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Sample records for streptococcus pyogenes disease

  1. Impact of immunization against SpyCEP during invasive disease with two streptococcal species: Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Claire E.; Kurupati, Prathiba; Wiles, Siouxsie; Edwards, Robert J.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is no licensed vaccine against the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. The highly conserved IL-8 cleaving S. pyogenes cell envelope proteinase SpyCEP is surface expressed and is a potential vaccine candidate. A recombinant N-terminal part of SpyCEP (CEP) was expressed and purified. AntiCEP antibodies were found to neutralize the IL-8 cleaving activity of SpyCEP. CEP-immunized mice had reduced bacterial dissemination from focal S. pyogenes intramuscular infection and intranasal infection. We also identified a functional SpyCEP-homolog protease SeCEP, expressed by the equine pathogen Streptococcus equi, which was able to cleave both human and equine IL-8. CEP-immunized mice also demonstrated reduced bacterial dissemination from S. equi intramuscular infection. Therefore immunization against SpyCEP may provide protection against other streptococci species with homologous proteases. PMID:19563892

  2. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  3. Novel Regulatory Small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Tesorero, Rafael A.; Yu, Ning; Wright, Jordan O.; Svencionis, Juan P.; Cheng, Qiang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that has shown complex modes of regulation of its virulence factors to cause diverse diseases. Bacterial small RNAs are regarded as novel widespread regulators of gene expression in response to environmental signals. Recent studies have revealed that several small RNAs (sRNAs) have an important role in S. pyogenes physiology and pathogenesis by regulating gene expression at the translational level. To search for new sRNAs in S. pyogenes, we performed a genomewide analysis through computational prediction followed by experimental verification. To overcome the limitation of low accuracy in computational prediction, we employed a combination of three different computational algorithms (sRNAPredict, eQRNA and RNAz). A total of 45 candidates were chosen based on the computational analysis, and their transcription was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Northern blot. Through this process, we discovered 7 putative novel trans-acting sRNAs. Their abundance varied between different growth phases, suggesting that their expression is influenced by environmental or internal signals. Further, to screen target mRNAs of an sRNA, we employed differential RNA sequencing analysis. This study provides a significant resource for future study of small RNAs and their roles in physiology and pathogenesis of S. pyogenes. PMID:23762235

  4. Molecular typing of Chinese Streptococcus pyogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    You, Yuanhai; Wang, Haibin; Bi, Zhenwang; Walker, Mark; Peng, Xianhui; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Haijian; Song, Yanyan; Tao, Xiaoxia; Kou, Zengqiang; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Menghan; Bi, Zhenqiang; Luo, Fengji; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes human infections ranging from mild pharyngitis and impetigo to serious diseases including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The objective of this study was to compare molecular emm typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) for genotyping of Chinese S. pyogenes isolates. Molecular emm typing and PFGE were performed using standard protocols. Seven variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci reported in a previous study were used to genotype 169 S. pyogenes geographically-diverse isolates from China isolated from a variety of disease syndromes. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis provided greater discrimination between isolates when compared to emm typing and PFGE. Removal of a single VNTR locus (Spy2) reduced the sensitivity by only 0.7%, which suggests that Spy2 was not informative for the isolates screened. The results presented support the use of MLVA as a powerful epidemiological tool for genotyping S. pyogenes clinical isolates. PMID:25843529

  5. The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS) and is

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS streptococcal pharyngitis6 and invasive diseases worldwide2,7 , and the resurgence of severe invasive GAS

  6. Changes in Streptococcus pyogenes causing invasive disease in Portugal: evidence for superantigen gene loss and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Friães, Ana; Lopes, Joana P; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mario

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of highly virulent and successful Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci - GAS) clones has been attributed to the exchange of virulence factors by lateral gene transfer mechanisms, which strongly contribute to genomic diversity. We characterized a collection of 191 GAS isolates recovered from normally sterile sites in Portugal during 2006-2009 and compared them to invasive isolates obtained during 2000-2005. Antimicrobial resistance rates did not change significantly between the two periods and were generally low. In 2006-2009, emm1, emm89, emm3, and emm6 represented 60% of the isolates. The chromosomally encoded superantigen (SAg) genes speG and smeZ were present in the majority (>90%) of the isolates, while speJ was found in only 45%. The phage encoded SAgs varied greatly in prevalence (2-53%). The distribution of emm types, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling (PFGE) clusters, and SAg profiles changed significantly between the periods, although there were no statistically supported changes in the prevalence of individual types. While the macrolide susceptible clone emm1-T1-ST28 remained dominant (28%), there was a significant decrease in clonal diversity as indicated by both PFGE profiling and emm typing. This was accompanied by intra-clonal divergence of SAg profiles, which was statistically confirmed for isolates representing emm1, emm28, and emm44. This diversification was associated with the loss and acquisition of SAg genes, carried by phages and of chromosomal origin. These data suggest an ongoing genomic diversification of GAS invasive isolates in Portugal that may contribute to the persistence of clones with improved fitness or virulence. PMID:23932912

  7. Gene Repertoire Evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB). PMID:22666370

  8. Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes after allograft implantation--Colorado, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    Allograft tissues are used for various orthopedic procedures (e.g., ligament reconstruction, meniscal transplantation, and spinal surgery). In 2002, approximately one million allografts were distributed for transplantation (American Association of Tissue Banks [AATB], unpublished data, 2002). Recent reports of allograft-associated infections have prompted evaluation of the processing and quality-control methods employed by tissue processors. This report describes a case of invasive disease with Streptococcus pyogenes (i.e., group A streptococcus [GAS]), after reconstructive knee surgery using contaminated allograft tissue and provides recommendations to reduce the risk for allograft-associated infections. Although allograft infections are rare, they highlight the need for improved tissue evaluation and processing standards. PMID:14654764

  9. Nasopharyngeal Infection of Mice with Streptococcus pyogenes and In Vivo Detection of Superantigen Activity.

    PubMed

    Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Kasper, Katherine J; Xu, Stacey X; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific pathogen that is responsible for an enormous burden of infectious disease. Despite intensive experimental efforts to understand the molecular correlates that contribute to invasive infections, there has been less focus on S. pyogenes carriage and local infection of the nasopharynx. This chapter describes an acute nasopharyngeal infection model in mice that is utilized in our laboratory to study the role of superantigen toxins in the biology of S. pyogenes. We also describe a method to detect superantigen-specific T cell activation in vivo. PMID:26676040

  10. The CXC Chemokine-degrading Protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes Promotes Its Uptake

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    The CXC Chemokine-degrading Protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes Promotes Its Uptake, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-contain- ing protein into human endothe- lial cells. Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen able

  11. [Invasive disease due to Streptococcus pyogenes in a patient with A H1N1 influenza infection. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Guerrero S, Gonzalo; Marín S, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial superinfection is a known complication among patients affected by viral respiratory tract infections. Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial agent involved in acute tonsillopharyngitis, skin and soft tissue infections, was reported as a co-infecting microorganism during the 2009 A H1N1 influenza pandemic. We report a 65-year-old male patient who evolved with multifocal pneumonia and multiple organ failure with a fatal outcome. Influenza A H1N1 was detected by a polymerase chain reaction-based technique from a tracheal aspirate sample. S. pyogenes was identified by a rapid test from a nasopharyngeal sample and isolated afterwards from a positive blood culture. PMID:26436938

  12. Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection

    PubMed Central

    Klonoski, Joshua M.; Hurtig, Heather R.; Juber, Brian A.; Schuneman, Margaret J.; Bickett, Thomas E.; Svendsen, Joshua M.; Burum, Brandon; Penfound, Thomas A.; Sereda, Grigoriy; Dale, James B.; Chaussee, Michael S.; Huber, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are associated with a significant number of illnesses and deaths on an annual basis. Many of the deaths are due to complications from secondary bacterial invaders, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. The ?-hemolytic bacteria S. pyogenes colonizes both skin and respiratory surfaces, and frequently presents clinically as strep throat or impetigo. However, when these bacteria gain access to normally sterile sites, they can cause deadly diseases including sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis, and pneumonia. We previously developed a model of influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection, which we used to demonstrate that vaccination against influenza virus can limit deaths associated with a secondary bacterial infection, but this protection was not complete. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a vaccine that targets the M protein of S. pyogenes to determine whether immunity toward the bacteria alone would allow the host to survive an influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection. Our data demonstrate that vaccination against the M protein induces IgG antibodies, in particular those of the IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, and that these antibodies can interact with macrophages. Ultimately, this vaccine-induced immunity eliminated death within our influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection model, despite the fact that all M protein-vaccinated mice showed signs of illness following influenza virus inoculation. These findings identify immunity against bacteria as an important component of protection against influenza virus:bacteria super-infection. PMID:25077423

  13. Differentiation of cultured keratinocytes promotes the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, G L; Fleckman, P; Jonas, M; Chi, E; Rubens, C E

    1998-01-01

    Based on a consideration of the histopathology of nonbullous impetigo that shows localization of Streptococcus pyogenes to highly differentiated, subcorneal keratinocytes, we hypothesized that adherence of an impetigo strain of S. pyogenes would be promoted by terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. An assay was developed in which S. pyogenes adhered via pilus-like projections from the cell wall to the surface of cultured human keratinocytes in a time- and inoculum-dependent manner suggestive of a receptor-mediated process. Terminal differentiation of keratinocytes was induced by increasing the calcium concentration in the growth medium, and was confirmed by morphologic analysis using electron microscopy. Adherence of S. pyogenes was three and fourfold greater to keratinocytes differentiated in 1.0 and 1.5 mM calcium, respectively, compared with undifferentiated keratinocytes in 0.15 mM calcium. The presence of calcium during the adherence assay further enhanced adherence nearly twofold. Adherence occurred preferentially to sites of contact between adjacent keratinocytes, suggesting that the keratinocyte receptor may be a molecule involved in cell-to-cell adhesion. In contrast, nonpathogenic Streptococcus gordonii adhered poorly to keratinocytes regardless of their state of terminal differentiation, and adherence of a pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes was twofold greater to undifferentiated than differentiated keratinocytes. This is the first report of in vitro adherence of S. pyogenes to keratinocytes in a manner that emulates human impetigo. Adherence of only the impetigo strain, and not the pharyngeal strain of S. pyogenes or the nonpathogenic S. gorgonii isolate, was promoted by keratinocyte differentiation. This result provides a model system for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of streptococcal skin infections. PMID:9421474

  14. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Torsten G.; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit. PMID:25309880

  15. Severe acute otitis media caused by mucoid Streptococcus pyogenes in a previously healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Irimada, Mihoko; Oda, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kazuaki; Ozawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Takashi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pyogenes is well recognized as the most common pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis in school-age children. In Japan, mucoid Streptococcus pneumoniae is well known as a causative agent of severe acute otitis media (AOM); however, mucoid S. pyogenes has rarely been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an AOM patient caused by mucoid S. pyogenes in Japan. A 36-year-old previously healthy female was referred to our hospital with suspicion of cerebrospinal otorrhea due to increasing otalgia accompanied by headache following myringotomy. Bacterial cultures of middle ear secretions were performed, and mucoid-form colonies surrounded by zones of complete ?-hemolysis were produced on sheep's blood agar. Antigen-agglutination test results were positive for S. pyogenes, and thus the patient received treatment with panipenem-betamipron 2.0 g/day for 10 days, which resolved nearly all symptoms. The bacteriological features of this strain were then investigated. The M-protein genotype encoded by the emm gene, the major virulence factor of S. pyogenes, was determined to be emm75. Generally, S. pyogenes forms colonies having non-mucoid matt appearances based on ?-hemolysis of sheep's blood agar. The mucoid phenotype results from abundant production of hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, a key virulence determinant. emm75 is common in noninvasive, but less common in invasive disease. In conclusion, mucoid S. pyogenes can cause severe infection even in previously healthy persons. Emergence of mucoid S. pyogenes and drug resistance trends should be monitored in the future. PMID:24727832

  16. Comparative functional analysis of the lac operons in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Jennifer A; Caparon, Michael G

    2007-04-01

    Having no known environmental reservoir, Streptococcus pyogenes, a bacterium responsible for a wider variety of human diseases than any other bacterial species, must rely on its host for metabolic substrates. Although a streptococcal aldolase, LacD.1, has been adapted to virulence gene regulation, both LacD.1 and a paralogous protein, LacD.2, are predicted to function in the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway for lactose and galactose utilization. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of the LacD.1 regulatory pathway and the role of genome context in the emergence of LacD.1's novel regulatory functions, we compared the function and regulation of the Lac.1 and Lac.2 loci. The Lac.1 operon is not inducible, and regulation by LacD.1 is independent of a functional tagatose 6-phosphate pathway and enhanced by the conserved truncation of upstream Lac.1 genes. In contrast, Lac.2 expression is sensitive to environmental carbohydrates, and LacD.2, not LacD.1, contributes to growth on galactose. Thus, we conclude that the Lac.1 locus has been specialized to participate in regulation, leaving efficient utilization of carbohydrate sources to the Lac.2 locus. The adaptation of LacD for transcription regulation may be an underappreciated strategy among prokaryotes, as homologues of this multifaceted enzyme are present in a broad range of species. PMID:17371500

  17. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Its Subspecies, and Its Clinical and Phylogenetic Relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic status and structure of Streptococcus dysgalactiae have been the object of much confusion. Bacteria belonging to this species are usually referred to as Lancefield group C or group G streptococci in clinical settings in spite of the fact that these terms lack precision and prevent recognition of the exact clinical relevance of these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to develop an improved basis for delineation and identification of the individual species of the pyogenic group of streptococci in the clinical microbiology laboratory, with a special focus on S. dysgalactiae. We critically reexamined the genetic relationships of the species S. dysgalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus canis, and Streptococcus equi, which may share Lancefield group antigens, by phylogenetic reconstruction based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequences and by emm typing combined with phenotypic characterization. Analysis of concatenated sequences of seven genes previously used for examination of viridans streptococci distinguished robust and coherent clusters. S. dysgalactiae consists of two separate clusters consistent with the two recognized subspecies dysgalactiae and equisimilis. Both taxa share alleles with S. pyogenes in several housekeeping genes, which invalidates identification based on single-locus sequencing. S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. pyogenes constitute a closely related branch within the genus Streptococcus indicative of recent descent from a common ancestor, while S. equi is highly divergent from other species of the pyogenic group streptococci. The results provide an improved basis for identification of clinically important pyogenic group streptococci and explain the overlapping spectrum of infections caused by the species associated with humans. PMID:22075580

  18. Human plasma fibronectin inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Ofek, I; Simpson, W A; Whitnack, E; Beachey, E H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of human plasma fibronectin on the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane droplets was investigated. Fibronectin blocked the adherence of streptococci to hexadecane in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect resulted from the binding of fibronectin to the streptococcal cells; radiolabeled fibronectin failed to bind to the hexadecane but bound readily to untreated streptococci. Chemical treatments of streptococci that decreased streptococcal binding of fibronectin also decreased their binding to hexadecane. Pretreatment of fibronectin with lipoteichoic acid blocked the binding of fibronectin to streptococci and abolished its ability to inhibit streptococcal adherence to hexadecane in a dose-related manner. In contrast, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine on the surface of S. pyogenes cells, failed to alter hexadecane adherence. The data suggest that fibronectin binds to lipoteichoic acid on the surface of the streptococci, thereby preventing lipoteichoic acid from interacting with the hexadecane phase. PMID:3880729

  19. Opacity Factor Activity and Epithelial Cell Binding by the Serum Opacity Factor Protein of Streptococcus pyogenes Are

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    of Streptococcus pyogenes Are Functionally Discrete*S Received for publication,August 14, 2007, and in revised form determinant expressed at the surface of Streptococcus pyo- genes and has been shown to elicit protective to the FnBD alone. Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS)4 is an important human pathogen

  20. Platelet-Dependent Neutrophil Function Is Dysregulated by M Protein from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Sinéad M; Kahn, Fredrik; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Mörgelin, Matthias; Sørensen, Ole E; Shannon, Oonagh

    2015-09-01

    Platelets are rapidly responsive sentinel cells that patrol the bloodstream and contribute to the host response to infection. Platelets have been reported to form heterotypic aggregates with leukocytes and may modulate their function. Here, we have investigated platelet-neutrophil complex formation and neutrophil function in response to distinct agonists. The endogenous platelet activator thrombin gave rise to platelet-dependent neutrophil activation, resulting in enhanced phagocytosis and bacterial killing. Streptococcus pyogenes is an important causative agent of severe infectious disease, which can manifest as sepsis and septic shock. M1 protein from S. pyogenes also mediated platelet-neutrophil complex formation; however, these neutrophils were dysfunctional and exhibited diminished chemotactic ability and bacterial killing. This reveals an important agonist-dependent neutrophil dysfunction during platelet-neutrophil complex formation and highlights the role of platelets during the immune response to streptococcal infection. PMID:26099589

  1. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Norway: Population Structure and Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Caugant, D. A.; Sangvik, M.; Høiby, E. A.; Sundsfjord, A.; Simonsen, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    A 2.7% prevalence of macrolide resistance in 1,657 Norwegian clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolates was primarily due to erm(TR) (59%) and mef(A) (20%). Four clonal complexes comprised 75% of the strains. Macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes in Norway is imported as resistant strains or locally selected in internationally disseminated susceptible clones. PMID:16641473

  2. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA? strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA? strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  3. Zinc disrupts central carbon metabolism and capsule biosynthesis in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y; Walker, Mark J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils release free zinc to eliminate the phagocytosed bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underpinning zinc toxicity towards this human pathogen, responsible for diseases ranging from pharyngitis and impetigo, to severe invasive infections. Using the globally-disseminated M1T1 GAS strain, we demonstrate that zinc stress impairs glucose metabolism through the inhibition of the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. In the presence of zinc, a metabolic shift to the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway allows conversion of D-galactose to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde phosphate, partially bypassing impaired glycolytic enzymes to generate pyruvate. Additionally, zinc inhibition of phosphoglucomutase results in decreased capsule biosynthesis. These data indicate that zinc exerts it toxicity via mechanisms that inhibit both GAS central carbon metabolism and virulence pathways. PMID:26028191

  4. Zinc disrupts central carbon metabolism and capsule biosynthesis in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; Walker, Mark J.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils release free zinc to eliminate the phagocytosed bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underpinning zinc toxicity towards this human pathogen, responsible for diseases ranging from pharyngitis and impetigo, to severe invasive infections. Using the globally-disseminated M1T1 GAS strain, we demonstrate that zinc stress impairs glucose metabolism through the inhibition of the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. In the presence of zinc, a metabolic shift to the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway allows conversion of D-galactose to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde phosphate, partially bypassing impaired glycolytic enzymes to generate pyruvate. Additionally, zinc inhibition of phosphoglucomutase results in decreased capsule biosynthesis. These data indicate that zinc exerts it toxicity via mechanisms that inhibit both GAS central carbon metabolism and virulence pathways. PMID:26028191

  5. Epidemiology of necrotizing infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes at an Iowa hospital.

    PubMed

    Thapaliya, Dipendra; O'Brien, Ashley M; Wardyn, Shylo E; Smith, Tara C

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to characterize the epidemiology of necrotizing soft tissue infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (n=14) and Staphylococcus aureus (n=14) isolates collected at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. An additional 9 S. pyogenes isolates were collected from patients being treated for mild respiratory infections and served as a comparison sample in the analysis. Patient data corresponding to the isolates (n=37) were also collected in order to identify risk factors or comorbid conditions possibly correlated with necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus among the study isolates was 35.7% (5/14), and the prevalence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene was 57% (8/14). The S. pyogenes NF (wound) isolates (n=14) belonged to 10 different emm types, none of which appeared to be associated with more severe disease when compared to the milder infection (throat) samples (n=9). Comorbid conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with NF. The results indicate that there may be a high prevalence of the PVL virulence factor in NF infections and that spa type t008 may be responsible for the increasing incidence of S. aureus NF infections in Iowa. PMID:26163423

  6. A systematic and functional classification of Streptococcus pyogenes that serves as a new tool for molecular typing and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sanderson-Smith, Martina; De Oliveira, David M P; Guglielmini, Julien; McMillan, David J; Vu, Therese; Holien, Jessica K; Henningham, Anna; Steer, Andrew C; Bessen, Debra E; Dale, James B; Curtis, Nigel; Beall, Bernard W; Walker, Mark J; Parker, Michael W; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Van Melderen, Laurence; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; Smeesters, Pierre R

    2014-10-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes ranks among the main causes of mortality from bacterial infections worldwide. Currently there is no vaccine to prevent diseases such as rheumatic heart disease and invasive streptococcal infection. The streptococcal M protein that is used as the substrate for epidemiological typing is both a virulence factor and a vaccine antigen. Over 220 variants of this protein have been described, making comparisons between proteins difficult, and hindering M protein-based vaccine development. A functional classification based on 48 emm-clusters containing closely related M proteins that share binding and structural properties is proposed. The need for a paradigm shift from type-specific immunity against S. pyogenes to emm-cluster based immunity for this bacterium should be further investigated. Implementation of this emm-cluster-based system as a standard typing scheme for S. pyogenes will facilitate the design of future studies of M protein function, streptococcal virulence, epidemiological surveillance, and vaccine development. PMID:24799598

  7. In Silico Investigation for Evaluation of the Potential of the SclA Protein in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pyogenes is an important pathogen that is associated with a range of infections in humans, and causes common and severe invasive diseases. Currently, antimicrobial therapy is the first choice for the treatment of S. pyogenes; however, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and side effects of antibacterial drugs is increasing. Consequently, there is an increased demand for novel drug targets and vaccine design. Objectives: To develop an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) , we described a novel collagen-like surface protein of S. pyogenes which is important virulence factors Materials and Methods: In this study, we focused on the SclA protein of S. pyogenes and characterized it using bioinformatic tools to introduce it as a candidate novel drug as a candidate for use in vaccine design. The secondary structure was determined and the 3D structure was modeled using SWISS-MODEL workspace. The immune epitope database analysis (IEDB) resource was used to predict regions of SclA that are likely to be recognized as epitopes. Results: The SclA protein is present on the cell surface of the cell and has interact with a common ligand by its hypervariable NH2-terminal regions. The IEDB showed that the maximum peptide length that is likely to be predicted as an epitope is of 6 amino acids, from amino acid 26 to 31, with a score of 4.791. This epitope can be considered for use in Antibody and drug design. Conclusions: Data from this study about SclA were not sufficient and further studies are needed; however, the information here suggests that SclA could be a candidate for further research on the design of drugs and vaccines against S. pyogenes infections. PMID:26495104

  8. Streptococcal 5'-Nucleotidase A (S5nA), a Novel Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factor That Facilitates Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lisa; Khemlani, Adrina; Lorenz, Natalie; Loh, Jacelyn M S; Langley, Ries J; Proft, Thomas

    2015-12-25

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases. Using bioinformatics analysis of the complete S. pyogenes strain SF370 genome, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes virulence factor, which we termed streptococcal 5'-nucleotidase A (S5nA). A recombinant form of S5nA hydrolyzed AMP and ADP, but not ATP, to generate the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine. Michaelis-Menten kinetics revealed a Km of 169 ?m and a Vmax of 7550 nmol/mg/min for the substrate AMP. Furthermore, recombinant S5nA acted synergistically with S. pyogenes nuclease A to generate macrophage-toxic deoxyadenosine from DNA. The enzyme showed optimal activity between pH 5 and pH 6.5 and between 37 and 47 °C. Like other 5'-nucleotidases, S5nA requires divalent cations and was active in the presence of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Mn(2+). However, Zn(2+) inhibited the enzymatic activity. Structural modeling combined with mutational analysis revealed a highly conserved catalytic dyad as well as conserved substrate and cation-binding sites. Recombinant S5nA significantly increased the survival of the non-pathogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis during a human whole blood killing assay in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role as an S. pyogenes virulence factor. In conclusion, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes enzyme with 5'-nucleotidase activity and immune evasion properties. PMID:26527680

  9. Multiple pyogenic liver abscesses caused by Streptococcus constellatus in the Amazon region. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, André Luiz Santos; Soares, Manoel C P; Ramos, Francisco L P; Crociati Meguins, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    There are few studies reporting pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) caused by Streptococcus constellatus in the medical literature. S. constellatus is a comensal microorganism that belongs to the Streptococcus milleri's bacteria group and is not considered to be pathogenic for humans. We report the case of a 23-year-old man with a 15-days history of abdominal pain in the right flank followed by daily fever, chills, nausea, vomits, sialism and jaundice. Physical examination revealed moderate jaundice (2+/4+), abdominal distention, generalized pain and tender over the right flank with positive Blumberg's sign. Additionally, the liver was palpable 5 cm below the costal margin in the right midclavicular line. Abdominal Computerized Tomography showed multiple hypodense hepatic images suggestive of liver abscesses. The patient underwent surgical exploration of the abdomen through a sub-costal incision and, during operation ruptured abscess localized on the hepatic segment III was drained. Culture of the purulent material obtained at surgery yielded Streptococcus constellatus as the causative agent. Liver abscess is a potential life-threatening disease that must be treated as soon as possible with invasive approaches, if necessary, and bacteriological studies performed when possible, allowing isolation of causative agents and specific antibiotic therapy. PMID:19841508

  10. Vaccination with Streptococcus pyogenes nuclease A stimulates a high antibody response but no protective immunity in a mouse model of infection.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Fiona J; Fraser, John D; Proft, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen which causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from pharyngitis to rheumatic fever, necrotising fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Development of a vaccine for S. pyogenes has been confounded both by the diversity of the disease-causing serotypes and the spectre of inadvertently stimulating autoimmunity. The S. pyogenes nuclease A (SpnA) is a recently characterised virulence factor that is highly conserved across strains and expressed during human disease. Deletion of spnA from S. pyogenes results in reduced survival of bacteria in whole human blood and attenuated virulence in a mouse model of infection. Collectively these features suggest that SpnA has potential as a vaccine candidate for S. pyogenes. Mice vaccinated subcutaneously with single or multiple doses of recombinant SpnA emulsified in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant developed a robust and durable IgG response, including neutralising activity, to this protein. However, vaccination with rSpnA conferred no advantage in terms of lesion development, disease symptoms or colonisation levels after a sub-lethal subcutaneous challenge with S. pyogenes. Anti-SpnA serum IgG responses and neutralising activity were increased in response to challenge, indicating that SpnA is expressed in vivo. SpnA is unlikely to be a suitable antigen for a vaccine against S. pyogenes. PMID:25119670

  11. Recombination between Streptococcus suis ICESsu32457 and Streptococcus agalactiae ICESa2603 yields a hybrid ICE transferable to Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Marini, Emanuela; Palmieri, Claudio; Magi, Gloria; Facinelli, Bruna

    2015-07-01

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile genetic elements that reside in the chromosome but retain the ability to undergo excision and to transfer by conjugation. Genes involved in drug resistance, virulence, or niche adaptation are often found among backbone genes as cargo DNA. We recently characterized in Streptococcus suis an ICE (ICESsu32457) carrying resistance genes [tet(O/W/32/O), tet(40), erm(B), aphA, and aadE] in the 15K unstable genetic element, which is flanked by two ?1.3kb direct repeats. Remarkably, ?1.3-kb sequences are conserved in ICESa2603 of Streptococcus agalactiae 2603V/R, which carry heavy metal resistance genes cadC/cadA and mer. In matings between S. suis 32457 (donor) and S. agalactiae 2603V/R (recipient), transconjugants were obtained. PCR experiments, PFGE, and sequence analysis of transconjugants demonstrated a tandem array between ICESsu32457 and ICESa2603. Matings between tandem array-containing S. agalactiae 2603V/R (donor) and Streptococcus pyogenes RF12 (recipient) yielded a single transconjugant containing a hybrid ICE, here named ICESa2603/ICESsu32457. The hybrid formed by recombination of the left ?1.3-kb sequence of ICESsu32457 and the ?1.3-kb sequence of ICESa2603. Interestingly, the hybrid ICE was transferable between S. pyogenes strains, thus demonstrating that it behaves as a conventional ICE. These findings suggest that both tandem arrays and hybrid ICEs may contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in streptococci, creating novel mobile elements capable of disseminating new combinations of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25935120

  12. Effect of elevated atmospheric pressure on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Schlamm, N A

    1972-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin, vancomycin, sodium cephalothin, and tetracycline, but increased susceptibility to sodium colistimethate, at a pressure of 68 atm in helium or helium-oxygen gas. Susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes was unchanged by pressurization. PMID:4618457

  13. Identification of the Streptococcus pyogenes surface antigens recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Reglinski, Mark; Gierula, Magdalena; Lynskey, Nicola N; Edwards, Robert J; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to common bacteria requires the generation of antibodies that promote opsonophagocytosis and neutralise toxins. Pooled human immunoglobulin is widely advocated as an adjunctive treatment for clinical Streptococcus pyogenes infection however, the protein targets of the reagent remain ill defined. Affinity purification of the anti-streptococcal antibodies present within pooled immunoglobulin resulted in the generation of an IgG preparation that promoted opsonophagocytic killing of S. pyogenes in vitro and provided passive immunity in vivo. Isolation of the streptococcal surface proteins recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin permitted identification and ranking of 94 protein antigens, ten of which were reproducibly identified across four contemporary invasive S. pyogenes serotypes (M1, M3, M12 and M89). The data provide novel insight into the action of pooled human immunoglobulin during invasive S. pyogenes infection, and demonstrate a potential route to enhance the efficacy of antibody based therapies. PMID:26508447

  14. Identification of the Streptococcus pyogenes surface antigens recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Gierula, Magdalena; Lynskey, Nicola N.; Edwards, Robert J.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to common bacteria requires the generation of antibodies that promote opsonophagocytosis and neutralise toxins. Pooled human immunoglobulin is widely advocated as an adjunctive treatment for clinical Streptococcus pyogenes infection however, the protein targets of the reagent remain ill defined. Affinity purification of the anti-streptococcal antibodies present within pooled immunoglobulin resulted in the generation of an IgG preparation that promoted opsonophagocytic killing of S. pyogenes in vitro and provided passive immunity in vivo. Isolation of the streptococcal surface proteins recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin permitted identification and ranking of 94 protein antigens, ten of which were reproducibly identified across four contemporary invasive S. pyogenes serotypes (M1, M3, M12 and M89). The data provide novel insight into the action of pooled human immunoglobulin during invasive S. pyogenes infection, and demonstrate a potential route to enhance the efficacy of antibody based therapies. PMID:26508447

  15. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; McShan, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5? end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges. PMID:25161960

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-08-29

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis.

  17. Adapting a diet from sugar to meat: double-dealing genes of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Jason W; Tuomanen, Elaine

    2007-04-01

    Intuitively, paralogues created by gene duplication should retain related functions. However, a study of the two lactose metabolic operons of Streptococcus pyogenes, reported in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, indicates that paralogues might evolve very different functions, in this case changing from a metabolic enzyme to a regulator of virulence. Divergence of paralogues could be a newly recognized theme in the metamorphosis of a bacteria from innocuous to pathogenic. PMID:17493119

  18. Streptolysin S Inhibits Neutrophil Recruitment during the Early Stages of Streptococcus pyogenes Infection? †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Loughman, Jennifer A.; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Miller, Mark J.; Caparon, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to infection of superficial tissues, Streptococcus pyogenes infection of deeper tissue can be associated with a significantly diminished inflammatory response, suggesting that this bacterium has the ability to both promote and suppress inflammation. To examine this, we analyzed the behavior of an S. pyogenes mutant deficient in expression of the cytolytic toxin streptolysin S (SLS?) and evaluated events that occur during the first few hours of infection by using several models including injection of zebrafish (adults, larvae, and embryos), a transepithelial polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) migration assay, and two-photon microscopy of mice in vivo. In contrast to wild-type S. pyogenes, the SLS? mutant was associated with the robust recruitment of neutrophils and significantly reduced lethal myositis in adult zebrafish. Similarly, the mutant was attenuated in embryos in its ability to cause lethality. Infection of larva muscle allowed an analysis of inflammation in real time, which revealed that the mutant had recruited PMNs to the infection site. Analysis of transepithelial migration in vitro suggested that SLS inhibited the host cells' production of signals chemotactic for neutrophils, which contrasted with the proinflammatory effect of an unrelated cytolytic toxin, streptolysin O. Using two-photon microscopy of mice in vivo, we showed that the extravasation of neutrophils during infection with SLS? mutant bacteria was significantly accelerated compared to infection with wild-type S. pyogenes. Taken together, these data support a role for SLS in the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment during the early stages of S. pyogenes infection. PMID:19687200

  19. Inactivation of the Rgg2 Transcriptional Regulator Ablates the Virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zutkis, Anastasia A.; Anbalagan, Srivishnupriya; Chaussee, Michael S.; Dmitriev, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes adapts to different niches encountered in the human host via the activity of numerous regulatory proteins including the Rgg family of transcriptional regulators. The S. pyogenes chromosome encodes four Rgg paralogues designated Rgg1 (RopB), Rgg2 (MutR), Rgg3, and Rgg4 (ComR). In order to understand the role of the Rgg2 protein in the regulation of metabolic and virulence-associated properties of S. pyogenes, the rgg2 gene was inactivated in the M1 serotype strain SF370. Inactivation of rgg2 increased the growth yield of S. pyogenes in THY broth, increased biofilm formation, and increased production of SIC, which is an important virulence factor that inhibits complement mediated lysis. To identify Rgg2-regulated genes, the transcriptomes of SF370 and the rgg2 mutant strains were compared in the middle-exponential and post-exponential phases of growth. Rgg2 was found to control the expression of dozens of genes primarily in the exponential phase of growth, including genes associated with virulence (sse, scpA, slo, nga, mf-3), DNA transformation, and nucleotide metabolism. Inactivation of rgg2 decreased the ability of S. pyogenes to adhere to epithelial cells. In addition, the mutant strain was more sensitive to killing when incubated with human blood and avirulent in a murine bacteremia model. Finally, inoculation of mice with the avirulent rgg2 mutant of S. pyogenes SF370 conferred complete protection to mice subsequently challenged with the wild-type strain. Restoration of an intact rgg2 gene in mutant strain restored the wild-type phenotypes. Overall, the results demonstrate that Rgg2 is an important regulatory protein in S. pyogenes involved in controlling genes associated with both metabolism and virulence. PMID:25486272

  20. Time-kill kinetics of oritavancin and comparator agents against Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Arhin, Francis F; McKay, Geoffrey A; Beaulieu, Sylvain; Sarmiento, Ingrid; Parr, Thomas R; Moeck, Gregory

    2009-12-01

    The activity of oritavancin in vitro against recent clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, including antibiotic-resistant strains, was characterised by determination of broth microdilution minimal inhibitory concentrations as well as time-kill assays. Ten clinical isolates of S. pyogenes, three of which were resistant to erythromycin, as well as one reference S. pyogenes strain were tested. In the time-kill assays, oritavancin and the comparators vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, penicillin, erythromycin and daptomycin were tested at static concentrations approximating their free peak (fC(max)) and free trough (fC(min)) concentrations in plasma when administered at approved doses for skin and skin-structure infections. At its fC(max) predicted from a 200 mg dose in humans, oritavancin exerted bactericidal activity (> or = 3 log kill relative to the starting inoculum) within 15 min to 3 h against all tested strains. Daptomycin exhibited bactericidal activity at its fC(max) for all but one strain; time to cidality was between 15 min and 6 h. At fC(min), only oritavancin was bactericidal against all the tested strains. Oritavancin displayed concentration-dependent killing of all isolates in vitro. Oritavancin was more rapidly bactericidal than the comparators at physiologically relevant concentrations against all strains tested. These data support the potential utility of oritavancin in infections with contemporary isolates of S. pyogenes, including drug-resistant strains. PMID:19818587

  1. Synergy and Mode of Action of Ceftazidime plus Quercetin or Luteolin on Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Siriwong, Supatcharee; Thumanu, Kanjana; Hengpratom, Tanaporn; Eumkeb, Griangsak

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The recommended therapy has been often failure through the interfering of beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (BLPB). The present study was to investigate antibacterial activity, synergy, and modes of action of luteolin and quercetin using alone and plus ceftazidime against S. pyogenes. The MICs of ceftazidime, luteolin, and quercetin against all S. pyogenes were 0.50, 128, and 128?µg?mL?1, respectively. A synergistic effect was exhibited on luteolin and quercetin plus ceftazidime against these strains at fractional inhibitory concentration indices 0.37 and 0.27, respectively, and was confirmed by the viable count. These combinations increased cytoplasmic membrane (CM) permeability, caused irregular cell shape, peptidoglycan, and CM damage, and decreased nucleic acid but increased proteins in bacterial cells. Enzyme assay demonstrated that these flavonoids had an inhibitory activity against ?-lactamase. In summary, this study provides evidence that the inhibitory mode of action of luteolin and quercetin may be mediated via three mechanisms: (1) inhibiting of peptidoglycan synthesis, (2) increasing CM permeability, and (3) decreasing nucleic acid but increasing the protein contents of bacterial cells. So, luteolin and quercetin propose the high potential to develop adjunct to ceftazidime for the treatment of coexistence of the BLPB and S. pyogenes infections. PMID:26576195

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the minor pilin FctB from Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Christian; Young, Paul G.; Kang, Hae Joo; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    The minor pilin FctB is an integral part of the pilus assembly expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. Since it is located at the cell wall, it can be hypothesized that it functions as a cell-wall anchor for the streptococcal pilus. In order to elucidate its structure, the genes for FctB from the S. pyogenes strains 90/306S and SF370 were cloned for overexpression in Escherichia coli. FctB from strain 90/306S was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium citrate as a precipitant. The hexagonal FctB crystals belonged to space group P61 or P65, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.15, c = 100.25?Å, and diffracted to 2.9?Å resolution. PMID:20124716

  3. Identification of phage-induced genomic islands in the 13 Streptococcus pyogenes strains using genome barcodes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunbao; Wang, Jiaxin; Wang, Yao; Liang, Yanchun

    2014-01-01

    With the revolutionary invention of the high-throughput sequencing technique, the production of bacterial genomes is significantly sped up. The in silico characterisation of genomic islands (GIs) in the pathogenic bacterium becomes increasingly needed, due to the time consumption and the high cost of the experimental techniques. A GI can be computationally detected through the DNA composition. Barcode, a dimension reduction and visualisation technique of genomic DNA composition, was recently applied to detect different DNA compositions effectively. In this work, we proposed a Barcode-based technique to detect Phage-induced Genomic Islands (PGIs) in the 13 completely sequenced strains of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our experimental results showed that the detected PGIs are highly consistent with the known GIs, the novel PGIs are promising candidates for the clinical diagnosis of S. pyogenes. PMID:25946863

  4. Innate Immune Response to Streptococcus pyogenes Depends on the Combined Activation of TLR13 and TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Fieber, Christina; Janos, Marton; Koestler, Tina; Gratz, Nina; Li, Xiao-Dong; Castiglia, Virginia; Aberle, Marion; Sauert, Martina; Wegner, Mareike; Alexopoulou, Lena; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Chen, Zhijian J.; von Haeseler, Arndt; Kovarik, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune recognition of the major human-specific Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes is not understood. Here we show that mice employ Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2- and TLR13-mediated recognition of S. pyogenes. These TLR pathways are non-redundant in the in vivo context of animal infection, but are largely redundant in vitro, as only inactivation of both of them abolishes inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages and dendritic cells infected with S. pyogenes. Mechanistically, S. pyogenes is initially recognized in a phagocytosis-independent manner by TLR2 and subsequently by TLR13 upon internalization. We show that the TLR13 response is specifically triggered by S. pyogenes rRNA and that Tlr13?/? cells respond to S. pyogenes infection solely by engagement of TLR2. TLR13 is absent from humans and, remarkably, we find no equivalent route for S. pyogenes RNA recognition in human macrophages. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that TLR13 occurs in all kingdoms but only in few mammals, including mice and rats, which are naturally resistant against S. pyogenes. Our study establishes that the dissimilar expression of TLR13 in mice and humans has functional consequences for recognition of S. pyogenes in these organisms. PMID:25756897

  5. Innate immune response to Streptococcus pyogenes depends on the combined activation of TLR13 and TLR2.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Christina; Janos, Marton; Koestler, Tina; Gratz, Nina; Li, Xiao-Dong; Castiglia, Virginia; Aberle, Marion; Sauert, Martina; Wegner, Mareike; Alexopoulou, Lena; Kirschning, Carsten J; Chen, Zhijian J; von Haeseler, Arndt; Kovarik, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune recognition of the major human-specific Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes is not understood. Here we show that mice employ Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2- and TLR13-mediated recognition of S. pyogenes. These TLR pathways are non-redundant in the in vivo context of animal infection, but are largely redundant in vitro, as only inactivation of both of them abolishes inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages and dendritic cells infected with S. pyogenes. Mechanistically, S. pyogenes is initially recognized in a phagocytosis-independent manner by TLR2 and subsequently by TLR13 upon internalization. We show that the TLR13 response is specifically triggered by S. pyogenes rRNA and that Tlr13-/- cells respond to S. pyogenes infection solely by engagement of TLR2. TLR13 is absent from humans and, remarkably, we find no equivalent route for S. pyogenes RNA recognition in human macrophages. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that TLR13 occurs in all kingdoms but only in few mammals, including mice and rats, which are naturally resistant against S. pyogenes. Our study establishes that the dissimilar expression of TLR13 in mice and humans has functional consequences for recognition of S. pyogenes in these organisms. PMID:25756897

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum reduces Streptococcus pyogenes virulence by modulating the IL-17, IL-23 and Toll-like receptor 2/4 expressions in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Antonietta; Losacco, Antonio; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Domenico, Marina Di; Bevilacqua, Nazario

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a common colonizer of the mucosal layers in the mouth, nose, and pharynx but it is also a major Gram-positive human pathogen that causes infections ranging from pharyngitis to severe systemic diseases. The lactobacilli colonize the oral tracts and are known to protect against colonization by many pathogens. Epithelial cells participate in the innate host defense by expressing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and TLRs in the interaction with microorganisms. The potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum was investigated for its capacity to influence the innate immune response of HEp-2 and A549 epithelial cells to S. pyogenes infection. In both epithelial cell types, pre-treatment with L. plantarum showed inhibition of S. pyogenes growth and a greater decrease in IL-17 and IL-23 levels compared to the control. Pre-treatment with the anti-TLR2/4 antibody abolished the inhibitory effects of L. plantarum on IL-17 and IL-23 production following S. pyogenes infection, indicating that L. plantarum downregulates TLR2/4-dependent IL-17 and IL-23 production. Overall, our findings suggest that in epithelial cell cultures with S. pyogenes, cytokine responses are modulated by the presence of L. plantarum through the induction of TLR2/TLR4. PMID:23892030

  7. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  8. Overexpression and Enzymatic Assessment of Antigenic Fragments of Hyaluronidase Recombinant Protein From Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sadoogh Abbasian, Shabnam; Ghaznavi Rad, Ehsanollah; Akbari, Neda; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza; pakzad, Iraj; Abtahi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hyaluronidase catalyzes the hydrolysis of hyaluronan polymers to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid. This enzyme is a dimer of identical subunits. Hyaluronidase has different pharmaceutical and medical applications. Previously, we produced a recombinant hyaluronidase antigenic fragment of Streptococcus pyogenes. Objectives: This study aimed to improve the protein production and purity of hyaluronidase recombinant protein from S. pyogenes. In addition, the enzymatic activity of this protein was investigated. Materials and Methods: The expression of hyaluronidase antigenic fragments was optimized using IPTG concentration, time of induction, temperature, culture, and absorbance of 0.6-0.8-1 at 600 nm. Afterwards, the expressed proteins were purified and the enzymatic activity was assessed by turbid metric method. Results: Data indicated that maximum protein is produced in OD = 0.8, 0.5 mM Isopropyl ?-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), 37ºC, NB 1.5x, without glucose, incubated for overnight. The enzymatic activity of the recombinant protein was similar to the commercial form of hyaluronidase. Conclusions: The results showed that an antigenic fragment of the recombinant hyaluronidase protein from S. pyogenes has a considerable enzymatic activity. It can be suggested to use it for medical purposes. In addition, applications of bioinformatics software would facilitate the production of a smaller protein with same antigenic properties and enzymatic activity. PMID:25789122

  9. [Epidemiology of Streptococcus pyogenes infections in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Minodier, Ph; Laporte, R; Miramont, S

    2014-11-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections are frequent in developing countries but the epidemiology is incompletely known. In 2005, 90 % of symptomatic pharyngitis, 96 % of invasive diseases and 97 % of deaths due to GAS were observed in these countries. Clinical features of GAS invasive infections are identical to those reported in developed countries, but frequency and mortality are higher, as is the number of the different emm types involved. In the world, from 15.6 to 19.6 millions of persons are affected by rheumatic heart disease (282,000 new cases and 233,000-468,000 deaths per year). Incidence of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis varies with time and location: in 2005, 472,000 new cases have been reported in the world (83 % in a developing country). World Heart Federation recently aimed at reducing the burden of rheumatic heart diseases by 25 % among < 25 years persons in 2025. PMID:25456683

  10. Epidemiology of Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes Infections in France in 2007 ?

    PubMed Central

    Lepoutre, A.; Doloy, A.; Bidet, P.; Leblond, A.; Perrocheau, A.; Bingen, E.; Trieu-Cuot, P.; Bouvet, A.; Poyart, C.; Lévy-Bruhl, D.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. A national survey was initiated to assess the burden of invasive GAS infections in France, describe their clinical characteristics, and assess the molecular characteristics of GAS strains responsible for these infections. The survey was conducted in 194 hospitals, accounting for 51% of acute care hospital admissions in France. Clinical data, predisposing factors, and demographic data were obtained, and all GAS isolates were emm sequence typed. We identified 664 cases of invasive GAS infections, with an annual incidence of 3.1 per 100,000 population. The case-fatality ratio was 14% and rose to 43% in the case of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Bacteremia without identified focus (22%) and skin/soft tissue infections (30%) were the most frequent clinical presentations. Necrotizing fasciitis was frequent in adults (18%) and uncommon in children (3%). The 3 predominant emm types were emm1, emm89, and emm28, accounting for 33%, 16%, and 10% of GAS isolates, respectively. The emm1 type was associated with fatal outcomes and was more frequent in children than in adults. Six clusters of cases were identified, with each cluster involving 2 invasive cases due to GAS strains which shared identical GAS emm sequence types. Four clusters of cases involved eight postpartum infections, one family cluster involved a mother and child, and one cluster involved two patients in a nursing home. Invasive GAS infection is one of the most severe bacterial diseases in France, particularly in persons aged ?50 years or when associated with toxic shock syndrome. PMID:21976764

  11. rRNA gene restriction patterns of Streptococcus pyogenes: epidemiological applications and relation to serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Bruneau, S; de Montclos, H; Drouet, E; Denoyel, G A

    1994-01-01

    The use of rRNA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (ribotyping) to subtype Streptococcus pyogenes strains was investigated. Sixty-eight S. pyogenes strains, including 17 reference strains and 51 isolates from blood, acute or chronic pharyngitis, and food-borne outbreaks, were characterized by determination of both their rDNA restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and their serotypes (T and M). Total DNA was cleaved with five selected restriction enzymes and then probed with a digoxigenin-labeled stretch of 1,063 bp hybridizing with 16S rRNA genes. Fifteen and nine distinct patterns were generated with SacI and XhoI, respectively, and five patterns were generated with each of the three additional restriction enzymes. With the combination SacI-XhoI, a total of 21 distinct ribotypes were obtained among the 68 isolates. This number was not increased by the results obtained with the other restriction enzymes. All strains tested were typeable. All isolates from each food-borne outbreak belonged to the same ribotype, and all isolates (pre- and posttreatment) from each child with chronic pharyngitis also belonged to the same ribotype, suggesting antibiotic treatment failures. A discriminatory index was calculated for the 47 isolates which were epidemiologically unrelated, using the Hunter-Gaston formula. This index reached 0.955 when the combination SacI-XhoI was used, showing the good discriminatory power of this typing method. Therefore, ribotyping proved to be a molecular method of interest to subtype S. pyogenes. Moreover, there was some correlation between ribotyping and serotyping, as several ribotypes were related to a unique distinct M serotype. Images PMID:7533778

  12. Sequence variability is correlated with weak immunogenicity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein

    PubMed Central

    Lannergård, Jonas; Kristensen, Bodil M; Gustafsson, Mattias C U; Persson, Jenny J; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial virulence factor, has an amino-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) that is a target for type-specific protective antibodies. Intriguingly, the HVR elicits a weak antibody response, indicating that it escapes host immunity by two mechanisms, sequence variability and weak immunogenicity. However, the properties influencing the immunogenicity of regions in an M protein remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the antibody response to different regions of the classical M1 and M5 proteins, in which not only the HVR but also the adjacent fibrinogen-binding B repeat region exhibits extensive sequence divergence. Analysis of antisera from S. pyogenes-infected patients, infected mice, and immunized mice showed that both the HVR and the B repeat region elicited weak antibody responses, while the conserved carboxy-terminal part was immunodominant. Thus, we identified a correlation between sequence variability and weak immunogenicity for M protein regions. A potential explanation for the weak immunogenicity was provided by the demonstration that protease digestion selectively eliminated the HVR-B part from whole M protein-expressing bacteria. These data support a coherent model, in which the entire variable HVR-B part evades antibody attack, not only by sequence variability but also by weak immunogenicity resulting from protease attack. PMID:26175306

  13. Functional and Structural Properties of a Novel Protein and Virulence Factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes *

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24825900

  14. Essential Genes in the Core Genome of the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; Belew, Ashton T.; Valdes, Kayla M.; Islam, Emrul; Curry, Patrick; Tettelin, Hervé; Shirtliff, Mark E.; El-Sayed, Najib M.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) remains a major public health burden worldwide, infecting over 750 million people leading to over 500,000 deaths annually. GAS pathogenesis is complex, involving genetically distinct GAS strains and multiple infection sites. To overcome fastidious genetic manipulations and accelerate pathogenesis investigations in GAS, we developed a mariner-based system (Krmit) for en masse monitoring of complex mutant pools by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq). Highly saturated transposant libraries (Krmit insertions in ca. every 25 nucleotides) were generated in two distinct GAS clinical isolates, a serotype M1T1 invasive strain 5448 and a nephritogenic serotype M49 strain NZ131, and analyzed using a Bayesian statistical model to predict GAS essential genes, identifying sets of 227 and 241 of those genes in 5448 and NZ131, respectively. A large proportion of GAS essential genes corresponded to key cellular processes and metabolic pathways, and 177 were found conserved within the GAS core genome established from 20 available GAS genomes. Selected essential genes were validated using conditional-expression mutants. Finally, comparison to previous essentiality analyses in S. sanguinis and S. pneumoniae revealed significant overlaps, providing valuable insights for the development of new antimicrobials to treat infections by GAS and other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25996237

  15. Essential Genes in the Core Genome of the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; Belew, Ashton T; Valdes, Kayla M; Islam, Emrul; Curry, Patrick; Tettelin, Hervé; Shirtliff, Mark E; El-Sayed, Najib M; McIver, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) remains a major public health burden worldwide, infecting over 750 million people leading to over 500,000 deaths annually. GAS pathogenesis is complex, involving genetically distinct GAS strains and multiple infection sites. To overcome fastidious genetic manipulations and accelerate pathogenesis investigations in GAS, we developed a mariner-based system (Krmit) for en masse monitoring of complex mutant pools by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq). Highly saturated transposant libraries (Krmit insertions in ca. every 25 nucleotides) were generated in two distinct GAS clinical isolates, a serotype M1T1 invasive strain 5448 and a nephritogenic serotype M49 strain NZ131, and analyzed using a Bayesian statistical model to predict GAS essential genes, identifying sets of 227 and 241 of those genes in 5448 and NZ131, respectively. A large proportion of GAS essential genes corresponded to key cellular processes and metabolic pathways, and 177 were found conserved within the GAS core genome established from 20 available GAS genomes. Selected essential genes were validated using conditional-expression mutants. Finally, comparison to previous essentiality analyses in S. sanguinis and S. pneumoniae revealed significant overlaps, providing valuable insights for the development of new antimicrobials to treat infections by GAS and other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25996237

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes Infection Induces Septic Arthritis with Increased Production of the Receptor Activator of the NF-?B Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kawabata, Shigetada; Amano, Atsuo; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial arthritis is a rapidly progressive and highly destructive joint disease in humans, with Staphylococcus aureus and Neisseria gonorrhoeae the major causative agents, although beta-hemolytic streptococci as well often induce the disease. We demonstrate here that intravenous inoculation of CD-1 mice with the group A streptococcus (GAS) species Streptococcus pyogenes resulted in a high incidence of septic arthritis. Signs of arthritis emerged within the first few days after injection, and bacterial examinations revealed that colonization of the inoculated GAS in the arthritic joints persisted for 21 days. Induction of persistent septic arthritis was dependent on the number of microorganisms inoculated. Immunohistochemical staining of GAS with anti-GAS antibodies revealed colonization in the joints of infected mice. Cytokine levels were quantified in the joints and sera of infected mice by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High levels of interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and IL-6 were detected in the joints from 3 to 20 days after infection. We noted that an increase in the amount of receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL), which is a key cytokine in osteoclastogenesis, was also evident in the joints of the infected mice. RANKL was not detected in sera, indicating local production of RANKL in the infected joints. Blocking of RANKL by osteoprotegerin, a decoy receptor of RANKL, prevented bone destruction in the infected joints. These results suggest that GAS can colonize in the joints and induce bacterial arthritis. Local RANKL production in the infected joints may be involved in bone destruction. PMID:14500523

  17. Streptococcus pyogenes Pharyngeal Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin in Spain: Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, Sebastián; Cortés, Guadalupe; García-Rey, Cesar; Rubio, Carmen; Baquero, Fernando; García-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Bouza, Emilio; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    A survey of emm gene sequences and an analysis of the pulsed-field electrophoretic profiles of 30 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with reduced susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin detected the prevalence of isolates with emm type 6 and considerable genetic diversity among isolates. The mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in these isolates was based on point mutations in topoisomerase IV subunit C encoded by parC, mainly replacement of serine-79 by alanine. PMID:15616324

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes emm28 Clinical Isolate M28PF1, Responsible for a Puerperal Fever

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Magalie; De Jode, Mathieu; Plainvert, Céline; Weckel, Antonin; Hua, Anna; Château, Alice; Glaser, Philippe; Poyart, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We report the sequence of the Streptococcus pyogenes emm28 strain M28PF1, isolated from a patient with postpartum endometritis. The M28 protein is smaller than that of MGAS6180 (NC_007296.1). Furthermore, the 1,896,976-bp-long chromosome presents, compared to that of MGAS6180, an inversion between the two comX genes. PMID:26184934

  19. Molecular characterization of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from pharyngitis patients in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Opavski, Natasa; Gajic, Ina; Borek, Anna L; Obsza?ska, Katarzyna; Stanojevic, Maja; Lazarevic, Ivana; Ranin, Lazar; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Mijac, Vera

    2015-07-01

    A steady increase in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes, group A streptococci (GAS) was reported in Serbia during 2004-2009 (9.9%). However, there are no data on the molecular epidemiology of pharyngeal macrolide resistance GAS (MRGAS) isolates. Therefore, the aims of this first nationwide study were to examine the prevalence of macrolide resistance in Serbian GAS and to determine their resistance phenotypes, genotypes and clonal relationships. Overall 3893 non-duplicate pharyngeal S. pyogenes isolates from outpatients with GAS infection were collected throughout country during 2008 and 2009. Among 486 macrolide resistant pharyngeal isolates collected, 103 were further characterized. Macrolide resistance phenotypes and genotypes were determined by double-disk diffusion test and PCR, respectively. Strain relatedness was determined by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage profiling (PP) and virulence factor profiling (VFP). Overall, macrolide resistance among GAS isolates in Serbia was 12.5%. M phenotype was the most common (71.8%), followed by iMLS (18.4%) and cMLS (9.7%). Three clonal complexes--emm75/mefA/ST49, emm12/mefA/ST36 and emm77/ermA/tetO/ST63 comprised over 90% of the tested strains. Although MLVA, PP and VFP distinguished 10, 20 and 12 different patterns, respectively, cluster analysis disclosed only small differences between strains which belonged to the same emm/ST type. Our data indicate dominance of three major internationally widely disseminated macrolide resistant clones and a high genetic homogeneity among the Serbian MRGAS population. Continued surveillance of macrolide resistance and clonal composition in MRGAS in Serbia in future is necessary to determine stability of MRGAS clones and to guide therapy strategies. PMID:25976381

  20. Streptococcus pyogenes infection of tonsil explants is associated with a human ?-defensin 1 response from control but not recurrent acute tonsillitis patients.

