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Sample records for streptococcus promotes resistance

  1. Streptococcal inhibitor of complement promotes innate immune resistance phenotypes of invasive M1T1 group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Pence, Morgan A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Cogen, Anna L; Cole, Jason N; Hollands, Andrew; Gallo, Richard L; Nizet, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) is a highly polymorphic extracellular protein and putative virulence factor secreted by M1 and M57 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS). The sic gene is highly upregulated in invasive M1T1 GAS isolates following selection of mutations in the covR/S regulatory locus in vivo. Previous work has shown that SIC (allelic form 1.01) binds to and inactivates complement C5b67 and human cathelicidin LL-37. We examined the contribution of SIC to innate immune resistance phenotypes of GAS in the intact organism, using (1) targeted deletion of sic in wild-type and animal-passaged (covS mutant) M1T1 GAS harboring the sic 1.84 allele and (2) heterologous expression of sic in M49 GAS, which does not possess the sic genein its genome. We find that M1T1 SIC production is strongly upregulated upon covS mutation but that the sic gene is not required for generation and selection of covS mutants in vivo. SIC 1.84 bound both human and murine cathelicidins and was necessary and sufficient to promote covS mutant M1T1 GAS resistance to LL-37, growth in human whole blood and virulence in a murine model of systemic infection. Finally, the sic knockout mutant M1T1 GAS strain was deficient in growth in human serum and intracellular macrophage survival. We conclude that SIC contributes to M1T1 GAS immune resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:20814187

  2. Factor H Binds to the Hypervariable Region of Many Streptococcus pyogenes M Proteins but Does Not Promote Phagocytosis Resistance or Acute Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Bodil M.; Olsen, John E.; Harris, Claire L.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR) of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems. PMID:23637608

  3. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus species

    PubMed Central

    Ilakkiya, A.; Parveen, Shabana; Kumar, C. Naveen; Swathi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Streptococci are Gram-positive spherical bacteria (cocci) that characteristically form pairs and chains during growth. Some macrolide-resistant bacteria lack the proper receptor on the ribosome (through methylation of the rRNA). This may be under plasmid or chromosomal control. Aim and Objectives: The aim was to study the prevalence of macrolide resistance among the isolate and evaluate the degree of resistance by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. And also to detect the phenotypic pattern of macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: All age group attending general medicine OPD and pediatric OPD with symptoms of respiratory and pyogenic infections are included in the study. Various samples are collected with detailed case history and processed for macrolide resistance among beta hemolytic Streptococci MIC method and D-test. Results: According to our studies resistance pattern in Group A Streptococci by D-test, cMLS was 27.85%, iMLS was 13.92%, M-type was 55.69%, in GCS, cMLS was 17.6%, M-type was 82.35% In GGS, cMLS was 31.58%, iMLS was 10.53% and M-type was 57.89%. Conclusions: Therefore by this study, we would like to highlight the necessity to do antibiotic sensitivity testing for all isolates, and limit the usage of antibiotics, whenever necessary and select the appropriate antibiotics for resistant strains. PMID:26015727

  4. Isolation and characterization of chromosomal promoters of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Slos, P; Bourquin, J C; Lemoine, Y; Mercenier, A

    1991-01-01

    A promoter probe vector, pTG244, was constructed with the aim of isolating transcription initiation signals from Streptococcus thermophilus (Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus). pTG244 is based on the Escherichia coli-streptococcus shuttle vector pTG222, into which the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene of Bacillus pumilus (cat-86) was cloned. Random Sau3A fragments from the S. thermophilus A054 chromosomal DNA were cloned upstream of the cat-86 gene by using E. coli as the host. The pool of recombinant plasmids were introduced into S. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in order to search for promoter activity in these hosts. For S. thermophilus, it was necessary to first select erythromycin-resistant transformants and then to screen for chloramphenicol resistance among these. Direct selection of chloramphenicol-resistant clones was, however, possible in L. lactis subsp. lactis. Six fragments exhibiting promoter activity were characterized in S. thermophilus by measuring the levels of cat-86 transcription and/or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activity. Three of the promoter-carrying fragments were sequenced. The 5' ends of their corresponding mRNAs were determined by S1 mapping and shown to correspond to a purine residue in all cases. Upstream from these potential transcription start points, sequences homologous to the E. coli sigma 70 and the Bacillus subtilis vegetative sigma 43 (or sigma A) consensus promoters were identified. Images PMID:1854195

  5. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  6. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains.

    PubMed

    Neemuchwala, Alefiya; Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  7. Antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus agalactiae from cows with mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Yu, Fu-Qing; Luo, Li-Ping; He, Jian-Zhong; Hou, Rong-Guang; Zhang, Han-Qi; Li, Shu-Mei; Su, Jing-Liang; Han, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance patterns of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from cows with mastitis in China. Antibiotic resistance was based on minimum inhibitory concentrations and detection of resistance genes by PCR. S. agalactiae isolates most frequently exhibited phenotypic resistance to tetracycline, while the resistance genes most frequently detected were ermB, tetL and tetM. Resistance genes were detected in some susceptible isolates, whereas no resistance genes could be detected in some resistant isolates, indicating that the resistance genotype does not accurately predict phenotypic resistance. PMID:22627045

  8. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  9. Comparison of genes required for H2O2 resistance in Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifan; Itzek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by several members of the genus Streptococcus mainly through the pyruvate oxidase SpxB under aerobic growth conditions. The acute toxic nature of H2O2 raises the interesting question of how streptococci cope with intrinsically produced H2O2, which subsequently accumulates in the microenvironment and threatens the closely surrounding population. Here, we investigate the H2O2 susceptibility of oral Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis and elucidate potential mechanisms of how they protect themselves from the deleterious effect of H2O2. Both organisms are considered primary colonizers and occupy the same intraoral niche making them potential targets for H2O2 produced by other species. We demonstrate that S. gordonii produces relatively more H2O2 and has a greater ability for resistance to H2O2 stress. Functional studies show that, unlike in Streptococcus pneumoniae, H2O2 resistance is not dependent on a functional SpxB and confirms the important role of the ferritin-like DNA-binding protein Dps. However, the observed increased H2O2 resistance of S. gordonii over S. sanguinis is likely to be caused by an oxidative stress protection machinery present even under anaerobic conditions, while S. sanguinis requires a longer period of time for adaptation. The ability to produce more H2O2 and be more resistant to H2O2 might aid S. gordonii in the competitive oral biofilm environment, since it is lower in abundance yet manages to survive quite efficiently in the oral biofilm. PMID:25280752

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Resistant to Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Haanperä-Heikkinen, M.; Lindgren, M.; Seppälä, H.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2006-01-01

    The telithromycin susceptibility of 210 erythromycin-resistant pneumococci was tested with the agar diffusion method. Twenty-six erm(B)-positive isolates showed heterogeneous resistance to telithromycin, which was manifested by the presence of colonies inside the inhibition zone. When these cells were cultured and tested, they showed stable, homogeneous, and high-level resistance to telithromycin. PMID:16641460

  11. Antimicrobial Susceptibility/Resistance of Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Karcic, Emina; Aljicevic, Mufida; Bektas, Sabaheta; Karcic, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, whose treatment is threatened with an increase in the number of strains resistant to antibiotic therapy. Goal: The main goal of this research was to investigate the presence of antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance of S. pneumoniae. Material and methods: Taken are swabs of the nose and nasopharynx, eye and ear. In vitro tests that were made in order to study the antimicrobial resistance of pneumococci are: disk diffusion method and E-test. Results: The resistance to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis was recorded at 39.17%, protein synthesis inhibitors 19.67%, folate antagonists 47.78% and quinolone in 1.11%. S. pneumoniae has shown drug resistance to erythromycin in 45%, clindamycin in 45%, chloramphenicol–0.56%, rifampicin–6.11%, tetracycline–4.67%, penicillin-G in 4.44%, oxacillin in 73.89%, ciprofloxacin in 1.11% and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 5.34% of cases. Conclusion: The highest resistance pneumococcus showed to erythromycin, clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and these should be avoided in the treatment. The least resistance pneumococcus showed to tetracycline, rifampicin, chloramphenicol, penicillin-G and ciprofloxacin. PMID:26236165

  12. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  13. Antibiotic Resistances of Yogurt Starter Cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Tommaso; Smiley, Martin B.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 15 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were tested for resistance to 35 antimicrobial agents by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Approximately 35% of the isolates had uncharacteristic resistance patterns. PMID:16345654

  14. A new structural paradigm in copper resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Bruce, Kevin E.; Sham, Lok-To; Higgins, Khadine A.; Lisher, John P.; Kazmierczak, Krystyna M.; Maroney, Michael J.; Dann, Charles E.; Winkler, Malcolm E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Copper resistance has emerged as an important virulence determinant of microbial pathogens. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, copper resistance is mediated by the copper-responsive repressor CopY, CupA, and CopA, a copper effluxing P1B-type ATPase. We show here that CupA is a novel cell membrane-anchored Cu(I) chaperone, and that a Cu(I)-binding competent, membrane-localized CupA is obligatory for copper resistance. The crystal structures of the soluble domain of CupA (sCupA) and the N-terminal metal binding domain (MBD) of CopA (CopAMBD) reveal isostructural cupredoxin-like folds each harboring a binuclear Cu(I) cluster unprecedented in bacterial copper trafficking. NMR studies reveal unidirectional Cu(I) transfer from the low-affinity site on sCupA to the high-affinity site of CopAMBD. However, copper binding by CopAMBD is not essential for cellular copper resistance, consistent with a primary role of CupA in cytoplasmic Cu(I) sequestration and/or direct delivery to the transmembrane site of CopA for cellular efflux. PMID:23354287

  15. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Onkar; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  16. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Onkar; O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J; Wessels, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  17. Drug resistance profile and serotype of streptococcus of pneumoniae infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiefei; Huang, Nannan; Wang, Guangzhou; Yu, Fengqin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the surveillance of drug resistance and serotype monitoring of steptococcus pneumoniae in hospitalized children. the pathogenic bacteria isolation and identification methods were employed to do the bacteria isolation identification and drug sensitive test on the specimens from Women & Infants Hospital of Zhengzhou. From the specimens, there were 134 detected strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the drug resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were respectively 97.7% and 89.9%, and the drug resistance to tetracycline, azithromycin and paediatric compound sulfamethoxazole were respectively 86. 3%, 58. 3%, 51. 2%. The vancomycin resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae were often not found. the Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were generally with drug resistant in Zhengzhou area. It shall strengthen drug resistance surveillance, and reasonably choose antibacterial agents. PMID:27592480

  18. Costs of CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Gatchitch, Francois; Gardan, Rozenn; Moineau, Sylvain; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a form of adaptive sequence-specific immunity in microbes. This system offers unique opportunities for the study of coevolution between bacteria and their viral pathogens, bacteriophages. A full understanding of the coevolutionary dynamics of CRISPR-Cas requires knowing the magnitude of the cost of resisting infection. Here, using the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and its associated virulent phage 2972, a well-established model system harbouring at least two type II functional CRISPR-Cas systems, we obtained different fitness measures based on growth assays in isolation or in pairwise competition. We measured the fitness cost associated with different components of this adaptive immune system: the cost of Cas protein expression, the constitutive cost of increasing immune memory through additional spacers, and the conditional costs of immunity during phage exposure. We found that Cas protein expression is particularly costly, as Cas-deficient mutants achieved higher competitive abilities than the wild-type strain with functional Cas proteins. Increasing immune memory by acquiring up to four phage-derived spacers was not associated with fitness costs. In addition, the activation of the CRISPR-Cas system during phage exposure induces significant but small fitness costs. Together these results suggest that the costs of the CRISPR-Cas system arise mainly due to the maintenance of the defence system. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of CRISPR-Cas-mediated immunity. PMID:26224708

  19. Streptococcus mutans: Fructose Transport, Xylitol Resistance, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J.M.; Thompson, A.; Wen, Z.T.; Burne, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiological agent of human dental caries, possesses at least two fructose phosphotransferase systems (PTSs), encoded by fruI and fruCD. fruI is also responsible for xylitol transport. We hypothesized that fructose and xylitol transport systems do not affect virulence. Thus, colonization and cariogenicity of fruI− and fruCD− single and double mutants, their WT (UA159), and xylitol resistance (Xr) of S. mutans were studied in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. A sucrose phosphorylase (gtfA−) mutant and a reference strain (NCTC-10449S) were additional controls. Recoveries of fruI mutant from the teeth were decreased, unlike those for the other strains. The fruCD mutation was associated with a slight loss of cariogenicity on enamel, whereas mutation of fruI was associated with a loss of cariogenicity in dentin. These results also suggest why xylitol inhibition of caries is paradoxically associated with spontaneous emergence of so-called Xr S. mutans in habitual human xylitol users. PMID:16567561

  20. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. RESULTS Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  1. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. Material/Methods Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. Results Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. Conclusions SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  2. Is Streptococcus pyogenes resistant or susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Asha C; Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Tong, Steven Y C; Baird, Robert W; Ward, Peter; McDonald, Malcolm I; Currie, Bart J; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2012-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly believed to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), resulting in reservations about using SXT for skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) where S. pyogenes is involved. S. pyogenes' in vitro susceptibility to SXT depends on the medium's thymidine content. Thymidine allows S. pyogenes to bypass the sulfur-mediated inhibition of folate metabolism and, historically, has resulted in apparently reduced susceptibility of S. pyogenes to sulfur antibacterials. The low thymidine concentration in Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) is now regulated. We explored S. pyogenes susceptibility to SXT on various media. Using two sets of 100 clinical S. pyogenes isolates, we tested for susceptibility using SXT Etests on MHA containing defibrinated horse blood and 20 mg/liter β-NAD (MHF), MHA with sheep blood (MHS), MHA alone, MHA with horse blood (MHBA), and MHA with lysed horse blood (MHLHBA). European Committee on Antibacterial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints defined susceptibility (MIC, ≤ 1 mg/liter) and resistance (MIC, >2 mg/liter). In study 1, 99% of S. pyogenes isolates were susceptible to SXT on MHA, MHBA, and MHLHBA, with geometric mean MICs of 0.04, 0.04, and 0.05 mg/liter, respectively. In study 2, all 100 S. pyogenes isolates were susceptible to SXT on MHF, MHS, MHA, and MHLHBA with geometric mean MICs of 0.07, 0.16, 0.07, and 0.09 mg/liter, respectively. This study confirms the in vitro susceptibility of S. pyogenes to SXT, providing support for the use of SXT for SSTIs. A clinical trial using SXT for impetigo is ongoing. PMID:23052313

  3. Macrolide resistance determinants in erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gulay, Zeynep; Ozbek, Ozgen Alpay; Bicmen, Meral; Gur, Deniz

    2008-11-01

    To determine the major molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Turkey, we examined a total of 151 isolates collected from different regions of Turkey. Overall, 40 (26.4%) isolates were resistant to erythromycin. The most common mechanism (38/40) was target site modification due to erm (B) genes. Only two isolates harbored the mef (A)/(E) efflux gene. A clonal spread of resistant strains could not be demonstrated by BOX-polymerase chain reaction. The results from this study have shown that the erm (B) gene is predominant in Turkish S. pneumoniae isolates, as in isolates from the rest of the world, and a clonal dissemination is not responsible for this resistance profile. PMID:19050364

  4. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in the Pediatric Population in Germany during 2000-2001

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Lütticken, Rudolf; Bryskier, André; Al-Lahham, Adnan

    2003-01-01

    In a nationwide study in Germany covering 13 clinical microbiology laboratories, a total of 307 Streptococcus pyogenes (mainly pharyngitis) and 333 Streptococcus pneumoniae (respiratory tract infections) strains were collected from outpatients less than 16 years of age. The MICs of penicillin G, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin A, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were determined by the microdilution method. In S. pyogenes isolates, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin, 0%; erythromycin A, 13.7%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin showed good activity against S. pyogenes isolates (MIC90 = 0.25 μg/ml; MIC range, 0.016 to 16 μg/ml). Three strains were found to be telithromycin-resistant (MIC ≥ 4 μg/ml). Erythromycin-resistant strains were characterized for the underlying resistance genotype, with 40.5% having the efflux type mef(A), 38.1% having the erm(A), and 9.5% having the erm(B) genotypes. emm typing of macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes isolates showed emm types 4 (45.2%), 77 (26.2%), and 12 (11.9%) to be predominant. In S. pneumoniae, resistance rates were as follows: penicillin intermediate, 7.5%; penicillin resistant, 0%; erythromycin A, 17.4%; and levofloxacin, 0%. Telithromycin was highly active against pneumococcal isolates (MIC90 ≤ 0.016 μg/ml; range, 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml). The overall resistance profile of streptococcal respiratory tract isolates is still favorable, but macrolide resistance is of growing concern in Germany. PMID:12543648

  5. Effects of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain Background on Complement Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hyams, Catherine; Opel, Sophia; Hanage, William; Yuste, Jose; Bax, Katie; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Spratt, Brian G.; Brown, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunity to infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is dependent on complement. There are wide variations in sensitivity to complement between S. pneumoniae strains that could affect their ability to cause invasive infections. Although capsular serotype is one important factor causing differences in complement resistance between strains, there is also considerable other genetic variation between S. pneumoniae strains that may affect complement-mediated immunity. We have therefore investigated whether genetically distinct S. pneumoniae strains with the same capsular serotype vary in their sensitivity to complement mediated immunity. Methodology and Principal Findings C3b/iC3b deposition and neutrophil association were measured using flow cytometry assays for S. pneumoniae strains with different genetic backgrounds for each of eight capsular serotypes. For some capsular serotypes there was marked variation in C3b/iC3b deposition between different strains that was independent of capsule thickness and correlated closely to susceptibility to neutrophil association. C3b/iC3b deposition results also correlated weakly with the degree of IgG binding to each strain. However, the binding of C1q (the first component of the classical pathway) correlated more closely with C3b/iC3b deposition, and large differences remained in complement sensitivity between strains with the same capsular serotype in sera in which IgG had been cleaved with IdeS. Conclusions These data demonstrate that bacterial factors independent of the capsule and recognition by IgG have strong effects on the susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to complement, and could therefore potentially account for some of the differences in virulence between strains. PMID:22022358

  6. Identification and Functional Analysis of Genome Mutations in a Fluoride-Resistant Streptococcus mutans Strain

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance. PMID:25856576

  7. Isolation of quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae from asymptomatic Korean women.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hye Ran; Lee, Hak Mee; Lee, Yeonhee

    2008-02-01

    Seven Streptococcus agalactiae isolates were obtained from the vagina of 80 asymptomatic women. Three of these isolates showed multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes: two isolates were resistant to clarithromycin, clindamycin, erythromycin, and tetracycline; and one isolate was resistant to clarithromycin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. There was no clonal relationship among the MDR isolates. This is the first report of quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant S. agalactiae. PMID:18337702

  8. Serotypes, Clones, and Mechanisms of Resistance of Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Laura; Ardanuy, C.; Cercenado, E.; Fenoll, A.; Bouza, E.; Pallares, R.; Martín, R.; Liñares, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distributions of antibiotic susceptibility patterns, serotypes, phenotypes, genotypes, and macrolide resistance genes among 125 nonduplicated erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates collected in a Spanish point prevalence study. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides in this study was 34.7%. Multiresistance (to three or more antimicrobials) was observed in 81.6% of these strains. Among 15 antimicrobials studied, cefotaxime, moxifloxacin, telithromycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin were the most active drugs. The most frequent serotypes of erythromycin-resistant isolates were 19F (25%), 19A (17%), 6B (12%), 14 (10%), and 23F (10%). Of the 125 strains, 109 (87.2%) showed the MLSB phenotype [103 had the erm(B) gene and 6 had both erm(B) and mef(E) genes]. Sixteen (12.8%) strains showed the M phenotype [14 with mef(E) and 2 with mef(A)]. All isolates were tested by PCR for the presence of the int, xis, tnpR, and tnpA genes associated with conjugative transposons (Tn916 family and Tn917). Positive detection of erm(B), tet(M), int, and xis genes related to the Tn916 family was found in 77.1% of MLSB phenotype strains. In 16 strains, only the tndX, erm(B), and tet(M) genes were detected, suggesting the presence of Tn1116, a transposon recently described for Streptococcus pyogenes. Five clones, namely, Sweden15A-25, clone19F ST87, Spain23F-1, Spain6B-2, and clone19A ST276, accounted for half of the MLSB strains. In conclusion, the majority of erythromycin-resistant pneumococci isolated in Spain had the MLSB phenotype, belonged to multiresistant international clones, and carried the erm(B), tet(M), xis, and int genes, suggesting the spread of transposons of the Tn916 family. PMID:17606677

  9. Plasmid mediated enhancement of uv resistance in Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Miehl, R.; Miller, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 38.5-Mdal plasmid of Streptococcus faecalis subdp. zymogenes has been shown to enhance survival following uv irradiation. In addition, the presence of this plasmid increases the mutation frequencies following uv irradiation and enhanced W-reactivation. The data presented indicate that S. faecalis has an inducible error-prone repair system and that the plasmid enhances these repair functions.

  10. Activity of faropenem against resistant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Moland, E S; Chartrand, S A; Thomson, K S

    2001-01-01

    An in vitro study of the activity of 9 agents against 181 US pediatric isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae identified imipenem and faropenem as the most active agents. Overall, faropenem was the most potent oral agent inhibiting 98% of isolates at 1 microg/mL. PMID:11687320

  11. Streptococcus anginosus (milleri) Group Strains Isolated in Poland (1996-2012) and their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Obszańska, Katarzyna; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabella; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Machura, Katarzyna; Stefaniuk, Elzbieta; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sitkiewicz, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus form a group of related streptococcal species, namely the Streptococcus Anginosus Group (SAG). The group, previously called "milleri" had been rarely described until 1980/1990 as source of infections. Nowadays SAG bacteria are often described as pathogens causing predominantly purulent infections. The number of infections is highly underestimated, as SAG strains are often classified in the microbiology laboratory as less virulent "viridans streptococci" Epidemiological situation regarding SAG infections in Poland has been unrecognized, therefore we performed a retrospective analysis of strains isolated between 1996 and 2012. Strains suspected of belonging to SAG were re-identified using an automated biochemical approach (Vitek2) and MALDI-TOF MS. We performed first analysis of antibiotic resistance among SAG strains isolated in Poland using automated methods (Vitek2), disk diffusion tests and E-Tests. We also performed PCR detection of resistance determinants in antibiotic resistant strains. Clonal structure of analyzed strains was evaluated with PFGE and MLVF methods. All three species are difficult to distinguish using automated diagnostic methods and the same is true for automated MIC evaluation. Our analysis revealed SAG strains are rarely isolated in Poland, predominantly from purulent infections. All isolates are very diverse on the genomic level as estimated by PFGE and MLVF analyses. All analyzed strains are sensitive to penicillin, a substantial group of strains is resistant to macrolides and the majority of strains are resistant to tetracycline. PMID:27281992

  12. mefE is necessary for the erythromycin-resistant M phenotype in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A; Clancy, J; Cronan, M; Dib-Hajj, F; Wondrack, L; Yuan, W; Sutcliffe, J

    1997-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that a significant number of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes strains contain a determinant that mediates resistance via a putative efflux pump. The gene encoding the erythromycin-resistant determinant was cloned and sequenced from three strains of S. pneumoniae bearing the M phenotype (macrolide resistant but clindamycin and streptogramin B susceptible). The DNA sequences of mefE were nearly identical, with only 2-nucleotide differences between genes from any two strains. When the mefE sequences were compared to the mefA sequence from S. pyogenes, the two genes were found to be closely related (90% identity). Strains of S. pneumoniae were constructed to confirm that mefE is necessary to confer erythromycin resistance and to explore the substrate specificity of the pump; no substrates other than 14- and 15-membered macrolides were identified. PMID:9333056

  13. Development of live attenuated sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae polyvalent vaccines to protect Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resi...

  14. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through selection of resistance to sparfloxacin, an attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar was obtained from its virulent parent strain S. agalactiae 138P. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138spar is 1,838,126 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identi...

  15. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae as potential vaccines by selecting for resistance to sparfloxacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resi...

  16. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine strain 138spar is 1,838,126 bp in size. The genome has 1892 coding sequences and 82 RNAs. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline. The publishing of this genome will allo...

  17. Multidrug-resistant viridans streptococcus (MDRVS) osteomyelitis of the mandible successfully treated with moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jocelyn Y; Asmar, Basim I

    2008-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant viridans group streptococcus (MDRVS) strains have emerged as important pathogens. Treatment of MDRVS infections is problematic. The use of fluoroquinolones for treatment of MDRVS osteomyelitis has not been established. We present the first case of MDRVS osteomyelitis of the mandible successfully treated with sequential intravenous then oral moxifloxacin, and review the literature on the subject. PMID:18414152

  18. Frequency of Spontaneous Resistance to Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor GSK1322322 in Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Min, Sharon; Ingraham, Karen; Huang, Jianzhong; McCloskey, Lynn; Rilling, Sarah; Windau, Anne; Pizzollo, Jason; Butler, Deborah; Aubart, Kelly; Miller, Linda A; Zalacain, Magdalena; Holmes, David J; O'Dwyer, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The continuous emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria is compromising the successful treatment of serious microbial infections. GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitor, shows good in vitro antibacterial activity and has demonstrated safety and efficacy in human proof-of-concept clinical studies. In vitro studies were performed to determine the frequency of resistance (FoR) to this antimicrobial agent in major pathogens that cause respiratory tract and skin infections. Resistance to GSK1322322 occurred at high frequency through loss-of-function mutations in the formyl-methionyl transferase (FMT) protein in Staphylococcus aureus (4/4 strains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (4/4 strains) and via missense mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae (6/21 strains), but the mutations were associated with severe in vitro and/or in vivo fitness costs. The overall FoR to GSK1322322 was very low in Haemophilus influenzae, with only one PDF mutant being identified in one of four strains. No target-based mutants were identified from S. pyogenes, and only one or no PDF mutants were isolated in three of the four S. aureus strains studied. In S. pneumoniae, PDF mutants were isolated from only six of 21 strains tested; an additional 10 strains did not yield colonies on GSK1322322-containing plates. Most of the PDF mutants characterized from those three organisms (35/37 mutants) carried mutations in residues at or in close proximity to one of three highly conserved motifs that are part of the active site of the PDF protein, with 30 of the 35 mutations occurring at position V71 (using the S. pneumoniae numbering system). PMID:26014938

  19. Development and efficacy of a noviobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae as a novel vaccine in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine was developed from a virulent strain of Streptococcus iniae (ISET0901) through selection for novobiocin resistance (therefore named ISNO). The safety of ISNO was then evaluated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) through intraperitoneal (IP) injecti...

  20. Development and efficacy of a novobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae as a novel vaccine in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine was developed from a virulent strain of Streptococcus iniae through selection for novobiocin resistance. The safety of the novel vaccine (named ISNO) was then evaluated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) through intraperitoneal (IP) injection. When...

  1. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  2. Helper plasmid cloning in Streptococcus sanguis: cloning of a tetracycline resistance determinant from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, J A; Macrina, F L

    1982-01-01

    A model system for testing the helper plasmid cloning system of Gryczan et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 177:459-467, 1980) was devised for the Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) host-vector system. In this system, linearized pVA736 plasmid efficiently transformed an S. sanguis (Challis) host containing a homologous plasmid, pVA380-1, but did not transform a plasmidless host or a host containing a nonhomologous plasmid, pVA380. In addition, whereas monomeric circular pVA736 transformed a plasmidless host with two-hit kinetics, it transformed a pVA380-1-containing host with one-hit kinetics. This helper plasmid cloning system was used to isolate two HindIII fragments (5.0 megadaltons [Mdal] and 1.9 Mdal in size) from the chromosome of Streptococcus mutans V825 which conferred high-level tetracycline resistance. One tetracycline-resistant clone was examined and found to contain three plasmids which were sized and designated pVA868 (9.0 Mdal), pVA869 (9.5 Mdal), and pVA870 (9.8 Mdal). Results of Southern blot hybridization and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed that all three chimeras were composed of two HindIII fragments of the S. mutans V825 chromosome, as well as a large portion, varying in size for each chimera, of the 2.8 Mdal cloning vector, pVA380-1. Incompatibility observed between pVA380-1 and each of the chimeras indicated that replication of the chimeras was governed by the pVA380-1 replicative origin. Southern blotting experiments revealed that the chimeras hybridized to Tn916, providing the first evidence that transposon-related genes of enteric streptococcal origin are disseminated among oral streptococci. Images PMID:6288658

  3. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in the genus Streptococcus: characterization of a vanB transferable determinant in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Poyart, C; Pierre, C; Quesne, G; Pron, B; Berche, P; Trieu-Cuot, P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis NEM760 was isolated from a stool swab collected on admission from a patient as surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Strain NEM760 was identified as S. bovis by conventional biochemical methods and partial sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA. This strain was resistant to a low level of vancomycin (MIC, 64 micrograms/ml) but was susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, 1 micrograms/ml), and vancomycin induced resistance to both glycopeptides. The presence of a vanB-related gene in NEM760 was demonstrated in a PCR assay which enabled specific amplification of a 635-hp internal segment of vanB. Sequence analysis of the corresponding PCR product revealed that it was highly homologous (96% identity) to the prototype vanB sequence of Enterococcus faecalis V583. The VanB resistance of determinant of S. bovis NEM760 was transferred by conjugation to E. faecalis and Enterococcus faecium at a similar frequency of 2 x 10(-5) per donor. SmaI-digested genomic DNAs of independently obtained transconjugants of E. faecalis and E. faecium were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with a vanB DNA probe. The electrophoretic and hybridization patterns obtained with all transconjugants of the same species were indistinguishable and revealed vanB-containing chromosomal insertions of approximately 100 kb. These results suggest that the genes mediating VanB-type resistance in S. bovis NEM760 are part of large transferable genetic elements. The results presented in the report demonstrate for the first time the role of streptococci in the dissemination of vancomycin resistance among gram-positive bacteria. PMID:8980749

  4. vanG Element Insertions within a Conserved Chromosomal Site Conferring Vancomycin Resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Knipe, Kristen M.; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; McGee, Lesley; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Glennen, Anita; Nichols, Megin; Harris, Carol; Brimmage, Mary; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Park, Connie J.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Frace, Michael A.; Sammons, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three vancomycin-resistant streptococcal strains carrying vanG elements (two invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates [GBS-NY and GBS-NM, both serotype II and multilocus sequence type 22] and one Streptococcus anginosus [Sa]) were examined. The 45,585-bp elements found within Sa and GBS-NY were nearly identical (together designated vanG-1) and shared near-identity over an ~15-kb overlap with a previously described vanG element from Enterococcus faecalis. Unexpectedly, vanG-1 shared much less homology with the 49,321-bp vanG-2 element from GBS-NM, with widely different levels (50% to 99%) of sequence identity shared among 44 related open reading frames. Immediately adjacent to both vanG-1 and vanG-2 were 44,670-bp and 44,680-bp integrative conjugative element (ICE)-like sequences, designated ICE-r, that were nearly identical in the two group B streptococcal (GBS) strains. The dual vanG and ICE-r elements from both GBS strains were inserted at the same position, between bases 1328 and 1329, within the identical RNA methyltransferase (rumA) genes. A GenBank search revealed that although most GBS strains contained insertions within this specific site, only sequence type 22 (ST22) GBS strains contained highly related ICE-r derivatives. The vanG-1 element in Sa was also inserted within this position corresponding to its rumA homolog adjacent to an ICE-r derivative. vanG-1 insertions were previously reported within the same relative position in the E. faecalis rumA homolog. An ICE-r sequence perfectly conserved with respect to its counterpart in GBS-NY was apparent within the same site of the rumA homolog of a Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain. Additionally, homologous vanG-like elements within the conserved rumA target site were evident in Roseburia intestinalis. PMID:25053786

  5. Fast induction of nisin resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus INIA 463 during growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sonia; Avila, Marta; Medina, Margarita; Nuñez, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus INIA 463 became nisin-resistant after exposure in skim milk to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of nisin (1-3 IU/ml) for less than 2 h. Addition of 20 IU/ml caused a 4 log unit decrease in S. thermophilus counts of a culture not exposed previously to nisin, whereas no decrease was observed in the culture exposed to nisin for 2 h. Transfer of immunity genes as responsible for nisin resistance was discarded. The presence of extracellular or intracellular specific nisin-degrading enzymes was not detected in the nisin-resistant variant of S. thermophilus INIA 463. Nisin resistance was caused by the induction of a resistance mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the nisin-resistant variant of S. thermophilus INIA 463 had a thickened cell wall compared to the wild strain. Resistance to nisin was lost after one transfer (4 h growth) in nisin-free skim milk. PMID:15364470

  6. Macrolide Resistance Gene mreA of Streptococcus agalactiae Encodes a Flavokinase

    PubMed Central

    Clarebout, Gervais; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2001-01-01

    The mreA gene from Streptococcus agalactiae COH31 γ/δ, resistant to macrolides and clindamycin by active efflux, has recently been cloned in Escherichia coli, where it was reported to confer macrolide resistance (J. Clancy, F. Dib-Hajj, J. W. Petitpas, and W. Yuan, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:2719–2723, 1997). Cumulative data suggested that the mreA gene was located on the chromosome of S. agalactiae COH31 γ/δ. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of mreA revealed significant homology with several bifunctional flavokinases/(flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetases, which convert riboflavin to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FMN to FAD, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography experiments showed that the mreA gene product had a monofunctional flavokinase activity, similar to that of RibR from Bacillus subtilis. Sequences identical to those of the mreA gene and of a 121-bp upstream region containing a putative promoter were detected in strains of S. agalactiae UCN4, UCN5, and UCN6 susceptible to macrolides. mreA and its allele from S. agalactiae UCN4 were cloned on the shuttle vector pAT28. Both constructs were introduced into E. coli, where they conferred a similar two- to fourfold increase in the MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, and clindamycin. The MICs of a variety of other molecules, including crystal violet, acriflavin, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and antibiotics, such as certain cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, nalidixic acid, novobiocin, and rifampin, were also increased. In contrast, resistance to these compounds was not detected when the constructs were introduced into E. faecalis JH2–2. In conclusion, the mreA gene was probably resident in S. agalactiae and may encode a metabolic function. We could not provide any evidence that it was responsible for macrolide resistance in S. agalactiae COH31 γ/δ; broad-spectrum resistance conferred by the gene in E. coli could involve multidrug efflux pumps by a mechanism

  7. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  8. Allelic Variation of the Capsule Promoter Diversifies Encapsulation and Virulence In Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhensong; Liu, Yanni; Qu, Fen; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2016-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule is the major virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), a major human pathogen. The sequences in the promoter and coding regions of the capsule gene locus undergo extensive variations through the natural transformation-mediated horizontal gene transfer. The sequence variations in the coding region have led to at least 97 capsular serotypes. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence polymorphisms in the promoter region have any biological significance. In this study, we determined the sequences of the cps promoter region from 225 invasive pneumococcal isolates, and identified modular composition and remarkable inter-strain sequence variations in this region. The strain-to strain variations in the cps promoter are characterized by diversity in sequence and size, mosaic combinations of nucleotide polymorphisms and sequence modules, selective preservation of the sequence combinations, and promiscuous assortments of the sequences between the promoter and coding regions. Isogenic pneumococci carrying allelic variants of the cps promoter displayed significant differences in the transcription of the capsule genes, capsule production, adhesion to host epithelial cells, anti-phagocytosis and virulence in mouse bacteremia model. This study has thus indicated that the sequence polymorphisms in the cps promoter represent a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the level of encapsulation and virulence among S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:27465908

  9. Connection between Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Use and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Bergman, Miika; Voipio, Tinna; Paakkari, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    The association between trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among the major respiratory tract pathogens was investigated by comparing regional consumption of the drug to regional resistance in the following year in 21 central hospital districts in Finland. A total of 23,530 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 28,320 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 14,138 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates were tested for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptibility during the study period (1998-2004). Among the S. pneumoniae isolates, a statistically significant connection was found between regional consumption and resistance. No statistically significant connection was found between regional trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use and resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates. According to our results, it seems that only in pneumococci can the development of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance be influenced by restricting its use. However, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains an important antimicrobial agent because of its reasonable price. Hence, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole among these pathogens needs continuous monitoring. PMID:18443116

  10. Group B Streptococcus CovR regulation modulates host immune signaling pathways to promote vaginal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wang, Nai-Yu; Fletcher, Erin M.; Cavaco, Courtney K.; Jimenez, Alyssa; Garg, Mansi; Fierer, Joshua; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Doran, Kelly S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a frequent commensal organism of the vaginal tract of healthy women. However, GBS can transition to a pathogen in susceptible hosts, but host and microbial factors that contribute to this conversion are not well understood. GBS CovR/S (CsrR/S) is a two component regulatory system that regulates key virulence elements including adherence and toxin production. We performed global transcription profiling of human vaginal epithelial cells exposed to WT, CovR deficient, and toxin deficient strains, and observed that insufficient regulation by CovR and subsequent increased toxin production results in a drastic increase in host inflammatory responses, particularly in cytokine signaling pathways promoted by IL-8 and CXCL2. Additionally, we observed that CovR regulation impacts epithelial cell attachment and intracellular invasion. In our mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, we further demonstrated that CovR regulation promotes vaginal persistence, as infection with a CovR deficient strain resulted in a heightened host immune response as measured by cytokine production and neutrophil activation. Using CXCr2 KO mice, we determined that this immune alteration occurs, at least in part, via signaling through the CXCL2 receptor. Taken together, we conclude that CovR is an important regulator of GBS vaginal colonization and loss of this regulatory function may contribute to the inflammatory havoc seen during the course of infection. PMID:23298320

  11. Group B Streptococcus CovR regulation modulates host immune signalling pathways to promote vaginal colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wang, Nai-Yu; Fletcher, Erin M; Cavaco, Courtney K; Jimenez, Alyssa; Garg, Mansi; Fierer, Joshua; Sheen, Tamsin R; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Doran, Kelly S

    2013-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a frequent commensal organism of the vaginal tract of healthy women. However, GBS can transition to a pathogen in susceptible hosts, but host and microbial factors that contribute to this conversion are not well understood. GBS CovR/S (CsrR/S) is a two component regulatory system that regulates key virulence elements including adherence and toxin production. We performed global transcription profiling of human vaginal epithelial cells exposed to WT, CovR deficient, and toxin deficient strains, and observed that insufficient regulation by CovR and subsequent increased toxin production results in a drastic increase in host inflammatory responses, particularly in cytokine signalling pathways promoted by IL-8 and CXCL2. Additionally, we observed that CovR regulation impacts epithelial cell attachment and intracellular invasion. In our mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, we further demonstrated that CovR regulation promotes vaginal persistence, as infection with a CovR deficient strainresulted in a heightened host immune response as measured by cytokine production and neutrophil activation. Using CXCr2 KO mice, we determined that this immune alteration occurs, at least in part, via signalling through the CXCL2 receptor. Taken together, we conclude that CovR is an important regulator of GBS vaginal colonization and loss of this regulatory function may contribute to the inflammatory havoc seen during the course of infection. PMID:23298320

  12. Nasopharyngeal carriage of community-acquired, antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Zambian paediatric population.

    PubMed Central

    Woolfson, A.; Huebner, R.; Wasas, A.; Chola, S.; Godfrey-Faussett, P.; Klugman, K.

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is an international health problem. Apart from South Africa few data on pneumococcal resistance are available for sub-Saharan Africa. This study examines the nasopharyngeal carriage and prevalence of antibiotic resistance in pneumococci isolated from 260 Zambian children aged < 6 years. Pneumococci were isolated from 71.9% of the children; the odds of carrying organisms were twice as high among children < 2 years of age compared with older children. Antibacterial resistance was found in 34.1% of the isolates; resistance to tetracycline, penicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol occurred in 23.0%, 14.3%, 12.7%, and 3.9% of the isolates, respectively. Only 4% of the isolates were resistant to three drugs. High-level resistance was found in all isolates resistant to tetracycline; but only intermediate level penicillin resistance was found. A total of 11.1% of the isolates demonstrated intermediate resistance to sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim. Children aged < 6 months were less likely to carry antibiotic-resistant organisms. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae appears to be an emerging public health problem in Zambia, and the national policy for the empirical treatment of pneumococcal meningitis and acute respiratory tract infections may need to be re-evaluated. The establishment of ongoing surveillance to monitor trends in pneumococcal resistance should be considered. PMID:9447779

  13. CovR activation of the dipeptide permease promoter (PdppA) in Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Gusa, Asiya A; Froehlich, Barbara J; Desai, Devak; Stringer, Virginia; Scott, June R

    2007-02-01

    CovR, the two-component response regulator of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) directly or indirectly represses about 15% of the genome, including genes encoding many virulence factors and itself. Transcriptome analyses also showed that some genes are activated by CovR. We asked whether the regulation by CovR of one of these genes, dppA, the first gene in an operon encoding a dipeptide permease, is direct or indirect. Direct regulation by CovR was suggested by the presence of five CovR consensus binding sequences (CBs) near the putative promoter. In this study, we identified the 5' end of the dppA transcript synthesized in vivo and showed that the start of dppA transcription in vitro is the same. We found that CovR binds specifically to the dppA promoter region (PdppA) in vitro with an affinity similar to that at which it binds to other CovR-regulated promoters. Disruption of any of the five CBs by a substitution of GG for TT inhibited CovR binding to that site in vitro, and binding at two of the CBs appeared cooperative. In vivo, CovR activation of transcription was not affected by individual mutations of any of the four CBs that we could study. This suggests that the binding sites are redundant in vivo. In vitro, CovR did not activate transcription from PdppA in experiments using purified GAS RNA polymerase and either linear or supercoiled DNA template. Therefore, we propose that in vivo, CovR may interfere with the binding of a repressor of PdppA. PMID:16997962

  14. Brain orexin promotes obesity resistance.

    PubMed

    Kotz, Catherine; Nixon, Joshua; Butterick, Tammy; Perez-Leighton, Claudio; Teske, Jennifer; Billington, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to obesity is becoming an exception rather than the norm, and understanding mechanisms that lead some to remain lean in spite of an obesigenic environment is critical if we are to find new ways to reverse this trend. Levels of energy intake and physical activity both contribute to body weight management, but it is challenging for most to adopt major long-term changes in either factor. Physical activity outside of formal exercise, also referred to as activity of daily living, and in stricter form, spontaneous physical activity (SPA), may be an attractive modifiable variable for obesity prevention. In this review, we discuss individual variability in SPA and NEAT (nonexercise thermogenesis, or the energy expended by SPA) and its relationship to obesity resistance. The hypothalamic neuropeptide orexin (hypocretin) may play a key role in regulating SPA and NEAT. We discuss how elevated orexin signaling capacity, in the context of a brain network modulating SPA, may play a major role in defining individual variability in SPA and NEAT. Greater activation of this SPA network leads to a lower propensity for fat mass gain and therefore may be an attractive target for obesity prevention and therapy. PMID:22803681

  15. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of commensal Streptococcus pneumoniae in nine European countries.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Rachid Y; den Heijer, Casper Dj; van Bijnen, Evelien Me; Paget, W John; Pringle, Mike; Goossens, Herman; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2016-06-01

    The human microbiota represents an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Moreover, the majority of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care. For this reason, we assessed the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of nasal carriage strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most prevalent bacterial causative agent of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, in outpatients in nine European countries. Nasal swabs were collected between October 2010 and May 2011, from 32,770 patients, recruited by general practices in nine European countries. Overall prevalence of S. pneumoniae nasal carriage in the nine countries was 2.9%. The carriage was higher in men (3.7%) than in women (2.7%). Children (4-9 years) had a higher carriage prevalence (27.2%) compared with those older than 10 years (1.9%). The highest resistance observed was to cefaclor. The highest prevalence of multidrug resistance was found in Spain and the lowest prevalence was observed in Sweden. PMID:27191588

  16. Novel type of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing multidrug-resistant acute otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R; Zeng, Mingtao

    2009-04-01

    After our recent discovery of a Streptococcus pneumoniae 19A "superbug" (Legacy strain) that is resistant to all Food and Drug Administration-approved antimicrobial drugs for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) in children, other S. pneumoniae isolates from children with AOM were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among 40 isolates studied, 16 (40%) were serotype 19A, and 9 (23%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. Two others had unreported sequence types (STs) that expressed the 19A capsule, and 8 (88%) of the 9 multidrug-resistant strains were serotype 19A, including the Legacy strain with the new ST-2722. In genetic relatedness, ST-2722 belonged to a cluster of reported strains of S. pneumoniae in which all strains had 6 of the same alleles as ST-156. The multidrug-resistant strains related to ST-156 expressed different capsular serotypes: 9V, 14, 11A, 15C, and 19F. PMID:19331730

  17. A human salivary protein which promotes adhesion of Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, E; Hay, D I; Gibbons, R J

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of one of the factors in human submandibular-sublingual (SMSL) saliva which promotes the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains to hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. Gel filtration chromatography of SMSL saliva on Trisacryl GF2000 gave a void volume peak which contained the major fraction of adhesion-promoting activity for S. mutans JBP to HA. Maximum adhesion-promoting activity, however, eluted slightly later than the maximum 220-nm absorbance of the void volume peak. Gel filtration of the void volume material after treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gave an early-eluting larger peak followed by a smaller peak with which the adhesion-promoting activity was associated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed the presence of relatively slowly migrating material associated with the larger inactive peak, presumably mucin, and a faster-migrating band(s) associated with the smaller active peak. SDS-PAGE indicated molecular weights in the range of 300,000 to 350,000 by extrapolation from size standards. Comparison of SMSL from five individuals showed the presence of single bands or double bands associated with adhesion-promoting activity, indicating genetic polymorphism. The active material did not resemble either secretory immunoglobulin A, based on SDS-PAGE and immunoassay, or fibronectin, based on SDS-PAGE, and also differed in molecular weight from salivary mucins and salivary constituents previously reported to promote aggregation of certain oral bacteria, but a relationship to these materials cannot be excluded. This adhesion-promoting material may play a significant role in the initial colonization of tooth surfaces by S. mutans strains. Images PMID:2807544

  18. FbsC, a Novel Fibrinogen-binding Protein, Promotes Streptococcus agalactiae-Host Cell Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Buscetta, Marco; Papasergi, Salvatore; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and adults. The ability of GBS to bind human fibrinogen is of crucial importance in promoting colonization and invasion of host barriers. We characterized here a novel fibrinogen-binding protein of GBS, designated FbsC (Gbs0791), which is encoded by the prototype GBS strain NEM316. FbsC, which bears two bacterial immunoglobulin-like tandem repeat domains and a C-terminal cell wall-anchoring motif (LPXTG), was found to be covalently linked to the cell wall by the housekeeping sortase A. Studies using recombinant FbsC indicated that it binds fibrinogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, and with moderate affinity. Expression of FbsC was detected in all clinical GBS isolates, except those belonging to the hypervirulent lineage ST17. Deletion of fbsC decreases NEM316 abilities to adhere to and invade human epithelial and endothelial cells, and to form biofilm in vitro. Notably, bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen and fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells were abolished following fbsC deletion in NEM316. Moreover, the virulence of the fbsC deletion mutant and its ability to colonize the brain were impaired in murine models of infection. Finally, immunization with recombinant FbsC significantly protected mice from lethal GBS challenge. In conclusion, FbsC is a novel fibrinogen-binding protein expressed by most GBS isolates that functions as a virulence factor by promoting invasion of epithelial and endothelial barriers. In addition, the protein has significant immunoprotective activity and may be a useful component of an anti-GBS vaccine. PMID:24904056

  19. Two-Year Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae in Four African Cities

    PubMed Central

    Benbachir, Mohamed; Benredjeb, Saida; Boye, Cheick Saadbouh; Dosso, Mireille; Belabbes, Houria; Kamoun, Aouatef; Kaire, Omar; Elmdaghri, Naima

    2001-01-01

    Worldwide spread of antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major problem. However, data from West and North African countries are scarce. To study the level of resistance and compare the situations in different cities, a prospective study was conducted in Abidjan (Ivory Coast), Casablanca (Morocco), Dakar (Senegal), and Tunis (Tunisia), from 1996 to 1997. The resistances to eight antibiotics of 375 isolates were studied by E test, and the results were interpreted using the breakpoints recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Overall, 30.4% of the isolates were nonsusceptible to penicillin G (25.6% were intermediate and 4.8% were resistant). Amoxicillin (96.3% were susceptible) and parenteral third-generation cephalosporins (92.7%) were highly active. Resistance to chloramphenicol was detected in 8.6% of the isolates. High levels of resistance were noted for erythromycin (28%), tetracycline (38.3%), and cotrimoxazole (36.4%). Resistance to rifampin was rare (2.1%). There were significant differences in resistance rates between individual countries. Multiple resistance was more frequent in penicillin-nonsusceptible isolates than in penicillin-susceptible isolates. Recommendations for treatment could be generated from these results in each participating country. PMID:11158769

  20. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally. PMID:26729498

  1. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Selected Antimicrobial Agents in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Mamata; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Ran; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Characterization of 227 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs during 2010 to 2013 showed high levels of resistance to clindamycin (95.6%), tilmicosin (94.7%), tylosin (93.8%), oxytetracycline (89.4%), chlortetracycline (86.8%), tiamulin (72.7%), neomycin (70.0%), enrofloxacin (56.4%), penicillin (56.4%), ceftiofur (55.9%), and gentamicin (55.1%). Resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolone was attributed to the tet gene, erm(B), erm(C), mph(C), and mef(A) and/or mef(E) genes, aph(3')-IIIa and aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia genes, and single point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC and GyrA, respectively. PMID:25903569

  2. Molecular Basis of Resistance to Selected Antimicrobial Agents in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Mamata; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Moon, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Ran; Jeong, Jin-Ha; Jang, Geum-Chan; Jung, Suk-Chan; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of 227 Streptococcus suis strains isolated from pigs during 2010 to 2013 showed high levels of resistance to clindamycin (95.6%), tilmicosin (94.7%), tylosin (93.8%), oxytetracycline (89.4%), chlortetracycline (86.8%), tiamulin (72.7%), neomycin (70.0%), enrofloxacin (56.4%), penicillin (56.4%), ceftiofur (55.9%), and gentamicin (55.1%). Resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolone was attributed to the tet gene, erm(B), erm(C), mph(C), and mef(A) and/or mef(E) genes, aph(3′)-IIIa and aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia genes, and single point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC and GyrA, respectively. PMID:25903569

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in a British district general hospital: the international connection.

    PubMed

    Birtles, Andrew; Virgincar, Nilangi; Sheppard, Carmen L; Walker, Rachel A; Johnson, Alan P; Warner, Marina; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; George, Robert C

    2004-12-01

    Between January 2000 and March 2001, Streptococcus pneumoniae were isolated from the blood of 56 patients admitted to a single district general hospital in the South-East of England. The serotype and antibiotic susceptibility were determined for all isolates and, for those resistant to erythromycin, the presence or absence of the mef(A) and erm(B) genes was determined by PCR. Multi-locus sequence typing, along with PFGE, was undertaken on all isolates resistant to penicillin or erythromycin and a group of antibiotic-susceptible isolates, to identify whether globally distributed pneumococcal clones, as described by the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), were present in the study population. Three serotype 9V penicillin-resistant isolates were identified as belonging to the Spain9V-3 clone, while 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates of serotype 14 belonged to the England14-9 clone. A single multi-resistant isolate of serotype 6B, was found to be a single-locus variant of the Spain6B-2 clone. All 14 erythromycin-resistant serotype 14 isolates possessed the mef(A) gene, while the single multi-resistant isolate possessed the erm(B) gene. These findings confirm the wide distribution and clinical impact of PMEN clones, which accounted for all of the penicillin and erythromycin resistance observed amongst invasive isolates in a district general hospital over a 15-month period. PMID:15585504

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility and analysis of macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in Hamadan

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh, Mohammad Najafi; Gharibi, Marzieh; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Saidijam, Massoud; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Macrolide resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae pose an emerging problem globally. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes (macrolide resistant genes) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and to detect drug resistance patterns of S. pneumoniae isolated from clinical samples to macrolides and other antibiotic agents by E-test method. Materials and Methods: Fifty five isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained from clinical samples with microbial tests. The antibiotic susceptibility of isolates for erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were determined by E-test method. Genotypic antibiotic resistance pattern was determined by PCR with primer designed for ermB and mefA genes. Results: The number of S. pneumoniae isolates resistance to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, ceftazidim, ciprofloxacin were 25.5%, 18.2%, 16.4%, 21.8% and 10.9%, respectively while no resistance to vancomycin was observed. The macrolide resistance genes of ermB and mefA were found in 10.9% and 18.2% of the isolates, respectively. Conclusion: The result of the current study suggests the necessity of evaluation the changes in MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values as well as genetic mutations to estimate the prevalence of the resistance antimicrobial agents in S. pneumoniae. PMID:25422753

  5. Conjugative transfer of resistance determinants among human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Tatiana Castro Abreu; Costa, Natália Silva; Corrêa, Ana Beatriz de Almeida; de Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Menezes; de Mattos, Marcos Correa; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Benchetrit, Leslie Claude

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major source of human perinatal diseases and bovine mastitis. Erythromycin (Ery) and tetracycline (Tet) are usually employed for preventing human and bovine infections although resistance to such agents has become common among GBS strains. Ery and Tet resistance genes are usually carried by conjugative transposons (CTns) belonging to the Tn916 family, but their presence and transferability among GBS strains have not been totally explored. Here we evaluated the presence of Tet resistance genes (tetM and tetO) and CTns among Ery-resistant (Ery-R) and Ery-susceptible (Ery-S) GBS strains isolated from human and bovine sources; and analyzed the ability for transferring resistance determinants between strains from both origins. Tet resistance and int-Tn genes were more common among Ery-R when compared to Ery-S isolates. Conjugative transfer of all resistance genes detected among the GBS strains included in this study (ermA, ermB, mef, tetM and tetO), in frequencies between 1.10(-7) and 9.10(-7), was possible from bovine donor strains to human recipient strain, but not the other way around. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of in vitro conjugation of Ery and Tet resistance genes among GBS strains recovered from different hosts. PMID:25477908

  6. Nasal Carriage in Vietnamese Children of Streptococcus pneumoniae Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Christopher M.; Diep, To Song; Wain, John; Hoa, Nguyen Thi Tuyet; Gainsborough, Mary; Nga, Diem; Davies, Catrin; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Hien, Tran Tinh; White, Nicholas J.; Farrar, Jeremy J.

