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Sample records for strong magnetic field

  1. MRS photodiode in strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Rykalin, V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Zutshi, v.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2004-12-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiode in the strong magnetic field of 4.4T, and the possible impact of the quench of the magnet at 4.5T on sensor's operation are reported.

  2. Magnetocaloric effect in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishin, A. M.

    Calculations of magnetic entropy change, Δ SM, and magnetocaloric effect, Δ T, in 3d and 4f magnetics have been carried out, based on the molecular field theory. Δ SM and Δ T have been studied as a function of Debye temperature, θ D, Lande factor, gj, quantum number of total mechanical momentum, J, and also of magnetic phase transition temperatures. Limiting values of Δ SM and Δ T have been determined in extremely strong magnetic fields. The results obtained are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the use of ferromagnetic alloys Tb x Gd 1-x as operating devices of magnetic refrigerating machines in the room temperature range is more efficient than the use of pure Gd. These alloys have been found to have high specific refrigerant capacity over a wide range of fields from 0.1 to 6 T, which enables one to develop highly economic refrigeration devices in which weak fields are applied.

  3. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres Menezes, Débora; Laércio Lopes, Luiz

    2016-02-01

    We revisit three of the mathematical formalisms used to describe magnetized quark matter in compact objects within the MIT and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models and then compare their results. The tree formalisms are based on 1) isotropic equations of state, 2) anisotropic equations of state with different parallel and perpendicular pressures and 3) the assumption of a chaotic field approximation that results in a truly isotropic equation of state. We have seen that the magnetization obtained with both models is very different: while the MIT model produces well-behaved curves that are always positive for large magnetic fields, the NJL model yields a magnetization with lots of spikes and negative values. This fact has strong consequences on the results based on the existence of anisotropic equations of state. We have also seen that, while the isotropic formalism results in maximum stellar masses that increase considerably when the magnetic fields increase, maximum masses obtained with the chaotic field approximation never vary more than 5.5%. The effect of the magnetic field on the radii is opposed in the MIT and NJL models: with both formalisms, isotropic and chaotic field approximation, for a fixed mass, the radii increase with the increase of the magnetic field in the MIT bag model and decrease in the NJL, the radii of quark stars described by the NJL model being smaller than the ones described by the MIT model.

  4. Charm production in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G. de; Strickland, M.

    2014-11-11

    We discuss the effects of a strong magnetic field on B and D mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and the masses of the bound states. Using the Color Evaporation Model we discuss the possible changes in the production of J/ψ and Υ. We briefly comment the recent experimental data.

  5. Bound states in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G.; Ferreira Filho, L. G.

    2013-03-25

    We expect a strong magnetic field to be produced in the perpendicular direction to the reaction plane, in a noncentral heavy-ion collision . The strength of the magnetic field is estimated to be eB{approx}m{sup 2}{sub {pi}}{approx} 0.02 GeV{sup 2} at the RHIC and eB{approx} 15m{sup 2}{sub {pi}}{approx} 0.3 GeV{sup 2} at the LHC. We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on B{sup 0} and D{sup 0} mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and of the mass of the bound states.

  6. Photoneutrino energy losses in strong magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Fassio-Canuto, L.

    1973-01-01

    Previously computed rates of energy losses (Petrosian et al., 1967) ignored the presence of strong magnetic fields, hence the change brought in when such a field (about 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th power G) is included is studied. The results indicate that for T about 10 to the 8th power K and densities rho of about 10,000 g/cu cm, the presence of a strong H field decreases the energy losses by at the most a factor between 10 and 100 in the region up to rho = 1,000,000 g/cu cm. At higher densities the neutrino emissivities are almost identical.

  7. Cold Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. R.; Choi, J.-H.; Povilus, A.; Raithel, G.

    2003-05-01

    The combination of laser-cooling and trapping methods with Rydberg-atom spectroscopy has opened the door to the study of novel ultracold atomic and plasma systems. In particular, the study of Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields, which has previously been restricted to optically accessible low azimuthal quantum numbers |m|, has been expanded to include high azimuthal quantum numbers |m| through new collisional and recombinative processes which can play a role in this regime. We describe our efforts to realize this new regime experimentally with a superconducting atom and plasma trap. In theoretical work, we have implemented an efficient method to calculate the spectra of Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic fields. We use adiabatic basis sets that reflect the disparate time scales of the electronic motion parallel and transverse to the magnetic field. We find that, with increasing absolute value of |m|, non-adiabatic corrections become negligible, the adiabatic basis states and their energies become exact solutions, and the level statistics evolve from a Wigner to a Possonian distribution of the nearest-neighbor energy separations. The analogy between the adiabatically separable regime of large |m| and the behavior of charged particles in Penning traps will be discussed.

  8. Possible adaptation to strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhilnitskaya, Z. N.; Klimovskaya, L. D.; Kuzmina, Z. F.; Mastryukova, V. M.; Smirnova, N. P.; Strzhizhovsky, A. D.; Cherkasov, G. V.

    Animal adaptation to a strong magnetic field was investigated. Mice were exposed to 30-day total-body continuous effects of a constant magnetic field (CMF) of 1.6 T, and their physiological responses were assessed. Analysis of the data obtained showed that different parameters varied in a dissimilar manner. Red blood changes returned to normal in the course of the experiment. Leucocytosis and increased content of catecholamines and corticosterone of blood and adrenals persisted throughout the exposure. Changes in the spermatogenic epithelium were most distinct after the exposure. The recovery of certain parameters during the CMF exposure is indicative of adaptation of some physiological systems. The adaptation is, however, incomplete as suggested by the long persisting stress manifestations. Reticulocytopenia and spermatogenetic abnormalities found after the exposure are of particular importance.

  9. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1986-01-01

    The relativistic cross section for Compton scattering by electrons in strong magnetic fields is derived. The results confirm and extend earlier work which has treated only transitions to the lowest or first excited Landau levels. For the teragauss field strengths expected in neutron star magnetospheres, the relative rates for excited state transitions are found to be significant, especially for incident photon energies several times the cyclotron frequency. Since these transitions must result in the rapid emission of one or more cyclotron photons as well as the Compton-scattered photon, the scattering process actually becomes a photon 'splitting' mechanism which acts to soften hard photon spectra, and also provides a specific mechanism for populating higher Landau levels in the electron distribution function. The results should be significant for models of gamma-ray bursters and pulsating X-ray sources.

  10. Free oscillations of magnetic fluid in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the esults of measuring the elastic parameters of an oscillatory system (coefficient of pondermotive elasticity, damping factor, and oscillation frequency) whose viscous inertial element is represented by a magnetic fluid confined in a tube by magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. The role of elasticity is played by the pondermotive force acting on thin layers at the upper and lower ends of the fluid column. It is shown that, by measuring the elastic oscillation frequencies of the magnetic fluid column, it is possible to develop a fundamentally new absolute method for determining the saturation magnetization of a magnetic colloid.

  11. Asymptotic freedom in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Andreichikov, M A; Orlovsky, V D; Simonov, Yu A

    2013-04-19

    Perturbative gluon exchange interaction between quark and antiquark, or in a 3q system, is enhanced in a magnetic field and may cause vanishing of the total qq[over ¯] or 3q mass, and even unlimited decrease of it-recently called the magnetic collapse of QCD. The analysis of the one-loop correction below shows a considerable softening of this phenomenon due to qq[over ¯] loop contribution, similar to the Coulomb case of QED, leading to approximately logarithmic damping of gluon exchange interaction (≈O(1/ln|eB|)) at large magnetic field. PMID:23679595

  12. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  13. Sodium in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Férez, R.; Schmelcher, P.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effects of a magnetic field with low to intermediate strength on several spectroscopic properties of the sodium atom. A model potential is used to describe the core of sodium, reducing the study of the system to an effective one-particle problem. All states with principal quantum numbers n = 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are studied and analysed. A grid of twenty values for the field strength in the complete regime B = 0 - 0.02 a.u. is employed. Ionisation energies, transition wavelengths and their dipole oscillator strengths are presented.

  14. Meson spectrum in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreichikov, M. A.; Kerbikov, B. O.; Orlovsky, V. D.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    We study the relativistic quark-antiquark system embedded in a magnetic field (MF). The Hamiltonian containing confinement, one gluon exchange, and spin-spin interaction is derived. We analytically follow the evolution of the lowest meson states as a function of MF strength. Calculating the one gluon exchange interaction energy ⟨VOGE⟩ and spin-spin contribution ⟨aSS⟩ we have observed that these corrections remain finite at large MF, preventing the vanishing of the total ρ meson mass at some Bcrit, as previously thought. We display the ρ masses as functions of the MF in comparison with recent lattice data.

  15. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields in chiral models

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, Aziz; Providencia, Constanca

    2011-05-15

    The chiral model is used to describe quark matter under strong magnetic fields and is compared to other models, the MIT bag model and the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The effect of vacuum corrections due to the magnetic field is discussed. It is shown that if the magnetic-field vacuum corrections are not taken into account explicitly, the parameters of the models should be fitted to low-density meson properties in the presence of the magnetic field.

  16. Warm and dense stellar matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the equation of state of warm stellar matter as it may occur in a protoneutron star. Both neutrino-free and neutrino-trapped matter at a fixed entropy per baryon are analyzed. A relativistic mean-field nuclear model, including the possibility of hyperon formation, is considered. A density-dependent magnetic field with a magnitude of 10{sup 15} G at the surface and not more than 3x10{sup 18} G at the center is considered. The magnetic field gives rise to a neutrino suppression, mainly at low densities, in matter with trapped neutrinos. It is shown that a hybrid protoneutron star will not evolve into a low-mass black hole if the magnetic field is strong enough and the magnetic field does not decay. However, the decay of the magnetic field after cooling may give rise to the formation of a low-mass black hole.

  17. Properties of hyperonic matter in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, P.; Yang, F.; Shen, H.

    2009-02-15

    We study the effects of strong magnetic fields on the properties of hyperonic matter. We employ the relativistic mean field theory, which is known to provide excellent descriptions of nuclear matter and finite nuclei. The two additional hidden-strangeness mesons, {sigma}* and {phi}, are taken into account, and some reasonable hyperon potentials are used to constrain the meson-hyperon couplings, which reflect the recent developments in hypernuclear physics. It is found that the effects of strong magnetic fields become significant only for magnetic field strength B>5x10{sup 18} G. The threshold densities of hyperons can be significantly altered by strong magnetic fields. The presence of hyperons makes the equation of state (EOS) softer than that in the case without hyperons, and the softening of the EOS becomes less pronounced with increasing magnetic field strength.

  18. Operating a magnetic nozzle helicon thruster with strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2016-03-01

    A pulsed axial magnetic field up to ˜2.8 kG is applied to a 26-mm-inner-diameter helicon plasma thruster immersed in a vacuum chamber, and the thrust is measured using a pendulum target. The pendulum is located 30-cm-downstream of the thruster, and the thruster rf power and argon flow rate are fixed at 1 kW and 70 sccm (which gives a chamber pressure of 0.7 mTorr). The imparted thrust increases as the applied magnetic field is increased and saturates at a maximum value of ˜9.5 mN for magnetic field above ˜2 kG. At the maximum magnetic field, it is demonstrated that the normalized plasma density, and the ion flow energy in the magnetic nozzle, agree within ˜50% and of 10%, respectively, with a one-dimensional model that ignores radial losses from the nozzle. This magnetic nozzle model is combined with a simple global model of the thruster source that incorporates an artificially controlled factor α, to account for radial plasma losses to the walls, where α = 0 and 1 correspond to zero losses and no magnetic field, respectively. Comparison between the experiments and the model implies that the radial losses in the thruster source are experimentally reduced by the applied magnetic field to about 10% of that obtained from the no magnetic field model.

  19. Finite temperature quark matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Avancini, S. S.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, we use the mean-field approximation to investigate quark matter described by both SU(2) and SU(3) versions of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at temperatures below 150 MeV and subject to a strong magnetic field. This kind of matter is possibly present in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions and in the interior of protoneutron stars. We have studied symmetric and asymmetric quark matter. The effect of the magnetic field on the effective quark masses and chemical potentials is only felt for quite strong magnetic fields, above 5x10{sup 18} G, with larger effects for the lower densities. Spin polarizations are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields and are larger for lower temperatures and lower densities. Temperature tends to wash out the magnetic field effects.

  20. Physics in strong magnetic fields near neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. Observations of rotation rate changes and cyclotron lines in pulsars and gamma-ray bursts indicate that surface magnetic fields of neutron stars often exceed a trillion gauss. In fields this strong, where electrons behave much as if they were in bound atomic states, familiar processes undergo profound changes, and exotic processes become important. Strong magnetic fields affect the physics in several fundamental ways: energies perpendicular to the field are quantized, transverse momentum is not conserved, and electron-positron spin is important. Neutron stars therefore provide a unique laboratory for the study of physics in extremely high fields that cannot be generated on earth.