    PubMed

    Bell, S; Howard, A; Wilson, J A; Abbot, E L; Smith, W D; Townes, C L; Hirst, B H; Hall, J

    2012-06-01

    Host defence peptides (HDP), including the defensins and hCAP-18, function as part of the innate immune defences, protecting the host epithelia from microbial attachment and invasion. Recurrent acute tonsillitis (RAT), in which patients suffer repeated symptomatic tonsil infections, is linked to Streptococcus pyogenes, a group A streptococcus, and may reflect the impaired expression of such peptides. To address this, the defensin and hCAP-18 messenger RNA expression profiles of 54 tonsils excised from control and RAT patients undergoing tonsillectomy were quantified and compared. Marked variation in expression was observed between individuals from the two groups, but statistically no significant differences were identified, suggesting that at the time of surgery the tonsil epithelial HDP barrier was not compromised in RAT subjects. Surgical removal of the tonsils occurs in a quiescent phase of disease, and so to assess the effects of an active bacterial infection, HaCaT cells an in vitro model of the tonsil epithelium, and explants of patient tonsils maintained in vitro were challenged with S. pyogenes. The HaCaT data supported the reduced expression of hCAP-18/LL-37, human ?-defensin 1 (HBD1;P < 0.01) and HBD2 (P < 0.05), consistent with decreased protection of the epithelial barrier. The tonsil explant data, although not as definitive, showed similar trends apart from HBD1 expression, which in the control tonsils but not the RAT patient tonsils was characterized by increased expression (P < 0.01). These data suggest that in vivo HBD1 may play a critical role in protecting the tonsil epithelia from S. pyogenes. PMID:22520386

  1. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Karaman, Isa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g(-1). The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L(-1). Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples. PMID:19386416

  2. Kinetic and Structural Characterization for Cofactor Preference of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Hyuk; Ah Park, Seong; Min Chi, Young; Lee, Ki Seog

    2014-01-01

    The ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) that is found in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms has been used in various ways as a signaling molecule or a significant component generating metabolic energy under conditions of nutrient limitation or stress, through GABA catabolism. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) catalyzes the oxidation of succinic semialdehyde to succinic acid in the final step of GABA catabolism. Here, we report the catalytic properties and two crystal structures of SSADH from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpSSADH) regarding its cofactor preference. Kinetic analysis showed that SpSSADH prefers NADP+ over NAD+ as a hydride acceptor. Moreover, the structures of SpSSADH were determined in an apo-form and in a binary complex with NADP+ at 1.6 Å and 2.1 Å resolutions, respectively. Both structures of SpSSADH showed dimeric conformation, containing a single cysteine residue in the catalytic loop of each subunit. Further structural analysis and sequence comparison of SpSSADH with other SSADHs revealed that Ser158 and Tyr188 in SpSSADH participate in the stabilization of the 2’-phosphate group of adenine-side ribose in NADP+. Our results provide structural insights into the cofactor preference of SpSSADH as the gram-positive bacterial SSADH. PMID:25256219

  3. Preparation and characterization of monomers to tetramers of a collagen-like domain from Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yong Y; Stoichevska, Violet; Howell, Linda; Madsen, Soren; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J; Ramshaw, John AM

    2014-01-01

    The collagen like domain Scl2 from Streptococcus pyogenes has been proposed as a potential biomedical material. It is non-cytotoxic and non-immunogenic and can be prepared in good yield in fermentation. The Scl2 collagen domain is about a quarter of the length, 234 residues, of the main collagen type, mammalian type I collagen (1014 residues) that is currently used in biomedical devices. In the present study we have made constructs comprising 1 to 4 copies of the Scl2 collagen domain, plus these same constructs with a CysCys sequence at the C-terminal, analogous to that found in mammalian type III collagens. The yields of these constructs were examined from 2 L fermentation studies. The yields of both series declined with increasing size. Circular dichroism showed that the addition of further collagen domains did not lead to a change in the melting temperature compared to the monomer domain. Addition of the CysCys sequence led to a small additional stabilization of about 2-3°C for the monomer construct when the folding (V) domain was present. PMID:25482084

  4. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of type A streptococcal exotoxin: kinetics and regulation during growth of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C W; Ferretti, J J

    1981-01-01

    We describe the detection and quantitation of type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This sensitive and specific technique detected microgram amounts of type A exotoxin and was useful for studying the kinetics and regulation of type A exotoxin production during the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes NY5. Maximum production of type A exotoxin was observed during the mid-log phase of growth, similar to the production of other streptococcal extracellular products. When S. pyogenes NY5 was grown at 42 degrees C, decreases in both growth and type A exotoxin production were observed. The results obtained when we studied the influence of nutrient additives and metal ions on the production of type A exotoxin led to the conclusion that none of these factors significantly affected type A exotoxin synthesis and that regulation was constitutive. Images PMID:7026447

  6. Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements carrying mef(I) and catQ determinants in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Morroni, Gianluca; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Del Grosso, Maria; Pantosti, Annalisa; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-10-01

    The linkage between the macrolide efflux gene mef(I) and the chloramphenicol inactivation gene catQ was first described in Streptococcus pneumoniae (strain Spn529), where the two genes are located in a module designated IQ element. Subsequently, two different defective IQ elements were detected in Streptococcus pyogenes (strains Spy029 and Spy005). The genetic elements carrying the three IQ elements were characterized, and all were found to be Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). The ICE from S. pneumoniae (ICESpn529IQ) was sequenced, whereas the ICEs from S. pyogenes (ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ, the first Tn5253-like ICEs reported in this species) were characterized by PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and restriction analysis. ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ were found to share the intSp 23FST81 integrase gene and an identical Tn916 fragment, whereas ICESpy005IQ has int5252 and lacks Tn916. All three ICEs were found to lack the linearized pC194 plasmid that is usually associated with Tn5253-like ICEs, and all displayed a single copy of a toxin-antitoxin operon that is typically contained in the direct repeats flanking the excisable pC194 region when this region is present. Two different insertion sites of the IQ elements were detected, one in ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ, and another in ICESpy005IQ. The chromosomal integration of the three ICEs was site specific, depending on the integrase (intSp 23FST81 or int5252). Only ICESpy005IQ was excised in circular form and transferred by conjugation. By transformation, mef(I) and catQ were cotransferred at a high frequency from S. pyogenes Spy005 and at very low frequencies from S. pneumoniae Spn529 and S. pyogenes Spy029. PMID:25070090

  7. Single- and Multistep Resistance Selection Studies on the Activity of Retapamulin Compared to Other Agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; McGhee, Pamela; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Retapamulin had the lowest rate of spontaneous mutations by single-step passaging and the lowest parent and selected mutant MICs by multistep passaging among all drugs tested for all Staphylococcus aureus strains and three Streptococcus pyogenes strains which yielded resistant clones. Retapamulin has a low potential for resistance selection in S. pyogenes, with a slow and gradual propensity for resistance development in S. aureus. PMID:16436741

  8. Differences in penicillin-binding proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes and two derived, stabilized L forms.

    PubMed

    Leon, O; Panos, C

    1988-10-01

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of Streptococcus pyogenes and two of its derived, stabilized (i.e., nonreverting) L forms, an osmotically fragile L form and a physiologic isotonic L form, were compared. The numbers of PBPs in the membranes of these organisms were 6, 4, and 2 for the coccus and the osmotically fragile and physiologic isotonic L forms, respectively. Likewise, the relative amounts of total PBPs were 1.00: 1.48:0.32 for this coccus and the osmotically fragile and physiologic isotonic L forms, respectively. The two largest PBPs (PBPs 1 and 2) of the coccus were absent in both L forms, while the smallest PBPs (PBPs 5 and 6) were found in all three membranes. Deacylation (half-life) of three of the four PBPs in the osmotically fragile L form membrane required a significantly longer time than did deacylation of these presumed identical enzymes in the parental coccal membrane. Conversely, there was no such difference between the only two PBPs of the physiologic isotonic L form and the same coccal membrane proteins. Intact cells of all three organisms secreted PBPs and what appeared to be penicilloic acid and a minimal amount of free penicillin. A greater amount of these PBPs was secreted by both L forms than by the coccus. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns and ratios of secreted PBPs were identical to those from labeled membrane preparations. These differences are correlated with some of our previous findings and are discussed in terms of inhibition of cell wall synthesis and resulting membrane changes in these two derived, stabilized coccal L forms. PMID:3049547

  9. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  10. Protective Mechanisms of Respiratory Tract Streptococci against Streptococcus pyogenes Biofilm Formation and Epithelial Cell Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Riani, Catur; Koczan, Dirk; Standar, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) encounter many streptococcal species of the physiological microbial biome when entering the upper respiratory tract of humans, leading to the question how GAS interact with these bacteria in order to establish themselves at this anatomic site and initiate infection. Here we show that S. oralis and S. salivarius in direct contact assays inhibit growth of GAS in a strain-specific manner and that S. salivarius, most likely via bacteriocin secretion, also exerts this effect in transwell experiments. Utilizing scanning electron microscopy documentation, we identified the tested strains as potent biofilm producers except for GAS M49. In mixed-species biofilms, S. salivarius dominated the GAS strains, while S. oralis acted as initial colonizer, building the bottom layer in mixed biofilms and thereby allowing even GAS M49 to form substantial biofilms on top. With the exception of S. oralis, artificial saliva reduced single-species biofilms and allowed GAS to dominate in mixed biofilms, although the overall two-layer structure was unchanged. When covered by S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms, epithelial cells were protected from GAS adherence, internalization, and cytotoxic effects. Apparently, these species can have probiotic effects. The use of Affymetrix array technology to assess HEp-2 cell transcription levels revealed modest changes after exposure to S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms which could explain some of the protective effects against GAS attack. In summary, our study revealed a protection effect of respiratory tract bacteria against an important airway pathogen and allowed a first in vitro insight into local environmental processes after GAS enter the respiratory tract. PMID:23241973

  11. Adaptive evolution of the Streptococcus pyogenes regulatory aldolase LacD.1.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Zachary; Caparon, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In the human-pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the tagatose bisphosphate aldolase LacD.1 likely originated through a gene duplication event and was adapted to a role as a metabolic sensor for regulation of virulence gene transcription. Although LacD.1 retains enzymatic activity, its ancestral metabolic function resides in the LacD.2 aldolase, which is required for the catabolism of galactose. In this study, we compared these paralogous proteins to identify characteristics correlated with divergence and novel function. Surprisingly, despite the fact that these proteins have identical active sites and 82% similarity in amino acid sequence, LacD.1 was less efficient at cleaving both fructose and tagatose bisphosphates. Analysis of kinetic properties revealed that LacD.1's adaptation was associated with a decrease in k(cat) and an increase in K(m). Construction and analysis of enzyme chimeras indicated that non-active-site residues previously associated with the variable activities of human aldolase isoenzymes modulated LacD.1's affinity for substrate. Mutant LacD.1 proteins engineered to have LacD.2-like levels of enzymatic efficiency lost the ability to function as regulators, suggesting that an alteration in efficiency was required for adaptation. In competition under growth conditions that mimic a deep-tissue environment, LacD.1 conferred a significant gain in fitness that was associated with its regulatory activity. Taken together, these data suggest that LacD.1's adaptation represents a form of neofunctionalization in which duplication facilitated the gain of regulatory function important for growth in tissue and pathogenesis. PMID:23316044

  12. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  13. Intracellular Streptococcus pyogenes in Human Macrophages Display an Altered Gene Expression Profile

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    protein has been identified as a pivotal factor affecting phagosomal maturation and S. pyogenes survival intracellularly is as of yet unknown. To address this, the gene expression profile of S. pyogenes within human macrophages was determined and compared to that of extracellular bacteria using customized microarrays

  14. Trading Capsule for Increased Cytotoxin Production: Contribution to Virulence of a Newly Emerged Clade of emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J.; Nasser, Waleed; de la Riva Morales, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes have become one of the major causes of invasive infections worldwide in the last 10 years. We recently sequenced the genome of 1,125 emm89 strains and identified three major phylogenetic groups, designated clade 1, clade 2, and the epidemic clade 3. Epidemic clade 3 strains, which now cause the great majority of infections, have two distinct genetic features compared to clade 1 and clade 2 strains. First, all clade 3 organisms have a variant 3 nga promoter region pattern, which is associated with increased production of secreted cytolytic toxins SPN (S. pyogenes NADase) and SLO (streptolysin O). Second, all clade 3 strains lack the hasABC locus mediating hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis, whereas this locus is intact in clade 1 and clade 2 strains. We constructed isogenic mutant strains that produce different levels of SPN and SLO toxins and capsule (none, low, or high). Here we report that emm89 strains with elevated toxin production are significantly more virulent than low-toxin producers. Importantly, we also show that capsule production is dispensable for virulence in strains that already produce high levels of SPN and SLO. Our results provide new understanding about the molecular mechanisms contributing to the rapid emergence and molecular pathogenesis of epidemic clade 3 emm89 S. pyogenes. PMID:26443457

  15. SECTION A Bacteria PART III Etiologic Agents of Infectious Diseases

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    SECTION A Bacteria PART III Etiologic Agents of Infectious Diseases 698 118 Streptococcus pyogenes(GroupAStreptococcus) Victor Nizet and John C. Arnold Group A streptococcus (GAS) is synonymous with Streptococcus pyogenes and disease states. Worldwide, there are estimated to be >600 million cases of GAS pharyngitis ("strep throat

  16. Emergence of type I restriction modification system-negative emm1 type Streptococcus pyogenes clinical isolates in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masakado; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes emm1 type is the dominant cause of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) in Japan and many other developed countries. Recently, the number of STSS patients in Japan was reported to be increasing. Hence, we analyzed the S. pyogenes clinical isolates detected in Japan after 2005. We found that the regions encoding the Spy1908–1910 two-component regulatory system and the adjacent type I restriction modification system were deleted in some emm1 type isolates. The isolates with the deletion were detected only in the emm1 strains that were isolated between 2010 and 2013, but not before 2010. Twenty-six of 46 (56.5%) emm1 type isolates were isolated in 2010–2013, and among these isolates, five of seven (71.4%) emm1 type STSS isolates were shown to have that deletion. PFGE and PCR analysis for the presence of several pyrogenic exotoxin-related genes suggested that the emm1 isolates with and without the deletion shared the same genetic background. The emm1 isolates with the deletion could incorporate exogenous plasmids by experimental electroporation transformation far more efficiently. These results suggested that the novel emm1 isolates have occupied a fairly large part of total emm1 isolates. PMID:25356467

  17. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32?g/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new ?m46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying ?m46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes. PMID:26429294

  18. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus Mark J. Walker,a Timothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267 Pharyngitis

  19. Streptococcus pyogenes SpyCEP Influences Host-Pathogen Interactions during Infection in a Murine Air Pouch Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Nico; Seubert, Anja; Telford, John L.; Grandi, Guido; Serruto, Davide; Margarit, Immaculada; Janulczyk, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a major human pathogen worldwide, responsible for both local and systemic infections. These bacteria express the subtilisin-like protease SpyCEP which cleaves human IL-8 and related chemokines. We show that localization of SpyCEP is growth-phase and strain dependent. Significant shedding was observed only in a strain naturally overexpressing SpyCEP, and shedding was not dependent on SpyCEP autoproteolytic activity. Surface-bound SpyCEP in two different strains was capable of cleaving IL-8. To investigate SpyCEP action in vivo, we adapted the mouse air pouch model of infection for parallel quantification of bacterial growth, host immune cell recruitment and chemokine levels in situ. In response to infection, the predominant cells recruited were neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils. Concomitantly, the chemokines KC, LIX, and MIP-2 in situ were drastically increased in mice infected with the SpyCEP knockout strain, and growth of this mutant strain was reduced compared to the wild type. SpyCEP has been described as a potential vaccine candidate against S. pyogenes, and we showed that surface-associated SpyCEP was recognized by specific antibodies. In vitro, such antibodies also counteracted the inhibitory effects of SpyCEP on chemokine mediated PMN recruitment. Thus, ?-SpyCEP antibodies may benefit the host both directly by enabling opsonophagocytosis, and indirectly, by neutralizing an important virulence factor. The animal model we employed shows promise for broad application in the study of bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:22848376

  20. RscA, a member of the MDR1 family of transporters, is repressed by CovR and required for growth of Streptococcus pyogenes under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Tracy L; Collins, Julie T; Barnett, Timothy C; Scott, June R

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) to respond to changes in environmental conditions is essential for this gram-positive organism to successfully cause disease in its human host. The two-component system CovRS controls expression of about 15% of the GAS genome either directly or indirectly. In most operons studied, CovR acts as a repressor. We previously linked CovRS to the GAS stress response by showing that the sensor kinase CovS is required to inactivate the response regulator CovR so that GAS can grow under conditions of heat, acid, and salt stress. Here, we sought to identify CovR-repressed genes that are required for growth under stress. To do this, global transcription profiles were analyzed by microarrays following exposure to increased temperature (40 degrees C) and decreased pH (pH 6.0). The CovR regulon in an M type 6 strain of GAS was also examined by global transcriptional analysis. We identified a gene, rscA (regulated by stress and Cov), whose transcription was confirmed to be repressed by CovR and activated by heat and acid. RscA is a member of the MDR1 family of ABC transporters, and we found that it is required for growth of GAS at 40 degrees C but not at pH 6.0. Thus, for GAS to grow at 40 degrees C, CovR repression must be alleviated so that rscA can be transcribed to allow the production of this potential exporter. Possible explanations for the thermoprotective role of RscA in this pathogen are discussed. PMID:16352823

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates in Germany during 2003-2013

    PubMed Central

    Imöhl, Matthias; van der Linden, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A nationwide laboratory-based surveillance study of invasive S. pyogenes infections was conducted in Germany. Invasive isolates (n = 1,281) were obtained between 2003 and 2013. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime and vancomycin. Tetracycline showed the highest rate of resistant or intermediate resistant isolates with 9.8%, followed by macrolides (4.0%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (1.9%), levofloxacin (1.3%), chloramphenicol (0.9%) and clindamycin (0.7%). The most prominent trends were the appearance of levofloxacin non-susceptible isolates since 2011, and an increase of SXT non-susceptibility since 2012. PMID:26340445

  2. Evolution of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes over 14 years in an area of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Raffaela; Morandi, Matteo; Zanchi, Alessandra; Tordini, Giacinta; Pozzi, Gianni; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated temporal fluctuations in macrolide resistance rates, analysing genetic determinants of resistance and clonal evolution in a population of 2744 S. pyogenes isolates collected in the period 2000-2013. The total resistance rate to erythromycin of the isolates was 17.9?%. A maximum of erythromycin resistance emerged in 2000 (38.6?%), followed by a significant decrease to 5.2?% in 2012 (P?pyogenes. Continuous monitoring of microbiological epidemiology seems to be crucial for correct and effective management of streptococcal infections. PMID:26224594

  3. M-Protein Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Associated with Acute Rheumatic Fever in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Deborah A; Smeesters, Pierre R; Steer, Andrew C; Steemson, John D; Ng, Adrian C H; Proft, Thomas; Fraser, John D; Baker, Michael G; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Moreland, Nicole J

    2015-11-01

    We applied an emm cluster typing system to group A Streptococcus strains in New Zealand, including those associated with acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We observed few so-called rheumatogenic emm types but found a high proportion of emm types previously associated with pyoderma, further suggesting a role for skin infection in ARF. PMID:26292296

  4. Dynamin inhibition interferes with inflammasome activation and cytokine gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes-infected human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, S; Mäkelä, S M; Miettinen, M; Charpentier, E; Julkunen, I

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we have analysed the ability of Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)] to activate the NACHT-domain-, leucine-rich repeat- and PYD-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome complex in human monocyte-derived macrophages and the molecules and signalling pathways involved in GAS-induced inflammatory responses. We focused upon analysing the impact of dynamin-dependent endocytosis and the role of major streptococcal virulence factors streptolysin O (SLO) and streptolysin S (SLS) in the immune responses induced by GAS. These virulence factors are involved in immune evasion by forming pores in host cell membranes, and aid the bacteria to escape from the endosome–lysosome pathway. We analysed cytokine gene expression in human primary macrophages after stimulation with live or inactivated wild-type GAS as well as with live SLO and SLS defective bacteria. Interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-? and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-10 cytokines were produced after bacterial stimulation in a dose-dependent manner and no differences in cytokine levels were seen between live, inactivated or mutant bacteria. These data suggest that streptolysins or other secreted bacterial products are not required for the inflammatory responses induced by GAS. Our data indicate that inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis in macrophages attenuates the induction of IL-1?, TNF-?, interferon (IFN)-? and CXCL-10 mRNAs. We also observed that pro-IL-1? protein was expressed and efficiently cleaved into mature-IL-1? via inflammasome activation after bacterial stimulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that multiple signalling pathways are involved in GAS-stimulated inflammatory responses in human macrophages. PMID:25079511

  5. Emergence of scarlet fever Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 clones in Hong Kong is associated with toxin acquisition and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark R; Holden, Matthew T; Coupland, Paul; Chen, Jonathan H K; Venturini, Carola; Barnett, Timothy C; Zakour, Nouri L Ben; Tse, Herman; Dougan, Gordon; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Walker, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    A scarlet fever outbreak began in mainland China and Hong Kong in 2011 (refs. 1-6). Macrolide- and tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 isolates represent the majority of clinical cases. Recently, we identified two mobile genetic elements that were closely associated with emm12 outbreak isolates: the integrative and conjugative element ICE-emm12, encoding genes for tetracycline and macrolide resistance, and prophage ?HKU.vir, encoding the superantigens SSA and SpeC, as well as the DNase Spd1 (ref. 4). Here we sequenced the genomes of 141 emm12 isolates, including 132 isolated in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2011. We found that the introduction of several ICE-emm12 variants, ?HKU.vir and a new prophage, ?HKU.ssa, occurred in three distinct emm12 lineages late in the twentieth century. Acquisition of ssa and transposable elements encoding multidrug resistance genes triggered the expansion of scarlet fever-associated emm12 lineages in Hong Kong. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant ssa-harboring scarlet fever strains should prompt heightened surveillance within China and abroad for the dissemination of these mobile genetic elements. PMID:25401300

  6. Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase Mutants Are Highly Susceptible to Killing by Host Factors Due to Aberrant Envelope Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Assaf; Tanasescu, Ana-Maria; Zhao, Anna M.; Serrano, Anna; Alston, Tricia; Sol, Asaf; Bachrach, Gilad; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall anchored virulence factors are critical for infection and colonization of the host by Gram-positive bacteria. Such proteins have an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal sorting signal, composed of an LPXTG motif, a hydrophobic stretch, and a few positively charged amino acids. The sorting signal halts translocation across the membrane, allowing sortase to cleave the LPXTG motif, leading to surface anchoring. Deletion of sortase prevents the anchoring of virulence factors to the wall; the effects on bacterial physiology however, have not been thoroughly characterized. Here we show that deletion of Streptococcus pyogenes sortase A leads to accumulation of sorting intermediates, particularly at the septum, altering cellular morphology and physiology, and compromising membrane integrity. Such cells are highly sensitive to cathelicidin, and are rapidly killed in blood and plasma. These phenomena are not a loss-of-function effect caused by the absence of anchored surface proteins, but specifically result from the accumulation of sorting intermediates. Reduction in the level of sorting intermediates leads to a return of the sortase mutant to normal morphology, while expression of M protein with an altered LPXTG motif in wild type cells leads to toxicity in the host environment, similar to that observed in the sortase mutant. These unanticipated effects suggest that inhibition of sortase by small-molecule inhibitors could similarly lead to the rapid elimination of pathogens from an infected host, making such inhibitors much better anti-bacterial agents than previously believed. PMID:26484774

  7. Structural insight into the substrate inhibition mechanism of NADP(+)-dependent succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Seong Ah; Chi, Young Min; Lee, Ki Seog

    2015-06-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenases (SSADHs) are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to succinic acid in the presence of NAD(P)(+), and play an important role in the cellular mechanisms including the detoxification of accumulated SSA or the survival in conditions of limited nutrients. Here, we report the inhibitory properties and two crystal structures of SSADH from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpSSADH) in a binary (ES) complex with SSA as the substrate and a ternary (ESS) complex with the substrate SSA and the inhibitory SSA, at 2.4 Å resolution for both structures. Analysis of the kinetic inhibitory parameters revealed significant substrate inhibition in the presence of NADP(+) at concentrations of SSA higher than 0.02 mM, which exhibited complete uncompetitive substrate inhibition with the inhibition constant (Ki) value of 0.10 ± 0.02 mM. In ES-complex of SpSSADH, the SSA showed a tightly bound bent form nearby the catalytic residues, which may be caused by reduction of the cavity volume for substrate binding, compared with other SSADHs. Moreover, structural comparison of ESS-complex with a binary complex with NADP(+) of SpSSADH indicated that the substrate inhibition was induced by the binding of inhibitory SSA in the cofactor-binding site, instead of NADP(+). Our results provide first structure-based molecular insights into the substrate inhibition mechanism of SpSSADH as the Gram-positive bacterial SSADH. PMID:25888791

  8. [Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes in primary school children: M-protein types, pyrogenic toxin genes, and investigation of the clonal relationships between the isolates].

    PubMed

    Otlu, Bar??; Karakurt, Cem?it; Bay?nd?r, Ya?ar; Kayaba?, Üner; Yakupo?ullar?, Yusuf; Gözükara Ba?, Harika

    2015-07-01

    M-protein and pyrogenic toxins are the most important virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes, and they play significant role in the pathophysiology of acute rheumatoid fever and scarlet fever, respectively. In this study, the pharyngeal carriage of S.pyogenes of the primary school children, clonal relationship of the strains, M-protein types, and the presence of pyrogenic toxin genes were aimed to be investigated. A total of 668 throat cultures obtained from children (age range: 6-16 years) in two primary schools in our region, were included in the study. The clonal relationships of the isolated group A streptococci (GAS) strains were investigated by DiversiLab assay (BioMérieux, France), and the clonal relatedness was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. M-protein (emm) typing was performed by DNA sequencing as suggested by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The genes encoding pyrogenic toxins, speA and speC, were investigated by an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. S.pyogenes was isolated from 134 (20.05%) of the throat samples. The GAS carriage rate of the students aged ?10 was statistically higher than those 7-9 years age group (%22 vs %16.4, p<0.05). The M protein gene could be characterized only among 123 isolates by DNA sequencing, and 20 different emm types were detected. The most frequent emm type was emm1 (n=38, 30.9%) followed by emm12 (n=18, 14.6%), emm89 (n=10, 8.1%), emm118 (n=9, 7.3%), and emm4 (n=7, 5.7%). Pyrogenic toxin genes were found in 25 (18.6%) of the isolates, including speA in 11 isolates (8.2%) and speC in 12 isolates (8.9%) and both genes were detected in 2 isolates (1.5%). Sixty-two different Rep (Repetitive extragenic palindromic)-PCR profiles were detected in 134 S.pyogenes isolates by DiversiLab method. Thirteen different clusters were formed by a total of clonally related 36 isolates revealing a strain clustering ratio of 26.9%. Clonal relationship of all isolates in the same cluster was confirmed by PFGE method. In this study, relatively high percentage of GAS carriage was observed among primary school children in our region. The coverage rate of the 30-valent vaccine was determined to be over 90% with respect to M-protein types. Since the pyrogenic toxin-encoding genes were found in one fifth of the isolates from the studied subjects, we concluded that the carrier population may also have high risk for scarlet fever. We also concluded that, the clonal relationship ratio determined among the isolates may be a risk in school transmission of GAS. PMID:26313273

  9. Severe Soft Tissue Infection Caused by a Non-Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Strain Harboring a Premature Stop Mutation in the sagC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Roman G.; Ensser, Armin; Dahesh, Samira; Popp, Isabel; Heeg, Christiane; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Merz, Thomas; Schulz, Theresia; Horch, Raymund E.; Bogdan, Christian; Nizet, Victor; van der Linden, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We recovered a non-beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes strain from a severe soft tissue infection. In this isolate, we detected a premature stop codon within the sagC gene of the streptolysin S (SLS) biosynthetic operon. Reintroduction of full-length sagC gene on a plasmid vector restored the beta-hemolytic phenotype to our clinical isolate, indicating that the point mutation in sagC accounted for loss of hemolytic activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that a severe soft tissue infection can be caused by a non-beta-hemolytic S. pyogenes strain lacking a functional SagC. PMID:23515542

  10. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49), employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5? rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR) analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of sRNAs expressed by a given organism requires the complementary use of different methods and the investigation of several environmental conditions. Despite a high conservation of sRNA genes within streptococci, the expression of sRNAs appears to be strain specific. PMID:23062031

  11. Differences between Macrolide-Resistant and -Susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: Importance of Clonal Properties in Addition to Antibiotic Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Costa, C.; Friães, A.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  12. Structural Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes NADH Oxidase: Conformational Dynamics Involved in Formation of the C(4a)-Peroxyflavin Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Wallen, Jamie R; Mallett, T Conn; Okuno, Takashi; Parsonage, Derek; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Claiborne, Al

    2015-11-17

    In probing the oxygen reactivity of an Enterococcus faecalis NADH oxidase (Nox; O2 ? 2H2O) C42S mutant lacking the Cys42-sulfenic acid (Cys42-SOH) redox center, we provided direct evidence of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin intermediate in the oxidative half-reaction and also described a conformational or chemical change that is rate-limiting for full reoxidation of the homodimer. In this work, the Nox from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyNox) has been expressed and crystallized, and the overoxidized wild-type [Cys44-SOH ? Cys44-sulfinic acid (Cys44-SO2H)] and C44S mutant enzyme structures have been refined at 2.0 and 2.15 Å, respectively. We show that azide binds to the two-electron reduced wild-type (EH2) enzyme and to the mutant enzyme in solution, but with a significantly higher affinity for the mutant protein. The spectral course of the titration with the SpyNox EH2 form clearly indicates progressive displacement of the Cys44-S(-) ? FAD charge-transfer interaction. An azide soak with C44S Nox crystals led to the structure of the complex, as refined at 2.10 Å. The active-site N3(-) ligand is proximal to the Ser44 and His11 side chains, and a significant shift in the Ser44 side chain also appears. This provides an attractive explanation for the azide-induced loss of charge-transfer absorbance seen with the wild-type EH2 form and also permits accommodation of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin structural model. The conformation of Ser44 and the associated helical element, and the resulting steric accommodation, appear to be linked to the conformational change described in the E. faecalis C42S Nox oxidative half-reaction. PMID:26506002

  13. Characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes beta-NAD+ glycohydrolase: re-evaluation of enzymatic properties associated with pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Joydeep; Anderson, Patricia J; Chandrasekaran, Sukantha; Caparon, Michael G

    2010-02-19

    The gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes injects a beta-NAD(+) glycohydrolase (SPN) into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. In this compartment, SPN accelerates the death of the host cell by an unknown mechanism that may involve its beta-NAD(+)-dependent enzyme activities. SPN has been reported to possess the unique characteristic of not only catalyzing hydrolysis of beta-NAD(+), but also carrying out ADP-ribosyl cyclase and ADP-ribosyltransferase activities, making SPN the only beta-NAD(+) glycohydrolase that can catalyze all of these reactions. With the long term goal of understanding how these activities may contribute to pathogenesis, we have further characterized the enzymatic activity of SPN using highly purified recombinant protein. Kinetic studies of the multiple activities of SPN revealed that SPN possessed only beta-NAD(+) hydrolytic activity and lacked detectable ADP-ribosyl cyclase and ADP-ribosyltransferase activities. Similarly, SPN was unable to catalyze cyclic ADPR hydrolysis, and could not catalyze methanolysis or transglycosidation. Kinetic analysis of product inhibition by recombinant SPN demonstrated an ordered uni-bi mechanism, with ADP-ribose being released as a second product. SPN was unaffected by product inhibition using nicotinamide, suggesting that this moiety contributes little to the binding energy of the substrate. Upon transformation, SPN was toxic to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas a glycohydrolase-inactive SPN allowed for viability. Taken together, these data suggest that SPN functions exclusively as a strict beta-NAD(+) glycohydrolase during pathogenesis. PMID:20018886

  14. Differences between macrolide-resistant and -susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes: importance of clonal properties in addition to antibiotic consumption.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, C; Friães, A; Ramirez, M; Melo-Cristino, J

    2012-11-01

    A steady decline in macrolide resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) in Portugal was reported during 1999 to 2006. This was accompanied by alterations in the prevalence of macrolide resistance phenotypes and in the clonal composition of the population. In order to test whether changes in the macrolide-resistant population reflected the same changing patterns of the overall population, we characterized both macrolide-susceptible and -resistant GAS associated with a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis recovered in the period from 2000 to 2005 in Portugal. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling was the best predictor of emm type and the only typing method that could discriminate clones associated with macrolide resistance and susceptibility within each emm type. Six PFGE clusters were significantly associated with macrolide susceptibility: T3-emm3-ST406, T4-emm4-ST39, T1-emm1-ST28, T6-emm6-ST382, B3264-emm89-ST101/ST408, and T2-emm2-ST55. Four PFGE clusters were associated with macrolide resistance: T4-emm4-ST39, T28-emm28-ST52, T12-emm22-ST46, and T1-emm1-ST28. We found no evidence for frequent ongoing horizontal transfer of macrolide resistance determinants. The diversity of the macrolide-resistant population was lower than that of susceptible isolates. The differences found between the two populations suggest that the macrolide-resistant population of GAS has its own dynamics, independent of the behavior of the susceptible population. PMID:22908153

  15. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes ?-NAD+ glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Lee, Sang Jae; Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young; Suh, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is ?-NAD+ glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPNct–IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPNct; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70?Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPNct and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope. PMID:24121349

  16. Decline in macrolide resistance rates among Streptococcus pyogenes causing pharyngitis in children isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, G; Petrelli, D; Di Luca, M C; Pimentel de Araujo, F; Bernaschi, P; Repetto, A; Bellesi, J; Vitali, L A

    2015-09-01

    Macrolides are often used to treat group A streptococcus (GAS) infections, but their resistance rates reached high proportions worldwide. The aim of the present study was to give an update on the characteristics and contemporary prevalence of macrolide-resistant pharyngeal GAS in Central Italy. A total of 592 isolates causing pharyngitis in children were collected in the period 2012-2013. Clonality was assessed by emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for all macrolide-resistant strains and for selected susceptible isolates. Genetic determinants of resistance were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Forty-four GAS were erythromycin-resistant (7.4 %). Among them, 52.3 % and 50 % were clindamycin- and tetracycline-resistant, respectively. erm(B)-positive isolates (52.3 %) expressed the constitutive cMLSB phenotype. mef(A) and its associated M phenotype were recorded in 40.9 % of the cases. The remaining erm(A)-positive isolates expressed the iMLSB phenotype. Seventeen tetracycline-resistant isolates carried tet(M) and five isolates carried tet(O). Twenty-five emm types were found among all strains, with the predominance of emm types 12, 89, 1, and 4. Eleven emm types and 12 PFGE clusters characterized macrolide-resistant strains, with almost two-thirds belonging to emm12, emm4, and emm11. Macrolide-susceptible and -resistant emm types 12, 89, 11, and 4 shared related PFGE profiles. There was a dramatic decline in macrolide resistance in Central Italy among pharyngeal GAS isolates in 2012-2013 when compared to previous studies from the same region (p?

  17. Surface Export of GAPDH/SDH, a Glycolytic Enzyme, Is Essential for Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong; Agarwal, Shivangi; Agarwal, Shivani; Pancholi, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcal surface dehydrogenase (SDH) (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) is an anchorless major multifunctional surface protein in group A Streptococcus (GAS) with the ability to bind important mammalian proteins, including plasmin(ogen). Although several biological properties of SDH are suggestive of its possible role in GAS virulence, its direct role in GAS pathogenesis has not been ascertained because it is essential for GAS survival. Thus, it has remained enigmatic as to “how and why” SDH/GAPDH is exported onto the bacterial surface. The present investigation highlights “why” SDH is exported onto the GAS surface. Differential microarray-based genome-wide transcript abundance analysis was carried out using a specific mutant, which was created by inserting a hydrophobic tail at the C-terminal end of SDH (M1-SDHHBtail) and thus preventing its exportation onto the GAS surface. This analysis revealed downregulation of the majority of genes involved in GAS virulence and genes belonging to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and upregulation of those related to lipid metabolism. The complete attenuation of this mutant for virulence in the mouse model and the decreased and increased virulence of the wild-type and mutant strains postcomplementation with SDHHBtail and SDH, respectively, indicated that the SDH surface export indeed regulates GAS virulence. M1-SDHHBtail also displayed unaltered growth patterns, increased intracellular ATP concentration and Hpr double phosphorylation, and significantly reduced pH tolerance, streptolysin S, and SpeB activities. These phenotypic and physiological changes observed in the mutant despite the unaltered expression levels of established transcriptional regulators further highlight the fact that SDH interfaces with many regulators and its surface exportation is essential for GAS virulence. PMID:21628503

  18. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders. PMID:25403787

  19. Epidemiological Study of Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes From Korea and Japan by emm Genotyping and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takashi; Arai, Kazuaki; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Koh, Eun-Ha; Yoshida, Haruno; Yano, Hisakazu; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background We determined the epidemiological characteristics of erythromycin (EM)-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) strains isolated from Korea and Japan, using emm genotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Methods Clinical isolates of GAS had been collected from 1992 to 2012 in Korea and from 2004 to 2009 in Japan. EM resistance was determined by the microdilution method, and resistance genotypes were assessed by PCR. The emm genotyping and MLST were performed by DNA sequencing. Results The emm genotypes and sequence types (STs) were concordant in 143 (85.1%) of 168 EM-resistant GAS strains from Korea. ST36/emm12 (35.1%), ST52/emm28 (22.6%), and ST49/emm75 (16.1%) were the most common types. Most of the ST36 (93.9%) and ST52 (95.8%) strains harbored erm(B), whereas strains ST49, ST42, and ST15 contained mef(A). The concordance between emm genotypes and STs was 41 (93.2%) among 44 EM-resistant GAS strains from Japan. ST36/emm12 (34.1%), ST49/emm75 (18.2%), and ST28/emm1 (15.9%) were the major types. ST36 isolates harbored either erm(B) (56.3%) or mef(A) (37.5%), whereas isolates ST28, ST49, and ST38 carried only mef(A). The proportion of erm(B) and mef(A) was 66.1% and 33.3% in Korea and 22.7% and 68.2% in Japan, respectively. Conclusions The common STs in Korea and Japan were ST36 and ST49, whereas ST52 was present only in Korea and ST28 only in Japan. Genotype erm(B) was predominant in Korea, whereas mef(A) was frequent in Japan. There were differences between Korea and Japan regarding the frequencies of emm genotypes, STs, and EM resistance genes among the EM-resistant GAS. PMID:26522753

  20. The FbaB-type fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes specific invasion

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    EC tropism. FbaB thus initiates a process that may contribute to the deep tissue tropism and spread tropism to impact the spectrum of diseases that a particular strain can cause. Fibronectin tropism of the pathogen to the oropharynx. M3 GAS do not possess the genes for SfbI/ PrtF1, or M1, two

  1. Application of a unique server-based oligonucleotide probe selection tool toward a novel biosensor for the detection of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Nugen, Sam R; Leonard, Barbara; Baeumner, Antje J

    2007-05-15

    We developed a software program for the rapid selection of detection probes to be used in nucleic acid-based assays. In comparison to commercially available software packages, our program allows the addition of oligotags as required by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) as well as automatic BLAST searches for all probe/primer pairs. We then demonstrated the usefulness of the program by designing a novel lateral flow biosensor for Streptococcus pyogenes that does not rely on amplification methods such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or NASBA to obtain low limits of detection, but instead uses multiple reporter and capture probes per target sequence and an instantaneous amplification via dye-encapsulating liposomes. These assays will decrease the detection time to just a 20 min hybridization reaction and avoid costly enzymatic gene amplification reactions. The lateral flow assay was developed quantifying the 16S rRNA from S. pyogenes by designing reporter and capture probes that specifically hybridize with the RNA and form a sandwich. DNA reporter probes were tagged with dye-encapsulating liposomes, biotinylated DNA oligonucleotides were used as capture probes. From the initial number of capture and reporter probes chosen, a combination of two capture and three reporter probes were found to provide optimal signal generation and significant enhancement over single capture/reporter probe combinations. The selectivity of the biosensor was proven by analyzing organisms closely related to S. pyogenes, such as other Streptococcus and Enterococcus species. All probes had been selected by the software program within minutes and no iterative optimization and re-design of the oligonucleotides was required which enabled a very rapid biosensor prototyping. While the sensitivity obtained with the biosensor was only 135 ng, future experiments will decrease this significantly by the addition of more reporter and capture probes for either the same rRNA or a different nucleic acid target molecule. This will lead to the possibility of detecting S. pyogenes with a rugged assay that does not require a cell culturing or gene amplification step and will therefore enable rapid, specific and sensitive onsite testing. PMID:17011180

  2. Dynamics of uterine infections with Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis and Trueperella pyogenes in post-partum dairy cows and their association with clinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Wagener, K; Grunert, T; Prunner, I; Ehling-Schulz, M; Drillich, M

    2014-12-01

    The diversity and dynamics of the uterine microbiota of dairy cows are poorly understood although it is becoming increasingly evident that they play a crucial role in the development of metritis and endometritis. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the bovine microbiota of 40 cows on the day of calving and days 3, 9, 15, and 21 after parturition, and to investigate the associations of selected species with clinical endometritis (CE). Trueperella pyogenes (43.5%), Escherichia coli (21.5%), Bacillus spp. (21.0%) and Streptococcus uberis (18.5%) were the most frequently isolated microbes. Analyses of different sampling time points revealed that the presence of S. uberis on day 3 increased the risk of subsequent T. pyogenes infection on day 9 (odds ratio [OR]?=?5.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.2-22.6). T. pyogenes infection (OR?=?36.0, 95% CI?=?3.8-343.2) and retained fetal membranes (RFM) (OR?=?12.4, 95%CI?=?1.4-112.7) were significant risk factors for CE. Cows with S. uberis on day 3 tended to have greater odds of CE than S. uberis-negative cows (OR?=?7.1, 95% CI?=?0.9-55.6). Chemometric analysis revealed significant differences in the metabolic profile of S. uberis strains isolated from cows with different vaginal discharge scores. This is the first study showing the association of specific S. uberis subtypes with the uterine health status of post-partum dairy cows. The study demonstrates that uterine clearance is a highly dynamic process, during which time bacteria show distinct patterns of progression, and provides information about interactions between bacterial species involved in the occurrence of CE. PMID:25439441

  3. ?1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase as a new target for therapeutics: inhibition of the enzyme from Streptococcus pyogenes and effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Petrollino, Davide; Fusetti, Massimo; Romanini, Letizia; Nocek, Bogus?aw; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Berlicki, Lukasz; Kafarski, Pawe?

    2012-06-01

    Compounds able to interfere with amino acid biosynthesis have the potential to inhibit cell growth. In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, unless an ornithine cyclodeaminase is present, the activity of ?1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase is mandatory to proline production, and the enzyme inhibition should result in amino acid starvation, blocking in turn protein synthesis. The ability of some substituted derivatives of aminomethylenebisphosphonic acid and its analogues to interfere with the activity of the enzyme from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes was investigated. Several compounds were able to suppress activity in the micromolar range of concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to the substrate P5C and non-competitive with respect to the electron donor NAD(P)H. The actual occurrence of enzyme inhibition in vivo was supported by the effects of the most active derivatives upon bacterial growth and free amino acid content. PMID:21744012

  4. Toward New Therapeutics for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: Propargyl-Linked Antifolates Are Potent Inhibitors of MRSA and Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Scocchera, Eric W.; Martin, Brooke D.; Swain III, P. Whitney; Alverson, Jeremy B.; Priestley, Nigel D.; Anderson, Amy C.; Wright, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    Hospital- and community-acquired, complicated skin and soft tissue infections, often attributed to Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, present a significant health burden that is associated with increased health care costs and mortality. As these two species are difficult to discern on diagnosis and are associated with differential profiles of drug resistance, the development of an efficacious antibacterial agent that targets both organisms is a high priority. Herein we describe a structure-based drug development effort that has produced highly potent inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from both species. Optimized propargyl-linked antifolates containing a key pyridyl substituent display antibacterial activity against both methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. pyogenes at MIC values below 0.1 µg/mL and minimal cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Further evaluation against a panel of clinical isolates shows good efficacy against a range of important phenotypes such as hospital- and community-acquired strains as well as strains resistant to vancomycin. PMID:22347365

  5. Pyogenic granuloma

    MedlinePLUS

    Pyogenic granulomas are small, raised, and red bumps on the skin. The bumps have a smooth surface and may ... The exact cause of pyogenic granulomas is unknown. They often appear ... arms, or face. Pyogenic granulomas are common in children.

  6. Specific Behavior of Intracellular Streptococcus pyogenes That Has Undergone Autophagic Degradation Is Associated with Bacterial Streptolysin O and Host Small G Proteins Rab5 and Rab7*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Funao, Junko; Nozawa, Takashi; Aikawa, Chihiro; Okahashi, Nobuo; Shintani, Seikou; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus (GAS)) is a pathogen that invades non-phagocytic host cells, and causes a variety of acute infections such as pharyngitis. Our group previously reported that intracellular GAS is effectively degraded by the host-cell autophagic machinery, and that a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, streptolysin O (SLO), is associated with bacterial escape from endosomes in epithelial cells. However, the details of both the intracellular behavior of GAS and the process leading to its autophagic degradation remain unknown. In this study, we found that two host small G proteins, Rab5 and Rab7, were associated with the pathway of autophagosome formation and the fate of intracellular GAS. Rab5 was involved in bacterial invasion and endosome fusion. Rab7 was clearly multifunctional, with roles in bacterial invasion, endosome maturation, and autophagosome formation. In addition, this study showed that the bacterial cytolysin SLO supported the escape of GAS into the cytoplasm from endosomes, and surprisingly, a SLO-deficient mutant of GAS was viable longer than the wild-type strain although it failed to escape the endosomes. This intracellular behavior of GAS is unique and distinct from that of other types of bacterial invaders. Our results provide a new picture of GAS infection and host-cell responses in epithelial cells. PMID:20472552

  7. Specific behavior of intracellular Streptococcus pyogenes that has undergone autophagic degradation is associated with bacterial streptolysin O and host small G proteins Rab5 and Rab7.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Funao, Junko; Nozawa, Takashi; Aikawa, Chihiro; Okahashi, Nobuo; Shintani, Seikou; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2010-07-16

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus (GAS)) is a pathogen that invades non-phagocytic host cells, and causes a variety of acute infections such as pharyngitis. Our group previously reported that intracellular GAS is effectively degraded by the host-cell autophagic machinery, and that a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, streptolysin O (SLO), is associated with bacterial escape from endosomes in epithelial cells. However, the details of both the intracellular behavior of GAS and the process leading to its autophagic degradation remain unknown. In this study, we found that two host small G proteins, Rab5 and Rab7, were associated with the pathway of autophagosome formation and the fate of intracellular GAS. Rab5 was involved in bacterial invasion and endosome fusion. Rab7 was clearly multifunctional, with roles in bacterial invasion, endosome maturation, and autophagosome formation. In addition, this study showed that the bacterial cytolysin SLO supported the escape of GAS into the cytoplasm from endosomes, and surprisingly, a SLO-deficient mutant of GAS was viable longer than the wild-type strain although it failed to escape the endosomes. This intracellular behavior of GAS is unique and distinct from that of other types of bacterial invaders. Our results provide a new picture of GAS infection and host-cell responses in epithelial cells. PMID:20472552

  8. tRNA Modification by GidA/MnmE Is Necessary for Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence: a New Strategy To Make Live Attenuated Strains ? †

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Caparon, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Studies directed at vaccine development and mucosal immunity against Streptococcus pyogenes would benefit from the availability of live attenuated strains. Our approach for production of candidate live attenuated strains was to identify mutations that did not alter growth in vitro and did not alter the overall complement of virulence factors produced but did result in reduced levels of expression of multiple secreted virulence factors. A global reduction but not elimination of expression would likely lead to attenuation while maximizing the number of antigenic targets available for stimulation of immunity. Adaptation of Tn5-based transposome mutagenesis to S. pyogenes with initial screening for reduced expression of the SpeB protease resulted in identification of mutations in gidA, which encodes an enzyme involved in tRNA modification. Reduced SpeB expression was due to delayed onset of speB transcription resulting from reduced translation efficiency of the message for RopB, a transcriptional activator. Overall, GidA? mutants had a nearly normal global transcription profile but expressed significantly reduced levels of multiple virulence factors due to impaired translation efficiencies. A translation defect was supported by the observation that mutants lacking MnmE, which functions in the same tRNA modification pathway as GidA, phenocopied GidA deficiency. The mutants stimulated a cytokine response in cultured macrophages identical to that in the wild type, with the exception of reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-23. Significantly, GidA? mutants were highly attenuated in the murine ulcer model of soft tissue infection. These characteristics suggest that GidA pathway tRNA modification mutants are attractive candidates for further evaluation as live attenuated strains. PMID:18426891

  9. Elimination of Chromosomal Island SpyCIM1 from Streptococcus pyogenes Strain SF370 Reverses the Mutator Phenotype and Alters Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Rahman, Maliha; McCullor, Kimberly A.; King, Catherine J.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McShan, W. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island M1 (SpyCIM1) integrates by site-specific recombination into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL in strain SF370SmR, blocking transcription of it and the downstream operon genes. During exponential growth, SpyCIM1 excises from the chromosome and replicates as an episome, restoring mutL transcription. This process is reversed in stationary phase with SpyCIM1 re-integrating into mutL, returning the cells to a mutator phenotype. Here we show that elimination of SpyCIM1 relieves this mutator phenotype. The downstream MMR operon genes, multidrug efflux pump lmrP, Holliday junction resolution helicase ruvA, and DNA base excision repair glycosylase tag, are also restored to constitutive expression by elimination of SpyCIM1. The presence of SpyCIM1 alters global transcription patterns in SF370SmR. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) demonstrated that loss of SpyCIM1 in the SpyCIM1 deletion mutant, CEM1?4, impacted the expression of over 100 genes involved in virulence and metabolism both in early exponential phase, when the SpyCIM1 is episomal, as well as at the onset of stationary phase, when SpyCIM1 has reintegrated into mutL. Among these changes, the up-regulation of the genes for the antiphagocytic M protein (emm1), streptolysin O (slo), capsule operon (hasABC), and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (speB), are particularly notable. The expression pattern of the MMR operon confirmed our earlier observations that these genes are transcribed in early exponential phase but silenced as stationary phase is approached. Thus, the direct role of SpyCIM1 in causing the mutator phenotype is confirmed, and further, its influence upon the biology of S. pyogenes was found to impact multiple genes in addition to the MMR operon, which is a novel function for a mobile genetic element. We suggest that such chromosomal islands are a remarkable evolutionary adaptation to promote the survival of its S. pyogenes host cell in changing environments. PMID:26701803

  10. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    SciTech Connect

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W.