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing rapidly in many Asian countries. There is little recent information concerning resistance levels in Vietnam. A prospective study of pneumococcal carriage in 911 urban and rural Vietnamese children, of whom 44% were nasal carriers, was performed. Carriage was more common in children <5 years old than in those ≥5 years old (192 of 389 [49.4%] versus 212 of 522 [40.6%]; P, 0.01). A total of 136 of 399 isolates (34%) had intermediate susceptibility to penicillin (MIC, 0.1 to 1 mg/liter), and 76 of 399 isolates (19%) showed resistance (MIC, >1.0 mg/liter). A total of 54 of 399 isolates (13%) had intermediate susceptibility to ceftriaxone, and 3 of 399 isolates (1%) were resistant. Penicillin resistance was 21.7 (95% confidence interval, 7.0 to 67.6) times more common in urban than in rural children (35 versus 2%; P, <0.001). More than 40% of isolates from urban children were also resistant to erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. Penicillin resistance was independently associated with an urban location when the age of the child was controlled for. Multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more antimicrobial agent groups) was present in 32% of isolates overall but in 39% of isolates with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin and 86% of isolates with penicillin resistance. The predominant serotypes of the S. pneumoniae isolates were 19, 23, 14, 6, and 18. Almost half of the penicillin-resistant isolates serotyped were serotype 23, and these isolates were often multidrug resistant. This study suggests that resistance to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents is common in carriage isolates of S. pneumoniae from children in Vietnam. PMID:10681307

  7. Molecular characterization of a novel mosaic tet(S/M) gene encoding tetracycline resistance in foodborne strains of Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Barile, Simona; Devirgiliis, Chiara; Perozzi, Giuditta

    2012-09-01

    The presence of antibiotic-resistance (AR) genes in foodborne bacteria of enteric origin represents a relevant threat to human health in the case of opportunistic pathogens, which can reach the human gut through the food chain. Streptococcus bovis is a human opportunistic pathogen often associated with infections in immune-compromised or cancer patients, and it can also be detected in the environment, including fermented foods. We have focused on the molecular characterization of a tetracycline (Tet)-resistance gene present in 39 foodborne isolates of S. bovis phenotypically resistant to this drug. The gene was identified as a novel tet(S/M) fusion, encoding a mosaic protein composed of the N-terminal 33 amino acids of Tet(S), in-frame with the Tet(M) coding sequence. Heterologous expression of the mosaic gene was found to confer Tet resistance upon Escherichia coli recipients. Moreover, the tet(S/M) gene was found to be transcriptionally inducible by Tet under the endogenous tet(S) promoter in both S. bovis and E. coli. Nucleotide sequencing of the surrounding genomic region of 16.2 kb revealed large blocks of homology with the genomes of Streptococcus infantarius and Lactococcus lactis. A subregion of about 4 kb containing mosaic tet(S/M) was flanked by two copies of the IS1216 mobile element. PCR amplification with primers directed outwards from the tet(S/M) gene identified the presence of a 4.3 kb circular form corresponding to the intervening chromosomal region between the two IS1216 elements, but lacking a replication origin. The circular element shared extensive overall homology with a region of the multidrug-resistance plasmid pK214 from Lc. lactis, containing tet(S), as well as the IS1216 transposase-containing element and intervening non-coding sequences. Linear reconstruction of the insertion events likely to have occurred within this genomic region, inferred from sequence homology, provides further evidence of the chromosomal rearrangements that drive

  8. Serine-rich repeat proteins and pili promote Streptococcus agalactiae colonization of the vaginal tract.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Tamsin R; Jimenez, Alyssa; Wang, Nai-Yu; Banerjee, Anirban; van Sorge, Nina M; Doran, Kelly S

    2011-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium found in the female rectovaginal tract and is capable of producing severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns and pregnant women. The vaginal tract is considered a major reservoir for GBS, and maternal vaginal colonization poses a significant risk to the newborn; however, little is known about the specific bacterial factors that promote GBS colonization and persistence in the female reproductive tract. We have developed in vitro models of GBS interaction with the human female cervicovaginal tract using human vaginal and cervical epithelial cell lines. Analysis of isogenic mutant GBS strains deficient in cell surface organelles such as pili and serine-rich repeat (Srr) proteins shows that these factors contribute to host cell attachment. As Srr proteins are heavily glycosylated, we confirmed that carbohydrate moieties contribute to the effective interaction of Srr-1 with vaginal epithelial cells. Antibody inhibition assays identified keratin 4 as a possible host receptor for Srr-1. Our findings were further substantiated in an in vivo mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, where mice inoculated with an Srr-1-deficient mutant exhibited decreased GBS vaginal persistence compared to those inoculated with the wild-type (WT) parental strain. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS exhibited a significant survival advantage over the ΔpilA or Δsrr-1 mutant in the vaginal tract. Our results suggest that these GBS surface proteins contribute to vaginal colonization and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vaginal niche establishment. PMID:21984789

  9. Multicenter Study of the Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Relationships of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates Resistant to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Ketolides in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. J.; Andreu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide, lincosamide, and ketolide mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships were characterized in a collection of 79 resistant group B streptococcus isolates obtained from neonates or pregnant women. The erm(B), erm(TR), and mef(A) genes were present in 62%, 30.4%, and 3.8% of the isolates, respectively. There was considerable clonal diversity among them. PMID:15917563

  10. Threonine phosphorylation prevents promoter DNA binding of the Group B Streptococcus response regulator CovR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Jung; Walthers, Don; Connelly, James E; Burnside, Kellie; Jewell, Kelsea A; Kenney, Linda J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2009-03-01

    All living organisms communicate with the external environment for their survival and existence. In prokaryotes, communication is achieved by two-component systems (TCS) comprising histidine kinases and response regulators. In eukaryotes, signalling is accomplished by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Although TCS and serine/threonine kinases coexist in prokaryotes, direct cross-talk between these families was first described in Group B Streptococcus (GBS). A serine/threonine kinase (Stk1) and a TCS (CovR/CovS) co-regulate toxin expression in GBS. Typically, promoter binding of regulators like CovR is controlled by phosphorylation of the conserved active site aspartate (D53). In this study, we show that Stk1 phosphorylates CovR at threonine 65. The functional consequence of threonine phosphorylation of CovR in GBS was evaluated using phosphomimetic and silencing substitutions. GBS encoding the phosphomimetic T65E allele are deficient for CovR regulation unlike strains encoding the non-phosphorylated T65A allele. Further, compared with wild-type or T65A CovR, the T65E CovR is unable to bind promoter DNA and is decreased for phosphorylation at D53, similar to Stk1-phosphorylated CovR. Collectively, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of response regulator control that enables GBS (and possibly other prokaryotes) to fine-tune gene expression for environmental adaptation. PMID:19170889

  11. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Invasive Serotype IV Group B Streptococcus, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Gomes, Janice; Seah, Christine; Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that 37/600 (6.2%) invasive infections with group B Streptococcus (GBS) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, were caused by serotype IV strains. We report a relatively high level of genetic diversity in 37 invasive strains of this emerging GBS serotype. Multilocus sequence typing identified 6 sequence types (STs) that belonged to 3 clonal complexes. Most isolates were ST-459 (19/37, 51%) and ST-452 (11/37, 30%), but we also identified ST-291, ST-3, ST-196, and a novel ST-682. We detected further diversity by performing whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis and found evidence of recombination events contributing to variation in some serotype IV GBS strains. We also evaluated antimicrobial drug resistance and found that ST-459 strains were resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin, whereas strains of other STs were, for the most part, susceptible to these antimicrobial drugs. PMID:25811284

  12. Short communication: Streptococcus species isolated from mastitis milk samples in Germany and their resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Minst, K; Märtlbauer, E; Miller, T; Meyer, C

    2012-12-01

    Mastitis is one of the most frequent infectious diseases in dairy cattle and is a reason for antimicrobial drug usage in dairy cows. The bacteria involved in bovine mastitis are mainly Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and coliforms. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance among Streptococcus spp. isolated from bovine mastitis milk. Antimicrobial resistance in Strep. uberis (n=227), Strep. dysgalactiae (n=49), and Strep. agalactiae (n=3) was determined for 9 antimicrobial agents using the broth microdilution method in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Of all Streptococcus spp., 13% were multidrug resistant. The rate of multidrug resistance was higher among Strep. uberis (15%) than among Strep. dysgalactiae (6%) and Strep. agalactiae (0%). Resistance to tetracycline was the most common, followed by resistance to erythromycin, pirlimycin, and gentamicin. Resistance rates were higher on farms with more than 80 cows compared with those with fewer than 20 cows. β-Lactams should remain the drugs of choice in the treatment of streptococcal mastitis. The slightly elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations determined for these antibiotics may indicate, however, the emergence of resistant streptococci. To identify such changes in susceptibility as early as possible, antimicrobial resistance in streptococci should be surveyed regularly. PMID:22999286

  13. Induction of ribosome methylation in MLS-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by macrolides and ketolides.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cao, Z; Hammond, R; Chen, Y; Beyer, J; Shortridge, V D; Phan, L Y; Pratt, S; Capobianco, J; Reich, K A; Flamm, R K; Or, Y S; Katz, L

    1999-01-01

    One major mechanism for resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae is MLS (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) resistance, manifested when the 23S rRNA is methylated by the product of an erm gene. This modification results in the decreased binding of all known macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotics to the ribosome. More than 30 ermAM-containing clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae were examined in our lab and showed high-level resistance (MIC > or =128 microg/ml) to erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, clindamycin, and ketolide (macrolides that lack the cladinose sugar) TE-802. We found that the new generation of ketolides A965 and A088 displayed variable activity against the same group of resistant S. pneumoniae strains. To understand the basis of variability of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of A965 and A088, we examined the effects of a series of macrolides and ketolides on the level of 23S rRNA methylation in five ermAM-containing resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. We show here that the basal levels of ribosomal methylation vary from strain to strain. The level of rRNA methylation can be strongly induced by erythromycin, azithromycin, and TE-802, resulting in high-level of resistance to these compounds. Ketolide A965 and A088, however, are weak inducers at sub-MIC drug concentrations, therefore showing variable activities in strains with differential methylation levels. PMID:10566867

  14. Carriage burden, multiple colonization and antibiotic pressure promote emergence of resistant vaccine escape pneumococci.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick K; Lipsitch, Marc; Hanage, William P

    2015-06-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines target the limited subset of the more than 90 known serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae responsible for the greatest burden of pneumococcal disease and antibiotic resistance. Following the introduction of these vaccines, serotypes not targeted were able to expand and resistance became more common within these types. Here we use a stochastic dynamic model of pediatric pneumococcal carriage to evaluate potential influences on the emergence of new resistant lineages following the introduction of a vaccine targeting more common resistant types. Antibiotic pressure was the strongest driver, with no emergence at low levels and universal emergence at high levels. At intermediate levels of antibiotic pressure, higher carriage burden and a greater degree of dual carriage promoted emergence. This may have implications for current plans to introduce childhood pneumococcal vaccination in several high-burden countries. PMID:25918447

  15. Genetic and physiological studies of antibiotic resistance in a clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    An erythromycin-sensitive clinical isolate of Streptococcus faecalis (CS-4B) generated intermediate-level erythromycin-resistant isolates ((CS-4B(S)) at a frequency of 4 x 10/sup -8/ per cell. CS-4B(S) produces high-level erythromycin-resistant isolates (CS-4B(L)) at a very high frequency. The erythromycin-resistance is non-transferable, chromosomally located, and distinct from the well described erythromycin-resistance of the MLS type. The erythromycin-resistance of CS-4B(S) and CS-4B(L) is not due to an in vitro or in vivo alteration or inactivation of erythromycin. /sup 14/C-erythromycin binds in vitro, as evaluated with sucrose gradients, to 70S ribosomes and 50S ribosomal subunits in CS-4B. Binding to CS-4B(L) ribosomes was barely detectable whereas CS-4B(S) ribosomes retained binding capacity. The binding studies on filter membranes revealed a substantial reduction of /sup 14/C-erythromycin binding to CS-4B(S) ribosomes when compared to CS-4B ribosomes. The in vivo accumulation of /sup 14/C-erythromycin in CS-4B and CS-4B(S) parallel the in vitro binding capacity of ribosomes indicating the apparent absence of a permeability barrier to erythromycin in CS-4B.

  16. Contribution of chloride channel permease to fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takatoshi; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Genes encoding fluoride transporters have been identified in bacterial and archaeal species. The genome sequence of the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans bacteria suggests the presence of a putative fluoride transporter, which is referred to as a chloride channel permease. Two homologues of this gene (GenBank locus tags SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c) reside in tandem in the genome of S. mutans The aim of this study was to determine whether the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance. We constructed SMU_1290c- and SMU_1289c-knockout S. mutans UA159 strains. We also constructed a double-knockout strain lacking both genes. SMU_1290c or SMU_1289c was transformed into a fluoride transporter- disrupted Escherichia coli strain. All bacterial strains were cultured under appropriate conditions with or without sodium fluoride, and fluoride resistance was evaluated. All three gene-knockout S. mutans strains showed lower resistance to sodium fluoride than did the wild-type strain. No significant changes in resistance to other sodium halides were recognized between the wild-type and double-knockout strains. Both SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c transformation rescued fluoride transporter-disrupted E. coli cell from fluoride toxicity. We conclude that the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance in S. mutans. PMID:27190286

  17. Influence of dietary levels of lipid and vitamin E on growth and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary levels of lipid and vitamin E on growth performance, immune responses and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. A basal purified diet (35% protein and 3.4 kcal DE/g) supplemented with 6, 10 and 14% of 1:1 mixture of corn...

  18. Growth response and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia Orechromis niloticus following infection or vaccination with Streptococcus iniae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the third power, 8.8 x 10 to the fourth power and 8.8 x 10 to the fifth power CFU fish-1 f...

  19. Growth Responses and Resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, Fed Diets Containing Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, body composition, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. Five isocaloric diets containing DDGS at levels of ...

  20. GROWTH RESPONSE AND ACQUIRED RESISTANCE OF NILE TILAPIA OREOCHROMIS NILOTICUS FOLLOWING INFECTION OR VACCINATION WITH STREPTOCOCCUS INIAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the 3rd power, 8.8 x 10 to the 4th power and 8.8 x 10 to the 5th power CFU fish-1 for ...

  1. Growth Response and Acquired Resistance of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Following Infection or Vaccination with Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the 3rd power, 8.8 x 10 to the 4th power and 8.8 x 10 to the 5th power CFU fish-1 for ...

  2. GROWTH RESPONSE AND RESISTANCE TO STREPTOCOCCUS INIAE OF NILE TILAPIA (OREOCHROMIS NILOTICUS) FED DIETS CONTAINING DISTILLER'S DRIED GRAINS WITH SOLUBLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, body composition, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. Five isocaloric diets containing DDGS at levels of ...

  3. Streptococcus mutans wall-associated protein A promotes TLR4-induced dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, D

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses, which are central to establishing efficient responses to vaccination. Wall-associated protein A (WapA) of Streptococcus mutans was previously used as a vaccine in animal studies for immunization against dental caries. However, as a cell surface protein, whether WapA activates innate immune responses and the effects of WapA on DCs remain unclear. In this study, WapA was cloned into the GST fusion vector pEBG, which can be expressed efficiently in mammalian cells. We found that when added before stimulation with LPS, purified WapA-GST protein increased TLR4-induced NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathway activation. Pretreatment with WapA-GST also increased LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by DCs, including IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, expression of the DC maturation markers CD80/86, CD40 and MHC II was also increased by WapA pretreatment. These data indicate that WapA is recognized by DCs and promotes DC maturation. PMID:24846569

  4. Streptococcus salivarius promotes mucin putrefaction and malodor production by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sterer, N; Rosenberg, M

    2006-10-01

    Although the contribution of the oral microbiota to oral malodor is well-documented, the potential role of Gram-positive micro-organisms is unclear. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that Gram-positive micro-organisms contribute to malodor production by deglycosylating oral glycoproteins, rendering them susceptible to subsequent proteolysis. To this end, we examined the effect of Streptococcus salivarius on Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated putrefaction of a model glycoprotein (pig gastric mucin). Malodor was scored by two odor judges, and volatile sulfides were determined with the use of a sulfide monitor. Mucin degradation was followed by electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE. Results showed that the addition of S. salivarius or beta-galactosidase promoted mucin degradation and concomitant malodor production. Addition of glycosidic inhibitors (p-APTG and glucose) inhibited this process. These results suggest that Gram-positive micro-organisms such as S. salivarius contribute to oral malodor production by deglycosylating salivary glycoproteins, thus exposing their protein core to further degradation by Gram-negative micro-organisms. PMID:16998130

  5. Prevalence and mechanisms of erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae from healthy pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sandra; Radhouani, Hajer; Coelho, Céline; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Carvalho, Eulália; Carvalho, José António; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Torres, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2009-06-01

    We sought to determine the resistance phenotypes for erythromycin and clindamycin and the mechanisms implicated in 93 Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from healthy pregnant women. Susceptibility testing for erythromycin, clindamycin, penicillin, cefotaxime, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, choramphenicol, ofloxacin, and meropenen was carried out by disc-diffusion test, and the E-test was also applied for erythromycin and clindamycin. The constitutive MLS(B) resistance (cMLS(B)) and inducible MLS(B) resistance (iMLS(B)) phenotypes, respectively, as well as the M resistance phenotype were determined by the erythromycin-clindamycin double-disc test. The presence of ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA, and mef(A/E) macrolide resistance genes was studied by PCR. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 15% and 9.6% of the isolates, respectively. The resistance phenotypes detected among the 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates were as follows (number of isolates): cMLS(B) (9), iMLS(B) (3), and M (2). The MICs for erythromycin and clindamycin were as follows: cMLS(B) isolates (128-256 and >or=32 mg/L, respectively), iMLS(B) isolates (16-256 and 1 mg/L), and M isolates (2-8 and 1 mg/L). The following combination of genes were detected among isolates with cMLS(B) or iMLS(B) phenotypes: erm(B) (6 isolates), ermA + ermTR (3), ermA + ermB + ermTR (1), and none of these genes (2). The two isolates with M phenotype harbored the mef(A/E), and msrA gene was also found in one of them. PMID:19432524

  6. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  7. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  8. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  9. Allergic lung inflammation alters neither susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection nor inducibility of innate resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cecilia G; Tuvim, Michael J; Evans, Christopher M; Tuvin, Daniel M; Dickey, Burton F; Evans, Scott E

    2009-01-01

    Background Protective host responses to respiratory pathogens are typically characterized by inflammation. However, lung inflammation is not always protective and it may even become deleterious to the host. We have recently reported substantial protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal) pneumonia by induction of a robust inflammatory innate immune response to an inhaled bacterial lysate. Conversely, the allergic inflammation associated with asthma has been proposed to promote susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. This study sought to determine whether preexisting allergic lung inflammation influences the progression of pneumococcal pneumonia or reduces the inducibilty of protective innate immunity against bacteria. Methods To compare the effect of different inflammatory and secretory stimuli on defense against pneumonia, intraperitoneally ovalbumin-sensitized mice were challenged with inhaled pneumococci following exposure to various inhaled combinations of ovalbumin, ATP, and/or a bacterial lysate. Thus, allergic inflammation, mucin degranulation and/or stimulated innate resistance were induced prior to the infectious challenge. Pathogen killing was evaluated by assessing bacterial CFUs of lung homogenates immediately after infection, the inflammatory response to the different conditions was evaluated by measurement of cell counts of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 18 hours after challenge, and mouse survival was assessed after seven days. Results We found no differences in survival of mice with and without allergic inflammation, nor did the induction of mucin degranulation alter survival. As we have found previously, mice treated with the bacterial lysate demonstrated substantially increased survival at seven days, and this was not altered by the presence of allergic inflammation or mucin degranulation. Allergic inflammation was associated with predominantly eosinophilic infiltration, whereas the lysate-induced response was primarily neutrophilic

  10. Emergence of the First Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Piccinelli, G.; Gargiulo, F.; Corbellini, S.; Ravizzola, G.; Bonfanti, C.; Caruso, A.

    2015-01-01

    Of 901 group B streptococcus strains analyzed, 13 (1.4%) were resistant to levofloxacin (MICs of >32 μg/ml for seven isolates, 2 μg/ml for four isolates, and 1.5 μg/ml for four isolates). Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV were identified. A double mutation involving the Ser-81 change to Leu for gyrA and the Ser-79 change to Phe or to Tyr for parC was linked to a high level of fluoroquinolone resistance. In addition, two other mutational positions in parC were observed, resulting in an Asp-83-to-Tyr substitution and an Asp-83-to-Asn substitution. Different mutations were also observed in gyrB, with unknown significance. Most levofloxacin-resistant GBS strains were of serotype Ib and belonged to sequence type 19 (ST19) and clonal complex 19 (CC-19). Most of them exhibited the epsilon gene. PMID:25666148

  11. Streptococcus suis in invasive human infections in Poland: clonality and determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, A; Molska, E; Janas, K; Skoczyńska, A; Stefaniuk, E; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of Streptococcus suis human invasive isolates, collected in Poland by the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. Isolates obtained from 21 patients during 2000-2013 were investigated by phenotypic tests, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), analysis of the TR9 locus from the multilocus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SmaI-digested DNA. Determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analysed by sequencing. All isolates represented sequence type 1 (ST1) and were suggested to be serotype 2. PFGE and analysis of the TR9 locus allowed the discrimination of four and 17 types, respectively. Most of the isolates were haemolysis- and DNase-positive, and around half of them formed biofilm. Genes encoding suilysin, extracellular protein factor, fibronectin-binding protein, muramidase-released protein, surface antigen one, enolase, serum opacity factor and pili were ubiquitous in the studied group, while none of the isolates carried sequences characteristic for the 89K pathogenicity island. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, gentamicin, linezolid, vancomycin and daptomycin. Five isolates (24 %) were concomitantly non-susceptible to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and harboured the tet(O) and erm(B) genes; for one isolate, lsa(E) and lnu(B) were additionally detected. Streptococcus suis isolated in Poland from human invasive infections belongs to a globally distributed clonal complex of this pathogen, enriched in virulence markers. This is the first report of the lsa(E) and lnu(B) resistance genes in S. suis. PMID:26980093

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae from Palestinian Nasopharyngeal Carriers: Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Asad; Salman, Nisreen; Salem, Ibrahim; Abdeen, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    Infections of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children can be prevented by vaccination; left untreated, they cause high morbidity and fatalities. This study aimed at determining the nasopharyngeal carrier rates, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns of S. pneumoniae in healthy Palestinian children under age two prior to the full introduction of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7), which was originally introduced into Palestine in a pilot trial in September, 2010. In a cross sectional study, nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from 397 healthy children from different Palestinian districts between the beginning of November 2012 to the end of January 2013. Samples were inoculated into blood agar and suspected colonies were examined by amplifying the pneumococcal-specific autolysin gene using a real-time PCR. Serotypes were identified by a PCR that incorporated different sets of specific primers. Antimicrobial susceptibility was measured by disk diffusion and MIC methods. The resulting carrier rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 55.7% (221/397). The main serotypes were PCV7 serotypes 19F (12.2%), 23F (9.0%), 6B (8.6%) and 14 (4%) and PCV13 serotypes 6A (13.6%) and 19A (4.1%). Notably, serotype 6A, not included in the pilot trial (PCV7) vaccine, was the most prevalent. Resistance to more than two drugs was observed for bacteria from 34.1% of the children (72/211) while 22.3% (47/211) carried bacteria were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. All the isolates were sensitive to cefotaxime and vancomycin. Any or all of these might impinge on the type and efficacy of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and antibiotics to be used for prevention and treatment of pneumococcal disease in the country. PMID:24339987

  13. High prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Asia (an ANSORP study).

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Jung, Sook-In; Ko, Kwan Soo; Kim, Na Young; Son, Jun Seong; Chang, Hyun-Ha; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Oh, Won Sup; Suh, Ji Yoeun; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Yang, Yonghong; Lu, Quan; Chongthaleong, Anan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lalitha, M K; Perera, Jennifer; Yee, Ti Teow; Kumarasinghe, Gamini; Jamal, Farida; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Parasakthi, Navaratnam; Van, Pham Hung; Carlos, Celia; So, Thomas; Ng, Tak Keung; Shibl, Atef

    2004-06-01

    A total of 685 clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumococcal diseases were collected from 14 centers in 11 Asian countries from January 2000 to June 2001. The in vitro susceptibilities of the isolates to 14 antimicrobial agents were determined by the broth microdilution test. Among the isolates tested, 483 (52.4%) were not susceptible to penicillin, 23% were intermediate, and 29.4% were penicillin resistant (MICs >/= 2 mg/liter). Isolates from Vietnam showed the highest prevalence of penicillin resistance (71.4%), followed by those from Korea (54.8%), Hong Kong (43.2%), and Taiwan (38.6%). The penicillin MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited (MIC(90)s) were 4 mg/liter among isolates from Vietnam, Hong Kong, Korea, and Taiwan. The prevalence of erythromycin resistance was also very high in Vietnam (92.1%), Taiwan (86%), Korea (80.6%), Hong Kong (76.8%), and China (73.9%). The MIC(90)s of erythromycin were >32 mg/liter among isolates from Korea, Vietnam, China, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. Isolates from Hong Kong showed the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance (11.8%), followed by isolates from Sri Lanka (9.5%), the Philippines (9.1%), and Korea (6.5%). Multilocus sequence typing showed that the spread of the Taiwan(19F) clone and the Spain(23F) clone could be one of the major reasons for the rapid increases in antimicrobial resistance among S. pneumoniae isolates in Asia. Data from the multinational surveillance study clearly documented distinctive increases in the prevalence rates and the levels of antimicrobial resistance among S. pneumoniae isolates in many Asian countries, which are among the highest in the world published to date. PMID:15155207

  14. Deletion of a Cation Transporter Promotes Lysis in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Jolanda; Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Kim, Kwang S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen which causes respiratory and serious invasive diseases. Mg2+ is essential for life, and its concentration varies throughout the human body. Magnesium uptake plays an important role in the virulence of many bacterial pathogens. To study the Mg2+ uptake of S. pneumoniae strain D39, a mutant was generated in SPD1383, a P-type ATPase with homology to the Salmonella Mg2+ transporter MgtA, which has also been shown to be a Ca2+ exporter in strain TIGR4. Under low-Ca2+ conditions, mutation led to a growth defect in complex medium and the gene was nearly essential for growth under low-Mg2+ conditions. Addition of Mg2+ restored the normal growth of the mutant in all cases, but the addition of other divalent cations had no effect. Addition of Ca2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ in the presence of high Mg2+ concentrations inhibited restoration of growth. The mutant was unable to proliferate in blood, which was also alleviated by the addition of Mg2+. The protein was located in the membrane and produced in various S. pneumoniae strains and pathogenic streptococcal species. Surprisingly, mutation of the gene led to an elevated toxicity for endothelial cells. This was caused by an increased amount of pneumolysin in the medium, mediated by elevated lysis of the mutant. Thus, in this study, we uncovered a role for SPD1383 in Mg2+ uptake and hypothesize that the protein is a Mg2+/Ca2+ antiporter. Furthermore, a disturbance in Mg2+ homeostasis seems to promote lysis of S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422174

  15. The effect of pH on the heat production and membrane resistance of Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Russell, J B

    1992-01-01

    Non-growing cultures of Streptococcus bovis JB1 which were incubated in 2-[N-moropholino] ethane-sulfonic acid (MES)-phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) and glucose (2 g/l) produced heat at a rate of 0.17 mW/mg protein, and this rate was proportional to the enthalpy change of the homolactic fermentation. Since the growth-independent heat production could be eliminated by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of F1F0 ATPases, it appeared that virtually all of the energy was being used to counteract proton flux through the cell membrane. When the pH was decreased from 6.8 to 5.8, heat production and glucose consumption increased, the electrical potential (delta psi) declined, the chemical gradient of protons (Z delta pH) increased, and there was a small increase in total protonmotive force (delta p). Further decreases in pH (5.8 to 4.5) caused a marked decrease in heat production and glucose consumption even though there was only a small decline in membrane voltage. Based on the enthalpy of ATP (4 kcal or 16.8 kJ/mol), it appeared that 38% of the wattage was passing through the cell membrane. The relationship between membrane voltage and membrane wattage or glucose consumption was non-linear (non-ohmic), and it appeared that the resistance of the membrane to current flow was not constant. Based on the electrical formula, resistance = voltage2/wattage and resistance = voltage/amperage, there was a marked increase in membrane resistance when the pH was less than 6.0. The increase in membrane resistance at low pH allowed S. bovis to maintain its membrane potential and expend less energy when its ability to ferment glucose was impaired. PMID:1444715

  16. Manganese Homeostasis in Group A Streptococcus Is Critical for Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Andrew G.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; Gillen, Christine M.; Davies, Mark R.; West, Nicholas P.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is an obligate human pathogen responsible for a spectrum of human disease states. Metallobiology of human pathogens is revealing the fundamental role of metals in both nutritional immunity leading to pathogen starvation and metal poisoning of pathogens by innate immune cells. Spy0980 (MntE) is a paralog of the GAS zinc efflux pump CzcD. Through use of an isogenic mntE deletion mutant in the GAS serotype M1T1 strain 5448, we have elucidated that MntE is a manganese-specific efflux pump required for GAS virulence. The 5448ΔmntE mutant had significantly lower survival following infection of human neutrophils than did the 5448 wild type and the complemented mutant (5448ΔmntE::mntE). Manganese homeostasis may provide protection against oxidative stress, explaining the observed ex vivo reduction in virulence. In the presence of manganese and hydrogen peroxide, 5448ΔmntE mutant exhibits significantly lower survival than wild-type 5448 and the complemented mutant. We hypothesize that MntE, by maintaining homeostatic control of cytoplasmic manganese, ensures that the peroxide response repressor PerR is optimally poised to respond to hydrogen peroxide stress. Creation of a 5448ΔmntE-ΔperR double mutant rescued the oxidative stress resistance of the double mutant to wild-type levels in the presence of manganese and hydrogen peroxide. This work elucidates the mechanism for manganese toxicity within GAS and the crucial role of manganese homeostasis in maintaining GAS virulence. PMID:25805729

  17. Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Li-Yun; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2014-01-01

    Our multicenter nationwide surveillance data indicated that erythromycin (ERY) resistance among group A Streptococcus (GAS) isolates in Taiwan declined from 53.1% in 1998 and 2000 to 14.6% in 2002 and 2004 and 10.7% in 2006 to 2010 (P < 0.01). The present study aimed to assess the epidemiology of GAS in Taiwan and identify factors associated with ERY resistance. All 127 ERY-resistant (ERYr) isolates and 128 randomly selected ERY-susceptible (ERYs) isolates recovered from 1998 to 2010 were emm typed. ERYr isolates were also characterized by ERY resistance phenotype and mechanisms and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Multilocus sequence typing was performed on selected ERYr isolates. The predominant emm types in ERYr isolates were emm22 (n = 33, 26.0%), emm12 (n = 24, 18.9%), emm4 (n = 21, 16.5%), and emm106 (n = 15, 11.8%). In ERYs isolates, emm12 (n = 27, 21.9%), emm1 (n = 18, 14.1%), emm106 (n = 16, 12.5%), and emm11 (n = 9, 7.1%) predominated. The most common ERY resistance phenotype was the M phenotype (resistant to macrolides) (70.9%), with all but one isolate carrying mef(A), followed by the constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (cMLSB) phenotype (26.8%), with isolates carrying erm(B) or erm(TR). ERYr isolates of the emm12-sequence type 36 (ST36) lineage with the cMLSB phenotype were mostly present before 2004, while those of the emm22-ST46 lineage with the M phenotype predominated in later years. Recovery from respiratory (throat swab) specimens was an independent factor associated with ERY resistance. emm1 and emm11 GAS isolates were significantly associated with ERYs, while emm22 was detected only in ERYr GAS. In addition, emm106 isolates were prevalent among the abscess/pus isolates, whereas emm12 isolates were strongly associated with a respiratory (throat) origin. In addition to identifying factors associated with ERY resistance in GAS, our study provides helpful information on the changing GAS epidemiology in Taiwan. PMID

  18. Promotion of Streptococcus mutans glucose transport by human whole saliva and parotid fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1985-01-01

    Human saliva and parotid fluid have two effects on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans: a reduction in the overall rate of uptake, and the promotion of a biphasic mode of uptake. The former effect had been previously shown to result from lactoperoxidase-mediated inhibition of transport or metabolism or both. The objective of the present study was to uncover the basis of the second effect. Biphasic glucose uptake consisted of a rapid phase of low capacity and short duration (approximately 10 to 15 s) followed by a slower phase of high capacity and long duration (several minutes). The slow phase is typical of cells not exposed to the secretions (control cells). S. mutans BHT cells pretreated with as little as 10 microM glucose for 10 min at 37 degrees C, followed by its removal, subsequently exhibit biphasic glucose uptake typical of saliva- or parotid fluid-treated cells. Since pretreatment of the organism with glucose, whole saliva supernatant, or parotid fluid supported subsequent transport of the nonmetabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose, we concluded that pretreatments established a relatively stable pool of glycolytic intermediates (i.e., a phosphoenolpyruvate potential). Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of extracts from [14C]glucose-pretreated cells confirmed the presence of a stable pool of triose phosphates. Dialysis experiments indicated that high-molecular-weight substrates in the secretions were readily utilized by the organism to establish a phosphoenolpyruvate potential, especially when the lactoperoxidase system was rendered inactive. A survey of several carbohydrate constituents of salivary glycoproteins revealed that mannose, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine, in addition to glucose, established phosphoenolpyruvate potentials in the organisms. Inactive substances included, among others, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid. In a survey of selected amino acids, arginine alone promoted 2-deoxyglucose accumulation by the organism

  19. Promotion of Streptococcus mutans glucose transport by human whole saliva and parotid fluid.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1985-04-01

    Human saliva and parotid fluid have two effects on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans: a reduction in the overall rate of uptake, and the promotion of a biphasic mode of uptake. The former effect had been previously shown to result from lactoperoxidase-mediated inhibition of transport or metabolism or both. The objective of the present study was to uncover the basis of the second effect. Biphasic glucose uptake consisted of a rapid phase of low capacity and short duration (approximately 10 to 15 s) followed by a slower phase of high capacity and long duration (several minutes). The slow phase is typical of cells not exposed to the secretions (control cells). S. mutans BHT cells pretreated with as little as 10 microM glucose for 10 min at 37 degrees C, followed by its removal, subsequently exhibit biphasic glucose uptake typical of saliva- or parotid fluid-treated cells. Since pretreatment of the organism with glucose, whole saliva supernatant, or parotid fluid supported subsequent transport of the nonmetabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose, we concluded that pretreatments established a relatively stable pool of glycolytic intermediates (i.e., a phosphoenolpyruvate potential). Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of extracts from [14C]glucose-pretreated cells confirmed the presence of a stable pool of triose phosphates. Dialysis experiments indicated that high-molecular-weight substrates in the secretions were readily utilized by the organism to establish a phosphoenolpyruvate potential, especially when the lactoperoxidase system was rendered inactive. A survey of several carbohydrate constituents of salivary glycoproteins revealed that mannose, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine, in addition to glucose, established phosphoenolpyruvate potentials in the organisms. Inactive substances included, among others, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid. In a survey of selected amino acids, arginine alone promoted 2-deoxyglucose accumulation by the organism

  20. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  1. GC-MS-Based Metabolome and Metabolite Regulation in Serum-Resistant Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Min-Yi; Peng, Bo; Cheng, Zhi-Xue; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes severe systemic infections in human and fish. In the present study, we established a pathogen-plasma interaction model by which we explored how S. agalactiae evaded serum-mediated killing. We found that S. agalactiae grew faster in the presence of yellow grouper plasma than in the absence of the plasma, indicating S. agalactiae evolved a way of evading the fish immune system. To determine the events underlying this phenotype, we applied GC-MS-based metabolomics approaches to identify differential metabolomes between S. agalactiae cultured with and without yellow grouper plasma. Through bioinformatics analysis, decreased malic acid and increased adenosine were identified as the most crucial metabolites that distinguish the two groups. Meanwhile, they presented with decreased TCA cycle and elevated purine metabolism, respectively. Finally, exogenous malic acid and adenosine were used to reprogram the plasma-resistant metabolome, leading to elevated and decreased susceptibility to the plasma, respectively. Therefore, our findings reveal for the first time that S. agalactiae utilizes a metabolic trick to respond to plasma killing as a result of serum resistance, which may be reverted or enhanced by exogenous malic acid and adenosine, respectively, suggesting that the metabolic trick can be regulated by metabolites. PMID:27251450

  2. Structural basis of lantibiotic recognition by the nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Khosa, Sakshi; Frieg, Benedikt; Mulnaes, Daniel; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides. Nisin is the most prominent member and contains five crucial lanthionine rings. Some clinically relevant bacteria express membrane-associated resistance proteins that proteolytically inactivate nisin. However, substrate recognition and specificity of these proteins is unknown. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure of a nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae (SaNSR) at 2.2 Å resolution. It contains an N-terminal helical bundle, and protease cap and core domains. The latter harbors the highly conserved TASSAEM region, which lies in a hydrophobic tunnel formed by all domains. By integrative modeling, mutagenesis studies, and genetic engineering of nisin variants, a model of the SaNSR/nisin complex is generated, revealing that SaNSR recognizes the last C-terminally located lanthionine ring of nisin. This determines the substrate specificity of SaNSR and ensures the exact coordination of the nisin cleavage site at the TASSAEM region. PMID:26727488

  3. Genome-wide dissection of globally emergent multi-drug resistant serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN) is well-documented but causal factors remain unclear. Canadian SPN isolates (1993-2008, n = 11,083) were serotyped and in vitro susceptibility tested. A subset of MDR 19A were multi-locus sequence typed (MLST) and representative isolates' whole genomes sequenced. Results MDR 19A increased in the post-PCV7 era while 19F, 6B, and 23F concurrently declined. MLST of MDR 19A (n = 97) revealed that sequence type (ST) 320 predominated. ST320 was unique amongst MDR 19A in that its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for penicillin, amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin were higher than for other ST present amongst post-PCV7 MDR 19A. DNA sequencing revealed that alleles at key drug resistance loci pbp2a, pbp2x, pbp2b, ermB, mefA/E, and tetM were conserved between pre-PCV7 ST 320 19F and post-PCV7 ST 320 19A most likely due to a capsule switch recombination event. A genome wide comparison of MDR 19A ST320 with MDR 19F ST320 identified 822 unique SNPs in 19A, 61 of which were present in antimicrobial resistance genes and 100 in virulence factors. Conclusions Our results suggest a complex genetic picture where high-level drug resistance, vaccine selection pressure, and SPN mutational events have created a "perfect storm" for the emergence of MDR 19A. PMID:20042094

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to macrolide in Casablanca, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Idrissa; Zerouali, Khalid; Katfy, Khalid; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Belabbes, Houria; Timinouni, Mohammed; Elmdaghri, Naima

    2016-06-01

    In Morocco, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) was introduced in the national immunization program (NIP) in October 2010 and replaced by the PCV-10 in July 2012. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (ERSP) and to analyze the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these isolates in Casablanca, Morocco from January 2007 to December 2014. Isolates were obtained from the Microbiology Laboratory of Ibn Rochd University Hospital Centre of Casablanca. Serogrouping was done using Pneumotest Kit and serotyping by the Quellung capsular swelling. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined by disk diffusion and Etest methods. A total of 655S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from 2007 to 2014 from pediatric and adult patients. Fifty-five percent of these isolates were from invasive pneumococcal diseases. Of the 655 isolates, 92 (14%) were ERSP. Globally, the proportion of ERSP from 2007 to 2010 (before vaccination) and from 2011 to 2014 (after vaccination) were 11.6% and 17.2% (p=0.04), respectively. Of the 92 ERSP, 89%, 4% and 7% displayed constitutive MLSB (resistance to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B), inducible MLSB, and M phenotype (resistance to macrolide only), respectively. ERSP genotypic analysis showed that 90.2% carried the ermB gene, 6.5% the mefE gene, and 3.3% both the genes (ermB+mefE). The most prevalent ERSP serotypes were 6B, 19F and 23F before vaccination and 19F, 6B, 6A and 23F after vaccination. Erythromycin resistance among S. pneumoniae is relatively high in Casablanca. The contribution of PCVs to the reduction in antibiotic use is encouraging but this should be accompanied by a rational use of antibiotic. PMID:26961592

  5. Serotype Distribution, Antibiotic Resistance and Clonality of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Immunocompromised Patients in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Baaboura, Rekaya; Félix, Sofia; Achour, Wafa; Ben Othman, Tarek; Béjaoui, Mohamed; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Ben Hassen, Assia

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally, has higher incidence among young children, the elderly and the immunocompromised of all ages. In Tunisia, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are not included in the national immunization program. Also, few studies have described the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in this country and, in particular, no molecular typing studies have been performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and clonality of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from neutropenic patients in Tunisia. Methods Fifty-nine S. pneumoniae were isolated from infection (n = 31) and colonization (n = 28) sites of patients (children and adults) attending the National Centre of Bone Marrow Transplantation in Tunis between 2005–2011. All isolates were characterized by serotype, antimicrobial resistance pattern and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results The majority (66.1%) of the isolates belonged to five serotypes all included in PCVs: 6B, 9V, 14, 19F and 23F. The potential coverage of the 10-valent and 13-valent PCV was of 71.2% and 76.3% respectively. Resistance rates were very high and 69.5% of the isolates were multidrug resistant: non-susceptibility rates to penicillin, amoxicillin and cefotaxime were 66.1%, 40.7% and 27.1%, respectively; resistance rates to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were 69.5%, 61.0%, 37.3%, 22.0% and 67.8%, respectively. The most frequent serotypes had STs characteristic of multidrug resistant international clones known to be highly successful and important causes of pneumococcal infection: Spain 23F-ST81, France 9V/14-ST156, Spain 6B-ST90, 19F-ST320, and Portugal 19F-ST177. Conclusions The majority of S. pneumoniae strains recovered from immunocompromised patients in Tunisia are representatives of multidrug resistant pandemic clones that express serotypes targeted by PCVs. To

  6. Antibiotic Selection Pressure and Macrolide Resistance in Nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Cluster-Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Skalet, Alison H.; Cevallos, Vicky; Ayele, Berhan; Gebre, Teshome; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Jorgensen, James H.; Zerihun, Mulat; Habte, Dereje; Assefa, Yared; Emerson, Paul M.; Gaynor, Bruce D.; Porco, Travis C.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2010-01-01

    Background It is widely thought that widespread antibiotic use selects for community antibiotic resistance, though this has been difficult to prove in the setting of a community-randomized clinical trial. In this study, we used a randomized clinical trial design to assess whether macrolide resistance was higher in communities treated with mass azithromycin for trachoma, compared to untreated control communities. Methods and Findings In a cluster-randomized trial for trachoma control in Ethiopia, 12 communities were randomized to receive mass azithromycin treatment of children aged 1–10 years at months 0, 3, 6, and 9. Twelve control communities were randomized to receive no antibiotic treatments until the conclusion of the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from randomly selected children in the treated group at baseline and month 12, and in the control group at month 12. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from the swabs using Etest strips. In the treated group, the mean prevalence of azithromycin resistance among all monitored children increased from 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%–8.9%) at baseline, to 46.9% (37.5%–57.5%) at month 12 (p = 0.003). In control communities, azithromycin resistance was 9.2% (95% CI 6.7%–13.3%) at month 12, significantly lower than the treated group (p<0.0001). Penicillin resistance was identified in 0.8% (95% CI 0%–4.2%) of isolates in the control group at 1 year, and in no isolates in the children-treated group at baseline or 1 year. Conclusions This cluster-randomized clinical trial demonstrated that compared to untreated control communities, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal resistance to macrolides was significantly higher in communities randomized to intensive azithromycin treatment. Mass azithromycin distributions were given more frequently than currently recommended by the World Health Organization's trachoma program. Azithromycin use in this setting did

  7. Compensatory Evolution of pbp Mutations Restores the Fitness Cost Imposed by β-Lactam Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Albarracín Orio, Andrea G.; Piñas, Germán E.; Cortes, Paulo R.; Cian, Melina B.; Echenique, José

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria is a major challenge to treating many infectious diseases. The spread of these genes is driven by the strong selection imposed by the use of antibacterial drugs. However, in the absence of drug selection, antibiotic resistance genes impose a fitness cost, which can be ameliorated by compensatory mutations. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, β-lactam resistance is caused by mutations in three penicillin-binding proteins, PBP1a, PBP2x, and PBP2b, all of which are implicated in cell wall synthesis and the cell division cycle. We found that the fitness cost and cell division defects conferred by pbp2b mutations (as determined by fitness competitive assays in vitro and in vivo and fluorescence microscopy) were fully compensated by the acquisition of pbp2x and pbp1a mutations, apparently by means of an increased stability and a consequent mislocalization of these protein mutants. Thus, these compensatory combinations of pbp mutant alleles resulted in an increase in the level and spectrum of β-lactam resistance. This report describes a direct correlation between antibiotic resistance increase and fitness cost compensation, both caused by the same gene mutations acquired by horizontal transfer. The clinical origin of the pbp mutations suggests that this intergenic compensatory process is involved in the persistence of β-lactam resistance among circulating strains. We propose that this compensatory mechanism is relevant for β-lactam resistance evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:21379570

  8. Group B Streptococcus Hijacks the Host Plasminogen System to Promote Brain Endothelial Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joana; Ribeiro, Adilia; Kim, Kwang Sik; Lima, Margarida; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Ferreira, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of meningitis in neonates. We have previously shown that plasminogen, once recruited to the GBS cell surface and converted into plasmin by host-derived activators, leads to an enhancement of bacterial virulence. Here, we investigated whether plasmin(ogen) bound at the GBS surface contributes to blood-brain barrier penetration and invasion of the central nervous system. For that purpose, GBS strain NEM316 preincubated with or without plasminogen plus tissue type plasminogen activator was analyzed for the capacity to adhere to, invade and transmigrate the human brain microvascular endothelial cell (hBMEC) monolayer, and to penetrate the central nervous system using a neonatal mouse model. At earlier times of infection, plasmin(ogen)-treated GBS exhibited a significant increase in adherence to and invasion of hBMECs. Later, injury of hBMECs were observed with plasmin(ogen)-treated GBS that displayed a plasmin-like activity. The same results were obtained when hBMECs were incubated with whole human plasma and infected with untreated GBS. To confirm that the observed effects were due to the recruitment and activation of plasminogen on GBS surface, the bacteria were first incubated with epsilon-aminocaproic acid (εACA), an inhibitor of plasminogen binding, and thereafter with plasmin(ogen). A significant decrease in the hBMECs injury that was correlated with a decrease of the GBS surface proteolytic activity was observed. Furthermore, plasmin(ogen)-treated GBS infected more efficiently the brain of neonatal mice than the untreated bacteria, indicating that plasmin(ogen) bound to GBS surface may facilitate the traversal of the blood-brain barrier. A higher survival rate was observed in offspring born from εACA-treated mothers, compared to untreated mice, and no brain infection was detected in these neonates. Our findings suggest that capture of the host plasmin(ogen) by the GBS surface promotes the crossing of the blood

  9. Controlled laboratory challenge demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance to Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. An alternative and ...

  10. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of clinical Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Binghuai; Fang, Yujie; Huang, Lei; Diao, Baowei; Du, Xiaoli; Kan, Biao; Cui, Yanchao; Zhu, Fengxia; Li, Dong; Wang, Duochun

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is presently considered as a human pathogen associated with clinical infection. We characterized 56 SDSE isolates collected from two tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China. Sixteen distinct emm types/subtypes were detected, dominated by stG245.0 (32.1%), stG652.0 (10.7%), stG6.1 (10.7%) and stG485.0 (10.7%), and a novel stG840.0 variant type was identified. All isolates possessed virulence genes of sagA and scpA, and most carried slo (98.2%), ska (98.2%) and speG(dys) (35.7%). By multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, 17 individual sequence types (STs) were distinguished, including 7 newly-identified STs (26.8% of isolates), of which ST127 (30.4%), ST7 (12.5%) and ST44 (10.7%) dominated. Meanwhile, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed 33 pattern types (PTs), which were further combined into 16 pattern clusters (PCs), and 59.3% of isolates were distributed into 2 dominant PCs. Notably, emm types had both close relationship and consistency with STs and PFGE PCs. Furthermore, of 56 SDSE isolates, the predominant antibiotic resistances were erythromycin (71.4%), clindamycin (71.4%) and tetracycline (60.7%). Correspondingly, the prevalent resistance genes of macrolide and tetracycline were erm(B) (78.6%) and tet(M) (73.2%). In addition, multiple point mutations of parC, one of fluoroquinolone resistance genes, were observed (accounting for 75%), and were divided into 12 types, with parC 07 as the predominant type. Our data suggested the wide molecular diversity and distinctive regional features of SDSE from clinical infection in Beijing, China. PMID:26925701

  11. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Sequence Type 25 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Teatero, Sarah; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes of ST1 and ST28 S. suis strains, which result, among other changes, in disruption of a pilus island locus. We report that recombination and lateral gene transfer contribute to ST25 genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis identified two main and distinct Thai and North American clades grouping most strains investigated. These clades also possessed distinct patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes, which correlated with acquisition of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Some of these ICEs were found to be integrated at a recombination hot spot, previously identified as the site of integration of the 89K pathogenicity island in serotype 2 ST7 S. suis strains. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for phylogenetic analysis of S. suis, and the importance of lateral gene transfer and recombination as drivers of diversity in this swine pathogen and zoonotic agent. PMID:26954687

  12. Optimization of culture conditions to obtain maximal growth of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Andrea V; Salazar, Beatriz E; Agudelo, María; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae, particularly penicillin-resistant strains (PRSP), constitute one of the most important causes of serious infections worldwide. It is a fastidious microorganism with exquisite nutritional and environmental requirements to grow, a characteristic that prevents the development of useful animal models to study the biology of the microorganism. This study was designed to determine optimal conditions for culture and growth of PRSP. Results We developed a simple and reproducible method for culture of diverse strains of PRSP representing several invasive serotypes of clinical and epidemiological importance in Colombia. Application of this 3-step culture protocol consistently produced more than 9 log10 CFU/ml of viable cells in the middle part of the logarithmic phase of their growth curve. Conclusion A controlled inoculum size grown in 3 successive steps in supplemented agar and broth under 5% CO2 atmosphere, with pH adjustment and specific incubation times, allowed production of great numbers of PRSP without untimely activation of autolysis mechanisms. PMID:15932633

  13. Conjugal Transfer of Plasmid-Borne Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus faecalis var. zymogenes

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alan E.; Hobbs, Susan J.

    1974-01-01

    A strain of Streptococcus faecalis var. zymogenes, designated JH1, had high-level resistance to the antibiotics streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. These resistances were lost en bloc from approximately 0.1% of cells grown in nutrient broth at 45 C. The frequency of resistance loss was not increased by growth in the presence of the “curing” agents acriflavine or acridine orange, but after prolonged storage in nutrient agar 17% of cells became antibiotic sensitive. Covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were isolated from the parental strain and from antibiotic-sensitive segregants by using cesium chloride-ethidium bromide gradients. DNA molecular species were identified by using neutral sucrose gradients. Strain JH1 contained two covalently closed circular DNA species of molecular weights 50 × 106 and 38 × 106. An antibiotic-sensitive segregant, strain JH1-9, had lost the larger molecular species. A second sensitive segregant, strain JH1-5, had also lost the larger molecular species but a new molecular species of approximate molecular weight 6 × 106 was present. The antibiotic resistances that were curable from the parental strain were transferred to antibiotic-sensitive strains of S. faecalis and to strain JH1-9, during mixed incubation in nutrient broth at 37 C. Data to be described are interpreted to suggest that the transfer is by a conjugal mechanism. Analysis of the plasmid species in recipient clones showed that all had received the plasmid of molecular weight 50 × 106. Strain JH1-5 was not a good recipient. Analysis of one successful recipient clone of JH1-5 revealed that it had gained the 50 × 106 molecular weight plasmid but lost the 6 × 106 molecular weight species. These data are interpreted to mean that the multiple antibiotic resistance is borne by a transferable plasmid of 50 × 106 molecular weight, and that in clone JH1-5 this plasmid suffered a large deletion leaving only a 6

  14. Rapid increase of resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in Streptococcus pyogenes in Italy, 1993-1995. The Italian Surveillance Group for Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Cornaglia, G.; Ligozzi, M.; Mazzariol, A.; Valentini, M.; Orefici, G.; Fontana, R.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes in Italy showed a sharp increase in erythromycin resistance. In 1993, the incidence of erythromycin-resistant strains was on average 5.1%, with marked variations by geographic area. Two years later, the incidence of these strains had registered a 1.5- to roughly 20-fold increase, with a mean value of 25.9%, exceeding 40% in three centers out of 13 and 30% in another four. For all the strains studied, normal levels of susceptibility to penicillin were reported. PMID:9011381

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 3 among Costa Rican Children with Otitis Media: clinical, epidemiological characteristics and antimicrobial resistance patterns

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Soley, Carolina; Guevara, Silvia; Porat, Nurith; Dagan, Ron; Arguedas, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Background After the introduction of the seven valent-pneumococcal conjugated vaccine into our National Immunization Program, it is important to establish and track local serotype distribution in order to evaluate its impact specially because serotype replacement phenomena has been described. To describe the clinical, epidemiological and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Costa Rican children with otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. Methods Middle ear fluid samples were obtained from Costa Rican children with otitis media who participated in various antimicrobial clinical trials between 1992 and 2007. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified according to laboratory standard procedures. Strains were serotyped and antimicrobial susceptibility to penicillin, amoxicillin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, azithromycin and levofloxacin was determined by E-test. Results Throughout 1992–2007 a total of 1919 tympanocentesis were performed in children with otitis media (median age: 19 months) and yielded a total of 1208 middle ear isolates. The most common pathogens were: Streptococcus pneumoniae, 511 isolates (49%); Non-Typable Haemophilus influenzae, 386 isolates (37%); Moraxella catarrahalis, 100 isolates (9.5%); and Streptococcus pyogenes, 54 isolates (5%). Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed in 346/511 isolates (68%) recovered during years 1999–2006. The most common serotypes were 19F (101/30.0%), 14 (46/13.7%), 3 (34/10.1%), 6B (30/8.9%) and 23F (23/6.8%). Analysis performed per years showed a higher prevalence of serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae during the study period 2004 and 2005. During the entire study period (1999–2006) serotype 3 was most commonly isolated in children older than 24 months (61.2% vs 40.6%;P = 0.05) and showed a lower rate of penicillin non-susceptibility (4.0% vs 18%; P = 0.003). Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 is an important pathogen in Costa Rican children with otitis media, especially in

  16. Spread of drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Asian countries: Asian Network for Surveillance of Resistant Pathogens (ANSORP) Study.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Lee, N Y; Ichiyama, S; Yoshida, R; Hirakata, Y; Fu, W; Chongthaleong, A; Aswapokee, N; Chiu, C H; Lalitha, M K; Thomas, K; Perera, J; Yee, T T; Jamal, F; Warsa, U C; Vinh, B X; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C; Pai, C H

    1999-06-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of 996 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from clinical specimens was investigated in 11 Asian countries from September 1996 to June 1997. Korea had the greatest frequency of nonsusceptible strains to penicillin with 79.7%, followed by Japan (65.3%), Vietnam (60.8%), Thailand (57.9%), Sri Lanka (41.2%), Taiwan (38.7%), Singapore (23.1%), Indonesia (21.0%), China (9.8%), Malaysia (9.0%), and India (3.8%). Serotypes 23F and 19F were the most common. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 154 isolates from Asian countries showed several major PFGE patterns. The serotype 23F Spanish clone shared the same PFGE pattern with strains from Korea, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Malaysia. Fingerprinting analysis of pbp1a, pbp2x, and pbp2b genes of 12 strains from six countries also showed identical fingerprints of penicillin-binding protein genes in most strains. These data suggest the possible introduction and spread of international epidemic clones into Asian countries and the increasing problems of pneumococcal drug resistance in Asian countries for the first time. PMID:10451154

  17. High Incidence of Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance among Streptococcus Agalactiae Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    EMANEINI, Mohammad; MIRSALEHIAN, Akbar; BEIGVIERDI, Reza; FOOLADI, Abbas Ali Imani; ASADI, Fatemeh; JABALAMELI, Fereshteh; TAHERIKALANI, Morovat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococci (GBS) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes a wide range of infections including neonatal sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and soft tissue or urinary tract infections. Material and methods: One hundred and fifteen isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae collected from urine specimens of patients attending a hospital in Tehran. All isolates were screened for their capsular types and genes encoding resistance to the macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics by PCR and multiplex PCR–based methods. Results: Most of isolates belonged to capsular types III (49%), V (19%), II (16%), and Ib (6%). Twelve isolates (10%) were nontypable. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and Quinupristin-dalfopristin, but were resistant to clindamycin (35%), chloramphenicol (45%), erythromycin (35%), linezolid (1%) and tetracycline (96%). The most prevalent antimicrobial resistance gene was tetM found in 93% of the isolates followed by ermTR, ermB, and tetK, found in 23%, 16%, and 16% of isolates, respectively. The genes, tetL, tetO, ermA, ermC and mefA were not detected in any of the S. agalactiae isolates. Of the 110 tetracycline resistant S. agalactiae, 89 isolates harbored the tetM gene alone and eighteen isolates carried the tetM gene with the tetK gene. All erythromycin-resistant isolates exhibited cMLSB resistance phenotype, 22 isolates harbored the ermTR gene alone and five isolates carried the ermTR gene with the ermB gene. The rate of coexistence of genes encoding the erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants was 34%. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that S. agalactiae isolates obtained from urine samples showed a high rate of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and macrolide antibiotics and were commonly associated with the resistance genes temM, ermTR or ermB. PMID:25705271

  18. The CovR response regulator of group A streptococcus (GAS) acts directly to repress its own promoter.

    PubMed

    Gusa, Asiya A; Scott, June R

    2005-06-01

    The CovR/S (CsrR/S) two component system is a global regulator of virulence gene expression in the group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes). The response regulator, CovR, regulates about 15% of the genes of GAS, including its own operon. Using in vitro DNA binding assays with purified CovR protein, we found that CovR binds a DNA fragment including the covR promoter (Pcov). DNaseI footprint analyses showed that phosphorylation of CovR enhanced and extended the protected regions. The proposed CovR consensus binding sequence (ATTARA) was present at most, but not all protected regions. The effect of replacing the two thymine residues in the consensus binding sequence (CB) with guanine residues was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Most, but not all, CB mutations reduced binding of CovR in vitro. Using a transcriptional reporter introduced in single copy into the GAS chromosome, we found that mutations at each CB completely or partially relieved CovR-mediated repression in vivo. This suggests that CovR regulation of Pcov is direct. Further support for this conclusion comes from use of an in vitro GAS transcription system in which CovR was sufficient to mediate repression of Pcov. This repression was enhanced by phosphorylation of the protein. In addition, we found that the CovR binding region overlapping the promoter was essential for wild type repression of Pcov both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that promoter occlusion is a primary mechanism of Pcov repression by CovR. PMID:15882414

  19. Structure of the Response Regulator NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, Which Is Involved in Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khosa, Sakshi; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Schmitt, Lutz; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Interestingly, several clinically relevant and human pathogenic strains are inherently resistant towards lantibiotics. The expression of the genes responsible for lantibiotic resistance is regulated by a specific two-component system consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator. Here, we focused on a response regulator involved in lantibiotic resistance, NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, and determined the crystal structures of its N-terminal receiver domain and C-terminal DNA-binding effector domain. The C-terminal domain exhibits a fold that classifies NsrR as a member of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily of regulators. Amino acids involved in phosphorylation, dimerization, and DNA-binding were identified and demonstrated to be conserved in lantibiotic resistance regulators. Finally, a model of the full-length NsrR in the active and inactive state provides insights into protein dimerization and DNA-binding. PMID:26930060

  20. Structure of the Response Regulator NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, Which Is Involved in Lantibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Sakshi; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Schmitt, Lutz; Smits, Sander H J

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Interestingly, several clinically relevant and human pathogenic strains are inherently resistant towards lantibiotics. The expression of the genes responsible for lantibiotic resistance is regulated by a specific two-component system consisting of a histidine kinase and a response regulator. Here, we focused on a response regulator involved in lantibiotic resistance, NsrR from Streptococcus agalactiae, and determined the crystal structures of its N-terminal receiver domain and C-terminal DNA-binding effector domain. The C-terminal domain exhibits a fold that classifies NsrR as a member of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily of regulators. Amino acids involved in phosphorylation, dimerization, and DNA-binding were identified and demonstrated to be conserved in lantibiotic resistance regulators. Finally, a model of the full-length NsrR in the active and inactive state provides insights into protein dimerization and DNA-binding. PMID:26930060

  1. Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes promoters by using novel Tn916-based shuttle vectors for the construction of transcriptional fusions to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Geist, R T; Okada, N; Caparon, M G

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a series of shuttle vectors based on the conjugative transposon Tn916 that have been designed for the analysis of transcriptional regulation in Streptococcus pyogenes and other gram-positive bacteria. Designated the pVIT vectors (vectors for integration into Tn916), the vectors are small, stable plasmids in Escherichia coli to facilitate the fusion of promoters from cloned S. pyogenes genes to a promoterless gene which encodes chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. The vectors each contain one or more small regions of Tn916 to direct the integration of the transcriptional fusion into the transposon via homologous recombination following transformation of S. pyogenes or other suitable gram-positive hosts. Integration can be monitored by the inactivation or replacement of an antibiotic resistance determinant in modified derivatives of Tn916. Promoter activity can then be quantitated by the determination of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-specific activity. In addition, since integration is into loci that do not disrupt the conjugative transpositional functions of Tn916, the vectors are useful for analysis of regulation in strains that are difficult or impossible to transform and can be introduced into these strains by conjugation following transformation of an intermediate host. The promoters for the genes which encode both the M protein and protein F of S. pyogenes were active in pVIT vectors, as was the region which controls transcription of mry, a trans-acting positive regulator of M protein expression. However, neither of the two characterized promoters for mry demonstrated activity when independently analyzed in pVIT-generated partial diploid strains, suggesting that regulation of mry is more complex than predicted by current models. The broad host range of Tn916 should make the pVIT vectors useful for analysis of regulation in numerous other bacterial species. PMID:8244925

  2. Emergence of Neoteric Serotypes Among Multidrug Resistant Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae Prevalent in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Bahy, Rehab H; Hamouda, Hayam M; Shahat, Amal S; Yassin, Aymen S; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The prevalent serotype distribution had shown variation along different studies conducted at different time intervals. In order to efficiently assess the epidemiology of the diseases for effective preventive and treatment strategies, serotype prevalence need to be periodically reassessed. Objectives Conducting a reassessment of the prevalent S. pneumoniae serotypes in Egypt as an essential step in the search for a regional vaccine. In addition, monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pneumococcal strains currently causing infections as an evaluation of therapeutic strategies applied. Materials and Methods A total of 100 specimens of different sources were collected in Cairo, Egypt, from 2011 to 2013, representing almost all different types of diseases caused by S. pneumoniae such as meningitis, pneumonia, otitis media and sinusitis. Conventional and molecular identification methods were performed, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were assessed and serotyping was done using PCR assays to identify the most prevalent types. In addition, detection of certain virulence genes for the most prevalent serotypes was carried out. Results Our results revealed that in Egypt, currently, the most prevalent serotypes were serogroup 6 and serotype 19F as they represented 58% of all isolates. High rates of resistance were found to different antibiotic classes. The lytA and psaA genes were found to be more sensitive for S. pneumoniae identification than ply. Conclusions Our study illustrates the importance of constantly monitoring the prevalent serotypes in any region in order to aid in the development of more effective vaccines. PMID:27303614

  3. The core promoter of the capsule operon of Streptococcus pneumoniae is necessary for colonization and invasive disease.