  1. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  2. Vacuum in a strong magnetic field as a hyperbolic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2011-12-16

    As demonstrated by Chernodub, vacuum in a strong magnetic field behaves as Abrikosov vortex lattice in a type-II superconductor. We investigate electromagnetic behavior of vacuum in this state and demonstrate that vacuum behaves as a hyperbolic metamaterial. If the magnetic field is constant, low frequency extraordinary photons experience this medium as a (3+1) Minkowski spacetime in which the role of time is played by the spatial z coordinate. Variations of the magnetic field curve this spacetime, and may lead to formation of "electromagnetic black holes." Since hyperbolic metamaterials behave as diffractionless "perfect lenses," and large enough magnetic fields probably existed in the early Universe, the demonstrated hyperbolic behavior of early vacuum may have imprints in the large scale structure of the present-day Universe. PMID:22243076

  3. Thermal properties of stellar matter in the strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piloyan, Arpine

    2012-07-01

    Low statistics and selection effects of the existing observational records of neutron stars ( NSs) do not allow to draw a coherent picture of the NSs typology only from observations. From theoretical point of view the unsufficient understanding of the mechanism of Supernovae explosion as well as the uncertainties in the modeling of the stellar matter equation of state make the knowledge of the parameters of the NS's structure and thermal, magnetic field or spin evolution non robust. The model's which are including the effects of superfluidity, superconductivity in dense matter and electro dynamics of super strong magnetic fields due to The complicated physics of matter under extrim conditions need further detailed investigations. The results are demonstrating the influence of magnetic field on the cooling regulators of NSs such as neutrino emissivity, heat conductivity and specific heat in the presence of magnetic fields for the investigations of cooling evolution of magnetars.

  4. Laser ablation and target acceleration under the strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, H.; Matsuo, K.; Breil, J.; Nicolai, P.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Asahina, T.; Sunahara, A.; Johzaki, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sano, T.; Mima, K.

    2015-11-01

    Various discussion and experiments have been made about the laser plasma phenomena under the strong magnetic field recently. One of the advantage is guiding electron beam for heating core plasma in last phase of Fast Ignition scheme. However, the implosion dynamics in FI is influenced by the magnetic field due to the anisotropic of electron heat conduction. Some simple experiments where target is accelerated by laser driven ablation under the strong magnetic field were conducted to benchmark the simulation code. Related to the experiment, we focus on the early stage of the acceleration in this study. 2-D radiative MHD code (PINOCO-MHD) is used for the simulation. In the simulation magnetic field transport, diffusion and Braginskii coefficient for electron heat conduction are taken account. In preliminary simulation result suggests that the magnetic pressure may have an influence on the target surface and/or ablated plasma at very early phase. The effect of the magnetic pressure is very sensitive to the vacuum, initial and boundary conditions, and they should be treated carefully. These numerical conditions will be discussed as well. This study was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26400532.

  5. Anomalously Strong Vertical Magnetic Fields from Distant Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.; Galanti, E.; Shuval, A.

    2014-12-01

    At distances of thousands of kilometers from lightning the vertical component of the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequencies (VLF - 3-30 kHz) and Extremely Low Frequencies (ELF - 3-3000 Hz) is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations.

  6. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy in incompressible MHD turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are investigated for high Reynolds numbers. It is found that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: (1) an essentially two-dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and the magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and (2) a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. These results are discussed in relation to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrorotor tokamak, as well as in relation to measurements of MHD turbulence in the solar wind.

  7. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy into incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are explored for the high Reynolds number case. The conclusion is reached that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: an essentially two dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. A minimal characterization of the spectral density tensors is given. Similarities to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrotor Tokamak are remarked upon, as are certain implications for the Belcher and Davis measurements of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind.

  8. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  9. Localized electron heating by strong guide-field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Sugawara, Takumichi; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ushiki, Tomohiko; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system is documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. Shape of the high electron temperature area does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et.jt . If we include a guide-field effect term Bt/(Bp+αBt) for Et.jt , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point.

  10. Strongly interacting photons in a synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, Pedram; Neill, C.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Y.; Barends, R.; Cambell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Lucero, E.; Mutus, J.; O'Malley, P.; Neeley, M.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Kapit, E.; Martinis, J.

    Interacting electrons in the presence of magnetic fields exhibit some of the most fascinating phases in condensed matter systems. Realizing these phases in an engineered platform could provide deeper insight into their. Using three superconducting qubits, we synthesize artificial magnetic fields by modulating the inter-qubit coupling. In the closed loop formed by the qubits, we observe the directional circulation of a microwave photon as well as chiral groundstate currents, the signatures of broken time-reversal symmetry. The existence of strong interactions in our system is seen via the creation of photon vacancies, or ''holes'', which circulate in the opposite direction from the photons. Our work demonstrates an experimental approach for engineering quantum phases of strongly interacting bosons.

  11. Hig Resolution Seismometer Insensitive to Extremely Strong Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Abramovich, Igor A

    2009-07-14

    A highly sensitive broadband seismic sensor has been developed successfully to be used in beam focusing systems of particale accelerators. The sensor is completely insensitive to extremely strong magnetic fields and to hard radiation conditions that exist at the place of their installation. A unique remote sensor calibration method has been invented and implemented. Several such sensors were sold to LAPP (LAPP-IN2P3/CNRS-Université de Savoie; Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules)

  12. Selective NMR excitation in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Todica, M; Fechete, R; Blümich, B

    2003-10-01

    The NMR-MOUSE is a unilateral and mobile NMR sensor which operates with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To produce a mobile NMR unit, RF excitation is sought, which can be produced with the most simple equipment, in particular nonlinear, low-power amplifiers, and to observe a free induction decay in strongly inhomogeneous fields, the excitation needs to be selective. The possibility to produce selective excitation by sequences of hard low-power radiofrequency pulses in the strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the NMR-MOUSE is explored. The use of the DANTE sequence for selection of magnetization from parts of the sensitive volume was investigated for longitudinal and transverse magnetization by computer simulations and experiments. The spectra of the recorded FIDs and echo signals are in good agreement with those simulated for the excitation, which verifies the concept of the DANTE excitation. The results obtained are an important step towards a low-power operation of the NMR-MOUSE to improve its mobility. PMID:14511590

  13. Pair annihilation into neutrinos in strong magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Fassio-Canuto, L.

    1973-01-01

    Among the processes that are of primary importance for the thermal history of a neutron star is electron-positron annihilation into neutrinos and photoneutrinos. These processes are computed in the presence of a strong magnetic field typical of neutron stars, and the results are compared with the zero-field case. It is shown that the neutrino luminosity Q(H) is greater than Q(O) for temperatures up to T about equal to 3 x 10 to the 8th power K and densities up to 1,000,000 g/cu cm.

  14. Strong magnetic fields in normal galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, Martin L.; Miniati, Francesco; Lilly, Simon J.; Kronberg, Philipp P.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2008-07-01

    The origin and growth of magnetic fields in galaxies is still something of an enigma. It is generally assumed that seed fields are amplified over time through the dynamo effect, but there are few constraints on the timescale. It was recently demonstrated that field strengths as traced by rotation measures of distant (and hence ancient) quasars are comparable to those seen today, but it was unclear whether the high fields were in the unusual environments of the quasars themselves or distributed along the lines of sight. Here we report high-resolution spectra that demonstrate that the quasars with strong MgII absorption lines are unambiguously associated with larger rotation measures. Because MgII absorption occurs in the haloes of normal galaxies along the sightlines to the quasars, this association requires that organized fields of surprisingly high strengths are associated with normal galaxies when the Universe was only about one-third of its present age.

  15. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity , we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  16. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semionova, Luidmila; Leahy, Denis; Paez, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field, for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation. Also, we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum. For very strong magnetic fields, transitions to the ground state predominate. Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained, which confirm previous results by Latal. Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation. We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation. Additionally we get, for the non-relativistic approximation, the transition rates for any polarization of radiation. As an application, the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53, which has multiple observable cyclotron lines, taking into account gravitational redshift. The most probable polarization is in(2).

  17. Diffusion of fast rising strong magnetic fields into conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Kuskova, N. I.; Rud, A. D.

    2014-11-01

    The basic processes occurring in a conductor exploding in a current skinning mode are the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in the conductor and the formation of low-temperature plasma at its surface. An experimental study of the phenomenon of nonlinear magnetic diffusion into conductors in magnetic fields of induction rising at a rate up to 3·109 T/s was carried out on the MIG generator capable of producing a peak current up to 2.5 MA within a rise time of 100 ns. It has been found experimentally that the average velocity of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in an aluminum conductor placed in a strong magnetic field (up to 300 T) rising at a high rate (on average, 3·109 T/s) is (2.7÷3.3)·105 cm/s. This is comparable to the velocity of sound in aluminum under normal conditions and reasonably agrees with predictions of numerical simulations.

  18. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  19. Mesons in strong magnetic fields: (I) General analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Koichi; Kojo, Toru; Su, Nan

    2016-07-01

    We study properties of neutral and charged mesons in strong magnetic fields | eB | ≫ ΛQCD2 with ΛQCD being the QCD renormalization scale. Assuming long-range interactions, we examine magnetic-field dependences of various quantities such as the constituent quark mass, chiral condensate, meson spectra, and meson wavefunctions by analyzing the Schwinger-Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations. Based on the density of states obtained from these analyses, we extend the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model to investigate thermodynamics at large B. As B increases the meson energy behaves as a slowly growing function of the meson's transverse momenta, and thus a large number of meson states is accommodated in the low energy domain; the density of states at low temperature is proportional to B2. This extended transverse phase space in the infrared regime significantly enhances the HRG pressure at finite temperature, so that the system reaches the percolation or chiral restoration regime at lower temperature compared to the case without a magnetic field; this simple picture would offer a gauge invariant and intuitive explanation of the inverse magnetic catalysis.

  20. Mesons in strong magnetic fields: (I) General analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hattori, Koichi; Kojo, Toru; Su, Nan

    2016-03-21

    Here, we study properties of neutral and charged mesons in strong magnetic fields |eB| >> Λ2QCD with ΛQCD being the QCD renormalization scale. Assuming long-range interactions, we examine magnetic-field dependences of various quantities such as the constituent quark mass, chiral condensate, meson spectra, and meson wavefunctions by analyzing the Schwinger–Dyson and Bethe–Salpeter equations. Based on the density of states obtained from these analyses, we extend the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model to investigate thermodynamics at large B. As B increases the meson energy behaves as a slowly growing function of the meson's transverse momenta, and thus a large number ofmore » meson states is accommodated in the low energy domain; the density of states at low temperature is proportional to B2. This extended transverse phase space in the infrared regime significantly enhances the HRG pressure at finite temperature, so that the system reaches the percolation or chiral restoration regime at lower temperature compared to the case without a magnetic field; this simple picture would offer a gauge invariant and intuitive explanation of the inverse magnetic catalysis.« less

  1. Helium atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that the neutron star surface may be composed of helium or heavier elements as hydrogen may be quickly depleted by diffuse nuclear burning Chang Bildsten However while Hydrogen atmospheres have been studied in great details atomic data for helium is available only for He ion Pavlov Bezchastnov 2005 We performed Hartree-Fock type calculation for Helium atom and molecules and computed their binding ionization and dissociation energies in strong magnetic fields B sim10 12 -- 10 15 G We will present ionization balance of Helium atmospheres at typical magnetic field strengths and temperatures to radio-quiet neutron stars and AXPs We will also discuss several implications of helium atmosphere to X-ray data of isolated neutron stars focusing on the detected spectral features

  2. Oriented fibrin gels formed by polymerization in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a soluble plasma protein which, after cleavage by the specific proteolytic enzyme thrombin, polymerizes to form the filamentous fibrin network during blood clotting (see refs 1 and 2 for reviews). Fibrinogen has a molecular weight of 340,000 and is composed of two identical halves, each containing three peptide chains designated Aα, Bβ and γ. Fibrin monomers are produced by thrombin which releases the small negatively charged fibrinopeptides A and B. The overall shape of the fibrinogen molecule has not been unequivocally established1,2. The trinodular, elongated (~450 Å long) structure proposed by Hall and Slayter3 is the most widely accepted model and it has obtained additional support from recent work4-6. Fibrin monomers are also about 450 Å long7 and in fibres they probably have a half-staggered arrangement along the axis7,8. The fibres are an assembly of protofibrils whose structure and packing are not reliably known. We report here that highly oriented fibrin gels are formed when polymerization takes place slowly in a strong magnetic field. It is shown that the protofibrils pack into a three-dimensional crystalline lattice. We introduce magnetically induced birefringence as a potential tool for studying polymerization and briefly speculate on the applications of strong magnetic fields.

  3. Kubo formulas for relativistic fluids in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xuguang; Sedrakian, Armen; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2011-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamics of strongly magnetized relativistic fluids is derived in the ideal and dissipative cases, taking into account the breaking of spatial symmetries by a quantizing magnetic field. A complete set of transport coefficients, consistent with the Curie and Onsager principles, is derived for thermal conduction, as well as shear and bulk viscosities. It is shown that in the most general case the dissipative function contains five shear viscosities, two bulk viscosities, and three thermal conductivity coefficients. We use Zubarev's non-equilibrium statistical operator method to relate these transport coefficients to correlation functions of the equilibrium theory. The desired relations emerge at linear order in the expansion of the non-equilibrium statistical operator with respect to the gradients of relevant statistical parameters (temperature, chemical potential, and velocity.) The transport coefficients are cast in a form that can be conveniently computed using equilibrium (imaginary-time) infrared Green's functions defined with respect to the equilibrium statistical operator. - Highlights: > Strong magnetic fields can make charged fluids behave anisotropically. > Magnetohydrodynamics for these fluids contains 5 shear, 2 bulk viscosities, and 3 heat conductivities. > We derive Kubo formulas for these transport coefficients.