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  11. Pyogenic Granuloma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by pyogenic granulomas than men, though male and female children are equally affected. Pyogenic granulomas are most often seen in: Children and young adults Pregnant women Women taking oral contraceptives People taking certain oral retinoid medications, including isotretinoin ...

  12. Effects of penicillin and erythromycin on adherence of invasive and noninvasive isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes to laminin

    PubMed Central

    Šmitran, Aleksandra; Vukovi?, Dragana; Gaji?, Ina; Marinkovi?, Jelena; Ranin, Lazar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship between the invasiveness of group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains and their abilities to adhere to laminin and assessed the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of penicillin and erythromycin on the ability of GAS to adhere to laminin. The adherence of noninvasive and highly invasive isolates of GAS to laminin was significantly higher than the adherence displayed by isolates of low invasiveness. Antibiotic treatment caused significant reductions in adherence to laminin in all three groups of strains. Penicillin was more successful in reducing the adherence abilities of the tested GAS strains than erythromycin. PMID:26270594

  13. Increased Risk of Pyogenic Liver Abscess Among Patients With Colonic Diverticular Diseases: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Hui-Ming; Hsin, Ming-Che; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hsu, Chung-Y; Liu, Yen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Whether patients with diverticular diseases exhibit a higher risk of developing pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) remains inconclusive.From the inpatient claims in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 54,147 patients diagnosed with diverticulosis in the 1998 to 2010 period and 216,588 controls without the disorder. The 2 cohorts were matched by age, sex, and admission year, and were followed up until the end of 2010 to estimate the risk of PLA.Overall, the incidence of PLA was 2.44-fold higher in the diverticular-disease group than in the controls (11.5 vs 4.65 per 10,000 person-year). The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PLA was 2.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81-2.44) for the diverticular-disease group, according to a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. The age-specific data showed that the aHR for the diverticular-disease group, compared with the controls, was the highest inpatients younger than 50 years old (aHR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.77-5.85). Further analysis showed that the diverticular-disease group exhibited an elevated risk of PLA regardless of whether patients had diverticulitis.The patients with diverticular diseases exhibited a higher risk of PLA. PMID:26656355

  14. Antibody levels and in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to Streptococcus pyogenes erythrogenic toxin A and mitogen of patients with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, G M; Yousof, A M; Behbehani, K; Majeed, H A; Sakkalah, S; Souan, K; Jarrad, I; Geoffroy, C; Alouf, J E

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to a streptococcal mitogen and erythrogenic toxin A of children with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD). Antibody levels to the streptococcal products were also analyzed in the sera of those with ARF or chronic rheumatic heart disease as well as in the sera of children with streptococcal pharyngitis or poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Our results demonstrated that the individuals had depressed lymphoproliferative responses during the active stage of rheumatic fever. The depressed responses were not found either to be induced by time-sensitive mitogen-specific suppressor cells or to be related to a dose-response phenomenon. On the other hand, antibody levels to the extracellular mitogens were significantly elevated in the sera of children with ARF compared with the levels in the rest of the groups. The hyperresponsiveness noted among children with ARF was found to be at a quantitative level and was not due to recognition of more epitopes, as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting). The profile of immune responsiveness in children with ARF to the streptococcal extracellular mitogens is discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of disease. Images PMID:1774298

  15. Epethelial presence of Trueperella pyogenes predicts site-level presence of cranial abscess disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Belser, Emily H; Cohen, Bradley S; Keeler, Shamus P; Killmaster, Charles H; Bowers, John W; Miller, Karl V

    2015-01-01

    Cranial/intracranial abscess disease is an emerging source of significant mortality for male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of cranial/intracranial abscess disease are associated with infection by the opportunistic pathogen Trueperella pyogenes although the relationship between the prevalence of the bacteria and occurrence of disease is speculative. We examined 5,612 hunter-harvested deer from 29 sites across all physiographic provinces in Georgia for evidence of cranial abscess disease and sampled the forehead, lingual, and nasal surfaces from 692 deer. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine presence of T. pyogenes from these samples. We found T. pyogenes prevalence at a site was a predictor for the occurrence of cranial abscess disease. Prevalence of T. pyogenes did not differ between samples from the nose or tongue although prevalence along the forehead was greater for males than females (p = 0.04), particularly at sites with high occurrence of this disease. Socio-sexual behaviors, bacterial prevalence, or physiological characteristics may predispose male deer to intracranial/cranial abscess disease. Determination of factors that affect T. pyogenes prevalence among sites may help explain the occurrence of this disease among populations. PMID:25803047

  16. Epethelial Presence of Trueperella pyogenes Predicts Site-Level Presence of Cranial Abscess Disease in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    PubMed Central

    Belser, Emily H.; Cohen, Bradley S.; Keeler, Shamus P.; Killmaster, Charles H.; Bowers, John W.; Miller, Karl V.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial/intracranial abscess disease is an emerging source of significant mortality for male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of cranial/intracranial abscess disease are associated with infection by the opportunistic pathogen Trueperella pyogenes although the relationship between the prevalence of the bacteria and occurrence of disease is speculative. We examined 5,612 hunter-harvested deer from 29 sites across all physiographic provinces in Georgia for evidence of cranial abscess disease and sampled the forehead, lingual, and nasal surfaces from 692 deer. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine presence of T. pyogenes from these samples. We found T. pyogenes prevalence at a site was a predictor for the occurrence of cranial abscess disease. Prevalence of T. pyogenes did not differ between samples from the nose or tongue although prevalence along the forehead was greater for males than females (p = 0.04), particularly at sites with high occurrence of this disease. Socio-sexual behaviors, bacterial prevalence, or physiological characteristics may predispose male deer to intracranial/cranial abscess disease. Determination of factors that affect T. pyogenes prevalence among sites may help explain the occurrence of this disease among populations. PMID:25803047

  17. Highly Effective Renaturation of a Streptokinase from Streptococcus pyogenes DT7 as Inclusion Bodies Overexpressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sy Le Thanh; Quyen, Dinh Thi; Vu, Hong Diep

    2014-01-01

    The streptokinase (SK) is emerging as an important thrombolytic therapy agent in the treatment of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases. We reported highly effective renaturation of a SK from S. pyogeness DT7 overexpressed in E. coli, purification, and biochemical characterization. A gene coding for the SK was cloned from S. pyogeness DT7. Because accumulation of active SK is toxic to the host cells, we have expressed it in the form of inclusion bodies. The mature protein was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 DE3/pESK under the control of the strong promoter tac induced by IPTG with a level of 60% of the total cell proteins. The activity of the rSK, renatured in phosphate buffer supplemented with Triton X-100 and glycerol, was covered with up to 41 folds of its initial activity. The purified of protein was identified with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry through four peptide fragments, which showed 100% identification to the corresponding peptides of the putative SK from GenBank. Due to overexpression and highly effective renaturation of large amounts of inclusion bodies, the recombinant E. coli BL21 DE3/pESK system could be potentially applied for large-scale production of SK used in the therapy of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24883307

  18. Consequences of the variability of the CovRS and RopB regulators among Streptococcus pyogenes causing human infections.

    PubMed

    Friães, Ana; Pato, Catarina; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of covRS and ropB mutations in invasive disease caused by Group A Streptococci (GAS), we determined the sequence of the covRS and ropB genes of 191 isolates from invasive infections and pharyngitis, comprising a diverse set of emm types and multilocus sequence types. The production of SpeB and the activity of NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) and streptolysin S (SLS) were evaluated. The results support the acquisition of null covS alleles (predicted to eliminate protein function), resulting in downregulation of SpeB and upregulation of NADase and SLS, as a mechanism possibly contributing to higher invasiveness. Among the isolates tested, this mechanism was found to be uncommon (10% of invasive isolates) and was not more prevalent among clones with enhanced invasiveness (including M1T1) but occurred in diverse genetic backgrounds. In lineages such as emm64, these changes did not result in upregulation of NADase and SLS, highlighting the diversity of regulatory pathways in GAS. Despite abrogating SpeB production, null alleles in ropB were not associated with invasive infection. The covRS and ropB genes are under stabilising selection and no expansion of isolates carrying null alleles has been observed, suggesting that the presence of these regulators is important for overall fitness. PMID:26174161

  19. Consequences of the variability of the CovRS and RopB regulators among Streptococcus pyogenes causing human infections

    PubMed Central

    Friães, Ana; Pato, Catarina; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of covRS and ropB mutations in invasive disease caused by Group A Streptococci (GAS), we determined the sequence of the covRS and ropB genes of 191 isolates from invasive infections and pharyngitis, comprising a diverse set of emm types and multilocus sequence types. The production of SpeB and the activity of NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) and streptolysin S (SLS) were evaluated. The results support the acquisition of null covS alleles (predicted to eliminate protein function), resulting in downregulation of SpeB and upregulation of NADase and SLS, as a mechanism possibly contributing to higher invasiveness. Among the isolates tested, this mechanism was found to be uncommon (10% of invasive isolates) and was not more prevalent among clones with enhanced invasiveness (including M1T1) but occurred in diverse genetic backgrounds. In lineages such as emm64, these changes did not result in upregulation of NADase and SLS, highlighting the diversity of regulatory pathways in GAS. Despite abrogating SpeB production, null alleles in ropB were not associated with invasive infection. The covRS and ropB genes are under stabilising selection and no expansion of isolates carrying null alleles has been observed, suggesting that the presence of these regulators is important for overall fitness. PMID:26174161

  20. Streptococcus mitis Strains Causing Severe Clinical Disease in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldana, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Horstmann, Nicola; Thompson, Erika; Flores, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The genetically diverse viridans group streptococci (VGS) are increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of human diseases. We used a recently developed multilocus sequence analysis scheme to define the species of 118 unique VGS strains causing bacteremia in patients with cancer; Streptococcus mitis (68 patients) and S. oralis (22 patients) were the most frequently identified strains. Compared with patients infected with non–S. mitis strains, patients infected with S. mitis strains were more likely to have moderate or severe clinical disease (e.g., VGS shock syndrome). Combined with the sequence data, whole-genome analyses showed that S. mitis strains may more precisely be considered as >2 species. Furthermore, we found that multiple S. mitis strains induced disease in neutropenic mice in a dose-dependent fashion. Our data define the prominent clinical effect of the group of organisms currently classified as S. mitis and lay the groundwork for increased understanding of this understudied pathogen. PMID:24750901

  1. Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus equi evolution: the role of CRISPRs.

    PubMed

    Waller, Andrew S; Robinson, Carl

    2013-12-01

    The host-restricted bacterium Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of equine strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, leading to significant welfare and economic cost. S. equi is believed to have evolved from an ancestral strain of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, an opportunistic pathogen of horses and other animals. Comparison of the genome of S. equi strain 4047 with those of S. zooepidemicus identified examples of gene loss due to mutation and deletion, and gene gain through the acquisition of mobile genetic elements that have probably shaped the pathogenic specialization of S. equi. In particular, deletion of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) locus in the ancestor of S. equi may have predisposed the bacterium to acquire and incorporate new genetic material into its genome. These include four prophages and a novel integrative conjugative element. The virulence cargo carried by these mobile genetic elements is believed to have shaped the ability of S. equi to cause strangles. Further sequencing of S. zooepidemicus has highlighted the diversity of this opportunistic pathogen. Again, CRISPRs are postulated to influence evolution, balancing the need for gene gain over genome stability. Analysis of spacer sequences suggest that these pathogens may be susceptible to a limited range of phages and provide further evidence of cross-species exchange of genetic material among Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus dysgalactiae. PMID:24256234

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm formation and dispersion will elucidate novel avenues to interfere with the spread of antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape, as well as novel strategies to target the mechanisms involved in induction of pneumococcal disease. PMID:25629011

  3. Microbiology of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Gillon, J C; Eykyn, S J; Phillips, I

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients with pyogenic liver abscesses were studied over 10 years to discover the causative organisms of the condition. Pus was subjected to Gram-negative smear or gas-liquid chromatography to detect volatile acids characteristic of anaerobes and then cultured. All isolates were identified by conventional methods and tested for sensitivity to appropriate antimicrobial agents. Bacteria were grown from the liver abscesses in all 16 patients. Streptococcus milleri Lancefield group F was the commonest organism isolated from the pyogenic liver abscesses, being found in 13 patients. If Strep milleri is isolated care should be taken not to mistake it for an anaerobe, and finding the organism in the blood should alert the clinician to the possible presence of a liver abscesses. PMID:6794712

  4. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from diseased Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P was isolated from the kidney of diseased Nile tilapia in Idaho during a 2007 streptococcal disease outbreak. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138P is 1,838,716 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identify genes for antigen disco...

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Role of group A Streptococcus HtrA in

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    ], Streptococcus pneumoniae [5], Bacillus sub- tilis [6], Staphylococcus aureus [7], Lactococcus lactis [8] and LisRESEARCH ARTICLE Role of group A Streptococcus HtrA in the maturation of SpeB protease Jason NP) of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is localized to the Ex

  6. Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Wang, Jinhong; Peters, Sarah E.; Corander, Jukka; Jombart, Thibaut; Baig, Abiyad; Howell, Kate J.; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Harris, David; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Campbell, James; Schultsz, Constance; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Maglennon, Gareth A.; Matthews, Dominic; Cuccui, Jon; Terra, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale. PMID:25824154

  7. Seropositivity for Antibodies to DRS-G, a Virulence Factor from Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Is an Independent Risk Factor for Poststreptococcus Glomerulonephritis and Chronic Kidney Disease in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Hule, Gouri P; Karmarkar, Mohan G; Cameron, Ainslie; Hase, Niwrutti; Khopkar, Uday; Mehta, Preeti R; McNeilly, Celia L; McMillan, David; Sriprakash, Kadaba S

    2015-08-01

    The disease spectrum caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis resembles that of S. pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]). These two bacterial species are closely related and possess many common virulence characteristics. While some GAS strains express virulence factors called streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) and distantly related to SIC (DRS), some S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis isolates express an orthologue of DRS, which is referred to as DRS-G. We reported previously that seropositivity for either anti-SIC or anti-DRS antibodies (Abs) is associated with poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN). However, only seropositivity for anti-SIC Abs is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We now extend the study to test whether seropositivity for anti-DRS-G Abs is also associated with these renal diseases. Stored serum samples collected for our previous study were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Abs to DRS-G. The samples represented sera from 100 CKD adult patients, 70 adult end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 25 PSGN pediatric patients, and corresponding age-matched control subjects. The proportion of PSGN, CKD, and ESRD patients who showed seroreaction to anti-DRS-G Abs was significantly higher than that of the corresponding age-matched controls, who in general exhibited seropositivity rates commensurate with the isolation rate of drsG-positive S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in the community during this study period. Since higher rates of seropositivity for anti-DRS-G Abs in the renal disease categories are resultant of previous infections with DRS-G-positive S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strains, we conclude the seropositivity is an additional risk factor for these renal diseases. In this regard, anti-DRS-G Abs have attributes similar to those of the anti-SIC Abs. PMID:26084513

  8. Genomic Evidence for the Evolution of Streptococcus equi: Host Restriction, Increased Virulence, and Genetic Exchange with Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, Romain; Steward, Karen F.; Webb, Katy; Ainslie, Fern; Jourdan, Thibaud; Bason, Nathalie C.; Holroyd, Nancy E.; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A.; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; Willey, David; Brooks, Karen; Aanensen, David M.; Spratt, Brian G.; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Kehoe, Michael; Chanter, Neil; Bentley, Stephen D.; Robinson, Carl; Maskell, Duncan J.; Parkhill, Julian; Waller, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The continued evolution of bacterial pathogens has major implications for both human and animal disease, but the exchange of genetic material between host-restricted pathogens is rarely considered. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is a host-restricted pathogen of horses that has evolved from the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus). These pathogens share approximately 80% genome sequence identity with the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. We sequenced and compared the genomes of S. equi 4047 and S. zooepidemicus H70 and screened S. equi and S. zooepidemicus strains from around the world to uncover evidence of the genetic events that have shaped the evolution of the S. equi genome and led to its emergence as a host-restricted pathogen. Our analysis provides evidence of functional loss due to mutation and deletion, coupled with pathogenic specialization through the acquisition of bacteriophage encoding a phospholipase A2 toxin, and four superantigens, and an integrative conjugative element carrying a novel iron acquisition system with similarity to the high pathogenicity island of Yersinia pestis. We also highlight that S. equi, S. zooepidemicus, and S. pyogenes share a common phage pool that enhances cross-species pathogen evolution. We conclude that the complex interplay of functional loss, pathogenic specialization, and genetic exchange between S. equi, S. zooepidemicus, and S. pyogenes continues to influence the evolution of these important streptococci. PMID:19325880

  9. Genomic evidence for the evolution of Streptococcus equi: host restriction, increased virulence, and genetic exchange with human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Holden, Matthew T G; Heather, Zoe; Paillot, Romain; Steward, Karen F; Webb, Katy; Ainslie, Fern; Jourdan, Thibaud; Bason, Nathalie C; Holroyd, Nancy E; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; Willey, David; Brooks, Karen; Aanensen, David M; Spratt, Brian G; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J; Kehoe, Michael; Chanter, Neil; Bentley, Stephen D; Robinson, Carl; Maskell, Duncan J; Parkhill, Julian; Waller, Andrew S

    2009-03-01

    The continued evolution of bacterial pathogens has major implications for both human and animal disease, but the exchange of genetic material between host-restricted pathogens is rarely considered. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is a host-restricted pathogen of horses that has evolved from the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus). These pathogens share approximately 80% genome sequence identity with the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. We sequenced and compared the genomes of S. equi 4047 and S. zooepidemicus H70 and screened S. equi and S. zooepidemicus strains from around the world to uncover evidence of the genetic events that have shaped the evolution of the S. equi genome and led to its emergence as a host-restricted pathogen. Our analysis provides evidence of functional loss due to mutation and deletion, coupled with pathogenic specialization through the acquisition of bacteriophage encoding a phospholipase A(2) toxin, and four superantigens, and an integrative conjugative element carrying a novel iron acquisition system with similarity to the high pathogenicity island of Yersinia pestis. We also highlight that S. equi, S. zooepidemicus, and S. pyogenes share a common phage pool that enhances cross-species pathogen evolution. We conclude that the complex interplay of functional loss, pathogenic specialization, and genetic exchange between S. equi, S. zooepidemicus, and S. pyogenes continues to influence the evolution of these important streptococci. PMID:19325880

  10. Nonoutbreak Surveillance of Group A Streptococci Causing Invasive Disease in Portugal Identified Internationally Disseminated Clones among Members of a Genetically Heterogeneous Population?

    PubMed Central

    Friães, A.; Ramirez, M.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2007-01-01

    The typing of 160 invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates confirmed the importance of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing for defining clones. The results identified an extremely diverse population and highlighted the importance of both internationally disseminated and local clones not previously associated with invasive disease. PMID:17460058

  11. Evaluation of Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Dental Caries in Children with Heart Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Behjatolmolook; Abolfathi, Ghazale; Mahmoudi, Eftekhar; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims . In the presence of certain systemic diseases, oral microflora may aggravate the condition of the disease. Microbial population in the oral cavity especially with heart disease can increase the risk of bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of oral Streptococcus mutansand the rate of caries in children suffering from heart disease. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional research, 66 children with congenital or acquired heart disease and 50 healthy children were selected. Children were orally examined and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was recorded for each subject. Saliva samples were taken from all subjects, and cultured on a special laboratory media and another specific media for S. mutans (sorbitoll +manitol). Bacterial counts were recorded, and for statistical analysis, chi square, Pearson's, and Exact Fisher tests were performed using SPSS 16 software. Results. The rate of S. mutans in children with congenital heart disease was significantly higher than the rates in childrenwith acquired heart disease and healthy control subjects. The mean DMFT in children with acquired heart disease who tookpenicillin as prophylaxis monthly was significantly lower than the other groups. Conclusion . The results revealed lower oral bacteria counts and comparatively lower caries rates in children with heart diseases, probably because of an effect of the regular prophylactic antibiotic regimen. PMID:26236437

  12. Evaluation of Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Dental Caries in Children with Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Behjatolmolook; Abolfathi, Ghazale; Mahmoudi, Eftekhar; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. In the presence of certain systemic diseases, oral microflora may aggravate the condition of the disease. Microbial population in the oral cavity especially with heart disease can increase the risk of bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of oral Streptococcus mutansand the rate of caries in children suffering from heart disease. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional research, 66 children with congenital or acquired heart disease and 50 healthy children were selected. Children were orally examined and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was recorded for each subject. Saliva samples were taken from all subjects, and cultured on a special laboratory media and another specific media for S. mutans (sorbitoll +manitol). Bacterial counts were recorded, and for statistical analysis, chi square, Pearson’s, and Exact Fisher tests were performed using SPSS 16 software. Results. The rate of S. mutans in children with congenital heart disease was significantly higher than the rates in childrenwith acquired heart disease and healthy control subjects. The mean DMFT in children with acquired heart disease who tookpenicillin as prophylaxis monthly was significantly lower than the other groups. Conclusion. The results revealed lower oral bacteria counts and comparatively lower caries rates in children with heart diseases, probably because of an effect of the regular prophylactic antibiotic regimen. PMID:26236437

  13. Role for Streptococcal Collagen-Like Protein 1 in M1T1 Group A Streptococcus Resistance to Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Role for Streptococcal Collagen-Like Protein 1 in M1T1 Group A Streptococcus Resistance of the most highly expressed proteins in the invasive M1T1 serotype group A Streptococcus (GAS), a globally A Streptococcus (GAS) (Streptococcus pyogenes) is among the top 10 human pathogens worldwide and is responsible

  14. Nasopharyngeal carriage rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, which often complicates homozygous sickle cell disease. Here, we determined the nasopharyngeal carriage rate of S. pneumoniae in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease, who attended the outpatient Sickle Cell Clinic at Mulago National Referral hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Results S. pneumoniae occurred in 27 of the 81 children with homozygous sickle cell disease (giving a carriage rate of 33%, 27/81). Twenty three children were previously hospitalized of whom S. pneumoniae occurred in only two (9%, 2/23), while among the 58 who were not previously hospitalized it occurred in 25 (43%, 25/58, ?2 = 8.8, p = 0.003), meaning there is an association between high carriage rate and no hospitalization. Two children previously immunized with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine did not carry the organism. Prior antimicrobial usage was reported in 53 children (65%, 53/81). There was high resistance of pneumococci to penicillin (100%, 27/27) and trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole (97%, 26/27), but low resistance to other antimicrobials. Of the 70 children without sickle cell disease, S. pneumoniae occurred in 38 (54%, 38/70) of whom 43 were males and 27 females (53% males, 23/43, and 56% females, 15/27). Conclusion Nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease is high. While nasopharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, pneumococcal bacteremia is reportedly low in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease. Studies on the contribution of high carriage rates to invasive pneumococcal disease in these children will be helpful. This is the first report on pneumococcal carriage rate in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease. PMID:22243524

  15. MOLECULAR MODELING OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    E-print Network

    Kuttel, Michelle

    MOLECULAR MODELING OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE ANTIGENS. Michelle Kuttel Bangalore, India #12;STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE · leading cause of disease esp. in developing world · meningitis, pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, bronchitis ... · annual global mortality 1 000 000

  16. Comparative genomics and the role of lateral gene transfer in the evolution of bovine adapted Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Lefébure, Tristan; Schukken, Ynte H.; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to causing severe invasive infections in humans, Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B Streptococcus (GBS), is also a major cause of bovine mastitis. Here we provide the first genome sequence for S. agalactiae isolated from a cow diagnosed with clinical mastitis (strain FSL S3-026). Comparison to eight S. agalactiae genomes obtained from human disease isolates revealed 183 genes specific to the bovine strain. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening for the presence/absence of a subset of these loci in additional bovine and human strains revealed strong differentiation between the two groups (Fisher exact test: p < 0.0001). The majority of the bovine strain-specific genes (~85%) clustered tightly into eight genomic islands, suggesting these genes were acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). This bovine GBS also contained an unusually high proportion of insertion sequences (4.3% of the total genome), suggesting frequent genomic rearrangement. Comparison to other mastitis-causing species of bacteria provided strong evidence for two cases of interspecies LGT within the shared bovine environment: bovine S. agalactiae with Streptococcus uberis (nisin U operon) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (lactose operon). We also found evidence for LGT, involving the salivaricin operon, between the bovine S. agalactiae strain and either Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus salivarius. Our findings provide insight intomechanismsfacilitatingenvironmentaladaptationandacquisitionofpotential virulence factors, while highlighting both the key role LGT has played in the recent evolution of the bovine S. agalactiae strain, and the importance of LGT among pathogens within a shared environment. PMID:21536150

  17. Pneumolysin Expression by Streptococcus pneumoniae Protects Colonized Mice from Influenza Virus-induced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Amaya I.; Strauman, Maura C.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Williams, Katie L.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Shen, Hao; Liu, Qin; Garlick, David; Artis, David; Hensley, Scott E.; Caton, Andrew J.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.; Erikson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The response to influenza virus (IAV) infection and severity of disease is highly variable in humans. We hypothesized that one factor contributing to this variability is the presence of specific respiratory tract (RT) microbes. One such microbe is Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) that is carried asymptomatically in the RT of many humans. In a mouse co-infection model we found that in contrast to secondary bacterial infection that exacerbates disease, Sp colonization 10 days prior to IAV protects from virus-induced morbidity and lung pathology. Using mutant Sp strains, we identified a critical role for the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY) in mediating this protection. Colonization with the PLY-sufficient Sp strain induces expression of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase 1 in alveolar macrophages (aMø) and correlates with attenuated recruitment and function of pulmonary inflammatory cells. Our study demonstrates a novel role for PLY in Sp-mediated protection by maintaining aMø as "gatekeepers" against virus-induced immunopathology. PMID:24999050

  18. Intrapartum chemoprophylaxis for group B streptococcus infection to prevent neonatal disease: who should be treated?

    PubMed

    Philipson, E H; Herson, V C

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the maternal risk factors associated with early onset Group B streptococcus (GBS) sepsis and determine the potential impact of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis using these risk factors. Using a computerized perinatal database, 26,525 deliveries over a five-year period (1989 to 1994) were identified. Neonates with GBS-positive cultures were identified and the neonatal and maternal chart of each case was reviewed. Twenty-six neonates (1 of 1000) had GBS sepsis documented by blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture. Maternal risk factor(s) were identified in 13 (50%) cases: preterm labor (5), preterm premature rupture of the membranes (5), prolonged rupture of membranes (6), sibling affected by symptomatic GBS infection (2), or maternal fever during labor (5). There were four mothers whose neonates had GBS sepsis in spite of intrapartum antibiotics. Intrapartum chemoprophylaxis for GBS based on risk factors alone will identify only half of the neonates who develop disease. Extension of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis to patients with risk factors appears to be necessary to prevent early onset disease in the other half. Since 85.7% of our total obstetrical population has no risk factors, this policy would require treating 1749 women to prevent one case of GBS sepsis. Chemoprophylaxis could be more appropriately targeted if mothers colonized with GBS could be identified in early labor. PMID:8989480

  19. Virulence mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Anjuli M.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for a wide spectrum of human diseases, from simple pharyngitisStreptococcus (GAS) is a leading human pathogen responsible for a wide range of diseases ranging from simple pharyngitis

  20. Burden of Invasive Group B Streptococcus Disease and Early Neurological Sequelae in South African Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Lala, Sanjay G.; Cutland, Clare L.; Koen, Anthonet; Jose, Lisa; Nakwa, Firdose; Ramdin, Tanusha; Fredericks, Joy; Wadula, Jeannette; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. We aimed to evaluate the burden of invasive early-onset (0–6 days of life, EOD) and late-onset (7–89 days, LOD) GBS disease and subsequent neurological sequelae in infants from a setting with a high prevalence (29.5%) of HIV among pregnant women. Methods A case-control study was undertaken at three secondary-tertiary care public hospitals in Johannesburg. Invasive cases in infants <3 months age were identified by surveillance of laboratories from November 2012 to February 2014. Neurodevelopmental screening was done in surviving cases and controls at 3 and 6 months of age. Results We identified 122 cases of invasive GBS disease over a 12 month period. Although the incidence (per 1,000 live births) of EOD was similar between HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (1.13 vs. 1.46; p = 0.487), there was a 4.67-fold (95%CI: 2.24–9.74) greater risk for LOD in HIV-exposed infants (2.27 vs. 0.49; p<0.001). Overall, serotypes Ia, Ib and III constituted 75.8% and 92.5% of EOD and LOD, respectively. Risk factors for EOD included offensive draining liquor (adjusted Odds Ratio: 27.37; 95%CI: 1.94–386.50) and maternal GBS bacteriuria (aOR: 8.41; 95%CI: 1.44–49.15), which was also a risk-factor for LOD (aOR: 3.49; 95%CI: 1.17–10.40). The overall case fatality rate among cases was 18.0%. The adjusted odds for neurological sequelae at 6 months age was 13.18-fold (95%CI: 1.44–120.95) greater in cases (13.2%) than controls (0.4%). Discussion The high burden of invasive GBS disease in South Africa, which is also associated with high case fatality rates and significant neurological sequelae among survivors, is partly due to the heightened risk for LOD in infants born to HIV-infected women. An effective trivalent GBS conjugate vaccine targeted at pregnant women could prevent invasive GBS disease in this setting. PMID:25849416

  1. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cariogenic Bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans, and Periodontal Diseases Actinomyces naeslundii and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Baca-Castañón, Magda Lorena; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica; Alcázar-Pizaña, Andrea Guadalupe; Grondin, Yohann; Coronado-Mendoza, Anahí; Sánchez-Najera, Rosa Isela; Cárdenas-Estrada, Eloy; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Escamilla-García, Erandi

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well known for their beneficial effects on human health in the intestine and immune system; however, there are few studies on the impact they can generate in oral health. The aim of this study was to test and compare in vitro antimicrobial activity of L. reuteri on pathogenic bacteria involved in the formation of dental caries: S. mutans, S. gordonii, and periodontal disease: A. naeslundii and T. forsythia. Also, we determined the growth kinetics of each bacterium involved in this study. Before determining the antimicrobial action of L. reuteri on cariogenic bacteria and periodontal disease, the behavior and cell development time of each pathogenic bacterium were studied. Once the conditions for good cell growth of each of selected pathogens were established according to their metabolic requirements, maximum exponential growth was determined, this being the reference point for analyzing the development or inhibition by LAB using the Kirby Bauer method. Chlorhexidine 0.12 % was positive control. L. reuteri was shown to have an inhibitory effect against S. mutans, followed by T. forsythia and S. gordonii, and a less significant effect against A. naeslundii. Regarding the effect shown by L. reuteri on the two major pathogens, we consider its potential use as a possible functional food in the prevention or treatment of oral diseases. PMID:25422124

  2. Interaction between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in paediatric patients suffering from an underlying chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Carla; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Terranova, Leonardo; Ierardi, Valentina; Gambino, Monia; Principi, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the interaction between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in school-age children and adolescents suffering from an underlying chronic disease. To increase our knowledge in this regard, an oropharyngeal swab was obtained from school-age children and adolescents suffering from asthma (n = 423), cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 212) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) (n = 296). S. pneumoniae detection and serotyping were performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction, and S. aureus detection was performed using the RIDAGENE MRSA system. Among asthmatic, CF and DM1 patients, both pathogens were identified in 65/423 (15.4%), 21/212 (9.9%) and 62/296 (20.9%) children, respectively; S. pneumoniae alone was identified in 127/434 (30.0%), 21/212 (9.9%) and 86/296 (29.1%), respectively; S. aureus alone was identified in 58/434 (13.7%), 78/212 (36.8%) and 49/296 (16.6%), respectively. S. pneumoniae colonisation rates were higher in younger children and declined with age, whereas the frequency of S. aureus colonisation was quite similar in the different age groups. Among asthmatic and CF patients aged 6-9 years, S. aureus carriage was significantly higher in children who were positive for S. pneumoniae (P <0.05). No significant association emerged between S. aureus carriage and carriage of S. pneumoniae serotypes included in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). This study shows for the first time that school-age children and adolescents with asthma, CF and DM1 are frequently colonised by S. pneumoniae and S. aureus and that no negative relationship seems to exist between these pathogens. Moreover, the supposed protection offered by PCV administration against S. aureus colonisation was not demonstrated. PMID:26395386

  3. Review on the association of Group B Streptococcus capsular antibody and protection against invasive disease in infants.

    PubMed

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Kwatra, Gaurav; Izu, Alane; Lala, Sanjay G; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-01-01

    A trivalent Group B streptococcus (GBS) polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine for vaccination of pregnant women is under development to protect their newborns against invasive GBS disease. Establishing sero-correlates of protection against invasive GBS disease in infants could expedite the licensure pathway of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine. A systematic review of studies reporting on the association of capsular antibodies and invasive GBS disease in infants and colonization in women or newborns was undertaken. Most studies that described maternal and/or infant capsular antibody levels in infants with invasive GBS disease identified an association between low capsular antibody levels in invasive GBS cases compared to controls. Different assay methods and the lack of standardized reference ranges for serotype-specific antibody levels makes it difficult to select an antibody level that may be used as a reliable sero-correlate of protection. Further studies using standardized methods are warranted. PMID:25242617

  4. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from disease Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P is 1838701 bp in size, containing 1831 genes. The genome has 1593 coding sequences, 152 pseudo genes, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and 1 non-coding RNA. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipel...

  5. Animal Models Used to Study Superantigen-Mediated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens secreted by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes interact with the T-cell receptor and major histocompatibility class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells to elicit a massive cytokine release and activation of T cells in higher numbers than that seen with ordinary antigens. Because of this unique ability, superantigens have been implicated as etiological agents for many different types of diseases, including toxic shock syndrome, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, and inflammatory skin diseases. This review covers the main animal models that have been developed in order to identify the roles of superantigens in human disease. PMID:26676033

  6. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•?), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  7. Responses of innate immune cells to group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Christina; Kovarik, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), also called Streptococcus pyogenes, is a Gram-positive beta-hemolytic human pathogen which causes a wide range of mostly self-limiting but also several life-threatening diseases. Innate immune responses are fundamental for defense against GAS, yet their activation by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and GAS-derived pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is incompletely understood. In recent years, the use of animal models together with the powerful tools of human molecular genetics began shedding light onto the molecular mechanisms of innate immune defense against GAS. The signaling adaptor MyD88 was found to play a key role in launching the immune response against GAS in both humans and mice, suggesting that PRRs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are involved in sensing this pathogen. The specific TLRs and their ligands have yet to be identified. Following GAS recognition, induction of cytokines such as TNF and type I interferons (IFNs), leukocyte recruitment, phagocytosis, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been recognized as key events in host defense. A comprehensive knowledge of these mechanisms is needed in order to understand their frequent failure against GAS immune evasion strategies. PMID:25325020

  8. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  9. High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcus Disease Caused by Strains of Uncommon emm Types in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Athey, Taryn B T; Teatero, Sarah; Sieswerda, Lee E; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Li, Aimin; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; McGeer, Allison; Williams, David; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of type emm59 invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease was declared in 2008 in Thunder Bay District, Northwestern Ontario, 2 years after a countrywide emm59 epidemic was recognized in Canada. Despite a declining number of emm59 infections since 2010, numerous cases of iGAS disease continue to be reported in the area. We collected clinical information on all iGAS cases recorded in Thunder Bay District from 2008 to 2013. We also emm typed and sequenced the genomes of all available strains isolated from 2011 to 2013 from iGAS infections and from severe cases of soft tissue infections. We used whole-genome sequencing data to investigate the population structure of GAS strains of the most frequently isolated emm types. We report an increased incidence of iGAS in Thunder Bay compared to the metropolitan area of Toronto/Peel and the province of Ontario. Illicit drug use, alcohol abuse, homelessness, and hepatitis C infection were underlying diseases or conditions that might have predisposed patients to iGAS disease. Most cases were caused by clonal strains of skin or generalist emm types (i.e., emm82, emm87, emm101, emm4, emm83, and emm114) uncommonly seen in other areas of the province. We observed rapid waxing and waning of emm types causing disease and their replacement by other emm types associated with the same tissue tropisms. Thus, iGAS disease in Thunder Bay District predominantly affects a select population of disadvantaged persons and is caused by clonally related strains of a few skin and generalist emm types less commonly associated with iGAS in other areas of Ontario. PMID:26491184

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup ?1} with a limit of detection of 0.16?ng?ml{sup ?1}.

  12. Streptococcus pyogenes Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M.; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy. PMID:24667224

  13. Pyogenic Sacroiliitis in a 13-Month-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Leroux; Isabelle, Bernardini; Lucie, Grynberg; Claire, Grandguillaume; Paul, Michelin; Mourad, Ould Slimane; Eric, Nectoux; François, Deroussen; Richard, Gouron; Audrey, Angelliaume; Brice, Ilharreborde; Mariette, Renaux-Petel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pyogenic sacroiliitis is exceptional in very young children. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical examination is misleading. FABER test is rarely helpful in very young children. Inflammatory syndrome is frequent. Bone scintigraphy and MRI are very sensitive for the diagnosis. Joint fluid aspiration and blood cultures are useful to identify the pathogen. Appropriate antibiotic therapy provides rapid regression of symptoms and healing. We report the case of pyogenic sacroiliitis in a 13-month-old child. Clinical, biological, and imaging data of this case were reviewed and reported retrospectively. A 13-month-old girl consulted for decreased weight bearing without fever or trauma. Clinical examination was not helpful. There was an inflammatory syndrome. Bone scintigraphy found a sacroiliitis, confirmed on MRI. Aspiration of the sacroiliac joint was performed. Empiric intravenous biantibiotic therapy was started. Patient rapidly recovered full weight bearing. On the 5th day, clinical examination and biological analysis returned to normal. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was switched for oral. One month later, clinical examination and biological analysis were normal and antibiotic therapy was stopped. Hematogenous osteoarticular infections are common in children but pyogenic sacroiliitis is rare and mainly affects older children. Diagnosis can be difficult because clinical examination is poor. Moreover, limping and decreased weight bearing are very common reasons for consultation. This may delay the diagnosis or refer misdiagnosis. Bone scintigraphy is useful to locate a bone or joint disease responsible for limping. In this observation, bone scintigraphy located the infection at the sacroiliac joint. Given the young age, MRI was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Despite the very young age of the patient, symptoms rapidly disappeared with appropriate antibiotic therapy. We report the case of pyogenic sacroiliitis in a 13-month-old child. It reminds the risk of misdiagnosing pyogenic sacroiliitis in children because it is exceptional and clinical examination is rarely helpful. It also highlights the usefulness of bone scintigraphy and MRI in osteoarticular infections in children. PMID:26496260

  14. Extragingival Pyogenic Granuloma: an Unusual Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is thought to represent an exuberant tissue reaction to local irritation. It occurs in second decade of life in young females. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic growth, pedunculated or sessile, which usually bleeds on provocation. Oral pyogenic granuloma preferentially affects the gingiva. On rare occasion, it can be found extragingivally on lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate which may mimic more serious pathological conditions such as malignancies. This article reports an unusual case of extra gingival pyogenic granuloma occurring on the right buccal mucosa in a female patient and discusses the features that distinguish this lesion from other similar oral mucosal lesions. PMID:26535410

  15. [Susceptibility in parenteral antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of commonly used clinical antimicrobial drugs were examined for 76 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated between 2006 and 2011 from pediatric patients with invasive pneumococcal infection. Patients from whom bacterial strains were isolated ranged from 4 months to 6 years old and included 50 infants (65.8%) 1 year old and 10 (13.2%) less than 1 year old, i.e., 79.1% of all patients studied. In diagnosis, 38 (50.0%) had occult bacteremia, 34 (44.7%) pneumonia, 3 (3.9%) meningitis, and 1 (1.3%) sepsis. Infections in all but one case who died of sepsis were treated without sequelae. The most frequent capsular serotype among isolates was 6B (20 strains, 26.3%), followed by 19 F (13 strains, 17.1%) and 14 (9 strains, 11.8%). Serotypes for 55 strains (72.4%) corresponded to those contained in heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. In classification by resistance based on mutations in penicillin-binding protein genes, 32 were penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (42.1%), 35 penicillin intermediate-resistant S. pneumoniae (46.1%), and 11 penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (11.8%). MIC90/MBC90 of drugs were as follows: ampicillin 4/4 microg/mL, cefotaxime 0.5/0.5 microg/mL, ceftriaxone 1/2 microg/ mL, panipenem 0.125/0.125 microg/mL, meropenem 0.5/0.5 microg/mL, and doripenem 0.25/0.25 microg/mL. PMID:23484371

  16. Disease isolates of Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable S. pneumoniae presumptively identified as atypical S. pneumoniae in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rolo, Dora; S Simões, Alexandra; Domenech, Arnau; Fenoll, Asunción; Liñares, Josefina; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Ardanuy, Carmen; Sá-Leão, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to obtain insights on the nature of a collection of isolates presumptively identified as atypical Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from invasive and non-invasive infections in Spain. One-hundred and thirty-two isolates were characterized by: optochin susceptibility in ambient and CO(2)-enriched atmosphere; bile solubility; PCR-based assays targeting pneumococcal genes lytA, ply, pspA, cpsA, Spn9802, aliB-like ORF2, and a specific 16S rRNA region; multilocus sequence analysis; and antimicrobial susceptibility. By multilocus sequence analysis, 61 isolates were S. pseudopneumoniae, 34 were pneumococci, 13 were S. mitis, and 24 remained unclassified as non-pneumococci. Among S. pseudopneumoniae isolates, 51 (83.6%) were collected from respiratory tract samples; eight isolates were obtained from sterile sources. High frequency of non-susceptibility to penicillin (60.7%) and erythromycin (42.6%) was found. Only 50.8% of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates displayed the typical optochin phenotype originally described for this species. None harbored the cpsA gene or the pneumococcal typical lytA restriction fragment length polymorphism. The Spn9802 and the specific 16S rRNA regions were detected among the majority of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates (n?=?59 and n?=?49, respectively). The ply and pspA genes were rarely found. A high genetic diversity was found and 59 profiles were identified. Among the S. pneumoniae, 23 were capsulated and 11 were non-typeable. Three non-typeable isolates, associated to international non-capsulated lineages, were recovered from invasive disease sources. In conclusion, half of the atypical pneumococcal clinical isolates were, in fact, S. pseudopneumoniae and one-fourth were other streptococci. We identified S. pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable pneumococci as cause of disease in Spain including invasive disease. PMID:23437306

  17. Genetic diversity and virulence of novel sequence types of Streptococcus suis from diseased and healthy pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujie; Gao, Mingming; An, Tongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jin, Jiamin; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Chenggang; Tu, Yabin; Hu, Shouping; Li, Jinsong; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; Cai, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a serious threat to swine industry and public health. In this work, a total of 62 S. suis isolates recovered from infected and healthy pigs from four provinces in northern China were classified by multilocus sequence typing into nine sequence types (STs), including six novel ones, namely, ST417, ST418, ST419, ST420, ST421, and ST422. The majority (64.5%) of these 62 isolates belong to serotype 2; all of these serotype 2 isolates can be assigned into ST1 or ST28 clonal complex, indicating at least two parallel routes of clonal dissemination of these isolates. In these serotype 2 isolates, 23 (20 from healthy pigs and three from diseased pigs) were identified as ST7 strains, which were previously characterized as the cause of streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. The novel ST strains lack 89 K pathogenicity island but can cause septicemia and meningitis in a mouse model, showing remarkable differences in virulence. The ST421 strain named HLB causes suppurative encephalitis. Our results highlighted the need for increased surveillance of S. suis in farm-raised pigs in northern China. PMID:25784908

  18. VACCINES TO PREVENT Streptococcus iniae AND S. agalactiae DISEASE IN NILE TILAPIA Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minimizing the effects of disease is crucial to prevent mortality, morbidity, and to promote optimal growth and feed conversion in sustained culture of warm-water fish in fresh, estuarine and marine waters. The control of diseases has been dependent on the use of therapeutics since the inception of...

  19. Lyme disease and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS): an overview

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hanna; Cameron, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a complex, multisystemic illness. As the most common vector- borne disease in the United States, LD is caused by bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, with potential coinfections from agents of anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and ehrlichiosis. Persistent symptoms and clinical signs reflect multiorgan involvement with episodes of active disease and periods of remission, not sparing the coveted central nervous system. The capability of microorganisms to cause and exacerbate various neuropsychiatric pathology is also seen in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), a recently described disorder attributed to bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in which neurologic tics and obsessive-compulsive disorders are sequelae of the infection. In the current overview, LD and PANDAS are juxtaposed through a review of their respective infectious etiologies, clinical presentations, mechanisms of disease development, courses of illness, and treatment options. Future directions related to immunoneuropsychiatry are also discussed. PMID:22393303

  20. Genome Sequence of a Lancefield Group C Streptococcus zooepidemicus Strain Causing Epidemic Nephritis: New Information about an Old Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beres, Stephen B.; Sesso, Ricardo; Pinto, Sergio Wyton L.; Hoe, Nancy P.; Porcella, Stephen F.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Musser, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Outbreaks of disease attributable to human error or natural causes can provide unique opportunities to gain new information about host-pathogen interactions and new leads for pathogenesis research. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN), a sequela of infection with pathogenic streptococci, is a common cause of preventable kidney disease worldwide. Although PSGN usually occurs after infection with group A streptococci, organisms of Lancefield group C and G also can be responsible. Despite decades of study, the molecular pathogenesis of PSGN is poorly understood. As a first step toward gaining new information about PSGN pathogenesis, we sequenced the genome of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain MGCS10565, a group C organism that caused a very large and unusually severe epidemic of nephritis in Brazil. The genome is a circular chromosome of 2,024,171 bp. The genome shares extensive gene content, including many virulence factors, with genetically related group A streptococci, but unexpectedly lacks prophages. The genome contains many apparently foreign genes interspersed around the chromosome, consistent with the presence of a full array of genes required for natural competence. An inordinately large family of genes encodes secreted extracellular collagen-like proteins with multiple integrin-binding motifs. The absence of a gene related to speB rules out the long-held belief that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B or antibodies reacting with it singularly cause PSGN. Many proteins previously implicated in GAS PSGN, such as streptokinase, are either highly divergent in strain MGCS10565 or are not more closely related between these species than to orthologs present in other streptococci that do not commonly cause PSGN. Our analysis provides a comparative genomics framework for renewed appraisal of molecular events underlying APSGN pathogenesis. PMID:18716664

  1. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anthony R; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J; Holder, Michael E; Petrosino, Joseph F; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans. PMID:25941374

  2. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J.; Holder, Michael E.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J.; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans. PMID:25941374

  3. Streptococcal toxins: role in pathogenesis and disease.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Timothy C; Cole, Jason N; Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Henningham, Anna; Paton, James C; Nizet, Victor; Walker, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are host-adapted bacterial pathogens among the leading infectious causes of human morbidity and mortality. These microbes and related members of the genus Streptococcus produce an array of toxins that act against human cells or tissues, resulting in impaired immune responses and subversion of host physiological processes to benefit the invading microorganism. This toxin repertoire includes haemolysins, proteases, superantigens and other agents that ultimately enhance colonization and survival within the host and promote dissemination of the pathogen. PMID:26433203

  4. Lack of mitogenic activity of speG- and speG(dys)-positive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from patients with invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Claudia M; Schweizer, Klaus G; Holland, Regina; Lütticken, Rudolf; Freyaldenhoven, Bettina S

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis has been isolated with an increasing frequency as the cause of invasive streptococcal diseases. For 46 S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from invasive infections and four isolates from superficial infections, the presence of emm/emmL genes and of genes encoding various different streptococcal superantigens was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PCR products were identified by DNA sequencing, and the expression of mRNA from superantigen genes was assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The mitogenic activity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation into human lymphocytes and compared with that of Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes. All S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates studied harbored an emm/emmL gene. Only in six of the S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from invasive infections, speG was detected by PCR, two of which were further identified as speGdys by sequencing of the PCR product. None of the S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates harbored any of the genes speA, speB, speC, speF, speH, speI, speJ, speK, speL, speM, smeZ, or ssa of S. pyogenes. In contrast to S. pyogenes, no expression of speG or speGdys mRNA, respectively, was detected in the reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for any of the speG- or speGdys-positive S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates. Moreover, S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and S. agalactiae revealed no or very low mitogenic activity, while S. pyogenes was a very powerful inducer of proliferative responses. These findings support the hypothesis that the pathogenicity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis may be associated in part with the presence of emm/emmL genes, and suggest that the severity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis invasive infections is not mediated by superantigen-induced mitogenicity. PMID:16325550

  5. Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Pyomyositis in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematous

    PubMed Central

    Chebbi, Wafa; Jerbi, Saida; Kessomtini, Wassia; Fradi, Asma; Sfar, Mohamed Habib

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis and pyomyositis are uncommon infectious diseases and their diagnoses are often delayed. They are typically seen in children and young adults and are rare in middle-aged people especially in those affected by rheumatic diseases. We present the first case of a Staphylococcus aureus related pyogenic sacroiliitis associated with iliacus and gluteal pyomyositis occurring in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. Antibiotic treatment was administered for a total of 6 weeks with a total recovery. Pyogenic sacroiliitis and pyomyositis, although remaining rare events, should be remembered as severe complications in immunosuppressed patients with inflammatory diseases. Early clinical suspicion, imaging diagnosis, and adequate therapy are decisive for the satisfactory outcome. PMID:25165609

  6. Coaggregation of Streptococcus sanguis and other streptococci with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, H F; Lala, H C; Shepherd, M G

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen strains of viridans group streptococci and two strains of other streptococci were tested for coaggregation with Candida albicans. Streptococcus sanguis strains generally exhibited low levels of adherence to 28 degrees C-grown exponential-phase yeast cells, but starvation of yeast cells for glucose at 37 degrees C (or at 28 degrees C) increased their coaggregating activity with these streptococci by at least tenfold. This was a property common to four C. albicans strains tested, two of which were able to form mycelia (6406 and MEN) and two of which were not (MM2002 and CA2). The expression of the coaggregation adhesin during yeast cell starvation was inhibited by addition of trichodermin or amphotericin B. The strains of S. sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus oralis tested for coaggregating activity encompassed a diverse range of physiological and morphological types, yet all exhibited saturable coaggregation with starved C. albicans cells. There was no correlation of cell surface hydrophobicity, of either yeast or streptococcal cells, with their abilities to coaggregate. Strains of Streptococcus anginosus also coaggregated with starved yeast cells; Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus pyogenes coaggregated to a lesser degree with C. albicans, and the coaggregation with S. pyogenes was not promoted by yeast cell starvation; Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis did not coaggregate with yeast. The coaggregation reactions of S. sanguis and S. gordonii with C. albicans were inhibited by EDTA and by heat or protease treatment of the yeast cells and were not reversible by the addition of lactose or other simple sugars. These observations extend the range of intergeneric coaggregations that are known to occur between oral microbes and suggest that coaggregations of C. albicans with viridans group streptococci may be important for colonization of oral surfaces by the yeast. PMID:2182544

  7. Native valve endocarditis due to Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus oralis.

    PubMed

    Doyuk, Elif; Ormerod, Oliver J; Bowler, Ian C J W

    2002-07-01

    Viridans streptococci are the commonest cause of native valve infective endocarditis (IE). The taxonomy of this group is evolving allowing new disease associations to be made. Streptococcus vestibularis is a recently described member of the viridans group, first isolated from the vestibular mucosa of the human oral cavity. It has rarely been associated with human disease. Streptococcus oralis, another member of the viridans group resident in the human oral cavity is a well known cause of IE and bacteraemia in neutropenic patients. We report the first case of native mitral valve endocarditis due to S. vestibularis in a patient with co-existing S. oralis endocarditis. PMID:12217730

  8. Molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and surveillance of invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, a review

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Odile B.; Brueggemann, Angela B.; Caugant, Dominique A.; van der Ende, Arie; Frosch, Matthias; Gray, Stephen; Heuberger, Sigrid; Krizova, Paula; Olcen, Per; Slack, Mary; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Maiden, Martin C. J

    2014-01-01

    Invasive disease caused by the encapsulated bacteria Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite the introduction of successful conjugate polysaccharide vaccines that target disease-associated strains. In addition, resistance, or more accurately reduced susceptibility, to therapeutic antibiotics is spreading in populations of these organisms. There is therefore a continuing requirement for the surveillance of vaccine and non-vaccine antigens and antibiotic susceptibilities among isolates from invasive disease, which is only partially met by conventional methods. This need can be met with molecular and especially nucleotide sequence-based typing methods, which are fully developed in the case of N. meningitidis and which could be more widely deployed in clinical laboratories for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. PMID:21622526

  9. Propionibacterium acnes Pyogenic Liver Abscess and Pylephlebitis

    PubMed Central

    Poursina, Arash; Weissman, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Reported is an unusual case of pyogenic liver abscess and septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein in a 44-year-old male caused by Propionibacterium acnes successfully managed with a combination of percutaneous drainage and antimicrobial therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this bacterium isolated in pure culture as the sole etiologic organism of pyogenic liver abscess and pylephlebitis in an adult patient. PMID:25954544