    PubMed

    Shainheit, Mara G; Mulé, Matthew; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal of the human nasopharynx but can cause invasive diseases, including otitis media, pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. The capsular polysaccharide (capsule) is a critical virulence factor required for both asymptomatic colonization and invasive disease, yet the expression level is different in each anatomical site. During colonization, reduced levels of capsule promote binding to the host epithelium and biofilm formation, while during systemic infection, increased capsule is required to evade opsonophagocytosis. How this regulation of capsule expression occurs is incompletely understood. To investigate the contribution of transcriptional regulation on capsule level in the serotype 4 strain TIGR4, we constructed two mutants harboring a constitutive promoter that was either comparably weaker (Pcat) or stronger (PtRNAGlu) than the wild-type (WT) capsule promoter, Pcps. Mild reductions in cpsA and cpsE transcript levels in the Pcat promoter mutant resulted in a 2-fold reduction in total amounts of capsule and in avirulence in murine models of lung and blood infection. Additionally, the PtRNAGlu mutant revealed that, despite expressing enhanced levels of cpsA and cpsE and possessing levels of capsule comparable to those of WT TIGR4, it was still significantly attenuated in all tested in vivo niches. Further analysis using chimeric promoter mutants revealed that the WT -10 and -35 boxes are required for optimal nasopharyngeal colonization and virulence. These data support the hypothesis that dynamic transcriptional regulation of the capsule operon is required and that the core promoter region plays a central role in fine-tuning levels of capsule to promote colonization and invasive disease. PMID:24478084

  4. Identification of the Novel Lincosamide Resistance Gene lnu(E) Truncated by ISEnfa5-cfr-ISEnfa5 Insertion in Streptococcus suis: De Novo Synthesis and Confirmation of Functional Activity in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Wendlandt, Sarah; Li, Hui; Li, Jun; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The novel lincosamide resistance gene lnu(E), truncated by insertion of an ISEnfa5-cfr-ISEnfa5 segment, was identified in Streptococcus suis. The gene lnu(E) encodes a 173-amino-acid protein with ≤69.4% identity to other lincosamide nucleotidyltransferases. The lnu(E) gene and its promoter region were de novo synthesized, and Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 carrying a shuttle vector with the cloned lnu(E) gene showed a 16-fold increase in the lincomycin MIC. Mass spectrometry experiments demonstrated that Lnu(E) catalyzed the nucleotidylation of lincomycin. PMID:24366733

  5. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Miki, Kanji; Sono, Yumi; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Jumpei; Tomii, Keisuke; Haruta, Tsunekazu

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants) in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly. PMID:24899822

  6. Clonal Spread of Levofloxacin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Invasive Isolates in Madrid, Spain, 2007 to 2009▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Ramos, Belén; Ríos, Esther; Cercenado, Emilia; Ordobás, María; Sanz, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Among 1,349 Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive isolates, 45 (3.3%) were levofloxacin resistant. Serotype distribution was as follows: 8 (n = 32 isolates), 19A (n = 4 isolates), 7F (n = 3 isolates), 9V (n = 2 isolates), 10A (n = 1 isolate), 19F (n = 1 isolate), 6B (n = 1 isolate), and nontypeable (n = 1 isolate). Levofloxacin-resistant isolates had dual mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. Serotype 8 strains corresponded to a capsular switching of the Sweden15A-25 clone. Levofloxacin resistance was also detected among multiresistant (ST27619A, Spain9V-ST156, ST8819F, and ST15426B) and among usually antibiotic-susceptible (Netherlands7F-ST191, ST120119A, and ST263910A) clones. PMID:21383091

  7. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  8. Induction of prophages by fluoroquinolones in Streptococcus pneumoniae: implications for emergence of resistance in genetically-related clones.

    PubMed

    López, Elena; Domenech, Arnau; Ferrándiz, María-José; Frias, Maria João; Ardanuy, Carmen; Ramirez, Mario; García, Ernesto; Liñares, Josefina; de la Campa, Adela G

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae has increased worldwide by the spread of a few clones. Fluoroquinolone resistance occurs mainly by alteration of their intracellular targets, the type II DNA topoisomerases, which is acquired either by point mutation or by recombination. Increase in fluoroquinolone-resistance may depend on the balance between antibiotic consumption and the cost that resistance imposes to bacterial fitness. In addition, pneumococcal prophages could play an important role. Prophage induction by fluoroquinolones was confirmed in 4 clinical isolates by using Southern blot hybridization. Clinical isolates (105 fluoroquinolone-resistant and 160 fluoroquinolone-susceptible) were tested for lysogeny by using a PCR assay and functional prophage carriage was studied by mitomycin C induction. Fluoroquinolone-resistant strains harbored fewer inducible prophages (17/43) than fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains (49/70) (P = 0.0018). In addition, isolates of clones associated with fluoroquinolone resistance [CC156 (3/25); CC63 (2/20), and CC81 (1/19)], had lower frequency of functional prophages than isolates of clones with low incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance [CC30 (4/21), CC230 (5/20), CC62 (9/21), and CC180 (21/30)]. Likewise, persistent strains from patients with chronic respiratory diseases subjected to fluoroquinolone treatment had a low frequency of inducible prophages (1/11). Development of ciprofloxacin resistance was tested with two isogenic strains, one lysogenic and the other non-lysogenic: emergence of resistance was only observed in the non-lysogenic strain. These results are compatible with the lysis of lysogenic isolates receiving fluoroquinolones before the development of resistance and explain the inverse relation between presence of inducible prophages and fluoroquinolone-resistance. PMID:24718595

  9. Vitamin D and the Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Enhance Group A Streptococcus Resistance to Killing by Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Love, John F.; Tran-Winkler, Hien J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CsrRS two-component regulatory system of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) responds to subinhibitory concentrations of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. LL-37 signaling through CsrRS results in upregulation of genes that direct synthesis of virulence factors, including the hyaluronic acid capsule and streptolysin O (SLO). Here, we demonstrate that a consequence of this response is augmented GAS resistance to killing by human oropharyngeal keratinocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. LL-37-induced upregulation of SLO and hyaluronic acid capsule significantly reduced internalization of GAS by keratinocytes and phagocytic killing by neutrophils and macrophages. Because vitamin D induces LL-37 production by macrophages, we tested its effect on macrophage killing of GAS. In contrast to the reported enhancement of macrophage function in relation to other pathogens, treatment of macrophages with 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 paradoxically reduced the ability of macrophages to control GAS infection. These observations demonstrate that LL-37 signals through CsrRS to induce a virulence phenotype in GAS characterized by heightened resistance to ingestion and killing by both epithelial cells and phagocytes. By inducing LL-37 production in macrophages, vitamin D may contribute to this paradoxical exacerbation of GAS infection. PMID:23093388

  10. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  11. Streptolysin O and NAD-Glycohydrolase Prevent Phagolysosome Acidification and Promote Group A Streptococcus Survival in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bastiat-Sempe, Benedicte; Love, John F.; Lomayesva, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is an ongoing threat to human health as the agent of streptococcal pharyngitis, skin and soft tissue infections, and life-threatening conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. In animal models of infection, macrophages have been shown to contribute to host defense against GAS infection. However, as GAS can resist killing by macrophages in vitro and induce macrophage cell death, it has been suggested that GAS intracellular survival in macrophages may enable persistent infection. Using isogenic mutants, we now show that the GAS pore-forming toxin streptolysin O (SLO) and its cotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase (NADase) mediate GAS intracellular survival and cytotoxicity for macrophages. Unexpectedly, the two toxins did not inhibit fusion of GAS-containing phagosomes with lysosomes but rather prevented phagolysosome acidification. SLO served two essential functions, poration of the phagolysosomal membrane and translocation of NADase into the macrophage cytosol, both of which were necessary for maximal GAS intracellular survival. Whereas NADase delivery to epithelial cells is mediated by SLO secreted from GAS bound to the cell surface, in macrophages, the source of SLO and NADase is GAS contained within phagolysosomes. We found that transfer of NADase from the phagolysosome to the macrophage cytosol occurs not by simple diffusion through SLO pores but rather by a specific translocation mechanism that requires the N-terminal translocation domain of NADase. These results illuminate the mechanisms through which SLO and NADase enable GAS to defeat macrophage-mediated killing and provide new insight into the virulence of a major human pathogen. PMID:25227466

  12. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  13. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  14. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carrolo, Margarida; Frias, Maria João; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages) residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population. PMID:21187931

  15. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014).

    PubMed

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance. PMID:27227336

  16. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M.; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995–2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance. PMID:27227336

  17. Differences between macrolide-resistant and -susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: importance of clonal properties in addition to antibiotic consumption.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, C; Friães, A; Ramirez, M; Melo-Cristino, J

    2012-11-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  18. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone. PMID:18519724

  19. Activities of Clinafloxacin, Gatifloxacin, Gemifloxacin, and Trovafloxacin against Recent Clinical Isolates of Levofloxacin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J. H.; Weigel, L. M.; Swenson, J. M.; Whitney, C. G.; Ferraro, M. J.; Tenover, F. C.

    2000-01-01

    The activities of two investigational fluoroquinolones and three fluoroquinolones that are currently marketed were determined for 182 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The collection included 57 pneumococcal isolates resistant to levofloxacin (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) recovered from patients in North America and Europe. All isolates were tested with clinafloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, and trovafloxacin by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards broth microdilution and disk diffusion susceptibility test methods. Gemifloxacin demonstrated the greatest activity on a per gram basis, followed by clinafloxacin, trovafloxacin, gatifloxacin, and levofloxacin. Scatterplots of the MICs and disk diffusion zone sizes revealed a well-defined separation of levofloxacin-resistant and -susceptible strains when the isolates were tested against clinafloxacin and gatifloxacin. DNA sequence analyses of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE from 21 of the levofloxacin-resistant strains identified eight different patterns of amino acid changes. Mutations among the four loci had the least effect on the MICs of gemifloxacin and clinafloxacin, while the MICs of gatifloxacin and trovafloxacin increased by up to six doubling dilutions. These data indicate that the newer fluoroquinolones have greater activities than levofloxacin against pneumococci with mutations in the DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. Depending upon pharmacokinetics and safety, the greater potency of these agents could provide improved clinical efficacy against levofloxacin-resistant pneumococcal strains. PMID:11036007

  20. Fitness cost, gyrB mutation, and absence of phosphotransferase system fructose specific IIABC component in novobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the fitness cost of novobiocin-resistance in an attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO compared to its virulent parent strain ISET0901, cell proliferation rate of the two strains were compared to each other. Our results revealed that the cell proliferation rates of ISNO wer...

  1. Growth, Immune Response and Resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile Tilapia Fed Diets Containing Various Levels of Vitamin C and E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of dietary levels of vitamins C and E on growth performance, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge were evaluated. A basal practical diet containing 32% protein and 2900 kcal DE/kg was supplemented with three levels of vitamin C (0, 100, 2000 mg/k...

  2. Growth Response and Resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Fed Diets Containing Distiller’s Dried Grains with Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, body composition, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. Five isocaloric diets containing DDGS at levels of ...

  3. Growth performance and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets supplemented with GroBiotic - A and Brewtech Dried Brewers Yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of Brewtech® dried brewers yeast (BY) and GroBiotic®-A (GB) on growth performance, proximate body composition, immune response and resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. A practical basal (control) diet ...

  4. Growth, body composition, immune response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus x O. aureaus, fed diets containing various levels of linoleic and linolenic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of various levels of dietary linoleic (LA) and linolenic acids (LN) on growth, body proximate and fatty acid composition, immune response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of juvenile, sex-reversed all-male hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus x O. areaus, were evaluated. A basal pu...

  5. Effects of dietary levels of vitamin A on growth, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplemental levels of vitamin A (0, 2,500, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 IU/kg diet) on the growth performance, hematology, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus to Streptococcus iniae challenge. Each diet was fed to Nil...

  6. Promoting Improved Ballistic Resistance of Transparent Armor

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Patel, P; Templeton, D W

    2011-01-01

    Transparent armor is a material or system of materials designed to be optically transparent, yet protect from fragmentation or ballistic impacts. Although engineered to defeat specific threats, or a range of threats, there are general requirements common to all of these designs. The primary requirement for a transparent armor system is to not only defeat the designated threat but also provide a multi-hit capability with minimized distortion of surrounding areas. Ground platforms have several parameters that must be optimized, such as weight, space efficiency, and cost versus performance. Glass exhibits tensile failure stress that is very much dependent on the amount of material being stressed, the side being tensile-stressed (i.e., air-versus tin-side if a float glass), and where it is being tensile stressed (i.e., in the middle or near an edge). An axiom arising from those effects is a greater amount of allowable deflection (i.e., higher failure stress) of a ballistically impacted transparent armor will result in improved ballistic resistance. Therefore, the interpretation and management of those tensile-failure-stress dependencies shall ultimately improve ballistic resistance and its predictability of transparent armor. Each of those three dependencies (size, side, and location) in a soda-lime silicate glass is described.

  7. Oligoclonal CD4+ T Cells Promote Host Memory Immune Responses to Zwitterionic Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Groneck, Laura; Schrama, David; Fabri, Mario; Stephen, Tom Li; Harms, Fabian; Meemboor, Sonja; Hafke, Helena; Bessler, Martina; Becker, Jürgen C.; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M.

    2009-01-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides of the normal flora bacteria represent a novel class of antigens in that they correct systemic CD4+ T-cell deficiencies and direct lymphoid organogenesis during colonization of the host. Presentation of these polysaccharides to CD4+ T cells depends on major histocompatibility complex class II- and DM-dependent retrograde transport from lysosomes to the cell surface. Yet the phenotype and clonality of the immune response to the polysaccharide in the mature host immune system have not been studied. Using the zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide Sp1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a transient member of the bacterial flora, in an experimental mouse model of cellular immunity, we demonstrated the accumulation of TH1- and TH17-polarized CD4+ CD44high CD62low CD25− memory T cells. Subcutaneous immunization with Sp1 resulted in an increase of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), predominantly of the IgG1 subclass, and suggested the presence of a humoral memory response to the polysaccharide. CD4+ T cells stimulated with polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo showed a nonrestricted pattern for the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region, as demonstrated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry. Clonotype mapping of in vivo and in vitro polysaccharide-activated CD4+ T cells revealed clonotypic TCR transcripts. Taken together, the data show the induction of clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells by polysaccharides of commensal bacteria. Cellular and humoral memory host responses imply the ability of these polysaccharides to mediate the expansion of T cells via recognition within the CDR3 region of the TCR. PMID:19546196

  8. The novel fibrinogen-binding protein FbsB promotes Streptococcus agalactiae invasion into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Heike; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Reinscheid, Dieter J

    2004-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in human newborns. The interaction of S. agalactiae with host proteins and the entry into host cells thereby represent important virulence traits of these bacteria. The present report describes the identification of the fbsB gene, encoding a novel fibrinogen-binding protein that plays a crucial role in the invasion of S. agalactiae into human cells. In Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) experiments, the FbsB protein was demonstrated to interact with soluble and immobilized fibrinogen. Binding studies showed the N-terminal 388 residues of FbsB and the Aalpha-subunit of human fibrinogen to recognize each other. By reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, the fbsB gene was shown to be cotranscribed with the gbs0851 gene in S. agalactiae. Deletion of the fbsB gene in the genome of S. agalactiae did not influence the binding of the bacteria to fibrinogen, suggesting that FbsB does not participate in the attachment of S. agalactiae to fibrinogen. In tissue culture experiments, however, the fbsB deletion mutant was severely impaired in its invasion into lung epithelial cells. Bacterial invasion could be reestablished by introducing the fbsB gene on a shuttle plasmid into the fbsB deletion mutant. Furthermore, treatment of lung epithelial cells with FbsB fusion protein blocked S. agalactiae invasion of epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion. These results suggest an important role of the FbsB protein in the overall process of host cell entry by S. agalactiae. PMID:15155657

  9. Emergence of scarlet fever Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 clones in Hong Kong is associated with toxin acquisition and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark R; Holden, Matthew T; Coupland, Paul; Chen, Jonathan H K; Venturini, Carola; Barnett, Timothy C; Zakour, Nouri L Ben; Tse, Herman; Dougan, Gordon; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Walker, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    A scarlet fever outbreak began in mainland China and Hong Kong in 2011 (refs. 1-6). Macrolide- and tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 isolates represent the majority of clinical cases. Recently, we identified two mobile genetic elements that were closely associated with emm12 outbreak isolates: the integrative and conjugative element ICE-emm12, encoding genes for tetracycline and macrolide resistance, and prophage ΦHKU.vir, encoding the superantigens SSA and SpeC, as well as the DNase Spd1 (ref. 4). Here we sequenced the genomes of 141 emm12 isolates, including 132 isolated in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2011. We found that the introduction of several ICE-emm12 variants, ΦHKU.vir and a new prophage, ΦHKU.ssa, occurred in three distinct emm12 lineages late in the twentieth century. Acquisition of ssa and transposable elements encoding multidrug resistance genes triggered the expansion of scarlet fever-associated emm12 lineages in Hong Kong. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant ssa-harboring scarlet fever strains should prompt heightened surveillance within China and abroad for the dissemination of these mobile genetic elements. PMID:25401300

  10. Comparative growth, cross stress resistance, transcriptomics of Streptococcus pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity and normal gravity

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, Duraisamy; Im, Chanki; Lee, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly found on pharynx, mouth and rarely on skin, lower gastrointestinal tract. It is a potential pathogen causing tonsillitis, pneumonia, endocarditis. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of low shear modeled microgravity on growth, morphology, antibiotic resistance, cross-stress resistance to various stresses and alteration in gene expression of S. pyogenes. The growth analysis performed using UV–Visible spectroscopy indicated decrease in growth of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity. Morphological analysis by Bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Bio-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) did not reveal much difference between normal and low shear modeled microgravity grown S. pyogenes. The sensitivity of S. pyogenes to antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, hygromycin, rifampicin indicates that the bacterium is resistant to hygromycin. Further S. pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity was found to be more sensitive to ampicillin and rifampicin as compared with normal gravity grown S. pyogenes. The bacteria were tested for the acid, osmotic, temperature and oxidative cross stress resistances. The gene expression of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity analyzed by microarray revealed upregulation of 26 genes and down regulation of 22 genes by a fold change of 1.5. PMID:26858535

  11. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mogen, Austin B; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  12. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Austin B.; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  13. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Sakshi; Hoeppner, Astrid; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2015-06-01

    Nisin is a 34-amino-acid antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis belonging to the class of lantibiotics. Nisin displays a high bactericidal activity against various Gram-positive bacteria, including some human-pathogenic strains. However, there are some nisin-non-producing strains that are naturally resistant owing to the presence of the nsr gene within their genome. The encoded protein, NSR, cleaves off the last six amino acids of nisin, thereby reducing its bactericidal efficacy. An expression and purification protocol has been established for the NSR protein from Streptococcus agalactiae COH1. The protein was successfully crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method in hanging and sitting drops, resulting in crystals that diffracted X-rays to 2.8 and 2.2 Å, respectively. PMID:26057793

  14. Nucleotides critical for the interaction of the Streptococcus pyogenes Mga virulence regulator with Mga-regulated promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Hause, Lara L; McIver, Kevin S

    2012-09-01

    The Mga regulator of Streptococcus pyogenes directly activates the transcription of a core regulon that encodes virulence factors such as M protein (emm), C5a peptidase (scpA), and streptococcal inhibitor of complement (sic) by directly binding to a 45-bp binding site as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I protection. However, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of all established Mga binding sites, we found that they exhibit only 13.4% identity with no discernible symmetry. To determine the core nucleotides involved in functional Mga-DNA interactions, the M1T1 Pemm1 binding site was altered and screened for nucleotides important for DNA binding in vitro and for transcriptional activation using a plasmid-based luciferase reporter in vivo. Following this analysis, 34 nucleotides within the Pemm1 binding site that had an effect on Mga binding, Mga-dependent transcriptional activation, or both were identified. Of these critical nucleotides, guanines and cytosines within the major groove were disproportionately identified clustered at the 5' and 3' ends of the binding site and with runs of nonessential adenines between the critical nucleotides. On the basis of these results, a Pemm1 minimal binding site of 35 bp bound Mga at a level comparable to the level of binding of the larger 45-bp site. Comparison of Pemm with directed mutagenesis performed in the M1T1 Mga-regulated PscpA and Psic promoters, as well as methylation interference analysis of PscpA, establish that Mga binds to DNA in a promoter-specific manner. PMID:22773785

  15. β-lactam Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Genotypes of Meningitis-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, David E.; Godoy, Daniel; Castiñeiras, Terezinha M. P. P.; Tulenko, Mary M.; Rebelo, Maria C.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Here, we report a laboratory-based study of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients with meningitis in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Methods The aim of this study was to determine the evolution of β-lactam resistance, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, serotypes, and genetic diversity of S. pneumoniae, isolated from meningitis patients between 2000 and 2008. Results A total of 264 S. pneumoniae recovered from patients between 2000 and 2008 were included. Susceptibility testing (E-test) of S. pneumoniae showed resistance to penicillin, ceftriaxone, oxacillin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, ofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and rifampicin. Penicillin resistance (PEN-R, minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥0.12 μg/mL) increased from 8% of isolates in 2000–2002, to 12% in 2003–2005, and to 20% in 2006–2008. Ceftriaxone resistance (MIC ≥1.0 μg/mL) was detected among some PEN-R isolates (13%) from 2004 onward. Within the PEN-R isolates, serotypes that are included in 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine predominated (90%), and resistance was detected mostly in isolates of serotypes 14 (61%), 23F (16%), 6B (10%), and 19F (3%). Multilocus sequence typing showed that 52% of the PEN-R isolates, and 89% of those with MICs ≥0.5 μg/mL, were sequence type (ST)-156 or single-locus variants of this ST (ST-557 or ST-4388); all of these isolates were serotype 14 and were assigned to the Spain9V-3 clone. Conclusions β-lactam resistance increased recently among cerebrospinal fluid isolates and was mainly due to the surge of the ST-4388, a previously undescribed gki single-locus variants of ST-156. Regional surveillance is shown to be essential to provide optimal antimicrobial therapy, monitor highly successful clones, and formulate adequate vaccination strategy. PMID:21860337

  16. A Novel Metallo-β-Lactamase Involved in the Ampicillin Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49136 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Hui-Jen; Li, Yaw-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a penicillin-sensitive bacterium, is recognized as a major cause of pneumonia and is treated clinically with penicillin-based antibiotics. The rapid increase in resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics affects 450 million people globally and results in 4 million deaths every year. To unveil the mechanism of resistance of S. pneumoniae is thus an important issue to treat streptococcal disease that might consequently save millions of lives around the world. In this work, we isolated a streptococci-conserved L-ascorbate 6-phosphate lactonase, from S. pneumoniae ATCC 49136. This protein reveals a metallo-β-lactamase activity in vitro, which is able to deactivate an ampicillin-based antibiotic by hydrolyzing the amide bond of the β-lactam ring. The Michaelis parameter (Km) = 25 μM and turnover number (kcat) = 2 s-1 were obtained when nitrocefin was utilized as an optically measurable substrate. Through confocal images and western blot analyses with a specific antibody, the indigenous protein was recognized in S. pneumoniae ATCC 49136. The protein-overexpressed S. pneumonia exhibits a high ampicillin-tolerance ability in vivo. In contrast, the protein-knockout S. pneumonia reveals the ampicillin-sensitive feature relative to the wild type strain. Based on these results, we propose that this protein is a membrane-associated metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) involved in the antibiotic-resistant property of S. pneumoniae. PMID:27214294

  17. Natural variation in the promoter of the gene encoding the Mga regulator alters host-pathogen interactions in group a Streptococcus carrier strains.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anthony R; Olsen, Randall J; Wunsche, Andrea; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Shelburne, Samuel A; Carroll, Ronan K; Musser, James M

    2013-11-01

    Humans commonly carry pathogenic bacteria asymptomatically, but the molecular factors underlying microbial asymptomatic carriage are poorly understood. We previously reported that two epidemiologically unassociated serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) carrier strains had an identical 12-bp deletion in the promoter of the gene encoding Mga, a global positive gene regulator. Herein, we report on studies designed to test the hypothesis that the identified 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter alters GAS virulence, thereby potentially contributing to the asymptomatic carrier phenotype. Using allelic exchange, we introduced the variant promoter into a serotype M3 invasive strain and the wild-type promoter into an asymptomatic carrier strain. Compared to strains with the wild-type mga promoter, we discovered that strains containing the promoter with the 12-bp deletion produced significantly fewer mga and Mga-regulated gene transcripts. Consistent with decreased mga transcripts, strains containing the variant mga promoter were also significantly less virulent in in vivo and ex vivo models of GAS disease. Further, we provide evidence that the pleiotropic regulator protein CodY binds to the mga promoter and that the 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter reduces CodY-mediated mga transcription. We conclude that the naturally occurring 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter significantly alters the pathogen-host interaction of these asymptomatic carrier strains. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular basis of the carrier state of an important human pathogen. PMID:23980109

  18. Natural Variation in the Promoter of the Gene Encoding the Mga Regulator Alters Host-Pathogen Interactions in Group A Streptococcus Carrier Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Olsen, Randall J.; Wunsche, Andrea; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Carroll, Ronan K.

    2013-01-01

    Humans commonly carry pathogenic bacteria asymptomatically, but the molecular factors underlying microbial asymptomatic carriage are poorly understood. We previously reported that two epidemiologically unassociated serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) carrier strains had an identical 12-bp deletion in the promoter of the gene encoding Mga, a global positive gene regulator. Herein, we report on studies designed to test the hypothesis that the identified 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter alters GAS virulence, thereby potentially contributing to the asymptomatic carrier phenotype. Using allelic exchange, we introduced the variant promoter into a serotype M3 invasive strain and the wild-type promoter into an asymptomatic carrier strain. Compared to strains with the wild-type mga promoter, we discovered that strains containing the promoter with the 12-bp deletion produced significantly fewer mga and Mga-regulated gene transcripts. Consistent with decreased mga transcripts, strains containing the variant mga promoter were also significantly less virulent in in vivo and ex vivo models of GAS disease. Further, we provide evidence that the pleiotropic regulator protein CodY binds to the mga promoter and that the 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter reduces CodY-mediated mga transcription. We conclude that the naturally occurring 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter significantly alters the pathogen-host interaction of these asymptomatic carrier strains. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular basis of the carrier state of an important human pathogen. PMID:23980109

  19. ABA receptor PYL9 promotes drought resistance and leaf senescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Chan, Zhulong; Gao, Jinghui; Xing, Lu; Cao, Minjie; Yu, Chunmei; Hu, Yuanlei; You, Jun; Shi, Haitao; Zhu, Yingfang; Gong, Yuehua; Mu, Zixin; Wang, Haiqing; Deng, Xin; Wang, Pengcheng; Bressan, Ray A.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting plant productivity. In this study, we screened drought-resistant transgenic plants from 65 promoter-pyrabactin resistance 1-like (PYL) abscisic acid (ABA) receptor gene combinations and discovered that pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic lines showed dramatically increased drought resistance and drought-induced leaf senescence in both Arabidopsis and rice. Previous studies suggested that ABA promotes senescence by causing ethylene production. However, we found that ABA promotes leaf senescence in an ethylene-independent manner by activating sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s), which subsequently phosphorylate ABA-responsive element-binding factors (ABFs) and Related to ABA-Insensitive 3/VP1 (RAV1) transcription factors. The phosphorylated ABFs and RAV1 up-regulate the expression of senescence-associated genes, partly by up-regulating the expression of Oresara 1. The pyl9 and ABA-insensitive 1-1 single mutants, pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant, and snrk2.2/3/6 triple mutant showed reduced ABA-induced leaf senescence relative to the WT, whereas pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants showed enhanced ABA-induced leaf senescence. We found that leaf senescence may benefit drought resistance by helping to generate an osmotic potential gradient, which is increased in pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants and causes water to preferentially flow to developing tissues. Our results uncover the molecular mechanism of ABA-induced leaf senescence and suggest an important role of PYL9 and leaf senescence in promoting resistance to extreme drought stress. PMID:26831097

  20. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rathert, Philipp; Roth, Mareike; Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R; Zuber, Johannes

    2015-09-24

    Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), bromodomain and extra terminal protein (BET) inhibitors are being explored as a promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced haematological malignancies, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukaemia, here we perform a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL-AF9;Nras(G12D)-driven AML mouse model, and investigate dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant mouse and human leukaemias. Our screen shows that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodelling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukaemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukaemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signalling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and self-transcribing active regulatory region sequencing of enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodelled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signalling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukaemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting

  1. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M.; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E.; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Zuber, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Summary Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)1,2, BET inhibitors are being explored as promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers3–5. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced hematologic malignancies6, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, we performed a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL/AF9; NrasG12D -driven AML model, and investigated dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant murine and human leukemias. Our screen reveals that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodeling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signaling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic ChIP- and STARR-seq enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodeled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signaling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting resistance to BET inhibitors and, potentially, other chromatin-targeted therapies. PMID:26367798

  2. Group A Streptococcus intranasal infection promotes CNS infiltration by streptococcal-specific Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Smith, Erica D.; Knowland, Daniel; Hsu, Martin; Platt, Maryann; Bittner-Eddy, Peter; Cohen, Brenda; Southern, Peter; Latimer, Elizabeth; Harley, Earl; Agalliu, Dritan; Cleary, P. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) infection induces the production of Abs that cross-react with host neuronal proteins, and these anti-GAS mimetic Abs are associated with autoimmune diseases of the CNS. However, the mechanisms that allow these Abs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induce neuropathology remain unresolved. We have previously shown that GAS infection in mouse models induces a robust Th17 response in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Here, we identified GAS-specific Th17 cells in tonsils of humans naturally exposed to GAS, prompting us to explore whether GAS-specific CD4+ T cells home to mouse brains following i.n. infection. Intranasal challenge of repeatedly GAS-inoculated mice promoted migration of GAS-specific Th17 cells from NALT into the brain, BBB breakdown, serum IgG deposition, microglial activation, and loss of excitatory synaptic proteins under conditions in which no viable bacteria were detected in CNS tissue. CD4+ T cells were predominantly located in the olfactory bulb (OB) and in other brain regions that receive direct input from the OB. Together, these findings provide insight into the immunopathology of neuropsychiatric complications that are associated with GAS infections and suggest that crosstalk between the CNS and cellular immunity may be a general mechanism by which infectious agents exacerbate symptoms associated with other CNS autoimmune disorders. PMID:26657857

  3. The Streptococcus pneumoniae pezAT Toxin–Antitoxin System Reduces β-Lactam Resistance and Genetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai T.; Espinosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomally encoded Type II Toxin–Antitoxin operons are ubiquitous in bacteria and archaea. Antitoxins neutralize the toxic effect of cognate Toxins by protein–protein interactions and sequestering the active residues of the Toxin. Toxins target essential bacterial processes, mostly translation and replication. However, one class apart is constituted by the PezAT pair because the PezT toxin target cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we have examined the role of the pezAT toxin–antitoxin genes in its natural host, the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. The pezAT operon on Pneumococcal Pathogenicity Island 1 was deleted from strain R6 and its phenotypic traits were compared with those of the wild type. The mutant cells formed shorter chains during exponential phase, leading to increased colony-forming units. At stationary phase, the mutant was more resilient to lysis. Importantly, the mutant exhibited higher resistance to antibiotics targeting cell walls (β-lactams), but not to antibiotics acting at other levels. In addition, the mutants also showed enhanced genetic competence. We suggest that PezAT participates in a subtle equilibrium between loss of functions (resistance to β-lactams and genetic competence) and gain of other traits (virulence). PMID:27610103

  4. The Streptococcus pneumoniae pezAT Toxin-Antitoxin System Reduces β-Lactam Resistance and Genetic Competence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai T; Espinosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomally encoded Type II Toxin-Antitoxin operons are ubiquitous in bacteria and archaea. Antitoxins neutralize the toxic effect of cognate Toxins by protein-protein interactions and sequestering the active residues of the Toxin. Toxins target essential bacterial processes, mostly translation and replication. However, one class apart is constituted by the PezAT pair because the PezT toxin target cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we have examined the role of the pezAT toxin-antitoxin genes in its natural host, the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. The pezAT operon on Pneumococcal Pathogenicity Island 1 was deleted from strain R6 and its phenotypic traits were compared with those of the wild type. The mutant cells formed shorter chains during exponential phase, leading to increased colony-forming units. At stationary phase, the mutant was more resilient to lysis. Importantly, the mutant exhibited higher resistance to antibiotics targeting cell walls (β-lactams), but not to antibiotics acting at other levels. In addition, the mutants also showed enhanced genetic competence. We suggest that PezAT participates in a subtle equilibrium between loss of functions (resistance to β-lactams and genetic competence) and gain of other traits (virulence). PMID:27610103

  5. Illustration of a Common Framework for Relating Multiple Typing Methods by Application to Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes†

    PubMed Central

    Carriço, J. A.; Silva-Costa, C.; Melo-Cristino, J.; Pinto, F. R.; de Lencastre, H.; Almeida, J. S.; Ramirez, M.

    2006-01-01

    The studies that correlate the results obtained by different typing methodologies rely solely on qualitative comparisons of the groups defined by each methodology. We propose a framework of measures for the quantitative assessment of correspondences between different typing methods as a first step to the global mapping of type equivalences. A collection of 325 macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates associated with pharyngitis cases in Portugal was used to benchmark the proposed measures. All isolates were characterized by macrolide resistance phenotyping, T serotyping, emm sequence typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), using SmaI or Cfr9I and SfiI. A subset of 41 isolates, representing each PFGE cluster, was also characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The application of Adjusted Rand and Wallace indices allowed the evaluation of the strength and the directionality of the correspondences between the various typing methods and showed that if PFGE or MLST data are available one can confidently predict the emm type (Wallace coefficients of 0.952 for both methods). In contrast, emm typing was a poor predictor of PFGE cluster or MLST sequence type (Wallace coefficients of 0.803 and 0.655, respectively). This was confirmed by the analysis of the larger data set available from http://spyogenes.mlst.net and underscores the necessity of performing PFGE or MLST to unambiguously define clones in S. pyogenes. PMID:16825375

  6. Pharmacodynamic assessment based on mutant prevention concentrations of fluoroquinolones to prevent the emergence of resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Hori, Toshihiko; Sugimori, Giichi; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, on the basis of the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) concept, and the emergence of resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolone antibacterials. Some clinical isolates with various MIC and MPC values of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin were exposed under conditions simulating the time-concentration curves observed when moxifloxacin (400 or 80 mg, once a day) or levofloxacin (200 mg, twice a day) was orally administered by using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model. The decrease in susceptibility was evaluated by altering the population analysis profiles after moxifloxacin or levofloxacin treatment for 72 h. When the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MPC and peak concentration (C(max))/MPC were above 13.41 and 1.20, respectively, complete eradication occurred and no decrease in susceptibility was observed. On the other hand, when AUC(0-24)/MPC and C(max)/MPC were below 0.84 and 0.08, respectively, the susceptibility decreased. However, the time inside the mutant selective window and the time above the MPC did not show any correlation with the decrease in susceptibility. These results suggest that AUC(0-24)/MPC and C(max)/MPC are important parameters for predicting the emergence of resistant mutants and that higher values indicate greater effectiveness. PMID:17664314

  7. Trends in the resistance to antimicrobial agents of Streptococcus suis isolates from Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Rasmussen, S R; Artursson, K; Jensen, N E

    1998-08-28

    This study was conducted to determine the MIC values of historical and contemporary Streptoccocus suis (serotypes 2 and 7) from Denmark and S. suis (serotype 2) from Sweden. A total of 52 isolates originating from 1967 through 1981 and 156 isolates from 1992 through 1997 in Denmark and 13 isolates from Sweden were examined for their MICs against 20 different antimicrobial agents. Most antimicrobials were active against most isolates. A frequent occurrence of resistance to sulphamethoxazole was observed, with most resistance among historic isolates of serotype 7 and least resistance among isolates from Sweden. A large number of the isolates was resistant to macrolides. However, all historic serotype 2 isolates from Denmark were susceptible, whereas 20.4% of the contemporary isolates were resistant. Among serotype 7 isolates 23.3% of the historic isolates were resistant to macrolides, whereas resistance was found in 44.8% of the contemporary isolates. All isolates from Sweden were susceptible to macrolides. Time-associated frequency of resistance to tetracycline was also found. Only a single historic isolate of serotype 2 was resistant to tetracycline, whereas 43.9% of the contemporary serotype 2 isolates and 15.5% of the contemporary serotype 7 isolates were resistant. Only one (7.7%) of the isolates from Sweden was resistant. The differences in resistance between historic and contemporary isolates from Denmark were statistically significant. This study demonstrated a significant serotype-associated difference in the susceptibility to macrolides and tetracycline and demonstrated that an increase in resistance among S. suis isolates has taken place during the last 15 years to the two most commonly used antimicrobial agents (tylosin and tetracycline) in pig production in Denmark. PMID:9810623

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of emm28 Type Streptococcus pyogenes MEW123, a Streptomycin-Resistant Derivative of a Clinical Throat Isolate Suitable for Investigation of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Kristin M.; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.; Dawid, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes type emm28 strain MEW123, a streptomycin-resistant derivative of a pediatric throat isolate. The genome length is 1,878,699 bp, with 38.29% G+C% content. The genome sequence adds value to this virulent emm28 representative strain and will aid in the investigation of streptococcal pathogenesis. PMID:26988051

  9. Salivaricin D, a novel intrinsically trypsin-resistant lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c isolated from a healthy infant.

    PubMed

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders; Nes, Ingolf F

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  10. Salivaricin D, a Novel Intrinsically Trypsin-Resistant Lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c Isolated from a Healthy Infant

    PubMed Central

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  11. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  12. Controlled challenge experiment demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. A complimentary pre...

  13. Emerging non-PCV13 serotypes of noninvasive Streptococcus pneumoniae with macrolide resistance genes in northern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchiya, M.; Urushibara, N.; Aung, M.S.; Morimoto, S.; Ito, M.; Kudo, K.; Sumi, A.; Kobayashi, N.

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to the nation's routine immunization program in April 2013 and was replaced by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in November 2013. Distribution of serotypes and macrolide resistance genotypes was investigated for a total of 1097 (975 children, 122 adults) and 960 (873 children, 87 adults) clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from noninvasive infections in Hokkaido (northern main island of Japan) in the routine immunization periods for PCV7 and PCV13 (April–October 2013 and November 2013–November 2014, respectively). Serotype was determined by sequential multiplex PCR and additional genetic analyses. Macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A/E) were detected by multiplex PCR. Although the most prevalent serotypes in children were 23A and 6C in the PCV7 period, after replacement with PCV13, 19A became the most common, followed by 6C, 15A and 23A. Among adults, serotype 3 was consistently the most frequent throughout the study periods. Compared with values from the pre-PCV7 routine immunization period, PCV7 serotypes decreased from 48.3 to 3.3% in the PCV13 period among children, while the rates of non-PCV13 serotypes (particularly 15A, 23A, 11A, 10A and 35B) increased from 39.7 to 75.1% (p < 0.001). In the PCV13 period, erm(B), mef(A/E) and both of these genes were detected in 75.8, 31.6 and 11.3% of all isolates, respectively. Serotype 19A accounted for 76.9% of the isolates with both the macrolide resistance genes, and emerging non-PCV13 serotypes 15A, 15C and 23A mostly harboured erm(B). PMID:26909157

  14. Emerging non-PCV13 serotypes of noninvasive Streptococcus pneumoniae with macrolide resistance genes in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchiya, M; Urushibara, N; Aung, M S; Morimoto, S; Ito, M; Kudo, K; Sumi, A; Kobayashi, N

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to the nation's routine immunization program in April 2013 and was replaced by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in November 2013. Distribution of serotypes and macrolide resistance genotypes was investigated for a total of 1097 (975 children, 122 adults) and 960 (873 children, 87 adults) clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from noninvasive infections in Hokkaido (northern main island of Japan) in the routine immunization periods for PCV7 and PCV13 (April-October 2013 and November 2013-November 2014, respectively). Serotype was determined by sequential multiplex PCR and additional genetic analyses. Macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A/E) were detected by multiplex PCR. Although the most prevalent serotypes in children were 23A and 6C in the PCV7 period, after replacement with PCV13, 19A became the most common, followed by 6C, 15A and 23A. Among adults, serotype 3 was consistently the most frequent throughout the study periods. Compared with values from the pre-PCV7 routine immunization period, PCV7 serotypes decreased from 48.3 to 3.3% in the PCV13 period among children, while the rates of non-PCV13 serotypes (particularly 15A, 23A, 11A, 10A and 35B) increased from 39.7 to 75.1% (p < 0.001). In the PCV13 period, erm(B), mef(A/E) and both of these genes were detected in 75.8, 31.6 and 11.3% of all isolates, respectively. Serotype 19A accounted for 76.9% of the isolates with both the macrolide resistance genes, and emerging non-PCV13 serotypes 15A, 15C and 23A mostly harboured erm(B). PMID:26909157

  15. Efficacy of single-dose ceftriaxone in experimental otitis media induced by penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, B; Muffat-Joly, M; Bauchet, J; Faurisson, F; Gehanno, P; Pocidalo, J J; Carbon, C

    1996-01-01

    We used a gerbil model of otitis media to assess the efficacy of single-dose ceftriaxone against three Streptococcus pneumoniae strains highly resistant to penicillin (MICs, 4 to 8 micrograms/ml) and with various susceptibilities to ceftriaxone (MICs, 0.5, 4, and 8 micrograms/ml). Middle ear infection was induced by bilateral transbullar challenge with 10(7) bacteria per ear. Antibiotic treatment was administered subcutaneously at 2 h postinfection. Infection status was checked 2 days later by counting the bacteria in middle ear and cerebrospinal fluid samples. With the cefriaxone-susceptible strain (MIC, 0.5 microgram/ml), we tested doses of 5 to 100 mg/kg of body weight. With a dose of 50 mg/kg, treatment outcome was equivalent to that with amoxicillin, which was used as a reference (25 mg/kg, two injections); no bacteria were recovered from 82% of the middle ear samples, and the rate of cerebrospinal fluid culture positivity was significantly reduced to 6%, relative to 59% for the untreated controls. Similar efficacy was obtained with a dose of 100 mg/kg against the two ceftriaxone-resistant strains. Pharmacokinetic study indicates that the values of the parameters in plasma after the administration of a dose of 100 mg/kg (peak level of total drug, 268 +/- 33 micrograms/ml; elimination half-life, 0.8 h; area under concentration-time curve, 488 micrograms.h.ml-1) were still suboptimal compared with the values of the parameters measured in pediatric patients after intravenous or intramuscular administration of a dose of 50 mg/kg. Our results indicate the efficacy of ceftriaxone against experimental cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal otitis and provide a basis for the clinical use of single-dose ceftriaxone against pneumococcal otitis media. PMID:8878566

  16. Host-derived probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus improves resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) via immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Safari, Reza; Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Dadar, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    The present study evaluated the benefits of dietary administration of host-derived candidate probiotics Enterococcus casseliflavus in juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by incorporating the microorganisms in the basal feed at 3 inclusion levels (i.e. 10(7) CFU g(-1) of feed [T1], 10(8) CFU g(-1) of feed [T2], 10(9) CFU g(-1) of feed [T3]). The probiotic feeds were administered for 8 weeks, with a group fed with the basal diet serving as control. The effects on growth performance, gut health, innate immunity and disease resistance were evaluated. Results showed that growth performance parameters were significantly improved in T2 and T3 groups. Activities of digestive enzymes such as trypsin and lipase were significantly higher in these two groups as well. Gut micro-ecology was influenced by probiotic feeding as shown by the significant increase in intestinal lactic acid bacteria and total viable aerobic counts in T2 and T3. Humoral immunity was impacted by dietary probiotics as total serum protein and albumin were significantly elevated in T3. The levels of serum IgM significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups at week 8; with the T3 group registering the highest increment. Respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes were significantly improved in T2 and T3. Hematological profiling further revealed that neutrophil counts significantly increased in all probiotic fed groups. Challenge test showed that probiotic feeding significantly improved host resistance to Streptococcus iniae infection, specifically in T2 and T3 where a considerable modulation of immune responses was observed. Taken together, this study demonstrated E. casseliflavus as a potential probiotics for rainbow trout with the capability of improving growth performance and enhancing disease resistance by immunomodulation. PMID:26997202

  17. Telithromycin- and Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Taiwan with High Prevalence of Resistance to Macrolides and β-Lactams: SMART Program 2001 Data

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Yang, Dine; Huang, Wen-Kuei; Shyr, Jainn-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Wan, Jen-Hsien; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lu, Jang-Jih; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chang, Feng-Yee; Yang, Yi-Chueh; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Liu, Yung-Ching; Lee, Chun-Ming; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2003-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of β-lactam- and macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Taiwan. To understand the in vitro susceptibilities of recent isolates of S. pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones and telithromycin (which is not available in Taiwan), the MICs of 23 antimicrobial agents for 936 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae isolated from different parts of Taiwan from 2000 to 2001 were determined by the agar dilution method. Overall, 72% of isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (with 61% being intermediate and 11% being resistant) and 92% were resistant to erythromycin. Telithromycin MICs were ≥1 μg/ml for 16% of the isolates, and for 99% of these isolates the MICs of all macrolides tested were ≥256 μg/ml; all of these isolates had the constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype. Eighty-eight percent of the isolates were resistant to three or more classes of drugs. The ciprofloxacin MICs were ≥4 μg/ml for six (0.6%) isolates from five patients collected in 2000 and 2001, and the levofloxacin MICs were ≥8 μg/ml for five of these isolates. Seven isolates for which ciprofloxacin MICs were ≥4 μg/ml, including one isolate recovered in 1999, belonged to three serotypes (serotype 19F, five isolates; serotype 23A, one isolate; and serotype 23B, one isolate). The isolates from the six patients for which ciprofloxacin MICs were ≥4 μg/ml had different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles and random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, indicating that no clonal dissemination occurred over this time period. Despite the increased rate of fluoroquinolone use, the proportion of pneumococcal isolates for which ciprofloxacin MICs were elevated (≥4 μg/ml) remained low. However, the occurrence of telithromycin resistance is impressive and raises concerns for the future. PMID:12821460

  18. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  19. Prevalence and Acquisition of the Genes for Zoocin A and Zoocin A Resistance in Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Anna-Lee D.; Simmonds, Robin S.; Gargis, Amy S.; Sloan, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Zoocin A is a streptococcolytic enzyme produced by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain 4881. The zoocin A gene (zooA) and the gene specifying resistance to zoocin A (zif) are adjacent on the chromosome and are divergently transcribed. Twenty-four S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains were analyzed to determine the genetic difference between three previously characterized as zoocin A producers (strains 4881, 9g and 9h) and the twenty-one non-producers. LT-PCR and Southern hybridization studies revealed that none of the non-producer strains possessed zooA or zif. RAPD and PFGE showed that the 24 strains were a genetically diverse population with 8 RAPD profiles. S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains 9g and 9h appeared genetically identical to each other, but quite different from 4881. Sequences derived from 4881 and 9g showed that zooA and zif were integrated into the chromosome adjacent to the gene flaR. A comparison of these sequences with the genome sequences of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains H70 and MGCS10565 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047 suggests that flaR flanks a region of genome plasticity in this species. PMID:19357799

  20. Identification of macrolide-resistant clones of Streptococcus pyogenes in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, C; Ramirez, M; Melo-Cristino, J

    2006-06-01

    Although the overall level of macrolide resistance (27%) has remained stable in Portugal, a rapid inversion in the dominant phenotypes has been noted, with a sharp decrease in the MLS(B) phenotype paralleled by an increase in the M phenotype. To gain further insight into these changes, 325 macrolide-resistant isolates were characterised using a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The use of Cfr9I, an isoschizomer of SmaI, to digest M phenotype isolates that were refractory to SmaI digestion allowed direct comparison of MLS(B) and M isolates. The results from PFGE and MLST were highly concordant and identified eight major clones, accounting for 92% of the isolates, each of which was associated exclusively with a single macrolide resistance phenotype. Two major clones were found among MLS(B) isolates, characterised by sequence types (ST) 46 (T12/emm22) and ST52 (T28/emm28), whereas clones characterised by ST39 (T4/emm4) and ST28 (T1/emm1) dominated among M isolates. The clone defined by ST52 corresponded to a bacitracin-resistant clone circulating in Europe, and a novel variant expressing other surface antigens (T12/emm22) was detected. The presence of the four major clones has been reported previously in other European countries, suggesting Europe-wide dissemination of a few macrolide-resistant lineages. PMID:16700698

  1. Prevalence and Molecular Genetics of Macrolide Resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Finland in 2002

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Huikko, S.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide resistance among 1,007 clinical pneumococcal isolates collected in Finland were investigated. Of these, 217 (21.5%) were resistant to erythromycin and 11% to clindamycin. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, mef(E) was present in 95 isolates (44%), mef(A) was present in 12 isolates (6%), and erm(B) was present in 90 isolates (41%). A double mechanism, mef(E) and erm(B), was detected in five isolates (2%). Ribosomal mutation was detected in 14 (6%) macrolide-resistant isolates in which no other determinant was found. Based on the telithromycin MICs, two groups of isolates were formed: 83.3% of the isolates belonged to a major group for which the telithromycin MIC range was ≤0.008 to 0.063 μg/ml, and 16.7% belonged to a minor group for which the telithromycin MIC range was 0.125 to 8 μg/ml. All except three isolates in the minor population carried a macrolide resistance gene. PMID:16189096

  2. In vitro activity of Tedizolid phosphate against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Ko, Kwan Soo; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; So, Thomas Man-Kit; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a second-generation oxazolidinone prodrug that is potential activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant streptococci, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The in vitro activity of tedizolid and other comparator agents against multidrug-resistant (MDR) pneumococci from various Asian countries were evaluated. Of the S. pneumoniae clinical pneumonia isolates collected during 2008 and 2009 from 8 Asian countries (Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Malaysia, Philippines, and Sri Lanka), 104 isolates of MDR pneumococci were included in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for 18 antimicrobial agents was performed by broth microdilution method. Tedizolid was highly active against pneumococci. All isolates tested were inhibited at a tedizolid minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of ≤0.25μg/ml (ranged from ≤0.03μg/ml to 0.25μg/ml). The MIC50 and MIC90 of tedizolid against MDR pneumococci were both 0.12μg/ml, while MIC50 and MIC90 of linezolid were 0.5μg/ml and 1μg/ml, respectively. In addition, tedizolid maintained the activity against S. pneumoniae regardless of the extensively drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype of the isolates. The activity of tedizolid was excellent against all types of MDR pneumococci, exhibiting and maintaining at least 4-fold-greater potency compared to linezolid, regardless of resistance phenotypes to other commonly utilized agents. Tedizolid has the potential to be an agent to treat infections caused by MDR pneumococci in the Asia. PMID:27083121