  4. Pair Production and Annihilation in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the presence of strong magnetic fields are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. In particular, the process of pair production by single photons in the presence of fields of order 10 to the 12th power Gauss is of importance in cascade models of pulsar gamma ray emission, and may also become significant in theories of other radiation phenomena whose sources may be neutron stars (e.g., gamma ray bursts). In addition to pair production, the inverse process of pair annihilation is greatly affected by the presence of superstrong magnetic fields. The most significant departures from annihilation processes in free space are a reduction in the total rate for annihilation into two photons, a broadening of the familiar 511-keV line for annihilation at rest, and the possibility for annihilation into a single photon (which dominates the two-photon annihilation for B ( 10 the 13th power Gauss). The physics of these pair conversion processes, which is reviewed briefly, can become quite complex in the teragauss regime, and can involve calculations which are technically difficult to incorporate into models of emission mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres. However, theoretical work, especially the case of pair annihilation, also suggests potential techniques for more direct measurements of field strengths near the stellar surface.

  5. Observations of Strong Magnetic Fields in Nondegenerate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Schöller, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We review magnetic-field measurements of nondegenerate stars across the Hertzprung-Russell diagram for main sequence, premain sequence, and postmain sequence stars. For stars with complex magnetic-field morphologies, which includes all G-M main sequence stars, the analysis of spectra obtained in polarized vs unpolarized light provides very different magnetic measurements because of the presence or absence of cancellation by oppositely directed magnetic fields within the instrument's spatial resolution. This cancellation can be severe, as indicated by the spatially averaged magnetic field of the Sun viewed as a star. These averaged fields are smaller by a factor of 1000 or more compared to spatially resolved magnetic-field strengths. We explain magnetic-field terms that characterize the fields obtained with different measurement techniques. Magnetic fields typically control the structure of stellar atmospheres in and above the photosphere, the heating rates of stellar chromospheres and coronae, mass and angular momentum loss through stellar winds, chemical peculiarity, and the emission of high energy photons, which is critically important for the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the habitability of exoplanets. Since these effects are governed by the star's magnetic energy, which is proportional to the magnetic-field strength squared and its fractional surface coverage, it is important to measure or reliably infer the true magnetic-field strength and filling factor across a stellar disk. We summarize magnetic-field measurements obtained with the different observing techniques for different types of stars and estimate the highest magnetic-field strengths. We also comment on the different field morphologies observed for stars across the H-R diagram, typically inferred from Zeeman-Doppler imaging and rotational modulation observations,

  6. Fluid vs. kinetic magnetic reconnection with strong guide fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-01

    The fast rates of magnetic reconnection found in both nature and experiments are important to understand theoretically. Recently, it was demonstrated that two-fluid magnetic reconnection remains fast in the strong guide field regime, regardless of the presence of fast-dispersive waves. This conclusion is in agreement with recent results from kinetic simulations, and is in contradiction to the findings in an earlier two-fluid study, where it was suggested that fast-dispersive waves are necessary for fast reconnection. In this paper, we give a more detailed derivation of the analytic model presented in a recent letter and present additional simulation results to support the conclusions that the magnetic reconnection rate in this regime is independent of both collisional dissipation and system-size. In particular, we present a detailed comparison between fluid and kinetic simulations, finding good agreement in both the reconnection rate and overall length of the current layer. Finally, we revisit the earlier two-fluid study, which arrived at different conclusions, and suggest an alternative interpretation for the numerical results presented therein.

  7. Fluid vs. kinetic magnetic reconnection with strong guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stanier, A. Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-15

    The fast rates of magnetic reconnection found in both nature and experiments are important to understand theoretically. Recently, it was demonstrated that two-fluid magnetic reconnection remains fast in the strong guide field regime, regardless of the presence of fast-dispersive waves. This conclusion is in agreement with recent results from kinetic simulations, and is in contradiction to the findings in an earlier two-fluid study, where it was suggested that fast-dispersive waves are necessary for fast reconnection. In this paper, we give a more detailed derivation of the analytic model presented in a recent letter and present additional simulation results to support the conclusions that the magnetic reconnection rate in this regime is independent of both collisional dissipation and system-size. In particular, we present a detailed comparison between fluid and kinetic simulations, finding good agreement in both the reconnection rate and overall length of the current layer. Finally, we revisit the earlier two-fluid study, which arrived at different conclusions, and suggest an alternative interpretation for the numerical results presented therein.

  8. Laser cooling at low intensity in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Straten, P.; Shang, S.-Q.; Sheehy, B.; Metcalf, H.; Nienhuis, G.

    1993-05-01

    We have studied theoretically and experimentally the effect of a relatively strong magnetic field on sub-Doppler laser cooling in a one-dimensional optical molasses. We used the operator description of laser cooling with the Larmor precession frequency ωZ being much higher than the optical pumping rate. We found velocity-selective resonances (VSR) in the force at velocities vr=nωZ, with n=0,+/-1,+/-2 for both the scattering and redistribution force operators. These depend on the relative direction of the magnetic field and the polarization vectors of the light beams. Analytical results for the force on the atom are obtained in two cases that illustrate the effect of the VSR on the force. These formulas are compared with numerical calculations of the force. We also discovered a redistribution mechanism that relies on the gradient of the eigenstates of the light-shift operator, with eigenvalues that are independent of position so that a ``Sisyphus cooling'' picture does not apply. The theory is compared with many experimental results and excellent agreement is found. We believe that all essential features of laser cooling at low intensity are well described by this operator theory.

  9. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-15

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called “elevator modes,” are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  10. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called "elevator modes," are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  11. Nonlinear response of the benzene molecule to strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2005-02-01

    The fourth-rank hypermagnetizability tensor of the benzene molecule has been evaluated at the coupled Hartree-Fock level of accuracy within the conventional common-origin approach, adopting gaugeless basis sets of increasing size and flexibility. The degree of convergence of theoretical tensor components has been estimated allowing for two different coordinate systems. It is shown that a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the molecule causes a distortion of the electron charge density, which tends to concentrate in the region of the C-C bonds. This charge contraction has a dynamical origin, and can be interpreted as a feedback effect in terms of the classical Lorentz force acting on the electron current density.

  12. Nonlinear response of the benzene molecule to strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Pagola, G I; Caputo, M C; Ferraro, M B; Lazzeretti, P

    2005-02-15

    The fourth-rank hypermagnetizability tensor of the benzene molecule has been evaluated at the coupled Hartree-Fock level of accuracy within the conventional common-origin approach, adopting gaugeless basis sets of increasing size and flexibility. The degree of convergence of theoretical tensor components has been estimated allowing for two different coordinate systems. It is shown that a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the molecule causes a distortion of the electron charge density, which tends to concentrate in the region of the C-C bonds. This charge contraction has a dynamical origin, and can be interpreted as a feedback effect in terms of the classical Lorentz force acting on the electron current density. PMID:15743243

  13. Neutrino emissivity from electron-positron annihilation in hot matter in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Amsterdamski, P.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-10-15

    The neutrino emissivity due to electron-positron annihilation in a strong magnetic field is computed. A strong magnetic field can significantly increase the neutrino emissivity at {ital T}{similar to}10{sup 9} K.

  14. Properties of mesons in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Fu, Wei-jie; Liu, Yu-xin

    2016-06-01

    By extending the Φ -derivable approach in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to a finite magnetic field we calculate the properties of pion, σ , and ρ mesons in a magnetic field at finite temperature not only in the quark-antiquark bound state scheme but also in the pion-pion scattering resonant state scenario. Our calculation as a result makes manifest that the masses of π 0 and σ meson can be nearly degenerate at the pseudo-critical temperature which increases with increasing magnetic field strength, and the π ^{± } mass ascends suddenly at almost the same critical temperature. Meanwhile the ρ mesons' masses decrease with the temperature but increase with the magnetic field strength. We also check the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation and find that the relation can be violated clearly with increasing temperature, and the effect of the magnetic field becomes pronounced around the critical temperature. With different criteria, we analyze the effect of the magnetic field on the chiral phase transition and find that the pseudo-critical temperature of the chiral phase cross, T_c^{χ }, is always enhanced by the magnetic field. Moreover, our calculations indicate that the ρ mesons will get melted as the chiral symmetry has not yet been restored, but the σ meson does not disassociate even at very high temperature. Particularly, it is the first to show that there does not exist a vector meson condensate in the QCD vacuum in the pion-pion scattering scheme.

  15. Electron beam guiding by strong longitudinal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.; Fujioka, S.; Sakagami, H.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Shiraga, H.

    2016-03-01

    In electron-driven fast ignition, the guiding of fast electron beam having significantly large beam divergence is one of the most critical issues for efficient core heating. To guide the fast electron beam to the core, we consider to externally apply longitudinal magnetic fields. From the 2D PIC simulations applying uniform magnetic fields, it was shown that the field strength of 1∼10kT is required for efficient guiding for the heating laser intensity of 1018∼1020W/cm2.

  16. Plasma waves in a relativistic, strongly anisotropic plasma propagated along a strong magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onishchenko, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    The dispersion properties of plasma waves in a relativistic homogeneous plasma propagated along a strong magnetic field are studied. It is shown that the non-damping plasma waves exist in the frequency range omega sub p or = omega or = omega sub L. The values of omega sub p and omega sub L are calculated for an arbitrary homogeneous relativistic function of the particle distribution. In the case of a power ultrarelativistic distribution, it is shown that, if the ultrarelativistic tail of the distribution drops very rapidly, slightly damping plasma waves are possible with the phase velocity (omega/K)c.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts as Sources of Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Jonathan; Piran, Tsvi; Bromberg, Omer; Racusin, Judith L.; Daigne, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the strongest explosions in the Universe, which due to their extreme character likely involve some of the strongest magnetic fields in nature. This review discusses the possible roles of magnetic fields in GRBs, from their central engines, through the launching, acceleration and collimation of their ultra-relativistic jets, to the dissipation and particle acceleration that power their γ-ray emission, and the powerful blast wave they drive into the surrounding medium that generates their long-lived afterglow emission. An emphasis is put on particular areas in which there have been interesting developments in recent years.

  18. Can Induced Orbital Paramagnetism Be Controlled by Strong Magnetic Fields?

    PubMed

    Pagola, G I; Ferraro, M B; Lazzeretti, P

    2009-11-10

    Magnetic hypersusceptibilities and hypershielding at the nuclei of BH, CH(+), C4H4, and C8H8 molecules in the presence of an external spatially uniform, time-independent magnetic field have been investigated accounting for cubic response contributions via Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. Numerical estimates have been obtained at the coupled Hartree-Fock and density-functional levels of theory within the conventional common-origin approach, using extended gaugeless basis sets. The fundamental role of electron correlation effects was assessed. Critical values of the applied magnetic field at which transition from paramagnetic to diamagnetic behavior would occur were estimated. It is shown that perturbative methods may successfully be employed to estimate the interaction energy for big cyclic molecules. PMID:26609984

  19. New QED calculations for processes in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D.; Semionova, L.

    2000-09-01

    The results of some new QED calculations are presented. We consider two-photon emission by electrons, and determine magnetic field, spin and polarization dependence of the transition rates. We utilize the electron wave functions of Sokolov and Ternov (1968, Synchrotron Radiation, Berlin: Akademie), rather than those of Johnson and Lippmann (1949, Physical Review D, 76, 828). As pointed out by Graziani (1993, Astrophysical Journal, 412, 351), use of the former wave functions is necessary to obtain results valid outside the weak field limit. The results are of particular interest for processes in magnetars, for which the magnetic field is near, or can exceed, the critical value (Bcr=4.414×1013 G). .

  20. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  1. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. PMID:12929156

  2. Cigar-shaped quarkonia under strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kei; Yoshida, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Heavy quarkonia in a homogeneous magnetic field are analyzed by using a potential model with constituent quarks. To obtain anisotropic wave functions and corresponding eigenvalues, the cylindrical Gaussian expansion method is applied, where the anisotropic wave functions are expanded by a Gaussian basis in the cylindrical coordinates. Deformation of the wave functions and the mass shifts of the S-wave heavy quarkonia (ηc, J /ψ , ηc(2 S ), ψ (2 S ) and bottomonia) are examined for the wide range of external magnetic field. The spatial structure of the wave functions changes drastically as adjacent energy levels cross each other. Possible observables in heavy-ion collision experiments and future lattice QCD simulations are also discussed.

  3. Permanent magnet assembly producing a strong tilted homogeneous magnetic field: towards magic angle field spinning NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Hugon, Cédric; Guiga, Angelo; Aubert, Guy; Cazaux, Sandrine; Hardy, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a cylindrical permanent magnet design that generates a homogeneous and strong magnetic field having an arbitrary inclination with respect to the axis of the cylinder. The analytical theory of 3 D magnetostatics has been applied to this problem, and a hybrid magnet structure has been designed. This structure contains two magnets producing a longitudinal and transverse component for the magnetic field, whose amplitudes and homogeneities can be fully controlled by design. A simple prototype has been constructed using inexpensive small cube magnets, and its magnetic field has been mapped using Hall and NMR probe sensors. This magnet can, in principle, be used for magic angle field spinning NMR and MRI experiments allowing for metabolic chemical shift profiling in small living animals. PMID:20891027

  4. Collisional excitation of electron Landau levels in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation and deexcitation of the quantized transverse energy levels of an electron in a magnetic field are calculated for electron-proton and electron-electron collisions in light of the importance of the cross sections for studies of X-ray pulsar emission. First-order matrix elements are calculated using the Dirac theory of the electron, thus taking into account relativistic effects, which are believed to be important in accreting neutron stars. Results for the collisional excitation of ground state electrons by protons are presented which demonstrate the importance of proton recoil and relativistic effects, and it is shown that electron-electron excitations may contribute 10 to 20% of the excitation rate from electron-proton scattering in a Maxwellian plasma. Finally, calculations of the cross section for electron-proton small-angle scattering are presented which lead to relaxation rates for the electron velocity distribution which are modified by the magnetic field, and to a possible increase in the value of the Coulomb logarithm.