  10. Getting to Grips with Strangles: An Effective Multi-Component Recombinant Vaccine for the Protection of Horses from Streptococcus equi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Bengt; Flock, Margareta; Frykberg, Lars; Waller, Andrew S.; Robinson, Carl; Smith, Ken C.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is a clonal, equine host-adapted pathogen of global importance that causes a suppurative lymphodendopathy of the head and neck, more commonly known as Strangles. The disease is highly prevalent, can be severe and is highly contagious. Antibiotic treatment is usually ineffective. Live attenuated vaccine strains of S. equi have shown adverse reactions and they suffer from a short duration of immunity. Thus, a safe and effective vaccine against S. equi is highly desirable. The bacterium shows only limited genetic diversity and an effective vaccine could confer broad protection to horses throughout the world. Welsh mountain ponies (n?=?7) vaccinated with a combination of seven recombinant S. equi proteins were significantly protected from experimental infection by S. equi, resembling the spontaneous disease. Vaccinated horses had significantly reduced incidence of lymph node swelling (p?=?0.0013) lymph node abscessation (p?=?0.00001), fewer days of pyrexia (p?=?0.0001), reduced pathology scoring (p?=?0.005) and lower bacterial recovery from lymph nodes (p?=?0.004) when compared with non-vaccinated horses (n?=?7). Six of 7 vaccinated horses were protected whereas all 7 non-vaccinated became infected. The protective antigens consisted of five surface localized proteins and two IgG endopeptidases. A second vaccination trial (n?=?7+7), in which the IgG endopeptidases were omitted, demonstrated only partial protection against S. equi, highlighting an important role for these vaccine components in establishing a protective immune response. S. equi shares >80% sequence identity with Streptococcus pyogenes. Several of the components utilized here have counterparts in S. pyogenes, suggesting that our findings have broader implications for the prevention of infection with this important human pathogen. This is one of only a few demonstrations of protection from streptococcal infection conferred by a recombinant multi-component subunit vaccine in a natural host. PMID:19763180

  11. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N; Ziane, H; Bekhoucha, S; Guechi, Z; Azzam, A; Touati, D; Naim, M; Azrou, S; Hamidi, M; Mertani, A; Laraba, A; Annane, T; Kermani, S; Tazir, M

    2015-07-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  12. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N.; Ziane, H.; Bekhoucha, S.; Guechi, Z.; Azzam, A.; Touati, D.; Naim, M.; Azrou, S.; Hamidi, M.; Mertani, A.; Laraba, A.; Annane, T.; Kermani, S.; Tazir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  13. Streptococcus Dysgalactiae Subspecies Dysgalactiae Infection after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Man Jun; Jung, Chul-Young; Ko, Young-Chul; Kim, Young-June; Kim, Chang-kyu; Kang, Eun-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDSD), Lancefield group C streptococcus, is an animal pathogen which often causes pyogenic infection in domestic animals. Human infection by SDSD has been reported as a cellulitis on the upper arm, but a prosthetic joint infection caused by SDSD after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not yet been reported in the literature demonstrating that its clinical manifestation and management have not been well established. In this case report, we aimed to present a case of SDSD prosthetic joint infection after TKA, which was successfully treated by two-stage re-implantation with an application of antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer. PMID:22708114

  14. Characterization and protective immunogenicity of the SzM protein of Streptococcus zooepidemicus NC78 from a clonal outbreak of equine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F

    2013-08-01

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus of Lancefield group C is a highly variable tonsillar and mucosal commensal that usually is associated with opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract of vertebrate hosts. More-virulent clones have caused epizootics of severe respiratory disease in dogs and horses. The virulence factors of these strains are poorly understood. The antiphagocytic protein SeM is a major virulence factor and protective antigen of Streptococcus equi, a clonal biovar of an ancestral S. zooepidemicus strain. Although the genome of S. zooepidemicus strain H70, an equine isolate, contains a partial homolog (szm) of sem, expression of the gene has not been documented. We have identified and characterized SzM from an encapsulated S. zooepidemicus strain from an epizootic of equine respiratory disease in New Caledonia. The SzM protein of strain NC78 (SzM(NC78)) has a predicted predominantly alpha-helical fibrillar structure with an LPSTG cell surface anchor motif and resistance to hot acid. A putative binding site for plasminogen is present in the B repeat region, the sequence of which shares homology with repeats of the plasminogen binding proteins of human group C and G streptococci. Equine plasminogen is activated in a dose-dependent manner by recombinant SzM(NC78). Only 23.20 and 25.46% DNA homology is shared with SeM proteins of S. equi strains CF32 and 4047, respectively, and homology ranges from 19.60 to 54.70% for SzM proteins of other S. zooepidemicus strains. As expected, SzM(NC78) reacted with convalescent-phase sera from horses with respiratory disease associated with strains of S. zooepidemicus. SzM(NC78) resembles SeM in binding equine fibrinogen and eliciting strong protective antibody responses in mice. Sera of vaccinated mice opsonized S. zooepidemicus strains NC78 and W60, the SzM protein of which shared partial amino acid homology with SzM(NC78). We conclude that SzM is a protective antigen of NC78; it was strongly reactive with serum antibodies from horses during recovery from S. zooepidemicus-associated respiratory disease. PMID:23740925

  15. Characterization and Protective Immunogenicity of the SzM Protein of Streptococcus zooepidemicus NC78 from a Clonal Outbreak of Equine Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Velineni, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus of Lancefield group C is a highly variable tonsillar and mucosal commensal that usually is associated with opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract of vertebrate hosts. More-virulent clones have caused epizootics of severe respiratory disease in dogs and horses. The virulence factors of these strains are poorly understood. The antiphagocytic protein SeM is a major virulence factor and protective antigen of Streptococcus equi, a clonal biovar of an ancestral S. zooepidemicus strain. Although the genome of S. zooepidemicus strain H70, an equine isolate, contains a partial homolog (szm) of sem, expression of the gene has not been documented. We have identified and characterized SzM from an encapsulated S. zooepidemicus strain from an epizootic of equine respiratory disease in New Caledonia. The SzM protein of strain NC78 (SzMNC78) has a predicted predominantly alpha-helical fibrillar structure with an LPSTG cell surface anchor motif and resistance to hot acid. A putative binding site for plasminogen is present in the B repeat region, the sequence of which shares homology with repeats of the plasminogen binding proteins of human group C and G streptococci. Equine plasminogen is activated in a dose-dependent manner by recombinant SzMNC78. Only 23.20 and 25.46% DNA homology is shared with SeM proteins of S. equi strains CF32 and 4047, respectively, and homology ranges from 19.60 to 54.70% for SzM proteins of other S. zooepidemicus strains. As expected, SzMNC78 reacted with convalescent-phase sera from horses with respiratory disease associated with strains of S. zooepidemicus. SzMNC78 resembles SeM in binding equine fibrinogen and eliciting strong protective antibody responses in mice. Sera of vaccinated mice opsonized S. zooepidemicus strains NC78 and W60, the SzM protein of which shared partial amino acid homology with SzMNC78. We conclude that SzM is a protective antigen of NC78; it was strongly reactive with serum antibodies from horses during recovery from S. zooepidemicus-associated respiratory disease. PMID:23740925

  16. Molecular phylogeny and a taxonomic proposal for the genus Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Póntigo, F; Moraga, M; Flores, S V

    2015-01-01

    Alternative phylogenies for the genus Streptococcus have been proposed due to uncertainty about the among-species group relationships. Here, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Streptococcus, considering all the species groups and also the genomic data accumulated by other studies. Seventy-five species were subjected to a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using sequences from eight genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, tuf, rnpB, gyrB, dnaJ, and recN). On the basis of our results, we propose a new Phylogeny for the genus, with special emphasis on the inter-species group level. This new phylogeny differs from those suggested previously. From topological and evolutionary distance criteria, we propose that gordonii, pluranimalium, and sobrinus should be considered as new species groups, in addition to the currently recognized groups of mutans, bovis, pyogenic, suis, mitis, and salivarius. PMID:26400318

  17. Nanogel-based PspA intranasal vaccine prevents invasive disease and nasal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  18. Distinct Structural Features of the Peroxide Response Regulator from Group A Streptococcus Drive DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Michal; Nix, Jay C.; Tseng, Hsiao-Ling; Tsou, Chih-Cheng; Fei, Chun-Hsien; Chiou, Huo-Sheng; Jeng, U-Ser; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Wang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a strict human pathogen that causes severe, invasive diseases. GAS does not produce catalase, but has an ability to resist killing by reactive oxygen species (ROS) through novel mechanisms. The peroxide response regulator (PerR), a member of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family, plays a key role for GAS to cope with oxidative stress by regulating the expression of multiple genes. Our previous studies have found that expression of an iron-binding protein, Dpr, is under the direct control of PerR. To elucidate the molecular interactions of PerR with its cognate promoter, we have carried out structural studies on PerR and PerR-DNA complex. By combining crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we confirmed that the determined PerR crystal structure reflects its conformation in solution. Through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis, we have identified DNA-binding residues suggesting that PerR binds to the dpr promoter at the per box through a winged-helix motif. Furthermore, we have performed SAXS analysis and resolved the molecular architecture of PerR-DNA complex, in which two 30 bp DNA fragments wrap around two PerR homodimers by interacting with the adjacent positively-charged winged-helix motifs. Overall, we provide structural insights into molecular recognition of DNA by PerR and define the hollow structural arrangement of PerR-30bpDNA complex, which displays a unique topology distinct from currently proposed DNA-binding models for Fur family regulators. PMID:24586487

  19. covR Mediated Antibiofilm Activity of 3-Furancarboxaldehyde Increases the Virulence of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Ashwinkumar Subramenium, Ganapathy; Viszwapriya, Dharmaprakash; Iyer, Prasanth Mani; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2015-01-01

    Background Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes), a multi-virulent, exclusive human pathogen responsible for various invasive and non-invasive diseases possesses biofilm forming phenomenon as one of its pathogenic armaments. Recently, antibiofilm agents have gained prime importance, since inhibiting the biofilm formation is expected to reduce development of antibiotic resistance and increase their susceptibility to the host immune cells. Principal Findings The current study demonstrates the antibiofilm activity of 3Furancarboxaldehyde (3FCA), a floral honey derived compound, against GAS biofilm, which was divulged using crystal violet assay, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The report is extended to study its effect on various aspects of GAS (morphology, virulence, aggregation) at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (132?g/ml). 3FCA was found to alter the growth pattern of GAS in solid and liquid medium and increased the rate of auto-aggregation. Electron microscopy unveiled the increase in extra polymeric substances around cell. Gene expression studies showed down-regulation of covR gene, which is speculated to be the prime target for the antibiofilm activity. Increased hyaluronic acid production and down regulation of srtB gene is attributed to the enhanced rate of auto-aggregation. The virulence genes (srv, mga, luxS and hasA) were also found to be over expressed, which was manifested with the increased susceptibility of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to 3FCA treated GAS. The toxicity of 3FCA was ruled out with no adverse effect on C. elegans. Significance Though 3FCA possess antibiofilm activity against GAS, it was also found to increase the virulence of GAS. This study demonstrates that, covR mediated antibiofilm activity may increase the virulence of GAS. This also emphasizes the importance to analyse the acclimatization response and virulence of the pathogen in the presence of antibiofilm compounds prior to their clinical trials. PMID:25978065

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Erythromycin Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Blood and Noninvasive Sites

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga, Maria Rosario; Carter, Philip E.; Cash, Phillip; McKenzie, Hamish

    2002-01-01

    Erythromycin-resistant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood cultures and noninvasive sites were studied over a 3-year period. The prevalence of erythromycin resistance was 11.9% (19 of 160) in blood culture isolates but 4.2% (60 of 1,435) in noninvasive-site isolates. Sixty-two of the 79 resistant isolates were available for study. The M phenotype was responsible for 76% (47 of 62) of resistance, largely due to a serotype 14 clone, characterized by multilocus sequence typing as ST9, which accounted for 79% (37 of 47) of M phenotype resistance. The ST9 clone was 4.8 times more common in blood than in noninvasive sites. All M phenotype isolates were PCR positive for mef(A), but sequencing revealed that the ST9 clone possessed the mef(A) sequence commonly associated with Streptococcus pyogenes. All M phenotype isolates with this mef(A) sequence also had sequences consistent with the presence of the Tn1207.1 genetic element inserted in the celB gene. In contrast, isolates with the mef(E) sequence normally associated with S. pneumoniae contained sequences consistent with the presence of the mega insertion element. All MLSB isolates carried erm(B), and two isolates carried both erm(B) and mef(E). Fourteen of the 15 MLSB isolates were tetracycline resistant and contained tet(M). However, six M phenotype isolates of serotypes 19 (two isolates) and 23 (four isolates) were also tetracycline resistant and contained tet(M). MICs for isolates with the mef(A) sequence were significantly higher than MICs for isolates with the mef(E) sequence (P < 0.001). Thus, the ST9 clone of S. pneumoniae is a significant cause of invasive pneumococcal disease in northeast Scotland and is the single most important contributor to M phenotype erythromycin resistance. PMID:12202572

  1. Pyogenic Sacroiliitis in a 13-Month-Old Child: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Julien, Leroux; Isabelle, Bernardini; Lucie, Grynberg; Claire, Grandguillaume; Paul, Michelin; Mourad, Ould Slimane; Eric, Nectoux; François, Deroussen; Richard, Gouron; Audrey, Angelliaume; Brice, Ilharreborde; Mariette, Renaux-Petel

    2015-10-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is exceptional in very young children. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical examination is misleading. FABER test is rarely helpful in very young children. Inflammatory syndrome is frequent. Bone scintigraphy and MRI are very sensitive for the diagnosis. Joint fluid aspiration and blood cultures are useful to identify the pathogen. Appropriate antibiotic therapy provides rapid regression of symptoms and healing. We report the case of pyogenic sacroiliitis in a 13-month-old child.Clinical, biological, and imaging data of this case were reviewed and reported retrospectively.A 13-month-old girl consulted for decreased weight bearing without fever or trauma. Clinical examination was not helpful. There was an inflammatory syndrome. Bone scintigraphy found a sacroiliitis, confirmed on MRI. Aspiration of the sacroiliac joint was performed. Empiric intravenous biantibiotic therapy was started. Patient rapidly recovered full weight bearing. On the 5th day, clinical examination and biological analysis returned to normal. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was switched for oral. One month later, clinical examination and biological analysis were normal and antibiotic therapy was stopped.Hematogenous osteoarticular infections are common in children but pyogenic sacroiliitis is rare and mainly affects older children. Diagnosis can be difficult because clinical examination is poor. Moreover, limping and decreased weight bearing are very common reasons for consultation. This may delay the diagnosis or refer misdiagnosis. Bone scintigraphy is useful to locate a bone or joint disease responsible for limping. In this observation, bone scintigraphy located the infection at the sacroiliac joint. Given the young age, MRI was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Despite the very young age of the patient, symptoms rapidly disappeared with appropriate antibiotic therapy.We report the case of pyogenic sacroiliitis in a 13-month-old child. It reminds the risk of misdiagnosing pyogenic sacroiliitis in children because it is exceptional and clinical examination is rarely helpful. It also highlights the usefulness of bone scintigraphy and MRI in osteoarticular infections in children. PMID:26496260

  2. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  3. The Majority of 9,729 Group A Streptococcus Strains Causing Disease Secrete SpeB Cysteine Protease: Pathogenesis Implications.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Randall J; Raghuram, Anjali; Cantu, Concepcion; Hartman, Meredith H; Jimenez, Francisco E; Lee, Susan; Ngo, Ashley; Rice, Kelsey A; Saddington, Deborah; Spillman, Hannaka; Valson, Chandni; Flores, Anthony R; Beres, Stephen B; Long, S Wesley; Nasser, Waleed; Musser, James M

    2015-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), the causative agent of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis, secretes the potent cysteine protease SpeB. Several lines of evidence suggest that SpeB is an important virulence factor. SpeB is expressed in human infections, protects mice from lethal challenge when used as a vaccine, and contributes significantly to tissue destruction and dissemination in animal models. However, recent descriptions of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production have led to the idea that GAS may be under selective pressure to decrease secreted SpeB protease activity during infection. Thus, two divergent hypotheses have been proposed. One postulates that SpeB is a key contributor to pathogenesis; the other, that GAS is under selection to decrease SpeB during infection. In order to distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we performed casein hydrolysis assays to measure the SpeB protease activity secreted by 6,775 GAS strains recovered from infected humans. The results demonstrated that 84.3% of the strains have a wild-type SpeB protease phenotype. The availability of whole-genome sequence data allowed us to determine the relative frequencies of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production. The most abundantly mutated genes were direct transcription regulators. We also sequenced the genomes of 2,954 GAS isolates recovered from nonhuman primates with experimental necrotizing fasciitis. No mutations that would result in a SpeB-deficient phenotype were identified. Taken together, these data unambiguously demonstrate that the great majority of GAS strains recovered from infected humans secrete wild-type levels of SpeB protease activity. Our data confirm the important role of SpeB in GAS pathogenesis and help end a long-standing controversy. PMID:26416912

  4. Usnic acid, a lichen secondary metabolite inhibits Group A Streptococcus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nithyanand, Paramasivam; Beema Shafreen, Raja Mohmed; Muthamil, Subramanian; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococci (GAS) are involved in a number of life threatening diseases and biofilm formation by these pathogens are considered as an important virulence determinant as it mediates antibiotic resistance among them. In the present study, we have explored the ability of (+)-usnic acid, a lichen secondary metabolite, as an antibiofilm agent against four serotypes of Streptococcus pyogenes causing pharyngitis. Usnic acid inhibited the biofilms of M serotypes M56, st38, M89 efficiently and the biofilm of M74 to a lesser extent. Confocal imaging of the treated samples showed that usnic acid reduced the biomass of the biofilms when compared to that of the control. Fourier Transfer Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicated that usnic acid reduced the cellular components (proteins and fatty acids) of the biofilms. Interestingly, the FT-IR spectrum further revealed that usnic acid probably acted upon the fatty acids of the biofilms as evident from the disappearance of a peak at 2,455-2,100 cm(-1) when compared to the control only in serotypes M56, st38 and M89 but not in M74. The present study shows, for the first time, that usnic acid can act as an effective antibiofilm agent against GAS. PMID:25367342

  5. Identification of Three Novel Superantigen-Encoding Genes in Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, szeF, szeN, and szeP? †

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, Romain; Darby, Alistair C.; Robinson, Carl; Wright, Nicola L.; Steward, Karen F.; Anderson, Emma; Webb, Katy; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Efstratiou, Androulla; Broughton, Karen; Jolley, Keith A.; Priestnall, Simon L.; Marotti Campi, Maria C.; Hughes, Margaret A.; Radford, Alan; Erles, Kerstin; Waller, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of superantigen-encoding genes by Streptococcus pyogenes has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in humans, and the gain of four superantigens by Streptococcus equi is linked to the evolution of this host-restricted pathogen from an ancestral strain of the opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus. A recent study determined that the culture supernatants of several S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains possessed mitogenic activity but lacked known superantigen-encoding genes. Here, we report the identification and activities of three novel superantigen-encoding genes. The products of szeF, szeN, and szeP share 59%, 49%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with SPEH, SPEM, and SPEL, respectively. Recombinant SzeF, SzeN, and SzeP stimulated the proliferation of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and gamma interferon (IFN-?) production, in vitro. Although none of these superantigen genes were encoded within functional prophage elements, szeN and szeP were located next to a prophage remnant, suggesting that they were acquired by horizontal transfer. Eighty-one of 165 diverse S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains screened, including 7 out of 15 isolates from cases of disease in humans, contained at least one of these new superantigen-encoding genes. The presence of szeN or szeP, but not szeF, was significantly associated with mitogenic activity in the S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus population (P < 0.000001, P < 0.000001, and P = 0.104, respectively). We conclude that horizontal transfer of these novel superantigens from and within the diverse S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus population is likely to have implications for veterinary and human disease. PMID:20713629

  6. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  7. Contribution of each of four Superantigens to Streptococcus equi-induced mitogenicity, gamma interferon synthesis, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Paillot, Romain; Robinson, Carl; Steward, Karen; Wright, Nicola; Jourdan, Thibaud; Butcher, Nicola; Heather, Zoe; Waller, Andrew S

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation and swelling of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, which can literally strangle the horse to death. S. equi produces four recently acquired phage-associated bacterial superantigens (sAgs; SeeH, SeeI, SeeL, and SeeM) that share homology with the mitogenic toxins of Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study was to characterize the contribution of each of these S. equi sAgs to mitogenic activity in vitro and quantify the sAg-neutralizing capacity of sera from naturally infected horses in order to better understand their role in pathogenicity. Each of the sAgs was successfully cloned, and soluble proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. SeeI, SeeL, and SeeM induced a dose-dependent proliferative response in equine CD4 T lymphocytes and synthesis of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). SeeH did not stimulate equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but induced proliferation of asinine PBMC. Allelic replacement mutants of S. equi strain 4047 with sequential deletion of the superantigen genes were generated. Deletion of seeI, seeL, and seeM completely abrogated the mitogenic activity and synthesis of IFN-gamma, in equine PBMC, of the strain 4047 culture supernatant. Sera from naturally infected convalescent horses had only limited sAg-neutralizing activities. We propose that S. equi sAgs play an important role in S. equi pathogenicity by stimulating an overzealous and inappropriate Th1 response that may interfere with the development of an effective immune response. PMID:20123710

  8. Contribution of Each of Four Superantigens to Streptococcus equi-Induced Mitogenicity, Gamma Interferon Synthesis, and Immunity ?

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, Romain; Robinson, Carl; Steward, Karen; Wright, Nicola; Jourdan, Thibaud; Butcher, Nicola; Heather, Zoe; Waller, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation and swelling of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, which can literally strangle the horse to death. S. equi produces four recently acquired phage-associated bacterial superantigens (sAgs; SeeH, SeeI, SeeL, and SeeM) that share homology with the mitogenic toxins of Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study was to characterize the contribution of each of these S. equi sAgs to mitogenic activity in vitro and quantify the sAg-neutralizing capacity of sera from naturally infected horses in order to better understand their role in pathogenicity. Each of the sAgs was successfully cloned, and soluble proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. SeeI, SeeL, and SeeM induced a dose-dependent proliferative response in equine CD4 T lymphocytes and synthesis of gamma interferon (IFN-?). SeeH did not stimulate equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but induced proliferation of asinine PBMC. Allelic replacement mutants of S. equi strain 4047 with sequential deletion of the superantigen genes were generated. Deletion of seeI, seeL, and seeM completely abrogated the mitogenic activity and synthesis of IFN-?, in equine PBMC, of the strain 4047 culture supernatant. Sera from naturally infected convalescent horses had only limited sAg-neutralizing activities. We propose that S. equi sAgs play an important role in S. equi pathogenicity by stimulating an overzealous and inappropriate Th1 response that may interfere with the development of an effective immune response. PMID:20123710

  9. Pyogenic Bacterial Infections in Humans with MyD88 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Jin, Zhongbo; Pankla, Rungnapa; Xiao, Hui; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Chrabieh, Maya; Mustapha, Imen Ben; Ghandil, Pegah; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Sirvent, Nicolas; Guedes, Margarida; Vitor, Artur Bonito; Herrero-Mata, María José; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Rodrigo, Carlos; Alsina, Laia; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estibaliz; Juan, Manel; Fortuny, Claudia; Yagüe, Jordi; Antón, Jordi; Pascal, Mariona; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Janniere, Lucile; Rose, Yoann; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Issekutz, Andrew; Maródi, László; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Banchereau, Jacques; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Chaussabel, Damien; Puel, Anne; Casanova1, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    MyD88 is a key downstream adapter for most Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). MyD88 deficiency in mice leads to susceptibility to a broad range of pathogens in experimental settings of infection. We describe a distinct situation in a natural setting of human infection. Nine children with autosomal recessive MyD88 deficiency suffered from life-threatening, often recurrent pyogenic bacterial infections, including invasive pneumococcal disease. However, these patients were otherwise healthy, with normal resistance to other microbes. Their clinical status improved with age, but not due to any cellular leakiness in MyD88 deficiency. The MyD88-dependent TLRs and IL-1Rs are therefore essential for protective immunity to a small number of pyogenic bacteria, but redundant for host defense to most natural infections. PMID:18669862

  10. Zolpidem Use Associated With Increased Risk of Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This was a population-based case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program since 2000 to 2011. We identified 1325 patients aged 20 to 84 years with the first-attack of pyogenic liver abscess as the cases, and 5082 patients without pyogenic liver abscess matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of hospitalization for pyogenic liver abscess as the controls. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted ?7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as current use of zolpidem. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted >7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as late use of zolpidem. Patients who never received 1 prescription for zolpidem were defined as never use of zolpidem. A multivariable unconditional logistic regression model was used to measure the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess. After adjustment for possible confounding variables, the adjusted OR of pyogenic liver abscess was 3.89 for patients with current use of zolpidem (95% CI 2.89, 5.23), when compared with those with never use of zolpidem. The adjusted OR decreased to 0.85 for those with late use of zolpidem (95% CI 0.70, 1.03), but without statistical significance. Current use of zolpidem is associated with the increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess. Physicians should take the risk of pyogenic liver abscess into account when prescribing zolpidem. PMID:26266369

  11. Isolation and genotypic characterization of Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes recovered from active cranial abscess infections of male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bradley S; Belser, Emily H; Keeler, Shamus P; Yabsley, Michael J; Miller, Karl V

    2015-03-01

    Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes is a causative agent of suppurative infections in domestic and wild animals. In some populations of captive or free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), cranial abscess disease is an important source of mortality in adult males. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood, T. pyogenes has been isolated from active infections with other opportunistic bacteria. In this study, bacteria associated with cranial abscess infections were identified, the prevalence of T. pyogenes associated with these infections was determined, and the presence of known virulence determinants in T. pyogenes isolates was ascertained. Using routine biochemical techniques seven bacterial species were identified from 65 samples taken from active cranial abscess infections of 65 male white-tailed deer. Trueperellapyogenes was recovered from 46 samples; in 32 samples it was the only bacterium species detected. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 26 samples. From these samples, the presence of known and putative virulence genes of T. pyogenes--plo, nanH, nanP, cbpA, fimA, fimC, fimE, and fimG--was examined by conventional polymerase chain reaction. All T. pyogenes isolates were positive for the pyolysin genes plo, nanP, and fimA. Furthermore, nanH, fimA, fimC, and fimE were detected in over 70% of isolates. Of the isolates tested, 48% had genotypes containing all virulence genes except cbpA. The suggestive virulence potential of all isolates, coupled with the large number of pure cultures obtained, implies that T. pyogenes is a causative agent of cranial abscess disease. PMID:25831577

  12. Dietary supplementation with Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus oryzae enhance immunity and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae infection in juvenile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Marina Keiko P; Nakandakare, Ivan B; Terhune, Jeffery S; Wood, Theresa; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José T

    2015-03-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary administration of probiotic with Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth, innate immune response, Hemato-immunological parameters and disease resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Animals were distributed in three equal groups, each of five replicates and received one of the following experimental diets for four weeks: Control, non-supplemented diet; 5 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 1.5 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 2 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)); and 10 g kg(-1) probiotic mixture (B. subtilis 3.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1), S. cerevisiae 2.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1) and A. oryzae 4.0 × 10(9) CFU g(-1)). The respiratory burst activity, white blood cells and hematological parameters were evaluated after four, five and six weeks of feeding. At the end of the growth trial, fish were sampled for intestinal microbiology and challenged by intraperitoneal injection of LD50 concentration of Aeromonas hydrophila and Streptococcus iniae. Mortality was recorded for the following 3 weeks. Results showed that administration of the probiotic had no significant effect on the growth rates of Nile tilapias, although the fish fed probiotics had better feed conversion. Respiratory burst activity, erythrocyte fragility and levels of white blood cells were significantly improved in tilapias fed diet supplemented with probiotic levels (P < 0.05), which may exhibit up-regulating effects on tilapia immune parameters. The cumulative mortality after A. hydrophila and S. iniae challenge decreased in tilapias fed with probiotic (P < 0.05). The present study demonstrated the potential of B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae and A. oryzae combined as beneficial dietary probiotic in juvenile O. niloticus. PMID:25530581

  13. Novel Twin Streptolysin S-Like Peptides Encoded in the sag Operon Homologue of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nakano, Kota; Ohkura, Kazuto; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Kikuchi, Ken; Whiley, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the anginosus group streptococci, which form part of the normal human oral flora. In contrast to the pyogenic group streptococci, our knowledge of the virulence factors of the anginosus group streptococci, including S. anginosus, is not sufficient to allow a clear understanding of the basis of their pathogenicity. Generally, hemolysins are thought to be important virulence factors in streptococcal infections. In the present study, a sag operon homologue was shown to be responsible for beta-hemolysis in S. anginosus strains by random gene knockout. Interestingly, contrary to pyogenic group streptococci, beta-hemolytic S. anginosus was shown to have two tandem sagA homologues, encoding streptolysin S (SLS)-like peptides, in the sag operon homologue. Gene deletion and complementation experiments revealed that both genes were functional, and these SLS-like peptides were essential for beta-hemolysis in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of these SLS-like peptides differed from that of the typical SLS of S. pyogenes, especially in their propeptide domain, and an amino acid residue indicated to be important for the cytolytic activity of SLS in S. pyogenes was deleted in both S. anginosus homologues. These data suggest that SLS-like peptides encoded by two sagA homologues in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus may be potential virulence factors with a different structure essential for hemolytic activity and/or the maturation process compared to the typical SLS present in pyogenic group streptococci. PMID:23292771

  14. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  15. Streptococcus bovis-related cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Deering, Eoin McCarthy; Muravec, Zlatko; Castineira, Constantino Fiuza; O'Donoghue, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a common inflammatory condition of the gallbladder caused most commonly by Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella organisms. Streptococcus bovis is a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, anaerobic coccus found as a commensal inhabitant of the digestive system in 16% of healthy people. We report a rare case of acute cholecystitis caused by S bovis and discuss its implications with regard to the two known S bovis biotypes (I & II) both of which are associated with a number of other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23605823

  16. Identification of Lipoprotein Homologues of Pneumococcal PsaA in the Equine Pathogens Streptococcus equi and Streptococcus zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Dean J.; Greated, Joanne S.; Chanter, Neil; Sutcliffe, Iain C.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus equi and Streptococcus zooepidemicus are major etiological agents of upper and lower airway disease in horses. Despite the considerable animal suffering and economic burden associated with these diseases, the factors that contribute to the virulence of these equine pathogens have not been extensively investigated. Here we demonstrate the presence of a homologue of the Streptococcus pneumoniae PsaA protein in both of these equine pathogens. Inhibition of signal peptide processing by the antibiotic globomycin confirmed the lipoprotein nature of the mature proteins, and surface exposure was confirmed by their release from intact cells by mild trypsinolysis. PMID:10992520

  17. SpyAD, a Moonlighting Protein of Group A Streptococcus Contributing to Bacterial Division and Host Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Marilena; Gancitano, Giovanni; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Mora, Marirosa; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Tuscano, Giovanna; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Taddei, Anna Rita; Rindi, Simonetta; Speziale, Pietro; Soriani, Marco; Bensi, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen causing a wide repertoire of mild and severe diseases for which no vaccine is yet available. We recently reported the identification of three protein antigens that in combination conferred wide protection against GAS infection in mice. Here we focused our attention on the characterization of one of these three antigens, Spy0269, a highly conserved, surface-exposed, and immunogenic protein of unknown function. Deletion of the spy0269 gene in a GAS M1 isolate resulted in very long bacterial chains, which is indicative of an impaired capacity of the knockout mutant to properly divide. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the protein was mainly localized at the cell septum and could interact in vitro with the cell division protein FtsZ, leading us to hypothesize that Spy0269 is a member of the GAS divisome machinery. Predicted structural domains and sequence homologies with known streptococcal adhesins suggested that this antigen could also play a role in mediating GAS interaction with host cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by showing that recombinant Spy0269 could bind to mammalian epithelial cells in vitro and that Lactococcus lactis expressing Spy0269 on its cell surface could adhere to mammalian cells in vitro and to mice nasal mucosa in vivo. On the basis of these data, we believe that Spy0269 is involved both in bacterial cell division and in adhesion to host cells and we propose to rename this multifunctional moonlighting protein as SpyAD (Streptococcus pyogenes Adhesion and Division protein). PMID:24778116

  18. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Rebecca A; Puricelli, Jessica M; Higashi, Dustin L; Park, Claudia J; Lee, Shaun W

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  19. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  20. Health Care Associated Hematogenous Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Pigrau, Carlos; Rodríguez-Pardo, Dolors; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Moretó, Laura; Pellise, Ferran; Larrosa, Maria-Nieves; Puig, Mireia; Almirante, Benito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although hematogenous pyogenic spinal infections have been related to hemodialysis (HD), catheter-related sepsis, and sporadically, to other nosocomial infections or procedures, in most recent studies and reviews the impact of nosocomial infection as a risk factor for vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is not well established. The aim of our study was to describe the risk factors, infectious source, etiology, clinical features, therapy, and outcome of health care associated VO (HCAVO), and compare them with community-acquired VO (CAVO) cases. A retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with hematogenous VO was conducted in our third-level hospital between 1987 and 2011. HCAVO was defined as onset of symptoms after 1 month of hospitalization or within 6 months after hospital discharge, or ambulatory manipulations in the 6 months before the diagnosis. Over the 25-year study period, among 163 hematogenous pyogenic VO, 41 (25%) were health care associated, a percentage that increased from 15% (9/61) in the 1987–1999 period to 31% (32/102) in the 2000–2011 period (P?pyogenic VO infections are health care associated, and a third of these are potentially preventable catheter-related infections. Compared with CAVO, in health care associated hematogenous VO, mortality and relapse rates are higher; hence, further prevention measures should be assessed. PMID:25621677

  1. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ndlangisa, Kedibone M; du Plessis, Mignon; Wolter, Nicole; de Gouveia, Linda; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60%) from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ?5 years) was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC) 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%)]), some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]). In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively). Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12) and 64% (9/14) of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction. PMID:25233455

  2. Evidence for niche adaptation in the genome of the bovine pathogen Streptococcus uberis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Philip N; Holden, Matthew TG; Leigh, James A; Lennard, Nicola; Bignell, Alexandra; Barron, Andy; Clark, Louise; Quail, Michael A; Woodward, John; Barrell, Bart G; Egan, Sharon A; Field, Terence R; Maskell, Duncan; Kehoe, Michael; Dowson, Christopher G; Chanter, Neil; Whatmore, Adrian M; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus uberis, a Gram positive bacterial pathogen responsible for a significant proportion of bovine mastitis in commercial dairy herds, colonises multiple body sites of the cow including the gut, genital tract and mammary gland. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of S. uberis strain 0140J was undertaken to help elucidate the biology of this effective bovine pathogen. Results The genome revealed 1,825 predicted coding sequences (CDSs) of which 62 were identified as pseudogenes or gene fragments. Comparisons with related pyogenic streptococci identified a conserved core (40%) of orthologous CDSs. Intriguingly, S. uberis 0140J displayed a lower number of mobile genetic elements when compared with other pyogenic streptococci, however bacteriophage-derived islands and a putative genomic island were identified. Comparative genomics analysis revealed most similarity to the genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In contrast, streptococcal orthologs were not identified for 11% of the CDSs, indicating either unique retention of ancestral sequence, or acquisition of sequence from alternative sources. Functions including transport, catabolism, regulation and CDSs encoding cell envelope proteins were over-represented in this unique gene set; a limited array of putative virulence CDSs were identified. Conclusion S. uberis utilises nutritional flexibility derived from a diversity of metabolic options to successfully occupy a discrete ecological niche. The features observed in S. uberis are strongly suggestive of an opportunistic pathogen adapted to challenging and changing environmental parameters. PMID:19175920

  3. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some women carry in their intestines and vagina. It is not ... to infections in: The blood (sepsis) The lungs (pneumonia) The brain (meningitis) Most babies who get GBS ...

  4. Changing trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive diseases in Central Thailand, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chatsuwan, Tanittha; Nunthapisud, Pongpun; Treerauthaweeraphong, Vipa; Rungnobhakhun, Pimpha; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2014-01-01

    To describe the trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. pneumoniae causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) we tested 238 pneumococci isolates from normally sterile sites between 2009 and 2012 and compared these findings with previous data collected within our network. Serotyping was performed for 15 serotypes contained in the 7-,10-, 13-, and experimental 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). The most common serotypes found were 6B (13.9%), 19A (12.6%), 14 (8.0%), 18C (5.9%), and 6A (3.8%); and 39.9% were non-PCV15 serotypes. One of 81 patients with available data had breakthrough infection with vaccine serotype (19F). There was a significant increase of serotype 19A among children ?5 years (5.6% in 2000-2009 vs 18.3% in 2009-2012, P = 0.003). The all-age serotype coverage was 36.4%, 41.5%, 59.3%, and 59.7% for PCV7, PCV10, PCV13, and PCV 15, respectively. The corresponding coverage in children ?5 years were 46.4%, 48.8%, 73.2%, and 73.2% respectively. High susceptibilities to penicillin (89.7%), cefotaxime (95.7%), cefditoren (90.2% by Spanish breakpoints), ofloxacin (97.9%), and levofloxacin (100%), but low to cefdinir (50.0%), cefditoren (45.1% by US-FDA breakpoints), macrolides (<50%), clindamycin (67.7%), tetracycline (41.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.4%) were observed. Serotype 19A was less susceptible to penicillin (80.0 vs 91.2%, P = 0.046), cefditoren (66.7 vs 95.5% by Spanish breakpoints, P = 0.004), and tetracycline (9.1 vs 45.5%, P = 0.024) than non-19A isolates. These data emphasize the need for continued surveillance to monitor changes in serotypes as well as antimicrobial susceptibilities in order to guide strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:25424794

  5. Dietary Aloe vera supplementation on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT).

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Ndakalimwe Naftal; Qiang, Jun; He, Jie; Ma, Xin Yu; Kpundeh, Mathew D; Xu, Pao

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated effects of dietary Aloe vera on growth performance, some haemato-biochemical parameters and disease resistance against Streptococcus iniae in tilapia (GIFT). Five groups were designed including a basal diet (control) and 100% A. vera powder incorporated in fish feed at 0.5% 1%, 2%, and 4%/kg feed, which were administered for 8 weeks. Fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera supplemented diet significantly improved (p < 0.05) weight gain, absolute growth rate and specific growth rate. Feed intake significantly increased in fish fed with A. vera diet at 1% and 2%/kg feed. Feed efficiency ratio, feed conversion ratio, and hepatosomatic index were significantly enhanced in 4% A. vera supplemented fish over unsupplemented ones (p < 0.05). Several haemato-biochemical indices were examined before and after fish were challenged with S. iniae pathogen containing 7.7 × 10(6) CFU cells mL(-1). A. vera supplemented fish showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in red blood cells, hematocrits (Hb), hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, serum total protein, glucose and cortisol after challenge when compared to unsupplemented ones. Meanwhile, 4% A. vera supplemented fish showed a decrease (p < 0.05) in RBC, Hb, Ht, WBC, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) after challenge compared to unsupplemented ones and other supplemented ones. In addition, lower mean corpuscular volume values (MCV) (p < 0.05) were observed in fish fed with A. vera diet at 2% and 4% A. vera/kg feed than those fed unsupplemented diet. Unchallenged fish fed 0.5%, 1%, and 2% A. vera showed significantly higher values (p < 0.05) of mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) than those fed unsupplemented diet and 4% A. vera supplemented diet. There was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L) within experimental groups after challenge; N/L ratio in A. vera unsupplemented fish and those supplemented with A. vera diet at 1%/kg feed increased significantly (p < 0.05) throughout challenge period; while those fed 4% A. vera supplemented diet maintained higher values at all experimental stages among groups. There was a significant correlation (p < 0.05, r = 0.53) between N/L ratio and glucose concentration, 96 h after challenge. Aloe had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on the survival of the fish when compared to the control; no mortality was recorded in challenge trial. Overall, our results indicated that dietary aloe supplementation could improve growth, feed utilization, and haemato-biochemical parameters of cultured tilapia. PMID:25758848

  6. Characterization of Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae from Diseased Farmed and Wild Marine Fish from the U.S. Gulf Coast, Latin America, and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Wang, Rui; Wiles, Judy; Baumgartner, Wes; Green, Christopher; Plumb, John; Hawke, John

    2015-06-01

    We examined Lancefield serogroup B Streptococcus isolates recovered from diseased, cultured hybrid Striped Bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis × White Bass M. chrysops) and wild and cultured Gulf Killifish Fundulus grandis from coastal waters of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Gulf coast) and compared those isolates to strains from tilapias Oreochromis spp. reared in Mississippi, Thailand, Ecuador, and Honduras and to the original Gulf coast strain identified by Plumb et al. ( 1974 ). The isolates were subjected to phylogenetic, biochemical, and antibiotic susceptibility analyses. Genetic analysis was performed using partial sequence comparison of (1) the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene; (2) the sipA gene, which encodes a surface immunogenic protein; (3) the cspA gene, which encodes a cell surface-associated protein; and (4) the secY gene, which encodes components of a general protein secretion pathway. Phylogenies inferred from sipA, secY, and cspA gene sequence comparisons were more discriminating than that inferred from the 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The U.S. Gulf coast strains showed a high degree of similarity to strains from South America and Central America and belonged to a unique group that can be distinguished from other group B streptococci. In agreement with the molecular findings, biochemical and antimicrobial resistance analyses demonstrated that the isolates recovered from the U.S. Gulf coast and Latin America were more similar to each other than to isolates from Thailand. Three laboratory challenge methods for inducing streptococcosis in Gulf Killifish were evaluated-intraperitoneal (IP) injection, immersion (IMM), and immersion plus abrasion (IMMA)-using serial dilutions of S. agalactiae isolate LADL 97-151, a representative U.S. Gulf coast strain. The dose that was lethal to 50% of test fish by 14 d postchallenge was approximately 2 CFU/fish via IP injection. In contrast, the fish that were challenged via IMM or IMMA presented cumulative mortality less than 40% by 14 d postchallenge. PMID:26030196

  7. Antiphagocytic Function of an IgG Glycosyl Hydrolase from Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Its Use as a Vaccine Component

    PubMed Central

    Flock, Margareta; Frykberg, Lars; Sköld, Markus; Guss, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    EndoSe from Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is an enzyme hydrolyzing glycosyl groups on IgG, analogous to EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes. We here show that the activity of EndoSe leads to an antiphagocytic function and may thus be a contributory factor to immune evasion of S. equi. Despite the damaging effect that EndoSe has on IgG, antibodies against EndoSe can neutralize its function. Antibodies against EndoSe restored the opsonic activity of specific opsonizing antibodies. Mice infected with either S. equi subsp. equi or subsp. zooepidemicus or S. pyogenes could be protected by vaccination with EndoSe. It is speculated that EndoSe could be a suitable vaccine candidate against streptococcal infections. PMID:22615244

  8. Surgical Management of Pyogenic Discitis of Lumbar Region

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R; Renjith Kumar, J

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of patients who had pyogenic discitis and were managed surgically. Purpose To analyze the bacteriology, pathology, management and outcome of pyogenic discitis of the lumbar region treated surgically. Overview of Literature Surgical management of pyogenic discitis is still an infrequently used modality of treatment. Methods A total of 42 patients comprised of 33 males and 9 females who had pyogenic discitis with a mean age of 51.61 years (range, 16-75 years) were included in this study. All the cases were confirmed as having pyogenic discitis by pus culture report and histopathological examination. The mean follow-up period was 41.9 months. Results Debridement and posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone graft was done in all cases. Thirteen (30.95%) patients had other medical co-morbidities. Five cases had a previous operation of the spine, and three cases had a history of vertebral fracture. Three patients were operated for gynaecological problems, and four cases had a history of urological surgery. L4-5 level was the most frequent site of pyogenic discitis. The most common bacterium isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Radiologically good fusion was seen in the majority of patients. Conclusions Pyogenic discitis should be suspected in people having pain and local tenderness in the spinal region with a rise in inflammatory parameters in blood. The most common bacterium was S. aureus, but there were still a greater number of patients infected with other types of bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics therapy should be started only after isolating the bacteria and making the culture sensitivity report. PMID:24761200

  9. Processing, stability, and kinetic parameters of C5a peptidase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth T; Wetherell, Michael G; Winter, Laurie A; Olmsted, Stephen B; Cleary, Patrick P; Matsuka, Yury V

    2002-10-01

    A recombinant streptococcal C5a peptidase was expressed in Escherichia coli and its catalytic properties and thermal stability were subjected to examination. It was shown that the NH2-terminal region of C5a peptidase (Asn32-Asp79/Lys90) forms the pro-sequence segment. Upon maturation the propeptide is hydrolyzed either via an autocatalytic intramolecular cleavage or by exogenous protease streptopain. At pH 7.4 the enzyme exhibited maximum activity in the narrow range of temperatures between 40 and 43 degrees C. The process of heat denaturation of C5a peptidase investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein undergoes biphasic unfolding transition with Tm of 50 and 70 degrees C suggesting melting of different parts of the molecule with different stability. Unfolding of the less stable structures was accompanied by the loss of proteolytic activity. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the COOH-terminus of human complement C5a we demonstrated that in vitro peptidase catalyzes hydrolysis of two His67-Lys68 and Ala58-Ser59 peptide bonds. The high catalytic efficiency obtained for the SQLRANISHKDMQLGR extended peptide compared to the poor hydrolysis of its derivative Ac-SQLRANISH-pNA that lacks residues at P2'-P7' positions, suggest the importance of C5a peptidase interactions with the P' side of the substrate. PMID:12354115

  10. Streptococcus iniae vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is among the most important emergent pathogens that affects many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, this Gram-positive bacterium causes significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Inf...

  11. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the "Streptococcus milleri group".

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, R A; Fraser, H; Hardie, J M; Beighton, D

    1990-01-01

    A biochemical scheme was developed by which strains of Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus can reliably be distinguished from within the "Streptococcus milleri group." Strains identified as S. intermedius were differentiated by the ability to produce detectable levels of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and sialidase with 4-methylumbelliferyl-linked fluorogenic substrates in microdilution trays after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, together with the production of hyaluronidase. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were differentiated by the production of alpha-glucosidase and hyaluronidase by the former and the production of beta-glucosidase by the latter. The majority of strains of the S. milleri group obtained from dental plaque were identified as S. intermedius, as were most strains isolated from abscesses of the brain and liver. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were from a wider variety of infections, both oral and nonoral, than were strains of S. intermedius, with the majority of strains from urogenital infections being identified as S. anginosus. PMID:2380375

  12. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of a Lancefield group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain causing streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) causes invasive streptococcal infections, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), as does Lancefield group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS). We sequenced the entire genome of SDSE strain GGS_124 isolated from a patient with STSS. Results We found that GGS_124 consisted of a circular genome of 2,106,340 bp. Comparative analyses among bacterial genomes indicated that GGS_124 was most closely related to GAS. GGS_124 and GAS, but not other streptococci, shared a number of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding streptolysin O, NADase, and streptokinase A, distantly related to SIC (DRS), suggesting the importance of these factors in the development of invasive disease. GGS_124 contained 3 prophages, with one containing a virulence factor gene for streptodornase. All 3 prophages were significantly similar to GAS prophages that carry virulence factor genes, indicating that these prophages had transferred these genes between pathogens. SDSE was found to contain a gene encoding a superantigen, streptococcal exotoxin type G, but lacked several genes present in GAS that encode virulence factors, such as other superantigens, cysteine protease speB, and hyaluronan synthase operon hasABC. Similar to GGS_124, the SDSE strains contained larger numbers of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) spacers than did GAS, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer via streptococcal phages between SDSE and GAS is somewhat restricted, although they share phage species. Conclusion Genome wide comparisons of SDSE with GAS indicate that SDSE is closely and quantitatively related to GAS. SDSE, however, lacks several virulence factors of GAS, including superantigens, SPE-B and the hasABC operon. CRISPR spacers may limit the horizontal transfer of phage encoded GAS virulence genes into SDSE. These findings may provide clues for dissecting the pathological roles of the virulence factors in SDSE and GAS that cause STSS. PMID:21223537

  13. Phylogenomics and the dynamic genome evolution of the genus Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Richards, Vincent P; Palmer, Sara R; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M; Highlander, Sarah K; Town, Christopher D; Burne, Robert A; Stanhope, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  14. Phylogenomics and the Dynamic Genome Evolution of the Genus Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Palmer, Sara R.; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M.; Highlander, Sarah K.; Town, Christopher D.; Burne, Robert A.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  15. Intravascular laser therapy in different forms of lung diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, M. N.; Reshetnikov, V. A.; Kazhekin, O. A.; Shepelenko, A. F.

    1993-06-01

    The potentions of laser intravascular therapy in elimination of pyogenic and inflammatory intoxication in cases of acute pneumonia, pyo-destructive diseases (including posttraumatic diseases) of the lungs are studied clinically.