  3. Molecular epidemiology and distribution of serotypes, genotypes, and antibiotic resistance genes of Streptococcus agalactiae clinical isolates from Guelma, Algeria and Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Bergal, A; Loucif, L; Benouareth, D E; Bentorki, A A; Abat, C; Rolain, J-M

    2015-12-01

    This study describes, for the first time, the genetic and phenotypic diversity among 93 Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) isolates collected from Guelma, Algeria and Marseille, France. All strains were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The molecular support of antibiotic resistance and serotyping were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phylogenetic lineage of each GBS isolate was determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and grouped into clonal complexes (CCs) using eBURST. The isolates represented 37 sequence types (STs), 16 of which were novel, grouped into five CCs, and belonging to seven serotypes. Serotype V was the most prevalent serotype in our collection (44.1%). GBS isolates of each serotype were distributed among multiple CCs, including cps III/CC19, cps V/CC1, cps Ia/CC23, cps II/CC10, and cps III/CC17. All isolates presented susceptibility to penicillin, whereas resistance to erythromycin was detected in 40% and tetracycline in 82.2% of isolates. Of the 37 erythromycin-resistant isolates, 75.7% showed the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB)-resistant phenotype and 24.3% exhibited the macrolide (M)-resistant phenotype. Constitutive MLSB resistance (46%) mediated by the ermB gene was significantly associated with the Guelma isolates, whereas the M resistance phenotype (24.3%) mediated by the mefA/E gene dominated among the Marseille isolates and belonged to ST-23. Tetracycline resistance was predominantly due to tetM, which was detected alone (95.1%) or associated with tetO (3.7%). These results provide epidemiological data in these regions that establish a basis for monitoring increased resistance to erythromycin and also provide insight into correlations among clones, serotypes, and resistance genes. PMID:26415872

  4. Activities of a New Fluoroketolide, HMR 3787, and Its (Des)-Fluor Derivative RU 64399 Compared to Those of Telithromycin, Erythromycin A, Azithromycin, Clarithromycin, and Clindamycin against Macrolide-Susceptible or -Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kensuke; Davies, Todd A.; Ednie, Lois M.; Bryskier, Andre; Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Activities of HMR 3787 and RU 64399 were compared to those of three macrolides, telithromycin, and clindamycin against 175 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and 121 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates. HMR3787 and telithromycin were the most active compounds tested against pneumococci. Telithromycin and RU 64399 were equally active against macrolide-susceptible (MICs, 0.008 to 0.06 μg/ml) and -resistant S. pyogenes isolates, but HMR 3787 had lower MICs for ermB strains. PMID:11600391

  5. Commensal Microbiome Promotes Resistance to Local and Systemic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; He, Qiu-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this review, to illustrate the resistance mechanism for pathogen insult, we discussed the role of the intestinal microbiome in promoting resistance to local gastrointestinal tract infections and to respiratory tract infections. Data Sources: The review was based on data obtained from the published research articles. Study Selection: A total of 49 original articles were selected in accordance with our main objective to illustrate the resistance mechanism(s) by which commensal microbiota can contribute to host defense against local and systemic infections. Results: Diverse microorganisms colonize human environmentally exposed surfaces such as skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Co-evolution has resulted in these microbes with extensive and diverse impacts on multiple aspects of host biological functions. During the last decade, high-throughput sequencing technology developed has been applied to study commensal microbiota and their impact on host biological functions. By using pathogen recognition receptors pathway and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain-like receptors pathway, the commensal microbiome promotes resistance to local and systemic infections, respectively. To protect against the local infections, the microbiome functions contain the following: The competing for sites of colonization, direct production of inhibition molecules or depletion of nutrients needed for pathogens, and priming immune defenses against pathogen insult. At the same time, with the purpose to maintain homeostasis, the commensal bacteria can program systemic signals toward not only local tissue but also distal tissue to modify their function for infections accordingly. Conclusions: Commensal bacteria play an essential role in protecting against infections, shaping and regulating immune responses, and maintaining host immune homeostasis. PMID:26265621

  6. Sequence Elements Upstream of the Core Promoter Are Necessary for Full Transcription of the Capsule Gene Operon in Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain D39

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhensong; Sertil, Odeniel; Cheng, Yongxin; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Xue; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major bacterial pathogen in humans. Its polysaccharide capsule is a key virulence factor that promotes bacterial evasion of human phagocytic killing. While S. pneumoniae produces at least 94 antigenically different types of capsule, the genes for biosynthesis of almost all capsular types are arranged in the same locus. The transcription of the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus is not well understood. This study determined the transcriptional features of the cps locus in the type 2 virulent strain D39. The initial analysis revealed that the cps genes are cotranscribed from a major transcription start site at the −25 nucleotide (G) upstream of cps2A, the first gene in the locus. Using unmarked chromosomal truncations and a luciferase-based transcriptional reporter, we showed that the full transcription of the cps genes not only depends on the core promoter immediately upstream of cps2A, but also requires additional elements upstream of the core promoter, particularly a 59-bp sequence immediately upstream of the core promoter. Unmarked deletions of these promoter elements in the D39 genome also led to significant reduction in CPS production and virulence in mice. Lastly, common cps gene (cps2ABCD) mutants did not show significant abnormality in cps transcription, although they produced significantly less CPS, indicating that the CpsABCD proteins are involved in the encapsulation of S. pneumoniae in a posttranscriptional manner. This study has yielded important information on the transcriptional characteristics of the cps locus in S. pneumoniae. PMID:25733517

  7. Variable resistance training promotes greater fatigue resistance but not hypertrophy versus constant resistance training.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Hulmi, Juha J; Wernbom, Mathias; Nyman, Kai; Kraemer, William J; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2013-09-01

    Loading using variable resistance devices, where the external resistance changes in line with the force:angle relationship, has been shown to cause greater acute neuromuscular fatigue and larger serum hormone responses. This may indicate a greater potential for adaptation during long-term training. Twelve (constant resistance group) and 11 (variable resistance group) men completed 20 weeks of resistance training with 10 men as non-training controls. Training-induced adaptations were assessed by bilateral leg press one repetition maximum, a repetition to failure test using 75 % 1RM, lower limb lean mass and vastus lateralis cross-sectional area. Only the variable resistance training group improved the total number of repetitions (41 ± 46 %) and volume load (52 ± 37 %) during the repetition to failure test (P < 0.05). Similar improvements in maximum strength and hypertrophy of the lower limbs were observed in both training groups. Also, constant and variable resistance 5 × 10RM leg press loadings were performed before and after training in a crossover design. Acute loading-induced responses were assessed by concentric and isometric force, serum hormone concentrations and phosphorylation of intramuscular signalling proteins (0-30 min post-loading). Greater acute decreases in force (P < 0.05-0.01), and greater increases in serum testosterone and cortisol concentration (P < 0.05) and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05) were observed following variable resistance loadings before and after training. Greater training-induced improvements in fatigue resistance occurred in the variable resistance training group, which may be due to greater acute fatigue and physiological responses during variable versus constant resistance loadings. PMID:23636698

  8. Selection of resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae during penicillin treatment in vitro and in three animal models.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Odenholt, Inga; Erlendsdottir, Helga; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Cars, Otto; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Espersen, Frank; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gudmundsson, Sigurdur

    2003-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties for the selection of resistant pneumococci were studied by using three strains of the same serotype (6B) for mixed-culture infection in time-kill experiments in vitro and in three different animal models, the mouse peritonitis, the mouse thigh, and the rabbit tissue cage models. Treatment regimens with penicillin were designed to give a wide range of T(>MIC)s, the amounts of time for which the drug concentrations in serum were above the MIC. The mixed culture of the three pneumococcal strains, 10(7) CFU of strain A (MIC of penicillin, 0.016 micro g/ml; erythromycin resistant)/ml, 10(6) CFU of strain B (MIC of penicillin, 0.25 micro g/ml)/ml, and 10(5) CFU of strain C (MIC of penicillin, 4 micro g/ml)/ml, was used in the two mouse models, and a mixture of 10(5) CFU of strain A/ml, 10(4) CFU of strain B/ml, and 10(3) CFU of strain C/ml was used in the rabbit tissue cage model. During the different treatment regimens, the differences in numbers of CFU between treated and control animals were calculated to measure the efficacies of the regimens. Selective media with erythromycin or different penicillin concentrations were used to quantify the strains separately. The efficacies of penicillin in vitro were similar when individual strains or mixed cultures were studied. The eradication of the bacteria, independent of the susceptibility of the strain or strains or the presence of the strains in a mixture or on their own, followed the well-known PK and PD rules for treatment with beta-lactams: a maximum efficacy was seen when the T(>MIC) was >40 to 50% of the observation time and the ratio of the maximum concentration of the drug in serum to the MIC was >10. It was possible in all three models to select for the less-susceptible strains by using insufficient treatments. In the rabbit tissue cage model, a regrowth of pneumococci was observed; in the mouse thigh model, the ratio between the different strains changed in

  9. In Vitro Activity of the New Ketolide Telithromycin Compared with Those of Macrolides against Streptococcus pyogenes: Influences of Resistance Mechanisms and Methodological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bemer-Melchior, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Tassin, Sandrine; Bryskier, Andre; Schito, Gian Carlo; Drugeon, Henri-B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, 80 susceptible to macrolides and 27 resistant to erythromycin A (MIC >0.5 μg/ml), were examined. The erythromycin A-lincomycin double-disk test assigned 7 resistant strains to the M-phenotype, 8 to the inducible macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance (iMLSB) phenotype, and 12 to the constitutive MLSB resistance (cMLSB) phenotype. MICs of erythromycin A, clarithromycin, azithromycin, roxithromycin, and clindamycin were determined by a broth microdilution method. MICs of telithromycin were determined by three different methods (broth microdilution, agar dilution, and E-test methods) in an ambient air atmosphere and in a 5 to 6% CO2 atmosphere. Erythromycin A resistance genes were investigated by PCR in the 27 erythromycin A-resistant isolates. MICs of erythromycin A and clindamycin showed six groups of resistant strains, groups A to F. iMLSB strains (A, B, and D groups) are characterized by two distinct patterns of resistance correlated with genotypic results. A- and B-group strains were moderately resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and highly susceptible to telithromycin. All A- and B-group isolates harbored erm TR gene, D-group strains, highly resistant to macrolides and intermediately resistant to telithromycin (MICs, 1 to 16 μg/ml), were all characterized by having the ermB gene. All M-phenotype isolates (C group), resistant to 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides and susceptible to clindamycin and telithromycin, harbored the mefA gene. All cMLSB strains (E and F groups) with high level of resistance to macrolides, lincosamide, and telithromycin had the ermB gene. The effect of 5 to 6% CO2 was remarkable on resistant strains, by increasing MICs of telithromycin from 1 to 6 twofold dilutions against D-E- and F-group isolates. PMID:11036012

  10. Helminth infection promotes colonization resistance via type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Deepshika; Bowcutt, Rowann; Lee, Soo Ching; Tang, Mei San; Kurtz, Zachary D; Ding, Yi; Honda, Kenya; Gause, William C; Blaser, Martin J; Bonneau, Richard A; Lim, Yvonne A L; Loke, P'ng; Cadwell, Ken

    2016-04-29

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease, in developed nations is associated with changes to the microbial environment, such as decreased prevalence of helminth colonization and alterations to the gut microbiota. We find that helminth infection protects mice deficient in the Crohn's disease susceptibility gene Nod2 from intestinal abnormalities by inhibiting colonization by an inflammatory Bacteroides species. Resistance to Bacteroides colonization was dependent on type 2 immunity, which promoted the establishment of a protective microbiota enriched in Clostridiales. Additionally, we show that individuals from helminth-endemic regions harbor a similar protective microbiota and that deworming treatment reduced levels of Clostridiales and increased Bacteroidales. These results support a model of the hygiene hypothesis in which certain individuals are genetically susceptible to the consequences of a changing microbial environment. PMID:27080105

  11. Helminth Infection Promotes Colonization Resistance via Type 2 Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, Deepshika; Bowcutt, Rowann; Lee, Soo Ching; Tang, Mei San; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Ding, Yi; Honda, Kenya; Gause, William C.; Blaser, Martin J.; Bonneau, Richard A.; Lim, Yvonne AL; Loke, P’ng; Cadwell, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease (CD) in developed nations is associated with changes to the environment, such as decreased prevalence of helminth colonization and alterations to the gut microbiota. We find that helminth infection protects mice deficient in the CD susceptibility gene Nod2 from intestinal abnormalities by inhibiting colonization with an inflammatory Bacteroides species. Colonization resistance to Bacteroides was dependent on type-2 immunity, which promoted the establishment of a protective microbiota enriched in Clostridiales. Additionally, we show that individuals from helminth-endemic regions harbor a similar protective microbiota, and that deworming treatment reduced Clostridiales and increased Bacteroidales. These results support a model of the hygiene hypothesis whereby certain individuals are genetically susceptible to the consequences of a changing microbial environment. PMID:27080105

  12. PbsP, a cell wall-anchored protein that binds plasminogen to promote hematogenous dissemination of group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Buscetta, Marco; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Galbo, Roberta; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Kaminski, Pierre-Alexandre; Gominet, Myriam; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates whose virulence is dependent on its ability to interact with cells and host components. We here characterized a surface protein with a critical function in GBS pathophysiology. This adhesin, designated PbsP, possesses two Streptococcal Surface Repeat domains, a methionine and lysine-rich region, and a LPXTG cell wall-anchoring motif. PbsP mediates plasminogen (Plg) binding both in vitro and in vivo and we showed that cell surface-bound Plg can be activated into plasmin by tissue plasminogen activator to increase the bacterial extracellular proteolytic activity. Absence of PbsP results in a decreased bacterial transmigration across brain endothelial cells and impaired virulence in a murine model of infection. PbsP is conserved among the main GBS lineages and is a major plasminogen adhesin in non-CC17 GBS strains. Importantly, immunization of mice with recombinant PbsP confers protective immunity. Our results indicate that GBS have evolved different strategies to recruit Plg which indicates that the ability to acquire cell surface proteolytic activity is essential for the invasiveness of this bacterium. PMID:26888569

  13. Tumor promotion by caspase-resistant retinoblastoma protein

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Helena L.; Bird, Jeff; Wasson, Katherine; Cardiff, Robert D.; Varki, Nissi; Eckmann, Lars; Wang, Jean Y. J.

    2005-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein regulates cell proliferation and cell death. RB is cleaved by caspase during apoptosis. A mutation of the caspase-cleavage site in the RB C terminus has been made in the mouse Rb-1 locus; the resulting Rb-MI mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced apoptosis in the intestine. The Rb-MI mice do not exhibit increased tumor incidence, because the MI mutation does not disrupt the Rb tumor suppressor function. In this study, we show that Rb-MI can promote the formation of colonic adenomas in the p53-null genetic background. Consistent with this tumor phenotype, Rb-MI reduces colorectal epithelial apoptosis and ulceration caused by dextran sulfate sodium. By contrast, Rb-MI does not affect the lymphoma phenotype of p53-null mice, in keeping with its inability to protect thymocytes and splenocytes from apoptosis. The Rb-MI protein is expressed and phosphorylated in the tumors, thereby inactivating its growth suppression function. These results suggest that RB tumor suppressor function, i.e., inhibition of proliferation, is inactivated by phosphorylation, whereas RB tumor promoting function, i.e., inhibition of apoptosis, is inactivated by caspase cleavage. PMID:16227443

  14. ACSL4 promotes prostate cancer growth, invasion and hormonal resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyu; Deng, Fangming; Li, Yirong; Daniels, Garrett; Du, Xinxin; Ren, Qinghu; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Ling Hang; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Valerio; Zhang, David; Ye, Fei; Melamed, Jonathan; Monaco, Marie E; Lee, Peng

    2015-12-29

    Increases in fatty acid metabolism have been demonstrated to promote the growth and survival of a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we examine the expression and function of the fatty acid activating enzyme, long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4), in PCa. Ectopic expression of ACSL4 in ACSL4-negative PCa cells increases proliferation, migration and invasion, while ablation of ACSL4 in PCa cells expressing endogenous ACSL4 reduces cell proliferation, migration and invasion. The cell proliferative effects were observed both in vitro, as well as in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of human PCa tissue samples indicated ACSL4 expression is increased in malignant cells compared with adjacent benign epithelial cells, and particularly increased in castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) when compared with hormone naive PCa. In cell lines co-expressing both ACSL4 and AR, proliferation was independent of exogenous androgens, suggesting that ACSL4 expression may lead to CRPC. In support for this hypothesis, ectopic ACSL4 expression induced resistance to treatment with Casodex, via decrease in apoptosis. Our studies further indicate that ACSL4 upregulates distinct pathway proteins including p-AKT, LSD1 and β-catenin. These results suggest ACSL4 could serve as a biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CRPC. PMID:26636648

  15. Biological and Epidemiological Features of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Pre- and Post-Conjugate Vaccine Eras: a United States Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lindsay; McGee, Lesley; Tomczyk, Sara; Beall, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae inflicts a huge disease burden as the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and meningitis. Soon after mainstream antibiotic usage, multiresistant pneumococcal clones emerged and disseminated worldwide. Resistant clones are generated through adaptation to antibiotic pressures imposed while naturally residing within the human upper respiratory tract. Here, a huge array of related commensal streptococcal strains transfers core genomic and accessory resistance determinants to the highly transformable pneumococcus. β-Lactam resistance is the hallmark of pneumococcal adaptability, requiring multiple independent recombination events that are traceable to nonpneumococcal origins and stably perpetuated in multiresistant clonal complexes. Pneumococcal strains with elevated MICs of β-lactams are most often resistant to additional antibiotics. Basic underlying mechanisms of most pneumococcal resistances have been identified, although new insights that increase our understanding are continually provided. Although all pneumococcal infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, the available choices are limited for some strains. Invasive pneumococcal disease data compiled during 1998 to 2013 through the population-based Active Bacterial Core surveillance program (U.S. population base of 30,600,000) demonstrate that targeting prevalent capsular serotypes with conjugate vaccines (7-valent and 13-valent vaccines implemented in 2000 and 2010, respectively) is extremely effective in reducing resistant infections. Nonetheless, resistant non-vaccine-serotype clones continue to emerge and expand. PMID:27076637

  16. Direct production of L-lysine from raw corn starch by Corynebacterium glutamicum secreting Streptococcus bovis alpha-amylase using cspB promoter and signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Toshihiro; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2007-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important microorganism in the industrial production of amino acids. We engineered a strain of C. glutamicum that secretes alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 (AmyA) for the efficient utilization of raw starch. Among the promoters and signal sequences tested, those of cspB from C. glutamicum possessed the highest expression level. The fusion gene was introduced into the homoserine dehydrogenase gene locus on the chromosome by homologous recombination. L-Lysine fermentation was conducted using C. glutamicum secreting AmyA in the growth medium containing 50 g/l of raw corn starch as the sole carbon source at various temperatures in the range 30 to 40 degrees C. Efficient L-lysine production and raw starch degradation were achieved at 34 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The alpha-amylase activity using raw corn starch was more than 2.5 times higher than that using glucose as the sole carbon source during L-lysine fermentation. AmyA expression under the control of cspB promoter was assumed to be induced when raw starch was used as the sole carbon source. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of raw corn starch to L-lysine were achieved by C. glutamicum secreting AmyA using the cspB promoter and signal sequence. PMID:17891388

  17. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  18. The FbaB-type fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes specific invasion into endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amelung, Silva; Nerlich, Andreas; Rohde, Manfred; Spellerberg, Barbara; Cole, Jason N.; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.; Talay, Susanne R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invasive serotype M3 Streptococcus pyogenes are among the most frequently isolated organisms from patients suffering from invasive streptococcal disease and have the potential to invade primary human endothelial cells (EC) via a rapid and efficient mechanism. FbaB protein, the fibronectin-binding protein expressed by M3 S. pyogenes, was herein identified as a potent invasin for EC. By combining heterologous gene expression with allelic replacement, we demonstrate that FbaB is essential and sufficient to trigger EC invasion via a Rac1-dependent phagocytosis-like uptake. FbaB-mediated uptake follows the classical endocytic pathway with lysosomal destination. FbaB is demonstrated to be a streptococcal invasin exhibiting EC tropism. FbaB thus initiates a process that may contribute to the deep tissue tropism and spread of invasive S. pyogenes isolates into the vascular EC lining. PMID:21615663

  19. Minocycline resistance in an oral Streptococcus infantis isolate is encoded by tet(S) on a novel small, low copy number plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Ciric, Lena; Brouwer, Michael S M; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the genetic basis of minocycline resistance in a strain of Streptococcus infantis isolated from a healthy human oral cavity. We demonstrate that tet(S), identical to tet(S) found on the enterococcal conjugative transposon Tn6000, is responsible for the observed resistance. The gene is located on a small, low copy number plasmid and is flanked by IS1216 elements. The tet(S) gene is capable of excising from the plasmid together with one of the IS1216 elements. The plasmid contains a putative toxin/antitoxin system related to relBE. Deletion of the toxin, relE, did not result in plasmid instability but did increase the fitness of the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. PMID:24605990

  20. Levofloxacin-Ceftriaxone Combination Attenuates Lung Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Bacteremic Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae via Inhibition of Cytolytic Activities of Pneumolysin and Autolysin

    PubMed Central

    Majhi, Arnab; Adhikary, Rana; Bhattacharyya, Aritra; Mahanti, Sayantika

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our objective was to determine whether a synergistic antimicrobial combination in vitro would be beneficial in the downregulation of pneumococcal virulence genes and whether the associated inflammation of the lung tissue induced by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in vivo needs to be elucidated in order to consider this mode of therapy in case of severe pneumococcal infection. We investigated in vivo changes in the expression of these virulence determinants using an efficacious combination determined in previous studies. BALB/c mice were infected with 106 CFU of bacteria. Intravenous levofloxacin at 150 mg/kg and/or ceftriaxone at 50 mg/kg were initiated 18 h postinfection; the animals were sacrificed 0 to 24 h after the initiation of treatment. The levels of cytokines, chemokines, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the serum and lungs, along with the levels of myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide the inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), changes in pneumolysin and autolysin gene expression and COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in the lungs were estimated. Combination therapy downregulated inflammation and promoted bacterial clearance. Pneumolysin and autolysin expression was downregulated, with a concomitant decrease in the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in lung tissue. Thus, the combination of levofloxacin and ceftriaxone can be considered for therapeutic use even in cases of pneumonia caused by drug-resistant isolates. PMID:24957840

  1. The Three Major Spanish Clones of Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Are the Most Common Clones Recovered in Recent Cases of Meningitis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Mark C.; Fenoll, Asunción; Griffiths, David; Spratt, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred six isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered in Spain from patients with meningitis in 1997 and 1998 were characterized by multilocus sequence typing. A heterogeneous collection of genotypes was associated with meningitis in Spain: 65 different sequence types were resolved and, even at a genetic distance of 0.43, there were 37 distinct lineages. Thirty-eight percent of the isolates, including all isolates of serotypes 6B, 9V, 14, and 23F, were resistant to penicillin, and 24% of the isolates were members of the three major Spanish penicillin-resistant or multidrug-resistant clones of serotypes 6B, 9V, and 23F or serotype variants of these clones. These three clones (MICs, 1 to 2 μg of penicillin/ml) were the most common clones associated with pneumococcal meningitis in Spain during 1997 and 1998. Only two of the other clones associated with meningitis were penicillin resistant (MICs, 0.12 to 0.5 μg/ml). One of the two most prevalent penicillin-susceptible clones causing meningitis (serotype 3) has not been detected outside of Spain, whereas the other (serotype 18C) has been recovered from patients with meningitis in the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and Denmark. The prevalence of meningitis caused by isolates of the three major Spanish penicillin-resistant or multiply antibiotic-resistant clones, which are now globally distributed, is disturbing and clearly establishes their ability to cause life-threatening disease. PMID:10488179

  2. Antibacterial resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) from healthy carriers and tonsillitis patients and association with antibacterial sale in the Faroe Islands.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Marita D; Gaini, Shahin; Gislason, Hannes; Kristinsson, Karl G

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), and correlate the findings with the sales of erythromycin and tetracycline. General practitioners in the Faroe Islands were recruited to send oropharyngeal swabs. From an ongoing pneumococcal study, nasopharyngeal swabs were sampled from healthy children 0-7 years of age. Erythromycin susceptibility data from Iceland were obtained from the reference laboratory at the Landspitali University Hospital. Susceptibility testing in the Faroe Islands and Iceland was performed according to CLSI methods and criteria. The resistance rate to erythromycin and tetracycline found in patients in the Faroe Islands in 2009/2010 was 6% and 30% respectively. Tetracycline resistance in patients declined significantly from 2009 to 2010 (37-10%, p-value = 0.006 < 0.05) and differed significantly between age groups (p-value = 0.03 < 0.05). In Iceland, there was a peak in erythromycin resistance in 2008 (44%) and a substantial decrease in 2009 (5%). Although the prevalence of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance in the Faroe Islands and Iceland may be associated with antimicrobial use, sudden changes can occur with the introduction of new resistant clones. PMID:26833774

  3. Levofloxacin-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States: evidence for clonal spread and the impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W R; McGee, Lesley; Jorgensen, James; Beall, Bernard; Facklam, Richard R; Whitney, Cynthia G; Klugman, Keith P

    2004-09-01

    The emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in sterile-site isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae is documented in this study characterizing all invasive levofloxacin-resistant (MIC, > or = 8 mg/liter) S. pneumoniae isolates (n = 50) obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Active Bacterial Core Surveillance from 1998 to 2002. Resistance among all isolates increased from 0.1% in 1998 to 0.6% in 2001 (P = 0.008) but decreased to 0.4% in 2002, while resistance among vaccine serotypes continued to increase from 0.3% in 1998 to 1.0% in 2002, suggesting that fluoroquinolones continue to exert selective pressure on these vaccine serotypes. Only 22% of resistant isolates were not covered by the conjugate vaccine serogroups. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that 58% of resistant strains were related to five international clones identified by the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network, with the Spain(23F)-1 clone being most frequent (16% of all isolates). Thirty-six percent of the isolates were coresistant to penicillin, 44% were coresistant to macrolides, and 28% were multiresistant to penicillin, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones. Fifty percent of the isolates were resistant to any three drug classes. Ninety-four percent of the isolates had multiple mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In 16% of the isolates, there was evidence of an active efflux mechanism. An unusual isolate was found that showed only a single parE mutation and for which the ciprofloxacin MIC was lower (2 mg/liter) than that of levofloxacin (8 mg/liter). Our results suggest that invasive pneumococcal isolates resistant to levofloxacin in the United States show considerable evidence of multiple resistance and of clonal spread. PMID:15328116

  4. The ability of 2-deoxyglucose to promote the lysis of Streptococcus bovis JB1 via a mechanism involving cell wall stability.

    PubMed

    Russell, J B; Wells, J E

    1997-11-01

    The non-metabolizable glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), decreased the growth rate and optical density of Streptococcus bovis JB1 20%, but it had an even greater effect on stationary phase cultures. Control cultures receiving only glucose (2 mg/ml) lysed very slowly (<5% decline in optical density in 48 h), but cultures that had been grown with glucose and 2-DG (2 mg/ml each) lysed much faster (>85% decline in optical density in 48 h). Cultures that were treated with inhibitors that decreased intracellular ATP (sodium fluoride, nigericin, and valinomycin or tetrachlorosalicylanilide) or membrane potential (sodium fluoride, nigericin, and valinomycin, tetrachlorosalicylanilide, or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) did not promote lysis. 2-DG had its greatest effect when it was added at inoculation. If 2-DG was added at later times, less lysis was observed, and cells that were given 2-DG just prior to stationary phase were unaffected. Cells that were grown with glucose and 2-DG were more susceptible to cell wall-degrading enzymes (lysozyme and mutanolysin) than cells that had been grown only with glucose, but sublethal doses of penicillin during growth did not promote lysis after the cells had reached stationary phase. The idea that 2-DG might be affecting autolytic activity was supported by the observation that cultures washed and resuspended in fresh medium with or without 2-DG lysed at a slower rate than cultures that were not centrifuged or were resuspended in the culture supernatant. PMID:9462960

  5. Prevalence of penicillin and erythromycin resistance among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates reported by laboratories in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Borg, M A; Tiemersma, E; Scicluna, E; van de Sande-Bruinsma, N; de Kraker, M; Monen, J; Grundmann, H

    2009-03-01

    Information about the epidemiology of resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae within southern and eastern countries of the Mediterranean region is incomplete, as reports have been sporadic and difficult to compare. Over a 36-month period, from 2003 to 2005, the ARMed project collected 1298 susceptibility test results of invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae from blood and spinal fluid cultures routinely processed within 59 participating laboratories situated in Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Overall, 26% (335) of isolates were reported as non-susceptible to penicillin, with the highest proportions being reported from Algeria (44%) and Lebanon (40%). During the same time period, the highest proportions of pneumococci that were not susceptible to erythromycin were reported from Malta (46%) and Tunisia (39%). Proportions of dual non-susceptibility in excess of 5% were found in laboratories in Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. ARMed data on the antimicrobial resistance epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region provided evidence of high rates of resistance, especially to penicillin. This evidence calls for a greater focus on the identification of relevant drivers of resistance and on the implemention of effective practices in order to address the problem of resistence. PMID:19154490

  6. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene. PMID:16258826

  7. Growth response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, fed diets containing different levels of wheat distiller dried grains with solubles with or without lysine supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of wheat distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with or without lysine supplementation on growth, body composition, hematology, immune response, and resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to Streptococcus iniae challen...

  8. Binding of the global response regulator protein CovR to the sag promoter of Streptococcus pyogenes reveals a new mode of CovR-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinxin; Gusa, Asiya A; Scott, June R; Churchward, Gordon

    2005-11-25

    CovR (CsrR) is a response regulator of gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes. It regulates approximately 15% of the genome, including the genes encoding several streptococcal virulence factors, and acts primarily as a repressor rather than an activator of transcription. We showed that in vitro, CovR is sufficient to repress transcription from the sag promoter, which directs the expression of streptolysin S, a hemolysin that can damage the membranes of eukaryotic cells and subcellular organelles. Repression was stimulated 10-fold by phosphorylation of CovR with acetyl phosphate. In contrast to binding at the has and cov promoters, which direct the expression of genes involved in capsule biosynthesis and of CovR itself, binding of CovR to Psag was highly cooperative. CovR bound to two extended regions of Psag, an upstream region overlapping the -35 and -10 promoter elements and a downstream region overlapping the translation initiation signals of the sagA gene. Each of these regions contains only a single consensus CovR binding sequence, ATTARA, which at the has promoter defines individual sites to which CovR binds non-cooperatively. At Phas and Pcov the T residues in the sequence ATTARA are important for CovR binding. However, using uracil interference experiments we find that although the ATTARA sequence in the Psag upstream region contains thymine residues important for CovR binding, important thymine residues in the Psag downstream region are located outside this sequence. Furthermore, again in contrast to its behavior at the has and cov promoters where phosphorylation of CovR leads to a 2-3-fold increase in DNA binding affinity, binding of CovR to the sag promoter was stimulated 8-32-fold by phosphorylation. We suggest that these differences in CovR binding mean that individual promoters will be repressed at different intracellular levels of phosphorylated CovR, permitting differences in the response of members of the CovR regulon to environmental and

  9. Camel Streptococcus agalactiae populations are associated with specific disease complexes and acquired the tetracycline resistance gene tetM via a Tn916-like element

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Camels are the most valuable livestock species in the Horn of Africa and play a pivotal role in the nutritional sustainability for millions of people. Their health status is therefore of utmost importance for the people living in this region. Streptococcus agalactiae, a Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an important camel pathogen. Here we present the first epidemiological study based on genetic and phenotypic data from African camel derived GBS. Ninety-two GBS were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), capsular polysaccharide typing and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We analysed the GBS using Bayesian linkage, phylogenetic and minimum spanning tree analyses and compared them with human GBS from East Africa in order to investigate the level of genetic exchange between GBS populations in the region. Camel GBS sequence types (STs) were distinct from other STs reported so far. We mapped specific STs and capsular types to major disease complexes caused by GBS. Widespread resistance (34%) to tetracycline was associated with acquisition of the tetM gene that is carried on a Tn916-like element, and observed primarily among GBS isolated from mastitis. The presence of tetM within different MLST clades suggests acquisition on multiple occasions. Wound infections and mastitis in camels associated with GBS are widespread and should ideally be treated with antimicrobials other than tetracycline in East Africa. PMID:24083845

  10. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  11. Population structure and drug resistance patterns of emerging non-PCV-13 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 22F, 15A, and 8 isolated from adults in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Duvvuri, Venkata R; Deng, Xianding; Teatero, Sarah; Memari, Nader; Athey, Taryn; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has led to the emergence of non-vaccine serotypes, which contributed to invasive pneumococcal disease in Canada and worldwide. A significant increase in the prevalence of non-13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13)-included serotypes 22F, 15A, and 8 was observed from 2009 to 2013 in Ontario (all p values<0.01). In this study, whole genome sequencing was conducted on the 25 isolates of serotype 22F, seven of 15A and 10 of 8 to investigate the population structure and antibiotic resistance. All seven serotype 15A isolates were found to be multidrug resistant. From whole genome analysis, we observed recombination events among serotypes 22F, 15A and 8 populations. Serotype 22F (ST433) has emerged into two sub-populations, with 28% (7/25) exhibiting recombination events, and five also acquiring macrolide resistance as a result of recombination. This study enhances the knowledge on the molecular evolution of emerging non-PCV-13 vaccine serotype 22F, including acquisition of resistance genes through recombination events. It underpins the importance of whole genome sequencing in studying Streptococcus pneumoniae population structures and dynamics, and its utility in molecular surveillance. PMID:27071529

  12. ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a primary target of fluoroquinolones and cooperates with DNA gyrase A subunit in forming resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; De La Campa, A G

    1996-01-01

    The genes encoding the ParC and ParE subunits of topoisomerase IV of Streptococcus pneumoniae, together with the region encoding amino acids 46 to 172 (residue numbers are as in Escherichia coli) of the pneumococcal GyrA subunit, were partially characterized. The gyrA gene maps to a physical location distant from the gyrB and parC loci on the chromosome, whereas parC is closely linked to parE. Ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cpr) clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae had mutations affecting amino acid residues of the quinolone resistance-determining region of ParC (low-level Cpr) or in both quinolone resistance-determining regions of ParC and GyrA (high-level Cpr). Mutations were found in residue positions equivalent to the serine at position 83 and the aspartic acid at position 87 of the E. coli GyrA subunit. Transformation experiments suggest that ParC is the primary target of ciprofloxacin. Mutation in parC appears to be a prerequisite before mutations in gyrA can influence resistance levels. PMID:8891124

  13. dpr and sod in Streptococcus mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H2O2.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Kei; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Tokuda, Masayuki; Torii, Mitsuo; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of bacteria coexist in the oral cavity. Streptococcus sanguinis, one of the major bacteria in dental plaque, produces hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which interferes with the growth of other bacteria. Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, can coexist with S. sanguinis in dental plaque, but to do so, it needs a means of detoxifying the H(2)O(2) produced by S. sanguinis. In this study, we investigated the association of three oxidative stress factors, Dpr, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and AhpCF, with the resistance of S. sanguinis to H(2)O(2). The knockout of dpr and sod significantly increased susceptibility to H(2)O(2), while the knockout of ahpCF had no apparent effect on susceptibility. In particular, dpr inactivation resulted in hypersensitivity to H(2)O(2). Next, we sought to identify the factor(s) involved in the regulation of these oxidative stress genes and found that PerR negatively regulated dpr expression. The knockout of perR caused increased dpr expression levels, resulting in low-level susceptibility to H(2)O(2) compared with the wild type. Furthermore, we evaluated the roles of perR, dpr, and sod when S. mutans was cocultured with S. sanguinis. Culturing of the dpr or sod mutant with S. sanguinis showed a significant decrease in the S. mutans population ratio compared with the wild type, while the perR mutant increased the ratio. Our results suggest that dpr and sod in S. mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H(2)O(2) in regulating the expression of Dpr. PMID:23263955

  14. Free Sialic Acid Acts as a Signal That Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Invasion of Nasal Tissue and Nonhematogenous Invasion of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Brandon L; Hale, Joanetha Y; Briles, David E

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and neurological sequelae in children worldwide. Acute bacterial meningitis is widely considered to result from bacteremia that leads to blood-brain barrier breakdown and bacterial dissemination throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we showed that pneumococci can gain access to the CNS through a nonhematogenous route without peripheral blood infection. This access is thought to occur when the pneumococci in the upper sinus follow the olfactory nerves and enter the CNS through the olfactory bulbs. In this study, we determined whether the addition of exogenous sialic acid postcolonization promotes nonhematogenous invasion of the CNS. Previously, others showed that treatment with exogenous sialic acid post-pneumococcal infection increased the numbers of CFU recovered from an intranasal mouse model of infection. Using a pneumococcal colonization model, an in vivo imaging system, and a multiplex assay for cytokine expression, we demonstrated that sialic acid can increase the number of pneumococci recovered from the olfactory bulbs and brains of infected animals. We also show that pneumococci primarily localize to the olfactory bulb, leading to increased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These findings provide evidence that sialic acid can enhance the ability of pneumococci to disseminate into the CNS and provide details about the environment needed to establish nonhematogenous pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27354445

  15. Moraxella catarrhalis Outer Membrane Vesicles Carry β-Lactamase and Promote Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae by Inactivating Amoxicillin▿

    PubMed Central

    Schaar, Viveka; Nordström, Therése; Mörgelin, Matthias; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common pathogen found in children with upper respiratory tract infections and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during exacerbations. The bacterial species is often isolated together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released by M. catarrhalis and contain phospholipids, adhesins, and immunomodulatory compounds such as lipooligosaccharide. We have recently shown that M. catarrhalis OMVs exist in patients upon nasopharyngeal colonization. As virtually all M. catarrhalis isolates are β-lactamase positive, the goal of this study was to investigate whether M. catarrhalis OMVs carry β-lactamase and to analyze if OMV consequently can prevent amoxicillin-induced killing. Recombinant β-lactamase was produced and antibodies were raised in rabbits. Transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blotting verified that OMVs carried β-lactamase. Moreover, enzyme assays revealed that M. catarrhalis OMVs contained active β-lactamase. OMVs (25 μg/ml) incubated with amoxicillin for 1 h completely hydrolyzed amoxicillin at concentrations up to 2.5 μg/ml. In functional experiments, preincubation of amoxicillin (10× MIC) with M. catarrhalis OMVs fully rescued amoxicillin-susceptible M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae, and type b or nontypeable H. influenzae from β-lactam-induced killing. Our results suggest that the presence of amoxicillin-resistant M. catarrhalis originating from β-lactamase-containing OMVs may pave the way for respiratory pathogens that by definition are susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:21576428

  16. Low incidence of antibiotic resistance among invasive and nasopharyngeal isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children in rural Philippines between 1994 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Sombrero, L; Nissinen, A; Esparar, G; Lindgren, M; Siira, L; Virolainen, A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acquired antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from nasopharyngeal swabs and blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens of 3,028 children hospitalized with signs or symptoms of pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis in rural Philippines between 1994 and 2000. Pneumococci were identified using standard methods, serotyped, and their susceptibility to oxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was determined using the disk diffusion method. Penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the oxacillin-resistant isolates were further tested. The clonality of the penicillin-nonsusceptible (PNSP) isolates was analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Altogether 1,048 isolates were analyzed, of which 35 were invasive and 1,013 nasopharyngeal isolates. None was resistant, but 22 (2.1%) were intermediately resistant to penicillin, 4 (0.2%) were resistant to chloramphenicol, 3 (0.2%) to erythromycin, 39 (3.7%) to tetracycline, and 4 (0.2%) to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Twelve of the 22 PNSP isolates were of serotype 14 and of sequence type 63. These included the two invasive PNSP isolates. PFGE profiling further identified three separate clusters among the sequence of type 63, serotype 14 (ST63(14)) isolates. Antimicrobial resistance in both invasive and nasopharyngeal pneumococcal pediatric isolates in rural Philippines is rare. In spite of this remote setting, the PNSP isolates of the serotype 14 clusters were of ST63 type, which has been described previously on other continents. PMID:18592281

  17. Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among Children with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Thailand: a Molecular Epidemiological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dejsirilert, Surang; Overweg, Karin; Sluijter, Marcel; Saengsuk, Leelawadee; Gratten, Mike; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Thailand has dramatically increased over the last decade. During a national survey, which was conducted from 1992 to 1994, 37.2% of the pneumococci isolated from the nasopharynges of children with acute respiratory tract infections were penicillin resistant (MIC, ≥0.1 μg/ml). In order to investigate the prevalence and clonal relatedness of nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae in Thailand, a molecular epidemiological survey was undertaken. To this end, 53 penicillin-resistant pneumococcal isolates from children who suffered from acute respiratory tract infections and who originated from five distinct regions of the country were characterized in detail. DNA fingerprint analysis demonstrated 13 clusters, i.e., genotypes shared by two or more strains, and 14 unique genotypes. The cluster size varied from 2 (nine clusters) to 11 strains (one cluster). Six of the 13 restriction fragment end labeling clusters consisted of two or more distinct serotypes, indicating frequent horizontal transfer of capsular genes. Geographical distribution of the genotypes among the five regions of Thailand demonstrated that only four genetic clusters were restricted to single areas of the country, whereas the other nine clusters represented isolates collected in two or more districts. These observations demonstrate that the majority of the genetic clusters are spread throughout the country. The most predominant genetic cluster, representing 21% of the isolates, was identical to the Spanish pandemic clone 23F. In addition, the second largest cluster matched the Spanish-French international clone 9V. These data indicate that the genetic clones 23F and 9V, which are widely spread throughout the world, are the most predominant multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones in Thailand. Therefore, we conclude that these pandemic clones are primarily responsible for the increase in the prevalence of

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile and Genotypic Characteristics of Streptococcus suis Capsular Type 2 Isolated from Clinical Carrier Sows and Diseased Pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunping; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Song, Li; Fan, Xuezheng; Wen, Fang; Xu, Shixin; Ning, Yibao

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an important zoonotic pathogen. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypic characterizations of S. suis 2 from carrier sows and diseased pigs remain largely unknown. In this study, 96 swine S. suis type 2, 62 from healthy sows and 34 from diseased pigs, were analyzed. High frequency of tetracycline resistance was observed, followed by sulfonamides. The lowest resistance of S. suis 2 for β-lactams supports their use as the primary antibiotics to treat the infection of serotype 2. In contrast, 35 of 37 S. suis 2 with MLSB phenotypes were isolated from healthy sows, mostly encoded by the ermB and/or the mefA genes. Significantly lower frequency of mrp+/epf+/sly+ was observed among serotype 2 from healthy sows compared to those from diseased pigs. Furthermore, isolates from diseased pigs showed more homogeneously genetic patterns, with most of them clustered in pulsotypes A and E. The data indicate the genetic complexity of S. suis 2 between herds and a close linkage among isolates from healthy sows and diseased pigs. Moreover, many factors, such as extensive use of tetracycline or diffusion of Tn916 with tetM, might have favored for the pathogenicity and widespread dissemination of S. suis serotype 2. PMID:26064892

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile and Genotypic Characteristics of Streptococcus suis Capsular Type 2 Isolated from Clinical Carrier Sows and Diseased Pigs in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunping; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Song, Li; Fan, Xuezheng; Wen, Fang; Xu, Shixin; Ning, Yibao

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an important zoonotic pathogen. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypic characterizations of S. suis 2 from carrier sows and diseased pigs remain largely unknown. In this study, 96 swine S. suis type 2, 62 from healthy sows and 34 from diseased pigs, were analyzed. High frequency of tetracycline resistance was observed, followed by sulfonamides. The lowest resistance of S. suis 2 for β-lactams supports their use as the primary antibiotics to treat the infection of serotype 2. In contrast, 35 of 37 S. suis 2 with MLSB phenotypes were isolated from healthy sows, mostly encoded by the ermB and/or the mefA genes. Significantly lower frequency of mrp+/epf+/sly+ was observed among serotype 2 from healthy sows compared to those from diseased pigs. Furthermore, isolates from diseased pigs showed more homogeneously genetic patterns, with most of them clustered in pulsotypes A and E. The data indicate the genetic complexity of S. suis 2 between herds and a close linkage among isolates from healthy sows and diseased pigs. Moreover, many factors, such as extensive use of tetracycline or diffusion of Tn916 with tetM, might have favored for the pathogenicity and widespread dissemination of S. suis serotype 2. PMID:26064892

  20. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N.; Ziane, H.; Bekhoucha, S.; Guechi, Z.; Azzam, A.; Touati, D.; Naim, M.; Azrou, S.; Hamidi, M.; Mertani, A.; Laraba, A.; Annane, T.; Kermani, S.; Tazir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  1. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N; Ziane, H; Bekhoucha, S; Guechi, Z; Azzam, A; Touati, D; Naim, M; Azrou, S; Hamidi, M; Mertani, A; Laraba, A; Annane, T; Kermani, S; Tazir, M

    2015-07-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  2. Investigation of serotype distribution and resistance genes profile in group B Streptococcus isolated from pregnant women: a Chinese multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuzhong; Hu, Hua; Lu, Tingyan; Fan, Huiqing; Hu, Yan; Li, Gang; Zhang, Xianhua; Shi, Yi; Xia, Rong

    2016-09-01

    We surveyed the group B Streptococcus (GBS) strains isolated from four teaching hospitals during 1-year period to investigate the current serotypes and antimicrobial resistance status of these strains. A total of 231 non-duplicate colonizing GBS isolates were collected from pregnant women. Antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates was tested by the disk diffusion method. Serotype was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Analysis of the resistance mechanisms was performed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Seven serotypes (Ia, Ib, II, III, V, VI, and VIII) were identified, and the prevalence ranged from 0.9 to 35.9%. All isolates were susceptible to the penicillin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin. The resistance of all the isolates to erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin was 61.5, 51.9, and 35.5%, respectively. The erythromycin resistance was mainly associated with the genes ermB and ermB-mef(A/E) (69.8%). The most predominant phenotype was cMLSB (77.5%). Five gene panels, including gyrA, parC, parE, gyrA-parC, and gyrA-parC-parE, were detected. The most predominant genotype was gyrA-parC-parE triple mutation (69.5%). The S81L in gyrA gene, S79Y mutation in parC gene, and H225Y mutation in parE gene were discovered. The isolates with serotype III, V, and Ia were the most important clone concerning the prevalence and resistance. PMID:27452669

  3. Emergence in Vietnam of Streptococcus pneumoniae Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents as a Result of Dissemination of the Multiresistant Spain23F-1 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Christopher M.; Duong, Nguyen Minh; Zhou, Jiaji; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Diep, To Song; Thinh, Le Quoc; Wain, John; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Griffiths, David; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Hien, Tran Tinh; Spratt, Brian G.; Farrar, Jeremy J.

    2002-01-01

    Surveillance for Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents is necessary to define the optimal empirical antibiotic therapy for meningitis in resource-poor countries such as Vietnam. The clinical and microbiological features of 100 patients admitted to the Centre for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, between 1993 and 2002 with invasive pneumococcal disease were studied. A penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcus (MIC, ≥0.1 μg/ml) was isolated from the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of 8% of patients (2 of 24) between 1993 and 1995 but 56% (20 of 36) during 1999 to 2002 (P < 0.0001). Pneumococcal isolates resistant to penicillin (MIC, ≥2.0 μg/ml) increased from 0% (0 of 24) to 28% (10 of 36) (P = 0.002). Only one isolate was ceftriaxone resistant (MIC, 2.0 μg/ml). Penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci were isolated from 78% of children younger than 15 years (28 of 36) compared with 25% of adults (16 of 64) (P = 0.0001). Isolation of a penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcus in adults with meningitis was independently associated with referral from another hospital (P = 0.005) and previous antibiotic therapy (P = 0.025). Multilocus sequence typing showed that 86% of the invasive penicillin-resistant pneumococcus isolates tested (12 of 14) were of the Spain23F-1 clone. The serotypes of >95% of the penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci were included in the currently available pneumococcal vaccines. Our findings point to the recent introduction and spread of the Spain23F-1 clone of penicillin-resistant pneumococci in Vietnam. Simple clinical predictors can be used to guide empirical antibiotic therapy of meningitis. Pneumococcal vaccination may help to control this problem. PMID:12384358

  4. p-Cresyl sulfate promotes insulin resistance associated with CKD.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Pillon, Nicolas J; Vella, Roxane E; Croze, Marine L; Pelletier, Caroline C; Chambert, Stéphane; Massy, Ziad; Glorieux, Griet; Vanholder, Raymond; Dugenet, Yann; Soula, Hédi A; Fouque, Denis; Soulage, Christophe O

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the insulin resistance that frequently accompanies CKD are poorly understood, but the retention of renally excreted compounds may play a role. One such compound is p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), a protein-bound uremic toxin that originates from tyrosine metabolism by intestinal microbes. Here, we sought to determine whether PCS contributes to CKD-associated insulin resistance. Administering PCS to mice with normal kidney function for 4 weeks triggered insulin resistance, loss of fat mass, and ectopic redistribution of lipid in muscle and liver, mimicking features associated with CKD. Mice treated with PCS exhibited altered insulin signaling in skeletal muscle through ERK1/2 activation. In addition, exposing C2C12 myotubes to concentrations of PCS observed in CKD caused insulin resistance through direct activation of ERK1/2. Subtotal nephrectomy led to insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice, and treatment with the prebiotic arabino-xylo-oligosaccharide, which reduced serum PCS by decreasing intestinal production of p-cresol, prevented these metabolic derangements. Taken together, these data suggest that PCS contributes to insulin resistance and that targeting PCS may be a therapeutic strategy in CKD. PMID:23274953

  5. Nasopharyngeal carriage, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae among children from Brazil before the introduction of the 10-valent conjugate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nasopharyngeal colonization plays an important role in the development and transmission of pneumococcal diseases, and infants and young children are considered to be the main reservoir of this pathogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rates and characteristics associated with nasopharyngeal carriage, the distribution of serotypes and the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Streptococcus pneumoniae among children in a large metropolitan area in Brazil before the introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Methods Between March and June 2010, nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 242 children aged <6 years attending one day care center and the emergency room of a pediatric hospital. Pneumococcal isolates were identified by conventional methods and serotypes were determined by a sequential multiplex PCR assay and/or the Quellung reaction. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the pneumococci were assessed by the disk diffusion method. MICs for erythromycin and penicillin were also performed. Erythromycin resistance genes were investigated by PCR. Results The overall colonization rate was 49.2% and it was considerably higher among children in the day care center. Pneumococcal carriage was more common among day care attenders and cohabitants with young siblings. The most prevalent serotypes were 6B, 19F, 6A, 14, 15C and 23F, which accounted for 61.2% of the isolates. All isolates were susceptible to clindamycin, levofloxacin, rifampicin and vancomycin. The highest rate of non-susceptibility was observed for sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim (51.2%). Penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci (PNSP) accounted for 27.3% of the isolates (MICs of 0.12-4 μg/ml). Penicillin non-susceptibility was strongly associated with serotypes 14 and 23F. Hospital attendance and the presence of respiratory or general symptoms were frequently associated with

  6. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  7. Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Causing Invasive and Noninvasive Pneumococcal Diseases in Korea from 2008 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Il Kwon; Park, Dongchul; Kim, Na Young; Song, Sae Am; Urm, Sang-Hwa; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important pathogen with high morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of common serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae in Korea. Methods. A total of 378 pneumococcal isolates were collected from 2008 through 2014. We analyzed the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility for both invasive and noninvasive isolates. Results. Over the 7 years, 3 (13.5%), 35 (10.8%), 19A (9.0%), 19F (6.6%), 6A (6.1%), and 34 (5.6%) were common serotypes/serogroups. The vaccine coverage rates of PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PPSV23 were 21.4%, 23.3%, 51.9%, and 62.4% in all periods. The proportions of serotypes 19A and 19F decreased and nonvaccine serotypes increased between 2008 and 2010 and 2011 and 2014. Of 378 S. pneumoniae isolates, 131 (34.7%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and serotypes 19A and 19F were predominant. The resistance rate to levofloxacin was significantly increased (7.2%). Conclusion. We found changes of pneumococcal serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility during the 7 years after introduction of the first pneumococcal vaccine. It is important to continuously monitor pneumococcal serotypes and their susceptibilities. PMID:27314035

  8. Sil: A Streptococcus iniae Bacteriocin with Dual Role as an Antimicrobial and an Immunomodulator That Inhibits Innate Immune Response and Promotes S. iniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Zhang, Bao-cun; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium and a severe pathogen to a wide range of economically important fish species. In addition, S. iniae is also a zoonotic pathogen and can cause serious infections in humans. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic S. iniae strain a putative bacteriocin, Sil, and examined its biological activity. Sil is composed of 101 amino acid residues and shares 35.6% overall sequence identity with the lactococcin 972 of Lactococcus lactis. Immunoblot analysis showed that Sil was secreted by S. iniae into the extracellular milieu. Purified recombinant Sil (rSil) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the growth of Bacillus subtilis but had no impact on the growths of other 16 Gram-positive bacteria and 10 Gram-negative bacteria representing 23 different bacterial species. Treatment of rSil by heating at 50°C abolished the activity of rSil. rSil bound to the surface of B. subtilis but induced no killing of the target cells. Cellular study revealed that rSil interacted with turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) head kidney monocytes and inhibited the innate immune response of the cells, which led to enhanced cellular infection of S. iniae. Antibody blocking of the extracellular Sil produced by S. iniae significantly attenuated the infectivity of S. iniae. Consistent with these in vitro observations, in vivo study showed that administration of turbot with rSil prior to S. iniae infection significantly increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that Sil is a novel virulence-associated bacteriostatic and an immunoregulator that promotes S. iniae infection by impairing the immune defense of host fish. PMID:24781647

  9. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread of

  10. Nationwide survey of the development of drug-resistant pathogens in the pediatric field: drug sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nonoyama, Masato; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the resistance to 20 different antibacterial agents of 362 clinically isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae accumulated from October 2000 to July 2001 (phase 1) and of 332 different strains accumulated from January to June 2004 (phase 2), from institutions throughout Japan that participated in the surveys carried out by the Drug-Resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease. In phase 1, the proportions of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae (PSSP), penicillin-insensitive S. pneumoniae (PISP), and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) were 35.4%, 34.8%, and 29.8%, respectively, and the proportions were almost the same in phase 2: 33.1%, 37.0%, and 29.8%, respectively. Comparison of the MIC(90) values of the antibacterial agents for PRSP in phase 1 and phase 2 revealed that these values for cefditoren, cefpodoxime, cefdinir, faropenem, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, meropenem, and vancomycin increased by twofold to fourfold during the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. However the MIC(90) of rokitamycin increased more than fourfold. The proportion of S. pneumoniae that were PISP + PRSP remained almost constant over the 3 years between phase 1 and phase 2. The background factors of patient age, previous administration of antibacterial agents, and attendance at a day nursery were examined; we found that in phase 1, the proportion of PISP + PRSP was significantly higher than that of PSSP in patients under 4 years old who had previously received antibacterial agents, but no significant differences were found in any of these background factors in the phase 2 survey. No significant difference was found in the proportions of penicillin-resistant bacteria according to whether or not the child had attended a day nursery. PMID:20012731

  11. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  12. Role of tooth elongation in promoting fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Keown, Amanda J; Bush, Mark B; Lee, James J-W; Lawn, Brian R

    2012-04-01

    A study is made of the role of tooth height on the resistance to side-wall longitudinal fracture under axial occlusal loading, building on earlier analyses for molar teeth with low dome-like ('bunodont') crown structures characteristic of primates and several other omnivorous mammals. The present study extends the analysis by considering molar teeth with an elongate columnar structure below the crown, more characteristic of grazing mammals. Extended finite element modeling is used to determine the evolution of longitudinal cracking, from initial growth to final failure. Experimental tests on sheep teeth confirm the predicted behavior of the longitudinal fracture mode, at least in its early stages. It is demonstrated that elongate tooth structures have a substantially increased resistance to longitudinal fracture, by restricting crack growth along the extended side walls. Biological implications concerning the adaptation of tooth structure to meet changes in the dietary habits of herbivores, and of some carnivores, are considered. PMID:22402152

  13. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  14. In Vitro Capability of Faropenem To Select for Resistant Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  15. Increase of stress resistance in Lactococcus lactis via a novel food-grade vector expressing a shsp gene from Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hongtao; Tan, Jianxin; Zhang, Lifang; Gu, Xinxi; Xu, Wentao; Guo, Xinghua; Luo, Yunbo

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the expression of a small heat shock protein (shsp) gene from Streptococcus thermophilus on stress resistance in Lactococcus lactis under different environmental stresses were investigated in this study. pMG36e-shsp, an expression vector, was first constructed by inserting a shsp open reading frame (ORF) cloned from S. thermophilus strain St-QC into pMG36e. Then, a food-grade expression vector, pMG-shsp, was generated by deleting the erythromycin resistance gene from pMG36e-shsp. The transformation rate of pMG-shsp was comparable to that of pMG36e-shsp when each of these two vectors was introduced into L. lactis. These results demonstrated that the shsp ORF could successfully used as a food-grade selection marker in both pMG-shsp and pMG36e-shsp. Furthermore, the growth characteristics were almost the same between L. lactis ML23 transformants harboring pMG36e or pMG-shsp. The survival rate of L. lactis ML23 expressing the shsp ORF were increased to 0.032%, 0.006%, 0.0027%, 0.03%, and 0.16% under the following environmental stresses: heat, acid, ethanol, bile salt and H2O2, respectively. These results indicated that the expression of the shsp gene in the food-grade vector pMG-shsp conferred resistance to environmental stresses without affecting the growth characteristics of L. lactis ML23. PMID:24031940

  16. cadDX Operon of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Feng, C. W.; Chiu, C. F.; Burne, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    A CadDX system that confers resistance to Cd2+ and Zn2+ was identified in Streptococcus salivarius 57.I. Unlike with other CadDX systems, the expression of the cad promoter was negatively regulated by CadX, and the repression was inducible by Cd2+ and Zn2+, similar to what was found for CadCA systems. The lower G+C content of the S. salivarius cadDX genes suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:18165364

  17. cadDX operon of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Feng, C W; Chiu, C F; Burne, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    A CadDX system that confers resistance to Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) was identified in Streptococcus salivarius 57.I. Unlike with other CadDX systems, the expression of the cad promoter was negatively regulated by CadX, and the repression was inducible by Cd(2+) and Zn(2+), similar to what was found for CadCA systems. The lower G+C content of the S. salivarius cadDX genes suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:18165364

  18. Clozapine-Induced Late Agranulocytosis and Severe Neutropenia Complicated with Streptococcus pneumonia, Venous Thromboembolism, and Allergic Vasculitis in Treatment-Resistant Female Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Christina; Giannas, Raphael; Paterakis, Georgios; Kanellou, Anna; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos; Pagoni, Stamata

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic agent from the benzodiazepine group indicated for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions. Using clozapine earlier on once a case appears to be refractory limits both social and personal morbidity of chronic psychosis. However treatment with second-generation antipsychotics is often complicated by adverse effects. We present a case of a 33-year-old Caucasian woman with a 25-year history of refractory psychotic mania after switching to a 2-year clozapine therapy. She presented clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia, agranulocytosis, which were complicated by Streptococcus pneumonia and sepsis. Clozapine-induced thromboembolism of the common femoral and right proximal iliac vein, as well as allergic vasculitis, was diagnosed. She achieved full remission on granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and specific antibiotic treatment. Early detection of severe clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia and agranulocytosis enabled the effective treatment of two among its most severe complications. Additional evidence to the previously reported possible causal relation between clozapine and venous thromboembolism is offered. Finally, clozapine-induced allergic vasculitis is confirmed as a late adverse effect of clozapine therapy. PMID:25755670

  19. Effects of xylitol on xylitol-sensitive versus xylitol-resistant Streptococcus mutans strains in a three-species in vitro biofilm.