  5. Sharp-front wave of strong magnetic field diffusion in solid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Gu, Zhuo-wei; Kan, Ming-xian; Wang, Gang-hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2016-08-01

    When a strong magnetic field diffuses into a solid metal, if the metal's resistance possesses an abrupt rise at some critical temperature and the magnetic field strength is above some critical value, the magnetic field will diffuse into the metal in the form of a sharp-front wave. Formulas for the critical conditions under which a sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave emerges and a formula for the wave-front velocity are derived in this work.

  6. Strong-field atomic ionization in an elliptically polarized laser field and a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylyuk, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the quasistationary quasienergy state (QQES) formalism, the tunneling and multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions subjected to a perturbation by a high intense laser radiation field of an arbitrary polarization and a constant magnetic field are considered. On the basis of the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Green's function for the electron moving in an arbitrary laser field and crossed constant electric and magnetic fields, the integral equation for the complex quasienergy and the energy spectrum of the ejected electron are derived. Using the "imaginary-time" method, the extremal subbarrier trajectory of the photoelectron moving in a nonstationary laser field and a constant magnetic field are considered. Within the framework of the QQES formalism and the quasiclassical perturbation theory, ionization rates when the Coulomb interaction of the photoelectron with the parent ion is taken into account at arbitrary values of the Keldysh parameter are derived. The high accuracy of rates is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. Simple analytical expressions for the ionization rate with the Coulomb correction in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes in the case of an elliptically polarized laser beam propagating at an arbitrary angle to the constant magnetic field are derived and discussed. The limits of small and large magnetic fields and low and high frequency of a laser field are considered in details. It is shown that in the presence of a nonstationary laser field perturbation, the constant magnetic field may either decrease or increase the ionization rate. The analytical consideration and numerical calculations also showed that the difference between the ionization rates for an s electron in the case of right- and left-elliptically polarized laser fields is especially significant in the multiphoton regime for not-too-high magnetic fields and decreases as the magnetic field increases. The paper

  7. Quark-hadron phase transition in a neutron star under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabhi, A.; Pais, H.; Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.

    2009-11-01

    We study the effect of a strong magnetic field on the properties of neutron stars with a quark-hadron phase transition. It is shown that the magnetic field prevents the appearance of a quark phase, enhances the leptonic fraction, decreases the baryonic density extension of the mixed phase and stiffens the total equation of state, including both the stellar matter and the magnetic field contributions. Two parametrizations of a density-dependent static magnetic field, increasing, respectively, fast and slowly with the density and reaching 2-4 × 1018 G in the centre of the star, are considered. The compact stars with strong magnetic fields have maximum mass configurations with larger masses and radii and smaller quark fractions. The parametrization of the magnetic field with density has a strong influence on the star properties.

  8. Suppression of cooling by strong magnetic fields in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Valyavin, G; Shulyak, D; Wade, G A; Antonyuk, K; Zharikov, S V; Galazutdinov, G A; Plachinda, S; Bagnulo, S; Machado, L Fox; Alvarez, M; Clark, D M; Lopez, J M; Hiriart, D; Han, Inwoo; Jeon, Young-Beom; Zurita, C; Mujica, R; Burlakova, T; Szeifert, T; Burenkov, A

    2014-11-01

    Isolated cool white dwarf stars more often have strong magnetic fields than young, hotter white dwarfs, which has been a puzzle because magnetic fields are expected to decay with time but a cool surface suggests that the star is old. In addition, some white dwarfs with strong fields vary in brightness as they rotate, which has been variously attributed to surface brightness inhomogeneities similar to sunspots, chemical inhomogeneities and other magneto-optical effects. Here we describe optical observations of the brightness and magnetic field of the cool white dwarf WD 1953-011 taken over about eight years, and the results of an analysis of its surface temperature and magnetic field distribution. We find that the magnetic field suppresses atmospheric convection, leading to dark spots in the most magnetized areas. We also find that strong fields are sufficient to suppress convection over the entire surface in cool magnetic white dwarfs, which inhibits their cooling evolution relative to weakly magnetic and non-magnetic white dwarfs, making them appear younger than they truly are. This explains the long-standing mystery of why magnetic fields are more common amongst cool white dwarfs, and implies that the currently accepted ages of strongly magnetic white dwarfs are systematically too young. PMID:25327247

  9. Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification behind Strong Shock Waves in GRB and SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2012-09-01

    Using three-dimensional (special relativistic) magnetohydrodynamics simulations, the amplification of magnetic field behind strong shock wave is studied. In supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts, strong shock waves propagate through an inhomogeneous density field. When the shock wave hit a density bump or density dent, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is induced that cause a deformation of the shock front. The deformed shock leaves vorticity behind the shock wave that amplifies the magnetic field due to the stretching of field lines.

  10. Decreased chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes exposed to a strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sipka, S; Szöllosi, I; Batta, Gy; Szegedi, Gy; Illés, A; Bakó, Gy; Novák, D

    2004-01-01

    The chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes, neutrophils and monocytes was examined in a strong static magnetic field (0.317+/-0.012 Tesla). The chemotaxis of the suspension of purified neutrophils and monocytes was tested in the Boyden chamber using C5a as a chemotactic signal. The chambers were placed into a temperature regulated (36.6 degrees C) equipment producing a strong static magnetic field (0.317 Tesla) for 60 minutes. The movement of cells proceeded into a nitrocellulose membrane toward the north-pole of the magnet, i.e. in the direction of the Earth's gravitational pull. The C5a induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils decreased significantly in the strong static magnetic field. Monocytes were not significantly effected. The strong static magnetic field decreased the chemotactic movement of neutrophils and this phenomenon may have implications when humans are exposed to magnetic resonance imaging for extended periods of time. PMID:15334831

  11. Dynamical behavior of strong magnetic fields in the solar convection zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vainshtein, S.; Levy, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic buoyancy is thought to play an important role in the dynamical behavior of the sun's magnetic field in the convection zone. Magnetic buoyancy is commonly thought to cause inescapable rapid loss of toroidal flux from much of the convection zone, thereby suppressing effective operation of a solar dynamo. This paper reexamines the detailed character of magnetic buoyancy, especially as it is influenced by the magnetic field's effect on heat transport and temperature gradients in the convection zone. It is suggested that suppression of convective heat transport across strong magnetic flux tubes can alter the temperature within the tubes and can subdue, or even reverse, the effect of magnetic buoyancy.

  12. Aversive responses of captive sandbar sharks Carcharhinus plumbeus to strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, A; Niemantsverdriet, P R W; Laterveer, M; Heitkönig, I M A

    2016-09-01

    This experimental study focused on the possible deterrent effect of permanent magnets on adult sandbar sharks Carcharhinus plumbeus. Results showed that the presence of a magnetic field significantly reduced the number of approaches of conditioned C. plumbeus towards a target indicating that adult C. plumbeus can be deterred by strong magnetic fields. These data, therefore, confirm that the use of magnetic devices to reduce shark by-catch is a promising avenue. PMID:27323691

  13. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  14. Thin accretion discs are stabilized by a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, Aleksander

    2016-07-01

    By studying three-dimensional, radiative, global simulations of sub-Eddington, geometrically thin (H/R ≈ 0.15) black hole accretion flows we show that thin discs which are dominated by magnetic pressure are stable against thermal instability. Such discs are thicker than predicted by the standard model and show significant amount of dissipation inside the marginally stable orbit. Radiation released in this region, however, does not escape to infinity but is advected into the black hole. We find that the resulting accretion efficiency (5.5 ± 0.5 per cent for the simulated 0.8dot{M}_Edd disc) is very close to the predicted by the standard model (5.7 per cent).

  15. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: Numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Buividovich, P. V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Using numerical simulations of quenched SU (2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged ρ mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eBc = 0.927 (77) GeV2 or Bc = (1.56 ± 0.13) ṡ1016 Tesla. The condensation of the charged ρ mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  16. Parametric distortion of the optical absorption edge of a magnetic semiconductor by a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, O.A.C.

    1985-09-15

    The influence of a strong laser field on the optical absorption edge of a direct-gap magnetic semiconductor is considered. It is shown that as the strong laser intensity increases the absorption coefficient is modified so as to give rise to an absorption tail below the free-field forbidden gap. An application is made for the case of the EuO.

  17. Hydromagnetic waves for a collisionless plasma in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhau, S.; de La Torre, A.

    1985-08-01

    A system of hydrodynamic equations is used to model the behavior of small-amplitude hydromagnetic waves in order to quantify the effects of the electron thermodynamic variables. The system of equations yields a dispersion relationship which is solved with a linear approximation when small perturbations are introduced into the steady state. The disturbances are expressed as a superposition of small amplitude, plane harmonic waves, which are traced as they propagate through a collisionless heat-conducting plasma. Only the mirror stability criterion is found to change when the electron pressure is considered in a zero heat flux. The phase speed will be symmetric with respect to arising from the presence of the heat flux will strongly couple the slow and fast magnetosonic modes with wavenumber vectors in the positive flux vector directions. The subsequent overstability will be independent of the ion anisotropy.

  18. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields. PMID:21441722

  19. Upper bound on the magnetic field strength in the quark core of a strongly-magnetized compact star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, Alexander; Yang, Jongmann

    2014-09-01

    Two types of strongly-magnetized compact stars, represented by magnetized strange quark stars and magnetized hybrid stars, are considered. In each case, there exists an upper bound H max on the magnetic field strength in the interior of a compact star. For a magnetized strange quark star, H max is determined by the magnetic field at which the upper bound on the bag pressure from the absolute stability window of magnetized strange quark matter (SQM) vanishes, assuming the Massachusetts Institute of Technology bag model description of SQM. For a hybrid star, H max is represented by the critical magnetic field for the occurrence of a longitudinal (along the magnetic field) instability in the quark core, at which the longitudinal pressure in magnetized SQM vanishes.

  20. Light bending by nonlinear electrodynamics under strong electric and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Taekoon E-mail: tlee@kunsan.ac.kr

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the bending angles of light under the strong electric and magnetic fields by a charged black hole and a magnetized neutron star according to the nonlinear electrodynamics of Euler-Heisenberg interaction. The bending angle of light by the electric field of charged black hole is computed from geometric optics and a general formula is derived for light bending valid for any orientation of the magnetic dipole. The astronomical significance of the light bending by magnetic field of a neutron star is discussed.

  1. Effects of strong magnetic fields on the electron distribution and magnetisability of rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2004-12-01

    Strong uniform static magnetic fields compress the electronic distribution of rare gas atoms and cause a 'spindle effect', which can be illustrated by plotting charge-density functions which depend quadratically on the flux density of the applied field. The fourth rank hypermagnetisabilities of He, Ne, Ar and Kr are predicted to have small positive values. Accordingly, the diamagnetism of rare gas atoms diminishes by a very little amount in the presence of intense magnetic field.

  2. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  3. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered "solid-cored" CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  4. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  5. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-23

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~10(5) gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈10(7) gauss. PMID:26494754

  6. Magneto-Chemical Systems Under Strong Magnetic Fields:. Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Yamamoto, I.

    2005-07-01

    Magnetic field-induced effects were investigated for two extreme cases of strongly ferromagnetic and weakly diamagnetic chemical systems. The thermodynamic quantities of a chemical reaction were changed by applied magnetic fields. The magnetic effects were systematically formulated as the magneto-thermodynamic effects and experimentally verified by applying fields of 10-30 T to a ferromagnetic system. Agarose gels, as weakly diamagnetic systems, were magnetically aligned by fields of 2 - 10 T. This magnetic alignment was confirmed by optical measurements. The magnetically aligned agarose gel was used as the matrix for DNA electrophoresis. The electrophoretic velocity of DNA varied with the aligned or random structure of the matrix gel, as well as the structure of the DNA, itself. Utilizing the aligned gel provides a new method for separating DNAs at high resolutions.

  7. Spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Providencia, J. Da

    2009-01-15

    We study the effect of strong magnetic fields, of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G, on the instability region of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings and with density-dependent parameters are considered. It is shown that a strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. As a consequence, we predict larger transition densities at the inner edge of the crust of compact stars with strong magnetic fields. The direction of instability gives rise to a very strong distillation effect if the last Landau level is only partially filled. However, for almost completed Landau levels, an antidistillation effect may occur.

  8. Dynamical mass generation in strongly coupled quantum electrodynamics with weak magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, Eduardo; Bashir, Adnan

    2006-05-15

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics in the presence of weak magnetic fields using Schwinger-Dyson equations. Contrary to the case where the magnetic field is strong, in the weak field limit the coupling should exceed certain critical value in order for the generation of masses to take place, just as in the case where no magnetic field is present. The weak field limit is defined as eB<field. We carry out a numerical analysis to study the magnetic field dependence of the mass function above critical coupling and show that in this regime the dynamically generated mass and the chiral condensate for the lowest Landau level increase proportionally to (eB){sup 2}.