  16. Development of a conjugate vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease based on capsular polysaccharides coupled with PspA/family 1 protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haiying; Peng, Yonghui; Lin, ZiLin; Zhang, Shuangling; Guo, Yanghao

    2015-01-01

    The efforts were focused on exploring alternative pneumococcal vaccine strategies, aimed at addressing the shortcomings of existing formulations, without compromising efficacy. Our strategy involved the use of the carrier protein, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), conjugated with capsular polysaccharides (CPS), to provide effective and non-serotype-dependent protection. In this study, we generated a stable Escherichia coli construct expressing functional PspA from a capsular serotype 6B strain and confirmed it belonging to family 1, which was conjugated with CPS. The distribution of anti-CPS antibody response was almost completely of IgG2a subclass followed by IgG3 and low level of IgG1 subclass, but that of anti-PspA IgG subclass antibodies was almost equal IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses. Though PspA was less conspicuous on the surface of pneumococci than the capsule, the antibodies induced with CPS-rPspA conjugate possessed more accessibility to the surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B and 19F (the same family 1 PspA). By survival experiment, the result suggested that the level of cross-protection after immunized with the conjugate was more measurable within the same family 1. The CPS-rPspA conjugate not only induced CPS-specific protection but also provided PspA specific cross-protection. PMID:25959527

  17. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype III, Multilocus Sequence Type 283 Strain SG-M1

    PubMed Central

    Mehershahi, Kurosh S.; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a common commensal strain in the human gastrointestinal tract that can also cause invasive disease in humans and other animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SG-M1, a serotype III, multilocus sequence type 283 strain, isolated from a Singaporean patient suffering from meningitis. PMID:26494662

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae NanC

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C. David; Lukacik, Petra; Potter, Jane A.; Sleator, Olivia; Taylor, Garry L.; Walsh, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a range of disease states. Sialidases are important bacterial virulence factors. There are three pneumococcal sialidases: NanA, NanB, and NanC. NanC is an unusual sialidase in that its primary reaction product is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en, also known as DANA), a nonspecific hydrolytic sialidase inhibitor. The production of Neu5Ac2en from ?2–3-linked sialosides by the catalytic domain is confirmed within a crystal structure. A covalent complex with 3-fluoro-?-N-acetylneuraminic acid is also presented, suggesting a common mechanism with other sialidases up to the final step of product formation. A conformation change in an active site hydrophobic loop on ligand binding constricts the entrance to the active site. In addition, the distance between the catalytic acid/base (Asp-315) and the ligand anomeric carbon is unusually short. These features facilitate a novel sialidase reaction in which the final step of product formation is direct abstraction of the C3 proton by the active site aspartic acid, forming Neu5Ac2en. NanC also possesses a carbohydrate-binding module, which is shown to bind ?2–3- and ?2–6-linked sialosides, as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid, which is captured in the crystal structure following hydration of Neu5Ac2en by NanC. Overall, the pneumococcal sialidases show remarkable mechanistic diversity while maintaining a common structural scaffold. PMID:26370075

  20. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Muhammad K.; Jones, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its ?-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  1. Pyogenic granuloma in relation to dental implants: Clinical and histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pinas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of pyogenic granuloma in association to dental implants is rare and only five cases have been reported in the literature. Material and Methods Patients charts were analyzed to select patients who had been diagnosed for pyogenic granuloma and its association with dental implants had been evaluated. The clinical status of the dental implants and the prosthesis had also been assessed. Results Clinical and histopathological diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma had been reached for soft mass growth in association with dental implants in 10 patients. Histological analysis of all samples was performed to obtain a firm diagnosis of finding against pyogenic granuloma lesions. Accumulation of dental plaque due to poor oral hygiene and improper design of the prosthesis had been related to the occurrence of pyogenic granuoloma. This lesion showed no predilection to specific surface type and had no significant association with marginal bone loss. Conclusions Pyogenic granuloma should be included in the differential diagnosis of soft mass growth around dental implants. Key words:Reactive lesion, soft mass, pyogenic granuloma, dental implant, titanium. PMID:26535087

  2. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Streptococcus canis Confirms the Zoonotic Origin of Human Infections and Reveals Genetic Exchange with Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, M. D.; Matos, S. C.; Pomba, C.; Lübke-Becker, A.; Wieler, L. H.; Preziuso, S.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen that occasionally causes human infections. Isolates recovered from infections of animals (n = 78, recovered from 2000 to 2010 in three European countries, mainly from house pets) and humans (n = 7, recovered from 2006 to 2010 in Portugal) were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods and characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and emm typing. S. canis isolates presented considerable variability in biochemical profiles and 16S rRNA. Resistance to antimicrobial agents was low, with the most significant being tet(M)- and tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance. MLST analysis revealed a polyclonal structure of the S. canis population causing infections, where the same genetic lineages were found infecting house pets and humans and were disseminated in distinct geographic locations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. canis was a divergent taxon of the sister species Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and found evidence of acquisition of genetic material by S. canis from S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. PFGE confirmed the MLST findings, further strengthening the similarity between animal and human isolates. The presence of emm-like genes was restricted to a few isolates and correlated with some MLST-based genetic lineages, but none of the human isolates could be emm typed. Our data show that S. canis isolates recovered from house pets and humans constitute a single population and demonstrate that isolates belonging to the main genetic lineages identified have the ability to infect the human host, providing strong evidence for the zoonotic nature of S. canis infection. PMID:23345291

  3. Brain abscess due to Streptococcus MG-intermedius (Streptococcus milleri).

    PubMed Central

    Melo, J C; Raff, M J

    1978-01-01

    Three cases of brain abscesses due to Streptococcus MG-intermedius are reported, and the literature pertaining to this subject is reviewed. The importance of careful and complete identification of these etiological agents of infection is stressed. The clinical presentation, the origin of S. MG-intermedius producing brain abscess, and its relation to hepatic abscesses and endocarditis are discussed. PMID:670377

  4. Antibacterial effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine monomers against Streptococcus pneumoniae via inhibiting pneumococcal histidine kinase (VicK)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Jianmin; Xu, Wenchun; Liu, Yusi; Wang, Wei; Wu, Kaifeng; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have the potential to be an effective target of the antimicrobials, and thus received much attention in recent years. VicK/VicR is one of TCSs in Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), which is essential for pneumococcal survival. We have previously obtained several Traditional Chinese Medicine monomers using a computer-based screening. In this study, either alone or in combination with penicillin, their antimicrobial activities were evaluated based on in vivo and in vitro assays. The results showed that the MICs of 5?-(Methylthio)-5?-deoxyadenosine, octanal 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazone, deoxyshikonin, kavahin, and dodecyl gallate against S. pneumoniae were 37.1, 38.5, 17, 68.5, and 21 ?g/mL, respectively. Time-killing assays showed that these compounds elicited bactericidal effects against S. pneumoniae D39 strain, which led to a 6-log reduction in CFU after exposure to compounds at four times of the MIC for 24 h. The five compounds inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, meanwhile, deoxyshikonin and dodecyl gallate displayed strong inhibitory activities against Staphylococcus aureus. These compounds showed no obvious cytotoxicity effects on Vero cells. Survival time of the mice infected by S. pneumoniae strains was prolonged by the treatment with the compounds. Importantly, all of the five compounds exerted antimicrobial effects against multidrug-resistant clinical strains of S. pneumoniae. Moreover, even at sub-MIC concentration, they inhibited cell division and biofilm formation. The five compounds all have enhancement effect on penicillin. Deoxyshikonin and dodecyl gallate showed significantly synergic antimicrobial activity with penicillin in vivo and in vitro, and effectively reduced nasopharyngeal and lung colonization caused by different penicillin-resistant pneumococcal serotypes. In addition, the two compounds also showed synergic antimicrobial activity with erythromycin and tetracycline. Taken together, our results suggest that these novel VicK inhibitors may be promising compounds against the pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. PMID:26042111

  5. Pyogenic liver abscess: a retrospective analysis of 107 patients during a 3-year period.

    PubMed

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Chen, Chin-Ming; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Hou, Ching-Cheng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2005-12-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a potentially life-threatening disease, and early diagnosis may be difficult. In order to provide diagnostic clues and to enhance the prompt management of such cases, we retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics of PLA during a 3-year period in a tertiary-care hospital. The crude incidence rate of PLA in our study was 446.1 per 100,000 hospital admissions. Male predominance and a mean age of 57.6 +/- 14.4 years were observed. Diabetes mellitus was the most common concomitant disease, and biliary pathologies were the most common predisposing cause of this type of abscess. The most common clinical features were fever, chills, and abdominal pain. Leukocytosis was found in 67.3% of the patients, and the observed C-reactive protein (CRP) values were high. The most common pathogen was Klebsiella pneumoniae. The mortality rate was 6.5%. A complete history, physical examination, evaluation of the white blood cell count and CRP, and the prompt arrangement of imaging studies may lead to an earlier diagnosis. The aggressive performance of image-guided catheter drainage and the appropriate administration of antibiotics may reduce the mortality rate of PLA. PMID:16377869

  6. Expression, genetic localization and phylogenic analysis of NAPlr in piscine Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae isolates and their patterns of adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, M.; Fujino, M.; Eissa, A.E.; Chen, S.C.; Warda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, the long recognized mammalian pathogen, has currently received a major concern regarding fish bacterial infection. Adhesion to host epithelial cells and the presence of wall-associated plasminogen binding proteins are prerequisites to Streptococcus infection. This is the first study of the occurrence of nephritis-associated plasminogen-binding receptor (NAPlr) and ?-enolase genes in piscine S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDSD) isolates. Further characterization of surface localized NAPlr of fish SDSD revealed a similar immune-reactive band of 43 KDa as that from porcine S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE). The phylogenetic analysis revealed that NAPlr of fish SDSD is more associated with those of mammalian SDSE and Streptococcus pyogenes rather than of other streptococci. Our findings warrant public attention to the possible implication of these virulence genes in dissemination of SDSD to different tissues of infected hosts and to get advantage to new niches. The SDSD adherence patterns were also studied to better understand their pathogenicity. The patterns of adherence of SDSD on two different cell lines showed a different pattern of adherence. Such difference gives an insight about the variance in host susceptibility to infection. PMID:26425363

  7. Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Treatment of Oral Pyogenic Granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Bugshan, Amr; Patel, Harsh; Garber, Karen; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granulomas (PGs) in the oral cavity present as an inflammatory hyperplasia usually caused by trauma, hormonal imbalance, chronic irritation, or as the response to a wide variety of drugs. PGs with atypical presentation and behavior may clinically mimic malignant tumors. Thus, histological examination is required to rule out cancer development. Lesions in the oral cavity have been described to be either an isolated entity or present in multiple forms and with multiple recurrences. Conservative surgical excision is the standard choice of treatment in almost every scenario. However, the severity of the lesions and the affected sites often challenge surgical treatment. In this report, we describe the clinical scenario of a recurrent PG, where surgical excision of the lesion was questioned. As an alternative, we describe a noninvasive approach with lesional steroid injections. PMID:26668570

  8. Development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after placement of dental implants: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem Motahir; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlight the development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after the placement of dental implants. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed Interface, for articles published between 2000 and 2014 in English, relating to the occurrence of pyogenic granuloma or hemangioma in relation to dental implants. Results: Our search identified only four case reports of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma related to dental implants as reported in the English literature. Conclusion: Placement of dental implants can cause development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma, indicating that placement of dental implants requires well-trained specialists with perfect skills in dental implantology. Furthermore, the critical selection of the appropriate case is of paramount importance to avoid the occurrence of such complications. PMID:25992330

  9. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  10. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Pyogenic Spondylitis Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Chung-Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data describing the clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB compared to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Methods We performed a retrospective review of medical records from patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis at four tertiary teaching hospitals over an 8-year period. Results A total of 344 patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis were evaluated. There were 62 patients (18.0%) with pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (n = 35, 10.2%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10, 2.9%). Pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB was more frequently associated with the female gender (64.5 vs. 35.5%, P <0.01), preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract infection (32.3 vs. 2.1%, P< 0.01), and intra-abdominal infection (12.9 vs. 0.4%, P< 0.01) compared to patients with GPC. Although pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB presented with severe sepsis more frequently (24.2 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.01), the mortality rate (6.0 vs. 5.2%) and the proportion of patients with residual disability (6.0 vs. 9.0%), defined as grade 3 or 4 (P = 0.78) 3 months after completion of treatment, were not significantly different compared to GPC patients. Conclusion GNB should be considered as the etiologic organism when infectious spondylitis develops in a patient with preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract and intra-abdominal infection. In addition, the mortality rate and clinical outcomes are not significantly different between pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and GPC. PMID:25978839

  11. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  12. Salivaricin D, a Novel Intrinsically Trypsin-Resistant Lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c Isolated from a Healthy Infant

    PubMed Central

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  13. Coenzyme preference of Streptococcus pyogenes ?1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase: evidence supporting NADPH as the physiological electron donor.

    PubMed

    Petrollino, Davide; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    The streptococcal enzyme that catalyzes the last step in proline biosynthesis was heterologously expressed and the recombinant protein was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized thoroughly. As for ?1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases from other sources, it was able to use either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor in vitro. However, with NADH the activity was markedly inhibited by physiological levels of NADP+. Results also strengthen the possibility that an unusual ordered substrate binding occurs, in which the dinucleotide binds last. PMID:21938400

  14. Bacteriophage enzymes for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infections: Stability and stabilization of the enzyme lysing Streptococcus pyogenes cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klyachko, N. L.; Dmitrieva, N. F.; Eshchina, A. S.; Ignatenko, O. V.; Filatova, L. Y.; Rainina, Evguenia I.; Kazarov, A. K.; Levashov, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant, phage associated lytic enzyme Ply C capable to lyse streptococci of groups A and C was stabilized in the variety of the micelles containing compositions to improve the stability of the enzyme for further application in medicine. It was shown that, in the micellar polyelectrolyte composition M16, the enzyme retained its activity for 2 months; while in a buffer solution under the same conditions ((pH 6.3, room temperature), it completely lost its activity in 2 days

  15. Facklamia Species and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Parvataneni, Kesav C; Iyer, Sugantha; Khatib, Riad; Saravolatz, Louis D

    2015-04-01

    Facklamia sp are Gram-positive cocci that are often mistaken for viridans streptococci, but they rarely cause invasive disease. In this report, we describe a case of mixed Facklamia sp and Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis in an immunocompetent host with sinusitis. This case demonstrates that Facklamia sp may be part of normal human flora but can be associated with invasive disease. PMID:26380331

  16. Facklamia Species and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Parvataneni, Kesav C.; Iyer, Sugantha; Khatib, Riad; Saravolatz, Louis D.

    2015-01-01

    Facklamia sp are Gram-positive cocci that are often mistaken for viridans streptococci, but they rarely cause invasive disease. In this report, we describe a case of mixed Facklamia sp and Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis in an immunocompetent host with sinusitis. This case demonstrates that Facklamia sp may be part of normal human flora but can be associated with invasive disease. PMID:26380331

  17. 77 FR 26014 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Streptococcus Pneumoniae AGENCY: Technology Transfer Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...), Technology Transfer Office, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), is contemplating the grant of a... Licensing and Marketing Specialist, Technology Transfer Office, Centers for Disease Control and...

  18. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. METHODS This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. RESULTS The mean operative time was 181.1 ± 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 ± 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. CONCLUSIONS Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This approach could be an alternative to the conventional open surgery. PMID:26340382

  19. Comparative genomic analyses of Streptococcus mutans provide insights into chromosomal shuffling and species-specific content

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus mutans is the major pathogen of dental caries, and it occasionally causes infective endocarditis. While the pathogenicity of this species is distinct from other human pathogenic streptococci, the species-specific evolution of the genus Streptococcus and its genomic diversity are poorly understood. Results We have sequenced the complete genome of S. mutans serotype c strain NN2025, and compared it with the genome of UA159. The NN2025 genome is composed of 2,013,587 bp, and the two strains show highly conserved core-genome. However, comparison of the two S. mutans strains showed a large genomic inversion across the replication axis producing an X-shaped symmetrical DNA dot plot. This phenomenon was also observed between other streptococcal species, indicating that streptococcal genetic rearrangements across the replication axis play an important role in Streptococcus genetic shuffling. We further confirmed the genomic diversity among 95 clinical isolates using long-PCR analysis. Genomic diversity in S. mutans appears to occur frequently between insertion sequence (IS) elements and transposons, and these diversity regions consist of restriction/modification systems, antimicrobial peptide synthesis systems, and transporters. S. mutans may preferentially reject the phage infection by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). In particular, the CRISPR-2 region, which is highly divergent between strains, in NN2025 has long repeated spacer sequences corresponding to the streptococcal phage genome. Conclusion These observations suggest that S. mutans strains evolve through chromosomal shuffling and that phage infection is not needed for gene acquisition. In contrast, S. pyogenes tolerates phage infection for acquisition of virulence determinants for niche adaptation. PMID:19656368

  20. Streptococcus milleri and surgical sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Tresadern, J. C.; Farrand, R. J.; Irving, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    For many years Viridans streptococci have been considered as commensal organisms in a wide variety of sites in the human body and only regarded as significant pathogens in subacute bacterial endocarditis. However, in recent years some reports have suggested that a particular species, Streptococcus milleri, can be a virulent pathogen, producing life-threatening sepsis particularly in surgical patients. We review here our experience of this organism in 23 general surgical patients over a 3 year period, and postulate that prophylactic use of antibiotic combinations such as gentamicin and metronidazole in patients undergoing colo-rectal surgery may be a factor promoting its emergence as a significant pathogen. Patients with established sepsis due to Streptococcus milleri should be considered for long-term antibiotic therapy as part of the treatment of their abscesses. PMID:6830135

  1. Replacing and Additive Horizontal Gene Transfer in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Chul; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Stanhope, Michael J.; Siepel, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The prominent role of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in the evolution of bacteria is now well documented, but few studies have differentiated between evolutionary events that predominantly cause genes in one lineage to be replaced by homologs from another lineage (“replacing HGT”) and events that result in the addition of substantial new genomic material (“additive HGT”). Here in, we make use of the distinct phylogenetic signatures of replacing and additive HGTs in a genome-wide study of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (SPY) and its close relatives S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDE) and S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDD). Using recently developed statistical models and computational methods, we find evidence for abundant gene flow of both kinds within each of the SPY and SDE clades and of reduced levels of exchange between SPY and SDD. In addition, our analysis strongly supports a pronounced asymmetry in SPY–SDE gene flow, favoring the SPY-to-SDE direction. This finding is of particular interest in light of the recent increase in virulence of pathogenic SDE. We find much stronger evidence for SPY–SDE gene flow among replacing than among additive transfers, suggesting a primary influence from homologous recombination between co-occurring SPY and SDE cells in human hosts. Putative virulence genes are correlated with transfer events, but this correlation is found to be driven by additive, not replacing, HGTs. The genes affected by additive HGTs are enriched for functions having to do with transposition, recombination, and DNA integration, consistent with previous findings, whereas replacing HGTs seen to influence a more diverse set of genes. Additive transfers are also found to be associated with evidence of positive selection. These findings shed new light on the manner in which HGT has shaped pathogenic bacterial genomes. PMID:22617954

  2. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  3. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100? of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100? of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02?mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3?mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04?mg for S. mutans and 0.6?mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  4. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100? of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100? of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02?mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3?mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04?mg for S. mutans and 0.6?mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  5. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Conditions of use . (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus ); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes ); blackleg...

  6. Nationwide surveillance of 6 otorhinolaryngological infectious diseases and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in the isolated pathogens in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kurono, Yuichi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Akira; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Iwata, Satoshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Hanaki, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    The Japanese Three Academic Societies Joint Antimicrobial Susceptibility Surveillance Committee has conducted a nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and rates of isolation in 6 otolaryngological diseases. The surveillance program was conducted in the otorhinolaryngological departments of 29 universities, and their 26 affiliated hospitals. Patients suffering from acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, acute nasal sinusitis, chronic nasal sinusitis, acute tonsillitis, and peritonsillar abscess between January 2011 and June 2012 were investigated. The collected swab or incision samples were cultivated for microbial identification, and the drug susceptibility of detected bacteria was measured at the Kitasato University Research Center for Infections and Antimicrobials. The surveillance focused on three gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus), three gram-negative bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella Catarrhalis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and three anaerobic bacteria (Peptostreptococcus spp., Prevotella spp., and Fusobacterium spp.). Bacterial susceptibility to 39 antimicrobial drugs was investigated. We compared bacterial isolation ratio of each disease in this surveillance from those of past 4 times surveillance which we performed formerly, and we also compared percentage of main drug resistant strains from those of past 4 times surveillance. The age composition between this time and former surveillances was not statistically significant by student-t test. We were unable to completely resolve the rise in resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, penicillin-intermediate resistant S. pneumoniae, beta-lactamase non-producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, beta-lactamase producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, and beta-lactamase producing amoxicillin clavulanic acid-resistant H. influenzae. We suggest promoting the proper usage of antimicrobial drugs in order to avoid the spread of these bacteria. PMID:26004175

  7. Human Streptococcus agalactiae strains in aquatic mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, Streptococcus agalactiae or group B streptococcus (GBS) is a frequent coloniser of the rectovaginal tract, a major cause of neonatal infectious disease and an emerging cause of disease in non-pregnant adults. In addition, Streptococcus agalactiae causes invasive disease in fish, compromising food security and posing a zoonotic hazard. We studied the molecular epidemiology of S. agalactiae in fish and other aquatic species to assess potential for pathogen transmission between aquatic species and humans. Methods Isolates from fish (n = 26), seals (n = 6), a dolphin and a frog were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and standardized 3-set genotyping, i.e. molecular serotyping and profiling of surface protein genes and mobile genetic elements. Results Four subpopulations of S. agalactiae were identified among aquatic isolates. Sequence type (ST) 283 serotype III-4 and its novel single locus variant ST491 were detected in fish from Southeast Asia and shared a 3-set genotype identical to that of an emerging ST283 clone associated with invasive disease of adult humans in Asia. The human pathogenic strain ST7 serotype Ia was also detected in fish from Asia. ST23 serotype Ia, a subpopulation that is normally associated with human carriage, was found in all grey seals, suggesting that human effluent may contribute to microbial pollution of surface water and exposure of sea mammals to human pathogens. The final subpopulation consisted of non-haemolytic ST260 and ST261 serotype Ib isolates, which belong to a fish-associated clonal complex that has never been reported from humans. Conclusions The apparent association of the four subpopulations of S. agalactiae with specific groups of host species suggests that some strains of aquatic S. agalactiae may present a zoonotic or anthroponotic hazard. Furthermore, it provides a rational framework for exploration of pathogenesis and host-associated genome content of S. agalactiae strains. PMID:23419028

  8. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-01-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine. PMID:591633

  9. A Gray-purple Mass on the Floor of the Mouth: Gigantic Mucogingival Pyogenic Granuloma in a Teenage Patient

    PubMed Central

    Brunet-LLobet, Lluís; Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Mrina, Ombeni; Nadal, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is defined as a benign neoplasm of vascular phenotype. This case describes the clinical and histopathological features of a gigantic mucogingival pyogenic granuloma, in a 14-year-old healthy black boy. This exophytic gray-purple mass, related to a toothpick injury, had more than twelve-month evolution on the anterior mandible involving lingual area besides to the floor of the mouth pressing the right salivary duct. Conservative excision was performed, followed by uncomplicated healing with no recurrence in two years. The histopathological examination reported a pyogenic granuloma (lobular capillary haemangioma). The authors provide a discussion of the presurgical differential diagnosis of the lesion. This case report presents an extremely uncommon location of a gigantic pyogenic granuloma, involving mucogingival complex and affecting the salivary outflow. This clinical manuscript may shed light on the controversies about possible mechanisms inducing oral pyogenic granuloma. PMID:24987485

  10. Obstruction of the external auditory meatus secondary to a giant pyogenic granuloma.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sooda; Loizou, Peter; Singh, Pranay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is a benign lesion of the skin and mucosa commonly known to occur in the head and neck region. The current literature has not yet identified its occurrence within the conchal bowl, a condition that leads to obstruction of the external auditory meatus. We present the case of a 28-year-old man who presented with a history of 3-4?weeks of a rapidly enlarging pedunculated lesion within the conchal bowl of the right ear and conductive hearing loss. Initial management included excision under local anaesthesia. The histological report concluded that it was a pyogenic granuloma. Later, reoccurrence was treated with a more definitive excision under general anaesthesia. During follow-up, the operative site was seen to have healed by secondary intention without reoccurrence. Although a pyogenic granuloma within the conchal bowl is benign, early therapeutic excision is important for histological diagnosis as much as to relieve consequential secondary obstruction and conductive hearing loss. PMID:26643183

  11. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in P. falciparum

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Feng

    Malaria is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality, and new strategies for treating and preventing this disease are needed. Here we show that the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 DNA endonuclease and single guide RNAs ...

  12. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes can prevent puerperal metritis during the first lactation of dairy cows, leading to improved reproduction. PMID:24638139

  13. Association between the 65-kilodalton heat shock protein, Streptococcus sanguis, and the corresponding antibodies in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Lavery, E; Smith, R; van der Zee, R; Mizushima, Y; Shinnick, T

    1991-01-01

    The etiology of Behcet's syndrome (BS) is unknown, but a number of streptococcal species have been implicated. A hypothesis was postulated that a shared antigen, such as a stress protein, might account for some of these findings. Indeed, a rabbit antiserum against a 65-kDa heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed a corresponding 65-kDa band with all six Streptococcus sanguis strains examined and S. pyogenes but not with S. salivarius. By applying a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies to the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein, an approximately 65-kDa antigen was identified in the uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis ST3 and H.83 and one with a different Mr was identified in KTH-1 and S. pyogenes. Monoclonal antibodies Y1.2, C1.1, II H9, and ML30, which reacted with these streptococci, recognize residues 11 to 27, 88 to 123, 107 to 122, and 276 to 297 of the 65-kDa heat shock protein, respectively, suggesting that these residues are conserved among some uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis and S. pyogenes. Immunoblot analyses of sera from patients with BS for immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies revealed bands of 65 to 70 kDa with the mycobacterial heat shock protein, S. sanguis strains, and S. pyogenes, although these reactivities were also found to a lesser extent in controls. A 65- to 70-kDa band was found more frequently with S. sanguis KTH-2 or KTH-3 and IgA in serum from patients with BS than with serum from controls (P less than 0.02). Antibodies in serum were then studied by a radioimmunoassay, and in patients with BS this revealed significantly raised IgA antibodies to the recombinant 65-kDa mycobacterial heat shock protein and to soluble protein extracts of S. sanguis ST3, KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3. Whereas significant anti-65-kDa heat shock protein and anti-S. sanguis ST3 antibodies were also found in sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and recurrent oral ulcers, the anti-S. sanguis KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3 antibodies were confined to BS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that some of the streptococcal antigens are associated with heat shock or stress proteins, which will need to be formally established by isolating heat shock proteins from streptococci. Images PMID:2004821

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Invades Erythrocytes and Utilizes Them to Evade Human Innate Immunity

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Streptococcus pneumoniae Invades Erythrocytes and Utilizes Them to Evade Human Innate Immunity pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium, is a major cause of invasive infection-related diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. In blood, erythrocytes are considered to be an important factor for bacterial growth

  15. Immunoproteomic analysis of the antibody response obtained in tilapia following immunization with a Streptococcus iniae vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is one of the most economically important Gram-positive pathogens in cultured fish species worldwide. Research has shown that vaccination is a tool that can be used in the prevention of streptococcal disease. The USDA-ARS patented S. iniae vaccine has been demonstrated to be ef...

  16. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 ?m). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 ?m. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 ?m below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 ?m. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis. PMID:25805186

  17. Quorum sensing in group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread phenomenon in the microbial world that has important implications in the coordination of population-wide responses in several bacterial pathogens. In Group A Streptococcus (GAS), many questions surrounding QS systems remain to be solved pertaining to their function and their contribution to the GAS lifestyle in the host. The QS systems of GAS described to date can be categorized into four groups: regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg), Sil, lantibiotic systems, and LuxS/AI-2. The Rgg family of proteins, a conserved group of transcription factors that modify their activity in response to signaling peptides, has been shown to regulate genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and competence. The sil locus, whose expression is regulated by the activity of signaling peptides and a putative two-component system (TCS), has been implicated on regulating genes involved with invasive disease in GAS isolates. Lantibiotic regulatory systems are involved in the production of bacteriocins and their autoregulation, and some of these genes have been shown to target both bacterial organisms as well as processes of survival inside the infected host. Finally AI-2 (dihydroxy pentanedione, DPD), synthesized by the LuxS enzyme in several bacteria including GAS, has been proposed to be a universal bacterial communication molecule. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of these four systems, the putative functions of their targets, and pose critical questions for future studies. PMID:25309879

  18. Promotion of intestinal carcinogenesis by Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Ellmerich, S; Schöller, M; Duranton, B; Gossé, F; Galluser, M; Klein, J P; Raul, F

    2000-04-01

    The involvement of Streptococcus bovis, an member of the human gut flora, in colorectal neoplastic diseases is an object of controversy. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of S.bovis and of antigens extracted from the bacterial cell wall on early preneoplastic changes in the intestinal tract. Adult rats received i. p. injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight) once per week for 2 weeks. Fifteen days (week 4) after the last injection of the carcinogen, the rats received, by gavage twice per week during 5 weeks, either S.bovis (10(10) bacteria) or wall-extracted antigens (100 microg). One week after the last gavage (week 10), we found that administration of either S.bovis or of antigens from this bacterium promoted the progression of preneoplastic lesions through the increased formation of hyperproliferative aberrant colonic crypts, enhanced the expression of proliferation markers and increased the production of IL-8 in the colonic mucosa. Our study suggests that S.bovis acts as a promoter of early preneoplastic lesions in the colon of rats. The fact that bacterial wall proteins are more potent inducers of neoplastic transformation than the intact bacteria may have important implications in colon cancer prevention. PMID:10753212

  19. Photodynamic inactivation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Carreira, Claudia Moura; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate specific effects of photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using erythrosine (ER) and Rose Bengal (RB) photosensitizers and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) on the viability of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis biofilms. Biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth to production of biofilms, inoculated with microbial suspension (10(6) cells/mL) and incubated for 48 h. After the formation of biofilms, the effects of the photosensitizers ER and RB at a concentration of 5 ?M for 5 min and blue LED (455 ± 20 nm) for 180 s, photosensitizers alone and conjugated were evaluated. Next, the disks were placed in tubes with sterile physiological solution (0.9 % sodium chloride) and sonicated for to disperse the biofilms. Tenfold serial dilutions were carried and aliquots seeded in brain heart infusion agar which were then incubated for 48 h. Then the numbers colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL; log10) were counted and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, P ? 0.05). Significant decreases in the viability of all microorganisms were observed for biofilms exposed to PDI mediated by both photosensitizers. The reductions with RB and ER were, 0.62 and 0.52 log10 CFU mL(-1) for S. mutans biofilms (p=0.001), and 0.95 and 0.88 log10 CFU mL(-1) for S. sanguinis biofilms (p=0.001), respectively. The results showed that biofilms formed in vitro by S. mutans and S. sanguinis, were sensitive to PDI using a blue LED associated with photosensitizers ER or RB, indicating its use in the control of caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:22847685

  20. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  1. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  2. An unexpected Streptococcus pneumoniae strain.

    PubMed

    Cenderello, Giovanni; Pontali, Emanuele; Torresin, Augusta; Milano, Giulia; Ansaldi, Filippo; Feasi, Marcello; Usiglio, David; Mori, Marco; Icardi, Giancarlo; Cassola, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    This clinical driven report describes the unexpected detection of a multidrug resistant (MDR) Streptococcus pneumoniae strain. Italy is usually considered a country characterized by a low prevalence of MDR S. pneumoniae. We describe the occurrence of bacterial meningitis sustained by a MDR S. pneumoniae strain in Italy. The first-line treatment was started with ceftriaxone and dexamethasone, but after the identification of such a resistant strain a second-line regimen was needed. The new regimen was chosen on both susceptibility and pharmacokinetic criteria. Linezolid and levofloxacin were started and a dramatic improvement was observed. A more sensitive anamnesis revealed some elements known to be associated to a MDR S. pneumoniae occurrence (immunesuppression, former antibiotic therapy). So this case should pinpoint our attention on risk factors of MDR for a careful choice of antibiotic therapy in serious pneumococcal infections. PMID:24090710

  3. Point-of-Care Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stephanie G; Beck, Sierra C

    2015-11-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented to the emergency department for evaluation of finger swelling after a dog bite. Point-of-care ultrasound was used to diagnose pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the digit after visualizing a fluid collection within the flexor tendon sheath. The patient underwent emergent incision and drainage of the digit with good outcome. PMID:26535504

  4. DrsG from Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis inhibits the antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Danielle; Cameron, Ainslie; Davies, Mark R; McNeilly, Celia; Hafner, Louise; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

    2014-06-01

    SIC and DRS are related proteins present in only 4 of the >200 Streptococcus pyogenes emm types. These proteins inhibit complement-mediated lysis and/or the activity of certain antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). A gene encoding a homologue of these proteins, herein called DrsG, has been identified in the related bacterium Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Here we show that geographically dispersed isolates representing 14 of 50 emm types examined possess variants of drsG. However, not all isolates within the drsG-positive emm types possess the gene. Sequence comparisons also revealed a high degree of conservation in different S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis emm types. To examine the biological activity of DrsG, recombinant versions of two major DrsG variants, DrsGS and DrsGL, were expressed and purified. Western blot analysis using antisera raised to these proteins demonstrated both variants to be expressed and secreted into culture supernatants. Unlike SIC, but similar to DRS, DrsG does not inhibit complement-mediated lysis. However, like both SIC and DRS, DrsG is a ligand of the cathelicidin LL-37 and is inhibitory to its bactericidal activity in in vitro assays. Conservation of prolines in the C-terminal region also suggests that these residues are important in the biology of this family of proteins. This is the first report demonstrating the activity of an AMP-inhibitory protein in S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and suggests that inhibition of AMP activity is the primary function of this family of proteins. The acquisition of the complement-inhibitory activity of SIC may reflect its continuing evolution. PMID:24664506

  5. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary infections caused by Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused...

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae proteomics: determinants of pathogenesis and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Bittaye, Mustapha; Cash, Phil

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen that is responsible for a variety of invasive diseases. The bacteria gain entry initially by establishing a carriage state in the nasopharynx from where they migrate to other sites in the body. The worldwide distribution of the bacteria and the severity of the diseases have led to a significant level of interest in the development of vaccines against the bacteria. Current vaccines, based on the bacterial polysaccharide, have a number of limitations including poor immunogenicity and limited effectiveness against all pneumococcal serotypes. There are many challenges in developing vaccines that will be effective against the diverse range of isolates and serotypes for this highly variable bacterial pathogen. This review considers how proteomic technologies have extended our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of nasopharyngeal colonization and disease development as well as the critical areas in developing protein-based vaccines. PMID:26524107

  11. THE MACROPHAGE CHEMOTACTIC ACTIVITY OF STREPTOCOCCUS AGALACTIAE AND STREPTOCOCCUS INIAE EXTRACELLULAR PRODUCTS (ECP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus iniae to attract macrophages of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was investigated. The extracellular products (ECP) from S. agalactiae and S. iniae were tested for macrophage chemotaxis using in vitro blind well chambers. The macrophage...

  12. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  13. Purification and immunochemical characterization of type e polysaccharide antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, S; Slade, H D

    1976-01-01

    The type-specific antigen of Streptococcus mutans strain MT703, serotype e, has been chromatographically purified and characterized. Two chromatographic fractions were obtained from saline extracts which reacted with both anti-MT703 whole-cell serum and Lancefield group E serum. The major fraction (eI) was identified as a polysaccharide composed of 37% glucose, 56% rhamnose, 5% protein, and 0.3% phosphorus, whereas the minor fraction (eII) contained 66% protein in addition to 10% glucose and 17% rhamnose. The immunological specificity of these antigens was found to be the same by immunodiffusion in agar gel. Another fraction with a negative charge (eIII) reacted with polyglycerophosphate antisera from Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus pyogenes. For comparison, the MT703 antigen in a hot trichloroacetic acid extract (eA) and the group E antigen from a saline extract of cells of strain K129 (EI) were similarly purified by anionic ion-exchange chromatography. Although the ratio of glucose and rhamnose in eA was 1:0.9 and in eI and eII approximately 1:1.5, reactions of identity were obtained in gel diffusion against specific anti-e serum. This difference in ratio is probably a result of the extraction procedures. Both the type e and group E antisera were reactive with both eI and EI antigens. The adsorption of group E antiserum with MT703 cells removed all E antibody, whereas type e-specific antibody remained after adsorption with K129 cells. These results suggest that eI antigen possesses both e and E specificities, whereas EI possesses E only. These findings were supported by the quantitative precipitin test and immunodiffusion and/or immunoelectrophoretic patterns in agar gel. Methyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside markedly inhibited the precipitin reaction in both type e and group E sera. However, a significantly stronger inhibition by cellobiose of type e serum than of group E serum indicates that a beta-linked glucose-glucose dimer is the predominant antigenic determinant of the e specificity. The presence of both e and E specificities on a single polysaccharide molecule was demonstrated by the use of purified e antigen released from a specific e-anti-e complex. This antigen reacted with a group E-specific serum as well as a type e-specific serum. An examination of five S. mutans type e strains showed the presence of group E specificity also, whereas the I, II, and IV serotypes of group E streptococci only possessed the group E specificity. Images PMID:59706

  14. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  15. Group B Streptococcus vaccine: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is cause of neonatal invasive diseases as well as of severe infections in the elderly and immune-compromised patients. Despite significant advances in the prevention and treatment of neonatal disease, sepsis and meningitis caused by GBS still represent a significant public health care concern globally and additional prevention and therapeutic strategies against infection are highly desirable. The introduction of national recommended guidelines in several countries to screen pregnant women for GBS carriage and the use of antibiotics during delivery significantly reduced disease occurring within the first hours of life (early-onset disease), but it has had no effect on the late-onset diseases occurring after the first week and is not feasible in most countries. Availability of an effective vaccine against GBS would provide an effective means of controlling GBS disease. This review provides an overview of the burden of invasive disease caused by GBS in infants and adults, and highlights the strategies for the development of an effective vaccine against GBS infections. PMID:26288735

  16. [Use of leukinferon for prophylaxis of pyogenic complications in victims with thoracic wounds].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Druzenko, O A; Markova, O A; Pogodina, A N; Khvatov, V B

    1999-01-01

    The results of treatment of 131 victims with penetrating wounds of the thorax complicated by profuse bleeding, are presented. 36 of them after surgery to prevent pyogenous complications received 5 injections of leukinferon (test group); 95 patients who were not treated by leukinferon made up control group comparable with the test group by sex, age and character of wounds. Comparative analysis of the results showed that treatment with leukinferon has resulted in decrease of postoperative complications. In the test group the number of complications made up 47.2%, in control group--61%. Al the same time in the former group there was only one pyogenous complication (2.9%), while in control group--10 (10.6%). After the course of leukinferon leucocytic formula of the blood has become normal, the number of patients with immunodeficiency and imbalance of proteins markers of the acuteness of inflammatory process has decreased. PMID:10459185

  17. Identification of Trueperella pyogenes Isolated from Bovine Mastitis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nagib, Samy; Rau, Jörg; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; Schlez, Karen; Zschöck, Michael; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Klein, Guenter; Abdulmawjood, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to identify Trueperella (T.) pyogenes isolated from bovine clinical mastitis. FT-IR spectroscopy was applied to 57 isolates obtained from 55 cows in a period from 2009 to 2012. Prior to FT-IR spectroscopy these isolates were identified by phenotypic and genotypic properties, also including the determination of seven potential virulence factor encoding genes. The FT-IR analysis revealed a reliable identification of all 57 isolates as T. pyogenes and a clear separation of this species from the other species of genus Trueperella and from species of genus Arcanobacterium and Actinomyces. The results showed that all 57 isolates were assigned to the correct species indicating that FT-IR spectroscopy could also be efficiently used for identification of this bacterial pathogen. PMID:25133407

  18. A molecular trigger for intercontinental epidemics of group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J; Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B; Vuopio, Jaana; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Porter, Adeline R; DeLeo, Frank R; Musser, James M

    2015-09-01

    The identification of the molecular events responsible for strain emergence, enhanced virulence, and epidemicity has been a long-pursued goal in infectious diseases research. A recent analysis of 3,615 genomes of serotype M1 group A Streptococcus strains (the so-called "flesh-eating" bacterium) identified a recombination event that coincides with the global M1 pandemic beginning in the early 1980s. Here, we have shown that the allelic variation that results from this recombination event, which replaces the chromosomal region encoding secreted NADase and streptolysin O, is the key driver of increased toxin production and enhanced infection severity of the M1 pandemic strains. Using isoallelic mutant strains, we found that 3 polymorphisms in this toxin gene region increase resistance to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, increase bacterial proliferation, and increase virulence in animal models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. Genome sequencing of an additional 1,125 streptococcal strains and virulence studies revealed that a highly similar recombinational replacement event underlies an ongoing intercontinental epidemic of serotype M89 group A Streptococcus infections. By identifying the molecular changes that enhance upper respiratory tract fitness, increased resistance to innate immunity, and increased tissue destruction, we describe a mechanism that underpins epidemic streptococcal infections, which have affected many millions of people. PMID:26258415

  19. Naturally Occurring Disseminated Group B Streptococcus Infections in Postnatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Katherine A; Hish, Gerald A; Selles, Lindsi A; Chowdhury, Mahboob A; Wiggins, Roger C; Dysko, Robert C; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae, GBS) is a gram-positive commensal and occasional opportunistic pathogen of the human vaginal, respiratory, and intestinal tracts that can cause sepsis, pneumonia, or meningitis in human neonates, infants, and immunosuppressed persons. We report here on a spontaneous outbreak of postnatal GBS-associated disease in rats. Ten of 26 (38.5%) 21- to 24-d-old rat pups died or were euthanized due to a moribund state in a colony of rats transgenic for the human diphtheria toxin receptor on a Munich–Wistar–Frömter genetic background. Four pups had intralesional coccoid bacteria in various organs without accompanying inflammation. GBS was isolated from the liver of 2 of these pups and from skin abscesses in 3 littermates. A connection with the transgene could not be established. A treatment protocol was evaluated in the remaining breeding female rats. GBS is a potentially clinically significant spontaneous infection in various populations of research rats, with some features that resemble late-onset postnatal GBS infection in human infants. PMID:23561938

  20. A molecular trigger for intercontinental epidemics of group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J.; Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B.; Vuopio, Jaana; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Porter, Adeline R.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular events responsible for strain emergence, enhanced virulence, and epidemicity has been a long-pursued goal in infectious diseases research. A recent analysis of 3,615 genomes of serotype M1 group A Streptococcus strains (the so-called “flesh-eating” bacterium) identified a recombination event that coincides with the global M1 pandemic beginning in the early 1980s. Here, we have shown that the allelic variation that results from this recombination event, which replaces the chromosomal region encoding secreted NADase and streptolysin O, is the key driver of increased toxin production and enhanced infection severity of the M1 pandemic strains. Using isoallelic mutant strains, we found that 3 polymorphisms in this toxin gene region increase resistance to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, increase bacterial proliferation, and increase virulence in animal models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. Genome sequencing of an additional 1,125 streptococcal strains and virulence studies revealed that a highly similar recombinational replacement event underlies an ongoing intercontinental epidemic of serotype M89 group A Streptococcus infections. By identifying the molecular changes that enhance upper respiratory tract fitness, increased resistance to innate immunity, and increased tissue destruction, we describe a mechanism that underpins epidemic streptococcal infections, which have affected many millions of people. PMID:26258415

  1. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Galhotra, Ritu Dhawan; Jain, Tanica; Sandhu, Parambir; Galhotra, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of spinal infections and specifically its accuracy in differentiating tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Materials and Methods: Totally, 50 patients referred for MRI scans with the clinical diagnosis of spinal infections were included in our study. The patients were classified as tubercular (TS), pyogenic (PS), and indeterminate spondylodiscitis on the basis of imaging findings and were correlated with the final diagnosis made by histopathology/cytology/culture/biochemistry or with successful therapeutic outcome. Imaging findings were subsequently analyzed for differentiating tubercular and pyogenic spondylodiscitis using the Chi-square test. Results: The most common pattern of spinal infection was spondylodiscitis (78% incidence rate) with epidural extension (86%) and cord compression (64%) being most common complications observed. Imaging (postcontrast study) and final diagnosis correlated in 93.7% tubercular (sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 90%) and 75% pyogenic (sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 83.3%) spondylodiscitis. The patients with tubercular spondylitis had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher incidence of following MRI findings: A well-defined paraspinal abnormal signal (80% in TS vs. 40% in PS), a thin and smooth abscess wall (84.2% in TS vs. 10% in PS), presence of intraosseous abscess (35% in TS vs. 0% in PS), focal and heterogenous enhancement of the vertebral body (75% in TS vs. 20% in PS), vertebral destruction more than or equal to grade 3 (71.8% in TS vs. 0% in PS), loss of cortical definition (75% in TS vs. 20% in PS), and spinal deformity (50% in TS vs. 5% in PS). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced images improve the sensitivity and specificity of detection and differentiation of tubercular and PS. PMID:26283836

  2. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  3. Evaluation of PCR Methods for Rapid Identification and Differentiation of Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus parauberis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A. A.; Khan, I. U.; Abdulmawjood, A.; Lämmler, C.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus parauberis reference strains and isolates obtained from routine diagnostics were investigated by PCR with oligonucleotide primers designed according to species-specific parts of the 16S rRNA gene, the 23S rRNA gene, and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of both species. All three primer pairs allowed an identification of 67 isolates as S. uberis and 4 isolates as S. parauberis. PMID:11283100

  4. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8?% and 93.1?% similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase ? subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7?% similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0?% and 82.9?% similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5?% similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T)?=?JCM 19287(T)?=?DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T)?=?JCM 19288(T)?=?DSM 27513(T)) are proposed. PMID:24994777

  5. STREPTOCOCCUS: A WORLDWIDE FISH HEALTH PROBLEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are important emergent pathogens that affect many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, these Gram-positive bacteria cause significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. ...

  6. Pathogenicity of Streptococcus ictaluri to Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The infectivity of a Streptococcus ictaluri isolate for fry (0.5 g), fingerling (15 g), and juvenile (55 g) channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was determined by bath immersion and injection infectivity experiments. Channel catfish exposed by immersion were exposed to baths containing 1012, 1011,...

  7. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  8. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping methods in regard of the expected specificity. In order to accommodate the genetic variability of the pneumococci cps loci, the database of cps-RFLP patterns will be progressively expanded to include new variant in vitro patterns. The cps-RFLP method with endonuclease XhoII coupled with MST for computer-assisted interpretation of results may represent a relevant contribution to the real time detection of changes in regional pneumococci population diversity in response to mass immunization programs. PMID:26041622

  9. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the surveillance committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010: General view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kadota, Junichi; Aoki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Oguri, Toyoko; Sato, Junko; Ogasawara, Kazuhiko; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Akira; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Watari, Tomohisa; Toyoshima, Eri; Takeuchi, Kenichi; Shiokoshi, Mayumi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Miki, Makoto; Kumagai, Toshio; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Nishiya, Hajime; Kawakami, Sayoko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takasaki, Jin; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Konosaki, Hisami; Aoki, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Shoji, Michi; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Koichiro; Kawana, Akihiko; Saionji, Katsu; Fujikura, Yuji; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kudo, Makoto; Sato, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Tsukada, Hiroki; Imai, Yumiko; Tsukada, Ayami; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Honma, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Toshinobu; Ban, Nobuyoshi; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Sawamura, Haruki; Miyara, Takayuki; Toda, Hirofumi; Sato, Kaori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Mitsuno, Noriko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Sano, Reiko; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Asari, Seishi; Nishi, Isao; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Koguchi, Yutaka; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichirou; Kuwabara, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Masui, Kayoko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Aoki, Yosuke; Fukuoka, Mami; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Suga, Moritaka; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Honda, Junichi; Fujita, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    The nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from patients in Japan, was conducted by Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases and Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010. The isolates were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections during the period from January and April 2010 by three societies. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institutes using maximum 45 antibacterial agents. Susceptibility testing was evaluable with 954 strains (206 Staphylococcus aureus, 189 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4 Streptococcus pyogenes, 182 Haemophilus influenzae, 74 Moraxella catarrhalis, 139 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 160 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Ratio of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was as high as 50.5%, and those of penicillin-intermediate and -resistant S. pneumoniae were 1.1% and 0.0%, respectively. Among H. influenzae, 17.6% of them were found to be ?-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediately resistant, 33.5% to be ?-lactamase-non-producing ABPC-resistant and 11.0% to be ?-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant strains. Extended spectrum ?-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa with metallo ?-lactamase were 2.9% and 0.6%, respectively. Continuous national surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of respiratory pathogens is crucial in order to monitor changing patterns of susceptibility and to be able to update treatment recommendations on a regular basis. PMID:25817352

  10. A Maternal Vaccine against Group B Streptococcus: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vincent L.; Avci, Fikri Y.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates. Though there have been tremendous advances in prevention of invasive neonatal GBS disease through prophylactic antibiotic treatment of pregnant women, the incidence of neonatal disease has not changed significantly over the past several years. Vaccination of pregnant women is an important strategy that has the potential to improve further on existing protocols. In this review, we explore the history of the design of maternal GBS vaccines. We also discuss how recent applications of genomics and immunology to vaccine design promise to further enhance our ability to develop more effective vaccines against this important disease. PMID:23973342

  11. Pneumolysin Localizes to the Cell Wall of Streptococcus pneumoniae?

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative agent of multiple diseases, including otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Pneumolysin (Ply), a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolytic pore-forming toxins, is produced by virtually all clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, and strains in which the Ply gene has been deleted are severely attenuated in mouse models of infection. In contrast to all other members of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin family, Ply lacks a signal peptide for export. Instead, Ply has been hypothesized to be released upon autolysis or, alternatively, via a nonautolytic mechanism that remains ill defined. We determined by use of cell fractionation and Western blotting that, during in vitro growth, exported Ply is localized primarily to the cell wall compartment in 18 different serotypes in the absence of detectable cell lysis. Hemolytic assays revealed that this cell wall-localized Ply is active. Additionally, cell wall-localized Ply is accessible to extracellular protease and is detergent releasable. PMID:19168620

  12. Streptococcus gallolyticus: a single bacteria, two different conditions.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cristiano Silva; Machado, Catarina; Almeida, André; Moura, Rita Barata

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 48-year-old woman presenting with fever, joint pain and migratory skin lesions. She had no other symptoms or medical history. After an extensive and inconclusive work up, she was admitted to the hospital for further study. This patient was ultimately found to have Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp gallolyticus bacteraemia. This finding led to the diagnosis of mitral valve infective endocarditis related to an underlying rectum adenocarcinoma. This article points out diagnostic difficulties related to an unusual presentation of the underlying disease. Furthermore, the authors reinforce the need of keeping a high level of suspicion and a systematic approach in every case of fever of unknown origin. This case highlights the importance of performing a colonoscopy in the event of S. gallolyticus subsp gallolyticus bacteraemia, as it may provide an opportunity for detecting colonic lesions at an earlier stage. PMID:26135668

  13. Fatal Streptococcus canis infections in intensively housed shelter cats.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, P A; Bannasch, M J; Bachmann, R; Byrne, B A; Hurley, K F

    2007-03-01

    Three independent, fatal outbreaks of Streptococcus canis infection occurred in a 2-year period in shelter cats. The outbreaks occurred in Northern California (Yolo County), Southern California (Kern County), and North Carolina (Guilford County). An estimation of the affected population is >150 cats among 3 affected shelters, with a mortality rate of up to 30%. Among 20 cats submitted for necropsy there were 2 distinct pathologic presentations. The first (shelters 1 and 2) was skin ulceration and chronic respiratory infection that progressed, in some cats, to necrotizing sinusitis and meningitis. The second (shelter 3) was rapid progression from necrotizing fasciitis with skin ulceration to toxic shock-like syndrome, sepsis, and death. S canis was the sole pathogen identified in most cases. Whether hypervirulent S canis strains exist is unknown; there is little understanding of how these bacteria cause invasive disease in cats. PMID:17317801

  14. Aromatic Esters of Bicyclic Amines as Antimicrobials against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Maestro, Beatriz; García-Fernández, Esther; de Waal, Bas; Meijer, E W; García, Pedro; Sanz, Jesús M

    2015-11-01

    A double approach was followed in the search of novel inhibitors of the surface choline-binding proteins (CBPs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) with antimicrobial properties. First, a library of 49 rationally-designed esters of alkyl amines was screened for their specific binding to CBPs. The best binders, being esters of bicyclic amines (EBAs), were then tested for their in?vitro effect on pneumococcal growth and morphology. Second, the efficiency of EBA-induced CBP inhibition was enhanced about 45?000-fold by multivalency effects upon synthesizing a poly(propylene imine) dendrimer containing eight copies of an atropine derivative. Both approaches led to compounds that arrest bacterial growth, dramatically decrease cell viability, and exhibit a protection effect in animal disease models, demonstrating that the pneumococcal CBPs are adequate targets for the discovery of novel antimicrobials that overcome the currently increasing antimicrobial resistance issues. PMID:26377931

  15. The group A Streptococcus small regulatory RNA FasX enhances streptokinase activity by increasing the stability of the ska mRNA transcript

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Treviño, Jeanette; Liu, Zhuyun; Perez, Nataly; Sumby, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Small RNA molecules play key regulatory roles in many bacterial species. However, little mechanistic data exists for the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we analyzed the relationship between a putative GAS sRNA and production of the secreted virulence factor streptokinase (SKA). SKA promotes GAS dissemination by activating conversion of host plasminogen into the fibrin-degrading protease plasmin. Homologues of the putative sRNA-encoding gene fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding/hemolytic-activity/streptokinase-regulator-X (fasX) were identified in four different pyogenic streptococcal species. However, despite 79% fasX nucleotide identity, a fasX allele from the animal pathogen Streptococcus zooepidemicus failed to complement a GAS fasX mutant. Using a series of precisely-constructed fasX alleles we discovered that FasX is a bona-fide sRNA that post-transcriptionally regulates SKA production in GAS. By base-pairing to the 5’ end of ska mRNA, FasX enhances ska transcript stability, resulting in a ~10-fold increase in SKA activity. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms used by sRNAs to activate target mRNAs, and enhances our understanding of the regulation of a key GAS virulence factor. PMID:21143309

  16. Sialic acid-dependent interactions between influenza viruses and Streptococcus suis affect the infection of porcine tracheal cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nai-Huei; Meng, Fandan; Seitz, Maren; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Herrler, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial co-infections are a major complication in influenza-virus-induced disease in both humans and animals. Either of the pathogens may induce a host response that affects the infection by the other pathogen. A unique feature in the co-infection by swine influenza viruses (SIV) and Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is the direct interaction between the two pathogens. It is mediated by the haemagglutinin of SIV that recognizes the ?2,6-linked sialic acid present in the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus suis. In the present study, this interaction was demonstrated for SIV of both H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes as well as for human influenza viruses that recognize ?2,6-linked sialic acid. Binding of SIV to Streptococcus suis resulted in co-sedimentation of virus with bacteria during low-speed centrifugation. Viruses bound to bacteria retained infectivity but induced only tiny plaques compared with control virus. Infection of porcine tracheal cells by SIV facilitated adherence of Streptococcus suis, which was evident by co-staining of bacterial and viral antigen. Sialic-acid-dependent binding of Streptococcus suis was already detectable after incubation for 30?min. By contrast, bacterial co-infection had a negative effect on the replication of SIV as indicated by lower virus titres in the supernatant and a delay in the kinetics of virus release. PMID:26297001

  17. Selective adsorption of heterophile polyglycerophosphate antigen from antigen extracts of Streptococcus mutans and other gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, S; Tai, S; Slade, H D

    1976-01-01

    Hot saline extracts of Streptococcus mutans have been shown to contain antigenic substances which occasionally react nonspecifically with some antisera against whole cells of various serological groups and types of streptococci. Chromatography of the extract of S. mutans strain MT703 (serotype e) on a diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-25 column gave two principal antigens. One antigen was eluted without adsorption to the resin and was identified as the serotype-specific polysaccharide. The other antigen, which contained a large quantity of phosphorus, was absorbed to and released from the resin by gradient elution. It was reactive against the antisera specific for polyglycerophosphate (PGP) from group A Streptococcus pyogenes and/or S. mutans strain Ingbritt (type c). The PGP antigen was further purified by gel filtration with Sephadex G-75. Two peaks, PGP-1, and PGP-2, were obtained. Each possessed the same antigenic specificity to anti-PGP serum as shown by immunodiffusion. Chemical analyses revealed that the molar ratio of phosphorus to glycerol in both was about 1:1, although the protein content between the two was significantly different. PGP antigen was found to be widely distributed in hot saline extracts from various gram-positive bacteria, with a few exceptions. However, all gram-negative bacteria examined were free of PGP. The PGP in the hot saline extracts of various gram-positive bacteria possessed an essentially identical antigenic specificity. The addition of diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-25 resin to hot saline extracts successfully removed the cross-reacting PGP antigen. After adsorption of the extract from S. mutans, the supernatant contained only type-specific polysaccharide antigen, except type b, in which both type b-specific polysaccharide and PGP antigens were absorbed with the resin. This simple procedure should be useful for the removal of the PGP-type teichoic acid from antigen extracts of bacteria that contain uncharged polysaccharides. Images PMID:825468

  18. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs...Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs...Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs...Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs...Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720 Section 866.3720 Food and Drugs...Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus...

  3. Fish Vaccine Development and Use to Prevent Streptococcal Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important pathogen of tilapia, hybrid striped bass and trout raised in intensive aquaculture is Streptococcus sp., a cause of severe economic losses in the fish farming industry. Infected fish experience severe to moderate mortality due to Streptococcus iniae and/or S. agalactiae. The diseased ...

  4. Efficacy of canine influenza virus (H3N8) vaccine to decrease severity of clinical disease after co-challenge with canine influenza virus and Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since first emerging into the North American canine population in 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) subtype H3N8 has shown horizontal transmission among dogs, with a high level of adaptation to this species. Severity of disease is variable, and co-infection by other respiratory pathogens is an impo...