    PubMed

    Marttinen, Aino M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Saari, Markku A; Ihalin, Riikka A; Söderling, Eva M

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effects of xylitol on biofilms containing xylitol-resistant (Xr) and xylitol-sensitive (Xs) Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and S. sanguinis. The biofilms were grown for 8 and 24 h on hydroxyapatite discs. The viable microorganisms were determined by plate culturing techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using a S. mutans-specific probe. Extracellular cell-bound polysaccharides (EPS) were determined by spectrofluorometry from single-species S. mutans biofilms. In the presence of 5 % xylitol, the counts of the Xs S. mutans decreased tenfold in the young (8 h) biofilm (p < 0.05) but no effect was seen in the mature (24 h) biofilm. No decrease was observed for the Xr strains, and FISH confirmed these results. No differences were detected in the EPS production of the Xs S. mutans grown with or without xylitol, nor between Xr and Xs S. mutans strains. Thus, it seems that xylitol did not affect the EPS synthesis of the S. mutans strains. Since the Xr S. mutans strains, not inhibited by xylitol, showed no xylitol-induced decrease in the biofilms, we conclude that growth inhibition could be responsible for the decrease of the counts of the Xs S. mutans strains in the clinically relevant young biofilms. PMID:22645015

  20. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte activation promotes innate antiviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mahima; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Chettle, James; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Goubau, Delphine; Chakravarty, Probir; Ramsay, George; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Staeheli, Peter; Blacklaws, Barbara A; Heeney, Jonathan L; Hayday, Adrian C

    2015-01-01

    Unrelenting environmental challenges to the gut epithelium place particular demands on the local immune system. In this context, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) compose a large, highly conserved T cell compartment, hypothesized to provide a first line of defence via cytolysis of dysregulated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and cytokine-mediated re-growth of healthy IEC. Here we show that one of the most conspicuous impacts of activated IEL on IEC is the functional upregulation of antiviral interferon (IFN)-responsive genes, mediated by the collective actions of IFNs with other cytokines. Indeed, IEL activation in vivo rapidly provoked type I/III IFN receptor-dependent upregulation of IFN-responsive genes in the villus epithelium. Consistent with this, activated IEL mediators protected cells against virus infection in vitro, and pre-activation of IEL in vivo profoundly limited norovirus infection. Hence, intraepithelial T cell activation offers an overt means to promote the innate antiviral potential of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25987506

  1. Weathering resistance of carbonate fault mirrors promotes rupture localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R.; Siman-Tov, S.; Emmanuel, S.

    2016-04-01

    Fractured rocks in fault zones regain their mechanical strength through a process called healing. A central pathway for healing involves the dissolution and reprecipitation of minerals in the fault zone which cements the fractured rocks during interseismic periods. However, some faults contain highly polished surfaces—coated in a thin nanoparticle layer—along which slip is localized. Crucially, these surfaces show little evidence of postseismic mineralization and healing. Here we use atomic force microscopy to show that naturally polished rocks from carbonate fault zones are resistant to dissolution, in stark contrast to the reactive minerals that make up the fault breccia. Our results suggest that the low reactivity of the nanoparticle layer could retard healing, helping to maintain the localization of the fault zone between seismic slip events. As fault localization affects seismic motion, the geochemical reactivity of fault mirrors could be an important control on seismicity along faults.

  2. Collective cell motility promotes chemotactic prowess and resistance to chemorepulsion.

    PubMed

    Malet-Engra, Gema; Yu, Weimiao; Oldani, Amanda; Rey-Barroso, Javier; Gov, Nir S; Scita, Giorgio; Dupré, Loïc

    2015-01-19

    Collective cell migration is a widespread biological phenomenon, whereby groups of highly coordinated, adherent cells move in a polarized fashion. This migration mode is a hallmark of tissue morphogenesis during development and repair and of solid tumor dissemination. In addition to circulating as solitary cells, lymphoid malignancies can assemble into tissues as multicellular aggregates. Whether malignant lymphocytes are capable of coordinating their motility in the context of chemokine gradients is, however, unknown. Here, we show that, upon exposure to CCL19 or CXCL12 gradients, malignant B and T lymphocytes assemble into clusters that migrate directionally and display a wider chemotactic sensitivity than individual cells. Physical modeling recapitulates cluster motility statistics and shows that intracluster cell cohesion results in noise reduction and enhanced directionality. Quantitative image analysis reveals that cluster migration runs are periodically interrupted by transitory rotation and random phases that favor leader cell turnover. Additionally, internalization of CCR7 in leader cells is accompanied by protrusion retraction, loss of polarity, and the ensuing replacement by new leader cells. These mechanisms ensure sustained forward migration and resistance to chemorepulsion, a behavior of individual cells exposed to steep CCL19 gradients that depends on CCR7 endocytosis. Thus, coordinated cluster dynamics confer distinct chemotactic properties, highlighting unexpected features of lymphoid cell migration. PMID:25578904

  3. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  4. Influence of methylene blue-mediated photodynamic therapy on the resistance to detachment of streptococcus mutans biofilms from titanium substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharab, Lina Y.

    In dental settings, as well as in other natural systems, plaque-forming microorganisms develop biofilms in which the microbes become protected via their own phenotypic changes and their polymeric exudates from disinfection by washes and antibiotics. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is variably effective against these microorganisms, depending on such factors as whether the bacteria are Gram positive or Gram negative, plaque age and thickness, and internal biofilm oxygen concentration. This investigation applied a novel combination of PDT and water-jet impingement techniques to Streptococcus mutans (ATCC strain 27351)-formed biofilms on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) starting with three different phases (ages) of the bacteria, to examine whether the detachment shear stress --as a signature for the work required for removal of the biofilms- would be affected by prior PDT treatment independently from microbial viability. Biofilms were grown with sucrose addition to Brain Heart Infusion media, producing visible thick films and nearly invisible thin films (within the same piece) having the same numbers of culturable microorganisms, the thicker films having greater susceptibility to detachment by water--jet impingement. Colony-forming-unit (CFU) counts routinely correlated well with results from a spectrophotometric Alamar Blue (AB) assay. Use of Methylene Blue (MB) as a photosensitizer (PS) for PDT of biofilms did not interfere with the AB assay, but did mask AB reduction spectral changes when employed with planktonic organisms. It was discovered in this work that PD-treated microbial biofilms, independently from starting or PS-influenced microorganism viability, were significantly (p<0.05) and differentially more easily delaminated and ultimately removed from their substrata biomaterials by the hydrodynamic forces of water-jet impingement. Control biofilms of varying thickness, not receiving PDT treatment, required between 144 and 228 dynes/cm2 of shear stress to

  5. Penicillin-Binding Protein Transpeptidase Signatures for Tracking and Predicting β-Lactam Resistance Levels in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Chochua, Sopio; Li, Zhongya; Gertz, Robert E.; Walker, Hollis; Hawkins, Paulina A.; Tran, Theresa; Whitney, Cynthia G.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Lactam antibiotics are the drugs of choice to treat pneumococcal infections. The spread of β-lactam-resistant pneumococci is a major concern in choosing an effective therapy for patients. Systematically tracking β-lactam resistance could benefit disease surveillance. Here we developed a classification system in which a pneumococcal isolate is assigned to a “PBP type” based on sequence signatures in the transpeptidase domains (TPDs) of the three critical penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), PBP1a, PBP2b, and PBP2x. We identified 307 unique PBP types from 2,528 invasive pneumococcal isolates, which had known MICs to six β-lactams based on broth microdilution. We found that increased β-lactam MICs strongly correlated with PBP types containing divergent TPD sequences. The PBP type explained 94 to 99% of variation in MICs both before and after accounting for genomic backgrounds defined by multilocus sequence typing, indicating that genomic backgrounds made little independent contribution to β-lactam MICs at the population level. We further developed and evaluated predictive models of MICs based on PBP type. Compared to microdilution MICs, MICs predicted by PBP type showed essential agreement (MICs agree within 1 dilution) of >98%, category agreement (interpretive results agree) of >94%, a major discrepancy (sensitive isolate predicted as resistant) rate of <3%, and a very major discrepancy (resistant isolate predicted as sensitive) rate of <2% for all six β-lactams. Thus, the PBP transpeptidase signatures are robust indicators of MICs to different β-lactam antibiotics in clinical pneumococcal isolates and serve as an accurate alternative to phenotypic susceptibility testing. PMID:27302760

  6. Effects of some dietary crude plant extracts on the growth and gonadal maturity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and their resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae infection.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Zana H; Abdelhadi, Yasser M; Christianus, Annie; Karim, Murni; Romano, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted on the growth performance, feeding efficacy, body indices, various hematological and plasma biochemical parameters, and histopathological examination of the gonads from male and female Nile tilapia fingerlings when fed different crude plant extracts from Cinnamomum camphora, Euphorbia hirta, Azadirachta indica, or Carica papaya at 2 g kg(-1) compared to a control diet. This was followed by a 14-day challenge to Streptococcus agalactiae. All treatments were triplicated, and each treatment consisted of 30 fish. Results showed that C. papaya extracts were the most effective at delaying gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, as well as significantly increasing (P < 0.05) growth performance compared to the control treatment. Similarly, dietary C. camphora and E. hirta extracts also significantly improved growth, while no significant growth effect was detected between the A. indica and control treatments (P > 0.05). Further, crude body lipid was lower in the C. camphora, E. hirta and C. papaya treatments, but was only significantly lower for the E. hirta treatment compared to the control. Meanwhile, none of the hematological or biochemical parameters were significantly affected, although plasma ALT was significantly lower for tilapia fed A. indica compared to the control. After the 14-day bacterial challenge, tilapia fed C. camphora supplementation had significantly higher survival, compared to the control, but was not significantly higher than the other supplemented diets. Results indicate that dietary C. papaya extract can significantly promote growth and delay gonadal maturation to both male and female tilapia, while C. camphora was the most effective prophylactic to S. agalactiae and may be a cost-effective and eco-friendly alternative to antibiotics. PMID:26643907

  7. Dietary supplementation with Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus oryzae enhance immunity and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae infection in juvenile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Marina Keiko P; Nakandakare, Ivan B; Terhune, Jeffery S; Wood, Theresa; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José T

    2015-03-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary administration of probiotic with Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth, innate immune response, Hemato-immunological parameters and disease resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Animals were distributed in three equal groups, each of five replicates and received one of the following experimental diets for four weeks: Control, non-supplemented diet; 5 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 1.5 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 2 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)); and 10 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 3.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 2.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 4.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)). The respiratory burst activity, white blood cells and hematological parameters were evaluated after four, five and six weeks of feeding. At the end of the growth trial, fish were sampled for intestinal microbiology and challenged by intraperitoneal injection of LD50 concentration of Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae. Mortality was recorded for the following 3 weeks. Results showed that administration of the probiotic had no significant effect on the growth rates of Nile tilapias, although the fish fed probiotics had better feed conversion. Respiratory burst activity, erythrocyte fragility and levels of white blood cells were significantly improved in tilapias fed diet supplemented with probiotic levels (P < 0.05), which may exhibit up-regulating effects on tilapia immune parameters. The cumulative mortality after A. hydrophila and S. iniae challenge decreased in tilapias fed with probiotic (P < 0.05). The present study demonstrated the potential of B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae and A. oryzae combined as beneficial dietary probiotic in juvenile O. niloticus. PMID:25530581

  8. Genetic inactivation of an extracellular cysteine protease (SpeB) expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes decreases resistance to phagocytosis and dissemination to organs.

    PubMed

    Lukomski, S; Burns, E H; Wyde, P R; Podbielski, A; Rurangirwa, J; Moore-Poveda, D K; Musser, J M

    1998-02-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a conserved cysteine protease expressed by virtually all Streptococcus pyogenes strains, has recently been shown to be an important virulence factor (S. Lukomski, S. Sreevatsan, C. Amberg, W. Reichardt, M. Woischnik, A. Podbielski, and J. M. Musser, J. Clin. Invest. 99:2574-2580, 1997). Genetic inactivation of SpeB significantly decreased the lethality of a serotype M49 strain for mice and abolished the lethality of a serotype M3 strain after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. In the present study, a wild-type M3 isolate and an M3 speB mutant derivative were used to investigate the mechanism responsible for altered virulence. Following i.p. injection, the mutant and wild-type strains induced virtually identical cellular inflammatory responses, characterized largely by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In addition, the mutant and wild-type strains rapidly entered the blood and were recovered from all organs examined. However, significantly fewer (P < 0.05) CFUs of the isogenic mutant derivative than of the wild-type parent strain were recovered from blood and organs. PMNs effectively cleared the M3 speB mutant from the peritoneum by 22 h, thereby sparing the host. In contrast, the wild-type M3 strain continued to replicate intraperitoneally and had the ability to kill phagocytes. This process allowed the wild-type strain to continuously disseminate, resulting in host death. Our results indicate that genetic inactivation of the cysteine protease decreased the resistance of the mutant to phagocytosis and impaired its subsequent dissemination to organs. These results provide insight into the detrimental effect of SpeB inactivation on virulence. PMID:9453640

  9. Genetic Inactivation of an Extracellular Cysteine Protease (SpeB) Expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes Decreases Resistance to Phagocytosis and Dissemination to Organs

    PubMed Central

    Lukomski, Slawomir; Burns, Eugene H.; Wyde, Philip R.; Podbielski, Andreas; Rurangirwa, Jacqueline; Moore-Poveda, Donna K.; Musser, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a conserved cysteine protease expressed by virtually all Streptococcus pyogenes strains, has recently been shown to be an important virulence factor (S. Lukomski, S. Sreevatsan, C. Amberg, W. Reichardt, M. Woischnik, A. Podbielski, and J. M. Musser, J. Clin. Invest. 99:2574–2580, 1997). Genetic inactivation of SpeB significantly decreased the lethality of a serotype M49 strain for mice and abolished the lethality of a serotype M3 strain after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. In the present study, a wild-type M3 isolate and an M3 speB mutant derivative were used to investigate the mechanism responsible for altered virulence. Following i.p. injection, the mutant and wild-type strains induced virtually identical cellular inflammatory responses, characterized largely by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In addition, the mutant and wild-type strains rapidly entered the blood and were recovered from all organs examined. However, significantly fewer (P < 0.05) CFUs of the isogenic mutant derivative than of the wild-type parent strain were recovered from blood and organs. PMNs effectively cleared the M3 speB mutant from the peritoneum by 22 h, thereby sparing the host. In contrast, the wild-type M3 strain continued to replicate intraperitoneally and had the ability to kill phagocytes. This process allowed the wild-type strain to continuously disseminate, resulting in host death. Our results indicate that genetic inactivation of the cysteine protease decreased the resistance of the mutant to phagocytosis and impaired its subsequent dissemination to organs. These results provide insight into the detrimental effect of SpeB inactivation on virulence. PMID:9453640

  10. Hypoxia promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changfu; Zhang, Qiao; Yu, Tao; Sun, Shudong; Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drug resistance has been recognized to be a major obstacle to the chemotherapy for osteosarcoma. And the potential importance of hypoxia as a target to reverse drug resistance in osteosarcoma has been indicated, though the mechanism underlining such role is not clarified. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in the drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Experimental design We investigated the promotion of the resistance to doxorubicin of osteosarcoma MG-63 and U2-os cells in vitro, and then determined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)α and HIF-1β, the activation and regulatory role of AMPK in the osteosarcoma U2-os cells which were treated with doxorubicin under hypoxia. Results It was demonstrated that hypoxia significantly reduced the sensitivity of MG-63 and U2-os cells to doxorubicin, indicating an inhibited viability reduction and a reduced apoptosis promotion. And such reduced sensitivity was not associated with HIF-1α, though it was promoted by hypoxia in U2-os cells. Interestingly, the AMPK signaling was significantly promoted by hypoxia in the doxorubicin-treated U2-os cells, with a marked upregulation of phosphorylated AMPK (Thr 172) and phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser 79), which were sensitive to the AMPK activator, AICAR and the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. Moreover, the promoted AMPK activity by AICAR or the downregulated AMPK activity by Compound C significantly reduced or promoted the sensitivity of U2-os cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion The present study confirmed the AMPK signaling activation in the doxorubicin-treated osteosarcoma cells, in response to hypoxia, and the chemical upregulation or downregulation of AMPK signaling reduced or increased the chemo-sensitivity of osteosarcoma U2-os cells in vitro. Our study implies that AMPK inhibition might be a effective strategy to sensitize osteocarcoma cells to chemotherapy. PMID

  11. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Rubin, Brian P.; Druker, Brian J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for GIST patients, but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. While in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients development resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend towards increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multi-kinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of GIST patients with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  12. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. Although in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients develop resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an IHC analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend toward increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multikinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of patients with GIST with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  13. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. PMID:25059827

  14. Can Clays in Livestock Feed Promote Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Pathogenic Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Valverde, José Ramón; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry has long been associated with the appearance of antibiotic resistance and virulence factor determinants. Nonetheless, the number of cases of human infection involving resistant or virulent microorganisms that originate in farms is increasing. While many antibiotics have been banned as dietary supplements in some countries, other additives thought to be innocuous in terms of the development and spread of antibiotic resistance are used as growth promoters. In fact, several clay materials are routinely added to animal feed with the aim of improving growth and animal product quality. However, recent findings suggest that sepiolite, a clay additive, mediates the direct transfer of plasmids between different bacterial species. We therefore hypothesize that clays present in animal feed facilitate the horizontal transfer of resistance determinants in the digestive tract of farm animals.

  15. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs. PMID:27139482

  16. Bacterial recombination promotes the evolution of multi-drug-resistance in functionally diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Lee, Alexander E. G.; Wang, Yun; Huang, Wei E.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial recombination is believed to be a major factor explaining the prevalence of multi-drug-resistance (MDR) among pathogenic bacteria. Despite extensive evidence for exchange of resistance genes from retrospective sequence analyses, experimental evidence for the evolutionary benefits of bacterial recombination is scarce. We compared the evolution of MDR between populations of Acinetobacter baylyi in which we manipulated both the recombination rate and the initial diversity of strains with resistance to single drugs. In populations lacking recombination, the initial presence of multiple strains resistant to different antibiotics inhibits the evolution of MDR. However, in populations with recombination, the inhibitory effect of standing diversity is alleviated and MDR evolves rapidly. Moreover, only the presence of DNA harbouring resistance genes promotes the evolution of resistance, ruling out other proposed benefits for recombination. Together, these results provide direct evidence for the fitness benefits of bacterial recombination and show that this occurs by mitigation of functional interference between genotypes resistant to single antibiotics. Although analogous to previously described mechanisms of clonal interference among alternative beneficial mutations, our results actually highlight a different mechanism by which interactions among co-occurring strains determine the benefits of recombination for bacterial evolution. PMID:22048956

  17. TERT promoter mutations and long telomere length predict poor survival and radiotherapy resistance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yiping; Wang, Maode; Cui, Bo; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have implicated somatic gain-of-function mutations at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter as one of the major mechanisms that promote transcriptional activation of TERT and subsequently maintain telomere length in human cancers including glioma. To investigate the prognostic value of these mutations and telomere length, individually and their coexistence, in gliomas, we analyzed two somatic mutations C228T and C250T in the TERT promoter, relative telomere length (RTL), IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation in 389 glioma patients, and explored their associations with patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Our data showed that C228T and C250T mutations were found in 17.0% (66 of 389) and 11.8% (46 of 389) of gliomas, respectively, and these two mutations were mutually exclusive in this cancer. Moreover, they were significantly associated with WHO grade. We also found that the RTL was significant longer in gliomas than in meningiomas and normal brain tissues (Median, 0.89 vs. 0.44 and 0.50; P < 0.001), and demonstrated that the RTL was strongly correlated with tumor recurrence. Importantly, TERT promoter mutations or long RTL caused a significantly poorer survival than TERT wild-type or short RTL. Coexisting TERT promoter mutations and long RTL were more commonly associated with poor patient survival than they were individually. Notably, the patients with TERT promoter mutations particularly C228T or long RTL were resistant to radiotherapy. Collectively, TERT promoter mutations and long RTL are not only prognostic factors for poor clinical outcomes, but also the predictors of radiotherapy resistance in gliomas. PMID:26556853

  18. Sox2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Repressed Gene That Promotes Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Cai, Yi; Reyes, Edwin E.; Otto, Kristen B.; Tom, Westin; Paner, Gladell P.; Szmulewitz, Russell Z.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR), has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5) expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways. PMID:23326489

  19. Cadazolid Does Not Promote Intestinal Colonization of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Enderlin-Paput, Michel; Pfaff, Philippe; Weiss, Maria; Ritz, Daniel; Clozel, Martine; Locher, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    The promotion of colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is one potential side effect during treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), resulting from disturbances in gut microbiota. Cadazolid (CDZ) is an investigational antibiotic with potent in vitro activity against C. difficile and against VRE and is currently in clinical development for the treatment of CDAD. We report that CDZ treatment did not lead to intestinal VRE overgrowth in mice. PMID:26503650

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired pneumonia and molecular analysis of multidrug-resistant serotype 19F and 23F strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Watanabe, H; Yoshimine, H; Guio, H; Watanabe, K; Kawakami, K; Iwagaki, A; Nagai, H; Goto, H; Kuriyama, T; Fukuchi, Y; Matsushima, T; Kudoh, S; Shimada, K; Matsumoto, K; Nagatake, T; Mizota, T; Oishi, K

    2006-12-01

    A nationwide study was undertaken to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan. S. pneumoniae was isolated from 114 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia over 22 months at 20 hospitals and medical centres in different regions in Japan. All but five isolates were from sputum. Forty-eight isolates (42.1%) were susceptible, 40 (35.1%) showed intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.12-1.0 microg/ml) and 26 (22.8%) were resistant (MIC, >or=2.0 microg/ml) to penicillin G. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone (breakpoint 1 microg/ml), imipenem (4 microg/ml) and vancomycin (4 microg/ml). Most were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin; only two were resistant to levofloxacin. Differences were found in the distribution of serotypes among isolates showing susceptibility to penicillin (predominant types 3, 6B, and 19F), intermediate resistance (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and full resistance (19F and 23F). PFGE typing showed that 14 of the 25 strains of serotype 19F had a single DNA profile, pattern A, a pattern closely similar to that of the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 19F clone. Twelve pattern A strains were not susceptible to penicillin but carried the macrolide resistance gene mef(A). The DNA profiles of the 15 strains of 23F were also heterogeneous but six were highly similar (pattern b) yet distinct from the Spanish multidrug-resistant 23F clone although possibly related to the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 23F clone. The pattern b strains were not susceptible to penicillin and also harboured either mef(A) or erm(B). Our results indicate that multidrug-resistant pneumococci are spreading rapidly in Japan. Efforts to prevent the spread of the pandemic multidrug-resistant serotypes should be intensified. PMID:16650327

  1. Genomic structure, gene expression, and promoter analysis of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Hsin-Hsin; Chang, Ming-Shi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Huang, Jin-Ding

    2002-03-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily transporters associated with anticancer drug efflux are attributed to the multidrug-resistance of cancer cells. The genomic organization of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7) was identified. The human MRP7 gene, consisting of 22 exons and 21 introns, greatly differs from other members of the human MRP subfamily. A splicing variant of human MRP7, MRP7A, expressed in most human tissues, was also characterized. The 1.93-kb promoter region of MRP7 was isolated and shown to support luciferase activity at a level 4- to 5-fold greater than that of the SV40 promoter. Basal MRP7 gene expression was regulated by 2 regions in the 5-flanking region at 1,780 1,287 bp, and at 611 to 208 bp. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, MRP7 promoter activity was increased by 226 percent by genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene and 347 percent by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. The protein was expressed in the membrane fraction of transfected MDCK cells.

  2. Dietary Aloe vera supplementation on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT).

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Ndakalimwe Naftal; Qiang, Jun; He, Jie; Ma, Xin Yu; Kpundeh, Mathew D; Xu, Pao

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated effects of dietary Aloe vera on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT). Five groups were designed including a basal diet (control) and 100% A. vera powder incorporated in fish feed at 0.5% 1%, 2%, and 4%/kg feed, which were administered for 8 weeks. Fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera supplemented diet significantly improved (p < 0.05) weight gain, absolute growth rate and specific growth rate. Feed intake significantly increased in fish fed with A. vera diet at 1% and 2%/kg feed. Feed efficiency ratio, feed conversion ratio, and hepatosomatic index were significantly enhanced in 4% A. vera supplemented fish over unsupplemented ones (p < 0.05). Several haemato-biochemical indices were examined before and after fish were challenged with S. iniae pathogen containing 7.7 × 10(6) CFU cells mL(-1). A. vera supplemented fish showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in red blood cells, hematocrits (Hb), hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, serum total protein, glucose and cortisol after challenge when compared to unsupplemented ones. Meanwhile, 4% A. vera supplemented fish showed a decrease (p < 0.05) in RBC, Hb, Ht, WBC, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) after challenge compared to unsupplemented ones and other supplemented ones. In addition, lower mean corpuscular volume values (MCV) (p < 0.05) were observed in fish fed with A. vera diet at 2% and 4% A. vera/kg feed than those fed unsupplemented diet. Unchallenged fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera showed significantly higher values (p < 0.05) of mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) than those fed unsupplemented diet and 4% A. vera supplemented diet. There was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L) within experimental groups after challenge; N/L ratio in A. vera unsupplemented fish and those supplemented with A. vera

  3. Multiple Mobile Promoter Regions for the Rare Carbapenem Resistance Gene of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Podglajen, I.; Breuil, J.; Rohaut, A.; Monsempes, C.; Collatz, E.

    2001-01-01

    Two novel insertion sequences (IS), IS1187 and IS1188, are described upstream from the carbapenem resistance gene cfiA in strains of Bacteroides fragilis. Mapping, with the RACE procedure, of transcription start sites of cfiA in these and two other previously reported IS showed that transcription of this rarely encountered gene is initiated close to a variety of B. fragilis consensus promoter sequences, as recently defined (D. P. Bayley, E. R. Rocha, and C. J. Smith, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 193:149–154, 2000). In the cases of IS1186 and IS1188, these sequences overlap with putative Eς70 promoter sequences, while in IS942 and IS1187 such sequences can be observed either upstream or downstream of the B. fragilis promoters. PMID:11344163

  4. Overexpression of an ABC transporter and mutations of GyrA, GyrB, and ParC in contributing to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance in Streptococcus suis type 2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Shang, Kexin; Huang, Jinhu; Ran, Wei; Kashif, Jam; Wang, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of zoonotic diseases. Moreover, the emergence of fluoro-quinolones (FQs) resistance in this pathogen has severe consequences for pigs and human health. In this study, the molecular mechanism of FQs resistance in S. suis type 2 (SS2) sensitive strains isolated from pigs was assessed after in vitro induction of resistance against the most frequently used FQs: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin. Proteome analysis, sequencing and real-time RT-PCR results strongly established an overexpression of an ABC transporter protein (other than SatAB) and topoisomerase mutations in GyrA (Ser81Arg), GyrB (Glu354Lys), and ParC (Ser79Phe) in contributing to high level ciprofloxacin resistance in SS2. Due to the overexpression of the ABC transporter, intracellular ciprofloxacin concentrations were significantly lower in the resistant strains than those of sensitive strains after 20, 35, and 60 min exposures to ciprofloxacin (p < 0.05). It was concluded that improper use of FQs is one of the main causes of the emergence of this zoonotic pathogen as a multiresistant organism against commonly used antibiotics. The existence of an efflux-like protein is an incentive to find new drug targets to avoid the spread of FQs-resistant S. suis isolates in pigs and the human population. PMID:24815385

  5. AEG-1 Promotes Anoikis Resistance and Orientation Chemotaxis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Luo, Min; Tu, Wei; Xia, Yujia; He, Jiayi; Han, Ping; Fu, Yu; Tian, De'an

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis are two important and sequential events in tumor cell metastasis. The process of tumor metastasis is known to be regulated by AEG-1, an important oncogene that plays a critical role in tumor metastasis, though the effects of this oncogene on anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis in HCC cells are currently unknown. To directly assess the role of AEG-1 in these processes, we up-regulated AEG-1 expression via exogenous transfection in SMMC-7721 cells, which express low endogenous levels of AEG-1; and down-regulated AEG-1 expression via siRNA-mediated knockdown in MHCC-97H and HCC-LM3 cells, which express high endogenous levels of AEG-1. Our data directly demonstrate that AEG-1 promotes cell growth as assessed by cell proliferation/viability and cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, the prevention of anoikis by AEG-1 correlates with decreased activation of caspase-3. AEG-1-dependent anoikis resistance is activated via the PI3K/Akt pathway and is characterized by the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bad. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 reverses the AEG-1 dependent effects on Akt phosphorylation, Bcl-2 expression and anoikis resistance. AEG-1 also promotes orientation chemotaxis of suspension-cultured cells towards supernatant from Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMECs). Our results show that AEG-1 activates the expression of the metastasis-associated chemokine receptor CXCR4, and that its ligand, CXCL12, is secreted by HPMECs. Furthermore, the CXCR4 antoagonist AMD3100 decreases AEG-1-induced orientation chemotaxis. These results define a pathway by which AEG-1 regulates anoikis resistance and orientation chemotaxis during HCC cell metastasis. PMID:24941119

  6. Dopamine agonist resistance-related endocan promotes angiogenesis and cells viability of prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Leng, Zhi Gen; Guo, Yu Hang; Lin, Shao Jian; Wu, Ze Rui; Su, Zhi Peng; Lu, Jiang Long; Wei, Li Fei; Zhuge, Qi Chuan; Jin, Kunlin; Wu, Zhe Bao

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine agonists (DAs) are the first-line treatment of prolactinomas. They function through the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) in the tumor cells. Endocan, also called endothelial cell-specific molecule-1 (ESM1), has been described as a marker of neoangiogenesis. However, whether ESM1 promotes the resistance of prolactinomas to DA therapy is largely unknown. In our study, 25 patients with prolactinomas were divided into resistant- and sensitive- groups according to the clinical response to bromocriptine. We found that ESM1-microvessel density of resistant prolactinomas was significantly higher than that of sensitive prolactinomas (47.9 ± 11.6, n = 8, vs 13.1 ± 2.8, n = 17, p = 0.0006), indicating that ESM1 was a DA resistance-related gene. Immunostaining showed that ESM1 was expressed in tumor vessels and sporadic tumor cells, and ESM1 was overlapped with the Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA) and von Willebrand Factor (VWF) in the tumor vessels. Silencing of ESM1 markedly suppressed the viability of GH3 and MMQ cells in vitro, and furthermore, significantly increased the sensitivity of GH3 and MMQ cells to DA treatment. Additionally, silencing of ESM1 down-regulated the angiogenesis-associated genes, such as VEGFR2, FGF2, CD34, CD31, VWF, and EGFR. Knockdown of ESM1 decreased endothelial tube formation of HUVECs, and significantly increased the sensitivity of HUVECs to Avastin treatment. Therefore, we first demonstrate that DA resistance-related ESM1 promotes the angiogenesis and tumor cells growth of prolactinomas, suggesting that ESM1 may be a novel therapeutic target for prolactinomas. PMID:26662185

  7. Androgen deprivation-induced NCoA2 promotes metastatic and castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Lee, Hui-Ju; Wu, San-Pin; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lanz, Rainer B; Creighton, Chad J; DeMayo, Francesco J; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2014-11-01

    A major clinical hurdle for the management of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) in patients is the resistance of tumors to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and their subsequent development into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While recent studies have identified potential pathways involved in CRPC development, the drivers of CRPC remain largely undefined. Here we determined that nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NCoA2, also known as SRC-2), which is frequently amplified or overexpressed in patients with metastatic PCa, mediates development of CRPC. In a murine model, overexpression of NCoA2 in the prostate epithelium resulted in neoplasia and, in combination with Pten deletion, promoted the development of metastasis-prone cancer. Moreover, depletion of NCoA2 in PTEN-deficient mice prevented the development of CRPC. In human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, androgen signaling suppressed NCoA2 expression, and NCoA2 overexpression in murine prostate tumors resulted in hyperactivation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling, promoting tumor malignance. Analysis of PCa patient samples revealed a strong correlation among NCoA2-mediated signaling, disease progression, and PCa recurrence. Taken together, our findings indicate that androgen deprivation induces NCoA2, which in turn mediates activation of PI3K signaling and promotes PCa metastasis and CRPC development. Moreover, these results suggest that the inhibition of NCoA2 has potential for PCa therapy. PMID:25295534

  8. Epithelial IL-22RA1-Mediated Fucosylation Promotes Intestinal Colonization Resistance to an Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tu Anh N.; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Arasteh, Julia M.; Stares, Mark D.; Browne, Hilary P.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Page, Andrew J.; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda; Harcourt, Katherine; Hale, Christine; Arends, Mark J.; Gaffney, Daniel J.; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our intestinal microbiota harbors a diverse microbial community, often containing opportunistic bacteria with virulence potential. However, mutualistic host-microbial interactions prevent disease by opportunistic pathogens through poorly understood mechanisms. We show that the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor IL-22RA1 protects against lethal Citrobacter rodentium infection and chemical-induced colitis by promoting colonization resistance against an intestinal opportunistic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis. Susceptibility of Il22ra1−/− mice to C. rodentium was associated with preferential expansion and epithelial translocation of pathogenic E. faecalis during severe microbial dysbiosis and was ameloriated with antibiotics active against E. faecalis. RNA sequencing analyses of primary colonic organoids showed that IL-22RA1 signaling promotes intestinal fucosylation via induction of the fucosyltransferase Fut2. Additionally, administration of fucosylated oligosaccharides to C. rodentium-challenged Il22ra1−/− mice attenuated infection and promoted E. faecalis colonization resistance by restoring the diversity of anaerobic commensal symbionts. These results support a model whereby IL-22RA1 enhances host-microbiota mutualism to limit detrimental overcolonization by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:25263220

  9. Androgen deprivation–induced NCoA2 promotes metastatic and castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun; Lee, Hui-Ju; Wu, San-Pin; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lanz, Rainer B.; Creighton, Chad J.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2014-01-01

    A major clinical hurdle for the management of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) in patients is the resistance of tumors to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and their subsequent development into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While recent studies have identified potential pathways involved in CRPC development, the drivers of CRPC remain largely undefined. Here we determined that nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NCoA2, also known as SRC-2), which is frequently amplified or overexpressed in patients with metastatic PCa, mediates development of CRPC. In a murine model, overexpression of NCoA2 in the prostate epithelium resulted in neoplasia and, in combination with Pten deletion, promoted the development of metastasis-prone cancer. Moreover, depletion of NCoA2 in PTEN-deficient mice prevented the development of CRPC. In human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, androgen signaling suppressed NCoA2 expression, and NCoA2 overexpression in murine prostate tumors resulted in hyperactivation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling, promoting tumor malignance. Analysis of PCa patient samples revealed a strong correlation among NCoA2-mediated signaling, disease progression, and PCa recurrence. Taken together, our findings indicate that androgen deprivation induces NCoA2, which in turn mediates activation of PI3K signaling and promotes PCa metastasis and CRPC development. Moreover, these results suggest that the inhibition of NCoA2 has potential for PCa therapy. PMID:25295534

  10. Transfer of plasmids by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; Shoemaker, N.B.; Burdett, V.; Guild, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer of resistance plasmids occurred by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) similiarly to the process in other streptococcal groups. The 20-megadalton plasmid pIP501 mediated its own DNase-resistant transfer by filter mating and mobilized the 3.6-megadalton non-self-transmissible pMV158. Pneumococcal strains acted as donors or as recipients for intraspecies transfers and for interspecific transfers with Streptococcus faecalis. Transfer-deficient mutants of pIP501 have been found.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of Bim transcription by Spi-1/PU.1 promotes apoptosis resistance in leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ridinger-Saison, M; Evanno, E; Gallais, I; Rimmelé, P; Selimoglu-Buet, D; Sapharikas, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Guillouf, C

    2013-09-01

    Deregulation of transcriptional networks contributes to haematopoietic malignancies. The transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is a master regulator of haematopoiesis and its alteration leads to leukaemia. Spi-1 overexpression inhibits differentiation and promotes resistance to apoptosis in erythroleukaemia. Here, we show that Spi-1 inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis in vitro and in vivo through the transcriptional repression of Bim, a proapoptotic factor. BIM interacts with MCL-1 that behaves as a major player in the survival of the preleukaemic cells. The repression of BIM expression reduces the amount of BIM-MCL-1 complexes, thus increasing the fraction of potentially active antiapoptotic MCL-1. We then demonstrate that Spi-1 represses Bim transcription by binding to the Bim promoter and by promoting the trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3, a repressive histone mark) on the Bim promoter. The PRC2 repressive complex of Polycomb is directly responsible for the deposit of H3K27me3 mark at the Bim promoter. SUZ12 and the histone methyltransferase EZH2, two PRC2 subunits bind to the Bim promoter at the same location than H3K27me3, distinct of the Spi-1 DNA binding site. As Spi-1 interacts with SUZ12 and EZH2, these results indicate that Spi-1 modulates the activity of PRC2 without directly recruiting the complex to the site of its activity on the chromatin. Our results identify a new mechanism whereby Spi-1 represses transcription and provide mechanistic insights on the antiapoptotic function of a transcription factor mediated by the epigenetic control of gene expression. PMID:23852375

  12. Mutant p53 cooperates with ETS2 to promote etoposide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Do, Phi M.; Varanasi, Lakshman; Fan, Songqing; Li, Chunyang; Kubacka, Iwona; Newman, Virginia; Chauhan, Krishna; Daniels, Silvano Rakeem; Boccetta, Maurizio; Garrett, Michael R.; Li, Runzhao; Martinez, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutant p53 (mtp53) promotes chemotherapy resistance through multiple mechanisms, including disabling proapoptotic proteins and regulating gene expression. Comparison of genome wide analysis of mtp53 binding revealed that the ETS-binding site motif (EBS) is prevalent within predicted mtp53-binding sites. We demonstrate that mtp53 regulates gene expression through EBS in promoters and that ETS2 mediates the interaction with this motif. Importantly, we identified TDP2, a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by etoposide, as a transcriptional target of mtp53. We demonstrate that suppression of TDP2 sensitizes mtp53-expressing cells to etoposide and that mtp53 and TDP2 are frequently overexpressed in human lung cancer; thus, our analysis identifies a potentially “druggable” component of mtp53's gain-of-function activity. PMID:22508727

  13. Mutant p53 cooperates with ETS2 to promote etoposide resistance.

    PubMed

    Do, Phi M; Varanasi, Lakshman; Fan, Songqing; Li, Chunyang; Kubacka, Iwona; Newman, Virginia; Chauhan, Krishna; Daniels, Silvano Rakeem; Boccetta, Maurizio; Garrett, Michael R; Li, Runzhao; Martinez, Luis A

    2012-04-15

    Mutant p53 (mtp53) promotes chemotherapy resistance through multiple mechanisms, including disabling proapoptotic proteins and regulating gene expression. Comparison of genome wide analysis of mtp53 binding revealed that the ETS-binding site motif (EBS) is prevalent within predicted mtp53-binding sites. We demonstrate that mtp53 regulates gene expression through EBS in promoters and that ETS2 mediates the interaction with this motif. Importantly, we identified TDP2, a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by etoposide, as a transcriptional target of mtp53. We demonstrate that suppression of TDP2 sensitizes mtp53-expressing cells to etoposide and that mtp53 and TDP2 are frequently overexpressed in human lung cancer; thus, our analysis identifies a potentially "druggable" component of mtp53's gain-of-function activity. PMID:22508727

  14. Survey of Plant Drought-Resistance Promoting Bacteria from Populus euphratica Tree Living in Arid Area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Ouyang, Liming; Ju, Xiangyang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yanbin

    2014-12-01

    Two hundred and thirty-two bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Populus euphratica which is the dominant tree living in extreme arid regions in northwest China. Some strains with plant growth-promoting bacteria related metabolic characteristics were able to promote drought resistance in plants after inoculation. Ten strains with the greatest effects increased the dry weight of wheat shoots from 0.5 to 34.4 %, and the surface area of the root systems from 12.56 to 212.17 % compared to the control after drought treatment whereas no obvious promoting effect was observed in normal water conditions. These 10 strains were identified to be of the genera Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Stenotrophomonas and Serratia by 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequence alignment. Among these strains, Serratia sp. 1-9 and Pseudomonas sp. 5-23 were the two most effective strains. Both of them produced auxin and the production increased significantly when cultured under simulated drought conditions which are inferred to be the most plausible mechanism for their plant growth-promoting effect under drought stress. PMID:25320440

  15. The Hippo effector YAP promotes resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Luping; Sabnis, Amit J; Chan, Elton; Olivas, Victor; Cade, Lindsay; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Asthana, Saurabh; Neel, Dana; Yan, Jenny Jiacheng; Lu, Xinyuan; Pham, Luu; Wang, Mingxue M; Karachaliou, Niki; Cao, Maria Gonzalez; Manzano, Jose Luis; Ramirez, Jose Luis; Torres, Jose Miguel Sanchez; Buttitta, Fiamma; Rudin, Charles M; Collisson, Eric A; Algazi, Alain; Robinson, Eric; Osman, Iman; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Cortes, Javier; Frederick, Dennie T; Cooper, Zachary A; McMahon, Martin; Marchetti, Antonio; Rosell, Rafael; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A; Bivona, Trever G

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted therapy is a major clinical challenge1–4. RAF and MEK inhibitors are initially but only transiently effective in some but not all patients with BRAF gene mutation and are largely ineffective in those with RAS gene mutation because of resistance5–14. Through a genetic screen in BRAF-mutant tumor cells, we show that the Hippo pathway effector YAP (encoded by YAP1) acts as a parallel survival input to promote resistance to RAF and MEK inhibitor therapy. Combined YAP and RAF or MEK inhibition was synthetically lethal not only in several BRAF-mutant tumor types but also in RAS-mutant tumors. Increased YAP in tumors harboring BRAF V600E was a biomarker of worse initial response to RAF and MEK inhibition in patients, establishing the clinical relevance of our findings. Our data identify YAP as a new mechanism of resistance to RAF- and MEK-targeted therapy. The findings unveil the synthetic lethality of combined suppression of YAP and RAF or MEK as a promising strategy to enhance treatment response and patient survival. PMID:25665005

  16. Phosphorylation-mediated EZH2 inactivation promotes drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Jiro; Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Taeko; Izumi, Tohru; Hofgaard, Peter O.; Bogen, Bjarne; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin modifications, such as histone methylation, have been suggested as mediating chemotherapy resistance in several cancer types; therefore, elucidation of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. In the present study, we identified histone H3–lysine 27 (H3K27) as a critical residue for epigenetic modification in multiple myeloma. We determined that abrogation of drug-induced H3K27 hypermethylation is associated with cell adhesion–mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), which is the most important form of drug resistance, using a coculture system to evaluate stroma cell adhesion–dependent alterations in multiple myeloma cells. Cell adhesion counteracted anticancer drug–induced hypermethylation of H3K27 via inactivating phosphorylation of the transcription regulator EZH2 at serine 21, leading to the sustained expression of antiapoptotic genes, including IGF1, B cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), and hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A). Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the IGF-1R/PI3K/AKT pathway reversed CAM-DR by promoting EZH2 dephosphorylation and H3K27 hypermethylation both in vitro and in refractory murine myeloma models. Together, our findings identify and characterize an epigenetic mechanism that underlies CAM-DR and suggest that kinase inhibitors to counteract EZH2 phosphorylation should be included in combination chemotherapy to increase therapeutic index. PMID:26517694

  17. Supplementing dietary sugar promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent insulin resistance and fatty liver in goose.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Zhao, Xing; Xia, Lili; Liu, Long; Li, Fuyuan; Yang, Biao; Wang, Qianqian; Montgomery, Sean; Cui, Hengmi; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-08-01

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) contributes to insulin resistance (IR) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in mammals. However, we recently demonstrated that overfeeding with a traditional diet (mainly consisting of cooked maize) does not induce ERS in goose. As cellular studies show that high glucose and palmitate can trigger ERS in mammalian cells, we hypothesized that supplementing sugar to the traditional diet could induce ERS, thus promoting insulin resistance and fatty liver. To test the hypothesis, we first treated goose primary hepatocytes with high glucose (25 mM and 50 mM) and palmitate (0.5 mM) supplemented with or without 0.25 mM oleate. Data indicated that, as in mammalian cells, high glucose and palmitate indeed induced ERS in goose primary hepatocytes, and palmitate-induced ERS was suppressed by supplemental 0.25 mM oleate. We then tested the hypothesis with an in vivo study, in which Landes geese overfed with traditional or novel diets (i.e., the traditional diet supplemented with sugar) were compared with control geese (normally fed with cooked maize) for ERS, IR and fatty liver. The differences in glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and postprandial blood glucose between the geese overfed with traditional and novel diets suggested that supplementing dietary sugar promoted IR. This promotion was accompanied with an increasing trend of liver weight and abdominal fat weight relative to body weight. Surprisingly, compared to overfeeding with the traditional diet, overfeeding with the novel diet did not induce ERS, even further suppressed ERS in goose fatty liver. Together, our findings suggest that supplementing dietary sugar promotes ERS-independent IR and fatty liver in goose. It is intriguing to discover the factor(s) protecting goose liver from ERS as well as the non-ERS mechanism underlying IR. PMID:27246737

  18. Complement Evasion by Borrelia burgdorferi: Serum-Resistant Strains Promote C3b Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Alitalo, Antti; Meri, Taru; Rämö, Lasse; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; Heikkilä, Tero; Seppälä, Ilkka J. T.; Oksi, Jarmo; Viljanen, Matti; Meri, Seppo

    2001-01-01

    The most characteristic features of the Lyme disease pathogens, the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) group, are their ability to invade tissues and to circumvent the immune defenses of the host for extended periods of time, despite elevated levels of borrelia-specific antibodies in serum and other body fluids. Our aim in the present study was to determine whether B. burgdorferi is able to interfere with complement (C) at the level of C3 by accelerating C3b inactivation and thus to inhibit the amplification of the C cascade. Strains belonging to different genospecies (Borrelia garinii, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, and Borrelia afzelii) were compared for their sensitivities to normal human serum and abilities to promote factor I-mediated C3b degradation. B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and B. afzelii strains were found to be serum resistant. When the spirochetes were incubated with radiolabeled C3b, factor I-mediated degradation of C3b was observed in the presence of C-resistant B. afzelii (n = 3) and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (n = 1) strains but not in the presence of C-sensitive B. garinii (n = 7) strains or control bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis). Immunoblotting and radioligand binding analyses showed that the C-resistant strains had the capacity to acquire the C inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) from growth medium and human serum. A novel surface protein with an apparent molecular mass of 35 kDa was found to preferentially bind to the N terminus region of factor H. Thus, the serum-resistant B. burgdorferi s.l. strains can circumvent C attack by binding the C inhibitors factor H and FHL-1 to their surfaces and promoting factor I-mediated C3b degradation. PMID:11349031

  19. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabretta, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Passacantilli, Ilaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fendrich, Volker; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favour the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, up-regulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to up-regulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM alternative splicing in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  20. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Calabretta, S; Bielli, P; Passacantilli, I; Pilozzi, E; Fendrich, V; Capurso, G; Fave, G Delle; Sette, C

    2016-04-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first-line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing (AS) of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence-free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favor the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, upregulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to upregulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM AS in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  1. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  2. Mutan: A mixed linkage α-[(1,3)- and (1,6)]-d-glucan from Streptococcus mutans, that induces osteoclast differentiation and promotes alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung Min; Han, Kook-Il; Jung, Eui-Gil; Kim, Yong Hyun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Yoon, Mi Sook; Chung, Sung Kyun; Kim, Wan Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2016-02-10

    Mutan is an extracellular polysaccharide of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that consists of α-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in main chains and α-(1,6) bonds in side chains. In the present study, mutan was isolated from S. mutans, and its structural characteristics were determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effects of mutan on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. Furthermore, microCT and morphometric analyses were used to determine the contribution of mutan to alveolar bone loss in the maxilla of a rat periodontitis model. Mutan increased (more than 2-fold) RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Mutan also enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the rat maxilla 2.3-fold. In mutan-treated rats, the bone mineral density, bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness decreased, whereas trabecular separation significantly increased. In addition, mutan and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced similar microarray profiles in RAW 264.7 cells. A total of 43 genes related to osteoclastogenesis were differentially expressed after either mutan or LPS treatment. Five-fold increases in the expression of several genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6, and chemokine ligands, were observed in mutan-treated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inflammation induced by S. mutans during the establishment of periodontal disease. PMID:26686164

  3. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  4. Fibulin-3 promotes glioma growth and resistance through a novel paracrine regulation of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Nandhu, Mohan S; Sim, Hosung; Agudelo-Garcia, Paula A; Saldivar, Joshua C; Dolan, Claire E; Mora, Maria E; Nuovo, Gerard J; Cole, Susan E; Viapiano, Mariano S

    2012-08-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive and chemoresistant brain tumors with extremely poor prognosis. Targeting of the soluble factors that trigger invasion and resistance, therefore, could have a significant impact against the infiltrative glioma cells that are a major source of recurrence. Fibulin-3 is a matrix protein that is absent in normal brain but upregulated in gliomas and promotes tumor invasion by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that fibulin-3 is a novel soluble activator of Notch signaling that antagonizes DLL3, an autocrine inhibitor or Notch, and promotes tumor cell survival and invasion in a Notch-dependent manner. Using a strategy for inducible knockdown, we found that controlled downregulation of fibulin-3 reduced Notch signaling and led to increased apoptosis, reduced self-renewal of glioblastoma-initiating cells, and impaired growth and dispersion of intracranial tumors. In addition, fibulin-3 expression correlated with expression levels of Notch-dependent genes and was a marker of Notch activation in patient-derived glioma samples. These findings underscore a major role for the tumor extracellular matrix in regulating glioma invasion and resistance to apoptosis via activation of the key Notch pathway. More importantly, this work describes a noncanonical, soluble activator of Notch in a cancer model and shows how Notch signaling can be reduced by targeting tumor-specific accessible molecules in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22665268

  5. Are drought-resistance promoting bacteria cross-compatible with different plant models?

    PubMed

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Vigani, Gianpiero; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia; Ouzari, Hadda; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-10-01

    The association between plant and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) contributes to the successful thriving of plants in extreme environments featured by water shortage. We have recently shown that, with respect to the non-cultivated desert soil, the rhizosphere of pepper plants cultivated under desert farming hosts PGPB communities that are endowed with a large portfolio of PGP traits. Pepper plants exposed to bacterial isolates from plants cultivated under desert farming exhibited a higher tolerance to water shortage, compared with untreated control. This promotion was mediated by a larger root system (up to 40%), stimulated by the bacteria, that enhanced plant ability to uptake water from dry soil. We provide initial evidence that the nature of the interaction can have a limited level of specificity and that PGPB isolates may determine resistance to water stress in plants others than the one of the original isolation. It is apparent that, in relation to plant resistance to water stress, a feature of primary evolutionary importance for all plants, a cross-compatibility between PGPB and different plant models exists at least on a short-term. PMID:24270625

  6. Are drought-resistance promoting bacteria cross-compatible with different plant models?

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Vigani, Gianpiero; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia; Ouzari, Hadda; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The association between plant and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) contributes to the successful thriving of plants in extreme environments featured by water shortage. We have recently shown that, with respect to the non-cultivated desert soil, the rhizosphere of pepper plants cultivated under desert farming hosts PGPB communities that are endowed with a large portfolio of PGP traits. Pepper plants exposed to bacterial isolates from plants cultivated under desert farming exhibited a higher tolerance to water shortage, compared with untreated control. This promotion was mediated by a larger root system (up to 40%), stimulated by the bacteria, that enhanced plant ability to uptake water from dry soil. We provide initial evidence that the nature of the interaction can have a limited level of specificity and that PGPB isolates may determine resistance to water stress in plants others than the one of the original isolation. It is apparent that, in relation to plant resistance to water stress, a feature of primary evolutionary importance for all plants, a cross-compatibility between PGPB and different plant models exists at least on a short-term. PMID:24270625

  7. Glucose-dependent acetylation of Rictor promotes targeted cancer therapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Kenta; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Ikegami, Shiro; Villa, Genaro R.; Yang, Huijun; Yong, William H.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Yamagata, Kanato; Arai, Nobutaka; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt their signaling in response to nutrient availability. To uncover the mechanisms regulating this process and its functional consequences, we interrogated cell lines, mouse tumor models, and clinical samples of glioblastoma (GBM), the highly lethal brain cancer. We discovered that glucose or acetate is required for epidermal growth factor receptor vIII (EGFRvIII), the most common growth factor receptor mutation in GBM, to activate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) and promote tumor growth. Glucose or acetate promoted growth factor receptor signaling through acetyl-CoA–dependent acetylation of Rictor, a core component of the mTORC2 signaling complex. Remarkably, in the presence of elevated glucose levels, Rictor acetylation is maintained to form an autoactivation loop of mTORC2 even when the upstream components of the growth factor receptor signaling pathway are no longer active, thus rendering GBMs resistant to EGFR-, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-, or AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog)-targeted therapies. These results demonstrate that elevated nutrient levels can drive resistance to targeted cancer treatments and nominate mTORC2 as a central node for integrating growth factor signaling with nutrient availability in GBM. PMID:26170313