  9. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  10. Equation of State of the Strong Interaction Matter in an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Yu-Xin

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the equation of state of the strong interaction matter in a background magnetic field via the two flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Starting from the mean-field thermodynamical potential density Ω, we calculate the pressure density p, the entropy density s, the energy density ɛ, and the interaction measure (ɛ - 3p)/T4 of the strong interaction matter at finite temperature and finite magnetic field. The results manifest that the chiral phase transition is just a crossover but not a low order phase transition. Moreover there may exist magnetic catalysis effect, and its mechanism is just the effective dimension reduction induced by the magnetic field. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 10935001, 11175004 and 11435001, and the National Key Basic Research Program of China under Grant Nos. G2013CB834400 and 2015CB856900

  11. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  12. Statistical Study of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections with Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Matthew E.

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) with strong magnetic fields (B ) are typically associated with significant Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, high solar wind speed and solar flare events. Successful prediction of the arrival time of a CME at Earth is required to maximize the time available for satellite, infrastructure, and space travel programs to take protective action against the coming flux of high-energy particles. It is known that the magnetic field strength of a CME is linked to the strength of a geomagnetic storm on Earth. Unfortunately, the correlations between strong magnetic field CMEs from the entire sun (especially from the far side or non-Earth facing side of the sun) to SEP and flare events, solar source regions and other relevant solar variables are not well known. New correlation studies using an artificial intelligence engine (Eureqa) were performed to study CME events with magnetic field strength readings over 30 nanoteslas (nT) from January 2010 to October 17, 2014. This thesis presents the results of this study, validates Eureqa to obtain previously published results, and presents previously unknown functional relationships between solar source magnetic field data, CME initial speed and the CME magnetic field. These new results enable the development of more accurate CME magnetic field predictions and should help scientists develop better forecasts thereby helping to prevent damage to humanity's space and Earth assets.

  13. Influence of strong static magnetic field on human cancer HT 1080 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodins, Juris; Korhovs, Vadims; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Buikis, Indulis; Ivanova, Tatjana

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate strong uniform magnetic field influence on the human cancer cells HT 1080. The cells were treated with magnetic field of intensity 1,16 Tesla and with anticancer agent - cis-platinum 0.025 mg/ml or vincristinum 2-3 ng/ml. The intact and the treated cell samples were incubated in a medium with acridine orange (AO). The magnetic field after 15 minutes of influence significantly increased cytoplasmic red fluorescence. Increased AO accumulation in lysosomes suggested to cancer cell metabolic activity stimulation.

  14. Magnetic Field-Induced Giant Enhancement of Electron-Phonon Energy Transfer in Strongly Disordered Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtyk, A. V.; Feigel'man, M. V.; Kravtsov, V. E.

    2013-10-01

    Relaxation of soft modes (e.g., charge density in gated semiconductor heterostructures, spin density in the presence of magnetic field) slowed down by disorder may lead to giant enhancement of energy transfer (cooling power) between overheated electrons and phonons at low bath temperature. We show that in strongly disordered systems with time-reversal symmetry broken by external or intrinsic exchange magnetic field the cooling power can be greatly enhanced. The enhancement factor as large as 102 at magnetic field B˜10T in 2D InSb films is predicted. A similar enhancement is found for the ultrasound attenuation.

  15. A simple model for optical capture of atoms in strong magnetic quadrupole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, D.; Höpe, A.; Meschede, D.

    1993-10-01

    The radiative capture of cesium atoms from the gas phase in a magnetooptic trap with strong magnetic field gradients is studied. A simplified analytic model is used to derive an upper limit for capture velocities. The resulting scaling law agrees well with the observed number of atoms and with the density as a function of field gradient.

  16. Orbital effects of strong magnetic field on a two-dimensional Holstein polaron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Subhasree; Chakraborty, Monodeep; Taraphder, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the orbital effects of a strong external magnetic field on the ground-state properties of a two-dimensional (2D) Holstein polaron, employing variational approaches based on exact diagonalization. From the ground-state energy and the wave function, we calculate the electron-phonon correlation function, the average phonon number, and the Drude weight and investigate the evolution of a 2D Holstein polaron as a function of the magnetic flux. Although the external magnetic field affects the polaron throughout the parameter regime, we show that the magnetic field has a stronger effect on a loosely bound (spatially extended) polaron. We also find that the magnetic field can be used as a tuning parameter, particularly for a weakly coupled polaron, to reduce the spatial extent of a large polaron.

  17. Anisotropic hydrodynamics, bulk viscosities, and r-modes of strange quark stars with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xuguang; Huang Mei; Rischke, Dirk H.; Sedrakian, Armen

    2010-02-15

    In strong magnetic fields the transport coefficients of strange quark matter become anisotropic. We determine the general form of the complete set of transport coefficients in the presence of a strong magnetic field. By using a local linear response method, we calculate explicitly the bulk viscosities {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} transverse and parallel to the B field, respectively, which arise due to the nonleptonic weak processes u+s{r_reversible}u+d. We find that for magnetic fields B<10{sup 17} G, the dependence of {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} on the field is weak, and they can be approximated by the bulk viscosity for the zero magnetic field. For fields B>10{sup 18} G, the dependence of both {zeta}{sub perpendicular} and {zeta}{sub ||} on the field is strong, and they exhibit de Haas-van Alphen-type oscillations. With increasing magnetic field, the amplitude of these oscillations increases, which eventually leads to negative {zeta}{sub perpendicular} in some regions of parameter space. We show that the change of sign of {zeta}{sub perpendicular} signals a hydrodynamic instability. As an application, we discuss the effects of the new bulk viscosities on the r-mode instability in rotating strange quark stars. We find that the instability region in strange quark stars is affected when the magnetic fields exceed the value B=10{sup 17} G. For fields which are larger by an order of magnitude, the instability region is significantly enlarged, making magnetized strange stars more susceptible to r-mode instability than their unmagnetized counterparts.

  18. Synthesis models of dayside field-aligned currents for strong interplanetary magnetic field By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masakazu; Iijima, Takesi; Rich, Frederick J.

    1996-06-01

    Using particle and magnetic field data acquired with DMSP-F6 and DMSP-F7 satellites, we have investigated interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By dependence of the global pattern of plasma regime and field-aligned currents (FACs) on dayside high latitudes during strong IMF By (averaged |By|>3.7 nT) and geomagnetically disturbed (mainly IMF Bz<0) periods. From particle data we have identified five plasma regimes: inner plasma sheet, outer plasma sheet, cleft, cusp, and mantle. All the plasma domains except the inner plasma sheet show By dependence in spatial distribution. Region 1 and ``traditional cusp'' currents appear in cusp/mantle domains, which we call midday region 1 and region 0 currents, respectively, in this paper. These currents perfectly reverse their flow directions depending on IMF By polarity. Traditional region 1 currents occurring in cleft and outer plasma sheet almost always flow into the ionosphere in the prenoon sector and flow away from the ionosphere in the postnoon sector regardless of By polarity. Thus the midday region 1 and region 0 current system that appears at local noon is not a simple continuation of flankside region 1/region 2 current system. Midday region 1 and region 0 currents are not necessarily balanced in intensity; region 0 current intensity occasionally exceeds midday region 1 current intensity. Furthermore, intensity imbalance also appears in cleft-associated region 1 currents; that is, region 1 current in the farside cleft from the reconnection site (``downstreamside'' cleft) is larger than region 1 current in the nearside cleft (``upstreamside'' cleft). On the basis of these observational facts we discuss the source mechanisms of the dayside FAC system: (1) directly coupled generation of region 0 and midday region 1 current in the cusp/mantle domains around noon and (2) generation of extra region 0 current in the tail magnetopause which is connected to the extra downstreamside cleft-associated region 1 current.

  19. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants. PMID:25708622

  20. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Elicit Swimming Behaviors Consistent with Direct Vestibular Stimulation in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Zee, David S.; Carey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for ‘high-throughput’ investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  1. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C; Della Santina, Charles C; Zee, David S; Carey, John P

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  2. Study of Strong Magnetic Fields Using Parametric Instability in a Magnetised Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Maximov, A. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Bauer, B. S.; Yates, K.

    2014-10-01

    Generation of strong magnetic fields with a strength of 10--50 MG plays a key role in some recent conceptions for controlled fusion. We suggest a laser method for measuring the local magnetic field, B > 10 MG, based on the parametric decay of the laser radiation to ω/2 and 3/2 ω harmonics which are generated in the area with the electron density of a quarter of the critical plasma density. Spectral components of parametric harmonics carry a signature of both the plasma temperature and strong magnetic field. A two-plasmon decay of laser radiation was studied in a magnetized plasma at the 1 MA pulsed power Zebra facility at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dense magnetized plasma with a magnetic field of 1--3 MG was created by the 1MA current flowing in the metal rod 0.7--2 mm in diameter. Radiation from the narrowband laser with intensity >1014 W/cm2 was focused on the surface plasma. Spectrum of the backscattering 3/2 ω harmonic included ``red'' and ``blue'' shifted components. Large 2-3 nm shifts of spectral components was identified with laser heating of plasma. Components with a small 0.1 nm spectral shift of may be linked to the magnetic field. Work was supported by the DOE Grant DE-SC0008824 and DOE/NNSA UNR Grant DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  3. The asteroseismic signature of strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations and little is known about their amplitude, geometry and evolution. I will discuss how strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, which arises from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation mode energy within the core of the star. Physically, the effect stems from magnetic tension forces created by sufficiently strong fields, which break the spherical symmetry of the wave propagation cavity. The loss of wave energy within the core reduces the mode visibility at the stellar surface, and we find that our predicted visibilities are in excellent agreement with a class of red giants exhibiting depressed dipole oscillation modes. The Kepler satellite has already observed hundreds of these red giants, which we identify as stars with strongly magnetized cores. Field strengths larger than roughly 10^5 G can produce the observed depression, and in one case we measure a core field strength of 10^7 G.

  4. Barrier-bound resonances in semiconductor superlattices in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, T.; Bhat, R.; Koza, M.; Derosa, F.; Rush, K. M.; Allen, S. J., Jr.

    1987-12-01

    The effective ``miniband'' mass approximation is shown to break down in strong magnetic fields when the magnetic length is smaller than the superlattice period. Under these conditions a real-space description must be used and features in the inhomogeneously broadened cyclotron resonance can be indexed by the position of the cyclotron orbit with respect to the barriers and wells. The line shape agrees with a calculation of the quantum states in a magnetic field in a one-dimensional periodic potential and these experiments give us a rare view of Landau states in the limit where the periodic potential has a period that is larger than the cyclotron diameter.

  5. Biological effects of strong static magnetic fields on insulin-secreting cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, T.; Miyakoshi, J.

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic flux density of MRI for clinical diagnosis has been increasing. However, there remains very little biological data regarding the effect of strong static magnetic fields (SMFs) on human health. To evaluate the biological effects of strong SMFs, we cultured INS-1 cells under exposure to sham and SMF conditions for 1 or 2 h, and analyzed insulin secretion, mRNA expression, cell proliferation and cell number. Exposure to SMF with a high magnetic field gradient for 1 h significantly increased insulin secretion and insulin 1 mRNA expression. Exposure to SMF did not affect cell proliferation and cell number. Our results suggested that MRI systems with a higher magnetic flux density might not cause cell proliferative or functional damages on insulin-secreting cells.

  6. On the theory of magnetic field generation by relativistically strong laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Shatashvili, N.L.; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1996-07-01

    The authors consider the interaction of subpicosecond relativistically strong short laser pulses with an underdense cold unmagnetized electron plasma. It is shown that the strong plasma inhomogeneity caused by laser pulses results in the generation of a low frequency (quasistatic) magnetic field. Since the electron density distribution is determined completely by the pump wave intensity, the generated magnetic field is negligibly small for nonrelativistic laser pulses but increases rapidly in the ultrarelativistic case. Due to the possibility of electron cavitation (complete expulsion of electrons from the central region) for narrow and intense beams, the increase in the generated magnetic field slows down as the beam intensity is increased. The structure of the magnetic field closely resembles that of the field produced by a solenoid; the field is maximum and uniform in the cavitation region, then it falls, changes polarity and vanishes. In extremely dense plasmas, highly intense laser pulses in the self-channeling regime can generate magnetic fields {approximately} 100 Mg and greater.

  7. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  8. Discovery of a strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating B2Vn star HR 7355

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksala, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Grunhut, J.; Bohlender, D.; Manset, N.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Mimes Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the He-variable early B-type star HR 7355 using spectropolarimetric data obtained with ESPaDOnS on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope within the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Large Program. HR 7355 is both the most rapidly rotating known main-sequence magnetic star and the most rapidly rotating He-strong star, with v sin i = 300 +/- 15 km s-1 and a rotational period of 0.5214404+/-0.0000006 d. We have modelled our eight longitudinal magnetic field measurements assuming an oblique dipole magnetic field. Constraining the inclination of the rotation axis to be between 38° and 86°, we find the magnetic obliquity angle to be between 30° and 85°, and the polar strength of the magnetic field at the stellar surface to be between 13-17 kG. The photometric light curve constructed from HIPPARCOS archival data and new CTIO measurements shows two minima separated by 0.5 in rotational phase and occurring 0.25 cycles before/after the magnetic extrema. This photometric behaviour, coupled with previously reported variable emission of the Hα line (which we confirm), strongly supports the proposal that HR 7355 harbours a structured magnetosphere similar to that in the prototypical He-strong star, σ Ori E. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii.

  9. Deconfinement to quark matter in neutron stars - The influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Hempel, M.