  5. A Case of Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis Caused by Campylobacter fetus for Which Early Diagnosis by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Was Difficult

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to report a rare case of pyogenic spondylodiscitis caused by Campylobacter fetus. A 37-year-old male presented with fever and low back pain. By lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no abnormal finding was observed at the first presentation. However, low back pain was aggravated, and fever did not improve. Thus, lumbar MRI was repeated on the 26 day after the onset of symptoms, showing abnormal signals at vertebrae and disc spaces, and pyogenic spondylitis was diagnosed. The possibility of pyogenic spondylodiscitis should be taken into account if a patient presents with low back pain and fever, and areas of low signal intensity on a T1-weighted MRI should be carefully examined. When initial MRI does not reveal abnormal findings, repeated MRI after one or two weeks or, more favorably, immediate gadolinium enhancement MRI, are important for patients who have persistent low back pain and fever. PMID:23275811

  6. Bilateral Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Debridement and Lavage for Lumbar Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chen; Tseng, Tzu-Ming; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2015-10-01

    Common management approaches for spinal infections include conservative administration of antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment has been reported and is gaining widespread attention because of its simplicity and effectiveness. This study retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of bilateral portal percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage with dilute povidone-iodine solution in the treatment of patients with lumbar pyogenic spondylitis. From January 2007 to December 2011, a total of 22 patients diagnosed with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylitis underwent bilateral portal percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage with dilute povidone-iodine solution at the authors' institution. Clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination, visual analog scale pain score, modified MacNab criteria functional score, regular serologic testing, and imaging studies to determine whether percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage treatment was successful or if surgical intervention was required. Causative bacteria were identified in 19 (86.4%) of 22 biopsy specimens. Eighteen patients had satisfactory relief of back pain and uneventful recovery after this treatment. The success rate was 81.8% (18 of 22). Both visual analog scale and modified MacNab criteria scores improved significantly in successfully treated patients. No major surgical complications were noted, except for 3 patients who had residual or subsequent paresthesia in the affected lumbar segment. Percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage is a minimally invasive procedure that can yield a higher bacterial diagnosis, relieve back pain, and help to eradicate lumbar pyogenic spondylitis. It is an effective alternative treatment for patients with spinal infection before extensive open surgery. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(10):e856-e863.]. PMID:26488778

  7. Bleeding Small Intestine Pyogenic Granuloma on 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Iravani, Amir; Law, Andrew; Millward, Michael; Warner, Michael; Sparrow, Susan

    2015-11-01

    A 53-year-old man with metastatic melanoma, in remission, presented with an 8-week history of melena and anemia. Initial investigations including upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, and Tc-labeled red blood cell scan did not reveal a source of bleeding. Given the concern over melanoma recurrence, F-FDG PET/CT was performed that demonstrated a focus of intense uptake in the small bowel. Uncomplicated surgical resection of the segment of jejunum containing the lesion was performed, after which the patient reported no further gastrointestinal bleeding. Histopathological assessment of the lesion was consistent with pyogenic granuloma. PMID:26252336

  8. Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis complicating abdominal penetrating injury: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis is a rare condition usually associated with endocarditis or spinal surgery. However, it may also occur following abdominal penetrating trauma with associated gastrointestinal perforation. Diagnosis might be challenging and appropriate treatment is essential to ensure a positive outcome. In trans-abdominal trauma, 48 hours of broad-spectrum antibiotics is generally recommended for prophylaxis of secondary infections. A case report of vertebral osteomyelitis complicating trans-colonic injury to the retroperitoneum is presented and clinical management is discussed in the light of literature review. PMID:24373134

  9. Pediatric feline upper respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2014-03-01

    Infectious feline upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) continues to be a widespread and important cause of morbidity and mortality in kittens. Multiple pathogens can contribute to URTD in kittens, and coinfections are common in overcrowded environments and contribute to increased disease severity. Worldwide, the most prevalent pathogens are feline herpesvirus-1 and feline calicivirus. Primary bacterial causes of URTD in cats include Bordetella bronchiseptica, Chlamydia felis, and Mycoplasma species. Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus occasionally play a role as primary pathogens in shelter situations and catteries. This article reviews the major causes of disease in kittens, and provides an update on treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:24580994

  10. Transformation and fusion of Streptococcus faecalis protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M D

    1985-01-01

    Nonconjugative plasmids were transferred by protoplast fusion among Streptococcus faecalis strains and from Streptococcus sanguis to S. faecalis. S. faecalis protoplasts were also transformed with several different plasmids, including the Tn917 delivery vehicle pTV1. Transformation was reproducible, but low in frequency (10(-6) transformants per viable protoplast). A new shuttle vector (pAM610), able to replicate in Escherichia coli and S. faecalis, was constructed and transformed into S. faecalis protoplasts. pAM610 was mobilized by the conjugative plasmid pAM beta 1 in matings among S. faecalis strains and from S. sanguis to S. faecalis. Chimeric derivatives of pAM610 were also transformed into S. faecalis. Images PMID:3920209

  11. FATAL CASE OF STREPTOCOCCUS SUIS INFECTION IN A YOUNG WILD BOAR (SUS SCROFA) FROM SOUTHWESTERN SPAIN.

    PubMed

    Risco, David; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M; García-Jiménez, Waldo L; Gonçalves, Pilar; Martínez, Remigio; García, Alfredo; Rosales, Rubén; Gómez, Luis; de Mendoza, Javier Hermoso

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus suis is a recognized pathogen that may cause important diseases in pigs and humans. This microorganism has been repeatedly isolated from wild boar (Sus scrofa). However, its health implications for this wild species are still unknown. This article reports a detailed description of a fatal case of septicemia by S. suis affecting a young wild boar. The affected animal, about 15 days old, was found near death and exhibiting neurologic signs at a wild boar estate in southwestern Spain. Postmortem examination showed generalized congestion, brain hemorrhages and lobular pneumonia. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated the presence of meningitis and encephalitis with marked congestion and suppurative bronchopneumonia. Streptococcus suis serotype 2 isolates exhibiting important virulence factors (extracellular factor, muramidase-released protein, and suylisin) were isolated from the affected animal. This study confirms the presence of potentially virulent and zoonotic strains of S. suis in wild boar from Spain. PMID:26056897

  12. Streptococcus agalactiae clones infecting humans were selected and fixed through the extensive use of tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Da Cunha, Violette; Davies, Mark R; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle; Margarit, Immaculada; Spinali, Sebastien; Perkins, Tim; Lechat, Pierre; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Ma, Laurence; Romi, Benedetta; Tichit, Magali; Lopez-Sanchez, Maria-José; Descorps-Declere, Stéphane; Souche, Erika; Buchrieser, Carmen; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Moszer, Ivan; Clermont, Dominique; Maione, Domenico; Bouchier, Christiane; McMillan, David J; Parkhill, Julian; Telford, John L; Dougan, Gordan; Walker, Mark J; Holden, Matthew T G; Poyart, Claire; Glaser, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a commensal of the digestive and genitourinary tracts of humans that emerged as the leading cause of bacterial neonatal infections in Europe and North America during the 1960s. Due to the lack of epidemiological and genomic data, the reasons for this emergence are unknown. Here we show by comparative genome analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of 229 isolates that the rise of human GBS infections corresponds to the selection and worldwide dissemination of only a few clones. The parallel expansion of the clones is preceded by the insertion of integrative and conjugative elements conferring tetracycline resistance (TcR). Thus, we propose that the use of tetracycline from 1948 onwards led in humans to the complete replacement of a diverse GBS population by only few TcR clones particularly well adapted to their host, causing the observed emergence of GBS diseases in neonates. PMID:25088811

  13. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J. H.; Mobegi, Fredrick M.; de Jonge, Marien I.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Meis, Jacques F.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Bentley, Stephen D.; Zomer, Aldert L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped 349 strains of S. pneumoniae isolated from IPD patients in Nijmegen between 2001 and 2011. Introduction of PCV7 in the Dutch National Immunization Program in 2006 preluded substantial alterations in the IPD population structure caused by serotype replacement. No evidence could be found for vaccine induced capsular switches. We observed that after a temporary bottleneck in gene diversity after the introduction of PCV7, the accessory gene pool re-expanded mainly by genes already circulating pre-PCV7. In the post-vaccine genomic population a number of genes changed frequency, certain genes became overrepresented in vaccine serotypes, while others shifted towards non-vaccine serotypes. Whether these dynamics in the invasive pneumococcal population have truly contributed to invasiveness and manifestations of disease remains to be further elucidated. We suggest the use of whole genome sequencing for surveillance of pneumococcal population dynamics that could give a prospect on the course of disease, facilitating effective prevention and management of IPD. PMID:26492862

  14. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L.; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 ?g mL?1). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them. PMID:24294257

  15. Antibacterial activity of clove, gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448

    PubMed Central

    Mirpour, Mirsasan; Gholizadeh Siahmazgi, Zohreh; Sharifi Kiasaraie, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antimicrobial compounds from herbal sources have good therapeutic potential. In this study, the antibacterial effects of clove and gall nut, methanolic and ethanolic extractions, were evaluated for their effect on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448, as both the two cause oral diseases. Method The clove and gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts were prepared and antibacterial activity was evaluated for S. mutans and S. salivarius in the base of inhibition zone diameter using agar diffusion method. In this part minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were assessed. Results These extracts showed effective antibacterial activity on bacteria. Antibacterial activity of Methanolic extract of clove was more than that of ethanolic extract, and ethanolic extracts of gall nut had antibacterial activity more than that of methanolic extracts. MIC and MBC results for clove methanolic extract were 1.5 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml for S. mutans and 6.25 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for clove ethanolic extracts were 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. MIC and MBC results for gall nut methanolic extract were 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. mutans and 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for gall nut ethanolic extracts were 3.1 mg/ml and 6.2 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. Discussion The results showed effective antibacterial activity using clove and gall nut methanolic extracts. If other properties such as tolerance of tissue can also be studied, these extracts can be used as a mouthwash. PMID:25853041

  16. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis cause pyogenic osteomyelitis in an intramedullary nail model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gahukamble, Abhay Deodas; McDowell, Andrew; Post, Virginia; Salavarrieta Varela, Julian; Rochford, Edward Thomas James; Richards, Robert Geoff; Patrick, Sheila; Moriarty, Thomas Fintan

    2014-05-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens implicated in prosthetic joint and fracture fixation device-related infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether P. acnes and the CoNS species Staphylococcus lugdunensis, isolated from an "aseptically failed" prosthetic hip joint and a united intramedullary nail-fixed tibial fracture, respectively, could cause osteomyelitis in an established implant-related osteomyelitis model in rabbits in the absence of wear debris from the implant material. The histological features of P. acnes infection in the in vivo rabbit model were consistent with localized pyogenic osteomyelitis, and a biofilm was present on all explanted intramedullary (IM) nails. The animals displayed no outward signs of infection, such as swelling, lameness, weight loss, or elevated white blood cell count. In contrast, infection with S. lugdunensis resulted in histological features consistent with both pyogenic osteomyelitis and septic arthritis, and all S. lugdunensis-infected animals displayed weight loss and an elevated white blood cell count despite biofilm detection in only two out of six rabbits. The differences in the histological and bacteriological profiles of the two species in this rabbit model of infection are reflective of their different clinical presentations: low-grade infection in the case of P. acnes and acute infection for S. lugdunensis. These results are especially important in light of the growing recognition of chronic P. acnes biofilm infections in prosthetic joint failure and nonunion of fracture fixations, which may be currently reported as "aseptic" failure. PMID:24599975

  17. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus lugdunensis Cause Pyogenic Osteomyelitis in an Intramedullary Nail Model in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gahukamble, Abhay Deodas; McDowell, Andrew; Post, Virginia; Salavarrieta Varela, Julian; Rochford, Edward Thomas James; Richards, Robert Geoff; Patrick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens implicated in prosthetic joint and fracture fixation device-related infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether P. acnes and the CoNS species Staphylococcus lugdunensis, isolated from an “aseptically failed” prosthetic hip joint and a united intramedullary nail-fixed tibial fracture, respectively, could cause osteomyelitis in an established implant-related osteomyelitis model in rabbits in the absence of wear debris from the implant material. The histological features of P. acnes infection in the in vivo rabbit model were consistent with localized pyogenic osteomyelitis, and a biofilm was present on all explanted intramedullary (IM) nails. The animals displayed no outward signs of infection, such as swelling, lameness, weight loss, or elevated white blood cell count. In contrast, infection with S. lugdunensis resulted in histological features consistent with both pyogenic osteomyelitis and septic arthritis, and all S. lugdunensis-infected animals displayed weight loss and an elevated white blood cell count despite biofilm detection in only two out of six rabbits. The differences in the histological and bacteriological profiles of the two species in this rabbit model of infection are reflective of their different clinical presentations: low-grade infection in the case of P. acnes and acute infection for S. lugdunensis. These results are especially important in light of the growing recognition of chronic P. acnes biofilm infections in prosthetic joint failure and nonunion of fracture fixations, which may be currently reported as “aseptic” failure. PMID:24599975

  18. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight and Comparative Genomic Analysis of M-18 Group A Streptococcus Strains Associated with an Acute Rheumatic Fever Outbreak in Northeast Italy in 2012 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Erika; Foschi, Claudio; Baggio, Enrico; Tamburini, Maria Vittoria; Creti, Roberta; Pascucci, Maria Grazia; Fagioni, Marco; Ambretti, Simone; Comandatore, Francesco; Landini, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a postsuppurative sequela caused by Streptococcus pyogenes infections affecting school-age children. We describe here the occurrence of an ARF outbreak that occurred in Bologna province, northeastern Italy, between November 2012 and May 2013. Molecular analysis revealed that ARF-related group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains belonged to the M-18 serotype, including subtypes emm18.29 and emm18.32. All M-18 GAS strains shared the same antigenic profile, including SpeA, SpeB, SpeC, SpeL, SpeM, and SmeZ. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that M-18 GAS strains grouped separately from other serotypes, suggesting a different S. pyogenes lineage. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequencing showed that emm18.29 and emm18.32 GAS strains clustered in two distinct groups, highlighting genetic variations between these subtypes. Comparative analysis revealed a similar genome architecture between emm18.29 and emm18.32 strains that differed from noninvasive emm18.0 strains. The major sources of differences between M-18 genomes were attributable to the prophage elements. Prophage regions contained several virulence factors that could have contributed to the pathogenic potential of emm18.29 and emm18.32 strains. Notably, phage ?SPBO.1 carried erythrogenic toxin A gene (speA1) in six ARF-related M-18 GAS strains but not in emm18.0 strains. In addition, a phage-encoded hyaluronidase gene (hylP.2) presented different variants among M-18 GAS strains by showing internal deletions located in the ?-helical and TS?H regions. In conclusion, our study yielded insights into the genome structure of M-18 GAS strains responsible for the ARF outbreak in Italy, thus expanding our knowledge of this serotype. PMID:25740772

  19. Structural Differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae Housekeeping and Pilus-Specific Sortases: SrtA and SrtC1

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.; Krishnan, V.; Rajashankar, K.R.; I-Hsiu, H.; Xin, M.; Ton-That, H.; Narayana, S.V.

    2011-10-21

    The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2) and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104). Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y) motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  20. Acquisition of the Sda1-Encoding Bacteriophage Does Not Enhance Virulence of the Serotype M1 Streptococcus pyogenes Strain SF370

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Acquisition of the Sda1-Encoding Bacteriophage Does Not Enhance Virulence of the Serotype M1 by horizontal acquisition of two unique bacteriophages, encoding the potent DNase Sda1/SdaD2 to the unique synergic effect of the M1T1 clone bacteriophage-specific virulence factor Sda1 acting in concert

  1. Interference of alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from tonsillar surface on beta-hemolytic streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes)--a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Grahn, E; Holm, S E; Ekedahl, C; Roos, K

    1983-07-01

    The interference between alpha-streptococcal strains obtained from patients with repeated tonsillitis and a collection of group A streptococcal strains were studied. For this purpose three in vitro methods were designed and compared. The results obtained by a simple plating technique suitable for screening purposes were found to correlate well with those using more laborious techniques. In a limited scale some of the alpha- and beta-streptococcal combinations were tested under in vivo conditions using a tissue cage model allowing repeated sampling. In most instances agreement between the results of the in vitro and in vivo methods was registered. Several alpha-strains having inhibitory capacity to the majority of a collection of group A streptococci belonging to different serotypes were found, but also alpha-strains with an inhibitory activity restricted to few group A isolates within a certain serotype. Also beta-streptococcal strains with growth inhibiting activity towards some alpha-strains were found. As the methods were chosen to eliminate many of the unspecific inhibitory factors and the beta-hemolytic test strains showed a pattern of inhibition that varied for each of the reference alpha-strains the activity is most likely attributed to bacteriocin-like substances. PMID:6372328

  2. 1116 | VOL.10 NO.11 | NOVEMBER2013 | nAture methods the cas9 protein from the Streptococcus pyogenes crisPr-cas

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    repeats (CRISPR)­CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems provide bacteria and archaea with acquired immunity by incorporating fragments of viral or plasmid DNA into CRISPR loci and using the transcribed crRNAs to guide the degradation of homologous sequences1,2. In type II CRISPR systems, a ternary complex of a Cas9 nuclease

  3. Rapid Inversion of the Prevalences of Macrolide Resistance Phenotypes Paralleled by a Diversification of T and emm Types among Streptococcus pyogenes in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Costa, C.; Ramirez, M.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2005-01-01

    In Portugal erythromycin resistance of 26.6% (n = 352) remained constant during 1998 to 2003, however in 1998 the MLSB phenotype dominated (85%), whereas in 2003 the M phenotype prevailed (77%). A decline in T12/emm22 MLSB isolates could partially explain the drop in this phenotype, but the rise of the M phenotype was not due to clonal expansion. PMID:15855540

  4. Kinetics of Coinfection with Influenza A Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    E-print Network

    Adler, Fred

    Kinetics of Coinfection with Influenza A Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Amber M. Smith1 between influenza and certain bacteria, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, but the precise processes. pneumoniae strains, type 2 D39 or type 3 A66.1. We determined that, following bacterial infection, viral

  5. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log?? 8.2-8.5 CFU mL?¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a ?-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant. PMID:22475940

  6. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Conditions of use . (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes , Staphylococcus aureus ); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes ); blackleg...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Conditions of use . (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes , Staphylococcus aureus ); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes ); blackleg...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Conditions of use . (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes , Staphylococcus aureus ); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes ); blackleg...

  9. 75 FR 54017 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G Procaine Suspension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...2) * * * (ii) * * * (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes); blackleg (Clostridium...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Conditions of use. (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes , Staphylococcus aureus ); upper respiratory infections such as rhinitis or pharyngitis (A. pyogenes ); blackleg...

  11. Streptococcus mutans Clonal Variation Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing?

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Alaluusua, Satu; Grönroos, Lisa; Vaara, Martti; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the major pathogen of dental caries, a biofilm-dependent infectious disease, and occasionally causes infective endocarditis. S. mutans strains have been classified into four serotypes (c, e, f, and k). However, little is known about the S. mutans population, including the clonal relationships among strains of S. mutans, in relation to the particular clones that cause systemic diseases. To address this issue, we have developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for S. mutans. Eight housekeeping gene fragments were sequenced from each of 102 S. mutans isolates collected from the four serotypes in Japan and Finland. Between 14 and 23 alleles per locus were identified, allowing us theoretically to distinguish more than 1.2 × 1010 sequence types. We identified 92 sequence types in these 102 isolates, indicating that S. mutans contains a diverse population. Whereas serotype c strains were widely distributed in the dendrogram, serotype e, f, and k strains were differentiated into clonal complexes. Therefore, we conclude that the ancestral strain of S. mutans was serotype c. No geographic specificity was identified. However, the distribution of the collagen-binding protein gene (cnm) and direct evidence of mother-to-child transmission were clearly evident. In conclusion, the superior discriminatory capacity of this MLST scheme for S. mutans may have important practical implications. PMID:17567784

  12. Group B Streptococcus pili mediate adherence to salivary glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Brittan, Jane L; Nobbs, Angela H

    2015-05-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis, and is responsible for a rising number of severe invasive infections in adults. For all disease manifestations, colonisation is a critical first step. GBS has frequently been isolated from the oropharynx of neonates and adults. However, little is understood about the mechanisms of GBS colonisation at this site. In this study it is shown that three GBS strains (COH1, NEM316, 515) have capacity to adhere to human salivary pellicle. Heterologous expression of GBS pilus island (PI) genes in Lactococcus lactis to form surface-expressed pili demonstrated that GBS PI-2a and PI-1 pili bound glycoprotein-340 (gp340), a component of salivary pellicle. By contrast, PI-2b pili did not interact with gp340. The variation was attributable to differences in capacities for backbone and ancillary protein subunits of each pilus to bind gp340. Furthermore, while GBS strains were aggregated by fluid-phase gp340, this mechanism was not mediated by pili, which displayed specificity for immobilised gp340. Thus pili may enable GBS to colonise the soft and hard tissues of the oropharynx, while evading an innate mucosal defence, with implications for risk of progression to severe diseases such as meningitis and sepsis. PMID:25576026

  13. [Serotype diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Maianski?, N A; Aliab'eva, N M; Lazareva, A V; Katosova, L K

    2014-01-01

    The pneumococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae) is a common bacterial pathogen responsible for various infections, especially in children below 5 years of age. The severity of pneumococcal infections varies from self-limiting mucosal infections, including acute otitis media, sinusitis, and noninvasive pneumonia, to life-threatening invasive disease like bacteremia and meningitis. A high incidence of pneumococcal infections is combined with a constantly growing antibiotic resistance of this pathogen. The growing resistance is thought to be associated with misuse of antibiotics and emerging of resistant clones that may spread throughout the entire population. Pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCV) contain an assortment of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides (from 7 to 13) that produce serotype-specific protective antibodies. Since early 2000's, the introduction of PCV into national immunization programs has been shown to substantially decrease the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal carriage associated with vaccine-type pneumococci in many countries. In 2014, PCV vaccination was included in the Russian national calendar of prophylactic vaccination. The present article reviews the current literature on serotype prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility, and PCV effect on the evolution of pneumococcus. PMID:25563003

  14. Genome of Streptococcus oralis strain Uo5.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Peter; Nuhn, Michael; Denapaite, Dalia; Brückner, Reinhold; Henrich, Bernhard; Maurer, Patrick; Rieger, Martin; Klages, Sven; Reinhard, Richard; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2011-06-01

    Streptococcus oralis, a commensal species of the human oral cavity, belongs to the Mitis group of streptococci, which includes one of the major human pathogens as well, S. pneumoniae. We report here the first complete genome sequence of this species. S. oralis Uo5, a high-level penicillin- and multiple-antibiotic-resistant isolate from Hungary, is competent for genetic transformation under laboratory conditions. Comparative and functional genomics of Uo5 will be important in understanding the evolution of pathogenesis among Mitis streptococci and their potential to engage in interspecies gene transfer. PMID:21460080

  15. Genome of Streptococcus oralis Strain Uo5?

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Peter; Nuhn, Michael; Denapaite, Dalia; Brückner, Reinhold; Henrich, Bernhard; Maurer, Patrick; Rieger, Martin; Klages, Sven; Reinhard, Richard; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis, a commensal species of the human oral cavity, belongs to the Mitis group of streptococci, which includes one of the major human pathogens as well, S. pneumoniae. We report here the first complete genome sequence of this species. S. oralis Uo5, a high-level penicillin- and multiple-antibiotic-resistant isolate from Hungary, is competent for genetic transformation under laboratory conditions. Comparative and functional genomics of Uo5 will be important in understanding the evolution of pathogenesis among Mitis streptococci and their potential to engage in interspecies gene transfer. PMID:21460080

  16. Detection of Cariogenic Streptococcus mutans in Extirpated Heart Valve and Atheromatous Plaque Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Inaba, Hiroaki; Nomura, Ryota; Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Takeda, Munehiro; Yoshioka, Hideo; Matsue, Hajime; Takahashi, Toshiki; Taniguchi, Kazuhiro; Amano, Atsuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of oral bacteria in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases has been the focus of attention in many studies, and several periodontal pathogens have been detected in diseased cardiovascular lesions, suggesting relationships between oral microorganisms and cardiovascular diseases. However, no information is available regarding the involvement of cariogenic pathogens such as Streptococcus mutans. The presence of oral streptococcal species and periodontitis-related bacteria in 35 heart valve and 27 atheromatous plaque clinical specimens, as well as 32 dental plaque specimens from the same subjects, was analyzed using a PCR method. Furthermore, broad-range PCR with DNA sequencing analysis was employed to identify the bacterial species in those samples. Streptococcus mutans was frequently detected in the heart valve (69%) and atheromatous plaque (74%) specimens, while other bacterial species, including those related to periodontitis, were detected with much lower frequencies. The bacterial composition in cardiovascular tissues was found to be markedly distinct from that in dental plaque, with only a limited number of species, including S. mutans, in the cardiovascular regions shown to have possibly originated from the oral cavity. Semiquantitative assay results revealed that S. mutans was detected in significant quantities in the heart valve (40%) and atheromatous plaque (48%) specimens, whereas the quantities of all other tested bacterial species, including several related to periodontitis, were negligible in the cardiovascular samples. These results indicate that S. mutans is a possible causative agent of cardiovascular disease. PMID:16954266

  17. A prospective series case study of pyogenic liver abscess: recent trands in etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Mangukiya, Dhaval O; Darshan, Jitendra R; Kanani, Vijay K; Gupta, Saurabh T

    2012-10-01

    Our study aims to review the literature on the management of pyogenic liver abscess, focusing on the choice of drainage. A case series of our experience with clinicopathological correlation is presented to highlight the indication and outcome of each modality of drainage. Intravenous antibiotic is the first line, and mainstay, of treatment. Drainage is necessary for large abscesses, equal to or larger than 5 cm in size, to facilitate resolution. While percutaneous drainage is appropriate as first-line surgical treatment in most cases, open surgical drainage is prudent in cases of rupture, multiloculation, associated biliary, or intra-abdominal pathology. Percutaneous drainage may help to optimize clinical condition prior to surgery. Nevertheless, in current good clinical practices, the choice of therapy needs to be individualized according to patient's clinical status and abscess factors. They are complementary in the management of liver abscesses. PMID:24082591

  18. The role of endoscopy in the management of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Omar; Man, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) is a clinical syndrome characterized by repeated episodes of suppurative cholangitis due to hepatolithiasis and extrahepatic stones in the biliary ducts. It is now recognized as a distinct syndrome with a different natural history and pathoetiology than spontaneously occurring liver abscesses. Most commonly seen in East Asian populations, this syndrome is growing increasingly common in Western Nations due to migration patterns. The exact pathogenesis of RPC remains elusive; although colonization of the biliary tract with particular enteric bacterial species, in combination with possible dietary factors, has been attributed as causative factors. Hepatobiliary surgery, in particular segmental hepatectomy, is often described as the definitive treatment of choice for RPC. The exact role of endoscopic intervention has been less clearly described in the literature. This review focuses on the management of RPC while highlighting situations in which endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be preferred over surgery as an initial or salvage therapeutic measure. PMID:26333855

  19. Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis in Asian immigrants: use of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cholangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Cello J.P.; Laing, F.C.; Jeffery, R.B. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Five cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) were studied by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and cholangiography. All patients were recent immigrants from the Orient or Indonesia and had had recurrent attacks of cholangitis for many years. The bile was infected by E. coli and the biliary ducts were dilated; in addition, extrahepatic bile-pigment calculi we represent in all 5 and intrahepatic calculi in 4. Abdominal ultrasound usually failed to demonstrate duct calculi and extrahepatic dilatation due to the soft, mud-like consistency of the stones. CT was successful in showing the calculi and the full extent of dilatation. The authors conclude that preoperative diagnosis of RPC is best achieved by awareness of the characteristic clinical presentation and the findings on abdominal CT. Preoperative cholangiography provides excellent detail, but poses the danger of biliary sepsis requiring antibiotics.

  20. Factors Influencing Culture Positivity in Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis Patients with Prior Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kang, Seung-Ji; Yoon, Doran; Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Moonsuk; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate factors influencing tissue culture positivity in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis exposed to antibiotics before diagnosis. Tissue culture was positive in 48.3% (28/58) of the patients, and the median antibiotic-free period was 1.5 days (range, 0.7 to 5.7 days). In a multivariate analysis, a higher C-reactive protein (CRP) level (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.29) and open surgical biopsy (aOR, 6.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 35.86) were associated with tissue culture positivity. PMID:25666156

  1. Streptococcus pluranimalium: A novel human pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Aryasinghe, Lasanthi; Sabbar, Saweera; Kazim, Yasmin; Awan, Liaqat Mahmood; Khan, Hammad Khan Nadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We present the first case of a subdural empyema caused by Streptococcus pluranimalium, in a healthy adolescent male as a possible complication of subclinical frontal sinusitis. Clinical features, diagnostic approach and management of subdural empyema are discussed. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 17-year-old male with a 2 day history of headache and nausea was referred to our Emergency Department (ED) as a case of possible meningitis. He was afebrile, lethargic and drowsy with significant neck stiffness on examination. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed a large frontotemporoparietal subdural fluid collection with significant midline shift. Subsequent contrast-enhanced CT established the presence of intracranial empyema; the patient underwent immediate burr-hole evacuation of the pus and received 7 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, recovering with no residual neurological deficit. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of subdural empyema as a complication of asymptomatic sinusitis in an immunocompetent patient with no history of fever or upper respiratory symptoms was unanticipated. Furthermore, the organism Streptococcus pluranimalium that was cultured from the pus has only been documented twice previously in medical literature to cause infection in humans, as it is primarily a pathogen responsible for infection in bovine and avian species. CONCLUSION Subdural empyema represents a neurosurgical emergency and if left untreated is invariably fatal. Rapid diagnosis, surgical intervention and intensive antibiotic therapy improve both morbidity and mortality. PMID:25437686

  2. Diverse virulent pneumophages infect Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Ouennane, Siham; Leprohon, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis has emerged as one of the leading causes of bacterial endocarditis and is related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic resistance has also increased among strains of S. mitis and S. pneumoniae. Phages are being reinvestigated as alternatives to antibiotics for managing infections. In this study, the two virulent phages Cp-1 (Podoviridae) and Dp-1 (Siphoviridae), previously isolated from S. pneumoniae, were found to also infect S. mitis. Microbiological assays showed that both pneumophages could not only replicate in S. mitis but also produced more visible plaques on this host. However, the burst size and phage adsorption data were lower in S. mitis as compared to S. pneumoniae. A comparison of the genomes of each phage grown on both hosts produced identical nucleotide sequences, confirming that the same phages infect both bacterial species. We also discovered that the genomic sequence of podophage Cp-1 of the Félix d'Hérelle collection is different than the previously reported sequence and thus renamed SOCP. PMID:25692983

  3. Diverse Virulent Pneumophages Infect Streptococcus mitis

    PubMed Central

    Ouennane, Siham; Leprohon, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis has emerged as one of the leading causes of bacterial endocarditis and is related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic resistance has also increased among strains of S. mitis and S. pneumoniae. Phages are being reinvestigated as alternatives to antibiotics for managing infections. In this study, the two virulent phages Cp-1 (Podoviridae) and Dp-1 (Siphoviridae), previously isolated from S. pneumoniae, were found to also infect S. mitis. Microbiological assays showed that both pneumophages could not only replicate in S. mitis but also produced more visible plaques on this host. However, the burst size and phage adsorption data were lower in S. mitis as compared to S. pneumoniae. A comparison of the genomes of each phage grown on both hosts produced identical nucleotide sequences, confirming that the same phages infect both bacterial species. We also discovered that the genomic sequence of podophage Cp-1 of the Félix d’Hérelle collection is different than the previously reported sequence and thus renamed SOCP. PMID:25692983

  4. Protective role of the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore against the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin of Trueperella pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Preta, Giulio; Lotti, Virginia; Cronin, James G.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of many Gram-positive bacteria depends on cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), which form pores in eukaryotic cell plasma membranes. Pyolysin (PLO) from Trueperella pyogenes provided a unique opportunity to explore cellular responses to CDCs because it does not require thiol activation. Sublytic concentrations of PLO stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK ERK and p38 in primary stromal cells, and induced autophagy as determined by protein light-chain 3B cleavage. Although, inhibitors of MAPK or autophagy did not affect PLO-induced cytolysis. However, 10 ?M 3-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid-(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)-hydrazide (Dynasore), a dynamin guanosine 5?-triphosphatase inhibitor, protected stromal cells against PLO-induced cytolysis as determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (85 ± 17% versus 50 ± 9% cell viability), measuring extracellular ATP, and kinetic assays. This was a generalized mechanism because Dynasore also protected HeLa cells against streptolysin O. Furthermore, the effect was reversible, with stromal cell sensitivity to PLO restored within 30 minutes of Dynasore removal. The protective effect of Dynasore was not conferred by dynamin inhibition, induction of ERK phosphorylation, or Dynasore binding to PLO. Rather, Dynasore reduced cellular cholesterol and disrupted plasma membrane lipid rafts, similar to positive control methyl-?-cyclodextrin. Dynasore is a tractable tool to explore the complexity of cholesterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells and to develop strategies to counter CDCs.—Preta, G., Lotti, V., Cronin, J. G., and Sheldon, I. M. Protective role of the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore against the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin of Trueperella pyogenes. PMID:25550455

  5. Long-Term Outcome of Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis: A Cohort Study of 260 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Kowalski, Todd J.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Enzler, Mark; Steckelberg, James M.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Nassr, Ahmad; Mandrekar, Jayawant M.; Berbari, Elie F.

    2014-01-01

    Background ?The long-term outcome of patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) has not been fully assessed. Methods ?We conducted a retrospective cohort study to describe the long-term outcome of PVO and to assess risk factors for treatment failure in patients evaluated at our institution between 1994 and 2002. Patients were observed until July 1, 2013. Results ?Two hundred sixty patients with PVO were included in this study. Twenty-seven percent (70) of patients developed their infection after an invasive spinal procedure. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 40% (103) of infections. Forty-nine percent (128) of patients underwent spinal surgery as part of their initial therapy. The median duration of parenteral antimicrobial therapy was 42 days (interquartile range, 38–53). The estimated 2-, 5-, and 10-year cumulative probability of treatment failure-free survival was 72%, 69%, and 69%, respectively. Seventy-five percent of patients who developed treatment failure did so within 4.7 months of diagnosis. Residual neurological defects and persistent back pain were seen in 16% and 32% of patients, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, longer duration of symptoms before diagnosis and having an infection with S. aureus were associated with increased risk of treatment failure. Conclusions ?Increasing duration of symptoms and infection with S. aureus were associated with treatment failure in patients with PVO. Most treatment failures occurred early after initiation of treatment. Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis is associated with a high 2-year failure rate. Persistent neurological deficits and back pain are common after therapy. PMID:25734175

  6. Endovascular aortic stent graft infection with Streptococcus equi: the first documented case.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jitesh; Winterbottom, Andrew; Cooke, Fiona; Lever, Andrew M L; Gaunt, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus equi is a common equine infectious disease, but transmission to man is rare and confined to those who commonly come into close contact with horses. Similarly, prosthetic stent graft infection is a rare complication of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. We describe the first reported case of aortic stent graft with S. equi occurring in a professional racehorse trainer. Clinical presentation, investigations, imaging and management of this case are described. In conclusion, clinicians should consider infection with rare organisms in patients with prosthetic implants who regularly come into contact with horses and other ruminants. PMID:21803839

  7. Xpert GBS Assay for Rapid Detection of Group B Streptococcus in Gastric Fluid Samples from Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Christelle; Bercot, Béatrice; Jacquier, Hervé; Raskine, Laurent; Barranger, Emmanuel; Mouchnino, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The Xpert GBS real-time PCR assay was applied to gastric fluid samples from 143 newborns, and it detected group B streptococcus (GBS) within 1 h for 16 (11.2%) cases, while microscopic examination detected only 2 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert GBS were 80% and 100%, respectively, with regard to 20 cases of GBS colonization or infection. Concordance of Xpert GBS results versus culture was 92.3%. This test detects in a timely manner newborns at risk for invasive GBS disease. PMID:24478506

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Pregnant Women in Gabon, Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Belard, Sabine; Toepfner, Nicole; Capan-Melser, Mesküre; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Zoleko-Manego, Rella; Groger, Mirjam; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Adegnika, Ayôla A.; González, Raquel; Kremsner, Peter G.; Menendez, Clara; Ramharter, Michael; Berner, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease due to Streptococcus agalactiae is life threatening and preventive strategies suitable for resource limited settings are urgently needed. Protective coverage of vaccine candidates based on capsular epitopes will relate to local epidemiology of S. agalactiae serotypes and successful management of critical infections depends on timely therapy with effective antibiotics. This is the first report on serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. agalactiae in pregnant women from a Central African region. Serotypes V, III, and Ib accounted for 88/109 (81%) serotypes and all isolates were susceptible to penicillin and clindamycin while 13% showed intermediate susceptibility to erythromycin. PMID:26603208

  9. Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Pregnant Women in Gabon, Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Belard, Sabine; Toepfner, Nicole; Capan-Melser, Mesküre; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Zoleko-Manego, Rella; Groger, Mirjam; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Agnandji, Selidji T; Adegnika, Ayôla A; González, Raquel; Kremsner, Peter G; Menendez, Clara; Ramharter, Michael; Berner, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease due to Streptococcus agalactiae is life threatening and preventive strategies suitable for resource limited settings are urgently needed. Protective coverage of vaccine candidates based on capsular epitopes will relate to local epidemiology of S. agalactiae serotypes and successful management of critical infections depends on timely therapy with effective antibiotics. This is the first report on serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of S. agalactiae in pregnant women from a Central African region. Serotypes V, III, and Ib accounted for 88/109 (81%) serotypes and all isolates were susceptible to penicillin and clindamycin while 13% showed intermediate susceptibility to erythromycin. PMID:26603208

  10. Oral immunization with recombinant Streptococcus lactis carrying the Streptococcus mutans surface protein antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, M; Okahashi, N; Takahashi, I; Kanamoto, T; Sugita-Konishi, Y; Aibara, K; Koga, T

    1990-01-01

    A recombinant Streptococcus lactis strain which carries the structural gene for a surface protein antigen (PAc) of 190,000 daltons from Streptococcus mutans serotype c was constructed for development of an oral vaccine against dental caries. The gene from S. mutans MT8148 joined to shuttle vector pSA3 was successfully transformed into S. lactis IL1403. A small amount of PAc was detected in the cell homogenate and cytoplasmic fraction of the recombinant S. lactis, but not in the culture supernatant of the recombinant, by Western immunoblotting and dot immunoblotting. The level of PAc-specific mRNA in the recombinant strain was lower than that in S. mutans MT8148. However, significant salivary immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G responses to PAc were induced in mice immunized orally with the recombinant S. lactis. Images PMID:2117575

  11. Autoinflammatory diseases in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Jonathan S; Dedeoglu, Fatma

    2013-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs) are characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic and organ-specific inflammation. Many of these diseases share fever as a common presenting feature. Physicians need to consider AIDs in children with recurrent, unexplained fevers, when infectious and malignant causes have been discarded. This article discusses the differential diagnosis of recurrent fever in children, with a focus on AIDs. It discusses pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis and the monogenic autoinflammatory diseases that cause recurrent fevers including familial Mediterranean fever, hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) D and periodic fever syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, deficiency of interleukin-36 receptor antagonist, Majeed syndrome, chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and increased temperature syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. In addition, the granulomatous disorders, pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne and Blau syndrome, will be discussed. PMID:23827250

  12. Reappraisal of the taxonomy of Streptococcus suis serotypes 20, 22 and 26: Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R; Maruyama, F; Ishida, S; Tohya, M; Sekizaki, T; Osawa, Ro

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the taxonomic position of serotypes 20, 22 and 26 of Streptococcus suis, biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on isolates (SUT-7, SUT-286(T), SUT-319, SUT-328 and SUT-380) reacted with specific antisera of serotypes 20, 22 or 26 from the saliva of healthy pigs as well as reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26. Comparative recN gene sequencing showed high genetic relatedness among our isolates, but marked differences from the type strain S. suis NCTC 10234(T), i.e. 74.8-75.7 % sequence similarity. The genomic relatedness between the isolates and other strains of species of the genus Streptococcus, including S. suis, was calculated using the average nucleotide identity values of whole genome sequences, which indicated that serotypes 20, 22 and 26 should be removed taxonomically from S. suis and treated as a novel genomic species. Comparative sequence analysis revealed 99.0-100 % sequence similarities for the 16S rRNA genes between the reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26, and our isolates. Isolate STU-286(T) had relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with S. suis NCTC 10234(T) (98.8 %). SUT-286(T) could be distinguished from S. suis and other closely related species of the genus Streptococcus using biochemical tests. Due to its phylogenetic and phenotypic similarities to S. suis we propose naming the novel species Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov., with SUT-286(T) (?= JCM 30273(T)?= DSM 29126(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25385995

  13. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H. S.; Campanella, Osvaldo H.; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases. PMID:25763359

  14. Recent advances in our understanding of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    A number of significant challenges remain with regard to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), which remains the most common bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Although this infection is documented to be extremely common in younger children and in older adults, the burden of pneumonia it causes is considerably underestimated, since the incidence statistics are derived largely from bacteremic infections, because they are easy to document, and yet the greater burden of pneumococcal pneumonias is non-invasive. It has been estimated that for every bacteremic pneumonia that is documented, three non-bacteremic infections occur. Management of these infections is potentially complicated by the increasing resistance of the isolates to the commonly used antibiotics. Furthermore, it is well recognized that despite advances in medical care, the mortality of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia has remained largely unchanged over the past 50 years and averages approximately 12%. Much recent research interest in the field of pneumococcal infections has focused on important virulence factors of the organism, on improved diagnostic and prognostication tools, on defining risk factors for death, on optimal treatment strategies involving both antibiotics and adjunctive therapies, and on disease prevention. It is hoped that through these endeavors the outlook of pneumococcal infections will be improved. PMID:25343039

  15. Natural transformation and genome evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Straume, Daniel; Stamsås, Gro Anita; Håvarstein, Leiv Sigve

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a frequent colonizer of the human nasopharynx that has the potential to cause severe infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis. Despite considerable efforts to reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, it continues to be a major public health problem. After the Second World War, antimicrobial therapy was introduced to fight pneumococcal infections, followed by the first effective vaccines more than half a century later. These clinical interventions generated a selection pressure that drove the evolution of vaccine-escape mutants and strains that were highly resistant against antibiotics. The remarkable ability of S. pneumoniae to acquire drug resistance and evade vaccine pressure is due to its recombination-mediated genetic plasticity. S. pneumoniae is competent for natural genetic transformation, a property that enables the pneumococcus to acquire new traits by taking up naked DNA from the environment and incorporating it into its genome through homologous recombination. In the present paper, we review current knowledge on pneumococcal transformation, and discuss how the pneumococcus uses this mechanism to adapt and survive under adverse and fluctuating conditions. PMID:25445643

  16. Molecular typing of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic variability among Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from fish was characterized using single-stranded conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) analysis of the intergenic spacer region (ISR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. A total of 49 S. agalactiae ...

  17. Introduction Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN) is a major human pathogen that

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    , sepsis and meningitis.1 Increasing preva- lence of acquired resistance to penicillin (PCN) and other Fasciitis Due to Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: Case Report and Review of the Literature G

  18. Quantification of bovine oxylipids during intramammary Streptococcus uberis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus uberis mastitis results in severe mammary tissue damage in dairy cows due to uncontrolled inflammation. Oxylipids are potent lipid mediators that orchestrate pathogen-induced inflammatory responses, however, changes in oxylipid biosynthesis during S. uberis mastitis are unknown. Thus, ...

  19. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly, similar findings were obtained not only for the dairy S. infantarius CJ18, but also for the blood isolate S. pasteurianus ATCC 43144. Conclusions Our whole genome analyses suggest traits of adaptation of S. macedonicus to the nutrient-rich dairy environment. During this process the bacterium gained genes presumably important for this new ecological niche. Finally, S. macedonicus carries a reduced number of putative SBSEC virulence factors, which suggests a diminished pathogenic potential. PMID:24713045

  20. Chemical modification of Streptococcus flagellar motors.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Berg, H C

    1984-01-01

    Video techniques were used to record changes in motility of cells of Streptococcus sp. strain V4051 exposed to a variety of protein modification reagents. Starved cells were tethered to glass by a single flagellum, energized metabolically with glucose, or treated with valinomycin and energized artificially via shifts to media containing low concentrations of potassium ion. Experiments were devised that distinguished reagents that lowered the proton motive force from those that blocked the generation of torque (damaged the flagellar motors). Imidazole reagents blocked the generation of torque. Amino, sulfhydryl, dithiol, and disulfide reagents did not. Some of the imidazole, amino, and sulfhydryl reagents had long-term effects on the direction of flagellar rotation. PMID:6725210

  1. Streptococcus suis vaccines: candidate antigens and progress.

    PubMed

    Segura, Mariela

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of human meningitis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. S. suis is a well-encapsulated pathogen and multiple serotypes have been described based on the capsular polysaccharide antigenic diversity. In addition, high genotypic, phenotypic and geographic variability exits among strains within the same serotype. Besides, S. suis uses an arsenal of virulence factors to evade the host immune system. Together, these characteristics have challenged the development of efficacious vaccines to fight this important pathogen. In this careful and comprehensive review, clinical field information and experimental data have been compiled and compared for the first time to give a precise overview of the current status of vaccine development against S. suis. The candidate antigens and vaccine formulations under research are examined and the feasibility of reaching the goal of a "universal" cross-protective S. suis vaccine discussed. PMID:26468755

  2. Transfer of plasmids by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; Shoemaker, N.B.; Burdett, V.; Guild, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer of resistance plasmids occurred by conjugation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) similiarly to the process in other streptococcal groups. The 20-megadalton plasmid pIP501 mediated its own DNase-resistant transfer by filter mating and mobilized the 3.6-megadalton non-self-transmissible pMV158. Pneumococcal strains acted as donors or as recipients for intraspecies transfers and for interspecific transfers with Streptococcus faecalis. Transfer-deficient mutants of pIP501 have been found.

  3. Group A Streptococcus Activates Type I Interferon Production and MyD88-dependent Signaling without Involvement of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9*S?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Nina; Siller, Maria; Schaljo, Barbara; Pirzada, Zaid A.; Gattermeier, Irene; Vojtek, Ivo; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Wagner, Hermann; Akira, Shizuo; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Kovarik, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are recognized by the innate immune system through pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Engagement of TLRs triggers signaling cascades that launch innate immune responses. Activation of MAPKs and NF-?B, elements of the major signaling pathways induced by TLRs, depends in most cases on the adaptor molecule MyD88. In addition, Gram-negative or intracellular bacteria elicit MyD88-independent signaling that results in production of type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that in mouse macrophages, the activation of MyD88-dependent signaling by the extracellular Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) does not require TLR2, a receptor implicated in sensing of Gram-positive bacteria, or TLR4 and TLR9. Redundant engagement of either of these TLR molecules was excluded by using TLR2/4/9 triple-deficient macrophages. We further demonstrate that infection of macrophages by GAS causes IRF3 (interferon-regulatory factor 3)-dependent, MyD88-independent production of IFN. Surprisingly, IFN is induced also by GAS lacking slo and sagA, the genes encoding cytolysins that were shown to be required for IFN production in response to other Gram-positive bacteria. Our data indicate that (i) GAS is recognized by a MyD88-dependent receptor other than any of those typically used by bacteria, and (ii) GAS as well as GAS mutants lacking cytolysin genes induce type I IFN production by similar mechanisms as bacteria requiring cytoplasmic escape and the function of cytolysins. PMID:18480050

  4. Natural Disruption of Two Regulatory Networks in Serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Contributes to the Virulence Factor Profile of This Hypervirulent Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tram N.; Liu, Zhuyun; Cao, Tran H.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Treviño, Jeanette; Danger, Jessica L.; Beres, Stephen B.; Musser, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the public health challenges associated with the emergence of new pathogenic bacterial strains and/or serotypes, there is a dearth of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that drive this variation. Here, we began to address the mechanisms behind serotype-specific variation between serotype M1 and M3 strains of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A Streptococcus [GAS]). Spatially diverse contemporary clinical serotype M3 isolates were discovered to contain identical inactivating mutations within genes encoding two regulatory systems that control the expression of important virulence factors, including the thrombolytic agent streptokinase, the protease inhibitor-binding protein-G-related ?2-macroglobulin-binding (GRAB) protein, and the antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid capsule. Subsequent analysis of a larger collection of isolates determined that M3 GAS, since at least the 1920s, has harbored a 4-bp deletion in the fasC gene of the fasBCAX regulatory system and an inactivating polymorphism in the rivR regulator-encoding gene. The fasC and rivR mutations in M3 isolates directly affect the virulence factor profile of M3 GAS, as evident by a reduction in streptokinase expression and an enhancement of GRAB expression. Complementation of the fasC mutation in M3 GAS significantly enhanced levels of the small regulatory RNA FasX, which in turn enhanced streptokinase expression. Complementation of the rivR mutation in M3 GAS restored the regulation of grab mRNA abundance but did not alter capsule mRNA levels. While important, the fasC and rivR mutations do not provide a full explanation for why serotype M3 strains are associated with unusually severe invasive infections; thus, further investigation is warranted. PMID:24516115

  5. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV. PMID:26482408

  6. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Shu Ki; Smeesters, Pierre R; Frost, Hannah R C; Licciardi, Paul; Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  7. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Smeesters, Pierre R.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  8. Streptococcus suis serotype 9 bacterin immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Nadine; Beineke, Andreas; de Buhr, Nicole; Lilienthal, Sabrina; Merkel, Jörg; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph Georg

    2012-05-15

    Streptococcus suis diseases in pigs, most importantly meningitis, are worldwide responsible for major economic losses in the pig industry. About one fourth of invasive S. suis diseases are caused by S. suis serotype 9 strains in Europe. However, little is known about serotype 9 since most studies were performed with serotype 2. The objective of this study was to determine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a serotype 9 bacterin in piglets. Challenge was conducted with a reference serotype 9 strain, belonging to the same clonal complex but to a different sequence type as the bacterin strain. The bacterin induced protection against mortality but not morbidity. Eleven days post infection, 3 of 7 vaccinated survivors were not fully convalescent and had not eliminated the challenge strain from inner organs completely. In accordance with the clinical findings, the majority of piglets showed fibrinous-suppurative lesions in at least one inner organ or tissue. In contrast to the placebo group such lesions were not detected in one third of bacterin-vaccinated piglets. Determination of specific serum IgG titers revealed that the bacterin elicited seroconversion against muramidase-released protein and basic membrane lipoprotein. Furthermore, vaccination was associated with induction of opsonizing antibodies against the serotype 9 challenge strain. However, titers of opsonizing antibodies were rather low in comparison to those found in our previous serotype 2 vaccination trial. Piglets developed substantially higher titers of opsonizing antibodies after challenge. Opsonizing antibodies were absorbable with the serotype 9 challenge strain but not with an unencapsulated isogenic mutant of a serotype 2 strain indicating their specificity. The results indicate that a serotype 9 bacterin is less protective than a serotype 2 bacterin, most likely due to inducing only low titers of opsonizing antibodies. This might contribute to emergence of serotype 9 strains, in particular strains of this clonal complex, in Europe. PMID:22516423

  9. Maternal group B Streptococcus and the infant gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cassidy-Bushrow, A E; Sitarik, A; Levin, A M; Lynch, S V; Havstad, S; Ownby, D R; Johnson, C C; Wegienka, G

    2016-02-01

    Early patterns of gut colonization may predispose children to adult disease. Exposures in utero and during delivery are associated with the infant gut microbiome. Although ~35% of women carry group B strep (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) during pregnancy, it is unknown if GBS presence influences the infant gut microbiome. As part of a population-based, general risk birth cohort, stool specimens were collected from infant's diapers at research visits conducted at ~1 and 6 months of age. Using the Illumina MiSeq (San Diego, CA) platform, the V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Infant gut bacterial community compositional differences by maternal GBS status were evaluated using permutational multivariate analysis of variance. Individual operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were tested using a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Data on maternal GBS and infant gut microbiota from either 1 (n=112) or 6-month-old stool (n=150) specimens was available on 262 maternal-child pairs. Eighty women (30.5%) were GBS+, of who 58 (72.5%) were given intrapartum antibiotics. After adjusting for maternal race, prenatal antifungal use and intrapartum antibiotics, maternal GBS status was statistically significantly associated with gut bacterial composition in the 6 month visit specimen (Canberra R 2=0.008, P=0.008; Unweighted UniFrac R 2=0.010, P=0.011). Individual OTU tests revealed that infants of GBS+ mothers were significantly enriched for specific members of the Clostridiaceae, Ruminococcoceae, and Enterococcaceae in the 6 month specimens compared with infants of GBS- mothers. Whether these taxonomic differences in infant gut microbiota at 6 months lead to differential predisposition for adult disease requires additional study. PMID:26264560

  10. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies. PMID:26016433

  11. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana.

