does not lead to acceleration of knee osteoarthritis, whether or not there is evidence of pre-existing disease. In either case there appears to be improved physical functioning and reduction of pain and disability in those who exercise. It is likely that exercise interventions are underused in the management of established knee osteoarthritis symptoms. PMID:19752252