    2013-03-25

    We use an extended version of the hadronic SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that also includes quarks to study hybrid stars. Within this approach, the degrees of freedom change naturally as the temperature/density increases. Different prescriptions of charge neutrality, local and global, are tested and the influence of strong magnetic fields and the anomalous magnetic moment on the particle population is discussed.

  10. Critical point in the QCD phase diagram for extremely strong background magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrödi, Gergely

    2015-07-01

    Lattice simulations have demonstrated that a background (electro)magnetic field reduces the chiral/deconfinement transition temperature of quantum chromodynamics for eB < 1 GeV2. On the level of observables, this reduction manifests itself in an enhancement of the Polyakov loop and in a suppression of the light quark condensates (inverse magnetic catalysis) in the transition region. In this paper, we report on lattice simulations of 1 + 1 + 1-flavor QCD at an unprecedentedly high value of the magnetic field eB = 3 .25 GeV2. Based on the behavior of various observables, it is shown that even at this extremely strong field, inverse magnetic catalysis prevails and the transition, albeit becoming sharper, remains an analytic crossover. In addition, we develop an algorithm to directly simulate the asymptotically strong magnetic field limit of QCD. We find strong evidence for a first-order deconfinement phase transition in this limiting theory, implying the presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Based on the available lattice data, we estimate the location of the critical point.

  11. Compton scattering S matrix and cross section in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Nagirner, Dmitrij I.; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-05-01

    Compton scattering of polarized radiation in a strong magnetic field is considered. The recipe for calculation of the scattering matrix elements, the differential and total cross sections based on quantum electrodynamic second-order perturbation theory is presented for the case of arbitrary initial and final Landau level, electron momentum along the field and photon momentum. Photon polarization and electron spin state are taken into account. The correct dependence of natural Landau level width on the electron spin state is taken into account in a general case of arbitrary initial photon momentum for the first time. A number of steps in the calculations were simplified analytically making the presented recipe easy to use. The redistribution functions over the photon energy, momentum and polarization states are presented and discussed. The paper generalizes already known results and offers a basis for the accurate calculation of radiation transfer in a strong B field, for example, in strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  12. Niobium thin films are superconductive in strong magnetic fields at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, P. J.; Fowler, P.

    1966-01-01

    Niobium film superconductor carries high currents in strong magnetic fields. The thin niobium film is formed on an inert substrate through evaporation in a vacuum environment. Control of temperature and vacuum results in rejection of gaseous impurities so that the film is of a very high purity.

  13. Modification of X-Ray Tissue Doses with Strong Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borke, Michael Faison

    1990-01-01

    The modification of dose distributions from secondary electrons produced by accelerator-generated photon or electron beams in the presence of strong magnetic fields was studied. A need exists to predict the action of magnetic fields on X-ray tissue doses and to identify those combinations of X-ray energies, magnetic field strengths, and tissue factors where the dose might be changed significantly from an exposure without the presence of a magnetic field. Modification of X-ray produced tissue dose arises from the ability of a strong magnetic field to induce deflections on the path of secondary electrons. In order to demonstrate the existence of this deflection, measurements were made of the relative dose distributions present within a tissue -equivalent phantom produced by exposures to X-rays and in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The dose measurements were made using radiographic film detectors, sandwiched within a polystyrene target phantom irradiated in the presence of different magnetic field intensities. The fields were oriented transversely to the direction of the incident X-ray beam. Optical densities of the film exposures were converted to equivalent tissue doses for comparison to the predictions of a semi-analytical relative dose model for the process. This model was a combination of the electron Continuous Slowing Down Approximation, modified to account for multiple scattering, and a exponential photon dose model. As a result of this work, it was found that: (1) strong magnetic fields in the range of 1.2 to 5 T can induce changes in the tissue distribution of X-ray produced dose to small volumes in excess of 10%, (2) the region of maximum dose may be displaced significantly from the undeflected target volume, and (3) a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of these changes can be predicted, if the X-ray energy distribution and magnetic flux density are known. Such changes in deposited doses may be clinically significant and should be taken into

  14. Physical processes in the strong magnetic fields of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical formulae are fitted to observational data on physical processes occurring in strong magnetic fields surrounding accreting neutron stars. The propagation of normal modes in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field is discussed in terms of a wave equation in Fourier space, quantum electrodynamic effects, polarization and mode ellipticity. The results are applied to calculating the Thomson scattering, bremsstrahlung and Compton scattering cross-sections, which are a function of the frequency, angle and polarization of the magnetic field. Numerical procedures are explored for solving the radiative transfer equations. When applied to modeling X ray pulsars, a problem arises in the necessity to couple the magnetic angle and frequency dependence of the cross-sections with the hydrodynamic equations. The use of time-dependent averaging and approximation techniques is indicated.

  15. Strong Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses: Interplanetary Sources and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Xie, Yanqiong; Wang, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  16. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  17. The onset of ion heating during magnetic reconnection with a strong guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-07-15

    The onset of the acceleration of ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations in the limit of a strong ambient guide field that self-consistently and simultaneously follow the motions of protons and α particles. Heating parallel to the local magnetic field during reconnection with a guide field is strongly reduced compared with the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields. The dominant heating of thermal ions during guide field reconnection results from pickup behavior of ions during their entry into reconnection exhausts and dominantly produces heating perpendicular rather than parallel to the local magnetic field. Pickup behavior requires that the ion transit time across the exhaust boundary (with a transverse scale of the order of the ion sound Larmor radius) be short compared with the ion cyclotron period. This translates into a threshold in the strength of reconnecting magnetic field that favors the heating of ions with high mass-to-charge. A simulation with a broad initial current layer produces a reconnecting system in which the amplitude of the reconnecting magnetic field just upstream of the dissipation region increases with time as reconnection proceeds. The sharp onset of perpendicular heating when the pickup threshold is crossed is documented. A comparison of the time variation of the parallel and perpendicular ion heating with that predicted based on the strength of the reconnecting field establishes the scaling of ion heating with ambient parameters both below and above the pickup threshold. The relevance to observations of ion heating in the solar corona is discussed.

  18. Magnetic Field Induced Shear Flow in a Strongly Coupled Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Konopka, U.; Jiang, K.; Morfill, G.

    2011-11-01

    We address an experimental observation of shear flow of micron sized dust particles in a strongly coupled complex plasma in presence of a homogeneous magnetic field. Two concentric Aluminum rings of different size are placed on the lower electrode of a radio frequency (rf) parallel plate discharge. The modified local sheath electric field is pointing outward/inward close to the inner/outher ring, respectively. The microparticles, confined by the rings and subject to an ion wind that driven by the local sheath electric field and deflected by an externally applied magnetic field, start flowing in azimuthal direction. Depending upon the rf amplitudes on the electrodes, the dust layers show rotation in opposite direction at the edges of the ring-shaped cloud resulting a strong shear in its center. MD simulations shows a good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Unitary Limit of Two-Nucleon Interactions in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Nplqcd Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Two-nucleon systems are shown to exhibit large scattering lengths in strong magnetic fields at unphysical quark masses, and the trends toward the physical values indicate that such features may exist in nature. Lattice QCD calculations of the energies of one and two nucleons systems are performed at pion masses of mπ˜450 and 806 MeV in uniform, time-independent magnetic fields of strength |B |˜1019- 1020 G to determine the response of these hadronic systems to large magnetic fields. Fields of this strength may exist inside magnetars and in peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the unitary behavior at large scattering lengths may have important consequences for these systems.

  20. Unitary Limit of Two-Nucleon Interactions in Strong Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J; Tiburzi, Brian C; Beane, Silas R; Chang, Emmanuel

    2016-03-18

    Two-nucleon systems are shown to exhibit large scattering lengths in strong magnetic fields at unphysical quark masses, and the trends toward the physical values indicate that such features may exist in nature. Lattice QCD calculations of the energies of one and two nucleons systems are performed at pion masses of m_{π}∼450 and 806 MeV in uniform, time-independent magnetic fields of strength |B|∼10^{19}-10^{20}  G to determine the response of these hadronic systems to large magnetic fields. Fields of this strength may exist inside magnetars and in peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the unitary behavior at large scattering lengths may have important consequences for these systems. PMID:27035294

  1. Unitary limit of two-nucleon interactions in strong magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel

    2016-03-14

    In this study, two-nucleon systems are shown to exhibit large scattering lengths in strong magnetic fields at unphysical quark masses, and the trends toward the physical values indicate that such features may exist in nature. Lattice QCD calculations of the energies of one and two nucleons systems are performed at pion masses of mπ ~ 450 and 806 MeV in uniform, time-independent magnetic fields of strength |B| ~ 1019 – 1020 Gauss to determine the response of these hadronic systems to large magnetic fields. Fields of this strength may exist inside magnetars and in peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions, andmore » the unitary behavior at large scattering lengths may have important consequences for these systems.« less

  2. Two regimes in conductivity and the Hall coefficient of underdoped cuprates in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gor'kov, L P; Teitel'baum, G B

    2014-01-29

    We address recent experiments shedding light on the energy spectrum of under and optimally doped cuprates at temperatures above the superconducting transition. Angle resolved photoemission reveals coherent excitation only near nodal points on parts of the 'bare' Fermi surface known as the Fermi arcs. The question debated in the literature is whether the small normal pocket, seen via quantum oscillations, exists at higher temperatures or forms below a charge order transition in strong magnetic fields. Assuming the former case as a possibility, expressions are derived for the resistivity and the Hall coefficient (in weak and strong magnetic fields) with both types of carriers participating in the transport. There are two regimes. At higher temperatures (at a fixed field) electrons are dragged by the Fermi arcs' holes. The pocket being small, its contribution to conductivity and the Hall coefficient is negligible. At lower temperatures electrons decouple from holes behaving as a Fermi gas in the magnetic field. As the mobility of holes on the arcs decreases in strong fields with a decrease of temperature, below a crossover point the pocket electrons prevail, changing the sign of the Hall coefficient in the low temperature limit. Such behavior finds its confirmation in recent high-field experiments. PMID:24389670

  3. Thermal convection in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of liquid metal blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. The effect of convection on the flow within a toroidally oriented duct is analyzed. Non-uniform strong heating arising from capture of high-speed neutrons is imposed internally, while the walls are assumed to be isothermal. Very strong heating (the Grashof number up to 1011) and strong magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 104) corresponding to the realistic fusion reactor conditions are considered. Stability of two-dimensional flow states is analyzed using numerical simulations. The unstable modes at high Hartmann and Grashof number are found to have large wavelengths. The integral properties of developed three-dimensional flows are close to those of two-dimensional flows at the typical parameters of a fusion reactor. We also consider the effect of the weak transverse component of the magnetic field on the flow. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  4. Calculation of the electric hypershielding at the nuclei of molecules in a strong magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Caputo, M C; Ferraro, M B; Pagola, G I; Lazzeretti, P

    2007-04-21

    The third-rank electric hypershielding at the nuclei of 14 small molecules has been evaluated at the Hartree-Fock level of accuracy, by a pointwise procedure for the geometrical derivatives of magnetic susceptibilities and by a straightforward use of its definition within the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The connection between these two quantities is provided by the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The magnetically induced hypershielding at the nuclei accounts for distortion of molecular geometry caused by strong magnetic fields and for related changes of magnetic susceptibility. In homonuclear diatomics H(2), N(2), and F(2), a field along the bond direction squeezes the electron cloud toward the center, determining shorter but stronger bond. It is shown that constraints for rotational and translational invariances and hypervirial theorems provide a natural criterion for Hartree-Fock quality of computed nuclear electric hypershielding. PMID:17461610

  5. Calculation of the electric hypershielding at the nuclei of molecules in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Pagola, G. I.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2007-04-01

    The third-rank electric hypershielding at the nuclei of 14 small molecules has been evaluated at the Hartree-Fock level of accuracy, by a pointwise procedure for the geometrical derivatives of magnetic susceptibilities and by a straightforward use of its definition within the Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. The connection between these two quantities is provided by the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The magnetically induced hypershielding at the nuclei accounts for distortion of molecular geometry caused by strong magnetic fields and for related changes of magnetic susceptibility. In homonuclear diatomics H2, N2, and F2, a field along the bond direction squeezes the electron cloud toward the center, determining shorter but stronger bond. It is shown that constraints for rotational and translational invariances and hypervirial theorems provide a natural criterion for Hartree-Fock quality of computed nuclear electric hypershielding.

  6. Generation of strong magnetic field using 60 mm∅ superconducting bulk magnet and its application to magnetron sputtering device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hazama, H.; Yokouchi, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, Y.; Oka, T.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.

    2005-10-01

    To make a practical application of a superconducting bulk magnet (SBM), it is necessary that the SBM generates a strong and stable magnetic field in a working space and the magnet can be handled without any special care that would be needed because of the use of a superconductor. To satisfy these requirements, we have designed a portable and user-friendly magnet system consisting of a small air-cooled type refrigerator and a bulk superconductor. By using the stress-controlling magnetization technique, we could achieve a magnetic flux density of 8.0 T on the bulk surface and 6.5 T over the vacuum chamber surface of the refrigerator, when a 60 mm∅ Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor reinforced with a 5 mm thick stainless steel ring was magnetized by field cooling in 8.5 T to 27 K. We have confirmed that the bulk magnet system coupled with a battery is quite portable and can be delivered to any location by using a car with an electric power outlet in the cabin. We have constructed a magnetron sputtering device that employs a bulk magnet system delivered from the place of magnetization by this method. This sputtering device exhibits several unique features such as deposition at a very low Ar gas pressure because the magnetic field is 20 times stronger than that obtained by a conventional device in the working space.