  8. Nucleotide sequence of conjugative prophage Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) carrying the mef(A)/msr(D) genes for efflux resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Iannelli, Francesco; Santagati, Maria; Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R.; Stefani, Stefania; Pozzi, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Genetic element Φ1207.3 (formerly Tn1207.3) is a prophage of Streptococcus pyogenes which carries the macrolide efflux resistance genes mef(A)/msr(D) and is capable of conjugal transfer among streptococci. Complete nucleotide sequence showed that Φ1207.3 is 52,491 bp in length and contained 58 open reading frames (ORFs). A manual homology-based annotation with functional prediction of the hypothetical gene product was possible only for 34 out of 58 ORFs. Φ1207.3 codes for two different C-methylation systems, several phage structural genes, a lysis cassette (composed by a holin and a peptidoglycan hydrolase), and three site-specific resolvases of the serine recombinase family. PMID:25538698

  9. URI promotes gastric cancer cell motility, survival, and resistance to adriamycin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Fei; Luo, Dongwei; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Xu, Zhonghai; Bian, Huiqin; Liang, Yuting; Lu, Yaojuan; Zheng, Qiping; Gu, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI), a RNA polymerase II Subunit 5-Interacting protein, is known to participate in the regulation of nutrient-sensitive mTOR-dependent transcription programs. Multiple studies have recently demonstrated that URI functions as an oncoprotein, possibly through the mTOR pathway, and regulates tumor cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, whether and how URI plays a role in gastric oncogenesis has not been elucidated. Due to drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis, the prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. This study aims to explore the effects of URI on gastric cancer cells by focusing on their migratory ability and resistance to adriamycin. URI was over-expressed or knocked-down in MGC-803 and HGC-27 gastric cancer cells using URI plasmid or siRNA transfection approach. The cell viability, apoptosis, and migration ability were then examined by the CCK-8 assay, flow cytometer Annexin V/PI staining, and the Transwell cell migration assay respectively. The protein levels of apoptosis and EMT related genes were detected by western blot. The results showed that overexpression of URI promoted while knock-down of URI inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation. URI overexpression resulted in increased Bcl-2 expression but decreased levels of Bax, cleaved PARP-1 and cleaved caspase-3. Conversely, cells treated with URI siRNA showed increased adriamycin induced apoptosis, along with reduced Bcl-2, but increased Bax, cleaved PARP-1 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. We have also shown that overexpression of URI enhanced cancer cell proliferation and migration with higher levels of Snail and Vimentin, whereas knockdown of URI in MGC-803 and HGC-27 cells inhibited proliferation and migration with decreased Snail and Vimentin expression. Together, our results support that URI promotes cell survival and mobility and acts as a chemotherapeutics resistant protein in MGC-803 and HGC-27 cells. URI might be a potential biomarker

  10. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Canet, Mark J.; Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Lin; Xiong, Yi; Yin, Lei; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic inflammation is believed to promote insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes progression in obesity. TRAF3, a cytoplasmic signaling protein, has been known to mediate/modulate cytokine signaling in immune cells. The goal is to define the metabolic function of hepatic TRAF3 in the setting of obesity. Methods Hepatocyte-specific TRAF3 knockout mice were generated using the loxp/albumin-cre system. Liver TRAF3 was deleted in adult obese mice via Cre adenoviral infection. Both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity were examined. TRAF3 levels and insulin signaling were measured by immunoblotting. Insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and glucose metabolism were examined by glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests. Hepatic steatosis was examined by Oil red O staining of liver sections and measuring liver triacylglycerol levels. Results Liver TRAF3 levels were lower in the fasted states in normal mice, and were aberrantly higher in obese mice and in mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Glucose directly increased TRAF3 levels in primary hepatocytes. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of TRAF3 decreased hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis in mice with either high fat diet-induced obesity or genetic obesity (ob/ob); conversely, in lean mice, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of TRAF3 in the liver induced hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Deletion of TRAF3 enhanced the ability of insulin to stimulate phosphorylation of Akt in hepatocytes, whereas overexpression of TRAF3 suppressed insulin signaling. Conclusions Glucose increases the levels of hepatic TRAF3. TRAF3 in turn promotes hyperglycemia through increasing hepatic glucose production, thus forming a glucose-TRAF3 reinforcement loop in the liver. This positive feedback loop may drive the progression of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity. PMID:26909311

  11. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca2+-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  12. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca(2+)-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  13. IRF3 promotes adipose inflammation and insulin resistance and represses browning.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Manju; Wang, Xun; Lantier, Louise; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Eguchi, Jun; Kang, Sona; Tenen, Danielle; Roh, Hyun Cheol; Kong, Xingxing; Kazak, Lawrence; Ahmad, Rasheed; Rosen, Evan D

    2016-08-01

    The chronic inflammatory state that accompanies obesity is a major contributor to insulin resistance and other dysfunctional adaptations in adipose tissue. Cellular and secreted factors promote the inflammatory milieu of obesity, but the transcriptional pathways that drive these processes are not well described. Although the canonical inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB is considered to be the major driver of adipocyte inflammation, members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family may also play a role in this process. Here, we determined that IRF3 expression is upregulated in the adipocytes of obese mice and humans. Signaling through TLR3 and TLR4, which lie upstream of IRF3, induced insulin resistance in murine adipocytes, while IRF3 knockdown prevented insulin resistance. Furthermore, improved insulin sensitivity in IRF3-deficient mice was associated with reductions in intra-adipose and systemic inflammation in the high fat-fed state, enhanced browning of subcutaneous fat, and increased adipose expression of GLUT4. Taken together, the data indicate that IRF3 is a major transcriptional regulator of adipose inflammation and is involved in maintaining systemic glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:27400129

  14. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  15. HOXA4 Gene Promoter Hypermethylation as an Epigenetic Mechanism Mediating Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Marjanu Hikmah; Baba, Abdul Aziz; Husin, Azlan; Sulong, Sarina; Hassan, Rosline; Sim, Goh Ai; Abdul Wahid, S. Fadilah; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2013-01-01

    Development of resistance to imatinib mesylate (IM) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients has emerged as a significant clinical problem. The observation that increased epigenetic silencing of potential tumor suppressor genes correlates with disease progression in some CML patients treated with IM suggests a relationship between epigenetic silencing and resistance development. We hypothesize that promoter hypermethylation of HOXA4 could be an epigenetic mechanism mediating IM resistance in CML patients. Thus a study was undertaken to investigate the promoter hypermethylation status of HOXA4 in CML patients on IM treatment and to determine its role in mediating resistance to IM. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of 95 CML patients (38 good responders and 57 resistant) and 12 normal controls. All samples were bisulfite treated and analysed by methylation-specific high-resolution melt analysis. Compared to the good responders, the HOXA4 hypermethylation level was significantly higher (P = 0.002) in IM-resistant CML patients. On comparing the risk, HOXA4 hypermethylation was associated with a higher risk for IM resistance (OR 4.658; 95% CI, 1.673–12.971; P = 0.003). Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that promoter hypermethylation of HOXA4 gene could be an epigenetic mechanism mediating IM resistance in CML patients. PMID:23484077

  16. The commensal Streptococcus salivarius K12 downregulates the innate immune responses of human epithelial cells and promotes host-microbe homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cosseau, Celine; Devine, Deirdre A; Dullaghan, Edie; Gardy, Jennifer L; Chikatamarla, Avinash; Gellatly, Shaan; Yu, Lorraine L; Pistolic, Jelena; Falsafi, Reza; Tagg, John; Hancock, Robert E W

    2008-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an early colonizer of human oral and nasopharyngeal epithelia, and strain K12 has reported probiotic effects. An emerging paradigm indicates that commensal bacteria downregulate immune responses through the action on NF-kappaB signaling pathways, but additional mechanisms underlying probiotic actions are not well understood. Our objective here was to identify host genes specifically targeted by K12 by comparing their responses with responses elicited by pathogens and to determine if S. salivarius modulates epithelial cell immune responses. RNA was extracted from human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14O- cells) cocultured with K12 or bacterial pathogens. cDNA was hybridized to a human 21K oligonucleotide-based array. Data were analyzed using ArrayPipe, InnateDB, PANTHER, and oPOSSUM. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-regulated oncogene alpha (Groalpha) secretion were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was demonstrated that S. salivarius K12 specifically altered the expression of 565 host genes, particularly those involved in multiple innate defense pathways, general epithelial cell function and homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, cell development and migration, and signaling pathways. It inhibited baseline IL-8 secretion and IL-8 responses to LL-37, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and flagellin in epithelial cells and attenuated Groalpha secretion in response to flagellin. Immunosuppression was coincident with the inhibition of activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Thus, the commensal and probiotic behaviors of S. salivarius K12 are proposed to be due to the organism (i) eliciting no proinflammatory response, (ii) stimulating an anti-inflammatory response, and (iii) modulating genes associated with adhesion to the epithelial layer and homeostasis. S. salivarius K12 might thereby ensure that it is tolerated by the host and maintained on the epithelial surface while actively protecting the host from inflammation and apoptosis

  17. The Commensal Streptococcus salivarius K12 Downregulates the Innate Immune Responses of Human Epithelial Cells and Promotes Host-Microbe Homeostasis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cosseau, Celine; Devine, Deirdre A.; Dullaghan, Edie; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Chikatamarla, Avinash; Gellatly, Shaan; Yu, Lorraine L.; Pistolic, Jelena; Falsafi, Reza; Tagg, John; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an early colonizer of human oral and nasopharyngeal epithelia, and strain K12 has reported probiotic effects. An emerging paradigm indicates that commensal bacteria downregulate immune responses through the action on NF-κB signaling pathways, but additional mechanisms underlying probiotic actions are not well understood. Our objective here was to identify host genes specifically targeted by K12 by comparing their responses with responses elicited by pathogens and to determine if S. salivarius modulates epithelial cell immune responses. RNA was extracted from human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14O- cells) cocultured with K12 or bacterial pathogens. cDNA was hybridized to a human 21K oligonucleotide-based array. Data were analyzed using ArrayPipe, InnateDB, PANTHER, and oPOSSUM. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-regulated oncogene alpha (Groα) secretion were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was demonstrated that S. salivarius K12 specifically altered the expression of 565 host genes, particularly those involved in multiple innate defense pathways, general epithelial cell function and homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, cell development and migration, and signaling pathways. It inhibited baseline IL-8 secretion and IL-8 responses to LL-37, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and flagellin in epithelial cells and attenuated Groα secretion in response to flagellin. Immunosuppression was coincident with the inhibition of activation of the NF-κB pathway. Thus, the commensal and probiotic behaviors of S. salivarius K12 are proposed to be due to the organism (i) eliciting no proinflammatory response, (ii) stimulating an anti-inflammatory response, and (iii) modulating genes associated with adhesion to the epithelial layer and homeostasis. S. salivarius K12 might thereby ensure that it is tolerated by the host and maintained on the epithelial surface while actively protecting the host from inflammation and apoptosis induced by

  18. Inhibition of autophagy induced by PTEN loss promotes intrinsic breast cancer resistance to trastuzumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liao; Guo-Chun, Zhang; Sheng-Li, An; Xue-Rui, Li; Kun, Wang; Jian, Zu; Chong-Yang, Ren; Ling-Zhu, Wen; Hai-Tong, Lv

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of the phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN) expression level on autophagic status and on the resistance of breast cancer to trastuzumab treatment. PTEN and LC3I/II were knocked down with shRNA expression vectors, which were transfected into estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines. After trastuzumab treatment, the changes in the autophagy signal transduction pathways and autophagic proteins (LC3I/II, p62, LAMP, and cathepsin B) in these stably transfected cells were detected using western blot. The cells were also orthotopically implanted into nude mice to explore the influence of PTEN knockdown on tumor size, cell viability, and autophagic proteins after trastuzumab treatment. Similar determinations were performed using the LC3I/II overexpressed shPTEN breast cancer cells (LC3I/II-shPTEN). Downregulation of PTEN and autophagic proteins LC3-I and LC3-II was observed in resistant human breast cancer samples. Knockdown of PTEN and PTEN+ LC3I/II with shRNA in breast cancer cells resulted in increased resistance to trastuzumab. Consistently, trastuzumab treatment could not effectively reduce tumor size. Significant decreases in the levels of autophagic proteins LC3I/II, LAMP, p62, cathepsin B, and PI3K-Akt-mTOR and the signaling pathway protein Akt were found in PTEN knockdown cells, compared to the PTEN normal group, after trastuzumab administration, both in vitro and in vivo. However, these findings were reversed with the LC3I/II-shPTEN treatment. Therefore, the loss of PTEN may promote the development of primary resistance to trastuzumab in breast cancer via autophagy defects. PMID:26563373

  19. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Promotes Autophagy to Facilitate Cisplatin Resistance in Melanoma Cells through the Activation of PARP1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rui; Liu, Lin; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Weigang; Yang, Yuqi; Wang, Huina; Shi, Qiong; Guo, Sen; Yi, Xiuli; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Luan, Qi; Li, Chunying

    2016-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA), a key protein in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, has been shown to promote the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by facilitating the DNA repair process. However, the role of XPA in the resistance of melanoma to platinum-based drugs like cisplatin is largely unknown. In this study, we initially found that XPA was expressed at higher levels in cisplatin-resistant melanoma cells than in cisplatin-sensitive ones. Furthermore, the knockdown of XPA not only increased cellular apoptosis but also inhibited cisplatin-induced autophagy, which rendered the melanoma cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, we discovered that the increased XPA in resistant melanoma cells promoted poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) activation and that the inhibition of PARP1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Finally, we proved that the inhibition of PARP1 and the autophagy process made resistant melanoma cells more susceptible to cisplatin treatment. Our study shows that XPA can promote cell-protective autophagy in a DNA repair-independent manner by enhancing the activation of PARP1 in melanoma cells resistant to cisplatin and that the XPA-PARP1-mediated autophagy process can be targeted to overcome cisplatin resistance in melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:26880244

  20. SerpinE2 promotes multiple cell proliferation and drug resistance in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mao, Minzhi; Wang, Wanchun

    2016-07-01

    SerpinE2 is a member of the Serpins family, which could inhibit serine protease and promote tumor progression, particularly in tumor metastasis. However, at present, its role in the progression of osteosarcoma has not been determined. The present study analyzed the expression profiles of SerpinE2 in cancer tissues, including tissues from osteosarcoma of different stages. Higher expression of SerpinE2 was shown in osteosarcoma tissues, particularly in tissue from patients with metastasis and a tumor-node-metastasis stage II‑III. Following chemotherapy, the SerpinE2 expression levels were shown to be higher than those at diagnosis. Cell proliferation and colony formation were increased after transfection with SerpinE2 over‑expression vector. Additionally, drug resistance to bortezomib and doxorubicin treatment following SerpinE2 transfection was analyzed. MG‑63 and SAOS‑2 cells showed less sensitivity following transfection with SerpinE2. The cell cycle‑related genes, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4 and cyclin D1 were positively correlated with SerpinE2 expression in patient‑derived tissue and in osteosarcoma cells. Finally, the high expression of SerpinE2 contributes to poor survival rates in patients with osteosarcoma. In conclusion, high expression of SerpinE2 in osteosarcoma stimulates cell proliferation, promotes drug‑resistance, and results in poor survival by regulating CDK4 and cyclin D1. Thus, SerpinE2 could be a potential target for treatment of patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:27221371

  1. Upregulation of TrkB Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Anoikis Resistance in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Qiu, Haifeng; Yang, Tingting; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wan, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms governing the metastasis of endometrial carcinoma (EC) are poorly defined. Recent data support a role for the cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB in the progression of several human tumors. Here we present evidence for a direct role of TrkB in human EC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TrkB and its secreted ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are more highly expressed in EC than in normal endometrium. High TrkB levels correlated with lymph node metastasis (p<0.05) and lymphovascular space involvement (p<0.05) in EC. Depletion of TrkB by stable shRNA-mediated knockdown decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of cancer cell lines in vitro and resulted in anoikis in suspended cells. Conversely, exogenous expression of TrkB increased cell migration and invasion and promoted anoikis resistance in suspension culture. Furthermore, over-expression of TrkB or stimulation by BDNF resulted in altered the expression of molecular mediators of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of the downstream regulator, Twist, blocked TrkB-induced EMT-like transformation. The use of in vivo models revealed decreased peritoneal dissemination in TrkB-depleted EC cells. Additionally, TrkB-depleted EC cells underwent mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and anoikis in vivo. Our data support a novel function for TrkB in promoting EMT and resistance to anoikis. Thus, TrkB may constitute a potential therapeutic target in human EC. PMID:23936232

  2. Chromosomal instability, tolerance of mitotic errors and multidrug resistance are promoted by tetraploidization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anastasia Y; Seget, Katarzyna; Moeller, Giuliana K; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; de Roos, Jeroen A D M; Dürrbaum, Milena; Kuffer, Christian; Müller, Stefan; Zaman, Guido J R; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Up to 80% of human cancers, in particular solid tumors, contain cells with abnormal chromosomal numbers, or aneuploidy, which is often linked with marked chromosomal instability. Whereas in some tumors the aneuploidy occurs by missegregation of one or a few chromosomes, aneuploidy can also arise during proliferation of inherently unstable tetraploid cells generated by whole genome doubling from diploid cells. Recent findings from cancer genome sequencing projects suggest that nearly 40% of tumors underwent whole genome doubling at some point of tumorigenesis, yet its contribution to cancer phenotypes and benefits for malignant growth remain unclear. Here, we investigated the consequences of a whole genome doubling in both cancerous and non-transformed p53 positive human cells. SNP array analysis and multicolor karyotyping revealed that induced whole-genome doubling led to variable aneuploidy. We found that chromosomal instability (CIN) is a frequent, but not a default outcome of whole genome doubling. The CIN phenotypes were accompanied by increased tolerance to mitotic errors that was mediated by suppression of the p53 signaling. Additionally, the expression of pro-apoptotic factors, such as iASPP and cIAP2, was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that whole genome doubling promotes resistance to a broad spectrum of chemotherapeutic drugs and stimulates anchorage-independent growth even in non-transformed p53-positive human cells. Taken together, whole genome doubling provides multifaceted benefits for malignant growth. Our findings provide new insight why genome-doubling promotes tumorigenesis and correlates with poor survival in cancer. PMID:26151317

  3. HDAC6 promotes cell proliferation and confers resistance to temozolomide in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Lian, Haiwei; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Yingying; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong; Xie, Conghua

    2016-08-28

    Histone deacetylases are considered to be among the most promising targets in drug development for cancer therapy. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a unique cytoplasmic enzyme that regulates many biological processes involved in tumorigenesis through its deacetylase and ubiquitin-binding activities. Here, we report that HDAC6 is overexpressed in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of HDAC6 promotes the proliferation and spheroid formation of glioblastoma cells. HDAC6 overexpression confers resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) mediated cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction. Conversely, knockdown of HDAC6 inhibits cell proliferation, impairs spheroid formation and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to TMZ. The inhibition of HDAC6 deacetylase activity by selective inhibitors inhibits the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induces apoptosis. HDAC6 selective inhibitors can sensitize glioblastoma cells to TMZ. Moreover, we showed that HDAC6 mediated EGFR stabilization might partly account for its oncogenic role in glioblastoma. TMZ resistant glioblastoma cells showed higher expression of HDAC6 and more activation of EGFR. HDAC6 inhibitors decrease EGFR protein levels and impair the activation of the EGFR pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of HDAC6 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:27267806

  4. Matrix Hyaluronan Promotes Specific MicroRNA Upregulation Leading to Drug Resistance and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor invasion, metastasis and therapeutic drug resistance are the common causes for serious morbidity and cancer recurrence in patients. A number of research studies have searched for malignancy-related biomarkers and drug targets that are closely linked to tumor cell properties. One of the candidates is matrix hyaluronan (HA), which is known as one of the major extracellular matrix (ECM) components. HA serves as a physiological ligand for surface CD44 molecule and also functions as a bio-regulator. The binding of HA to CD44 has been shown to stimulate concomitant activation of a number of oncogenic pathways and abnormal cellular processes in cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small RNAs containing ~20–25 nucleotides and are known to promote aberrant cellular functions in cancer cells. In this article, I have focused on the role of HA interaction with CD44 and several important signaling molecules in the regulation of unique miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-302 and miR-10b) and their downstream targets leading to multiple tumor cell-specific functions (e.g., tumor cell growth, drug resistance and metastasis) and cancer progression. This new knowledge could provide the groundwork necessary for establishing new tumor markers and developing important, novel drugs targeted against HA/CD44-associated tumor progression, which can be utilized in the therapeutic treatment of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:27070574

  5. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  6. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  7. NADP(+)-IDH Mutations Promote Hypersuccinylation that Impairs Mitochondria Respiration and Induces Apoptosis Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; He, Xiadi; Ye, Dingwei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Hongxiu; Yao, Cuifang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Sha; Wu, Xiaohui; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Shi, Jiaqi; He, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jie; Qu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Fushen; Zhao, Jianyuan; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Shimin

    2015-11-19

    Elucidating the tumorigenic mechanism of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) is critical for determining how NADP(+)-IDH mutations cause cancer. Here we report that R-2HG induces cancerous metabolism and apoptosis resistance through promoting hypersuccinylation. By competitive inhibition of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), R-2HG preferentially induced succinyl-CoA accumulation and hypersuccinylation in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation-bearing glioma samples and cells were hypersuccinylated in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation or SDH inactivation resulted in hypersuccinylation, causing respiration inhibition and inducing cancerous metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization. These mitochondrial dysfunctions induced BCL-2 accumulation at the mitochondrial membrane, leading to apoptosis resistance of hypersuccinylated cells. Relief of hypersuccinylation by overexpressing the desuccinylase SIRT5 or supplementing glycine rescued mitochondrial dysfunctions, reversed BCL-2 accumulation, and slowed the oncogenic growth of hypersuccinylated IDH1(R132C)-harboring HT1080 cells. Thus, R-2HG-induced hypersuccinylation contributes to the tumorigenicity of NADP(+)-IDH mutations, suggesting the potential of hypersuccinylation inhibition as an intervention for hypersuccinylation-related tumors. PMID:26585387

  8. Involvement of EGFR in the promotion of malignant properties in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Wen; Li, Qing-Quan; Tao, Li-Li; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Juan; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Zu-De

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most predominant phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in breast cancer patients. Despite many studies having suggested that overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a potent predictor of malignancy in cancers, systematic research of EGFR in multidrug resistant (MDR) breast cancer cells is lacking. In order to clarify the role of EGFR in MDR breast cancer cells, MCF7/Adr expressing relatively higher EGFR, and its parental cell line MCF7 expressing relatively lower EGFR, were chosen for this study. Knockdown of EGFR by siRNA in MCF7/Adr cells showed that EGFR siRNA inhibits cell migration, invasion and proliferation in vitro; converse effects were observed in MCF7 cells transfected with pcDNA3.0-EGFR plasmid. Moreover, we found that EGFR upregulated migration and invasion via EMMPRIN, MMP2 and MMP9 in addition to promoting cell cycle passage via elevation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in MDR breast cancer cells. Interestingly, MCF7/Adr cells not expressing EGFR showed significant decrease of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and ABCG2 expression levels, and became more sensitive to treatment of adriamycin (ADR) and paclitaxel (Taxol); the above results indicated that MDR of cancer cells is related to S-phase arrest. In conclusion, EGFR is an important factor enhancing the malignancy of MDR breast cancer cells, partially, inducing MDR. Anti-EGFR therapy may improve outcome in chemorefractory breast cancer patients. PMID:21805028

  9. SFRP2 augments WNT16B signaling to promote therapeutic resistance in the damaged tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Chen, F; Qian, M; Wei, H; Chen, W; Xu, J

    2016-08-18

    Most tumors initially respond to cytotoxic treatments, but acquired resistance often follows. The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a major barrier to clinical success by compromising therapeutic efficacy, and pathological relevance of multiple soluble factors released by a therapeutically remodeled TME remains largely unexplored. Here we show that the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), a Wnt pathway modulator, is produced by human primary fibroblasts after genotoxic treatments. SFRP2 induction is remarkable in tumor stroma, with transcription mainly modulated by the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex, a property shared by several effectors of the DNA damage secretory program. Instead of directly altering canonical Wnt signaling, SFRP2 augments β-catenin activities initiated by WNT16B, another soluble factor from DNA-damaged stroma. WNT16B recognizes cancer cell surface receptors including frizzled (FZD) 3/4/6, a process enhanced by SFRP2, coordinated by the co-receptor LRP6 but subject to abrogation by DKK1. Importantly, we found WNT16B plays a central role in promoting advanced malignancies particularly acquired resistance by counteracting cell death, an effect that can be minimized by a neutralizing antibody co-administered with classical chemotherapy. Furthermore, DNA damage-triggered expression of WNT16B is systemic, imaged by significant induction among diverse solid organs and circulation in peripheral blood, thereby holding promise as not only a TME-derived anticancer target but also a novel biomarker for clinical evaluation of treatment efficacy. Overall, our study substantiates the biological complexity and pathological implication of a therapy-activated TME, and provides the proof of principle of co-targeting tumor and the TME to prevent acquired resistance, with the aim of improving intervention outcome in an era of precision medicine. PMID:26751775

  10. SFRP2 augments WNT16B signaling to promote therapeutic resistance in the damaged tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Chen, F; Qian, M; Wei, H; Chen, W; Xu, J

    2016-01-01

    Most tumors initially respond to cytotoxic treatments, but acquired resistance often follows. The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a major barrier to clinical success by compromising therapeutic efficacy, and pathological relevance of multiple soluble factors released by a therapeutically remodeled TME remains largely unexplored. Here we show that the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), a Wnt pathway modulator, is produced by human primary fibroblasts after genotoxic treatments. SFRP2 induction is remarkable in tumor stroma, with transcription mainly modulated by the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex, a property shared by several effectors of the DNA damage secretory program. Instead of directly altering canonical Wnt signaling, SFRP2 augments β-catenin activities initiated by WNT16B, another soluble factor from DNA-damaged stroma. WNT16B recognizes cancer cell surface receptors including frizzled (FZD) 3/4/6, a process enhanced by SFRP2, coordinated by the co-receptor LRP6 but subject to abrogation by DKK1. Importantly, we found WNT16B plays a central role in promoting advanced malignancies particularly acquired resistance by counteracting cell death, an effect that can be minimized by a neutralizing antibody co-administered with classical chemotherapy. Furthermore, DNA damage-triggered expression of WNT16B is systemic, imaged by significant induction among diverse solid organs and circulation in peripheral blood, thereby holding promise as not only a TME-derived anticancer target but also a novel biomarker for clinical evaluation of treatment efficacy. Overall, our study substantiates the biological complexity and pathological implication of a therapy-activated TME, and provides the proof of principle of co-targeting tumor and the TME to prevent acquired resistance, with the aim of improving intervention outcome in an era of precision medicine. PMID:26751775

  11. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hanwen; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling.

  12. Endocarditis caused by unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium)

    PubMed Central

    Fotoglidis, A; Pagourelias, E; Kyriakou, P; Vassilikos, V

    2015-01-01

    Background Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is caused mainly by Staphylococcus species and usually affects the right heart valves. Case Description We report the case of a 37-years-old intravenous drug abuser, who was diagnosed with infective endocarditis of the mitral and aortic valve. An unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium) was isolated from surgical specimens (peripheral arterial emboli, valves’ vegetations) which, according to the literature, is related to animals’ diseases such as infective endocarditis in adult broiler parents, with no references existing regarding causing such disease in humans. This unusual coccus infection caused specific clinical features (sizable vegetation on mitral valve >2cm, smaller vegetations on aortic valve, systemic emboli), resistance to antimicrobial therapy, rapid progression of the disease (despite of medical therapy and surgical replacement of both valves), and finally the death of the patient two months after the initial presentation of infective endocarditis. Conclusion Unusual cases of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers are emerging and are characterized by changing microbiological profile and varying clinical characteristics. Clinical doctors must be aware of these cases, especially when their patients present an atypical clinical course, and reappraise their medical management. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):182-185. PMID:27418771

  13. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  14. Decreased chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II expression in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Krista A; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S; Cochrum, Renate K; Watts, Mary Beth; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2006-10-15

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is successfully used for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However, many patients that are initially TAM responsive develop tumors that are antiestrogen/TAM resistant (TAM-R). The mechanism behind TAM resistance in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive tumors is not understood. The orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)-I interacts directly with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)- and estradiol (E(2))-occupied ERalpha, corepressors NCoR and SMRT, and inhibit E(2)-induced gene transcription in breast cancer cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that reduced COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII correlate with TAM resistance. We report for the first time that COUP-TFII, but not COUP-TFI, is reduced in three antiestrogen/TAM-R cell lines derived from TAM-sensitive (TAM-S) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in MDA-MB-231 cells compared with MCF-7. ERalpha and ERbeta protein expression was not different between TAM-S and TAM-R cells, but progesterone receptor (PR) was decreased in TAM-R cells. Further, E(2) increased COUP-TFII transcription in MCF-7, but not TAM-R, cells. Importantly, reexpression of COUP-TFII in TAM-S cells to levels comparable to those in MCF-7 was shown to increase 4-OHT-mediated growth inhibition and increased apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of COUP-TFII in TAM-S MCF-7 cells blocked growth inhibitory activity and increased 4-OHT agonist activity. 4-OHT increased COUP-TFII-ERalpha interaction approximately 2-fold in MCF-7 cells. COUP-TFII expression in TAM-R cells also inhibited 4-OHT-induced endogenous PR and pS2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that reduced COUP-TFII expression correlates with acquired TAM resistance in human breast cancer cell lines and that COUP-TFII plays a role in regulating the growth inhibitory activity of TAM in breast cancer cells. PMID:17047084

  15. Recurrent growth factor starvation promotes drug resistance in human leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, K; Okuma, E; Yuo, A

    2002-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance can be induced by various environmental stresses including an exposure to chemical drugs and X-ray irradiation. In addition, hypo-nutritive conditions are known to promote multi-drug resistance in solid tumours. To understand the importance of nutritive conditions in the development of drug resistance in non-solid tumours and to know whether a transient malnutrition could induce a permanent reduction in drug sensitivity, leukaemic cells were transiently cultured under growth factor-starved conditions. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent human leukaemic MO7e cells were cultured in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for 2 weeks, during which the majority of the cells died, and the minor viable cells were expanded in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for following 1 week. This procedure was repeated three times, and the surviving cells were cloned by limiting dilution. These clones underwent G1 arrest in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor, while parental cells underwent apoptosis. Interestingly, activities of the downstream targets of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor were regulated in a granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor-independent manner, indicating that the ligand-independent activation of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor had not taken place. Moreover, the 4–7-fold increases in IC50 for etoposide and the 2–6-fold increase in IC90 for doxorubicin was observed. Furthermore, Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly up-regulated in the clones while no significant changes in Bax, Bcl-xL, P-glycoprotein and Hsp70 protein expression and no consistent changes in p53 expression were detected. We propose that recurrent growth factor starvation, which may occur in vivo when stromal function is damaged after intensive chemotherapy or bone marrow occupation by malignant cells, causes

  16. [Investigation of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric outpatients nationwide with a respiratory tract infection at the first consultation (2002-2003)--proportion of resistant strains and sensitivity to oral antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2005-11-01

    The propotions of resistant strains and sensitivity to oral antibacterial agents were determined for 468 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 557 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric outpatients with a respiratory tract infection at the first consultation at 20 medical institutions nationwide in the predefined 4-week period during November 2002 and June 2003. PRSP of the S. pneumoniae strains, accounted for 27%, and BLNAR accounted for 35% of the H. influenzae strains. Against the S. pneumoniae strains, faropenem showed the best MIC90 value, 0.5 microg/mL, of the beta-lactam antibacterial agents, followed by cefditoren-pivoxil, and among the macrolide and ketolide antibacterial agents, telithromycin showed the best MIC90 value, 0.12 microg/mL. Against the H. influenzae strains, cefditoren-pivoxil showed the best MIC90 value, 0.25 microg/mL, among the beta-lactam antibacterial agents, and among the macrolide and ketolide antibacterial agents, azithromycin showed the best activity, followed by telithromycin. It seems necessary to take these results into consideration when choosing drugs for treatment. It will be necessary to survey the trends in resistant strains and the clinical efficacy of various oral antibacterial agents in the future. PMID:16366360

  17. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:25636925

  18. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from human and animal origins: genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and characterization of a vancomycin-resistant calf isolate carrying a vanA-Tn1546-like element.

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome. PMID:25605355

  19. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from Human and Animal Origins: Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Characterization of a Vancomycin-Resistant Calf Isolate Carrying a vanA-Tn1546-Like Element

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P.; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome. PMID:25605355

  20. PmrB Mutations Promote Polymyxin Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Colistin-Treated Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, Mark K.; Dasgupta, Nandini; Pier, Miyuki; Sgambati, Nicole; Miller, Amanda K.; Selgrade, Sara E.; Miller, Samuel I.; Denton, Miles; Conway, Steven P.; Johansen, Helle K.; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin and other cationic antimicrobial peptides. Previous work has shown that mutations in the PmrAB and PhoPQ regulatory systems can confer low to moderate levels of colistin (polymyxin E) resistance in laboratory strains and clinical isolates of this organism (MICs of 8 to 64 mg/liter). To explore the role of PmrAB in high-level clinical polymyxin resistance, P. aeruginosa isolates from chronically colistin-treated cystic fibrosis patients, most with colistin MICs of >512 mg/liter, were analyzed. These cystic fibrosis isolates contained probable gain-of-function pmrB alleles that conferred polymyxin resistance to strains with a wild-type or pmrAB deletion background. Double mutant pmrB alleles that contained mutations in both the periplasmic and dimerization-phosphotransferase domains markedly augmented polymyxin resistance. Expression of mutant pmrB alleles induced transcription from the promoter of the arnB operon and stimulated addition of 4-amino-l-arabinose to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this lipid A modification in polymyxin resistance. For some highly polymyxin-resistant clinical isolates, repeated passage without antibiotic selection pressure resulted in loss of resistance, suggesting that secondary suppressors occur at a relatively high frequency and account for the instability of this phenotype. These results indicate that pmrB gain-of-function mutations can contribute to high-level polymyxin resistance in clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. PMID:22106224

  1. Skeletal muscle salt inducible kinase 1 promotes insulin resistance in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Mark; Stewart-Fitzgibbon, Randi; Fu, Jingqi; Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.; Rivera-Molina, Yisel A.; Gibson, Micah; Berglund, Eric D.; Justice, Nicholas J.; Berdeaux, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance causes type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia due to excessive hepatic glucose production and inadequate peripheral glucose uptake. Our objectives were to test the hypothesis that the proposed CREB/CRTC2 inhibitor salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) contributes to whole body glucose homeostasis in vivo by regulating hepatic transcription of gluconeogenic genes and also to identify novel SIK1 actions on glucose metabolism. Methods We created conditional (floxed) SIK1-knockout mice and studied glucose metabolism in animals with global, liver, adipose or skeletal muscle Sik1 deletion. We examined cAMP-dependent regulation of SIK1 and the consequences of SIK1 depletion on primary mouse hepatocytes. We probed metabolic phenotypes in tissue-specific SIK1 knockout mice fed high fat diet through hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and biochemical analysis of insulin signaling. Results SIK1 knockout mice are viable and largely normoglycemic on chow diet. On high fat diet, global SIK1 knockout animals are strikingly protected from glucose intolerance, with both increased plasma insulin and enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity. Surprisingly, liver SIK1 is not required for regulation of CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis, despite contributions of SIK1 to hepatocyte CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis regulation ex vivo. Sik1 mRNA accumulates in skeletal muscle of obese high fat diet-fed mice, and knockout of SIK1 in skeletal muscle, but not liver or adipose tissue, improves insulin sensitivity and muscle glucose uptake on high fat diet. Conclusions SIK1 is dispensable for glycemic control on chow diet. SIK1 promotes insulin resistance on high fat diet by a cell-autonomous mechanism in skeletal muscle. Our study establishes SIK1 as a promising therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese individuals without deleterious effects on hepatic glucose production. PMID:26844205

  2. Mutation in promoter region of a serine protease inhibitor confers Perkinsus marinus resistance in the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Bao, Zhenmin; Zhang, Quanqi; Guo, Ximing

    2012-08-01

    Protease inhibitors from the host may inhibit proteases from invading pathogens and confer resistance. We have previously shown that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP198C) in a serine protease inhibitor gene (cvSI-1) is associated with Perkinsus marinus resistance in the eastern oyster. As SNP198 is synonymous, we studied whether its linkage to polymorphism at the promoter region could explain the resistance. A 631 bp fragment of the promoter region was cloned by genome-walking and resequenced, revealing 22 SNPs and 3 insertion/deletions (indels). A 25 bp indel at position -404 was genotyped along with SNP198 for association analysis using before- and after-mortality samples. After mortalities that were primarily caused by P. marinus, the frequency of deletion allele at -404indel increased by 15.6% (p = 0.0437), while that of SNP198C increased by only 3.4% (p = 0.5756). The resistance alleles at the two loci were coupled in 79.6% of the oysters. Oysters with the deletion allele at -404indel showed significant (p = 0.0189) up-regulation of cvSI-1 expression under P. marinus challenge. Our results suggest that mutation at the promoter region causes increased transcription of cvSI-1, which in turn confers P. marinus resistance in the eastern oyster likely through inhibiting pathogenic proteases from the parasite. PMID:22683517

  3. Effects of dietary levels of potassium diformate on growth, feed utilization and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal production, including aquaculture, is increasingly under public scrutiny and criticism. In the EU countries, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock production has been banned since January 2006. Short-chain organic acids or their ...

  4. The GATA Transcription Factor egl-27 Delays Aging by Promoting Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Stress is a fundamental aspect of aging, as accumulated damage from a lifetime of stress can limit lifespan and protective responses to stress can extend lifespan. In this study, we identify a conserved Caenorhabditis elegans GATA transcription factor, egl-27, that is involved in several stress responses and aging. We found that overexpression of egl-27 extends the lifespan of wild-type animals. Furthermore, egl-27 is required for the pro-longevity effects from impaired insulin/IGF-1 like signaling (IIS), as reduced egl-27 activity fully suppresses the longevity of worms that are mutant for the IIS receptor, daf-2. egl-27 expression is inhibited by daf-2 and activated by pro-longevity factors daf-16/FOXO and elt-3/GATA, suggesting that egl-27 acts at the intersection of IIS and GATA pathways to extend lifespan. Consistent with its role in IIS signaling, we found that egl-27 is involved in stress response pathways. egl-27 expression is induced in the presence of multiple stresses, its targets are significantly enriched for many types of stress genes, and altering levels of egl-27 itself affects survival to heat and oxidative stress. Finally, we found that egl-27 expression increases between young and old animals, suggesting that increased levels of egl-27 in aged animals may act to promote stress resistance. These results identify egl-27 as a novel factor that links stress and aging pathways. PMID:23271974

  5. Role of Microstructure in Promoting Fracture and Fatigue Resistance in Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H

    2005-04-01

    An investigation of how microstructural features affect the fracture and fatigue properties of a promising class of high temperature Mo-Si-B based alloys is presented. Fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth properties are measured at 25 and 1300 C for five Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} containing alloys produced by powder metallurgy with {alpha}-Mo matrices. Results are compared with previous studies on intermetallic-matrix microstructures in alloys with similar compositions. It is found that increasing the {alpha}-Mo phase volume fraction (17-49%) or ductility (by increasing the temperature) benefits the fracture resistance; in addition, {alpha}-Mo matrix materials show significant improvements over intermetallic-matrix alloys. Fatigue thresholds were also increased with increasing {alpha}-Mo phase content, until a transition to more ductile fatigue behavior occurred with large amounts of {alpha}-Mo phase (49%) and ductility (i.e., at 1300 C). The beneficial role of such microstructural variables are attributed to the promotion of the observed toughening mechanisms of crack trapping and bridging by the relatively ductile {alpha}-Mo phase.

  6. HDAC6 promotes cell proliferation and confers resistance to gefitinib in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Tang, Fang; Hu, Pengchao; Wang, Ying; Gong, Jun; Sun, Shaoxing; Xie, Conghua

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising targets for cancer therapy, and first-generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer patients. HDAC6, which is a key regulator of many signaling pathways that are linked to cancer, has recently emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, HDAC6 was found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and was negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of HDAC6 promoted the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cells in a deacetylase activity-dependent manner. HDAC6 overexpression conferred resistance to gefitinib via the stabilization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The inhibition of HDAC6 by CAY10603, a potent and selective inhibitor of HDAC6, inhibited the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cells and induced apoptosis. CAY10603 downregulated the levels of EGFR protein, which in turn inhibited activation of the EGFR signaling pathway. Moreover, CAY10603 synergized with gefitinib to induce apoptosis of the lung adenocarcinoma cell lines via the destabilization of EGFR. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of HDAC6 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27221381

  7. Adipose-Resident Group 1 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Rapp, Moritz; Fan, Xiying; Weizman, Orr-El; Bhardwaj, Priya; Adams, Nicholas M; Walzer, Thierry; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-08-16

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) function to protect epithelial barriers against pathogens and maintain tissue homeostasis in both barrier and non-barrier tissues. Here, utilizing Eomes reporter mice, we identify a subset of adipose group 1 ILC (ILC1) and demonstrate a role for these cells in metabolic disease. Adipose ILC1s were dependent on the transcription factors Nfil3 and T-bet but phenotypically and functionally distinct from adipose mature natural killer (NK) and immature NK cells. Analysis of parabiotic mice revealed that adipose ILC1s maintained long-term tissue residency. Diet-induced obesity drove early production of interleukin (IL)-12 in adipose tissue depots and led to the selective proliferation and accumulation of adipose-resident ILC1s in a manner dependent on the IL-12 receptor and STAT4. ILC1-derived interferon-γ was necessary and sufficient to drive proinflammatory macrophage polarization to promote obesity-associated insulin resistance. Thus, adipose-resident ILC1s contribute to obesity-related pathology in response to dysregulated local proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27496734

  8. Resistant starch promotes equol production and inhibits tibial bone loss in ovariectomized mice treated with daidzein.

    PubMed

    Tousen, Yuko; Abe, Fumiko; Ishida, Tatsuya; Uehara, Mariko; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2011-10-01

    Daidzein is metabolized to equol in the gastrointestinal tract by gut microflora. Equol has greater estrogenic activity than genistein and daidzein, with its production shown to be promoted by dietary fiber. It is known that resistant starch (RS) is not absorbed in the proximal intestine and acts as dietary fiber in the colon. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of daidzein and RS intake on equol production, bone mineral density, and intestinal microflora in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Female mice of the ddY strain, aged 8 weeks, were either sham operated (n = 6) or OVX. The OVX mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: OVX control (n = 6), OVX fed 0.1% daidzein-supplemented diet (OVX + Dz, n = 8), OVX fed 0.1% daidzein- and 12% RS-supplemented diet (OVX + Dz + RS, n = 8), OVX fed 12% RS-supplemented diet (OVX + RS, n = 8), and OVX who received daily subcutaneous administration of 17 β-estradiol (n = 6). After 6 weeks, urinary equol concentration was significantly higher in the OVX + Dz + RS group than in the OVX + Dz group. The bone mineral density of the whole tibia was higher in the OVX + Dz +RS group compared with the OVX + Dz group. The occupation ratios of Bifidobacterium spp in the cecal microflora in groups fed RS were significantly higher than those in the other groups. The present study demonstrated that RS may increase the bioavailability of daidzein. PMID:21550090

  9. Mutant Prevention Concentrations for Single-Step Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutants of Wild-Type, Efflux-Positive, or ParC or GyrA Mutation-Containing Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather J.; Walters, Michael; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Zhanel, George G.; Hoban, Daryl J.

    2004-01-01

    Three fluoroquinolone-susceptible and five fluoroquinolone-resistant (two with ParC Ser79Phe mutations, one with a GyrA Ser81Phe mutation, and two that were efflux positive) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were exposed to one, two, four, eight, and sixteen times the MICs of ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Mutational frequencies were calculated at each multiple of the MIC for which growth was observed. Mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) and the multiple of the MIC at the MPC (MPMIC) were evaluated. All resulting mutants were sequenced for quinolone resistance-determining region changes in GyrA and ParC and were evaluated for reserpine-sensitive efflux. The MPC order was generally ciprofloxacin > levofloxacin > gatifloxacin > moxifloxacin > gemifloxacin. The MPMIC order varied depending on the genetic constitution of the original isolates from which the mutants were generated. For those mutants created from fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (those that had wild-type ParC and GyrA and were efflux negative), the MPMIC order was ciprofloxacin = moxifloxacin > gemifloxacin > levofloxacin > gatifloxacin. The MPMICs of each fluoroquinolone for mutants created from isolates with a ParC mutation (with wild-type GyrA and efflux negative) were similar. A similar occurrence was observed with the mutants created from the efflux-positive isolates (with wild-type ParC and GyrA). The MPMIC order for the mutants created from the isolate with a GyrA mutation (with wild-type ParC and efflux negative) was ciprofloxacin = gemifloxacin > levofloxacin = moxifloxacin > gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin may be intrinsically more able to prevent the development of resistance by fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates, isolates that are efflux positive, or isolates that carry a GyrA mutation. However, once a ParC mutation is present, the MPC increases dramatically for all fluoroquinolones. PMID:15388458

  10. The Mga Regulon but Not Deoxyribonuclease Sda1 of Invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus Contributes to In Vivo Selection of CovRS Mutations and Resistance to Innate Immune Killing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Feng, Wenchao; Li, Dengfeng; Liu, Mengyao; Nelson, Daniel C; Lei, Benfang

    2015-11-01

    Invasive M1T1 group A Streptococcus (GAS) can have a mutation in the regulatory system CovRS, and this mutation can render strains hypervirulent. Interestingly, via mechanisms that are not well understood, the host innate immune system's neutrophils select spontaneous M1T1 GAS CovRS hypervirulent mutants, thereby enhancing the pathogen's ability to evade immune killing. It has been reported that the DNase Sda1 is critical for the resistance of M1T1 strain 5448 to killing in human blood and provides pressure for in vivo selection of CovRS mutations. We reexamined the role of Sda1 in the selection of CovRS mutations and in GAS innate immune evasion. Deletion of sda1 or all DNase genes in M1T1 strain MGAS2221 did not alter emergence of CovRS mutants during murine infection. Deletion of sda1 in strain 5448 resulted in Δsda1 mutants with (5448 Δsda1(M+) strain) and without (5448 Δsda1(M-) strain) M protein production. The 5448 Δsda1(M+) strain accumulated CovRS mutations in vivo and resisted killing in the bloodstream, whereas the 5448 Δsda1(M-) strain lost in vivo selection of CovRS mutations and was sensitive to killing. The deletion of emm and a spontaneous Mga mutation in MGAS2221 reduced and prevented in vivo selection for CovRS mutants, respectively. Thus, in contrast to previous reports, Sda1 is not critical for in vivo selection of invasive M1T1 CovRS mutants and GAS resistance to innate immune killing mechanisms. In contrast, M protein and other Mga-regulated proteins contribute to the in vivo selection of M1T1 GAS CovRS mutants. These findings advance the understanding of the progression of invasive M1T1 GAS infections. PMID:26283338

  11. The Mga Regulon but Not Deoxyribonuclease Sda1 of Invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus Contributes to In Vivo Selection of CovRS Mutations and Resistance to Innate Immune Killing Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanghui; Feng, Wenchao; Li, Dengfeng; Liu, Mengyao; Nelson, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive M1T1 group A Streptococcus (GAS) can have a mutation in the regulatory system CovRS, and this mutation can render strains hypervirulent. Interestingly, via mechanisms that are not well understood, the host innate immune system's neutrophils select spontaneous M1T1 GAS CovRS hypervirulent mutants, thereby enhancing the pathogen's ability to evade immune killing. It has been reported that the DNase Sda1 is critical for the resistance of M1T1 strain 5448 to killing in human blood and provides pressure for in vivo selection of CovRS mutations. We reexamined the role of Sda1 in the selection of CovRS mutations and in GAS innate immune evasion. Deletion of sda1 or all DNase genes in M1T1 strain MGAS2221 did not alter emergence of CovRS mutants during murine infection. Deletion of sda1 in strain 5448 resulted in Δsda1 mutants with (5448 Δsda1M+ strain) and without (5448 Δsda1M− strain) M protein production. The 5448 Δsda1M+ strain accumulated CovRS mutations in vivo and resisted killing in the bloodstream, whereas the 5448 Δsda1M− strain lost in vivo selection of CovRS mutations and was sensitive to killing. The deletion of emm and a spontaneous Mga mutation in MGAS2221 reduced and prevented in vivo selection for CovRS mutants, respectively. Thus, in contrast to previous reports, Sda1 is not critical for in vivo selection of invasive M1T1 CovRS mutants and GAS resistance to innate immune killing mechanisms. In contrast, M protein and other Mga-regulated proteins contribute to the in vivo selection of M1T1 GAS CovRS mutants. These findings advance the understanding of the progression of invasive M1T1 GAS infections. PMID:26283338

  12. The GATA transcription factor/MTA-1 homolog egr-1 promotes longevity and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Stephanie M; Kim, Stuart K

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a large number of both phenotypic and molecular changes, but for most of these, it is not known whether these changes are detrimental, neutral, or protective. We have identified a conserved Caenorhabditis elegans GATA transcription factor/MTA-1 homolog egr-1 (lin-40) that extends lifespan and promotes resistance to heat and UV stress when overexpressed. Expression of egr-1 increases with age, suggesting that it may promote survival during normal aging. This increase in expression is dependent on the presence of the germline, raising the possibility that egr-1 expression is regulated by signals from the germline. In addition, loss of egr-1 suppresses the long lifespan of insulin receptor daf-2 mutants. The DAF-16 FOXO transcription factor is required for the increased stress resistance of egr-1 overexpression mutants, and egr-1 is necessary for the proper regulation of sod-3 (a reporter for DAF-16 activity). These results indicate that egr-1 acts within the insulin signaling pathway. egr-1 can also activate the expression of its paralog egl-27, another factor known to extend lifespan and increase stress resistance, suggesting that the two genes act in a common program to promote survival. These results identify egr-1 as part of a longevity-promoting circuit that changes with age in a manner that is beneficial for the lifespan of the organism. PMID:24304470

  13. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation. PMID:26469935

  14. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM

    PubMed Central

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S.; Theis, Fabian J.; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  15. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM.

    PubMed

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S; Theis, Fabian J; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  16. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc) is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc) were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media. PMID:22963456

  17. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  18. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grow at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). YATP (grams of cells per mole of ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [14C]acetate and [14C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation. PMID:2036013

  19. Progranulin promotes Temozolomide resistance of glioblastoma by orchestrating DNA repair and tumor stemness.

    PubMed

    Bandey, I; Chiou, S-H; Huang, A-P; Tsai, J-C; Tu, P-h

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults with a dismal prognosis. Current therapy of surgical removal combined with Temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy only slightly prolongs the survival of GBM patients. Thus, it is essential to elucidate mechanism underlying its highly malignant properties in order to develop efficacious therapeutic regimens. In this study, we showed that progranulin (PGRN) was overexpressed in most GBM cell lines and the majority of human tumor samples. PGRN overexpression conferred GBM cells with tumorigenic properties and TMZ resistance by upregulating DNA repair (PARP, ATM, BRCA1, Rad51, XRCC1 and so on) and cancer stemness (CD133, CD44, ABCG2) genes, in part via an AP-1 transcription factor, specifically cFos/JunB. Curcumin, an AP-1 inhibitor, was also found to regulate PGRN promoter activity and expression including its downstream effectors aforementioned. These data suggested a feedforward loop between PGRN signaling and AP-1. PGRN depletion significantly decreased unlimited self-renewal and multilineage differentiation and the malignant properties of GBMs cells S1R1, and enhanced their vulnerability to TMZ. In addition, S1R1 depleted of PGRN also lost the ability to form tumor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. In conclusion, PGRN had a critical role in the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of GBM and functioned at the top of the hierarchy of cellular machinery that modulates both DNA repair pathways and cancer stemness. Our data suggest that a new strategy combining current regimens with compounds targeting PGRN/AP-1 loop like curcumin may significantly improve the therapeutic outcome of GBM. PMID:24793792

  20. A Drought Resistance-Promoting Microbiome Is Selected by Root System under Desert Farming

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Ettoumi, Besma; Vigani, Gianpiero; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Abou-Hadid, Ayman F.; El-Behairy, Usama A.; Sorlini, Claudia; Cherif, Ameur; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional agro-systems in arid areas are a bulwark for preserving soil stability and fertility, in the sight of “reverse desertification”. Nevertheless, the impact of desert farming practices on the diversity and abundance of the plant associated microbiome is poorly characterized, including its functional role in supporting plant development under drought stress. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the structure of the microbiome associated to the drought-sensitive pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L.) cultivated in a traditional Egyptian farm, focusing on microbe contribution to a crucial ecosystem service, i.e. plant growth under water deficit. The root system was dissected by sampling root/soil with a different degree of association to the plant: the endosphere, the rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil that were compared to the uncultivated soil. Bacterial community structure and diversity, determined by using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, differed according to the microhabitat, indicating a selective pressure determined by the plant activity. Similarly, culturable bacteria genera showed different distribution in the three root system fractions. Bacillus spp. (68% of the isolates) were mainly recovered from the endosphere, while rhizosphere and the root surrounding soil fractions were dominated by Klebsiella spp. (61% and 44% respectively). Most of the isolates (95%) presented in vitro multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) activities and stress resistance capabilities, but their distribution was different among the root system fractions analyzed, with enhanced abilities for Bacillus and the rhizobacteria strains. We show that the C. annuum rhizosphere under desert farming enriched populations of PGP bacteria capable of enhancing plant photosynthetic activity and biomass synthesis (up to 40%) under drought stress. Conclusions/Significance Crop cultivation provides critical ecosystem services in arid lands with the plant root

  1. Streptococcus iniae vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is among the most important emergent pathogens that affects many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, this Gram-positive bacterium causes significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Inf...

  2. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the "Streptococcus milleri group".

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, R A; Fraser, H; Hardie, J M; Beighton, D

    1990-01-01

    A biochemical scheme was developed by which strains of Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus can reliably be distinguished from within the "Streptococcus milleri group." Strains identified as S. intermedius were differentiated by the ability to produce detectable levels of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and sialidase with 4-methylumbelliferyl-linked fluorogenic substrates in microdilution trays after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, together with the production of hyaluronidase. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were differentiated by the production of alpha-glucosidase and hyaluronidase by the former and the production of beta-glucosidase by the latter. The majority of strains of the S. milleri group obtained from dental plaque were identified as S. intermedius, as were most strains isolated from abscesses of the brain and liver. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were from a wider variety of infections, both oral and nonoral, than were strains of S. intermedius, with the majority of strains from urogenital infections being identified as S. anginosus. PMID:2380375

  3. Developing oral probiotics from Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Wescombe, Philip A; Hale, John D F; Heng, Nicholas C K; Tagg, John R

    2012-12-01

    Considerable human illness can be linked to the development of oral microbiota disequilibria. The predominant oral cavity commensal, Streptococcus salivarius has emerged as an important source of safe and efficacious probiotics, capable of fostering more balanced, health-associated oral microbiota. Strain K12, the prototype S. salivarius probiotic, originally introduced to counter Streptococcus pyogenes infections, now has an expanded repertoire of health-promoting applications. K12 and several more recently proposed S. salivarius probiotics are now being applied to control diverse bacterial consortia infections including otitis media, halitosis and dental caries. Other potential applications include upregulation of immunological defenses against respiratory viral infections and treatment of oral candidosis. An overview of the key steps required for probiotic development is also presented. PMID:23231486

  4. Growth performance, immune response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of Nile tilapia fed diets containing various levels of vitamins C and E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of dietary levels of vitamin C (0, 100, 2,000 mg/kg), E (0, 50, 500 mg/kg), and their interaction on growth performance, immune response and resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus to Sterptococcus iniae challenge were evaluated. Each diet was fed to Nile tilapia in triplicate a...