    PubMed

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  12. Stress responses in Streptococcus species and their effects on the host.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Park, Sang-Sang; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-11-01

    Streptococci cause a variety of diseases, such as dental caries, pharyngitis, meningitis, pneumonia, bacteremia, endocarditis, erysipelas, and necrotizing fasciitis. The natural niche of this genus of bacteria ranges from the mouth and nasopharynx to the skin, indicating that the bacteria will inevitably be subjected to environmental changes during invasion into the host, where it is exposed to the host immune system. Thus, the Streptococcus-host interaction determines whether bacteria are cleared by the host's defenses or whether they survive after invasion to cause serious diseases. If this interaction was to be deciphered, it could aid in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic agents. Streptococcus species possess many virulent factors, such as peroxidases and heat-shock proteins (HSPs), which play key roles in protecting the bacteria from hostile host environments. This review will discuss insights into the mechanism(s) by which streptococci adapt to host environments. Additionally, we will address how streptococcal infections trigger host stress responses; however, the mechanism by which bacterial components modulate host stress responses remains largely unknown. PMID:26502957

  13. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  14. Susceptibility Pattern of Microorganisms Isolated by Percutaneous Needle Biopsy in Nonbacteremic Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Desoutter, Sophie; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Ghout, Idir; Issartel, Bertrand; Dinh, Aurélien; Martin, Arnaud; Carlier, Robert; Bernard, Louis

    2015-12-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is diagnosed according to several lines of evidence: clinical, biological, radiological, and histological. Definitive diagnosis requires the isolation of a causative pathogen or histological confirmation. The aim of our study was to describe the microorganisms isolated by percutaneous needle biopsy (PNB) and to analyze their susceptibility patterns, in order to assess the possibility of empirical combination therapy for the treatment of nonbacteremic patients without resorting to PNB. Based on a French prospective multicenter study of 351 patients with VO, we compiled clinical, biological, and radiological findings for 101 patients with microbiologically confirmed VO. Based on antibiotic susceptibility testing of PNB isolated pathogens, the suitabilities of four antibiotic combinations were analyzed: ofloxacin plus rifampin, levofloxacin plus rifampin, ciprofloxacin plus clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin plus amoxicillin-clavulanate. The main causative pathogens identified were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (26% of isolates), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21%), Streptoccocus spp. (13%), and enterobacteria (21%). Empirical antibiotic combination therapy was effective in nearly 75% of cases, and the different combinations gave similar results, except for ofloxacin-rifampin, which was effective in only 58% of cases. A "perfect" empirical antibiotic therapy does not exist. If PNB is not possible, a combination of a fluoroquinolone with clindamycin or rifampin can be used, but the high risk of microbiological failure does not allow the exclusion of PNB. (This study has been registered with EudraCT, number 2006-000951-18, and ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00764114.). PMID:26438497

  15. Effect of amino acid substitutions in the epitope regions of pyolysin from Arcanobacterium pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Keisuke; Matsunaga, Kazue; Higuchi, Hiroki; Kaidoh, Toshio; Takeuchi, Shotaro

    2003-02-01

    Pyolysin (PLO), secreted by Arcanobacterium pyogenes, is a novel member of the thiol-activated cytolysin (TACY, cholesterol-dependent cytolysin) family of bacterial toxins. Recently, we demonstrated that the epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) S, H, C, and G lie in the regions of amino acids regions 55-73, 123-166, 482-506, and 482-506 of PLO, respectively, by the reaction of mAbs with truncated PLOs. In this study, we substituted the amino acids in these epitope regions of PLO by site-directed mutagenesis and examined the effect of these amino acid substitutions. Mutants I70S/R71A/L73S, Y131S/P132S, and L163S/P164S for mAbs H or S completely lost the hemolytic activity of the proteins, but these mutants still bound to erythrocyte membranes. Mutants L495S/W497S and W500S/W501S for mAbs C and G also completely lost their hemolytic activity, but still bound to erythrocyte membranes. In the undecapeptide region of PLO, the cysteine residue required for thiol activation is replaced with alanine. Therefore, we substituted Ala-492 of the undecapeptide region for Cys. The hemolytic activity of this mutant A492C decreased by adding hydrogen peroxide or storing at 4 degrees C, and the decreased hemolytic activity was restored by adding L-cysteine. PMID:12458169

  16. Pyogenic Granuloma/Peripheral Giant-Cell Granuloma Associated with Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jané-Salas, Enric; Albuquerque, Rui; Font-Muñoz, Aura; González-Navarro, Beatríz; Estrugo Devesa, Albert; López-López, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pyogenic granuloma (PG) and peripheral giant-cell granuloma (PGCG) are two of the most common inflammatory lesions associated with implants; however, there is no established pathway for treatment of these conditions. This paper aims to illustrate the successful treatment of PG and PGCG and also report a systematic review of the literature regarding the various treatments proposed. Methods. To collect relevant information about previous treatments for PG and PGCG involving implants we carried out electronic searches of publications with the key words “granuloma”, “oral”, and “implants” from the last 15 years on the databases Pubmed, National Library of Medicine's Medline, Scielo, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Results. From the electronic search 16 case reports were found showing excision and curettage as the main successful treatment. As no clinical trials or observational studies were identified the authors agreed to present results from a review perspective. Conclusion. This is the largest analysis of PG and PGCG associated with implants published to date. Our review would suggest that PGCG associated with implants appears to have a more aggressive nature; however the level of evidence is very limited. Further cohort studies with representative sample sizes and standard outcome measures are necessary for better understanding of these conditions. PMID:26697068

  17. Alternate Structural Conformations of Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyaluronan Lyase: Insights into Enzyme

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    Alternate Structural Conformations of Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyaluronan Lyase: Insights Chemistry, Am Faßberg 11 37077 Go¨ttingen, Germany Streptococcus pneumoniae hyaluronan lyase is a surface. Structural studies together with flexibility analyses of two streptococcal enzymes, from S. pneumoniae

  18. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...infections of the urinary tract caused by Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary...Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused by...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...infections of the urinary tract caused by Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary...Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused by...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...infections of the urinary tract caused by Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary...Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused by...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...infections of the urinary tract caused by Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary...Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused by...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride with lidocaine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...infections of the urinary tract caused by Hemolytic staphylococcus, Streptococcus spp., Bacterial pulmonary...Brucella bronchiseptica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, secondary bacterial infections caused by...

  3. Development, Validation, and Cost Effectiveness of Clinical Prediction Rules for Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis In Children From Lower and Upper Middle Income Countries

    E-print Network

    Assefa, Mehret

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from children with pharyngitisPharyngitis Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) isstreptococcus (GABHS), a bacterial pathogen, is responsible for pharyngitis

  4. Effect of the antimicrobial decapeptide KSL on the growth of oral pathogens and Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Lina; Zhou, Xuedong; Hu, Shen; Zhang, Siyu; Wu, Hongkun

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontitis are common oral bacterial infectious diseases. Their prevention and treatment requires control of the causative pathogens, such as Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis, that exist within dental plaque. As one of the attractive future substitutes for conventional antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), both natural and synthetic, have been widely tested and used for controlling bacterial infections. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of KSL (KKVVFKVKFK-NH(2)), a novel AMP, against several major cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria as well as Candida albicans in vitro. Streptococcus mutans, the causative agent of dental caries, was chosen for in-depth testing. Bacterial susceptibility and time-kill assays were performed to investigate the sensitivity of S. mutans to KSL. The effect of KSL on biofilm formation and on pre-formed biofilm was also examined. For biofilm studies, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to observe and analyse bacterial biofilm. The results showed that KSL had antimicrobial activity against a variety of oral bacteria and fungi. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus were the most susceptible strains to KSL peptide [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.0625 mg/mL] compared with other species tested (MICs of 0.125-1mg/mL). KSL also inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation, with a minimum biofilm inhibition concentration of 0.0625-0.125 mg/mL, and reduced 1-day-old developed S. mutans biofilm, with a minimum biofilm reduction concentration of 0.25-0.5mg/mL. CLSM images showed that KSL significantly reduced the viability of biofilm cells. This study suggests that KSL may have a potential clinical application in treating dental caries by killing S. mutans within dental plaque. PMID:20956070

  5. Rapid Evolution of Virulence and Drug Resistance in the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Matthew T. G.; Hauser, Heidi; Sanders, Mandy; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Cherevach, Inna; Cronin, Ann; Goodhead, Ian; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A.; Price, Claire; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sharp, Sarah; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Chieu, Tran Bich; Thi Hoang Mai, Nguyen; Diep, To Song; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Kehoe, Michael; Leigh, James A.; Ward, Philip N.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Whatmore, Adrian M.; Chanter, Neil; Iversen, Pernille; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Slater, Josh D.; Smith, Hilde E.; Spratt, Brian G.; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun; Bentley, Stephen; Barrell, Barclay G.; Schultsz, Constance; Maskell, Duncan J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that infects pigs and can occasionally cause serious infections in humans. S. suis infections occur sporadically in human Europe and North America, but a recent major outbreak has been described in China with high levels of mortality. The mechanisms of S. suis pathogenesis in humans and pigs are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings The sequencing of whole genomes of S. suis isolates provides opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of infection. Here we describe whole genome sequences of three S. suis strains from the same lineage: one from European pigs, and two from human cases from China and Vietnam. Comparative genomic analysis was used to investigate the variability of these strains. S. suis is phylogenetically distinct from other Streptococcus species for which genome sequences are currently available. Accordingly, ?40% of the ?2 Mb genome is unique in comparison to other Streptococcus species. Finer genomic comparisons within the species showed a high level of sequence conservation; virtually all of the genome is common to the S. suis strains. The only exceptions are three ?90 kb regions, present in the two isolates from humans, composed of integrative conjugative elements and transposons. Carried in these regions are coding sequences associated with drug resistance. In addition, small-scale sequence variation has generated pseudogenes in putative virulence and colonization factors. Conclusions/Significance The genomic inventories of genetically related S. suis strains, isolated from distinct hosts and diseases, exhibit high levels of conservation. However, the genomes provide evidence that horizontal gene transfer has contributed to the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:19603075

  6. Untangling the Web of Systemic Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Caso, Francesco; De Clemente, Caterina; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is involved in the pathophysiology of systemic autoinflammatory diseases (SAIDs), an enlarging group of disorders caused by dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-?, in which autoreactive T-lymphocytes and autoantibodies are indeed absent. A widely deranged innate immunity leads to overactivity of proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent multisite inflammatory symptoms depicting various conditions, such as hereditary periodic fevers, granulomatous disorders, and pyogenic diseases, collectively described in this review. Further research should enhance our understanding of the genetics behind SAIDs, unearth triggers of inflammatory attacks, and result in improvement for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25132737

  7. Export Requirements of Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Greene, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Pneumolysin (Ply), a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), is produced by virtually all clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, and ply mutant strains are severely attenuated in mouse models of colonization and infection. In contrast to all other known members of the CDC family, Ply lacks a signal peptide for export outside the cell. Instead, Ply has been hypothesized to be released upon autolysis or, alternatively, via a nonautolytic mechanism that remains undefined. We show that an exogenously added signal sequence is not sufficient for Sec-dependent Ply secretion in S. pneumoniae but is sufficient in the surrogate host Bacillus subtilis. Previously, we showed that Ply is localized primarily to the cell wall compartment in the absence of detectable cell lysis. Here we show that Ply released by autolysis cannot reassociate with intact cells, suggesting that there is a Ply export mechanism that is coupled to cell wall localization of the protein. This putative export mechanism is capable of secreting a related CDC without its signal sequence. We show that B. subtilis can export Ply, suggesting that the export pathway is conserved. Finally, through truncation and domain swapping analyses, we show that export is dependent on domain 2 of Ply. PMID:22563048

  8. Cloning of chromosomal genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Stassi, D.L.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.; Lacks, S.A.

    1981-11-01

    A system for molecular cloning in Streptococcus pneumoniae was developed. The multicopy plasmids pMV158 (5.4 kilobases) and pLS1 (4.3 kilobases), which confer tetracycline resistance, were used as vectors to clone chromosomal genes of S. pneumoniae in host cells of this species. A 3.3-kilobase restriction fragment containing the malM gene, which codes for amylomaltase, was cloned in a deletion mutant lacking chromosomal homology with the fragment. The recombinant plasmid, pLS70, could transform over 50% of a recipient population to maltose utilization. Amylomaltase constituted up to 10% of the protein of cells containing pLS70. A derivative with a deletion, pLS69, appeared to gain a selective advantage by producing less enzyme. A 10-kilobase restriction fragment containing the sul-d gene for sulfonamide resistance was cloned in the presence of the homologous chromosomal gene. De novo establishment of a recombinant plasmid was just as frequent as transformation in an endogenous plasmid. Despite the processing of DNA during uptake in the transformation of S. pneumoniae, recombinant plasmids can be introduced. Models for the reconstruction of recombinant DNA in cells of S. pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis are considered and compared.

  9. Infection of barramundi Lates calcarifer with Streptococcus iniae: effects of different routes of exposure.

    PubMed

    Bromage, E S; Owens, L

    2002-12-10

    The use of various challenge techniques has allowed the formation of a hypothesis for the mode of infection of Streptococcus iniae in barramundi. A bacterial dose of 1 x 10(3) colony forming units (cfu), corresponding to the LD50, delivered orally to barramundi could initiate the sub-acute form of the disease observed at the farms. The acute form of the disease could be initiated through bath exposure to the pathogen. S. iniae was equally as infective in freshwater, saltwater or when fish were subject to skin trauma prior to exposure, with LD50 values of 3.2 x 10(4), 2.0 x 10(4), 3.2 x 10(4) cfu, respectively, when observed over a 10 d period. It is suggested that sub-acute infection occurs orally, with mass mortalities occurring through the increased presence of the bacterium in the environment. PMID:12553448

  10. Modified MLVA for Genotyping Queensland Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Rachael E.; Savill, John; Hafner, Louise M.; Huygens, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, over 800 000 children under five die each year from infectious diseases caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. To understand genetic relatedness between isolates, study transmission routes, assess the impact of human interventions e.g. vaccines, and determine infection sources, genotyping methods are required. The ‘gold standard’ genotyping method, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), is useful for long-term and global studies. Another genotyping method, Multi-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA), has emerged as a more discriminatory, inexpensive and faster technique; however there is no universally accepted method and it is currently suitable for short-term and localised epidemiology studies. Currently Australia has no national MLST database, nor has it adopted any MLVA method for short-term or localised studies. This study aims to improve S. pneumoniae genotyping methods by modifying the existing MLVA techniques to be more discriminatory, faster, cheaper and technically less demanding than previously published MLVA methods and MLST. Methods Four different MLVA protocols, including a modified method, were applied to 317 isolates of serotyped invasive S. pneumoniae isolated from sterile body sites of Queensland children under 15 years from 2007–2012. MLST was applied to 202 isolates for comparison. Results The modified MLVA4 is significantly more discriminatory than the ‘gold standard’ MLST method. MLVA4 has similar discrimination compared to other MLVA techniques in this study). The failure to amplify particular loci in previous MLVA methods were minimised in MLVA4. Failure to amplify BOX-13 and Spneu19 were found to be serotype specific. Conclusion We have modified a highly discriminatory MLVA technique for genotyping Queensland invasive S. pneumoniae. MLVA4 has the ability to enhance our understanding of the pneumococcal epidemiology and the changing genetics of the pneumococcus in localised and short-term studies. PMID:25923909

  11. The influence of Brazilian plant extracts on Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    BARNABÉ, Michele; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Coury; DUTRA-CORREA, Maristela; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen plant extracts obtained from plants from the Brazilian Amazon showed activity against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, an important bacterium involved in the first steps of biofilm formation and the subsequent initiation of several oral diseases. Objective Our goal was to verify whether plant extracts that showed activity against planktonic S. mutans could prevent the organization of or even disrupt a single-species biofilm made by the same bacteria. Material and Methods Plant extracts were tested on a single-bacteria biofilm prepared using the Zürich method. Each plant extract was tested at a concentration 5 times higher than its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Discs of hydroxyapatite were submersed overnight in brain-heart infusion broth enriched with saccharose 5%, which provided sufficient time for biofilm formation. The discs were then submersed in extract solutions for one minute, three times per day, for two subsequent days. The discs were then washed with saline three times, at ten seconds each, after each treatment. Supports were allowed to remain in the enriched medium for one additional night. At the end of the process, the bacteria were removed from the discs by vortexing and were counted. Results Only two of 19 plant extracts showed activity in the present assay: EB1779, obtained from Dioscorea altissima, and EB1673, obtained from Annona hypoglauca. Although the antibacterial activity of the plant extracts was first observed against planktonic S. mutans, influence over biofilm formation was not necessarily observed in the biofilm model. The present results motivate us to find new natural products to be used in dentistry. PMID:25466471

  12. Detection of Streptococcus suis in Bioaerosols of Swine Confinement Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Veillette, Marc; Létourneau, Valérie; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen that can cause septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia. Also recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent, it is responsible for outbreaks of human infections in Asian countries. Serotype 2 is the predominant isolate from diseased animals and humans. The aerosolization of S. suis in the air of swine confinement buildings (SCB) was studied. The presence of S. suis in bioaerosols was monitored in SCB where cases of infection had been reported and in healthy SCB without reported infections. Using a quantitative-PCR (qPCR) method, we determined the total number of bacteria (1 × 108 to 2 × 108 airborne/m3), total number of S. suis bacteria (4 × 105 to 10 × 105 airborne/m3), and number of S. suis serotype 2 and 1/2 bacteria (1 × 103 to 30 × 103 airborne/m3) present in the air. S. suis serotypes 2 and 1/2 were detected in the air of all growing/finishing SCB that had documented cases of S. suis infection and in 50% of healthy SCB. The total number of bacteria and total numbers of S. suis and S. suis serotype 2 and 1/2 bacteria were monitored in one positive SCB during a 5-week period, and it was shown that the aerosolized S. suis serotypes 2 and 1/2 remain airborne for a prolonged period. When the effect of aerosolization on S. suis was observed, the percentage of intact S. suis bacteria (showing cell membrane integrity) in the air might have been up to 13%. Finally S. suis was found in nasal swabs from 14 out of 21 healthy finishing-SCB workers, suggesting significant exposure to the pathogen. This report provides a better understanding of the aerosolization, prevalence, and persistence of S. suis in SCB. PMID:24632262

  13. Sucrose metabolism contributes to in vivo fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary We characterized two sucrose-metabolizing systems – sus and scr – and describe their roles in the physiology and virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine models of carriage and pneumonia. The sus and scr systems are regulated by LacI family repressors SusR and ScrR respectively. SusR regulates an adjacent ABC transporter (susT1/susT2/susX) and sucrose-6-phosphate (S-6-P) hydrolase (susH). ScrR controls an adjacent PTS transporter (scrT), fructokinase (scrK) and second S-6-P hydrolase (scrH). sus and scr play niche-specific roles in virulence. The susH and sus locus mutants are attenuated in the lung, but dispensable in nasopharyngeal carriage. Conversely, the scrH and scr locus mutants, while dispensable in the lung, are attenuated for nasopharyngeal colonization. The scrH/susH double mutant is more attenuated than scrH in the nasopharynx, indicating SusH can substitute in this niche. Both systems are sucrose-inducible, with ScrH being the major in vitro hydrolase. The scrH/susH mutant does not grow on sucrose indicating that sus and scr are the only sucrose-metabolizing systems in S. pneumoniae. We propose a model describing hierarchical regulation of the scr and sus systems by the putative inducer, S-6-P. The transport and metabolism of sucrose or a related disaccharide thus contributes to S. pneumoniae colonization and disease. PMID:17880421

  14. Sucrose metabolism contributes to in vivo fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Camilli, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    We characterized two sucrose-metabolizing systems -sus and scr- and describe their roles in the physiology and virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine models of carriage and pneumonia. The sus and scr systems are regulated by LacI family repressors SusR and ScrR respectively. SusR regulates an adjacent ABC transporter (susT1/susT2/susX) and sucrose-6-phosphate (S-6-P) hydrolase (susH). ScrR controls an adjacent PTS transporter (scrT), fructokinase (scrK) and second S-6-P hydrolase (scrH). sus and scr play niche-specific roles in virulence. The susH and sus locus mutants are attenuated in the lung, but dispensable in nasopharyngeal carriage. Conversely, the scrH and scr locus mutants, while dispensable in the lung, are attenuated for nasopharyngeal colonization. The scrH/susH double mutant is more attenuated than scrH in the nasopharynx, indicating SusH can substitute in this niche. Both systems are sucrose-inducible, with ScrH being the major in vitro hydrolase. The scrH/susH mutant does not grow on sucrose indicating that sus and scr are the only sucrose-metabolizing systems in S. pneumoniae. We propose a model describing hierarchical regulation of the scr and sus systems by the putative inducer, S-6-P. The transport and metabolism of sucrose or a related disaccharide thus contributes to S. pneumoniae colonization and disease. PMID:17880421

  15. Mathematical Modelling of the Gene Regulatory Network governing Natural Transformation in Streptococcus thermophilus

    E-print Network

    Bastin, Georges

    -off mechanism of the competence state. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, it has recently been shown in Streptococcus thermophilus Laurie Haustenne1, Georges Bastin2, Astrid Wahl1, Brigitte Delplace1, Laetitia relying on a negative feedback loop. The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus has

  16. Genome Sequence of Streptococcus gallolyticus: Insights into Its Adaptation to the Bovine Rumen and Its Ability To Cause Endocarditis ? †

    PubMed Central

    Rusniok, Christophe; Couvé, Elisabeth; Da Cunha, Violette; El Gana, Rachida; Zidane, Nora; Bouchier, Christiane; Poyart, Claire; Leclercq, Roland; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Glaser, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus (formerly known as Streptococcus bovis biotype I) is an increasing cause of endocarditis among streptococci and frequently associated with colon cancer. S. gallolyticus is part of the rumen flora but also a cause of disease in ruminants as well as in birds. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of strain UCN34, responsible for endocarditis in a patient also suffering from colon cancer. Analysis of the 2,239 proteins encoded by its 2,350-kb-long genome revealed unique features among streptococci, probably related to its adaptation to the rumen environment and its capacity to cause endocarditis. S. gallolyticus has the capacity to use a broad range of carbohydrates of plant origin, in particular to degrade polysaccharides derived from the plant cell wall. Its genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters and catalytic activities, like tannase, phenolic compounds decarboxylase, and bile salt hydrolase, that should contribute to the detoxification of the gut environment. Furthermore, S. gallolyticus synthesizes all 20 amino acids and more vitamins than any other sequenced Streptococcus species. Many of the genes encoding these specific functions were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from other bacterial species present in the rumen. The surface properties of strain UCN34 may also contribute to its virulence. A polysaccharide capsule might be implicated in resistance to innate immunity defenses, and glucan mucopolysaccharides, three types of pili, and collagen binding proteins may play a role in adhesion to tissues in the course of endocarditis. PMID:20139183

  17. Short communication: Streptococcus canis is able to establish a persistent udder infection in a dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Król, Jaros?aw; Twardo?, Jan; Mrowiec, Jacek; Podkowik, Magdalena; Dejneka, Grzegorz; D?bski, Bogdan; Nowicki, Tadeusz; Zalewski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus canis is relatively rare. Consequently, many epidemiologic aspects of the infection, including factors that mediate crossing of host species barriers by the pathogen, infectiousness of the microorganism to the mammary gland, and the course of the disease within a herd, are still not elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe results of a 15-mo observation of subclinical Strep. canis mastitis on a dairy farm housing 76 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Upon 3 visits to the farm during a period between April 2013 and June 2014, Strep. canis was cultured from milk samples of 17 (22.4% of the herd), 7 (9.6%), and 8 (11.3%) cows, respectively. The isolates obtained were characterized phenotypically by means of the API Strep identification kit (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), as well as genetically by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains displayed the same biochemical features, and the molecular methods revealed that the isolates belonged to a single clone or were very closely related. Results of the study indicate that Strep. canis is capable of causing intramammary infections of long duration, behaving in a contagious manner. Because a persistently infected cow may serve as the source of Strep. canis infection for other animals, effective control of this type of udder infection within a herd may require similar measures to those adopted in Streptococcus agalactiae eradication programs. PMID:26233445

  18. Identification of novel genes expressed during host infection in Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus ATCC35246.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhe; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Tingting; Xu, Bin; Ma, Fang; Peng, Jie; Fan, Hongjie

    2015-02-01

    Infection with Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus, SEZ) can cause septicemia, meningitis, and mastitis in domesticated species. Identification of this organism's virulence factors is an effective way of clarifying its pathogenic mechanism. We employed in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) to find bacterial genes that were only expressed or upregulated in an infected host (IVI genes). Convalescent-phase sera from pigs infected with SEZ were pooled, adsorbed against in vitro antigens, and used to screen SEZ genomic expression libraries. This analysis identified 43 genes as IVI genes. Six of these 43 genes were verified via real-time PCR. Following the analysis, we were able to assign a putative function to 36 of the 43 proteins. These proteins included those involved in virulence and adaptation; formation of intermediary products; gene replication, transcription and expression; energy metabolism; transport and also various proteins of unknown function. The relationship between sagD gene and bacterial virulence was confirmed. This study provides new molecular data for the study of streptococcal disease in swine and is important for identifying the pathogenic mechanisms of SEZ. PMID:25595678

  19. Biofilm formation by Streptococcus agalactiae: influence of environmental conditions and implicated virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important human pathogen that colonizes the urogenital and/or the lower gastro-intestinal tract of up to 40% of healthy women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in the neonates. GBS can also infect the elderly and immuno-compromised adults, and is responsible for mastitis in bovines. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS can form biofilm-like three-dimensional structures that could enhance its ability to colonize and persist in the host. Biofilm formation by GBS has been investigated in vitro and appears tightly controlled by environmental conditions. Several adhesins have been shown to play a role in the formation of GBS biofilm-like structures, among which are the protein components of pili protruding outside the bacterial surface. Remarkably, antibodies directed against pilus proteins can prevent the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofilm formation in the context of GBS asymptomatic colonization and dissemination to cause invasive disease remain to be investigated in detail. PMID:25699242

  20. Epidemiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Outcomes of Streptococcus suis Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Huong, Vu Thi Lan; Ha, Ngo; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Horby, Peter; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Zhu, Xiaotong; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Schultsz, Constance; Wertheim, Heiman Frank Louis

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis, a bacterium that affects pigs, is a neglected pathogen that causes systemic disease in humans. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize global estimates of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of this zoonosis. We searched main literature databases for all studies through December 2012 using the search term “streptococcus suis.” The prevalence of S. suis infection is highest in Asia; the primary risk factors are occupational exposure and eating of contaminated food. The pooled proportions of case-patients with pig-related occupations and history of eating high-risk food were 38.1% and 37.3%, respectively. The main clinical syndrome was meningitis (pooled rate 68.0%), followed by sepsis, arthritis, endocarditis, and endophthalmitis. The pooled case-fatality rate was 12.8%. Sequelae included hearing loss (39.1%) and vestibular dysfunction (22.7%). Our analysis identified gaps in the literature, particularly in assessing risk factors and sequelae of this infection. PMID:24959701

  1. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of Streptococcus suis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Huong, Vu Thi Lan; Ha, Ngo; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Horby, Peter; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Zhu, Xiaotong; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Schultsz, Constance; Wertheim, Heiman Frank Louis; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus suis, a bacterium that affects pigs, is a neglected pathogen that causes systemic disease in humans. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize global estimates of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of this zoonosis. We searched main literature databases for all studies through December 2012 using the search term "streptococcus suis." The prevalence of S. suis infection is highest in Asia; the primary risk factors are occupational exposure and eating of contaminated food. The pooled proportions of case-patients with pig-related occupations and history of eating high-risk food were 38.1% and 37.3%, respectively. The main clinical syndrome was meningitis (pooled rate 68.0%), followed by sepsis, arthritis, endocarditis, and endophthalmitis. The pooled case-fatality rate was 12.8%. Sequelae included hearing loss (39.1%) and vestibular dysfunction (22.7%). Our analysis identified gaps in the literature, particularly in assessing risk factors and sequelae of this infection. PMID:24959701

  2. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious Spinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se-Jin; Youm, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Ha, Ho-Gyun; Yi, Jin-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infectious spinal disease is regarded as an infection by a specific organism that affects the vertebral body, intervertebral disc and adjacent perivertebral soft tissue. Its incidence seems to be increasing as a result of larger proportion of the older patients with chronic debilitating disease, the rise of intravenous drug abuser, and the increase in spinal procedure and surgery. In Korea, studies assessing infectious spinal disease are rare and have not been addressed in recent times. The objectives of this study are to describe the epidemiology of all kind of spinal infectious disease and their clinical and microbiological characteristics as well as to assess the diagnostic methodology and the parameters related to the outcomes. Methods A retrospective study was performed in all infectious spinal disease cases presenting from January 2005 to April 2010 to three tertiary teaching hospitals within a city of 1.5 million in Korea. Patient demographics, risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes were assessed. Risk factors entailed the presence of diabetes, chronic renal failure, liver cirrhosis, immunosuppressants, remote infection, underlying malignancy and previous spinal surgery or procedure. We comparatively analyzed the results between the groups of pyogenic and tuberculous spinal infection. SPSS version 14 statistical software was used to perform the analyses of the data. The threshold for statistical significance was established at p<0.05. Results Ninety-two cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Overall, patients of tuberculous spinal infection (TSI) and pyogenic spinal infection (PSI) entailed 20 (21.7%) and 72 (78.3%) cases, respectively. A previous spinal surgery or procedure was the most commonly noted risk factor (39.1%), followed by diabetes (15.2%). The occurrence of both pyogenic and tuberculous spondylitis was predominant in the lumbar spine. Discs are more easily invaded in PSI. At initial presentation, white cell blood count and C-reactive protein levels were higher in PSI compared to TSI (p<0.05). Etiological agents were identified in 53.3%, and the most effective method for identification of etiological agents was tissue culture (50.0%). Staphyococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated infective agent associated with pyogenic spondylitis, followed by E. coli. Surgical treatment was performed in 31.5% of pyogenic spondylitis and in 35.0% of tuberculous spondylitis cases. Conclusion Many previous studies in Korea usually reported that tuberculous spondylitis is the predominant infection. However, in our study, the number of pyogenic infection was 3 times greater than that of tuberculous spinal disease. Etiological agents were identified in a half of all infectious spinal disease. For better outcomes, we should try to identify the causative microorganism before antibiotic therapy and make every effort to improve the result of culture and biopsy. PMID:25289121

  3. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae and muramyl dipeptide by NOD2 results in potent induction of MMP-9, which can be controlled by lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marloes; Hartman, Yvonne; Groh, Laszlo; de Jong, Dirk J; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) is a protease involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix collagen. Evidence suggests that MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. However, not much is known about the induction of MMP-9 and the regulatory processes involved. We show here that the Gram-positive bacteria used in this study induced large amounts of MMP-9, in contrast to the Gram-negative bacteria that were used. An important pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) for Gram-positive bacteria is muramyl dipeptide (MDP). MDP is a very potent inducer of MMP-9 and showed a dose-dependent MMP-9 induction. Experiments using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Crohn's disease patients with nonfunctional NOD2 showed that MMP-9 induction by Streptococcus pneumoniae and MDP is NOD2 dependent. Increasing amounts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important PAMP for Gram-negative bacteria, resulted in decreasing amounts of MMP-9. Moreover, the induction of MMP-9 by MDP could be counteracted by simultaneously adding LPS. The inhibition of MMP-9 expression by LPS was found to be regulated posttranscriptionally, independently of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), an endogenous inhibitor of MMP-9. Collectively, these data show that Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to induce large amounts of MMP-9. These high MMP-9 levels are potentially involved in Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:25183734

  4. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Muramyl Dipeptide by NOD2 Results in Potent Induction of MMP-9, Which Can Be Controlled by Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Marloes; Hartman, Yvonne; Groh, Laszlo; de Jong, Dirk J.; de Jonge, Marien I.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) is a protease involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix collagen. Evidence suggests that MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. However, not much is known about the induction of MMP-9 and the regulatory processes involved. We show here that the Gram-positive bacteria used in this study induced large amounts of MMP-9, in contrast to the Gram-negative bacteria that were used. An important pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) for Gram-positive bacteria is muramyl dipeptide (MDP). MDP is a very potent inducer of MMP-9 and showed a dose-dependent MMP-9 induction. Experiments using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Crohn's disease patients with nonfunctional NOD2 showed that MMP-9 induction by Streptococcus pneumoniae and MDP is NOD2 dependent. Increasing amounts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important PAMP for Gram-negative bacteria, resulted in decreasing amounts of MMP-9. Moreover, the induction of MMP-9 by MDP could be counteracted by simultaneously adding LPS. The inhibition of MMP-9 expression by LPS was found to be regulated posttranscriptionally, independently of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), an endogenous inhibitor of MMP-9. Collectively, these data show that Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to induce large amounts of MMP-9. These high MMP-9 levels are potentially involved in Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:25183734

  5. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  6. Streptococcus: A World-Wide Fish Health Problem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are important emergent-epizootic pathogens which affect many fish species world-wide, especially in warm-water regions. Further, these Gram-positive bacteria cause significant economic losses in marine and freshwater aquaculture systems with an estimated loss i...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740...

  12. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Infections Associated with Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrea; Levine, Seth J.; Garvin, Joseph P.; Brown, Susan; Turner, Lauren; Fritzinger, Angela; Gertz, Robert E.; Murphy, Julia M.; Vogt, Marshall; Beall, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is a known zoonotic pathogen. In this public health investigation conducted in Virginia, USA, in 2013, we identified a probable family cluster of S. zooepidemicus cases linked epidemiologically and genetically to infected guinea pigs. S. zooepidemicus infections should be considered in patients who have severe clinical illness and report guinea pig exposure. PMID:25531424

  13. Streptococcus bovis as a Silage Inoculant, a Second Chance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research indicated that Streptococcus bovis, a lactate producing ruminal bacterium, was similar or better than commercial silage inoculants. This study assessed the potential of two S. bovis strains, JB1 (a bacteriocin negative strain) and HC5 (a bacteriocin producing strain). Four treatmen...

  14. Streptococcus sanguinis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Makhlynets, Olga; Boal, Amie K.; Rhodes, DeLacy V.; Kitten, Todd; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a causative agent of infective endocarditis. Deletion of SsaB, a manganese transporter, drastically reduces S. sanguinis virulence. Many pathogenic organisms require class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides under aerobic conditions, and recent studies demonstrate that this enzyme uses a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical (MnIII2-Y•) cofactor in vivo. The proteins required for S. sanguinis ribonucleotide reduction (NrdE and NrdF, ? and ? subunits of RNR; NrdH and TrxR, a glutaredoxin-like thioredoxin and a thioredoxin reductase; and NrdI, a flavodoxin essential for assembly of the RNR metallo-cofactor) have been identified and characterized. Apo-NrdF with FeII and O2 can self-assemble a diferric-tyrosyl radical (FeIII2-Y•) cofactor (1.2 Y•/?2) and with the help of NrdI can assemble a MnIII2-Y• cofactor (0.9 Y•/?2). The activity of RNR with its endogenous reductants, NrdH and TrxR, is 5,000 and 1,500 units/mg for the Mn- and Fe-NrdFs (Fe-loaded NrdF), respectively. X-ray structures of S. sanguinis NrdIox and MnII2-NrdF are reported and provide a possible rationale for the weak affinity (2.9 ?m) between them. These streptococcal proteins form a structurally distinct subclass relative to other Ib proteins with unique features likely important in cluster assembly, including a long and negatively charged loop near the NrdI flavin and a bulky residue (Thr) at a constriction in the oxidant channel to the NrdI interface. These studies set the stage for identifying the active form of S. sanguinis class Ib RNR in an animal model for infective endocarditis and establishing whether the manganese requirement for pathogenesis is associated with RNR. PMID:24381172

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus pneumoniae co-infection in post-traumatic meningitis in a patient with unknown HIV status.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faryal; Fasih, Naima; Zafar, Afia

    2015-10-01

    Meningitis is a serious disease associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Mixed meningeal infections due to bacteria and fungi are exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of meningeal co-infection with cryptococcus neoformans and streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status. Because of the rarity of such cases, stringent screening of every cerebrospinal fluid specimen to exclude the presence of multiple pathogens is imperative. Assessment of patients for immunodeficiencies in case of isolation of an opportunistic organism like cryptococcus is also needed. PMID:26440847

  16. Vaccination Drives Changes in Metabolic and Virulence Profiles of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Eleanor R.; Penman, Bridget S.; Lourenço, José; Buckee, Caroline O.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Gupta, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), is a leading cause of life-threatening illness and death worldwide. Available conjugate vaccines target only a small subset (up to 13) of >90 known capsular serotypes of S. pneumoniae and, since their introduction, increases in non-vaccine serotypes have been recorded in several countries: a phenomenon termed Vaccine Induced Serotype Replacement (VISR). Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling and whole genome analysis, we show that targeting particular serotypes through vaccination can also cause their metabolic and virulence-associated components to transfer through recombination to non-vaccine serotypes: a phenomenon we term Vaccine-Induced Metabolic Shift (VIMS). Our results provide a novel explanation for changes observed in the population structure of the pneumococcus following vaccination, and have important implications for strain-targeted vaccination in a range of infectious disease systems. PMID:26181911

  17. Genome Annotation and Intraviral Interactome for the Streptococcus pneumoniae Virulent Phage Dp-1? ¶

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mourad; Häuser, Roman; Ouellette, Marc; Liu, Jing; Dehbi, Mohammed; Moeck, Greg; García, Ernesto; Titz, Björn; Uetz, Peter; Moineau, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes several diseases, including pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Phage Dp-1 is one of the very few isolated virulent S. pneumoniae bacteriophages, but only a partial characterization is currently available. Here, we confirmed that Dp-1 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Then, we determined its complete genomic sequence of 56,506 bp. It encodes 72 open reading frames, of which 44 have been assigned a function. We have identified putative promoters, Rho-independent terminators, and several genomic clusters. We provide evidence that Dp-1 may be using a novel DNA replication system as well as redirecting host protein synthesis through queuosine-containing tRNAs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of purified phage Dp-1 particles identified at least eight structural proteins. Finally, using comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified 156 phage protein interactions, and this intraviral interactome was used to propose a structural model of Dp-1. PMID:21097633

  18. Genome annotation and intraviral interactome for the Streptococcus pneumoniae virulent phage Dp-1.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Mourad; Häuser, Roman; Ouellette, Marc; Liu, Jing; Dehbi, Mohammed; Moeck, Greg; García, Ernesto; Titz, Björn; Uetz, Peter; Moineau, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes several diseases, including pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Phage Dp-1 is one of the very few isolated virulent S. pneumoniae bacteriophages, but only a partial characterization is currently available. Here, we confirmed that Dp-1 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Then, we determined its complete genomic sequence of 56,506 bp. It encodes 72 open reading frames, of which 44 have been assigned a function. We have identified putative promoters, Rho-independent terminators, and several genomic clusters. We provide evidence that Dp-1 may be using a novel DNA replication system as well as redirecting host protein synthesis through queuosine-containing tRNAs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of purified phage Dp-1 particles identified at least eight structural proteins. Finally, using comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified 156 phage protein interactions, and this intraviral interactome was used to propose a structural model of Dp-1. PMID:21097633

  19. Infection of specific strains of Streptococcus mutans, oral bacteria, confers a risk of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ayuchi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Wada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Katayama, Kazufumi; Yoneda, Masato; Higurashi, Takuma; Nomura, Ryota; Hokamura, Kazuya; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Umemura, Kazuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ooshima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Although oral bacteria-associated systemic diseases have been reported, association between Streptococcus mutans, pathogen of dental caries, and ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been reported. We investigated the effect of various S. mutans strains on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse colitis. Administration of TW295, the specific strain of S. mutans, caused aggravation of colitis; the standard strain, MT8148 did not. Localization of TW295 in hepatocytes in liver was observed. Increased expression of interferon-? in liver was also noted, indicating that the liver is target organ for the specific strain of S. mutans-mediated aggravation of colitis. The detection frequency of the specific strains in UC patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. Administration of the specific strains of S. mutans isolated from patients caused aggravation of colitis. Infection with highly-virulent specific types of S. mutans might be a potential risk factor in the aggravation of UC. PMID:22451861

  20. Infection of specific strains of Streptococcus mutans, oral bacteria, confers a risk of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Ayuchi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Wada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Katayama, Kazufumi; Yoneda, Masato; Higurashi, Takuma; Nomura, Ryota; Hokamura, Kazuya; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Umemura, Kazuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ooshima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Although oral bacteria-associated systemic diseases have been reported, association between Streptococcus mutans, pathogen of dental caries, and ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been reported. We investigated the effect of various S. mutans strains on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse colitis. Administration of TW295, the specific strain of S. mutans, caused aggravation of colitis; the standard strain, MT8148 did not. Localization of TW295 in hepatocytes in liver was observed. Increased expression of interferon-? in liver was also noted, indicating that the liver is target organ for the specific strain of S. mutans-mediated aggravation of colitis. The detection frequency of the specific strains in UC patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. Administration of the specific strains of S. mutans isolated from patients caused aggravation of colitis. Infection with highly-virulent specific types of S. mutans might be a potential risk factor in the aggravation of UC. PMID:22451861

  1. Mechanisms and impact of genetic recombination in the evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chaguza, Chrispin; Cornick, Jennifer E.; Everett, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a highly recombinogenic bacterium responsible for a high burden of human disease globally. Genetic recombination, a process in which exogenous DNA is acquired and incorporated into its genome, is a key evolutionary mechanism employed by the pneumococcus to rapidly adapt to selective pressures. The rate at which the pneumococcus acquires genetic variation through recombination is much higher than the rate at which the organism acquires variation through spontaneous mutations. This higher rate of variation allows the pneumococcus to circumvent the host innate and adaptive immune responses, escape clinical interventions, including antibiotic therapy and vaccine introduction. The rapid influx of whole genome sequence (WGS) data and the advent of novel analysis methods and powerful computational tools for population genetics and evolution studies has transformed our understanding of how genetic recombination drives pneumococcal adaptation and evolution. Here we discuss how genetic recombination has impacted upon the evolution of the pneumococcus. PMID:25904996

  2. Population genomic datasets describing the post-vaccine evolutionary epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Pelton, Stephen I.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Lipsitch, Marc; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is common nasopharyngeal commensal bacterium and important human pathogen. Vaccines against a subset of pneumococcal antigenic diversity have reduced rates of disease, without changing the frequency of asymptomatic carriage, through altering the bacterial population structure. These changes can be studied in detail through using genome sequencing to characterise systematically-sampled collections of carried S. pneumoniae. This dataset consists of 616 annotated draft genomes of isolates collected from children during routine visits to primary care physicians in Massachusetts between 2001, shortly after the seven valent polysaccharide conjugate vaccine was introduced, and 2007. Also made available are a core genome alignment and phylogeny describing the overall population structure, clusters of orthologous protein sequences, software for inferring serotype from Illumina reads, and whole genome alignments for the analysis of closely-related sets of pneumococci. These data can be used to study both bacterial evolution and the epidemiology of a pathogen population under selection from vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26528397

  3. Associations among Trueperella pyogenes, endometritis diagnosis, and pregnancy outcomes in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, M L S; Lima, F S; Machado, V S; Meira, E B; Ganda, E K; Foditsch, C; Bicalho, R C; Gilbert, R O

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate three commonly used methods for endometritis diagnosis by comparing each one's association with the presence of intrauterine Trueperella pyogenes (TP) and reproductive performance. Lactating Holstein cows (n = 452) were evaluated a single time at 35 ± 3 days postpartum to diagnose endometritis on the basis of three criteria: presence of purulent vaginal discharge (PVD) detected by a Metricheck device, presence of purulent uterine lavage fluid (PUL), presence of cytologic endometritis (CE) based on relative abundance of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in uterine lavage fluid. A threshold of polymorphonuclear leukocytes greater than 5% was used to diagnose the occurrence of CE. Also, a swab of the uterine lavage was cultured to evaluate the presence of TP and determine its association with endometritis diagnosis criteria and pregnancy outcomes. The results showed that cows positive for TP had increased prevalence of PVD and PUL and tended to have greater prevalence of CE. Median time to pregnancy was 56 days longer, and hazard of pregnancy was 34% lower for TP-positive cows than for TP-negative cows. Presence of PUL led to a 35% lower hazard of pregnancy and 34-day-longer median time to pregnancy than cows without PUL. Likewise, cows diagnosed with PVD had a 47% lower hazard of pregnancy and 57-day-longer median time to pregnancy than cows without PVD. Cows diagnosed with CE had a 27% lower hazard of pregnancy and 42-day-longer median time to pregnancy than cows without CE. When the three different diagnostic methods were used as independent variables in a Cox's proportional hazard model that evaluated hazard of pregnancy, the variable PVD was the only statistically significant variable. Combined PUL and CE or combined PUL and PVD had no additional effects on hazard of pregnancy when compared with only PUL, only PVD, or only CE as the criterion to determine endometritis. However, combined PVD and CE had an additive detrimental effect on reproductive performance. The sensitivity and specificity of each of TP, PUL, PVD, and CE for predicting nonpregnancy at 300 days postpartum were all similar. In conclusion, TP-positive cows had impaired reproductive performance and increased likelihood of PVD and PUL. Additionally, TP-positive cows tended to have an increased prevalence of CE. Cows with PVD had the lowest reproductive performance when compared to cows with PUL or CE, suggesting that PVD at 35 days postpartum is a better criterion for the diagnosis of endometritis and reproductive failure. PMID:26483313

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18, an African fermented camel milk isolate with adaptations to dairy environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius (Sii) belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex associated with several human and animal infections. Sii is a predominant bacterium in spontaneously fermented milk products in Africa. The genome sequence of Sii strain CJ18 was compared with that of other Streptococcus species to identify dairy adaptations including genome decay such as in Streptococcus thermophilus, traits for its competitiveness in spontaneous milk fermentation and to assess potential health risks for consumers. Results The genome of Sii CJ18 harbors several unique regions in comparison to Sii ATCC BAA-102T, among others an enlarged exo- and capsular polysaccharide operon; Streptococcus thermophilus-associated genes; a region containing metabolic and hypothetical genes mostly unique to CJ18 and the dairy isolate Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus; and a second oligopeptide transport operon. Dairy adaptations in CJ18 are reflected by a high percentage of pseudogenes (4.9%) representing genome decay which includes the inactivation of the lactose phosphotransferase system (lacIIABC) by multiple transposases integration. The presence of lacS and lacZ genes is the major dairy adaptation affecting lactose metabolism pathways also due to the disruption of lacIIABC. We constructed mutant strains of lacS, lacZ and lacIIABC and analyzed the resulting strains of CJ18 to confirm the redirection of lactose metabolism via LacS and LacZ. Natural competence genes are conserved in both Sii strains, but CJ18 contains a lower number of CRISPR spacers which indicates a reduced defense capability against alien DNA. No classical streptococcal virulence factors were detected in both Sii strains apart from those involved in adhesion which should be considered niche factors. Sii-specific virulence factors are not described. Several Sii-specific regions encoding uncharacterized proteins provide new leads for virulence analyses and investigation of the unclear association of dairy and clinical Sii with human diseases. Conclusions The genome of the African dairy isolate Sii CJ18 clearly differs from the human isolate ATCC BAA-102T. CJ18 possesses a high natural competence predisposition likely explaining the enlarged genome. Metabolic adaptations to the dairy environment are evident and especially lactose uptake corresponds to S. thermophilus. Genome decay is not as advanced as in S. thermophilus (10-19%) possibly due to a shorter history in dairy fermentations. PMID:23521820

  5. Species belonging to the "Streptococcus milleri" group: antimicrobial susceptibility and comparative prevalence in significant clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Bantar, C; Fernandez Canigia, L; Relloso, S; Lanza, A; Bianchini, H; Smayevsky, J

    1996-01-01

    The association between the three species belonging to the "Streptococcus milleri" group and different sites of isolation was examined for 73 successive strains recovered from clinically significant, purulent infections. Susceptibility testing was performed on 64 of these strains. The present study supports the association of particular species with different clinical sources. Susceptibility data suggest that emerging penicillin resistance among Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius isolates may represent a potential clinical problem in the therapeutic management of infections caused by these species. PMID:8818904

  6. Splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a young healthy man

    PubMed Central

    Caire, William; Nair, Rajasree; Bridges, Debbie

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of splenic abscess with multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a healthy young man without any identifiable risk factors, which resolved with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Streptococcus intermedius, a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, is a common commensal organism of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and it is a known cause of deep-seated infections. Suppurative infections caused by Streptococcus anginosus group are sometimes associated with bacteremia, but hematogenous spread of infection from an occult source leading to concurrent splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses has never been previously reported in a healthy young individual. PMID:21738290

  7. [Fever, malaise and new onset mitral valve insufficiency. Subacute Streptococcus bovis mitral valve endocarditis ].

    PubMed

    Burri, E; Laffer, R; Steuerwald, M; Cathomas, G; Zimmerli, W

    2004-05-01

    A 62-year-old patient with low grade fever, fatigue, arthralgia and newly discovered mitral regurgitation was diagnosed with subacute endocarditis. Streptococcus bovis grew from all six blood culture bottles. Streptococcus bovis is known to be associated with gastrointestinal neoplasias. Therefore a colonoscopy was performed and two polyps were removed. Histological analysis revealed a tubulovillous adenoma and a serrated adenoma. Colonoscopy is mandatory for all patients with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis even without any symptoms for colorectal neoplasia. The significance of Streptococcus bovis for the carcinogenesis of colorectal neoplasias and the possible alternative pathway for colorectal carcinomas through serrated adenomas will be discussed. PMID:15185488

  8. Nature GeNetics VOLUME 46 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2014 305 EvasionofclinicalinterventionsbyStreptococcus pneumoniae

    E-print Network

    Kaski, Samuel

    Streptococcus pneumoniae occursthroughselectionofnon-susceptiblegenomic variants.Wereportwhole-genomesequencingof3 dynamicsandprovideinformationforthedesignoffuture interventionstrategies. S. pneumoniae is a human-restricted nasopharyngeal commensal

  9. Acne as a chronic systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C

    2014-01-01

    Acne is the most common skin disorder. In the majority of cases, acne is a disease that changes its skin distribution and severity over time; moreover, it can be a physically (scar development) and psychologically damaging condition that lasts for years. According to its clinical characteristics, it can be defined as a chronic disease according to the World Health Organization criteria. Acne is also a cardinal component of many systemic diseases or syndromes, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia, seborrhea-acne-hirsutism-androgenetic alopecia syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome, Apert syndrome, synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis-pyoderma gangrenosum-acne syndrome. Recent studies on the Ache hunter gatherers of Paraguay detected the lack of acne in association with markedly lower rates of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular diseases, a finding that indicates either a nutritional or a genetic background of this impressive concomitance. PMID:24767186

  10. Streptococcus suis Infection in Hospitalized Patients, Nakhon Phanom Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Jocelynn T.; Thammathitiwat, Somsak; Ditsungnoen, Darunee; Boonmongkon, Pimpawan; Sangwichian, Ornuma; Prasert, Kriengkrai; Srihapanya, Sankhom; Sornwong, Kanlaya; Kerdsin, Anusak; Dejsirilert, Surang; Baggett, Henry C.; Olsen, Sonja J.

    2015-01-01

    In Nakhon Phanom, Thailand, we identified 38 hospitalized patients with Streptococcus suis infection during 2006–2012. Deafness developed in 12 patients; none died. Thirty-five reported recent exposure to pigs/pork. Annual incidence was 0.1–2.2 cases/100,000 population (0.2–3.2 in persons >20 years of age). Clinicians should consider S. suis infection in areas where pig exposure is common. PMID:25625540

  11. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in children, Malawi, 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Cornick, Jennifer E; Everett, Dean B; Broughton, Caroline; Denis, Brigitte B; Banda, Daniel L; Carrol, Enitan D; Parry, Christopher M

    2011-06-01

    Of 176 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children in Malawi, common serotypes were 1 (23%), 6A/B (18%), 14 (6%), and 23F (6%). Coverage with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was 39%; PCV10 and PCV13 increased coverage to 66% and 88%, respectively. We found chloramphenicol resistance in 27% of isolates and penicillin nonsusceptibility in 10% (by using meningitis breakpoints); all were ceftriaxone susceptible. PMID:21749782

  12. Serotype Distribution and Drug Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Palestinian Territories

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Randa; Abu Rayyan, Amal; Zheiman, Inas; Idkeidek, Suzan; Baraghithi, Sabri; Rishmawi, Nabeel; Turkuman, Sultan; Abu-Diab, Afaf; Ghneim, Riyad; Zoughbi, Madeleine; Dauodi, Rula; Ghneim, Raed; Issa, Abed-El-Razeq; Siryani, Issa; Al Qas, Randa; Liddawi, Rawan; Khamash, Hatem; Kanaan, Moein; Marzouqa, Hiyam

    2011-01-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes, we analyzed isolates from blood cultures of sick children residing in the West Bank before initiation of pneumococcal vaccination. Of 120 serotypes isolated, 50.8%, 73.3%, and 80.8% of the bacteremia cases could have been prevented by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotype 14 was the most drug-resistant serotype isolated. PMID:21192863

  13. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  14. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lianci; Kang, Shuai; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Li, Zhengwen; Zou, Yuanfeng; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Yin, Lizi; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng; Jing, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, morphology and protein of the S. agalactiae cells treated with berberine. The antibacterial susceptibility test result indicated minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae was 78 ?g/mL and the time-kill curves showed the correlation of concentration-time. After the bacteria was exposed to 78 ?g/mL berberine, the fragmentary cell membrane and cells unequal division were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating the bacterial cells were severely damaged. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) study demonstrated that berberine could damage bacterial cells through destroying cellular proteins. Meanwhile, Fluorescence microscope revealed that berberine could affect the synthesis of DNA. In conclusion, these results strongly suggested that berberine may damage the structure of bacterial cell membrane and inhibit synthesis of protein and DNA, which cause Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria to die eventually. PMID:26191220

  15. Structure of a conjugative element in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.N.; Priebe, S.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have cloned and mapped a 69-kilobase (kb) region of the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae DP1322, which carries the conjugative Omega(cat-tet) insertion from S. pneumoniae BM6001. This element proved to be 65.5 kb in size. Location of the junctions was facilitated by cloning a preferred target region from the wild-type strain Rx1 recipient genome. This target site was preferred by both the BM6001 element and the cat-erm-tet element from Streptococcus agalactiae B109. Within the BM6001 element cat and tet were separated by 30 kb, and cat was flanked by two copies of a sequence that was also present in the recipient strain Rx1 DNA. Another sequence at least 2.4 kb in size was found inside the BM6001 element and at two places in the Rx1 genome. Its role is unknown. The ends of the BM6001 element appear to be the same as those of the B109 element, both as seen after transfer to S. pneumoniae and as mapped by others in pDP5 after transposition in Streptococcus faecalis. No homology is seen between the ends of the BM6001 element and no evidence found suggesting that it ever circularizes.