  7. Effects of Strong Static Magnetic Fields on Amphibian Development and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Furuno, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-07-01

    This investigation attempts to clarify the effects of strong vertical and static magnetic fields (SMFs) of 11-15 T on Xenopus laevis development and on Xotx2 (an important regulator of fore- and midbrain morphogenesis) and Xag1 (essential for cement gland formation) gene expression. Results showed that (1) a strong SMF significantly retarded normal development and induced microcephaly, two heads, abnormal cement glands and multiple malformations, indicating that SMF inhibits normal embryonic development, (2) a strong SMF suppressed Xotx2 and Xag1 expression.

  8. Low energy THz excitations in distorted perovskites under strong magnetic fields and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, N. E.; Holldack, K.; Ta Phuoc, V.; Sopracase, R.; Del Campo, L.; de Sousa Meneses, D.; Echegut, P.; Alonso, J. A.

    We report on the magnetic field evolution of distinctive absorption bands in several zero field cooled polycrystalline RMO3 (R = Pr, Nd, Sm, Er, Tm, Lu; M = Cr, Mn, Fe. Ni) at low temperatures. Measurements below 120 cm-1 were done in an 11 T magnet combined with a Bruker IFS125-HR interferometer at the THz beamline of the BESSY II storage ring. At the reordering spin temperature, the spectra of ErCrO3 show an Er-Kramers doublet at ~55 cm-1 following a second order continuous reorientation. It suggests strong anisotropic Er3+-Cr3 + magnetic exchange interactions. The band strength of its triplet excited states decreases upon increasing the magnetic field. Non-Kramers Pr in PrCrO3 implies a magnetic field induced quasi-doublet system. Spin wave modes AF and F are also tentatively assigned. In ErFeO3, the spin reordering of the canted transition metal, and the Er3+ exchange, is monitored emerging above 80 K. Temperature dependent multiplet transitions centered at 50 cm-1 and 110 cm-1 appear as asymmetric field dependent broad lines. The absence of activity at ~4 K in SmCrO3, shared by SmMO3 (M =Fe, Ni), is consequence of near Cr-canted-Rare-Earth-opposite moment compensation juxtaposed to random micrograin orientation. We will also comment on observed only in ErNiO3 field dependent Er transitions and band profiles.

  9. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  10. Transport through a strongly coupled graphene quantum dot in perpendicular magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present transport measurements on a strongly coupled graphene quantum dot in a perpendicular magnetic field. The device consists of an etched single-layer graphene flake with two narrow constrictions separating a 140 nm diameter island from source and drain graphene contacts. Lateral graphene gates are used to electrostatically tune the device. Measurements of Coulomb resonances, including constriction resonances and Coulomb diamonds prove the functionality of the graphene quantum dot with a charging energy of approximately 4.5 meV. We show the evolution of Coulomb resonances as a function of perpendicular magnetic field, which provides indications of the formation of the graphene specific 0th Landau level. Finally, we demonstrate that the complex pattern superimposing the quantum dot energy spectra is due to the formation of additional localized states with increasing magnetic field. PMID:21711781

  11. Photons in a cold axion background and strong magnetic fields: Polarimetric consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espriu, Domènec; Renau, Albert

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the propagation of photons in an environment where a strong magnetic field (perpendicular to the photon momenta) coexists with an oscillating cold axion background with the characteristics expected from dark matter in the galactic halo. Qualitatively, the main effect of the combined background is to produce a three-way mixing among the two photon polarizations and the axion. It is interesting to note that in spite of the extremely weak interaction of photons with the cold axion background, its effects compete with those coming from the magnetic field in some regions of the parameter space. We determine (with one plausible simplification) the proper frequencies and eigenvectors as well as the corresponding photon ellipticity and induced rotation of the polarization plane that depend both on the magnetic field and the local density of axions. We also comment on the possibility that some of the predicted effects could be measured in optical table-top experiments.

  12. Measurements of Heme Relaxation and Ligand Recombination in Strong Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Heme cooling signals and diatomic ligand recombination kinetics are measured in strong magnetic fields (up to 10 Tesla). We examined diatomic ligand recombination to heme model compounds (NO and CO), myoglobin (NO and O2), and horseradish peroxidase (NO). No magnetic field induced rate changes in any of the samples were observed within the experimental detection limit. However, in the case of CO binding to heme in glycerol and O2 binding to myoglobin, we observe a small magnetic field dependent change in the early time amplitude of the optical response that is assigned to heme cooling. One possibility, consistent with this observation, is that there is a weak magnetic field dependence of the non-radiative branching ratio into the vibrationally hot electronic ground state during CO photolysis. Ancillary studies of the “spin-forbidden” CO binding reaction in a variety of heme compounds in the absence of magnetic field demonstrate a surprisingly wide range for the Arrhenius prefactor. We conclude that CO binding to heme is not always retarded by unfavorable spin selection rules involving a double spin-flip superexchange mechanism. In fact, it appears that the small prefactor (~109s−1) found for CO rebinding to Mb may be anomalous, rather than the general rule for heme-CO rebinding. These results point to unresolved fundamental issues that underlie the theory of heme-ligand photolysis and rebinding. PMID:19588986

  13. Two-photon annihilation of thermal pairs in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1992-01-01

    The annihilation spectrum of pairs with 1-D thermal distributions in the presence of a strong magnetic field is calculated. Numerical analysis of the spectrum are performed for mildly relativistic temperatures and for different angles of emission with respect to field lines. Teragauss magnetic fields are assumed so that conditions are typical of gamma ray burst and pulsar environments. The spectra at each viewing angle reveal asymmetric line profiles that are signatures of the magnetic broadening and red shifting of the line: these asymmetries are more prominent for small viewing angles. Thermal Doppler broadening tends to dominate in the right wing of the line and obscures the magnetic broadening more at high temperatures and smaller viewing angles. This angular dependence of the line asymmetry may prove a valuable diagnostic tool. For low temperatures and magnetic field strengths, useful analytic expressions are presented for the line width, and also for the annihilation spectrum at zero viewing angle. The results presented find application in gamma ray burst and pulsar models, and may prove very helpful in deducing field strengths and temperatures of the emission regions of these objects from line observations made by Compton GRO and future missions.

  14. Optical visualisation of the flow around a cylinder in electrolyte under strong axial magnetic field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, O.; Kobzev, A.; Kolesnikov, Yu.; Thess, A.

    Flows around obstacles are among the most common problems encountered in the fluid mechanics literature, and cylindrical obstacles definitely received the most extensive attention. The reason for this is that this relatively simple geometry already encompasses most of the important physical effects likely to play a role in flow around more complicated obstacles. This means that understanding the cylinder problem provides relevant insight on a wide variety of problem ranging from aerodynamics, with the flow around a wing or a vehicle, to pollutant dispersion around building, flows in turbines … When the working fluid conducts electricity additional effects are involved. In particular, the presence of a magnetic field tends to homogenise the flow in the direction of the magnetic field lines which leads to strong alterations of the flow patterns known from the classical nonconducting case. This configuration is also a very generic one as Magnetohydrodynamic flows around obstacle also occur in a wide variety of applications: for instance, the space vehicle re-entry problem features the flow of a conducting plasma around an obstacle: [1] and [2] have shown that it could be influenced by a strong magnetic field in order to reduce heat transfer. The cooling blanket of the future nuclear fusion reactor ITER soon to be built in France, features a complex flow of liquid metal in a very high magnetic field (typically 10 T), in which the occurrence of obstacles cannot be avoided.

  15. Relativistic electron motion in cylindrical waveguide with strong guiding magnetic field and high power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing

    2015-06-15

    In O-type high power microwave (HPM) devices, the annular relativistic electron beam is constrained by a strong guiding magnetic field and propagates through an interaction region to generate HPM. Some papers believe that the E × B drift of electrons may lead to beam breakup. This paper simplifies the interaction region with a smooth cylindrical waveguide to research the radial motion of electrons under conditions of strong guiding magnetic field and TM{sub 01} mode HPM. The single-particle trajectory shows that the radial electron motion presents the characteristic of radial guiding-center drift carrying cyclotron motion. The radial guiding-center drift is spatially periodic and is dominated by the polarization drift, not the E × B drift. Furthermore, the self fields of the beam space charge can provide a radial force which may pull electrons outward to some extent but will not affect the radial polarization drift. Despite the radial drift, the strong guiding magnetic field limits the drift amplitude to a small value and prevents beam breakup from happening due to this cause.

  16. Fast Vacuum Decay into Quark Pairs in Strong Color Electric and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Y.; Iritani, T.; Suganuma, H.

    2011-10-21

    We study quark-pair creations in strong color electomagnetic fields. We point out that, for massless quarks, the vacuum persistency probability per unit space-time volume is zero, i.e., the quark-pair creation rate w is infinite, in general homogeneous color electromagnetic fields, while it is finite when the color magnetic field is absent. We find that the contribution from the lowest Landau level (LLL) dominates this phenomenon. With an effective theory of the LLL projection, we also discuss dynamics of the vacuum decay, taking into account the back reaction of pair creations.

  17. Effect of the {delta} meson on the instabilities of nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Da Providencia, J.

    2009-08-15

    We study the influence of the isovector-scalar meson on the spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in asymmetric nonhomogenous nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings (NLW) and with density-dependent parameters (DDRH) are considered. A strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. It is shown that for neutron-rich matter the inclusion of the {delta} meson increases the size of the instability region for NLW models and decreases it for the DDRH models. The effect of the {delta} meson on the transition density to homogeneous {beta}-equilibrium matter is discussed. The DDRH{delta} model predicts the smallest transition pressures, about half the values obtained for NL{delta}.

  18. A strong magnetic field around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Eatough, R P; Falcke, H; Karuppusamy, R; Lee, K J; Champion, D J; Keane, E F; Desvignes, G; Schnitzeler, D H F M; Spitler, L G; Kramer, M; Klein, B; Bassa, C; Bower, G C; Brunthaler, A; Cognard, I; Deller, A T; Demorest, P B; Freire, P C C; Kraus, A; Lyne, A G; Noutsos, A; Stappers, B; Wex, N

    2013-09-19

    Earth's nearest candidate supermassive black hole lies at the centre of the Milky Way. Its electromagnetic emission is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment, which is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which the black hole can be fed. The magnetization of the gas, however, which is a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to synchrotron emission such as that previously observed. Here we report multi-frequency radio measurements of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that the pulsar's unusually large Faraday rotation (the rotation of the plane of polarization of the emission in the presence of an external magnetic field) indicates that there is a dynamically important magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission--from radio to X-ray wavelengths--from the black hole. PMID:23945588

  19. Density-functional-theory calculations of matter in strong magnetic fields. I. Atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Lai Dong

    2006-12-15

    We present calculations of the electronic structure of various atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10{sup 12} G to 2x10{sup 15} G, appropriate for radio pulsars and magnetars. For these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function which is tested to be reliable in the strong field regime. Numerical results of the ground-state energies are given for H{sub N} (up to N=10), He{sub N} (up to N=8), C{sub N} (up to N=5), and Fe{sub N} (up to N=3), as well as for various ionized atoms. Fitting formulae for the B dependence of the energies are also given. In general, as N increases, the binding energy per atom in a molecule, vertical bar E{sub N}|/N, increases and approaches a constant value. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon molecules are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x10{sup 12} G, carbon molecules are very weakly bound relative to individual atoms). Iron molecules are not bound at B < or approx. 10{sup 13} G, but become energetically more favorable than individual atoms at larger field strengths.

  20. Quark matter subject to strong magnetic fields: phase diagram and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Débora P.; Pinto, Marcus B.; Providência, Constança; Costa, Pedro; Ferreira, Márcio; Castro, Luis B.

    2015-07-01

    In the present work we are interested in understanding various properties of quark matter subject to strong magnetic fields described by the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with Polyakov loop. We start by analysing the differences arising from two different vector interactions in the Lagrangian densities, at zero temperature, and apply the results to stellar matter. We then investigate the position of the critical end point for different chemical potential and density scenarios.

  1. Defect characterization and magnetic properties in un-doped ZnO thin film annealed in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Shuai; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Wei-Peng; Li, Zheng-Cao; Zhang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Highly c-axis oriented un-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films, each with a thickness of ~ 100 nm, are deposited on Si (001) substrates by pulsed electron beam deposition at a temperature of ~ 320 °C, followed by annealing at 650 °C in argon in a strong magnetic field. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), positron annihilation analysis (PAS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) characterizations suggest that the major defects generated in these ZnO films are oxygen vacancies. Photoluminescence (PL) and magnetic property measurements indicate that the room-temperature ferromagnetism in the un-doped ZnO film originates from the singly ionized oxygen vacancies whose number depends on the strength of the magnetic field applied in the thermal annealing process. The effects of the magnetic field on the defect generation in the ZnO films are also discussed.

  2. Modular design for narrow scintillating cells with MRS photodiodes in strong magnetic field for ILC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpffer, J.; Zutshi, V.

    2006-08-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm 2 are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers with the Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor (MRS) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The count rates were obtained using radioactive source 90Sr, with threshold at about three photoelectrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed, and their performances were tested using the radioactive source by measuring the photomutiplier current using the same WLS fiber. Because effective cell area can be readily enlarged or reduced, this module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector. Experimental verification of the performance of the MRS photodiode in a strong magnetic field of 9 T, and the impact a magnet quench at 9.5 T are reported. The measurement method used is described. The results confirm the expectations that the MRS photodiode is insensitive to a strong magnetic field and therefore applicable to calorimetry in the presence of magnetic field. The overall result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems.