  5. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in France: Antimicrobial Resistance, Serotype, and Molecular Epidemiology Findings from a Monthly National Study in 2000 to 2002

    PubMed Central

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Pina, Patrick; Viguier, Florent; Picot, Franc; Courvalin, Patrice; Allouch, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A study of 257 French invasive pneumococci isolated between 2000 and 2002 showed high rates of nonsusceptibility to penicillin and macrolides (50%), contrasting with a low frequency of resistance to amoxicillin or levofloxacin (<1%) and tolerance to vancomycin (0%). The genetic homogeneity of some serogroups, including serogroup 1, enhanced the risk of epidemiological changes. PMID:15328146

  6. PROX1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation and sorafenib resistance by enhancing β-catenin expression and nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Ye, X; Zhang, J-B; Ouyang, H; Shen, Z; Wu, Y; Wang, W; Wu, J; Tao, S; Yang, X; Qiao, K; Zhang, J; Liu, J; Fu, Q; Xie, Y

    2015-10-29

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is frequent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and contributes to HCC initiation and progression. This abnormal activation may result from somatic mutations in the genes of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and/or dysregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The mechanism for the latter remains poorly understood. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (PROX1) is a downstream target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human colorectal cancer and elevated PROX1 expression promotes malignant progression. However, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway does not regulate PROX1 expression in the liver and HCC cells. Here we report that PROX1 promotes HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in HCC xenograft mice. PROX1 and β-catenin levels are positively correlated in tumor tissues as well as in cultured HCC cells. PROX1 can upregulate β-catenin transcription by stimulating the β-catenin promoter and enhance the nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCC cells, which leads to the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Moreover, we show that increase in PROX1 expression renders HCC cells more resistant to sorafenib treatment, which is the standard therapy for advanced HCC. Overall, we have pinpointed PROX1 as a critical factor activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HCC, which promotes HCC proliferation and sorafenib resistance. PMID:25684142

  7. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China. PMID:25597676

  8. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  9. The B cell mutator AID promotes B lymphoid blast crisis and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Lars; Duy, Cihangir; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Kuchen, Stefan; von Levetzow, Gregor; Feldhahn, Niklas; Henke, Nadine; Li, Zhiyu; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; Kim, Yong-mi; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Jumaa, Hassan; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora; Martinelli, Giovanni; Lieber, Michael R; Casellas, Rafael; Müschen, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is induced by BCR-ABL1 and can be effectively treated for many years with Imatinib until leukemia cells acquire drug resistance through BCR-ABL1 mutations and progress into fatal B lymphoid blast crisis (LBC). Despite its clinical significance, the mechanism of progression into LBC is unknown. Here we show that LBC but not CML cells express the B cell-specific mutator enzyme AID. We demonstrate that AID expression in CML cells promotes overall genetic instability by hypermutation of tumor suppressor and DNA repair genes. Importantly, our data uncover a causative role of AID activity in the acquisition of BCR-ABL1 mutations leading to Imatinib-resistance, thus providing a rationale for the rapid development of drug resistance and blast crisis progression. PMID:19732723

  10. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer cells promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enling; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Yuxiu; Mi, Ruoran; Wang, Dehua

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Cisplatin is a very effective cancer chemotherapy drug, but cisplatin resistance is a crucial problem of therapy failure. Overexpression of PVT1 has been demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The mRNA level of PVT1 in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-sensitive patients, cisplatin-resistant cells SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP, cisplatin-sensitive cells SKOV-3 and A2780 were determined by qRT-PCR. The influence of the knockdown or overexpression of PVT1 on cisplatin resistance was measured by measuring the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and the apoptotic rate of ovarian cancer cells was detected by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, Smad4, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 in apoptotic pathways were determined. The mRNA level of PVT1 was significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-resistant cells. SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP cell viability and the percentage of apoptotic cells after transfection with PVT-1 siRNA and treated with cisplatin was markedly lower and higher than the control, respectively. Moreover, the overexpression of PVT1 exhibited the anti-apoptotic property in SKOV-3 and A2780 cells after transfection with LV-PVT1-GFP and treated with cisplatin. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 were much higher in cisplatin-resistant cells transfected with siPVT1. Overexpression of LncRNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways. PMID:26884974

  11. Increase of the M Phenotype among Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Spain Related to the Serotype 14 Variant of the Spain9V-3 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Ardanuy, C.; Fenoll, A.; Berrón, S.; Calatayud, L.; Liñares, J.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2003 the rate of erythromycin resistance among pneumococci in Spain was 34.4%. Although the MLSB phenotype was prevalent (94.7%), the rate of the M phenotype increased from 3.3% to 8.9% (P < 0.01). Clonal dissemination of mef(E)-carrying strains of serotype 14 variant of the Spain9V-3 clone was the major contributor to this increase. PMID:16940119

  12. Ribosomal Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajamäki, Marja; Kataja, Janne; Seppälä, Helena; Elliot, John; Leinonen, Maija; Huovinen, Pentti; Jalava, Jari

    2002-01-01

    Eleven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, isolated in Finland during 1996 to 2000, had an unusual macrolide resistance phenotype. They were resistant to macrolides and streptogramin B but susceptible, intermediate, or low-level resistant to lincosamides. No acquired macrolide resistance genes were detected from the strains. The isolates were found to have mutations in domain V of the 23S rRNA or ribosomal protein L4. Seven isolates had an A2059C mutation in two to four out of the four alleles encoding the 23S rRNA, two isolates had an A2059G mutation in two alleles, one isolate had a C2611G mutation in all four alleles, and one isolate had a 69GTG71-to-69TPS71 substitution in ribosomal protein L4. PMID:11850244

  13. Characterization of cadmium-resistant bacteria for its potential in promoting plant growth and cadmium accumulation in Sesbania bispinosa root.

    PubMed

    Kartik, V P; Jinal, H N; Amaresan, N

    2016-11-01

    The cadmium (Cd) resistant bacteria were isolated from soils of Damanganga river, Vapi, and identified 11 potential Cd resistant bacteria based on 16S rDNA sequences. The Cd resistant bacteria belonged to four different genera: Providencia spp., Morganella sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., and Bacillus spp. The assessment of plant growth-promoting (PGP) parameters revealed that the Cd tolerant bacteria showed one or more PGP properties. Further, a pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of Cd resistant bacteria on the plant growth and the uptake of Cd by Sesbania bispinosa. The bacterized seedlings recorded 36.0-74.8% and 21.2-32.9% higher root and shoot lengths, respectively, in Cd amended soil compared with control. The Cd mobilization in the root of S. bispinosa by microbial inoculants ranged from 0.02 ± 0.01 to 1.11 ± 0.06 ppm. The enhanced concentrations of Cd accumulation in S. bispinosa roots correspond to the effect of the bacterial strains on metal mobilization in soil. The present observations showed that the Cd resistant strains protect the plants against the inhibitory effects of Cd, probably due to the production of PGP properties. The present results provided a new insight into the phytoremediation of Cd contaminated soil. PMID:27185302

  14. Flying Under the Radar: Immune Evasion by Group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Adelle P; Woodward, Joshua J

    2016-07-13

    Type I IFN production is an important host defense mechanism against Gram-positive Streptococci. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Andrade et al. (2016) report that Group B Streptococcus limits type I IFN by expressing a surface phosphodiesterase that degrades extracellular bacterial cyclic dinucleotides, thereby promoting virulence. PMID:27414494

  15. Virulence Potential and Genome-Wide Characterization of Drug Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Clones Selected In Vivo by the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frazão, Nelson; Hiller, N. Luisa; Powell, Evan; Earl, Josh; Ahmed, Azad; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Tomasz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We used mouse models of pneumococcal colonization and disease combined with full genome sequencing to characterize three major drug resistant clones of S. pneumoniae that were recovered from the nasopharynx of PCV7-immunized children in Portugal. The three clones – serotype 6A (ST2191), serotype 15A (ST63) and serotype 19A (ST276) carried some of the same drug resistance determinants already identified in nasopharyngeal isolates from the pre-PCV7 era. The three clones were able to colonize efficiently the mouse nasopharyngeal mucosa where populations of these pneumococci were retained for as long as 21 days. During this period, the three clones were able to asymptomatically invade the olfactory bulbs, brain, lungs and the middle ear mucosa and established populations in these tissues. The virulence potential of the three clones was poor even at high inoculum (105 CFU per mouse) concentrations in the mouse septicemia model and was undetectable in the pneumonia model. Capsular type 3 transformants of clones 6A and 19A prepared in the laboratory produced lethal infection at low cell concentration (103 CFU per mouse) but the same transformants became impaired in their potential to colonize, indicating the importance of the capsular polysaccharide in both disease and colonization. The three clones were compared to the genomes of 56 S. pneumoniae strains for which sequence information was available in the public databank. Clone 15A (ST63) only differed from the serotype 19F clone G54 in a very few genes including serotype so that this clone may be considered the product of a capsular switch. While no strain with comparable degree of similarity to clone 19A (ST276) was found among the sequenced isolates, by MLST this clone is a single locust variant (SLV) of Denmark14-ST230 international clone. Clone 6A (ST2191) was most similar to the penicillin resistant Hungarian serotype 19A clone. PMID:24069360

  16. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees. PMID:25983736

  17. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Antibody Escape Promotes Neuraminidase Antigenic Variation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.; Das, Suman R.; Gibbs, James S.; Bailey, Adam L.; Schmidt, Loren M.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature. PMID:21364978

  18. Virulence Factors of Geminivirus Interact with MYC2 to Subvert Plant Resistance and Promote Vector Performance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Li, Jie; Jung, Choonkyun; Qu, Jing; Sun, Yanwei; Qian, Hongmei; Tee, ChuanSia; van Loon, Joop J.A.; Dicke, Marcel; Chua, Nam-Hai; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A pathogen may cause infected plants to promote the performance of its transmitting vector, which accelerates the spread of the pathogen. This positive effect of a pathogen on its vector via their shared host plant is termed indirect mutualism. For example, terpene biosynthesis is suppressed in begomovirus-infected plants, leading to reduced plant resistance and enhanced performance of the whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) that transmit these viruses. Although begomovirus-whitefly mutualism has been known, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Here, we identified βC1 of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus, a monopartite begomovirus, as the viral genetic factor that suppresses plant terpene biosynthesis. βC1 directly interacts with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2 to compromise the activation of MYC2-regulated terpene synthase genes, thereby reducing whitefly resistance. MYC2 associates with the bipartite begomoviral protein BV1, suggesting that MYC2 is an evolutionarily conserved target of begomoviruses for the suppression of terpene-based resistance and the promotion of vector performance. Our findings describe how this viral pathogen regulates host plant metabolism to establish mutualism with its insect vector. PMID:25490915

  19. Production of interleukin‑4 in CD133+ cervical cancer stem cells promotes resistance to apoptosis and initiates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Tao; Xin, Ying; Tong, Chun-Yan; Li, Bing; Bao, Hong-Li; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Wang, Xue-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory suggests that cancer growth and invasion is dictated by the small population of CSCs within the heterogenous tumor. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the cause for chemotherapy failure and the resistance of CSCs to apoptosis. A total of ~2.3% cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells were identified in cases of uterine cervical cancer. These CD133+ SP cells were found to potently initiate tumor growth and invasion, as they exhibit transcriptional upregulation of stemness genes, including octamer‑binding transcription factor‑4, B‑cell‑specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site‑1, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, (sex determining region Y)‑box 2, Nestin and anti‑apoptotic B cell lymphoma‑2. In addition, the CD133+ SP cells showed resistance to multi‑drug treatment and apoptosis. The present study further showed that the secretion of interleukin‑4 (IL‑4) in CD133+ cervical cancer SP cells promoted cell proliferation and prevented the SP cells from apoptosis. Following the neutralization of IL‑4 with anti‑IL‑4 antibody, the CD133+ SP cells were more sensitive to drug treatment and apoptosis. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study suggested that the autocrine secretion of IL‑4 promotes increased survival and resistance to cell death in CSCs. PMID:27121303

  20. Production of interleukin-4 in CD133+ cervical cancer stem cells promotes resistance to apoptosis and initiates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHUN-TAO; XIN, YING; TONG, CHUN-YAN; LI, BING; BAO, HONG-LI; ZHANG, CAI-YUN; WANG, XUE-HUI

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory suggests that cancer growth and invasion is dictated by the small population of CSCs within the heterogenous tumor. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the cause for chemotherapy failure and the resistance of CSCs to apoptosis. A total of ~2.3% cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells were identified in cases of uterine cervical cancer. These CD133+ SP cells were found to potently initiate tumor growth and invasion, as they exhibit transcriptional upregulation of stemness genes, including octamer-binding transcription factor-4, B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site-1, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, (sex determining region Y)-box 2, Nestin and anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma-2. In addition, the CD133+ SP cells showed resistance to multi-drug treatment and apoptosis. The present study further showed that the secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) in CD133+ cervical cancer SP cells promoted cell proliferation and prevented the SP cells from apoptosis. Following the neutralization of IL-4 with anti-IL-4 antibody, the CD133+ SP cells were more sensitive to drug treatment and apoptosis. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study suggested that the autocrine secretion of IL-4 promotes increased survival and resistance to cell death in CSCs. PMID:27121303

  1. MicroRNA-320a promotes 5-FU resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Xueju; Wang, Lanlan; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Yu; Wang, Fang; Sun, Guotao; Zhang, Junwu; Ma, Yanni; Zhao, Yupei; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The drug-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells results in poor therapeutic effect. To predict the therapeutic effect of the chemotherapy drugs to specific patients and to reverse the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells are critical for chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the genesis of drug-resistance of various cancer types. There are also many advantages of miRNAs in diagnosis and therapy of disease. Although several miRNAs regulating 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in human pancreatic cancer have been reported, the detailed molecular mechanism remains to be determined. In this study, we found that miR-320a was significantly up-regulated in 5-FU resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-320a strongly contributed to pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which was represented by the increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis, drug-resistance characteristics and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-320a was able to bind to 3′UTR of PDCD4 mRNA, and mediated its down-regulation in 5-FU resistance of human pancreatic cancer cells. Whereas restoration of PDCD4 expression could partially attenuate the function of miR-320a in pancreatic cancer. Taken together, our study demonstrated that miR-320a played important role in regulating 5-FU resistance by targeting PDCD4 and might be developed as new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27279541

  2. MicroRNA-320a promotes 5-FU resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Xueju; Wang, Lanlan; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Yu; Wang, Fang; Sun, Guotao; Zhang, Junwu; Ma, Yanni; Zhao, Yupei; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The drug-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells results in poor therapeutic effect. To predict the therapeutic effect of the chemotherapy drugs to specific patients and to reverse the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells are critical for chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the genesis of drug-resistance of various cancer types. There are also many advantages of miRNAs in diagnosis and therapy of disease. Although several miRNAs regulating 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in human pancreatic cancer have been reported, the detailed molecular mechanism remains to be determined. In this study, we found that miR-320a was significantly up-regulated in 5-FU resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-320a strongly contributed to pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which was represented by the increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis, drug-resistance characteristics and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-320a was able to bind to 3'UTR of PDCD4 mRNA, and mediated its down-regulation in 5-FU resistance of human pancreatic cancer cells. Whereas restoration of PDCD4 expression could partially attenuate the function of miR-320a in pancreatic cancer. Taken together, our study demonstrated that miR-320a played important role in regulating 5-FU resistance by targeting PDCD4 and might be developed as new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27279541

  3. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance. PMID:26397118

  4. Peroxide Responsive Regulator PerR of group A Streptococcus Is Required for the Expression of Phage-Associated DNase Sda1 under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsin-Tzu; Zheng, Po-Xing; Tsou, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Shuying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2013-01-01

    The peroxide regulator (PerR) is a ferric uptake repressor-like protein, which is involved in adaptation to oxidative stress and iron homeostasis in group A streptococcus. A perR mutant is attenuated in surviving in human blood, colonization of the pharynx, and resistance to phagocytic clearance, indicating that the PerR regulon affects both host environment adaptation and immune escape. Sda1 is a phage-associated DNase which promotes M1T1 group A streptococcus escaping from phagocytic cells by degrading DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps. In the present study, we found that the expression of sda1 is up-regulated under oxidative conditions in the wild-type strain but not in the perR mutant. A gel mobility shift assay showed that the recombinant PerR protein binds the sda1 promoter. In addition, mutation of the conserved histidine residue in the metal binding site of PerR abolished sda1 expression under hydrogen peroxide treatment conditions, suggesting that PerR is directly responsible for the sda1 expression under oxidative stress. Our results reveal PerR-dependent sda1 expression under oxidative stress, which may aid innate immune escape of group A streptococcus. PMID:24312597

  5. Induction of miRNA-181a by genotoxic treatments promotes chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yayun; Xue, Jingyan; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ziqin; Fan, Meiyun; Yang, Chuan He; Shao, Zhi-ming; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.; Wu, Jiong; Wu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Acquired therapeutic resistance is the major drawback to effective systemic therapies for cancers. Aggressive triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) develop resistance to chemotherapies rapidly, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we show that genotoxic treatments significantly increased the expression of miR-181a in TNBC cells, which enhanced TNBC cell survival and metastasis upon Doxorubicin treatment. Consistently, high miR-181a level associated with poor disease free survival and overall survival after treatments in breast cancer patients. The up-regulation of miR-181a was orchestrated by transcription factor STAT3 whose activation depended on NF-κB-mediated IL-6 induction in TNBC cells upon genotoxic treatment. Intriguingly, activated STAT3 not only directly bound to MIR181A1 promoter to drive transcription, it also facilitated the recruitment of MSK1 to the same region where MSK1 promoted a local active chromatin state by phosphorylating histone H3. We further identified BAX as a direct functional target of miR-181a, whose suppression decreased apoptosis and increased invasion of TNBC cells upon Dox treatment. These results were further confirmed by evidence that suppression of miR-181a significantly enhanced therapeutic response and reduced lung metastasis in a TNBC orthotopic model. Collectively, our data suggested that miR-181a induction played a critical role in promoting therapeutic resistance and aggressive behavior of TNBC cells upon genotoxic treatment. Antagonizing miR-181a may serve as a promising strategy to sensitize TNBC cells to chemotherapy and mitigate metastasis. PMID:26028030

  6. Induction of miRNA-181a by genotoxic treatments promotes chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Niu, J; Xue, A; Chi, Y; Xue, J; Wang, W; Zhao, Z; Fan, M; Yang, C H; Shao, Z-M; Pfeffer, L M; Wu, J; Wu, Z-H

    2016-03-10

    Acquired therapeutic resistance is the major drawback to effective systemic therapies for cancers. Aggressive triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) develop resistance to chemotherapies rapidly, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we show that genotoxic treatments significantly increased the expression of miR-181a in TNBC cells, which enhanced TNBC cell survival and metastasis upon Doxorubicin treatment. Consistently, high miR-181a level associated with poor disease free survival and overall survival after treatments in breast cancer patients. The upregulation of miR-181a was orchestrated by transcription factor STAT3 whose activation depended on NF-κB-mediated IL-6 induction in TNBC cells upon genotoxic treatment. Intriguingly, activated STAT3 not only directly bound to MIR181A1 promoter to drive transcription but also facilitated the recruitment of MSK1 to the same region where MSK1 promoted a local active chromatin state by phosphorylating histone H3. We further identified BAX as a direct functional target of miR-181a, whose suppression decreased apoptosis and increased invasion of TNBC cells upon Dox treatment. These results were further confirmed by evidence that suppression of miR-181a significantly enhanced therapeutic response and reduced lung metastasis in a TNBC orthotopic model. Collectively, our data suggested that miR-181a induction had a critical role in promoting therapeutic resistance and aggressive behavior of TNBC cells upon genotoxic treatment. Antagonizing miR-181a may serve as a promising strategy to sensitize TNBC cells to chemotherapy and mitigate metastasis. PMID:26028030

  7. Overexpression of an ABA biosynthesis gene using a stress-inducible promoter enhances drought resistance in petunia

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Melo, Alejandro C; Chao; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The response of plants to drought stress includes reduced transpiration as stomates close in response to increased abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations. Constitutive overexpression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, increases drought resistance, but causes negative pleiotropic effects on plant growth and development. We overexpressed the tomato NCED (LeNCED1) in petunia plants under the control of a stress-inducible promoter, rd29A. Under water stress, the transgenic plants had increased transcripts of NCED mRNA, elevated leaf ABA concentrations, increased concentrations of proline, and a significant increase in drought resistance. The transgenic plants also displayed the expected decreases in stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis. After 14 days without water, the control plants were dead, but the transgenic plants, though wilted, recovered fully when re-watered. Well-watered transgenic plants grew like non-transformed control plants and there was no effect of the transgene on seed dormancy. PMID:26504568

  8. Overexpression of an ABA biosynthesis gene using a stress-inducible promoter enhances drought resistance in petunia.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Melo, Alejandro C; Chao; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The response of plants to drought stress includes reduced transpiration as stomates close in response to increased abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations. Constitutive overexpression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, increases drought resistance, but causes negative pleiotropic effects on plant growth and development. We overexpressed the tomato NCED (LeNCED1) in petunia plants under the control of a stress-inducible promoter, rd29A. Under water stress, the transgenic plants had increased transcripts of NCED mRNA, elevated leaf ABA concentrations, increased concentrations of proline, and a significant increase in drought resistance. The transgenic plants also displayed the expected decreases in stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis. After 14 days without water, the control plants were dead, but the transgenic plants, though wilted, recovered fully when re-watered. Well-watered transgenic plants grew like non-transformed control plants and there was no effect of the transgene on seed dormancy. PMID:26504568

  9. Scouting contaminated estuaries: heavy metal resistant and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in the native metal rhizoaccumulator Spartina maritima.

    PubMed

    Mesa, J; Mateos-Naranjo, E; Caviedes, M A; Redondo-Gómez, S; Pajuelo, E; Rodríguez-Llorente, I D

    2015-01-15

    Spartina maritima is a native endangered heavy metal rhizoaccumulator cordgrass naturally growing in southwest coasts of Spain, where is used as a biotool to rehabilitate degraded salt marshes. Fifteen bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of S. maritima growing in the estuary of the Tinto River, one of the most polluted areas in the world. A high proportion of bacteria were resistant towards several heavy metals. They also exhibited multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) properties, in the absence and the presence of Cu. Bacillus methylotrophicus SMT38, Bacillusaryabhattai SMT48, B. aryabhattai SMT50 and Bacilluslicheniformis SMT51 were selected as the best performing strains. In a gnobiotic assay, inoculation of Medicago sativa seeds with the selected isolates induced higher root elongation. The inoculation of S. maritima with these indigenous metal-resistant PGP rhizobacteria could be an efficient method to increase plant adaptation and growth in contaminated estuaries during restoration programs. PMID:25467875

  10. Genetic relationship between soxRS and mar loci in promoting multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P F; Gambino, L F; Sulavik, M C; Gracheck, S J

    1994-01-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli has typically been associated with mutations at the mar locus, located at 34 min on the E. coli chromosome. A new mutant, marC, isolated on the basis of a Mar phenotype but which maps to the soxRS (encoding the regulators of the superoxide stress response) locus located at 92 min, is described here. This mutant shares several features with a known constitutive allele of the soxRS gene, prompting the conclusion that it is a highly active allele of this gene. The marC mutation has thus been given the designation soxR201. This new mutant was used to examine the relationship between the mar and sox loci in promoting antibiotic resistance. The results of these studies indicate that full antibiotic resistance resulting from the soxR201 mutation is partially dependent on an intact mar locus and is associated with an increase in the steady-state level of mar-specific mRNA. In addition, paraquat treatment of wild-type cells is shown to increase the level of antibiotic resistance in a dose-dependent manner that requires an intact soxRS locus. Conversely, overexpression of MarA from a multicopy plasmid results in weak activation of a superoxide stress response target gene. These findings are consistent with a model in which the regulatory factors encoded by the marA and soxS genes control the expression of overlapping sets of target genes, with MarA preferentially acting on targets involved with antibiotic resistance and SoxS directed primarily towards components of the superoxide stress response. Furthermore, compounds frequently used to induce the superoxide stress response, including paraquat, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate, differ with respect to the amount of protection provided against them by the antibiotic resistance response. Images PMID:7986007

  11. Rhizosphere fungus Penicillium chrysogenum promotes growth and induces defence-related genes and downy mildew disease resistance in pearl millet.

    PubMed

    Murali, M; Sudisha, J; Amruthesh, K N; Ito, S-I; Shetty, H S

    2013-01-01

    Susceptible pearl millet seeds (cv 7042S) were treated with the plant growth promoting fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (PenC-JSB9) at 1 × 10(8) spores·ml(-1) to examine mRNA expression profiles of five defence responsive genes and test its ability to induce resistance to downy mildew caused by Sclerospora graminicola. PenC-JSB9 treatment at 1 × 10(8) CFU·ml(-1) for 6 h significantly enhanced seed germination (9.8- 89%), root length (4.08% to 5.1 cm), shoot length (18.9% to 7.77 cm) and reduced disease incidence (28%) in comparison with untreated controls. In planta colonisation of PenC-JSB9 showed that all three root segments (0-6 cm) and soil dilutions incubated on PDA produced extensive mycelial growth, however colonisation frequency of PenC-JSB9 was significantly higher in soil than in root segments. Spatiotemporal studies revealed that induction of resistance was triggered as early as 24 h and a minimum 2-3 days was optimal for total resistance to build up between inducer treatment and challenge inoculation in both experiments. In Northern blot analysis, transcript accumulation of resistant and PenC-JSB9 induced susceptible cultivars showed higher basal levels of defence gene expression than non-pretreated susceptible controls. Transcript accumulation in resistant seedlings challenge-inoculated with the pathogen showed maximum expression of CHS (3.5-fold increase) and Pr-1a (threefold increase) at 24 and 12 h, respectively. While PenC-JSB9 pretreated susceptible seedlings challenge-inoculated showed rapid and enhanced expression of LOX and POX at 48 h and for CHT at 24 h, whereas non-pretreated susceptible seedlings after pathogen inoculation showed weak expression of hybridised defence genes. Enhanced activation of defence genes by PenC-JSB9 suggests its role in elevated resistance against S. graminicola. PMID:22672261

  12. Activation of the pleiotropic drug resistance pathway can promote mitochondrial DNA retention by fusion-defective mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Nebibe; Garipler, Görkem; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-07-01

    Genetic and microscopic approaches using Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified many proteins that play a role in mitochondrial dynamics, but it is possible that other proteins and pathways that play a role in mitochondrial division and fusion remain to be discovered. Mutants lacking mitochondrial fusion are characterized by rapid loss of mitochondrial DNA. We took advantage of a petite-negative mutant that is unable to survive mitochondrial DNA loss to select for mutations that allow cells with fusion-deficient mitochondria to maintain the mitochondrial genome on fermentable medium. Next-generation sequencing revealed that all identified suppressor mutations not associated with known mitochondrial division components were localized to PDR1 or PDR3, which encode transcription factors promoting drug resistance. Further studies revealed that at least one, if not all, of these suppressor mutations dominantly increases resistance to known substrates of the pleiotropic drug resistance pathway. Interestingly, hyperactivation of this pathway did not significantly affect mitochondrial shape, suggesting that mitochondrial division was not greatly affected. Our results reveal an intriguing genetic connection between pleiotropic drug resistance and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:24807265

  13. DNA damage induces GDNF secretion in the tumor microenvironment with paracrine effects promoting prostate cancer treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland M.; Lucas, Jared M.; Gomez-Sarosi, Luis A.; Coleman, Ilsa; Zhao, Song; Coleman, Roger; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Though metastatic cancers often initially respond to genotoxic therapeutics, acquired resistance is common. In addition to cytotoxic effects on tumor cells, DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapy induce injury in benign cells of the tumor microenvironment resulting in the production of paracrine-acting factors capable of promoting tumor resistance phenotypes. In studies designed to characterize the responses of prostate and bone stromal cells to genotoxic stress, we found that transcripts encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) increased several fold following exposures to cytotoxic agents including radiation, the topoisomerase inhibitor mitoxantrone and the microtubule poison docetaxel. Fibroblast GDNF exerted paracrine effects toward prostate cancer cells resulting in enhanced tumor cell proliferation and invasion, and these effects were concordant with the expression of known GDNF receptors GFRA1 and RET. Exposure to GDNF also induced tumor cell resistance to mitoxantrone and docetaxel chemotherapy. Together, these findings support an important role for tumor microenvironment damage responses in modulating treatment resistance and identify the GDNF signaling pathway as a potential target for improving responses to conventional genotoxic therapeutics. PMID:25575823

  14. Bioaugmentation with cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to assist cadmium phytoextraction by Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Chanprasert, Maesinee; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2013-07-01

    Micrococcus sp. MU1 and Klebsiella sp. BAM1, the cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), produce high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the late stationary phase of their growth. The ability of PGPR to promote root elongation, plant growth and cadmium uptake in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated. Both species of bacteria were able to remove cadmium ions from an aqueous solution and enhanced cadmium mobilization in contaminated soil. Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. use aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid as a nitrogen source to support their growth, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cadmium for Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. were 1000 and 800mM, respectively. These bacteria promoted root elongation in H. annuus seedlings in both the absence and presence of cadmium compared to uninoculated seedlings. Inoculation with these bacteria was found to increase the root lengths of H. annuus that had been planted in cadmium-contaminated soil. An increase in dry weight was observed for H. annuus inoculated with Micrococcus sp. Moreover, Micrococcus sp. enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the root and leaf of H. annuus compared to untreated plants. The highest cadmium accumulation in the whole plant was observed when the plants were treated with EDTA following the treatment with Micrococcus sp. In addition, the highest translocation of cadmium from root to the above-ground tissues of H. annuus was found after treatment with Klebsiella sp. in the fourth week after planting. Our results show that plant growth and cadmium accumulation in H. annuus was significantly enhanced by cadmium-resistant PGPRs, and these bacterial inoculants are excellent promoters of phytoextraction for the rehabilitation of heavy metal-polluted environments. PMID:23478127

  15. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly

  16. L-Rhamnosylation of Listeria monocytogenes Wall Teichoic Acids Promotes Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides by Delaying Interaction with the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filipe; Atilano, Magda L.; Pombinho, Rita; Covas, Gonçalo; Gallo, Richard L.; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic Gram-positive bacterial pathogen responsible for listeriosis, a human foodborne disease. Its cell wall is densely decorated with wall teichoic acids (WTAs), a class of anionic glycopolymers that play key roles in bacterial physiology, including protection against the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In other Gram-positive pathogens, WTA modification by amine-containing groups such as D-alanine was largely correlated with resistance to AMPs. However, in L. monocytogenes, where WTA modification is achieved solely via glycosylation, WTA-associated mechanisms of AMP resistance were unknown. Here, we show that the L-rhamnosylation of L. monocytogenes WTAs relies not only on the rmlACBD locus, which encodes the biosynthetic pathway for L-rhamnose, but also on rmlT encoding a putative rhamnosyltransferase. We demonstrate that this WTA tailoring mechanism promotes resistance to AMPs, unveiling a novel link between WTA glycosylation and bacterial resistance to host defense peptides. Using in vitro binding assays, fluorescence-based techniques and electron microscopy, we show that the presence of L-rhamnosylated WTAs at the surface of L. monocytogenes delays the crossing of the cell wall by AMPs and postpones their contact with the listerial membrane. We propose that WTA L-rhamnosylation promotes L. monocytogenes survival by decreasing the cell wall permeability to AMPs, thus hindering their access and detrimental interaction with the plasma membrane. Strikingly, we reveal a key contribution of WTA L-rhamnosylation for L. monocytogenes virulence in a mouse model of infection. PMID:26001194

  17. Coaggregation of Streptococcus sanguis and other streptococci with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, H F; Lala, H C; Shepherd, M G

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen strains of viridans group streptococci and two strains of other streptococci were tested for coaggregation with Candida albicans. Streptococcus sanguis strains generally exhibited low levels of adherence to 28 degrees C-grown exponential-phase yeast cells, but starvation of yeast cells for glucose at 37 degrees C (or at 28 degrees C) increased their coaggregating activity with these streptococci by at least tenfold. This was a property common to four C. albicans strains tested, two of which were able to form mycelia (6406 and MEN) and two of which were not (MM2002 and CA2). The expression of the coaggregation adhesin during yeast cell starvation was inhibited by addition of trichodermin or amphotericin B. The strains of S. sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus oralis tested for coaggregating activity encompassed a diverse range of physiological and morphological types, yet all exhibited saturable coaggregation with starved C. albicans cells. There was no correlation of cell surface hydrophobicity, of either yeast or streptococcal cells, with their abilities to coaggregate. Strains of Streptococcus anginosus also coaggregated with starved yeast cells; Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus pyogenes coaggregated to a lesser degree with C. albicans, and the coaggregation with S. pyogenes was not promoted by yeast cell starvation; Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis did not coaggregate with yeast. The coaggregation reactions of S. sanguis and S. gordonii with C. albicans were inhibited by EDTA and by heat or protease treatment of the yeast cells and were not reversible by the addition of lactose or other simple sugars. These observations extend the range of intergeneric coaggregations that are known to occur between oral microbes and suggest that coaggregations of C. albicans with viridans group streptococci may be important for colonization of oral surfaces by the yeast. PMID:2182544

  18. TXNDC17 promotes paclitaxel resistance via inducing autophagy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Fa; Wang, Xin-Yu; Fu, Zhi-Qin; Peng, Qiao-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Yang; Ye, Feng; Fu, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Lu, Wei-Guo; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is recommended as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent against ovarian cancer, but drug resistance becomes a major limitation of its success clinically. The key molecule or mechanism associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer still remains unclear. Here, we showed that TXNDC17 screened from 356 differentially expressed proteins by LC-MS/MS label-free quantitative proteomics was more highly expressed in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and the high expression of TXNDC17 was associated with poorer prognostic factors and exhibited shortened survival in 157 ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, paclitaxel exposure induced upregulation of TXNDC17 and BECN1 expression, increase of autophagosome formation, and autophagic flux that conferred cytoprotection for ovarian cancer cells from paclitaxel. TXNDC17 inhibition by siRNA or enforced overexpression by a pcDNA3.1(+)-TXNDC17 plasmid correspondingly decreased or increased the autophagy response and paclitaxel resistance. Additionally, the downregulation of BECN1 by siRNA attenuated the activation of autophagy and cytoprotection from paclitaxel induced by TXNDC17 overexpression in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our findings suggest that TXNDC17, through participation of BECN1, induces autophagy and consequently results in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer. TXNDC17 may be a potential predictor or target in ovarian cancer therapeutics. PMID:25607466

  19. TXNDC17 promotes paclitaxel resistance via inducing autophagy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song-Fa; Wang, Xin-Yu; Fu, Zhi-Qin; Peng, Qiao-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Yang; Ye, Feng; Fu, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Lu, Wei-Guo; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is recommended as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent against ovarian cancer, but drug resistance becomes a major limitation of its success clinically. The key molecule or mechanism associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer still remains unclear. Here, we showed that TXNDC17 screened from 356 differentially expressed proteins by LC-MS/MS label-free quantitative proteomics was more highly expressed in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and the high expression of TXNDC17 was associated with poorer prognostic factors and exhibited shortened survival in 157 ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, paclitaxel exposure induced upregulation of TXNDC17 and BECN1 expression, increase of autophagosome formation, and autophagic flux that conferred cytoprotection for ovarian cancer cells from paclitaxel. TXNDC17 inhibition by siRNA or enforced overexpression by a pcDNA3.1(+)-TXNDC17 plasmid correspondingly decreased or increased the autophagy response and paclitaxel resistance. Additionally, the downregulation of BECN1 by siRNA attenuated the activation of autophagy and cytoprotection from paclitaxel induced by TXNDC17 overexpression in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our findings suggest that TXNDC17, through participation of BECN1, induces autophagy and consequently results in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer. TXNDC17 may be a potential predictor or target in ovarian cancer therapeutics. PMID:25607466

  20. In Vitro Bactericidal and Bacteriolytic Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 against Planktonic Cultures and Biofilms of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Pathogenic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Margarita; García, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    Ceragenin CSA-13, a cationic steroid, is here reported to show a concentration-dependent bactericidal/bacteriolytic activity against pathogenic streptococci, including multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The autolysis promoted by CSA-13 in pneumococcal cultures appears to be due to the triggering of the major S. pneumoniae autolysin LytA, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. CSA-13 also disintegrated pneumococcal biofilms in a very efficient manner, although at concentrations slightly higher than those required for bactericidal activity on planktonic bacteria. CSA-13 has little hemolytic activity which should allow testing its antibacterial efficacy in animal models. PMID:25006964

  1. Interleukin-6 signaling promotes alternative macrophage activation to limit obesity-associated insulin resistance and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Goldau, Julia; Vogt, Merly C.; Ruud, Johan; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Theurich, Sebastian; Hausen, A. Christine; Schmitz, Joel; Brönneke, Hella S.; Estevez, Emma; Allen, Tamara L.; Mesaros, Andrea; Partridge, Linda; Febbraio, Mark A.; Chawla, Ajay; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are closely associated with the development of low-grade inflammation. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is linked to obesity-associated inflammation, however its role in this context remains controversial. Here, we show that mice with inactivated Il6ra gene in myeloid cells (Il6raΔmyel) displayed exaggerated deterioration of glucose homeostasis upon diet-induced obesity due to enhanced insulin resistance. Insulin target tissues showed increased inflammation and a shift in macrophage polarization. IL-6 induced IL-4-receptor expression and augmented the response to IL-4 in macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Il6raΔmyel mice were resistant to IL-4-mediated alternative macrophage polarization and exhibited increased susceptibility to LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results reveal IL-6 signaling as an important determinant for alternative macrophage-activation and assign IL-6 an unexpected homeostatic role to limit inflammation. PMID:24681566

  2. Human involucrin promoter mediates repression-resistant and compartment-specific LEKTI expression.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Semenova, Ekaterina; Larcher, Fernando; Del Rio, Marcela; Harper, John I; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2012-01-01

    Gene-modified skin grafts, produced through gene transfer to human keratinocyte stem cells, offer the possibility of therapeutic benefit for inherited skin diseases. We have previously described efficient lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer to keratinocyte stem cells and the generation of human skin grafts for the inherited skin disease, Netherton syndrome, which arises due to mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5). Vectors incorporating an internal murine retroviral-derived promoter [spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV)] in combination with a codon-optimized SPINK5 transgene supported high levels of reconstitution and robust correction of skin architecture. Subsequent longer-term experiments have uncovered unanticipated silencing phenomena, with loss of SPINK5 gene expression over time. The inadvertent introduction of CpG sites during codon optimization appears to have rendered vectors susceptible to silencing due to methylation across the promoter-transgene boundary. Substitution of the methylation-susceptible SFFV promoter with a 572-bp minimal human involucrin promoter (INVOp), which encodes very few CpG sites, prevented repression of the SPINK5 transgene and resulted in durable and highly compartment-specific reconstitution of lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) in human skin grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We conclude that skin grafts modified with lentiviral vectors encoding INVOp offer a suitable platform for therapeutic gene therapy in Netherton syndrome, and our experience highlights unanticipated effects of transgene codon optimization. PMID:21895535

  3. Phospholipids of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Mota, J. M. dos Santos; Den Kamp, J. A. F. Op; Verheij, H. M.; Van Deenen, L. L. M.

    1970-01-01

    Autoradiograms of total lipid extracts from Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790, harvested in the stationary phase from a medium containing 32P-orthophosphate, showed six major spots. The corresponding compounds were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol (possibly with a penta acyl structure); phosphatidylglycerol; a provisionally identified mixture of alanylphosphatidylglycerol and of the 2′-lysyl-derivative of phosphatidylglycerol; the 3′-lysyl-derivative of phosphatidylglycerol, probably together with some arginylphosphatidylglycerol; a diglucosyl derivative of phosphatidylglycerol; and a compound which was tentatively identified as the 2′,3′-dilysyl derivative of phosphatidylglycerol. Images PMID:4321329

  4. Promotive effects of alginate-derived oligosaccharides on the inducing drought resistance of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruizhi; Jiang, Xiaolu; Guan, Huashi; Li, Xiaoxia; Du, Yishuai; Wang, Peng; Mou, Haijin

    2009-09-01

    In order to determine the role of alginate-derived oligosaccharides (ADO) in drought stress resistance of tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Miller) seedlings, the leaves were exposed to different concentrations of ADO (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.20%, 0.30% and 0.50%) after drought stress was simulated by exposing the roots to 0.6 molL-1 PEG-6000 solution for 6 h. Changes in biomass, electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA), free proline, total soluble sugars (TSS) and abscisic acid (ABA), the enzyme activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were measured to investigate the effects of ADO treatment. The results showed that the treatment with an ADO concentration of 0.20% exhibited the highest performance of drought stress resistance in the tomato seedlings by decreasing the electrolyte leakage and the concentration of MDA, increasing the contents of free proline, TSS and ABA, and increasing the activities of CAT, SOD, POD and PAL after treatment with ADO. It is suggested that changes in electrolyte leakage, MDA, osmotic solutes, ABA, anti-oxidative enzyme and PAL activities were responsible for the increased drought stress resistance in tomato seedlings. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of ADO treatment on enhancing the drought stress resistance of tomato seedlings.

  5. P-Rex1 promotes resistance to VEGF/VEGFR-targeted therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pursell, Bryan; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine VEGF signaling is critical for sustaining prostate and other cancer stem cells (CSCs) and it is a potential therapeutic target, but we observed that CSCs isolated from prostate tumors are resistant to anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) and anti-VEGFR (sunitinib) therapy. Intriguingly, resistance is mediated by VEGF/Neuropilin signaling, which is not inhibited by bevacizumab and sunitinib, and it involves the induction of P-Rex1, a Rac GEF, and consequent Rac1-mediated ERK activation. This induction of P-Rex1 is dependent on Myc. CSCs isolated from the PTENpc−/− transgenic model of prostate cancer exhibit Rac1-dependent resistance to bevacizumab. Rac1 inhibition or P-Rex1 down-regulation increases the sensitivity of prostate tumors to bevacizumab. These data reveal that prostate tumors harbor cells with stem cell properties that are resistant to inhibitors of VEGF/VEGFR signaling. Combining the use of available VEGF/VEGFR-targeted therapies with P-Rex1 or Rac1 inhibition should improve the efficacy of these therapies significantly. PMID:26923603

  6. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27050305

  7. The Potential of Inoculation in Promoting Resistance to the Effectiveness of Comparative Advertising Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential of the inoculation message strategy to deflect the persuasiveness of comparative advertisements. Indicates modest potential for inoculation, confirming that inoculation pretreatments confer resistance to a comparative ad's influence on consumer attitudes, especially on behalf of high-involving products. (SR)

  8. CYTOKININS AS BIOREGULATORS PROMOTE INSECT RESISTANCE IN PLANTS TRANSFORMED WITH THE IPT GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of the bacterial cytokinin biosynthesis gene (PI-II-ipt ) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants has been associated with antifeedent and toxic effects on Manduca sexta and Myzus persicae larvae. To characterize the components responsible for the resistance, leaf extracts prepared ...

  9. Characterization of metal-resistant plant-growth promoting Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolated from serpentine soil in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Mani; Ma, Ying; Freitas, Helena

    2008-12-01

    A metal-resistant bacterial strain SM3 isolated from a serpentine soil in the north-east of Portugal was characterized as Bacillus weihenstephanensis based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics and on the comparative analysis of the partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. Bacillus weihenstephanensis SM3 showed a high degree of resistance to nickel (1500 mg l(-1)), copper (500 mg l(-1)) and zinc (700 mg l(-1)) and also to antibiotics (ampicillin, penicillin, kanamycin and streptomycin). Strain SM3 has also exhibited the capability of solubilizing phosphate and producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) both in the absence and in the presence of metals (Ni, Cu and Zn). A pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of strain SM3 on plant growth and uptake of Ni, Cu or Zn by Helianthus annuus. Inoculation with strain SM3 increased the shoot and root biomass of H. annuus grown in both non-contaminated and contaminated soil. Furthermore, strain SM3 increased the accumulation of Cu and Zn in the root and shoot systems. A batch experiment was also conducted to assess the metal mobilization potential of strain SM3 in soil. Inoculation with this strain increased the concentrations of water soluble Ni, Cu and Zn in soil. Metal solubilization by this bacterial strain may be an important process to promote the uptake of heavy metals by plants. This study elucidates the multifarious role of strain SM3 in plant growth promotion and its metal mobilizing potential. PMID:18785659

  10. Molecular Basis for Different Levels of tet(M) Expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grohs, Patrick; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Podglajen, Isabelle; Grondin, Sophie; Firon, Arnaud; Poyart, Claire; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Seventy-four unrelated clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae harboring the tet(M) gene were studied. Seven strains with low tetracycline (Tc) MICs (0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml) were found to harbor truncated tet(M) alleles that were inactivated by different frameshift mutations. In contrast, five strains bore deletions in the tet(M) promoter region, among which four displayed increased Tc MICs (16 to 64 μg/ml). The same promoter mutations were detected in Tc-resistant mutants selected in vitro from various susceptible strains. Sequence analysis revealed that these deletions might impede the formation of the transcriptional attenuator located immediately upstream of tet(M). Expression in Enterococcus faecalis of a tet(M) reporter gene transcribed from these promoter mutants conferred a level of Tc resistance similar to that observed in the parental S. pneumoniae strains. These results show that different levels of Tc susceptibility found in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae can be explained by frameshift mutations within tet(M) and by alterations of the upstream transcriptional attenuator. PMID:22802249

  11. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  12. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E.; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  13. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  14. Oncogenic Ras suppresses ING4-TDG-Fas axis to promote apoptosis resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Shen, Qi; Lu, Haiqi; Jiang, Zhinong; Xu, Wenxia; Feng, Lifeng; Li, Ling; Wang, Xian; Cai, Xiujun; Jin, Hongchuan

    2015-01-01

    Ras is aberrantly activated in many cancers and active DNA demethylation plays a fundamental role to establish DNA methylation pattern which is of importance to cancer development. However, it was unknown whether and how Ras regulate DNA demethylation during carcinogenesis. Here we found that Ras downregulated thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG), a DNA demethylation enzyme, by inhibiting the interaction of transcription activator ING4 with TDG promoter. TDG recruited histone lysine demethylase JMJD3 to the Fas promoter and activated its expression, thus restoring sensitivity to apoptosis. TDG suppressed in vivo tumorigenicity of xenograft pancreatic cancer. Thus, we speculate that reversing Ras-mediated ING4 inhibition to activate Fas expression is a potential therapeutic approach for Ras-driven cancers. PMID:26544625

  15. Oasis desert farming selects environment-specific date palm root endophytic communities and cultivable bacteria that promote resistance to drought.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Hanene; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Ferjani, Raoudha; Fusi, Marco; Soussi, Asma; Mapelli, Francesca; Blilou, Ikram; Borin, Sara; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Cherif, Ameur; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ouzari, Hadda

    2015-08-01

    Oases are desert-farming agro-ecosystems, where date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) plays a keystone role in offsetting the effects of drought and maintaining a suitable microclimate for agriculture. At present, abundance, diversity and plant growth promotion (PGP) of date palm root-associated bacteria remain unknown. Considering the environmental pressure determined by the water scarcity in the desert environments, we hypothesized that bacteria associated with date palm roots improve plant resistance to drought. Here, the ecology of date palm root endophytes from oases in the Tunisian Sahara was studied with emphasis on their capacity to promote growth under drought. Endophytic communities segregated along a north-south gradient in correlation with geo-climatic parameters. Screening of 120 endophytes indicated that date palm roots select for bacteria with multiple PGP traits. Bacteria rapidly cross-colonized the root tissues of different species of plants, including the original Tunisian date palm cultivar, Saudi Arabian cultivars and Arabidopsis. Selected endophytes significantly increased the biomass of date palms exposed to repeated drought stress periods during a 9-month greenhouse experiment. Overall, results indicate that date palm roots shape endophytic communities that are capable to promote plant growth under drought conditions, thereby contributing an essential ecological service to the entire oasis ecosystem. PMID:26033617

  16. Aspirin Resistance and Promoting Blood Circulation and Removing Blood Stasis: Current Situation and Prospectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang; Feng, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin plays a crucial physiological and pathophysiological role in cardiovascular diseases and cerebrovascular diseases by irreversibly inhibiting thromboxane A2. However, some patients may be “resistant” to its effect. The resistance has close association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and increased mortality, so that resolving the problem of aspirin resistance (AR) is widely concerned. By studying the correlation between AR and blood stasis syndrome (BSS), it is demonstrated that BSS may be one of the pathogenesis of AR in traditional Chinese medicine. Chinese herb and formulas definitely possess the advantage of whole body regulation by many ways and many targets. It is a new direction for treatment of AR to combine TCM and modern medicine to study the mechanism and prevention of AR. PMID:24696702

  17. Aerobic training stimulates growth and promotes disease resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Castro, Vicente; Grisdale-Helland, Barbara; Helland, Ståle J; Kristensen, Torstein; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Helgerud, Jan; Claireaux, Guy; Farrell, Anthony P; Krasnov, Aleksei; Takle, Harald

    2011-10-01

    Improving fish robustness is of utmost relevance to reducing fish losses in farming. Although not previously examined, we hypothesized that aerobic training, as shown for human studies, could strengthen disease resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Thus, we exercised salmon pre-smolts for 6 weeks at two different aerobic training regimes; a continuous intensity training (CT; 0.8bls(-1)) and an interval training (IT; 0.8bl s(-1) 16h and 1.0bl s(-1) 8h) and compared them with untrained controls (C; 0.05bl s(-1)). The effects of endurance training on disease resistance were evaluated using an IPN virus challenge test, while the cardiac immune modulatory effects were characterized by qPCR and microarray gene expression analyses. In addition, swimming performance and growth parameters were investigated. Survival after the IPN challenge was higher for IT (74%) fish than for either CT (64%) or C (61%) fish. While both CT and IT groups showed lower cardiac transcription levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 prior to the IPN challenge test, IT fish showed the strongest regulation of genes involved in immune responses and other processes known to affect disease resistance. Both CT and IT regimes resulted in better growth compared with control fish, with CT fish developing a better swimming efficiency during training. Overall, interval aerobic training improved growth and increased robustness of Atlantic salmon, manifested by better disease resistance, which we found was associated with a modulation of relevant gene classes on the cardiac transcriptome. PMID:21726657

  18. Cell Division Cycle 6 Promotes Mitotic Slippage and Contributes to Drug Resistance in Paclitaxel-Treated Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Yan, Daoyu; Zheng, Dianpeng; Hu, Zhiming; Li, Hongwei; Li, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is an antimitotic drug that possesses potent anticancer activity, but its therapeutic potential in the clinic has been hindered by drug resistance. Here, we report a mechanism by which cancer cells can exit from the PTX-induced mitotic arrest, i.e. mitotic slippage, and avoid subsequent death resulting in drug resistance. In cells experiencing mitotic slippage, Cdc6 protein level was significantly upregulated, Cdk1 activity was inhibited, and Cohesin/Rad21 was cleaved as a result. Cdc6 depletion by RNAi or Norcantharidin inhibited PTX-induced Cdc6 up-regulation, maintained Cdk1 activity, and repressed Cohesin/Rad21 cleavage. In all, this resulted in reduced mitotic slippage and reversal of PTX resistance. Moreover, in synchronized cells, the role of Cdc6 in mitotic exit under PTX pressure was also confirmed. This study indicates that Cdc6 may promote mitotic slippage by inactivation of Cdk1. Targeting of Cdc6 may serve as a promising strategy for enhancing the anticancer activity of PTX. PMID:27611665

  19. MiR-1180 promotes apoptotic resistance to human hepatocellular carcinoma via activation of NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guosheng; Wu, Linwei; Tan, Jinfu; Zhang, Bing; Tai, William Chi-shing; Xiong, Shiqiu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianyong; Li, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant factor in carcinogenesis. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in apoptosis resistance is crucial for developing anticancer therapies. Importantly, small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported as key biomarkers for detecting tumour onset and progression. In the present study, we demonstrate that miR-1180 is upregulated in HCC. Ectopic expression of miR-1180 has an anti-apoptotic effect in HCC, while miR-1180 inhibition increases cell apoptosis, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, our results show that miR-1180 directly targets key inhibitors of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway (i.e., OTUD7B and TNIP2) and the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 associated death promoter (BAD) protein by post-transcriptional downregulation. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic function of miR-1180 in HCC may occur through NF-κB pathway activation via downregulation of its negative regulators. In conclusion, our study reveals the critical role of miR-1180 during apoptosis resistance in HCC. PMID:26928365

  20. "In situ" phytostabilisation of heavy metal polluted soils using Lupinus luteus inoculated with metal resistant plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dary, M; Chamber-Pérez, M A; Palomares, A J; Pajuelo, E

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of metal phytostabilisation potential of Lupinus luteus inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. 750 and heavy metal resistant PGPRs (plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria), for in situ reclamation of multi-metal contaminated soil after a mine spill. Yellow lupines accumulated heavy metals mainly in roots (Cu, Cd and especially Pb were poorly translocated to shoots). This indicates a potential use of this plant in metal phytostabilisation. Furthermore, As accumulation was undetectable. On the other hand, zinc accumulation was 10-100 times higher than all other metals, both in roots and in shoots. Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium sp. 750 increased both biomass and nitrogen content, indicating that nitrogen fixation was effective in soils with moderate levels of contamination. Co-inoculation of lupines with a consortium of metal resistant PGPR (including Bradyrhizobium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Ochrobactrum cytisi) produced an additional improvement of plant biomass. At the same time, a decrease in metal accumulation was observed, both in shoots and roots, which could be due to a protective effect exerted on plant rhizosphere. Our results indicate the usefulness of L. luteus inoculated with a bacterial consortium of metal resistant PGPRs as a method for in situ reclamation of metal polluted soils. PMID:20056325

  1. Zinc triggers signaling mechanisms and defense responses promoting resistance to Alternaria brassicicola in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Cabot, Catalina; Llugany, Mercè; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    According to the elemental defense hypothesis the accumulation of trace elements by plants may substitute for organic defenses, while the joint effects hypothesis proposes that trace elements and organic defenses can have additive or synergistic effects against pathogens or herbivores. To evaluate these hypotheses the response of the pathosystem Alternaria brassicicola-Arabidopsis thaliana to control (2μM) and surplus (12μM) Zn was evaluated using the camalexin deficient mutant pad3-1 and mtp1-1, a mutant with impaired Zn vacuolar storage, along with the corresponding wildtypes. In vitro, a 50% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved by 440μM Zn. A. thaliana leaves could accumulate equivalent concentrations without harm. In fact, surplus Zn enhanced the resistance of A. thaliana to fungal attack in Columbia (Col-0), Wassilewskija (WS), and mtp1-1. However, surplus Zn was unable to protect pad3-1 demonstrating that Zn cannot substitute for camalexin, the main organic defense in A. thaliana. High, non phytotoxic leaf Zn concentrations enhanced the resistance to A. brassicicola of A. thaliana genotypes able to produce camalexin. This was mainly due to Zn-induced enhancement of the JA/ETH signaling pathway leading to enhanced PAD3 expression. These results support the joint effects hypothesis and highlight the importance of adequate Zn supply for reinforced pathogen resistance. PMID:27297986

  2. The Stringent Response Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Dissemination by Regulating Integron Integrase Expression in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Strugeon, Emilie; Tilloy, Valentin; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Class 1 integrons are genetic systems that enable bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes. These integrons, when isolated in clinical contexts, most often carry antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. They play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. The key element of integrons is the integrase, which allows gene cassettes to be acquired and shuffled. Planktonic culture experiments have shown that integrase expression is regulated by the bacterial SOS response. In natural settings, however, bacteria generally live in biofilms, which are characterized by strong antibiotic resilience and by increased expression of stress-related genes. Here, we report that under biofilm conditions, the stringent response, which is induced upon starvation, (i) increases basal integrase and SOS regulon gene expression via induction of the SOS response and (ii) exerts biofilm-specific regulation of the integrase via the Lon protease. This indicates that biofilm environments favor integron-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance and other adaptive functions encoded by gene cassettes. PMID:27531906