  16. Streptococcus castoreus sp. nov., isolated from a beaver (Castor fiber).

    PubMed

    Lawson, Paul A; Foster, Geoffrey; Falsen, Enevold; Markopoulos, Susanne J; Collins, Matthew D

    2005-03-01

    A previously undescribed, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, Streptococcus-like organism originating from a European beaver (Castor fiber) was subjected to a taxonomic study. The organism displayed beta-haemolytic activity and gave a positive reaction with Lancefield group A antisera. Based on the results of biochemical testing, the organism was tentatively identified as a member of the genus Streptococcus, but it did not correspond phenotypically to any recognized species of this genus. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed this assignment, with the bacterium forming a hitherto unknown subline within the genus. Sequence divergence values of greater than 3 % from other reference streptococcal species, however, demonstrated that the unidentified coccus-shaped organism represents a hitherto unknown species. Based on phenotypic and molecular phylogenetic evidence, it is therefore proposed that the unknown organism from a beaver be classified as a novel species, Streptococcus castoreus sp. nov. The type strain is M605815/03/2(T) (=CCUG 48115(T)=CIP 108205(T)). PMID:15774672

  17. Whole genome investigation of a divergent clade of the pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Abiyad; Weinert, Lucy A.; Peters, Sarah E.; Howell, Kate J.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Wang, Jinhong; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major porcine and zoonotic pathogen responsible for significant economic losses in the pig industry and an increasing number of human cases. Multiple isolates of S. suis show marked genomic diversity. Here, we report the analysis of whole genome sequences of nine pig isolates that caused disease typical of S. suis and had phenotypic characteristics of S. suis, but their genomes were divergent from those of many other S. suis isolates. Comparison of protein sequences predicted from divergent genomes with those from normal S. suis reduced the size of core genome from 793 to only 397 genes. Divergence was clear if phylogenetic analysis was performed on reduced core genes and MLST alleles. Phylogenies based on certain other genes (16S rRNA, sodA, recN, and cpn60) did not show divergence for all isolates, suggesting recombination between some divergent isolates with normal S. suis for these genes. Indeed, there is evidence of recent recombination between the divergent and normal S. suis genomes for 249 of 397 core genes. In addition, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene and 132 genes that were conserved between the divergent isolates and representatives of the broader Streptococcus genus showed that divergent isolates were more closely related to S. suis. Six out of nine divergent isolates possessed a S. suis-like capsule region with variation in capsular gene sequences but the remaining three did not have a discrete capsule locus. The majority (40/70), of virulence-associated genes in normal S. suis were present in the divergent genomes. Overall, the divergent isolates extend the current diversity of S. suis species but the phenotypic similarities and the large amount of gene exchange with normal S. suis gives insufficient evidence to assign these isolates to a new species or subspecies. Further, sampling and whole genome analysis of more isolates is warranted to understand the diversity of the species. PMID:26583006

  18. Antigenic distribution of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from pregnant women at Garankuwa hospital – South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chukwu, Martina O; Mavenyengwa, Rooyen Tinago; Monyama, Charles M; Bolukaoto, John Y; Lebelo, Sogolo L; Maloba, Motlatji RB; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Moyo, Sylvester Rogers

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS) is globally recognised as one of the leading causes of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. It also causes adverse pregnancy outcomes such as stillbirth and miscarriages. Incidence of invasive disease is increasing in non-pregnant adults with underlying medical conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus). Epidemiological studies of GBS infections are based on capsular serotyping. Genotyping of the surface anchored protein genes is also becoming an important tool for GBS studies. Currently ten different GBS serotypes have been identified. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of GBS capsular types (CTs) and surface anchored protein genes in isolates from colonized pregnant women attending antenatal clinic, at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital, Garankuwa, Pretoria, South Africa. Methods The samples were collected over 11 months and cultured on selective media. GBS was identified using different morphological and biochemical tests. Capsular typing was done using latex agglutination test and conventional PCR. Multiplex PCR with specific primers was used to detect the surface anchored protein genes. Results Of the 413 pregnant women recruited, 128 (30.9%) were colonized with GBS. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) typing test showed that CPS type III (29.7%) was the most prevalent capsular type followed by CPS type Ia (25.8%), II (15.6%), IV (8.6%), V (10.9%) and Ib (8.6%); 0.7% of the isolates were nontypeable. Multiplex PCR revealed that the surface proteins genes were possessed by all the capsular types: rib (44.5%), bca (24.7%), alp2/3 (17.9%), epsilon (8.6%) and alp4 (4.7%). Conclusion The common capsular types found in this study are Ia, III, and II. The most common protein genes identified were rib and bca, and the distribution of the surface protein genes among the isolates of different capsular types showed similar trends to the distribution reported from previous studies. PMID:26716101

  19. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. PMID:26314916

  20. A novel C5a-derived immunobiotic peptide reduces Streptococcus agalactiae colonization through targeted bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Courtney K; Patras, Kathryn A; Zlamal, Jaime E; Thoman, Marilyn L; Morgan, Edward L; Sanderson, Sam D; Doran, Kelly S

    2013-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes the cervicovaginal tract in approximately 25% of healthy women. Although colonization is asymptomatic, GBS can be vertically transmitted to newborns peripartum, causing severe disease such as pneumonia and meningitis. Current prophylaxis, consisting of late gestation screening and intrapartum antibiotics, has failed to completely prevent transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in the United States. Lack of an effective vaccine and emerging antibiotic resistance necessitate exploring novel therapeutic strategies. We have employed a host-directed immunomodulatory therapy using a novel peptide, known as EP67, derived from the C-terminal region of human complement component C5a. Previously, we have demonstrated in vivo that EP67 engagement of the C5a receptor (CD88) effectively limits staphylococcal infection by promoting cytokine release and neutrophil infiltration. Here, using our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, we observed that EP67 treatment results in rapid clearance of GBS from the murine vagina. However, this was not dependent on functional neutrophil recruitment or CD88 signaling, as EP67 treatment reduced the vaginal bacterial load in mice lacking CD88 or the major neutrophil receptor CXCr2. Interestingly, we found that EP67 inhibits GBS growth in vitro and in vivo and that antibacterial activity was specific to Streptococcus species. Our work establishes that EP67-mediated clearance of GBS is likely due to direct bacterial killing rather than to enhanced immune stimulation. We conclude that EP67 may have potential as a therapeutic to control GBS vaginal colonization. PMID:23979760

  1. Genome specialization and decay of the strangles pathogen, Streptococcus equi, is driven by persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Simon R.; Robinson, Carl; Steward, Karen F.; Webb, Katy S.; Paillot, Romain; Parkhill, Julian; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Waller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide, is caused by Streptococcus equi. Despite its prevalence, the global diversity and mechanisms underlying the evolution of S. equi as a host-restricted pathogen remain poorly understood. Here, we define the global population structure of this important pathogen and reveal a population replacement in the late 19th or early 20th Century. Our data reveal a dynamic genome that continues to mutate and decay, but also to amplify and acquire genes despite the organism having lost its natural competence and become host-restricted. The lifestyle of S. equi within the horse is defined by short-term acute disease, strangles, followed by long-term infection. Population analysis reveals evidence of convergent evolution in isolates from post-acute disease samples as a result of niche adaptation to persistent infection within a host. Mutations that lead to metabolic streamlining and the loss of virulence determinants are more frequently found in persistent isolates, suggesting that the pathogenic potential of S. equi reduces as a consequence of long-term residency within the horse post-acute disease. An example of this is the deletion of the equibactin siderophore locus that is associated with iron acquisition, which occurs exclusively in persistent isolates, and renders S. equi significantly less able to cause acute disease in the natural host. We identify several loci that may similarly be required for the full virulence of S. equi, directing future research toward the development of new vaccines against this host-restricted pathogen. PMID:26160165

  2. Hypopituitarism as consequence of late neonatal infection by Group B streptococcus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Santana; Fernandes, Ana Lourdes Lima Araújo; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by dysfunction of the pituitary gland hormone production. The insults of the perinatal period, which includes the late infection by Group B Streptococcus, consists in a rare etiology of this condition. We present the case of a 39-days-old infant with meningitis caused by Streptococcus Group B, which showed, among other consequences, hypopituitarism. PMID:26161231

  3. Discovery and characterization of sialic acid O-acetylation in group B Streptococcus

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    of contaminated vaginal fluids. Pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis are potential complications, reflecting an arrayDiscovery and characterization of sialic acid O-acetylation in group B Streptococcus Amanda L, New York, NY, and approved June 21, 2004 (received for review April 28, 2004) Group B Streptococcus

  4. Group B Streptococcus Engages an Inhibitory Siglec through Sialic Acid Mimicry to Blunt Innate Immune and

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Streptococcus (GBS) is a common agent of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns. The GBS surface capsule cause of neonatal pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis [1,2,3], and GBS colonization during pregnancyGroup B Streptococcus Engages an Inhibitory Siglec through Sialic Acid Mimicry to Blunt Innate

  5. Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in asymptomatic, community-dwelling elderly in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Deursen, Anna M M; van den Bergh, Menno R; Sanders, Elisabeth A M

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the upper respiratory tract by Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered prerequisite for pneumococcal disease. Despite high rates of pneumococcal disease in elderly, pneumococcal carriage rates are usually below 5% when detected by the conventional culture method. We assessed pneumococcal carriage in 330 asymptomatic community-dwelling elderly aged 65 years and older. While pneumococci were cultured from 25 (8%) individuals, 65 (20%) elderly were positive for the pneumococcus-specific lytA gene when tested by quantitative-PCR, increasing the overall number of carriers to 75 (22%). Significantly more oropharyngeal samples were pneumococci-positive (18% versus 10%, p<0.001) when tested by the molecular method as compared to nasopharyngeal samples. Our findings indicate that pneumococcal carriage in elderly is higher than previously reported with up to 1 in 5 asymptomatic community-dwelling elderly positive for pneumococcal carriage, when detected by qPCR. The detection of pneumococci by conventional culture alone, greatly underestimates S. pneumoniae colonization in elderly. PMID:26602269

  6. Interferon-? from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-? in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-? to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-? mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1? and TNF-?, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-? antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-? produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  7. Gene cloning and characterization of MdeA, a novel multidrug efflux pump in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Cho, Eun Ji; Joo, Seoung-Je; Chung, Jung-Min; Son, Byoung Yil; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Young-Man; Kwon, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Eun-Woo

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug resistance, especially multidrug efflux mechanisms that extrude structurally unrelated cytotoxic compounds from the cell by multidrug transporters, is a serious problem and one of the main reasons for the failure of therapeutic treatment of infections by pathogenic microorganisms as well as of cancer cells. Streptococcus mutans is considered one of the primary causative agents of dental caries and periodontal disease, which comprise the most common oral diseases. A fragment of chromosomal DNA from S. mutans KCTC3065 was cloned using Escherichia coli KAM32 as host cells lacking major multidrug efflux pumps. Although E. coli KAM32 cells were very sensitive to many antimicrobial agents, the transformed cells harboring a recombinant plasmid became resistant to several structurally unrelated antimicrobial agents such as tetracycline, kanamycin, rhodamin 6G, ampicillin, acriflavine, ethidium bromide, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride. This suggested that the cloned DNA fragment carries a gene encoding a multidrug efflux pump. Among 49 of the multidrug-resistant transformants, we report the functional gene cloning and characterization of the function of one multidrug efflux pump, namely MdeA from S. mutans, which was expressed in E. coli KAM32. Judging from the structural and biochemical properties, we concluded that MdeA is the first cloned and characterized multidrug efflux pump using the proton motive force as the energy for efflux drugs. PMID:23462018

  8. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis? †

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified—a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (?2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention. PMID:19703977

  9. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D. Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L.; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis. PMID:25852228

  10. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in France before introduction of the PCV-13 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Grall, N; Hurmic, O; Al Nakib, M; Longo, M; Poyart, C; Ploy, M-C; Varon, E; Raymond, J

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the serotype incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from adults and children with invasive disease (IPD) or acute otitis media (AOM) before introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine. During 2009, 494 strains of S. pneumoniae isolated were collected. Complete serotyping by latex antisera and molecular methods was performed. The most frequent serotypes isolated from children with IPD were 1 (26.2%), 19A (25%) and 7F (14.3%). Serotype 19A was predominant (42.1%) in children???2 years, whereas serotype 1 was predominant (63.3%) after the age of 5. Serotype 19A was the most frequently isolated serotype from AOM (62.3%). In adults, serotypes responsible for IPD were 7F (19.4%), 19A (13.7%), 1 (8.4%) and 3 (7.5%). The serotype 19A was predominant in adults older than 65 years (19.1%). The emergence of serotype 12F was observed in adults. Between 2007 and 2009, the introduction of PCV-7 has resulted in a significant decrease of IPD caused by serotypes included in the vaccine, in children as well as in adults, confirming the herd effect. Serotype coverage of PCV-13 was 70% and 80.9% for adult and children's IPD, respectively. PCV-13 will be more efficient in preventing invasive diseases among children and adults. PMID:21499971

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae Translocates into the Myocardium and Forms Unique Microlesions That Disrupt Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Armand O.; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Hankins, Jane S.; Humann, Jessica; Giardina, Jonathan; Faverio, Paola; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Halade, Ganesh V.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Lindsey, Merry L.; Hanes, Martha; Happel, Kyle I.; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory J.; Lorent, Jose A.; Cardinal, Pablo; Granados, Rosario; Esteban, Andres; LeSaux, Claude J.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization of the elderly for invasive pneumococcal disease is frequently accompanied by the occurrence of an adverse cardiac event; these are primarily new or worsened heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia. Herein, we describe previously unrecognized microscopic lesions (microlesions) formed within the myocardium of mice, rhesus macaques, and humans during bacteremic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. In mice, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) severity correlated with levels of serum troponin, a marker for cardiac damage, the development of aberrant cardiac electrophysiology, and the number and size of cardiac microlesions. Microlesions were prominent in the ventricles, vacuolar in appearance with extracellular pneumococci, and remarkable due to the absence of infiltrating immune cells. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin was required for microlesion formation but Interleukin-1? was not detected at the microlesion site ruling out pneumolysin-mediated pyroptosis as a cause of cell death. Antibiotic treatment resulted in maturing of the lesions over one week with robust immune cell infiltration and collagen deposition suggestive of long-term cardiac scarring. Bacterial translocation into the heart tissue required the pneumococcal adhesin CbpA and the host ligands Laminin receptor (LR) and Platelet-activating factor receptor. Immunization of mice with a fusion construct of CbpA or the LR binding domain of CbpA with the pneumolysin toxoid L460D protected against microlesion formation. We conclude that microlesion formation may contribute to the acute and long-term adverse cardiac events seen in humans with IPD. PMID:25232870

  12. A report on the first outbreak of a single clone group A Streptococcus (emm-type 89) tonsillopharyngitis in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Mei; Zhao, Jian-Zhong; Li, Bin-Bin; Yang, Jun-Yong; Dong, Xiao-Gen; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Cao, Bin

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, 28 out of 140 staff working for a film crew in a Beijing movie and television base experienced a sudden onset of fever, sore throat, and/or tiredness, headache within the 24 hour period of July 26-27. All of the patients visited the hospital and were diagnosed as having tonsillopharyngitis. On July 28, 2012, a team of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff arrived and initiated an outbreak investigation. Pharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients for microbiologic analysis. All isolates of the outbreak were analyzed for toxin-genes and drug-resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction, and were performed for the emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. On July 30, 2012, Group A Streptococcus was isolated from eight of the 16 throat swab specimens obtained on site. These isolates were found to have the same genotype emm 89. This is the first report to identify Group A Streptococcus emm type-89 as a cause of tonsillopharyngitis in Beijing, China. PMID:24113070

  13. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (? 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (? 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites (all levels of the digestive tract, skin, breast milk, and body fluids) and included clinical strains, no genetic or genomic niche-specific features could be identified to discriminate specific group. PMID:25311532

  14. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  15. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century

    PubMed Central

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M.; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n?=?2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4–12.9; P?Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly affects native aortic valves. Half of the cases in the present study had concomitant pneumonia, and a considerable number developed meningitis. Mortality was high, mainly in patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Surgery was protective. PMID:26426629

  16. Immunization with Pneumococcal Surface Protein K of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Provides Protection in a Mouse Model of Colonization.

    PubMed

    Keller, Lance E; Luo, Xiao; Thornton, Justin A; Seo, Keun-Seok; Moon, Bo Youn; Robinson, D Ashley; McDaniel, Larry S

    2015-11-01

    Current vaccinations are effective against encapsulated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, but they do not protect against nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp), which is increasing in colonization and incidence of pneumococcal disease. Vaccination with pneumococcal proteins has been assessed for its ability to protect against pneumococcal disease, but several of these proteins are not expressed by NESp. Pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK), an NESp virulence factor, has not been assessed for immunogenic potential or host modulatory effects. Mammalian cytokine expression was determined in an in vivo mouse model and in an in vitro cell culture system. Systemic and mucosal mouse immunization studies were performed to determine the immunogenic potential of PspK. Murine serum and saliva were collected to quantitate specific antibody isotype responses and the ability of antibody and various proteins to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion. Host cytokine response was not reduced by PspK. NESp was able to colonize the mouse nasopharynx as effectively as encapsulated pneumococci. Systemic and mucosal immunization provided protection from colonization by PspK-positive (PspK(+)) NESp. Anti-PspK antibodies were recovered from immunized mice and significantly reduced the ability of NESp to adhere to human epithelial cells. A protein-based pneumococcal vaccine is needed to provide broad protection against encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci in an era of increasing antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape mutants. We demonstrate that PspK may serve as an NESp target for next-generation pneumococcal vaccines. Immunization with PspK protected against pneumococcal colonization, which is requisite for pneumococcal disease. PMID:26311246

  17. A Novel ?-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, ?-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  18. A Novel Pheromone Quorum-Sensing System Controls the Development of Natural Competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius? †

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor ?X, which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  19. Induction of Cytokines by Glucosyltransferases of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jean-San; Lien, Huei-Ting; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chen, Pei-Min; Sun, Andy; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2002-01-01

    Production of proinflammatory cytokines is implicated in the pathogenesis of viridans streptococcus-induced ?-streptococcal shock syndrome and infective endocarditis. Streptococcus mutans, one of the opportunistic pathogens causing infective endocarditis, was reported previously to stimulate monocytes and epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro to produce various cytokines. We found that glucosyltransferases (GTFs) GtfC and GtfD of S. mutans stimulated predominantly the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from T cells cultured in vitro. The level of IL-6 but not of tumor necrosis factor alpha in blood was significantly elevated when rats were injected intravenously with S. mutans GS-5, whereas IL-6 was detected at a much lower level when rats were challenged with NHS1DD, an isogenic mutant defective in the expression of GTFs. The serum IL-6 level was elevated in patients with endocarditis caused by different species of viridans streptococci which express GTF homologues. Affinity column-purified GTFs reduced the levels of detectable IL-2 of T cells stimulated by another bacterial antigen, tetanus toxoid. These results suggested that GTFs might modulate the production of Th1-type cytokines and that GTFs of S. mutans play a significant role in stimulating the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 in vivo. PMID:12093691

  20. Lysogenic Transfer of Group A Streptococcus Superantigen Gene among Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Vojtek, Ivo; Pirzada, Zaid A.; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Mastny, Markus; Janapatla, Rajendra P.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    A group A Streptococcus(GAS) isolate,serotypeM12,recovered from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was analyzed for superantigen-carrying prophages, revealing 149, which encodes superantigen SSA. Sequence analysis of the att-L proximal region of 149 showed that the phage had a mosaic nature. Remarkably, we successfully obtained lysogenic conversion of GAS clinical isolates of various M serotypes (M1, M3, M5, M12, M19, M28, and M94), as well as of group C Streptococcus equisimilis (GCSE) clinical isolates, via transfer of a recombinant phage 149::Kmr. Phage149::Kmr from selected lysogenized GAS and GCSE strains could be transferred back to M12 GAS strains. Our data indicate that horizontal transfer of lysogenic phages among GAS can occur across the M-type barrier; these data also provide further support for the hypothesis that toxigenic conversion can occur via lysogeny between species. Streptococci might employ this mechanism specifically to allow more efficient adaptation to changing host challenges, potentially leading to fitter and more virulent clones. PMID:18179387

  1. Characterisation of Streptococcus suis isolates from wild boars (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Sánchez del Rey, Verónica; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Briones, Víctor; Lavín, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Vela, Ana Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Wild boar are widely distributed throughout the Iberian Peninsula and can carry potentially virulent strains of Streptococcus suis. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. suis in wild boars from two large geographical regions of Spain. Serotypes 1, 2, 7 and 9 identified were further genetically characterised by virulence-associated genotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine the population structure of S. suis carried by these animals. Streptococcus suis was isolated from 39.1% of the wild boars examined: serotype 9 was the most frequently isolated (12.5%), followed by serotype 1 (2.5%). Serotype 2 was rarely isolated (0.3%). Eighteen additional serotypes were identified indicating wide diversity of this pathogen within the wild boar population. This heterogeneity was confirmed by PFGE and MLST analyses and the majority of isolates exhibited the virulence-associated genotype mrp-/epf-/sly-. The results of this study highlight that the carriage of S. suis by wild boars is commonplace. However, MLST data indicate that these isolates are not related to prevalent clonal complexes ST1, ST16, ST61 and ST87 typically associated with infection of pigs or humans in Europe. PMID:24726078

  2. Comparative molecular analysis of ovine and bovine Streptococcus uberis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, T L; Smith, D G E; Fitzpatrick, J L; Zadoks, R N; Fontaine, M C

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus uberis causes clinical and subclinical mastitis in cattle and sheep, but it is unknown whether the composition of Strep. uberis populations differs between host species. To address this, we characterized a collection of bovine and ovine Strep. uberis isolates with shared geographical and temporal origins by means of an expanded multilocus sequence typing scheme. Among 14 ovine and 35 bovine isolates, 35 allelic profiles were detected. Each allelic profile was associated with a single host species and all but one were new to the multilocus sequence typing database. The median number of new alleles per isolate was higher for ovine isolates than for bovine isolates. None of the ovine isolates belonged to the global clonal complexes 5 or 143, which are commonly associated with bovine mastitis and which have a wide geographical distribution. Ovine isolates also differed from bovine isolates in carriage of plasminogen activator genes, with significantly higher prevalence of pauB in ovine isolates. Isolates that were negative for yqiL, one of the targets of multilocus sequence typing, were found among ovine and bovine isolates and were not associated with a specific sequence type or global clonal complex. One bovine isolate carried a gapC allele that was probably acquired through lateral gene transfer, most likely from Streptococcus salivarius. We conclude that ovine isolates are distinct from bovine isolates of Strep. uberis, and that recombination between isolates from different host species or bacterial species could contribute to changes in virulence gene profiles with relevance for vaccine development. PMID:23200465

  3. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, D C

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employing a combination of ion-exchange column chromatography, gel filtration column chromatography, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All four proteases could be eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at a sodium chloride gradient concentration of 0.25 M but were separable by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-100 column. They varied in molecular weights as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from approximately 13,000 to 230,000. All four proteases had pH optima of between 8.0 and 9.0, and two of the proteases were active against casein, human serum albumin, and gelatin but were not active against elastin and collagen. The remaining two proteases were able to degrade only casein and gelatin. These results show that S. sanguis is able to excrete maximal levels of potentially destructive enzymes when the organisms are not actively multiplying. This finding may explain some of the damage caused in heart tissue by these organisms during subacute bacterial endocarditis. Images PMID:6759404

  4. Increased Risk for Group B Streptococcus Sepsis in Young Infants Exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004–20081

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Thigpen, Michael C.; Velaphi, Sithembiso C.; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J.; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004–2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored. PMID:25812061

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, D. Tien; Louwen, Rogier; Elberse, Karin; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Luijendijk, Ad; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These results demonstrate that pneumococcal colonization can enhance subsequent HRSV infection, and provide tools for additional mechanistic and intervention studies. PMID:25970287

  6. Pneumococcal Disease Fast Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccination For Clinicians Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Clinical Features Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For Laboratorians Drug Resistance Surveillance & Reporting Global ...

  7. Effect of emodin on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans and the development of caries in rats

    PubMed Central

    XU, JING-SHU; CUI, YUN; LIAO, XIAN-MIN; TAN, XIAO-BIN; CAO, XUE

    2014-01-01

    Emodin is an active herbal component traditionally used in East Asian countries for treating a variety of diseases. The present study investigated the effects of emodin on specific virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in vitro and on caries development in vivo. The growth and acid production of S. mutans were significantly inhibited by emodin (0.5–2 mg/ml). Emodin also significantly suppressed the synthesis of insoluble glucans by S. mutans. Furthermore, the topical application of emodin reduced the incidence and severity of carious lesions in rats. These results suggest that the natural compound emodin may be a novel pharmacological agent for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. PMID:25187845

  8. Evaluation of a new lateral flow test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Uldum, Søren A; Sørensen, Jesper F; Skovsted, Ian C; Otte, Sanne; Elverdal, Pernille L

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of the etiologic agent is important in order to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. In this study we evaluated the first commercial combined test for the agents of pneumococcal pneumonia and Legionnaires' disease based on urinary antigen detection, the ImmuView® Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. In this evaluation, the new test had a significantly higher sensitivity than the BinaxNOW® lateral flow tests and the Binax® EIA test. This identifies the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test as a fast and sensitive point of care test for identification of the infectious agent in a major group of patients with pneumonia. PMID:26141796

  9. A Bivalent Vaccine Based on a Replication-Incompetent Influenza Virus Protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Hiroaki; Piao, Zhenyu; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Akeda, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Shinji; Horimoto, Taisuke

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia; together with influenza virus, it represents an important public health burden. Although vaccination is the most effective prophylaxis against these infectious agents, no single vaccine simultaneously provides protective immunity against both S. pneumoniae and influenza virus. Previously, we demonstrated that several replication-incompetent influenza viruses efficiently elicit IgG in serum and IgA in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Here, we generated a replication-incompetent hemagglutinin knockout (HA-KO) influenza virus possessing the sequence for the antigenic region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). Although this virus (HA-KO/PspA virus) could replicate only in an HA-expressing cell line, it infected wild-type cells and expressed both viral proteins and PspA. PspA- and influenza virus-specific antibodies were detected in nasal wash and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and in sera from mice intranasally inoculated with HA-KO/PspA virus, and mice inoculated with HA-KO/PspA virus were completely protected from lethal challenge with either S. pneumoniae or influenza virus. Further, bacterial colonization of the nasopharynx was prevented in mice immunized with HA-KO/PspA virus. These results indicate that HA-KO/PspA virus is a promising bivalent vaccine candidate that simultaneously confers protective immunity against both S. pneumoniae and influenza virus. We believe that this strategy offers a platform for the development of bivalent vaccines, based on replication-incompetent influenza virus, against pathogens that cause respiratory infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza viruses cause contagious diseases, but no single vaccine can simultaneously provide protective immunity against both pathogens. Here, we used reverse genetics to generate a replication-incompetent influenza virus carrying the sequence for the antigenic region of pneumococcal surface protein A and demonstrated that mice immunized with this virus were completely protected from lethal doses of infection with either influenza virus or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We believe that this strategy, which is based on a replication-incompetent influenza virus possessing the antigenic region of other respiratory pathogens, offers a platform for the development of bivalent vaccines. PMID:25210171

  10. Macrorestriction Fingerprinting of “Streptococcus milleri” Group Bacteria by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bartie, K. L.; Wilson, M. J.; Williams, D. W.; Lewis, M. A. O.

    2000-01-01

    Although isolates of the “Streptococcus milleri” group (SMG) of bacteria are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, they are frequently encountered in purulent infections from a range of body sites. The genetic diversity of 91 epidemiologically unrelated SMG isolates (including 37 commensal strains and 49 disease-associated strains) was analyzed by macrorestriction fingerprinting (MF). The genomes were digested with SmaI and ApaI independently, and fragments were resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Similarities between banding profiles were determined, and strains were clustered on this basis into dendrograms. In common with other commensal species that have been examined by MF, considerable genetic diversity was revealed. In addition, the clustering of strains tended to support the current taxonomic position of this heterogeneous group. The present study has shown that MF is a powerful tool for characterization of SMG strains and that its use is likely to be of great value in epidemiological and population genetic studies of this group of bacteria. PMID:10834967

  11. Conjugative transfer of resistance determinants among human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Tatiana Castro Abreu; Costa, Natália Silva; Corrêa, Ana Beatriz de Almeida; de Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Menezes; de Mattos, Marcos Correa; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Benchetrit, Leslie Claude

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major source of human perinatal diseases and bovine mastitis. Erythromycin (Ery) and tetracycline (Tet) are usually employed for preventing human and bovine infections although resistance to such agents has become common among GBS strains. Ery and Tet resistance genes are usually carried by conjugative transposons (CTns) belonging to the Tn916 family, but their presence and transferability among GBS strains have not been totally explored. Here we evaluated the presence of Tet resistance genes (tetM and tetO) and CTns among Ery-resistant (Ery-R) and Ery-susceptible (Ery-S) GBS strains isolated from human and bovine sources; and analyzed the ability for transferring resistance determinants between strains from both origins. Tet resistance and int-Tn genes were more common among Ery-R when compared to Ery-S isolates. Conjugative transfer of all resistance genes detected among the GBS strains included in this study (ermA, ermB, mef, tetM and tetO), in frequencies between 1.10?7 and 9.10?7, was possible from bovine donor strains to human recipient strain, but not the other way around. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of in vitro conjugation of Ery and Tet resistance genes among GBS strains recovered from different hosts. PMID:25477908

  12. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharide production, and virulence by an oxazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lulu; Ren, Zhi; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, a biofilm-related oral disease, is a result of disruption of the microbial ecological balance in the oral environment. Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the primary cariogenic bacteria, produces glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The EPSs, especially water-insoluble glucans, contribute to the formation of dental plaque, biofilm stability, and structural integrity, by allowing bacteria to adhere to tooth surfaces and supplying the bacteria with protection against noxious stimuli and other environmental attacks. The identification of novel alternatives that selectively inhibit cariogenic organisms without suppressing oral microbial residents is required. The goal of the current study is to investigate the influence of an oxazole derivative on S. mutans biofilm formation and the development of dental caries in rats, given that oxazole and its derivatives often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. Our data shows that one particular oxazole derivative, named 5H6, inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms and prevented synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides by antagonizing Gtfs in vitro, without affecting the growth of the bacteria. In addition, topical applications with the inhibitor resulted in diminished incidence and severity of both smooth and sulcal surface caries in vivo with a lower percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque compared to the control group (P?

  13. Spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 8-ST63 Multidrug-Resistant Recombinant Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; García, Ernesto; Fenoll, Asunción; Calatayud, Laura; Cercenado, Emilia; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Bouza, Emilio; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, a total of 131 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae multidrug-resistant invasive serotype 8 have been detected in Spain. These isolates showed resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. All isolates were obtained from adult patients and shared a common genotype (sequence type [ST]63; penicillin-binding protein 1a [pbp1a], pbp2b, and pbp2x gene profiles; ermB and tetM genes; and a ParC-S79F change). Sixty-eight isolates that required a ciprofloxacin MIC ?16 ?g/mL had additional gyrA gene changes. Serotype 8-ST63 pbp2x sequences were identical with those of antimicrobial drug–susceptible serotype 8-ST53 isolates. Serotype 8-ST63 pbp2b sequences were identical with those of the multidrug-resistant Sweden 15A-ST63 clone. Recombination between the capsular locus and flanking regions of an ST53 isolate (donor) and an ST63 pneumococcus (recipient) generated the novel 15A-ST63 clone. One recombination point was upstream of pbp2x and another was within pbp1a. A serotype 8-ST63 clone was identified as a cause of invasive disease in Spain. PMID:25340616

  14. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus infantarius subspecies coli Isolated from Sea Otters with Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Gill, Verena A; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; LeFebvre, Rance B; Byrne, Barbara A

    2015-06-01

    The Gram positive bacterial coccus Streptococcus infantarius subspecies coli is increasingly linked with development of fatal vegetative infective endocarditis and septicemia in humans, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) and other animals. However, the pathogenesis of these infections is poorly understood. Using S. infantarius subsp. coli strains isolated from sea otters with infective endocarditis, this study evaluated adherence and invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells, adherence to extracellular matrix components, and macrophage survival. Significant adherence to endothelial-derived cells was observed for 62% of isolates, 24% adhered to epithelial cell lines, and 95% invaded one or both cell types in vitro. The importance of the hyaluronic acid capsule in host cell adherence and invasion was also evaluated. Capsule removal significantly reduced epithelial adherence and invasion for most S. infantarius subsp. coli isolates, suggesting that the capsule facilitates attachment to and invasion of epithelium. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing revealed that all isolates adhered significantly to the extracellular matrix components collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin and hyaluronic acid. Finally, significant bacterial survival following phagocytosis by macrophages was apparent for 81% of isolates at one or more time points. Taken collectively these findings indicate that S. infantarius subsp. coli has multiple pathogenic properties that may be important to host colonization, invasion and disease. PMID:25838157

  15. Arginase 1 activity worsens lung-protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Sarah; Brumshagen, Christina; Aschenbrenner, Franziska; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 helper cell (Th2) dominated chronic lung diseases such as asthma are characterized by an increased risk for bacterial lung infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. Arginase 1 (Arg1) has been suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma, and is rapidly induced in lung macrophages by Th2 cytokines, thereby limiting macrophage-derived antimicrobial nitric oxide (NO) production. Here we examined the effect of Th2 cytokine induced upregulation or lung myeloid cell specific conditional knockdown of Arg1 on lung resistance against Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) in mice. Lung macrophages responded with a profound induction of Arg1 mRNA and protein to treatment with IL-13 both in vitro and in vivo. IL-13-induced Arg1 activity in the lungs of mice led to significantly attenuated lung-protective immunity against Spn, while conditional Arg1 knockdown had no effect on lung-protective immunity against Spn. Collectively, the data show that Th2 cytokine induced increased Arg1 activity worsens lung-protective immunity against Spn, and interventions to block Th2 cytokine induced lung Arg1 activity may thus be a novel immunomodulatory strategy to lower the risk of bacterial infections in asthmatic patients. PMID:25789453

  16. Solution structure of the Big domain from Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals a novel Ca2+-binding module.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Xu, Chao; Tu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen causing acute respiratory infection, otitis media and some other severe diseases in human. In this study, the solution structure of a bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domain from a putative S. pneumoniae surface protein SP0498 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. SP0498 Big domain adopts an eight-?-strand barrel-like fold, which is different in some aspects from the two-sheet sandwich-like fold of the canonical Ig-like domains. Intriguingly, we identified that the SP0498 Big domain was a Ca(2+) binding domain. The structure of the Big domain is different from those of the well known Ca(2+) binding domains, therefore revealing a novel Ca(2+)-binding module. Furthermore, we identified the critical residues responsible for the binding to Ca(2+). We are the first to report the interactions between the Big domain and Ca(2+) in terms of structure, suggesting an important role of the Big domain in many essential calcium-dependent cellular processes such as pathogenesis. PMID:23326635

  17. Mechanisms of platelet aggregation by Streptococcus sanguis, a causative organism in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ford, I; Douglas, C W; Preston, F E; Lawless, A; Hampton, K K

    1993-05-01

    The ability of certain strains of Streptococcus sanguis to aggregate human platelets in vitro may be related to their virulence in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. We have studied the mechanisms of aggregation of human platelets by S. sanguis strain NCTC 7863. Platelet aggregation follows incubation of S. sanguis cells with platelet-rich plasma from normal, healthy adults, after a lag of 7-19 min. Platelet aggregation was accompanied by 5-hydroxytryptamine release and thromboxane B2 production. Aggregation was prevented by aspirin and by EDTA. Platelets from two patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia did not respond to bacteria. Fixed, washed platelets resuspended in normal plasma were not agglutinated by S. sanguis. Blocking the glycoprotein Ib receptor with a monoclonal antibody inhibited aggregation of PRP. However, S. sanguis did not induce von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to platelets; nor did the bacteria prevent ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination or vWF binding. The aggregation response was not related to plasma vWF activity levels in normal subjects or in patients with von Willebrand's disease. The platelet response to S. sanguis therefore resembles true aggregation, requiring the cyclo-oxygenase pathway and the presence of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. The mechanism also involves glycoprotein Ib, but not apparently through irreversible binding of vWF. PMID:8338784

  18. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  19. The SloR/Dlg Metalloregulator Modulates Streptococcus mutans Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rolerson, Elizabeth; Swick, Adam; Newlon, Lindsay; Palmer, Cameron; Pan, Yong; Keeshan, Britton; Spatafora, Grace

    2006-01-01

    Metal ion availability in the human oral cavity plays a putative role in Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and in appropriate formation of the plaque biofilm. In this report, we present evidence that supports such a role for the DtxR-like SloR metalloregulator (called Dlg in our previous publications) in this oral pathogen. Specifically, the results of gel mobility shift assays revealed the sloABC, sloR, comDE, ropA, sod, and spaP promoters as targets of SloR binding. We confirmed differential expression of these genes in a GMS584 SloR-deficient mutant versus the UA159 wild-type progenitor by real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR experiments. The results of additional expression studies support a role for SloR in S. mutans control of glucosyltransferases, glucan binding proteins, and genes relevant to antibiotic resistance. Phenotypic analysis of GMS584 revealed that it forms aberrant biofilms on an abiotic surface, is compromised for genetic competence, and demonstrates heightened incorporation of iron and manganese as well as resistance to oxidative stress compared to the wild type. Taken together, these findings support a role for SloR in S. mutans adherence, biofilm formation, genetic competence, metal ion homeostasis, oxidative stress tolerance, and antibiotic gene regulation, all of which contribute to S. mutans-induced disease. PMID:16816176

  20. Structure and Assembly of Group B Streptococcus Pilus 2b Backbone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization. PMID:25942637

  1. Regulation of Streptococcus mutans PTSBio by the transcriptional repressor NigR

    PubMed Central

    Vujanac, M.; Iyer, V.S.; Sengupta, M.; Ajdic, D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus mutans is implicated in human dental caries, and the carbohydrate metabolism of this organism plays an important role in the formation of this disease. Carbohydrate transport and metabolism are essential for the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity. It is known that a unique phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system PTSBio of S. mutans UA159 is expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms (Mol Oral Microbiol 28: 2013; 114). In this study we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the operon (OBio) encoding the PTSBio and showed that it was repressed by NigR, a LacI-like transcriptional regulator. Using electromobility shift assay, we described two operators to which NigR bound with different affinities. We also identified the transcriptional start site and showed that one of the operators overlaps with the promoter and presumably represses initiation of transcription. Mutational analyses revealed the key nucleotides in the operators required for high-affinity binding of NigR. PTSBio is expressed in S. mutans biofilms so understanding its regulation may provide improved strategies for caries treatment and prevention. PMID:25580872

  2. Liver functional metabolomics discloses an action of L-leucine against Streptococcus iniae infection in tilapias.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Mei; Yang, Man-Jun; Wang, Sanying; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus iniae seriously affects the intensive farming of tilapias. Much work has been conducted on prevention and control of S. iniae infection, but little published information on the metabolic response is available in tilapias against the bacterial infection, and no metabolic modulation way may be adopted to control this disease. The present study used GC/MS based metabolomics to characterize the metabolic profiling of tilapias infected by a lethal dose (LD50) of S. iniae and determined two characteristic metabolomes separately responsible for the survival and dying fishes. A reversal changed metabolite, decreased and increased l-leucine in the dying and survival groups, respectively, was identified as a biomarker which featured the difference between the two metabolomes. More importantly, exogenous l-leucine could be used as a metabolic modulator to elevate survival ability of tilapias infected by S. iniae. These results indicate that tilapias mount metabolic strategies to deal with bacterial infection, which can be regulated by exogenous metabolites such as l-leucine. The present study establishes an alternative way, metabolic modulation, to cope with bacterial infections. PMID:25957884

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  4. Mutual Exclusivity of Hyaluronan and Hyaluronidase in Invasive Group A Streptococcus*

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Aziz, Ramy K.; Kuipers, Kirsten; Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Dahesh, Samira; Choudhury, Biswa; Van Vleet, Jeremy; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Seymour, Lisa M.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; He, Lingjun; Smith, Helen V.; Grimwood, Keith; Beatson, Scott A.; Ghosh, Partho; Walker, Mark J.; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    A recent analysis of group A Streptococcus (GAS) invasive infections in Australia has shown a predominance of M4 GAS, a serotype recently reported to lack the antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule. Here, we use molecular genetics and bioinformatics techniques to characterize 17 clinical M4 isolates associated with invasive disease in children during this recent epidemiology. All M4 isolates lacked HA capsule, and whole genome sequence analysis of two isolates revealed the complete absence of the hasABC capsule biosynthesis operon. Conversely, M4 isolates possess a functional HA-degrading hyaluronate lyase (HylA) enzyme that is rendered nonfunctional in other GAS through a point mutation. Transformation with a plasmid expressing hasABC restored partial encapsulation in wild-type (WT) M4 GAS, and full encapsulation in an isogenic M4 mutant lacking HylA. However, partial encapsulation reduced binding to human complement regulatory protein C4BP, did not enhance survival in whole human blood, and did not increase virulence of WT M4 GAS in a mouse model of systemic infection. Bioinformatics analysis found no hasABC homologs in closely related species, suggesting that this operon was a recent acquisition. These data showcase a mutually exclusive interaction of HA capsule and active HylA among strains of this leading human pathogen. PMID:25266727

  5. Serotype and genotype distribution among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Colombia, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eliana L; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n?=?629) and multilocus sequence typing (n?=?10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ?0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain(6B)ST90, Spain(9V)ST156, Spain(23F)ST81, and Colombia(23F)ST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  6. Humoral Immune Responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Setting of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lumin; Li, Zihai; Wan, Zhuang; Kilby, Andrew; Kilby, J Michael; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) remains one of the most commonly identified causes of bacterial infection in the general population, and the risk is 30-100 fold higher in HIV-infected individuals. Both innate and adaptive host immune responses to pneumococcal infection are important against pathogen invasion. Pneumococcal-specific IgA antibody (Ab) is key to control infection at the mucosal sites. Ab responses against pneumococcal infection by B cells can be generated through T cell-dependent or T cell-independent pathways. Depletion of CD4+ T cells is a hallmark of immunodeficiency in HIV infection and this defect also contributes to B cell dysfunction, which predisposes to infections such as the pneumococcus. Two pneumococcal vaccines have been demonstrated to have potential benefits for HIV-infected patients. One is a T cell dependent 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13); the other is a T cell independent 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). However, many questions remain unknown regarding these two vaccines in the clinical setting in HIV disease. Here we review the latest research regarding B cell immune responses against pneumococcal antigens, whether derived from potentially invading pathogens or vaccinations, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. PMID:26141012

  7. The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall

    E-print Network

    that effectively kill Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae References S. pyogenes, S. uberis, Group C Streptococcus RU 637 PlyC US Pat. 7,582,729 US Pat. 7 only 755 Ply PH US Pat 8,389,469 Yoong et al., J Bacteriol. 2006, 188 (7): 2711 S. pneumoniae 621 Pal

  8. 77 FR 26014 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...as either a carrier and/or immunoenhancer in a polysaccharide vaccine conjugate for prevention of Streptococcus pneumonia infection in humans'') to practice the inventions embodied in the patent application referred to below to Viper Therapeutics,...

  9. MUTACIN IV PRODUCTION IN STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS UA159: CHARACTERIZATION, REGULATION, AND MECHANISM OF SELF-IMMUNITY

    E-print Network

    Hossain, Mohammad Shahnoor

    2012-05-31

    Streptococcus mutans, an oral pathogen, is considered as a principle etiological agent of dental caries. To colonize successfully in the oral cavity, this organism encounters fierce competition with other oral microbiota and this process...

  10. ROLE OF AN ABC TRANSPORTER COMPLEX IN VIOLOGEN TOLERANCE IN STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS

    E-print Network

    Biswas, Saswati

    2011-05-31

    The gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent in the formation of dental caries in humans. To persist in the oral cavity, S. mutans must be able to tolerate rapid and substantial environmental ...

  11. Bath immersion, booster vaccination strategy holds potential for protecting juvenile tilapia against Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is a significant bacterial pathogen that causes hemorrhagic septicemia and meningoencephalitis in tilapia, hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, olive flounder, yellowtail, barramundi and other species of cultured and wild fish worldwide. In tilapia production, vaccination of fry ...

  12. Pleural effusion Due to Streptococcus milleri: Case descriptions.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia Janeth; Molinos, Luis; García-Clemente, Marta; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fleites, Ana; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2014-09-01

    In this study we analyzed the characteristics of patients with pleural effusion secondary to Streptococcus milleri studied retrospectively between January and March 2013 and found seven patients with a mean age of 60 years, 43% of which were smokers and 57% with a drinking habit. The most common associated factors were alcoholism, previous pneumonia and diabetes. Other bacteria were identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroides and Prevotella intermedia capillosus in two patients. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 28 days; six patients underwent pleural drainage by chest tube and one patient needed surgery due to poor clinical progress. The mean duration of hospitalization was 30 days with satisfactory outcome in all cases, despite some changes in residual function. PMID:24439468

  13. CRISPR Immunity Drives Rapid Phage Genome Evolution in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Espino, David; Sharon, Itai; Morovic, Wesley; Stahl, Buffy; Thomas, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacteria rely on CRISPR-Cas systems to provide adaptive immunity against phages, predation by which can shape the ecology and functioning of microbial communities. To characterize the impact of CRISPR immunization on phage genome evolution, we performed long-term bacterium-phage (Streptococcus thermophilus-phage 2972) coevolution experiments. We found that in this species, CRISPR immunity drives fixation of single nucleotide polymorphisms that accumulate exclusively in phage genome regions targeted by CRISPR. Mutation rates in phage genomes highly exceed those of the host. The presence of multiple phages increased phage persistence by enabling recombination-based formation of chimeric phage genomes in which sequences heavily targeted by CRISPR were replaced. Collectively, our results establish CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity as a key driver of phage genome evolution under the conditions studied and highlight the importance of multiple coexisting phages for persistence in natural systems. PMID:25900652

  14. [Primary peritonitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae in childhood].

    PubMed

    van Houten, M A; Ab, E; Zwierstra, R P; Kimpen, J L

    1998-04-01

    Three patients, two boys of 5 months and 6 years and one girl aged 4 years, presented with acute abdominal pain, vomiting and fever, suggesting peritonitis. Imaging examinations (abdominal survey roentgenogram and (or) echography), exploratory laparotomy (in two patients) and blood cultures with growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae led to the diagnosis of primary peritonitis. Intravenous antibiotics led to recovery, in one patient complicated by paralytic ileus, which was treated surgically. Primary peritonitis is a rare condition which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with an acute abdominal syndrome. Conditions requiring surgery should be excluded by imaging examinations or laparotomy. When the diagnosis is confirmed by paracentesis or laparotomy, antibiotic treatment has to be started. PMID:9646612

  15. Hyaluronidase production in Streptococcus milleri in relation to infection.

    PubMed Central

    Unsworth, P F

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and seven (41%) of 262 isolates of Streptococcus milleri, from human sources, produced hyaluronidase. Hyaluronidase production was commoner in beta haemolytic isolates 32 of 39 (82%), many of which were of Lancefield group F. But hyaluronidase was also found in alpha and non-haemolytic isolates, and in groups A, C, G, and non-groupable isolates. There was a strong association between hyaluronidase production and isolation from known internal abscesses (48/58, 83%) compared with isolates from the normal flora of uninfected sites (24/97, 25%). Isolates from 15 patients with endocarditis were uniformly negative, although 13 of 25 (52%) isolates from dental plaque produced the enzyme. Production of hyaluronidase may therefore be an important determinant in the pathogenicity of infection by S milleri and could be helpful in predicting the likelihood of deep purulent lesions in isolates from blood culture. PMID:2732345

  16. Genetic patterns of Streptococcus uberis isolated from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Elina B; Lasagno, Mirta C; Odierno, Liliana M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotypic relationships among 40 Streptococcus uberis isolated from bovine mastitis by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Additionally, the association between PFGE patterns and virulence profiles was investigated. The isolates exhibited 17 PFGE patterns. Different strains were found within and among herds; however, a low number of isolates within the same herd shared an identical PFGE type. No association between PFGE patterns and virulence profiles was found. However, the detection of specific strains in some herds could indicate that some strains are more virulent than others. Further research needs to be undertaken to elucidate new virulence-associated genes that might contribute to the capability of these strains to produce infection. PMID:25861725

  17. Atypical presentation of thoracic spondylodiscitis caused by Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Vincent P; Deng, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis, which is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is an uncommon infection in adults. The diagnosis of spondylodiscitis is often delayed by its vague and non-specific presentations. As part of the normal flora in human mouth and sinuses, Streptococcus mitis is a very rare cause of spondylodiscitis. We report a case of thoracic spondylodiscitis caused by S. mitis in a patient with chronic sinusitis. The patient atypically presented with a sharp chest pain that radiated to the back and the imaging studies were initially negative. He failed outpatient pain management and the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis was confirmed by bone biopsy 6?weeks later. Treatment with antibiotics completely alleviated the pain. Increased awareness and a high index of suspicion are essential for early diagnosis of spondylodiscitis with an atypical presentation. PMID:24842345

  18. Novel shuttle plasmid vehicles for Escherichia-Streptococcus transgeneric cloning.

    PubMed

    Macrina, F L; Evans, R P; Tobian, J A; Hartley, D L; Clewell, D B; Jones, K R

    1983-11-01

    A novel plasmid vector that is able to replicate both in Escherichia coli and in Streptococcus sanguis is described. This 9.2-kb plasmid, designated pVA856, carries Cmr, Tcr, and Emr determinants that are expressed in E. coli. Only the Emr determinant is expressed in S. sanguis. Both the Cmr and the Tcr of pVA856 may be insertionally inactivated. This plasmid affords several different cleavage-ligation strategies for cloning in E. coli followed by subsequent introduction of chimeras into S. sanguis. In addition, we have modified a previously described E. coli-S. sanguis shuttle plasmid [pVA838; Macrina et al., Gene 19 (1982) 345-353], so that it is unable to replicate in S. sanguis. The utility of such a plasmid for cloning and selecting sequences enabling autonomous replication in S. sanguis is demonstrated. PMID:6319229

  19. Streptococcus iniae, a bacterial infection in barramundi Lates calcarifer.

    PubMed

    Bromage, E S; Thomas, A; Owens, L

    1999-05-31

    The cause of ongoing mortality in barramundi Lates calcarifer (Bloch) in seawater culture was identified as Streptococcus iniae by biochemical and physiological tests. This is the first published record of this bacterial species in Australia and the first confirmed report of S. iniae causing mortality in barramundi. The bacterium was highly pathogenic for barramundi when challenged by bath exposure. The pathogen was found to have a LD50 of 2.5 x 10(5) and 3.2 x 10(4) colony-forming units at 48 h and 10 d respectively. Experimental challenge of barramundi resulted in high levels of mortality (> 40%) within a 48 h period. Ten days after the challenge, S. iniae could not be isolated from kidney, spleen, liver or eye of surviving fish. However, the organism was easily isolated from the brain of both moribund and healthy fish, indicating that barramundi can carry the bacterium asymptomatically. PMID:10401583

  20. DNA microarray-based typing of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Heike; Slickers, Peter; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae frequently colonizes the urogenital tract, and it is a major cause of bacterial septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns. For typing purposes, a microarray targeting group B streptococcus (GBS) virulence-associated markers and resistance genes was designed and validated with reference strains, as well as clinical and veterinary isolates. Selected isolates were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing. It was observed that putative typing markers, such as alleles of the alpha-like protein or capsule types, vary independently of each other, and they also vary independently from the affiliation to their multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined sequence types. Thus, it is not possible to assign isolates to sequence types based on the identification of a single distinct marker, such as a capsule type or alp allele. This suggests the occurrence of frequent genomic recombination. For array-based typing, a set of 11 markers (bac, alp, pil1 locus, pepS8, fbsB, capsule locus, hylB, abiG-I/-II plus Q8DZ34, pil2 locus, nss plus srr plus rogB2, and rgfC/A/D/B) was defined that provides a framework for splitting the tested 448 S. agalactiae isolates into 76 strains that clustered mainly according to MLST-defined clonal complexes. There was evidence for region- and host-specific differences in the population structure of S. agalactiae, as well as an overrepresentation of strains related to sequence type 17 among the invasive isolates. The arrays and typing scheme described here proved to be a convenient tool for genotyping large numbers of clinical/veterinary isolates and thus might help obtain insight into the epidemiology of S. agalactiae. PMID:25165085