  3. TM4SF1 Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Vijaya; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Li, Zhaoshen; Xu, Leiming; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Background TM4SF1 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and affects the development of this cancer. Also, multidrug resistance (MDR) is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. However, the correlation between TM4SF1 and MDR remains unknown. This research aims to investigate the effect of TM4SF1 on gemcitabine resistance in PDAC and explore the possible molecular mechanism between TM4SF1 and MDR. Methods The expression of TM4SF1 was evaluated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. TM4SF1 siRNA transfection was carried out using Hiperfect transfection reagent to knock down TM4SF1. The transcripts were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting for further study. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were obtained to investigate the sensitivity to gemcitabine of pancreatic cancer cells after silencing TM4SF1 in vitro. We demonstrated that cell signaling of TM4SF1 mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells by assessing the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes using quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo, we used orthotopic pancreatic tumor models to investigate the effect of proliferation after silencing TM4SF1 by a lentivirus-mediated shRNA in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines. Results The mRNA expression of TM4SF1 was higher in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines than in HPDE cell lines. In three gemcitabine-sensitive cell lines (L3.6pl, BxPC-3, SU86.86), the expression of TM4SF1 was lower than that in four gemcitabine-resistant cell lines (MIA PaCa-2, PANC-1, Hs766T, AsPC-1). We evaluated that TM4SF1 was a putative target for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Using AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, we investigated that TM4SF1 silencing affected cell proliferation and increased the percentages of cell apoptosis mediated by treatment with gemcitabine compared with cells which were treated with negative control. This resistance was

  4. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant. PMID:6490816

  5. Genetic Manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  6. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  7. Reinforcing Lipid A Acylation on the Cell Surface of Acinetobacter baumannii Promotes Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Desiccation Survival

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Joseph M.; Tucker, Ashley T.; Klein, Dustin R.; Beltran, Alexander M.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Davies, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging Gram-negative pathogen found in hospitals and intensive care units. In order to persist in hospital environments, A. baumannii withstands desiccative conditions and can rapidly develop multidrug resistance to conventional antibiotics. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) have served as therapeutic alternatives because they target the conserved lipid A component of the Gram-negative outer membrane to lyse the bacterial cell. However, many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including A. baumannii, fortify their outer membrane with hepta-acylated lipid A to protect the cell from CAMP-dependent cell lysis. Whereas in Escherichia coli and Salmonella, increased production of the outer membrane acyltransferase PagP results in formation of protective hepta-acylated lipid A, which reinforces the lipopolysaccharide portion of the outer membrane barrier, A. baumannii does not carry a gene that encodes a PagP homolog. Instead, A. baumannii has evolved a PagP-independent mechanism to synthesize protective hepta-acylated lipid A. Taking advantage of a recently adapted A. baumannii genetic recombineering system, we characterized two putative acyltransferases in A. baumannii designated LpxLAb (A. baumannii LpxL) and LpxMAb (A. baumannii LpxM), which transfer one and two lauroyl (C12:0) acyl chains, respectively, during lipid A biosynthesis. Hepta-acylation of A. baumannii lipid A promoted resistance to vertebrate and polymyxin CAMPs, which are prescribed as last-resort treatment options. Intriguingly, our analysis also showed that LpxMAb-dependent acylation of lipid A is essential for A. baumannii desiccation survival, a key resistance mechanism for survival in hospital environments. Compounds that inhibit LpxMAb-dependent hepta-acylation of lipid A could act synergistically with CAMPs to provide innovative transmission prevention strategies and treat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:25991684

  8. Dps promotes survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in biofilm communities in vitro and resistance to clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Kock, Nancy D.; Swords, W. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common airway commensal and opportunistic pathogen that persists within surface-attached biofilm communities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacterial stress-responses are activated within biofilms. Transcripts for several factors associated with bacterial resistance to environmental stress were increased in biofilm cultures as compared to planktonic cultures. Among these, a homolog of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells (dps) was chosen for further study. An isogenic NTHi 86-028NP dps mutant was generated and tested for resistance to environmental stress, revealing a significant survival defects in high-iron conditions, which was mediated by oxidative stress and was restored by genetic complementation. As expected, NTHi 86-028NP dps had a general stress-response defect, exhibiting decreased resistance to many types of environmental stress. While no differences were observed in density and structure of NTHi 86-028NP and NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms, bacterial survival was decreased in NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms as compared to the parental strain. The role of dps persistence in vivo was tested in animal infection studies. NTHi 86-028NP dps had decreased resistance to clearance after pulmonary infection of elastase-treated mice as compared to NTHi 86-028NP, whereas minimal differences were observed in clearance from mock-treated mice. Similarly, lower numbers of NTHi 86-028NP dps were recovered from middle-ear effusions and bullar homogenates in the chinchilla model for otitis media (OM). Therefore, we conclude that Dps promotes bacterial survival within NTHi biofilm communities both in vitro and in chronic infections in vivo. PMID:22919649

  9. Quorum sensing enhancement of the stress response promotes resistance to quorum quenching and prevents social cheating

    PubMed Central

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Nuñez-López, Leslie; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Kwan, Brian W; Belmont, Javier A; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) coordinates the expression of virulence factors and allows bacteria to counteract the immune response, partly by increasing their tolerance to the oxidative stress generated by immune cells. Despite the recognized role of QS in enhancing the oxidative stress response, the consequences of this relationship for the bacterial ecology remain unexplored. Here we demonstrate that QS increases resistance also to osmotic, thermal and heavy metal stress. Furthermore a QS-deficient lasR rhlR mutant is unable to exert a robust response against H2O2 as it has less induction of catalase and NADPH-producing dehydrogenases. Phenotypic microarrays revealed that the mutant is very sensitive to several toxic compounds. As the anti-oxidative enzymes are private goods not shared by the population, only the individuals that produce them benefit from their action. Based on this premise, we show that in mixed populations of wild-type and the mexR mutant (resistant to the QS inhibitor furanone C-30), treatment with C-30 and H2O2 increases the proportion of mexR mutants; hence, oxidative stress selects resistance to QS compounds. In addition, oxidative stress alone strongly selects for strains with active QS systems that are able to exert a robust anti oxidative response and thereby decreases the proportion of QS cheaters in cultures that are otherwise prone to invasion by cheats. As in natural environments stress is omnipresent, it is likely that this QS enhancement of stress tolerance allows cells to counteract QS inhibition and invasions by social cheaters, therefore having a broad impact in bacterial ecology. PMID:24936763

  10. Overexpression of CDX2 in gastric cancer cells promotes the development of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin-Hai; Wei, Wei-Yuan; Cao, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Xie, Yu-Bo; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene is a direct transcriptional target of CDX2. However, we still speculate whether CDX2 affects MDR through other ways. In this study, a cisplatin-resistant (SGC7901/DDP) and a 5-fluoro-2, 4(1h,3h)pyrimidinedione-resistant (BGC823/5-FU) gastric cancer cell line with stable overexpression of CDX2 were established. The influence of overexpression of CDX2 on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil, rate of doxorubicin efflux, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression detected by flow cytometry. In addition, we determined the in vivo effects of CDX2-overexpression lentiviral vector (LV-CDX2-GFP) on tumor size, and apoptotic cells in tumor tissues were detected by deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results showed that LV-CDX2-GFP led to up-regulation of CDX2 mRNA and protein expression. It significantly inhibited the sensitivity of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Flow cytometry confirmed that the percentage of apoptotic cells decreased after CDX2 up-regulation. This notion was further supported by the observation that up-regulation of CDX2 blocked entry into the M-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, up-regulation of CDX2 significantly decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. In molecular studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that CDX2 up-regulation could suppress expression of Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PTEN, and increased the expression of MDR1, MRP, mTOR, HIF-1α. PMID:25628941

  11. Sirtuin 1 promotes the growth and cisplatin resistance of endometrial carcinoma cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Tsutomu; Yamada, Yasushi; Ando, Hirofumi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Kobara, Hisanori; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), originally identified as a longevity gene, is induced by caloric restriction, and regulates various cellular functions including DNA repair, cell survival and metabolism via the deacetylation of target proteins such as histone and p53. These functions are considered to act dualistically as preventing or facilitating cancer. This study aimed to clarify the expression and role of SIRT1 in endometrial carcinoma. Because a high-calorie diet was a well-known risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, we first hypothesized that SIRT1 might be downregulated in normal endometrial glandular cells of obese women. However, no correlation was observed between the expression of SIRT1 and body mass index (BMI). In contrast, regardless of BMI, the immunohistochemical expression of SIRT1 was significantly higher in endometrial carcinoma (108 cases) than in normal endometria (60 cases) (P<0.05), and its overexpression was associated with a shorter survival (P<0.05). Our experiments in vivo revealed that SIRT1 accelerated the proliferation of endometrial carcinoma cell lines (HHUA, HEC151, and HEC1B). SIRT1 overexpression significantly enhanced the resistance for cisplatin and paclitaxel in HHUA cells. Although p53 is an important target protein for SIRT1, the selective SIRT1 inhibitor (EX527) significantly suppressed the proliferation and cisplatin resistance of three endometrial carcinoma cell lines regardless of the p53 mutation status. In addition, SIRT1 overexpression in HHUA cells accelerated tumor growth and cisplatin resistance in nude mice, and EX527 significantly suppressed the growth of tumors of HHUA and HEC1B cells. No adverse effect of EX527 was observed in these mice. In conclusion, SIRT1 is involved in the acquisition of the aggressive behavior associated with endometrial carcinoma, and the SIRT1 inhibitor, EX527, may be a useful agent for the treatment of this malignancy. PMID:26367491

  12. A Novel Pyrimidin-Like Plant Activator Stimulates Plant Disease Resistance and Promotes Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tie-Jun; Lu, Yun; Narusaka, Mari; Shi, Chao; Yang, Yu-Bing; Wu, Jian-Xin; Zeng, Hong-Yun; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Plant activators are chemicals that induce plant defense responses to a broad spectrum of pathogens. Here, we identified a new potential plant activator, 5-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6-methyl-2-(2-pyridyl)pyrimidin-4-ol, named PPA (pyrimidin-type plant activator). Compared with benzothiadiazole S-methyl ester (BTH), a functional analog of salicylic acid (SA), PPA was fully soluble in water and increased fresh weight of rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis plants at low concentrations. In addition, PPA also promoted lateral root development. Microarray data and real-time PCR revealed that PPA-treated leaves not challenged with pathogen showed up-regulation of genes related to reactive oxygen species (ROS), defenses and SA. During bacterial infection, Arabidopsis plants pretreated with PPA showed dramatically decreased disease symptoms and an earlier and stronger ROS burst, compared with plants pretreated with BTH. Microscopy revealed that H2O2 accumulated in the cytosol, plasma membrane and cell wall around intracellular bacteria, and also on the bacterial cell wall, indicating that H2O2 was directly involved in killing bacteria. The increase in ROS-related gene expression also supported this observation. Our results indicate that PPA enhances plant defenses against pathogen invasion through the plant redox system, and as a water-soluble compound that can promote plant growth, has broad potential applications in agriculture. PMID:25849038

  13. The novel polysaccharide deacetylase homologue Pdi contributes to virulence of the aquatic pathogen Streptococcus iniae

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Carlo J. E.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Locke, Jeffrey B.; Dahesh, Samira; Nizet, Victor; Buchanan, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The aquatic zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus iniae represents a threat to the worldwide aquaculture industry and poses a risk to humans who handle raw fish. Because little is known about the mechanisms of S. iniae pathogenesis or virulence factors, we established a high-throughput system combining whole-genome pyrosequencing and transposon mutagenesis that allowed us to identify virulence proteins, including Pdi, the polysaccharide deacetylase of S. iniae, that we describe here. Using bioinformatics tools, we identified a highly conserved signature motif in Pdi that is also conserved in the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA protein family. A Δpdi mutant was attenuated for virulence in the hybrid striped bass model and for survival in whole fish blood. Moreover, Pdi was found to promote bacterial resistance to lysozyme killing and the ability to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. On the other hand, there was no difference in the autolytic potential, resistance to oxidative killing or resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides between S. iniae wild-type and Δpdi. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that pdi is involved in S. iniae adherence and invasion, lysozyme resistance and survival in fish blood, and have shown that pdi plays a role in the pathogenesis of S. iniae. Identification of Pdi and other S. iniae virulence proteins is a necessary initial step towards the development of appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures against diseases and economic losses caused by this pathogen. PMID:19762441

  14. AB007. Neurotensin derived from cancer stroma contributes to castration resistance via promoting neuroendocrine transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shimiao; Shang, Zhiqun; Tian, Hao; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Niu, Yuanjie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NED) during the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains undefined. Although androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) can impair tumor cell growth, ADT can also triggers a parallel reaction, leading to increased neurotensin (NTS) production in cancer associated stromal cells which drives NED. Here, we systematically explore the NTS network in tumor microenvironment that drives NED following ADT. The CK8+/CK14+ intermediate cells, as opposed to other epithelial cells, can be transdifferentiated to neuroendocrine (NE) status by excessive NTS through simultaneous activation of neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1)-PRKACB and 3 (NTSR3)-AHNAK axes. The importance of PRKACB and AHNAK in NED development was then confirmed in human prostate tumor tissues. More importantly, we demonstrated SR48692 (an inhibitor of NTSR1) could inhibit NED and prevent castration resistance in prostate tumor from xenografts and TRAMP models. We propose that targeting this pathway could provide benefit for patients with tumors expressing high levels of NTS following ADT.

  15. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis resists phagosome acidification and autophagy to promote intracellular survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    While many strains of Enterococcus faecalis have been reported to be capable of surviving within macrophages for extended periods, the exact mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this study, we found that after phagocytosis by macrophages, enterococci-containing vacuoles resist acidification, and E. faecalis is resistant to low pH. Ultrastructural examination of the enterococci-containing vacuole by transmission electron microscopy revealed a single membrane envelope, with no evidence of the classical double-membraned autophagosomes. Western blot analysis further confirmed that E. faecalis could trigger inhibition of the production of LC3-II during infection. By employing cells transfected with RFP-LC3 plasmid and infected with GFP-labelled E. faecalis, we also observed that E. faecalis was not delivered into autophagosomes during macrophage infection. While these observations indicated no role for autophagy in elimination of intracellular E. faecalis, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were keys to this process. Stimulation of autophagy suppressed the intracellular survival of E. faecalis in macrophages in vitro and decreased the burden of E. faecalis in vivo. In summary, the results from this study offer new insights into the interaction of E. faecalis with host cells and may provide a new approach to treatment of enterococcal infections. PMID:26663775

  16. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  17. Ectopic Expression of the Chinese Cabbage Malate Dehydrogenase Gene Promotes Growth and Aluminum Resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-Fei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Dai, Zi-Hui; Zhang, Lu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) are key metabolic enzymes that play important roles in plant growth and development. In the present study, we isolated the full-length and coding sequences of BraMDH from Chinese cabbage [Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour) Olsson]. We conducted bioinformatics analysis and a subcellular localization assay, which revealed that the BraMDH gene sequence contained no introns and that BraMDH is localized to the chloroplast. In addition, the expression pattern of BraMDH in Chinese cabbage was investigated, which revealed that BraMDH was heavily expressed in inflorescence apical meristems, as well as the effect of BraMDH overexpression in two homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis lines, which resulted in early bolting and taller inflorescence stems. Furthermore, the fresh and dry weights of aerial tissue from the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher than those from the corresponding wild-type plants, as were plant height, the number of rosette leaves, and the number of siliques produced, and the transgenic plants also exhibited stronger aluminum resistance when treated with AlCl3. Therefore, our results suggest that BraMDH has a dramatic effect on plant growth and that the gene is involved in both plant growth and aluminum resistance. PMID:27536317

  18. Ectopic Expression of the Chinese Cabbage Malate Dehydrogenase Gene Promotes Growth and Aluminum Resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Fei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Dai, Zi-Hui; Zhang, Lu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) are key metabolic enzymes that play important roles in plant growth and development. In the present study, we isolated the full-length and coding sequences of BraMDH from Chinese cabbage [Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour) Olsson]. We conducted bioinformatics analysis and a subcellular localization assay, which revealed that the BraMDH gene sequence contained no introns and that BraMDH is localized to the chloroplast. In addition, the expression pattern of BraMDH in Chinese cabbage was investigated, which revealed that BraMDH was heavily expressed in inflorescence apical meristems, as well as the effect of BraMDH overexpression in two homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis lines, which resulted in early bolting and taller inflorescence stems. Furthermore, the fresh and dry weights of aerial tissue from the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher than those from the corresponding wild-type plants, as were plant height, the number of rosette leaves, and the number of siliques produced, and the transgenic plants also exhibited stronger aluminum resistance when treated with AlCl3. Therefore, our results suggest that BraMDH has a dramatic effect on plant growth and that the gene is involved in both plant growth and aluminum resistance. PMID:27536317

  19. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  20. Effect of Human Saliva on Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans and Other Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, Greg R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the effects of human whole salivary supernatant and parotid fluid on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The following three effects of saliva were observed: (i) inhibition of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), (ii) promotion of a transient, rapid (0 to 30 s) burst of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), and (iii) enhancement of glucose uptake (S. mitis, A. viscosus, S. aureus, E. coli). We observed no differences between the effects of whole salivary supernatant and the effects of parotid fluid. Heat treatment (80°C, 10 min) of saliva or the addition of dithiothreitol abolished inhibition of glucose uptake. Supplementation of saliva with H2O2 potentiated inhibition of glucose uptake. S. mitis and A. viscosus, which were stimulated by saliva alone, were inhibited by H2O2-supplemented saliva; 50% inhibition of glucose uptake by S. mutans and S. mitis required ca. 10 μM H2O2 in 50% (vol/vol) saliva. Loss of the inhibitory action of saliva occurred at about 5% (vol/vol) saliva. Supplementation of saliva dilutions with SCN− and H2O2 extended the inhibitory activity to solutions containing ca. 0.2% (vol/vol) saliva. We suggest that the salivary lactoperoxidase-SCN−-H2O2 system is responsible for the inhibitory activity of saliva reported here. Furthermore, we concluded that lactoperoxidase and SCN− are present in saliva specimens in concentrations that exceed minimal inhibitory levels by factors of ca. 500 and 10 to 20, respectively. The resistance of A. viscosus, S. aureus, and E. coli to the inhibitory potential of saliva alone was probably due to the production of catalase by these organisms. The resistance of S. mitis may have been due to special effects of saliva on H2O2 accumulation by this organism compared with S. mutans and S. sanguis. The basis of saliva-dependent enhancement of glucose uptake and the basis of promotion

  1. Effect of human saliva on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans and other oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1981-02-01

    We examined the effects of human whole salivary supernatant and parotid fluid on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The following three effects of saliva were observed: (i) inhibition of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), (ii) promotion of a transient, rapid (0 to 30 s) burst of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), and (iii) enhancement of glucose uptake (S. mitis, A. viscosus, S. aureus, E. coli). We observed no differences between the effects of whole salivary supernatant and the effects of parotid fluid. Heat treatment (80 degrees C, 10 min) of saliva or the addition of dithiothreitol abolished inhibition of glucose uptake. Supplementation of saliva with H(2)O(2) potentiated inhibition of glucose uptake. S. mitis and A. viscosus, which were stimulated by saliva alone, were inhibited by H(2)O(2)-supplemented saliva; 50% inhibition of glucose uptake by S. mutans and S. mitis required ca. 10 muM H(2)O(2) in 50% (vol/vol) saliva. Loss of the inhibitory action of saliva occurred at about 5% (vol/vol) saliva. Supplementation of saliva dilutions with SCN(-) and H(2)O(2) extended the inhibitory activity to solutions containing ca. 0.2% (vol/vol) saliva. We suggest that the salivary lactoperoxidase-SCN(-)-H(2)O(2) system is responsible for the inhibitory activity of saliva reported here. Furthermore, we concluded that lactoperoxidase and SCN(-) are present in saliva specimens in concentrations that exceed minimal inhibitory levels by factors of ca. 500 and 10 to 20, respectively. The resistance of A. viscosus, S. aureus, and E. coli to the inhibitory potential of saliva alone was probably due to the production of catalase by these organisms. The resistance of S. mitis may have been due to special effects of saliva on H(2)O(2) accumulation by this organism compared with S. mutans and S. sanguis. The basis of saliva-dependent enhancement of glucose

  2. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  3. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  4. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  5. Impairment of biliverdin reductase-A promotes brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer disease: A new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Di Domenico, Fabio; Cassano, Tommaso; Arena, Andrea; Tramutola, Antonella; Lavecchia, Michele Angelo; Coccia, Raffaella; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies suggest a link between peripheral insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction. Interestingly, post-mortem analyses of Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects demonstrated insulin resistance in the brain proposing a role for cognitive deficits observed in AD. However, the mechanisms responsible for the onset of brain insulin resistance (BIR) need further elucidations. Biliverdin reductase-A (BVR-A) emerged as a unique Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase directly involved in the insulin signaling and represents an up-stream regulator of the insulin signaling cascade. Because we previously demonstrated the oxidative stress (OS)-induced impairment of BVR-A in human AD brain, we hypothesize that BVR-A dysregulation could be associated with the onset of BIR in AD. In the present work, we longitudinally analyze the age-dependent changes of (i) BVR-A protein levels and activation, (ii) total oxidative stress markers levels (PC, HNE, 3-NT) as well as (iii) IR/IRS1 levels and activation in the hippocampus of the triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Furthermore, ad hoc experiments have been performed in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to clarify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying changes observed in mice. Our results show that OS-induced impairment of BVR-A kinase activity is an early event, which starts prior the accumulation of Aβ and tau pathology or the elevation of TNF-α, and that greatly contribute to the onset of BIR along the progression of AD pathology in 3xTg-Ad mice. Based on these evidence we, therefore, propose a new paradigm for which: OS-induced impairment of BVR-A is firstly responsible for a sustained activation of IRS1, which then causes the stimulation of negative feedback mechanisms (i.e. mTOR) aimed to turn-off IRS1 hyper-activity and thus BIR. Similar alterations characterize also the normal aging process in mice, positing BVR-A impairment as a possible bridge in the transition from normal aging to AD. PMID:26698666

  6. Enhancement of resistance of polyethylene to seawater-promoted degradation by surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Richard W.

    Low-density polyethylene was subjected to several surface-modification techniques, and the effectiveness of each method in retarding seawater-promoted degradation was evaluated. Surface treatments studied included radio-frequency glow-discharge exposure in air followed by diacid or triisocyanate co-polymerization and surface irradiation with 500 keV electrons of very low penetration. Plasma and co-polymerization treatments were monitored by ESCA and ATR IR spectroscopy, from which tentative conclusions were possible concerning reaction rates and probable chemical nature of the modified surface regions. Electron irradiation was monitored by gel content and cellophane dosimetry. Samples of treated polyethylene were subjected to accelerated testing by cyclic flexure in seawater and wide-angle X-ray diffraction results showed that each treatment method studied caused retardation of degradation; however, the relative effectiveness of the various techniques varied greatly.

  7. Promoting Health in American-Occupied Japan Resistance to Allied Public Health Measures, 1945-1952

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As soon as the authority of the Public Health and Welfare Section (PHW) of the Supreme Commander for Allied Powers waned in May 1951, the Japanese government overturned several measures it had implemented. Although the PHW contributed greatly toward improving public health conditions, not all of its activities were models of cooperative success. Many Japanese perceived some measures—terminated pensions for wounded Japanese veterans, lack of support for segregated orphanages for mixed-race children, and suppression of Japanese atomic bomb medical reports—as promoting US national interest at the expense of Japanese public health needs. Similarly, the PHW's upgrade of nursing education and separation of the professions of medicine and pharmacy were reversed because neither professionals nor the public saw these measures as urgent. Their reinstitution toward the end of the twentieth century suggests that the progressive measures were sound, but broke too sharply with Japanese tradition and were enforced prematurely. PMID:19542032

  8. Transcription of the Streptococcus pyogenes hyaluronic acid capsule biosynthesis operon is regulated by previously unknown upstream elements.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Zurek, Oliwia W; Watkins, Robert L; Reed, Robert W; Ali, Hadeel; Sumby, Paul; Voyich, Jovanka M; Korotkova, Natalia

    2014-12-01

    The important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) produces a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule that plays critical roles in immune evasion. Previous studies showed that the hasABC operon encoding the capsule biosynthesis enzymes is under the control of a single promoter, P1, which is negatively regulated by the two-component regulatory system CovR/S. In this work, we characterize the sequence upstream of P1 and identify a novel regulatory region controlling transcription of the capsule biosynthesis operon in the M1 serotype strain MGAS2221. This region consists of a promoter, P2, which initiates transcription of a novel small RNA, HasS, an intrinsic transcriptional terminator that inefficiently terminates HasS, permitting read-through transcription of hasABC, and a putative promoter which lies upstream of P2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and transcriptional reporter data identified CovR as a negative regulator of P2. We found that the P1 and P2 promoters are completely repressed by CovR, and capsule expression is regulated by the putative promoter upstream of P2. Deletion of hasS or of the terminator eliminates CovR-binding sequences, relieving repression and increasing read-through, hasA transcription, and capsule production. Sequence analysis of 44 GAS genomes revealed a high level of polymorphism in the HasS sequence region. Most of the HasS variations were located in the terminator sequences, suggesting that this region is under strong selective pressure. We discovered that the terminator deletion mutant is highly resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing and is significantly more virulent in a mouse model of GAS invasive disease than the wild-type strain. Together, these results are consistent with the naturally occurring mutations in this region modulating GAS virulence. PMID:25287924

  9. Transcription of the Streptococcus pyogenes Hyaluronic Acid Capsule Biosynthesis Operon Is Regulated by Previously Unknown Upstream Elements

    PubMed Central

    Falaleeva, Marina; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Watkins, Robert L.; Reed, Robert W.; Ali, Hadeel; Sumby, Paul; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2014-01-01

    The important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) produces a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule that plays critical roles in immune evasion. Previous studies showed that the hasABC operon encoding the capsule biosynthesis enzymes is under the control of a single promoter, P1, which is negatively regulated by the two-component regulatory system CovR/S. In this work, we characterize the sequence upstream of P1 and identify a novel regulatory region controlling transcription of the capsule biosynthesis operon in the M1 serotype strain MGAS2221. This region consists of a promoter, P2, which initiates transcription of a novel small RNA, HasS, an intrinsic transcriptional terminator that inefficiently terminates HasS, permitting read-through transcription of hasABC, and a putative promoter which lies upstream of P2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and transcriptional reporter data identified CovR as a negative regulator of P2. We found that the P1 and P2 promoters are completely repressed by CovR, and capsule expression is regulated by the putative promoter upstream of P2. Deletion of hasS or of the terminator eliminates CovR-binding sequences, relieving repression and increasing read-through, hasA transcription, and capsule production. Sequence analysis of 44 GAS genomes revealed a high level of polymorphism in the HasS sequence region. Most of the HasS variations were located in the terminator sequences, suggesting that this region is under strong selective pressure. We discovered that the terminator deletion mutant is highly resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing and is significantly more virulent in a mouse model of GAS invasive disease than the wild-type strain. Together, these results are consistent with the naturally occurring mutations in this region modulating GAS virulence. PMID:25287924

  10. CCBE1 promotes GIST development through enhancing angiogenesis and mediating resistance to imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhu, Chun-Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Zhu, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Rong-Kun; Tu, Lin; Wang, Yang; Zhuang, Chun; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most major mesenchymal neoplasm of the digestive tract. Up to now, imatinib mesylate has been used as a standard first-line treatment for irresectable and metastasized GIST patients or adjuvant treatment for advanced GIST patients who received surgical resection. However, secondary resistance to imatinib usually happens, resulting in a major obstacle in GIST successful therapy. In this study, we first found that collagen and calcium binding EGF domains 1 (CCBE1) expression gradually elevated along with the risk degree of NIH classification, and poor prognosis emerged in the CCBE1-positive patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CCBE1 protein can enhance angiogenesis and neutralize partial effect of imatinib on the GIST-T1 cells. In conclusion, these data indicated that CCBE1 may be served as a new predictor of prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in stimulating GIST progression. PMID:27506146

  11. CCBE1 promotes GIST development through enhancing angiogenesis and mediating resistance to imatinib.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhu, Chun-Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Zhu, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Rong-Kun; Tu, Lin; Wang, Yang; Zhuang, Chun; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most major mesenchymal neoplasm of the digestive tract. Up to now, imatinib mesylate has been used as a standard first-line treatment for irresectable and metastasized GIST patients or adjuvant treatment for advanced GIST patients who received surgical resection. However, secondary resistance to imatinib usually happens, resulting in a major obstacle in GIST successful therapy. In this study, we first found that collagen and calcium binding EGF domains 1 (CCBE1) expression gradually elevated along with the risk degree of NIH classification, and poor prognosis emerged in the CCBE1-positive patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CCBE1 protein can enhance angiogenesis and neutralize partial effect of imatinib on the GIST-T1 cells. In conclusion, these data indicated that CCBE1 may be served as a new predictor of prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in stimulating GIST progression. PMID:27506146

  12. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-01

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis. PMID:26159717

  13. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties

    PubMed Central

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J. B.; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C.; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J.; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T.; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5–1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  14. Selenium hyperaccumulators harbor a diverse endophytic bacterial community characterized by high selenium resistance and plant growth promoting properties.

    PubMed

    Sura-de Jong, Martina; Reynolds, Ray J B; Richterova, Klara; Musilova, Lucie; Staicu, Lucian C; Chocholata, Iva; Cappa, Jennifer J; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Frantik, Tomas; Dolinova, Iva; Strejcek, Michal; Cochran, Alyssa T; Lovecka, Petra; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se)-rich plants may be used to provide dietary Se to humans and livestock, and also to clean up Se-polluted soils or waters. This study focused on endophytic bacteria of plants that hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) to 0.5-1% of dry weight. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was used to compare the diversity of endophytic bacteria of hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata (Brassicaceae) and Astragalus bisulcatus (Fabaceae) with those from related non-accumulators Physaria bellii (Brassicaceae) and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae) collected on the same, seleniferous site. Hyperaccumulators and non-accumulators showed equal T-RF diversity. Parsimony analysis showed that T-RFs from individuals of the same species were more similar to each other than to those from other species, regardless of plant Se content or spatial proximity. Cultivable endophytes from hyperaccumulators S. pinnata and A. bisulcatus were further identified and characterized. The 66 bacterial morphotypes were shown by MS MALDI-TOF Biotyper analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to include strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Staphylococcus, Paenibacillus, Advenella, Arthrobacter, and Variovorax. Most isolates were highly resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and all could reduce selenite to red elemental Se, reduce nitrite and produce siderophores. Seven isolates were selected for plant inoculation and found to have plant growth promoting properties, both in pure culture and when co-cultivated with crop species Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae) or M. sativa. There were no effects on plant Se accumulation. We conclude that Se hyperaccumulators harbor an endophytic bacterial community in their natural seleniferous habitat that is equally diverse to that of comparable non-accumulators. The hyperaccumulator endophytes are characterized by high Se resistance, capacity to produce elemental Se and plant growth promoting properties. PMID:25784919

  15. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Yuri; De Vitto, Humberto; De Palma, Sara; Airoldi, Cristina; Vasso, Michele; Ricciardiello, Francesca; Lombardi, Pietro Paolo; Cirulli, Claudia; Rizzi, Raffaella; Nicotra, Francesco; Hiller, Karsten; Gelfi, Cecilia; Alberghina, Lilia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA) axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:26978032

  16. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Palorini, Roberta; Votta, Giuseppina; Pirola, Yuri; De Vitto, Humberto; De Palma, Sara; Airoldi, Cristina; Vasso, Michele; Ricciardiello, Francesca; Lombardi, Pietro Paolo; Cirulli, Claudia; Rizzi, Raffaella; Nicotra, Francesco; Hiller, Karsten; Gelfi, Cecilia; Alberghina, Lilia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2016-03-01

    Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA) axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:26978032

  17. Heterogeneous glioblastoma cell cross-talk promotes phenotype alterations and enhanced drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Motaln, Helena; Koren, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Ramšak, Živa; Schichor, Christian; Lah, Tamara T

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most lethal of brain cancer, and it comprises a heterogeneous mixture of functionally distinct cancer cells that affect tumor progression. We examined the U87, U251, and U373 malignant cell lines as in vitro models to determine the impact of cellular cross-talk on their phenotypic alterations in co-cultures. These cells were also studied at the transcriptome level, to define the mechanisms of their observed mutually affected genomic stability, proliferation, invasion and resistance to temozolomide. This is the first direct demonstration of the neural and mesenchymal molecular fingerprints of U87 and U373 cells, respectively. U87-cell conditioned medium lowered the genomic stability of U373 (U251) cells, without affecting cell proliferation. In contrast, upon exposure of U87 cells to U373 (U251) conditioned medium, U87 cells showed increased genomic stability, decreased proliferation rates and increased invasion, due to a plethora of produced cytokines identified in the co-culture media. This cross talk altered the expression 264 genes in U87 cells that are associated with proliferation, inflammation, migration, and adhesion, and 221 genes in U373 cells that are associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, cell differentiation and migration. Indirect and direct co-culturing of U87 and U373 cells showed mutually opposite effects on temozolomide resistance. In conclusion, definition of transcriptional alterations of distinct glioblastoma cells upon co-culturing provides better understanding of the mechanisms of glioblastoma heterogeneity, which will provide the basis for more informed glioma treatment in the future. PMID:26517510

  18. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  19. Heterogeneous glioblastoma cell cross-talk promotes phenotype alterations and enhanced drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Motaln, Helena; Koren, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Ramšak, Živa; Schichor, Christian; Lah, Tamara T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most lethal of brain cancer, and it comprises a heterogeneous mixture of functionally distinct cancer cells that affect tumor progression. We examined the U87, U251, and U373 malignant cell lines as in vitro models to determine the impact of cellular cross-talk on their phenotypic alterations in co-cultures. These cells were also studied at the transcriptome level, to define the mechanisms of their observed mutually affected genomic stability, proliferation, invasion and resistance to temozolomide. This is the first direct demonstration of the neural and mesenchymal molecular fingerprints of U87 and U373 cells, respectively. U87-cell conditioned medium lowered the genomic stability of U373 (U251) cells, without affecting cell proliferation. In contrast, upon exposure of U87 cells to U373 (U251) conditioned medium, U87 cells showed increased genomic stability, decreased proliferation rates and increased invasion, due to a plethora of produced cytokines identified in the co-culture media. This cross talk altered the expression 264 genes in U87 cells that are associated with proliferation, inflammation, migration, and adhesion, and 221 genes in U373 cells that are associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, cell differentiation and migration. Indirect and direct co-culturing of U87 and U373 cells showed mutually opposite effects on temozolomide resistance. In conclusion, definition of transcriptional alterations of distinct glioblastoma cells upon co-culturing provides better understanding of the mechanisms of glioblastoma heterogeneity, which will provide the basis for more informed glioma treatment in the future. PMID:26517510

  20. Ly6E/K Signaling to TGFβ Promotes Breast Cancer Progression, Immune Escape, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    AlHossiny, Midrar; Luo, Linlin; Frazier, William R; Steiner, Noriko; Gusev, Yuriy; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Glasgow, Eric; Creswell, Karen; Madhavan, Subha; Kumar, Rakesh; Upadhyay, Geeta

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell antigen Sca-1 is implicated in murine cancer stem cell biology and breast cancer models, but the role of its human homologs Ly6K and Ly6E in breast cancer are not established. Here we report increased expression of Ly6K/E in human breast cancer specimens correlates with poor overall survival, with an additional specific role for Ly6E in poor therapeutic outcomes. Increased expression of Ly6K/E also correlated with increased expression of the immune checkpoint molecules PDL1 and CTLA4, increased tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells, and decreased natural killer (NK) cell activation. Mechanistically, Ly6K/E was required for TGFβ signaling and proliferation in breast cancer cells, where they contributed to phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and Smad2/3. Furthermore, Ly6K/E promoted cytokine-induced PDL1 expression and activation and binding of NK cells to cancer cells. Finally, we found that Ly6K/E promoted drug resistance and facilitated immune escape in this setting. Overall, our results establish a pivotal role for a Ly6K/E signaling axis involving TGFβ in breast cancer pathophysiology and drug response, and highlight this signaling axis as a compelling realm for therapeutic invention. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3376-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197181

  1. Structure and dynamics of polymyxin-resistance-associated response regulator PmrA in complex with promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yuan-Chao; Weng, Tsai-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Chuan; Kao, Yi-Fen; Lin, Wei-Feng; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chou, Shan-Ho; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Chinpan

    2015-01-01

    PmrA, an OmpR/PhoB family response regulator, manages genes for antibiotic resistance. Phosphorylation of OmpR/PhoB response regulator induces the formation of a symmetric dimer in the N-terminal receiver domain (REC), promoting two C-terminal DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to recognize promoter DNA to elicit adaptive responses. Recently, determination of the KdpE–DNA complex structure revealed an REC–DBD interface in the upstream protomer that may be necessary for transcription activation. Here, we report the 3.2-Å-resolution crystal structure of the PmrA–DNA complex, which reveals a similar yet different REC–DBD interface. However, NMR studies show that in the DNA-bound state, two domains tumble separately and an REC–DBD interaction is transiently populated in solution. Reporter gene analyses of PmrA variants with altered interface residues suggest that the interface is not crucial for supporting gene expression. We propose that REC–DBD interdomain dynamics and the DBD–DBD interface help PmrA interact with RNA polymerase holoenzyme to activate downstream gene transcription. PMID:26564787

  2. Deletion of Macrophage Vitamin D Receptor Promotes Insulin Resistance and Monocyte Cholesterol Transport to Accelerate Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Darwech, Isra; Funai, Katsuhiko; Shao, JianSu; Chin, Kathleen; Sierra, Oscar L.; Carmeliet, Geert; Ostlund, Richard E.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intense effort has been devoted to understanding predisposition to chronic systemic inflammation as this contributes to cardiometabolic disease. We demonstrate that deletion of the macrophage vitamin D receptor (VDR) in mice (KODMAC) is sufficient to induce insulin resistance by promoting M2 macrophage accumulation in the liver, as well as increase cytokine secretion and hepatic glucose production. Moreover, VDR deletion increases atherosclerosis by enabling lipid-laden M2 monocytes to adhere, migrate, and carry cholesterol into the atherosclerotic plaque, and by increasing macrophage cholesterol uptake and esterification. Increased foam cell formation results from lack of VDR-SERCA2b interaction, causing SERCA dysfunction, activation of ER stress-CaMKII-JNKp-PPARγ signaling, and induction of the scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A1. BM transplant of VDR-expressing cells into KODMAC mice improved insulin sensitivity, suppressed atherosclerosis, and decreased foam cell formation. The immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in macrophages are thus critical in diet-induced insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in mice. Graphical Abstract PMID:25801026

  3. Reactive stroma component COL6A1 is upregulated in castration-resistant prostate cancer and promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi-Jun; Wang, Hong-Kai; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the most critical challenge in the clinical management of prostate cancer (PCa). Reactive stromal changes in PCa are likely involved in the emergence of CRPC. In the present study, we identified a novel oncogene termed COL6A1 which was upregulated in the reactive stroma of CRPC. We established an androgen-independent LNCaP (LNCaP-AI) cell line in steroid-reduced (SR) medium within 2 months. We examined COL6A1 expression with western blot during the LNCaP-AI induction, and studied the function of COL6A1 in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical staining of COL6A1 was performed in ten pairs of androgen-sensitive PCa and CRPC samples. We demonstrated that COL6A1 expression was markedly increased in LNCaP-AI cells and CRPC tissues compared with LNCaP cells and paired androgen-sensitive PCa specimens. In vitro, COL6A1 knockdown resulted in G1-S cell cycle arrest and descended vitality. Overexpression of COL6A1 was associated with accelerated S phase entry and elevated vitality in prostate cancer cells. COL6A1 also promoted tumorigenesis of LNCaP cells in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest an important role of COL6A1 in the molecular etiology of castration-resistant prostate cancer, and support the potential use of COL6A1 in CRPC therapy. PMID:25895032

  4. Autophagy promotes resistance to photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis selectively in colorectal cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ming-Feng; Chen, Min-Wei; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Lou, Pei-Jen; Lin, Susan Yun-Fan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Hsiao, Michael; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) exhibit a high resistance to current therapeutic strategies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT), leading to the recurrence and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). In cancer, autophagy acts as both a tumor suppressor and a tumor promoter. However, the role of autophagy in the resistance of CSCs to PDT has not been reported. In this study, CSCs were isolated from colorectal cancer cells using PROM1/CD133 (prominin 1) expression, which is a surface marker commonly found on stem cells of various tissues. We demonstrated that PpIX-mediated PDT induced the formation of autophagosomes in PROM1/CD133+ cells, accompanied by the upregulation of autophagy-related proteins ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, and ATG12. The inhibition of PDT-induced autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors and silencing of the ATG5 gene substantially triggered apoptosis of PROM1/CD133+ cells and decreased the ability of colonosphere formation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. In conclusion, our results revealed a protective role played by autophagy against PDT in CSCs and indicated that targeting autophagy could be used to elevate the PDT sensitivity of CSCs. These findings would aid in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for CSC treatment. PMID:24905352

  5. Human carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells promote ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance via a BMP4/HH signaling loop

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, Lan G.; Choi, Yun-Jung; McLean, Karen; Allen, Benjamin L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is critical to cancer growth and therapy resistance. We previously characterized human ovarian carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (CA-MSCs). CA-MSCs are multi-potent cells that can differentiate into tumor microenvironment components including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and adipocytes. We previously reported CA-MSCs, compared to normal MSCs, express high levels of BMP proteins and promote tumor growth by increasing numbers of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). We demonstrate here that ovarian tumor cell-secreted Hedgehog (HH) induces CA-MSC BMP4 expression. CA-MSC-derived BMP4 reciprocally increases ovarian tumor cell HH expression indicating a positive feedback loop. Interruption of this loop with a HH pathway inhibitor or BMP4 blocking antibody decreases CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and tumor-derived HH preventing enrichment of CSCs and reversing chemotherapy resistance. The impact of HH inhibition was only seen in CA-MSC-containing tumors, indicating the importance of a humanized stroma. These results are reciprocal to findings in pancreatic and bladder cancer, suggesting HH signaling effects are tumor tissue specific warranting careful investigation in each tumor type. Collectively, we define a critical positive feedback loop between CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and ovarian tumor cell-secreted HH and present evidence for the further investigation of HH as a clinical target in ovarian cancer. PMID:26755648

  6. MUC1 upregulation promotes immune resistance in tumor cells undergoing brachyury-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    David, Justin M.; Hamilton, Duane H.; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular and cellular program in which epithelial cells lose their well-differentiated phenotype and adopt mesenchymal characteristics. This process, which occurs naturally during embryogenesis, has also been shown to be associated with cancer progression and with tumor recurrence following conventional therapies. Brachyury is a transcription factor that mediates EMT during development, and is aberrantly expressed in various human cancers where it promotes tumor cell EMT, metastatic dissemination, and resistance to conventional therapies. We have recently shown that very high expression of brachyury can protect tumor cells against immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In seeking to elucidate mechanisms of immunotherapy resistance, we have discovered a novel positive association between brachyury and mucin-1 (MUC1). MUC1 is overexpressed in the majority of carcinomas, and it has been shown to mediate oncogenic signaling and confer resistance to genotoxic agents. We found that MUC1 is concomitantly upregulated in tumor cell lines that highly express brachyury due to an enhancement of MUC1 mRNA stability. Analysis of patient lung tumor tissues also identified a positive association between these two proteins in the majority of samples. Inhibition of MUC1 by siRNA-based gene silencing markedly enhanced the susceptibility of brachyury-expressing cancer cells to killing by tumor necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and to perforin/granzyme-dependent lysis by immune cytotoxic cells. These studies confirm a protective role for MUC1 in brachyury-expressing cancer cells, and suggest that inhibition of MUC1 can restore the susceptibility of mesenchymal-like cancer cells to immune attack. PMID:27141403

  7. FOXD1 promotes breast cancer proliferation and chemotherapeutic drug resistance by targeting p27

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhao, Jing-Yu; Yue, Hong; Hu, Ke-Shi; Shen, Hao; Guo, Zheng-Gang; Su, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD1 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance by inducing G1 to S transition. • FOXD1 transcriptionally suppresses p27 expression. - Abstract: Forkhead transcription factors are essential for diverse processes in early embryonic development and organogenesis. As a member of the forkhead family, FOXD1 is required during kidney development and its inactivation results in failure of nephron progenitor cells. However, the role of FOXD1 in carcinogenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we reported that FOXD1 is a potential oncogene in breast cancer. We found that FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Depletion of FOXD1 expression decreases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas overexpression of FOXD1 increases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we observed that FOXD1 induces G1 to S phase transition by targeting p27 expression. Our results suggest that FOXD1 may be a potential therapy target for patients with breast cancer.

  8. Clonal dissemination of macrolide-resistant and penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 and penicillin-resistant Taiwan 19F-14 and 23F-15 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan: a pilot surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi; Uno, Kenji; Takahashi, Ken; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshimoto, Eiichiro; Murakawa, Koichi; Kita, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Large-scale surveillance studies using molecular techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have revealed that the spread of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci is due to clonal spread. However, in Japan, surveillance studies using such molecular techniques have never been done. Therefore, we conducted a pilot surveillance study to elucidate the present situation in Japan. Among the 145 isolates examined, the most prevalent serotype was type 19F (20%), for which most isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (86.2%) but were positive for the mef(A)/mef(E) gene (89.7%). The secondmost prevalent was serotype 3 (16.6%), for which most isolates were susceptible to penicillin (87.5%) and positive for the erm(B) gene (91.7%). PFGE analysis showed that both serotypes consisted mainly of clonally identical or related isolates and, in particular, 38% of the type 19F isolates were indistinguishable from or closely related to the Taiwan 19F-14 clone. In addition, some of the Japanese type 23F isolates with the erm(B) gene were indistinguishable from or related to the Taiwan 23F-15 clone as analyzed by PFGE. Based on the results of our pilot study performed in a single institution, it is likely that international antibiotic-resistant clones have already spread in Japan; therefore, a nationwide surveillance study should be urgently conducted. PMID:15814978

  9. miR-25 Targets TRAIL Death Receptor-4 and Promotes Apoptosis Resistance in Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Razumilava, Nataliya; Bronk, Steve F.; Smoot, Rory L.; Fingas, Christian D.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Mott, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been established that microRNA expression and function contribute to phenotypic features of malignant cells, including resistance to apoptosis. While targets and functional roles for a number of microRNAs have been described in cholangiocarcinoma, many additional microRNAs dysregulated in this tumor have not been assigned functional roles. In this study, we identify elevated miR-25 expression in malignant cholangiocarcinoma cell lines as well as patient samples. In cultured cells, treatment with the Smoothened inhibitor, cyclopamine, reduced miR-25 expression, suggesting Hedgehog signaling stimulates miR-25 production. Functionally, miR-25 was shown to protect cells against TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Correspondingly, antagonism of miR-25 in culture sensitized cells to apoptotic death. Computational analysis identified the TRAIL Death Receptor-4 (DR4) as a potential novel miR-25 target, and this prediction was confirmed by immunoblot, cell staining, and reporter assays. Conclusion These data implicate elevated miR-25 levels in the control of tumor cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma. The identification of the novel miR-25 target DR4 provides a mechanism by which miR-25 contributes to evasion of TRIAL-induced cholangiocarcinoma apoptosis. PMID:21953056

  10. Nucleic Acid-Targeting Pathways Promote Inflammation in Obesity-Related Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Xavier S; Ghazarian, Magar; Chng, Melissa Hui Yen; Luck, Helen; Kim, Justin H; Zeng, Kejing; Shi, Sally Y; Tsai, Sue; Lei, Helena; Kenkel, Justin; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Tsui, Hubert; Sima, Corneliu; Xiao, Changting; Shen, Lei; Li, Xiaoying; Jin, Tianru; Lewis, Gary F; Woo, Minna; Utz, Paul J; Glogauer, Michael; Engleman, Edgar; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2016-07-19

    Obesity-related inflammation of metabolic tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver, are key factors in the development of insulin resistance (IR), though many of the contributing mechanisms remain unclear. We show that nucleic-acid-targeting pathways downstream of extracellular trap (ET) formation, unmethylated CpG DNA, or ribonucleic acids drive inflammation in IR. High-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice show increased release of ETs in VAT, decreased systemic clearance of ETs, and increased autoantibodies against conserved nuclear antigens. In HFD-fed mice, this excess of nucleic acids and related protein antigens worsens metabolic parameters through a number of mechanisms, including activation of VAT macrophages and expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in the liver. Consistently, HFD-fed mice lacking critical responders of nucleic acid pathways, Toll-like receptors (TLR)7 and TLR9, show reduced metabolic inflammation and improved glucose homeostasis. Treatment of HFD-fed mice with inhibitors of ET formation or a TLR7/9 antagonist improves metabolic disease. These findings reveal a pathogenic role for nucleic acid targeting as a driver of metabolic inflammation in IR. PMID:27373163

  11. Inhibition of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Akash K.; Shojaie, Ali; Panzitt, Katrin; Sonavane, Rajni; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Manikkam, Mohan; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Putluri, Vasanta; Vasu, Vihas T.; Zhang, Yiqing; Khan, Ayesha S.; Lloyd, Stacy; Szafran, Adam T.; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Bader, David A.; Stossi, Fabio; Li, Hangwen; Samanta, Susmita; Cao, Xuhong; Tsouko, Efrosini; Huang, Shixia; Frigo, Daniel E.; Chan, Lawrence; Edwards, Dean P.; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L.; Mancini, Michael; McGuire, Sean E.; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Palapattu, Ganesh S.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The precise molecular alterations driving castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are not clearly understood. Using a novel network-based integrative approach, here, we show distinct alterations in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) to be critical for CRPC. Expression of HBP enzyme glucosamine-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1 (GNPNAT1) is found to be significantly decreased in CRPC compared with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Genetic loss-of-function of GNPNAT1 in CRPC-like cells increases proliferation and aggressiveness, in vitro and in vivo. This is mediated by either activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway in cells expressing full-length androgen receptor (AR) or by specific protein 1 (SP1)-regulated expression of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) in cells containing AR-V7 variant. Strikingly, addition of the HBP metabolite UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to CRPC-like cells significantly decreases cell proliferation, both in-vitro and in animal studies, while also demonstrates additive efficacy when combined with enzalutamide in-vitro. These observations demonstrate the therapeutic value of targeting HBP in CRPC. PMID:27194471

  12. Inhibition of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Akash K; Shojaie, Ali; Panzitt, Katrin; Sonavane, Rajni; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Manikkam, Mohan; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Putluri, Vasanta; Vasu, Vihas T; Zhang, Yiqing; Khan, Ayesha S; Lloyd, Stacy; Szafran, Adam T; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Bader, David A; Stossi, Fabio; Li, Hangwen; Samanta, Susmita; Cao, Xuhong; Tsouko, Efrosini; Huang, Shixia; Frigo, Daniel E; Chan, Lawrence; Edwards, Dean P; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L; Mancini, Michael; McGuire, Sean E; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Putluri, Nagireddy; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The precise molecular alterations driving castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are not clearly understood. Using a novel network-based integrative approach, here, we show distinct alterations in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) to be critical for CRPC. Expression of HBP enzyme glucosamine-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1 (GNPNAT1) is found to be significantly decreased in CRPC compared with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Genetic loss-of-function of GNPNAT1 in CRPC-like cells increases proliferation and aggressiveness, in vitro and in vivo. This is mediated by either activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway in cells expressing full-length androgen receptor (AR) or by specific protein 1 (SP1)-regulated expression of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) in cells containing AR-V7 variant. Strikingly, addition of the HBP metabolite UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to CRPC-like cells significantly decreases cell proliferation, both in-vitro and in animal studies, while also demonstrates additive efficacy when combined with enzalutamide in-vitro. These observations demonstrate the therapeutic value of targeting HBP in CRPC. PMID:27194471

  13. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  14. Cell resistant zwitterionic polyelectrolyte coating promotes bacterial attachment: an adhesion contradiction.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jessica S; Kelly, Kristopher D; Ghoussoub, Yara E; Delgado, Jose D; Keller Iii, Thomas C S; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    Polymers of various architectures with zwitterionic functionality have recently been shown to effectively suppress nonspecific fouling of surfaces by proteins and prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (mammalian) cells as well as other microorganisms and environmental contaminants. In this work, zwitterionic copolymers were used to make thin coatings on substrates with the layer-by-layer method. Polyelectrolyte multilayers, PEMUs, were built with [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)], PAH, and copolymers of acrylic acid and either the AEDAPS zwitterionic group 3-[2-(acrylamido)-ethyldimethyl ammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-AEDAPS), or benzophenone (PAABp). Benzophenone allowed the PEMU to be toughened by photocrosslinking post-deposition. The attachment of two mammalian cell lines, rat aortic smooth muscle (A7r5) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3), and the biofilm-forming Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli was studied on PEMUs terminated with PAA-co-AEDAPS. Consistent with earlier studies, it is shown that PAH/PAA-co-AEDAPS PEMUs resist the adhesion of mammalian cells, but, contrary to our initial hypothesis, are bacterial adhesive and significantly so after maximizing the surface presentation of PAA-co-AEDAPS. This unexpected contrast in the adhesive behavior of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is explained by differences in adhesion mechanisms as well as different responses to the topology and morphology of the multilayer surface. PMID:26872345

  15. ARK5 promotes doxorubicin resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Pan, Shengjing; Zhi, Xiao; Wen, Liang; Zhou, Yue; Chen, Bryan Wei; Qiu, Junyu; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Qi; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-07-28

    AMP-activated protein kinase family member 5 (ARK5) overexpression has been reported in many human cancers, and ARK5 is associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether ARK5 is involved in HCC chemoresistance is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the role of ARK5 in HCC chemoresistance and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we found that SNU387 and SNU449 HCC cell lines overexpressing ARK5 displayed low doxorubicin sensitivity compared to Huh7 and Hep3B HCC cell lines with ARK5 low-expression. And knockdown of ARK5 increased the doxorubicin sensitivity in all HCC cell lines in the manner of inhibiting cell proliferation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence both showed that ARK5 knockdown upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated vimentin, which was consistent with the knockdown of TWIST, indicating ARK5 was involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, suppressing ARK5 by siRNA restored E-cadherin and vimentin expression induced by doxorubicin treatment or hypoxia culture. Our results indicated ARK5 confers doxorubicin resistance in HCC via inducing EMT. PMID:27126361

  16. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection. PMID:26153407

  17. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo Bedran, Telma Blanca; Azelmat, Jabrane; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis. PMID:24222906

  18. PLA2G16 promotes osteosarcoma metastasis and drug resistance via the MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Liang, Shoulei; Wasylishen, Amanda R.; Zhang, Yanqin; Yang, Xueli; Zhou, Bingzheng; Shan, Luling; Han, Xiuxin; Mu, Tianyang; Wang, Guowen; Xiong, Shunbin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of metastatic osteosarcoma is dismal and a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying disease progression is essential to improve treatment options and patient outcomes. We previously demonstrated Pla2g16 overexpression in mouse osteosarcoma contributes to metastasis phenotypes and increased expression of PLA2G16 is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in human tumors. To further examine the mechanisms through which PLA2G16 contributes to human osteosarcoma metastasis and explore the potential of PLA2G16 as a therapeutic target in osteosarcoma, we generated a panel of human osteosarcoma cell lines expressing different levels of PLA2G16. The functional analyses of these cell lines demonstrated high levels of PLA2G16 expression increased osteosarcoma cell migration, invasion, clonogenic survival, and anchorage-independent colony formation. Importantly, this activity was dependent on the phospholipase activity of PLA2G16. Additionally, PLA2G16 overexpression decreased the sensitivity of cells to a panel of chemotherapeutic agents. Analysis of downstream pathways revealed the pro-metastasis functions of PLA2G16 were mediated through the MAPK pathway, as knockdown of PLA2G16 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and pharmacological inhibition of MEK significantly repressed PLA2G16 mediated cell migration and clonogenic survival. Furthermore, PLA2G16 overexpression promoted xenograft tumor growth in vivo, and these tumors exhibit increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Lastly, the expression of PLA2G16 is strongly correlated with the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human osteosarcoma samples, and the combined lesions are associated with reduced overall and metastasis-free survival. Collectively, these results demonstrate increased PLA2G16 expression activates the MAPK pathway to enhance osteosarcoma metastasis and may be a novel therapeutic target for these cancers. PMID:26933804

  19. THE RNA-BINDING PROTEIN HUR PROMOTES GLIOMA GROWTH AND TREATMENT RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Yang, Xiuhua; Wang, Yimin; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Cathy; King, Peter H.; Wheeler, Crystal; Nabors, L. Burt

    2011-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a critical control point for the expression of genes that promote or retard tumor growth. We previously found that the mRNA binding protein, ELAV 1 (HuR), is upregulate