  3. Ion charge state distributions of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Yushkov, G.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.; Brown, I.

    1998-02-01

    Vacuum arc plasmas with discharge currents of 300 A and duration 250 {mu}s have been produced in strong magnetic fields up to 4 T. Ion charge state distributions have been measured for C, Al, Ag, Ta, Pt, Ho, and Er with a time-of-flight charge-mass spectrometer. Our previous measurements have been confirmed which show that ion charge states can be considerably enhanced when increasing the magnetic field up to about 1 T. The new measurements address the question of whether or not the additional increase continues at even higher magnetic field strength. It has been found that the increase becomes insignificant for field strengths greater than 1 T. Ion charge state distributions are almost constant for magnetic field strengths between 2 and 4 T. The results are explained by comparing the free expansion length with the freezing length. The most significant changes of charge state distributions are observed when these lengths are similar. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Cage correlation and diffusion in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Dzhumagulova, K N; Masheyeva, R U; Ott, T; Hartmann, P; Ramazanov, T S; Bonitz, M; Donkó, Z

    2016-06-01

    The influence of an external homogeneous magnetic field on the quasilocalization of the particles-characterized quantitatively by cage correlation functions-in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems is investigated via molecular dynamics computer simulations over a wide domain of the system parameters (coupling and screening strengths, and magnetic field). The caging time is found to be enhanced by the magnetic field B. The anisotropic migration of the particles in the presence of magnetic field is quantified via computing directional correlation functions, which indicate a more significant increase of localization in the direction perpendicular to B, while a moderate increase is also found along the B field lines. Associating the particles' escapes from the cages with jumps of a characteristic length, a connection is found with the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficients derived from the decay time of the directional correlation functions in both the directions perpendicular to and parallel with B are in very good agreement with respective diffusion coefficients values obtained from their usual computation based on the mean-squared displacement of the particles. PMID:27415379

  5. Cage correlation and diffusion in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Masheyeva, R. U.; Ott, T.; Hartmann, P.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bonitz, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of an external homogeneous magnetic field on the quasilocalization of the particles—characterized quantitatively by cage correlation functions—in strongly coupled three-dimensional Yukawa systems is investigated via molecular dynamics computer simulations over a wide domain of the system parameters (coupling and screening strengths, and magnetic field). The caging time is found to be enhanced by the magnetic field B . The anisotropic migration of the particles in the presence of magnetic field is quantified via computing directional correlation functions, which indicate a more significant increase of localization in the direction perpendicular to B , while a moderate increase is also found along the B field lines. Associating the particles' escapes from the cages with jumps of a characteristic length, a connection is found with the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficients derived from the decay time of the directional correlation functions in both the directions perpendicular to and parallel with B are in very good agreement with respective diffusion coefficients values obtained from their usual computation based on the mean-squared displacement of the particles.

  6. Spin state ordering of strongly correlating LaCoO3 induced at ultrahigh magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Nomura, Toshihiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Matsuo, Akira; Kindo, Koichi; Sato, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    Magnetization measurements of LaCoO3 have been carried out up to 133 T, generated with a destructive pulse magnet at a wide temperature range from 2 to 120 K. A novel magnetic transition was found at B >100 T and T >T*=32 ±5 K, which is characterized by its transition field increasing with increasing temperature. At T field phase at 80 K is found to be smaller for about 1.5 J K-1mol-1 than that of the low-field phase. We suggest that the observed two high-field phases may originate in different spatial orders of the spin states and possibly other degrees of freedom such as orbitals. An inherent strong correlation of spin states among cobalt sites should have triggered the emergence of the ordered phases in LaCoO3 at high magnetic fields.

  7. Comptonization in ultra-strong magnetic fields: numerical solution to the radiative transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-02-01

    Context. We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B ≳ Bc ≈ 4.4 × 1013 G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims: The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods: We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results: We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions: We derived the specific intensity of the ordinary photons, under the

  8. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  9. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-06-01

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are ni,f ∼104-105. We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ∼1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ∼104-105. The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed.

  10. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-06-01

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are ni,f ∼104-105. We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ∼1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ∼104-105. The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed.

  11. Anomalously strong vertical magnetic fields from distant ELF/VLF sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Israel; Price, Colin; Galanti, Eli; Shuval, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    There are many sources of very low frequency (VLF—3-30 kHz) and extremely low frequency (ELF—3-3000 Hz) radiation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (e.g., lightning and ELF/VLF communication transmitters). At distances of thousands of kilometers from these sources, the vertical component of the ELF/VLF AC magnetic fields is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations. In addition, our results imply that using only the horizontal components for direction finding or the absolute magnetic field strength may result in errors, since often a significant fraction of the magnetic field energy hides in the vertical component.

  12. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  13. Intra-well relaxation process in magnetic fluids subjected to strong polarising fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, C. N.; Fannin, P. C.; Mălăescu, I.; Barvinschi, P.; Ercuţa, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the frequency and field dependent complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of a kerosene-based magnetic fluid with iron oxide nanoparticles, stabilized with oleic acid, in the frequency range 0.1-6 GHz and over the polarising field range of 0-168.4 kA/m. By increasing polarising field, H, a subsidiary loss-peak clearly occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance peak, from which it remains distinct even in strong polarising fields of 168.4 kA/m. This is in contrast to other reported cases in which the intra-well relaxation process is manifested only as a shoulder of the resonance peak, which vanishes in polarising fields larger than that of 100 kA/m. The results of the XRD analysis connected to the anisotropy field results confirm that the investigated sample contains particles of magnetite and of the tetragonal phase of maghemite. Taking into account the characteristics of our sample, the theoretical analysis revealed that the intra-well relaxation process of the small particles of the tetragonal phase of maghemite may be responsible for the subsidiary loss peak of the investigated magnetic fluid.

  14. Cold equation of state in a strong magnetic field - Effects of inverse beta-decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of a high magnetic field (B is greater than 10 exp 12 G) on the degenerate matter equation of state appropriate to a neutron star is studied. The regime dominated by relativistic electrons up to the neutron drip density is highlighted. The equilibrium matter composition and equation of state, allowing for inverse beta-decay. Two different equilibrium models are determined: an ideal neutron-proton-electron (npe) gas and the more realistic model of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland (1971) consisting of a Coulomb lattice of heavy nuclei embedded in an electron gas. For a sufficiently high field strength, the magnetic field has an appreciable effect, changing the adiabatic index of the matter and the nuclear transition densities. The influence of a strong field on some simple nonequilibrium processes, including beta-decay and inverse beta-decay (electron capture) is also considered. The effects produced by the magnetic field are mainly due to the changes in the transverse electron quantum orbits and the allowed electron phase space induced by the field.

  15. Active galaxies. A strong magnetic field in the jet base of a supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Muller, Sébastien; Vlemmings, Wouter; Horellou, Cathy; Aalto, Susanne

    2015-04-17

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) host some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. AGN are thought to be powered by accretion of matter onto a rotating disk that surrounds a supermassive black hole. Jet streams can be boosted in energy near the event horizon of the black hole and then flow outward along the rotation axis of the disk. The mechanism that forms such a jet and guides it over scales from a few light-days up to millions of light-years remains uncertain, but magnetic fields are thought to play a critical role. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have detected a polarization signal (Faraday rotation) related to the strong magnetic field at the jet base of a distant AGN, PKS 1830-211. The amount of Faraday rotation (rotation measure) is proportional to the integral of the magnetic field strength along the line of sight times the density of electrons. The high rotation measures derived suggest magnetic fields of at least tens of Gauss (and possibly considerably higher) on scales of the order of light-days (0.01 parsec) from the black hole. PMID:25883352

  16. Generation of strong pulsed magnetic fields using a compact, short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuka, D.; Efimov, S.; Nitishinskiy, M.; Rososhek, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-04-01

    The generation of strong magnetic fields (˜50 T) using single- or multi-turn coils immersed in water was studied. A pulse generator with stored energy of ˜3.6 kJ, discharge current amplitude of ˜220 kA, and rise time of ˜1.5 μs was used in these experiments. Using the advantage of water that it has a large Verdet constant, the magnetic field was measured using the non-disturbing method of Faraday rotation of a polarized collimated laser beam. This approach does not require the use of magnetic probes, which are sensitive to electromagnetic noise and damaged in each shot. It also avoids the possible formation of plasma by either a flashover along the conductor or gas breakdown inside the coil caused by an induced electric field. In addition, it was shown that this approach can be used successfully to investigate the interesting phenomenon of magnetic field enhanced diffusion into a conductor.

  17. Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Samkharadze, N.; Kumar, A.; Csathy, G. A.; Manfra, M. J.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2011-05-15

    We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK.

  18. Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Samkharadze, N; Kumar, A; Manfra, M J; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Csáthy, G A

    2011-05-01

    We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK. PMID:21639513

  19. Spin superconductivity and ac-Josephson effect in Graphene system under strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, China Collaboration

    We study the spin superconductivity in Graphene system under strong magnetic field. From the microscopically Gor'kov method combined with the Aharonov-Casher effect, we derive the effective Landau-Ginzburg free energy and analyze the time evolution of order parameter, which is confirmed to be the off-diagonal long range order. Meanwhile, we compare the ground state of spin superconductivity to the canted-antiferromagnetic state, and demonstrate the equivalence between these two states. Moreover, we give out the pseudo-field flux quantization condition of spin supercurrent, and propose an experimental measurable ac-Josephson effect of spin superconductivity in this system.

  20. Strong ionospheric field-aligned currents for radial interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Lühr, Hermann; Shue, Jih-Hong; Frey, Harald. U.; Kervalishvili, Guram; Huang, Tao; Cao, Xue; Pi, Gilbert; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2014-05-01

    The present work has investigated the configuration of field-aligned currents (FACs) during a long period of radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 19 May 2002 by using high-resolution and precise vector magnetic field measurements of CHAMP satellite. During the interest period IMF By and Bz are weakly positive and Bx keeps pointing to the Earth for almost 10 h. The geomagnetic indices Dst is about -40 nT and AE about 100 nT on average. The cross polar cap potential calculated from Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and derived from DMSP observations have average values of 10-20 kV. Obvious hemispheric differences are shown in the configurations of FACs on the dayside and nightside. At the south pole FACs diminish in intensity to magnitudes of about 0.1 μA/m2, the plasma convection maintains two-cell flow pattern, and the thermospheric density is quite low. However, there are obvious activities in the northern cusp region. One pair of FACs with a downward leg toward the pole and upward leg on the equatorward side emerge in the northern cusp region, exhibiting opposite polarity to FACs typical for duskward IMF orientation. An obvious sunward plasma flow channel persists during the whole period. These ionospheric features might be manifestations of an efficient magnetic reconnection process occurring in the northern magnetospheric flanks at high latitude. The enhanced ionospheric current systems might deposit large amount of Joule heating into the thermosphere. The air densities in the cusp region get enhanced and subsequently propagate equatorward on the dayside. Although geomagnetic indices during the radial IMF indicate low-level activity, the present study demonstrates that there are prevailing energy inputs from the magnetosphere to both the ionosphere and thermosphere in the northern polar cusp region.

  1. Production of large volume, strongly magnetized laser-produced plasmas by use of pulsed external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Albertazzi, B.; Beard, J.; Billette, J.; Portugall, O.; Ciardi, A.; Vinci, T.; Albrecht, J.; Chen, S. N.; Da Silva, D.; Hirardin, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Simond, S.; Veuillot, E.; Fuchs, J.; Burris-Mog, T.; Dittrich, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kroll, F.; Nitsche, S.; and others

    2013-04-15

    The production of strongly magnetized laser plasmas, of interest for laboratory astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion studies, is presented. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system, which generates a magnetic field by means of a split coil, with the ELFIE laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In order to influence the plasma dynamics in a significant manner, the system can generate, repetitively and without debris, high amplitude magnetic fields (40 T) in a manner compatible with a high-energy laser environment. A description of the system and preliminary results demonstrating the possibility to magnetically collimate plasma jets are given.

  2. Production of large volume, strongly magnetized laser-produced plasmas by use of pulsed external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; Béard, J; Ciardi, A; Vinci, T; Albrecht, J; Billette, J; Burris-Mog, T; Chen, S N; Da Silva, D; Dittrich, S; Herrmannsdörfer, T; Hirardin, B; Kroll, F; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nitsche, S; Riconda, C; Romagnagni, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Simond, S; Veuillot, E; Cowan, T E; Portugall, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2013-04-01

    The production of strongly magnetized laser plasmas, of interest for laboratory astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion studies, is presented. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system, which generates a magnetic field by means of a split coil, with the ELFIE laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In order to influence the plasma dynamics in a significant manner, the system can generate, repetitively and without debris, high amplitude magnetic fields (40 T) in a manner compatible with a high-energy laser environment. A description of the system and preliminary results demonstrating the possibility to magnetically collimate plasma jets are given. PMID:23635194

  3. Mean field analysis of the high temperature magnetic properties of terbium iron garnet in strong DC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoubi, Mahieddine; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the description of the magnetic phase diagrams (MPD) together with a special interest to the determination of more precise values of some reliable parameters at the compensation point, Tcomp=243.5±0.5 K of the terbium iron garnet, Tb3Fe5O12 or TbIG. Using isothermal magnetizations performed on single crystal in strong DC magnetic fields up to 200 kOe applied along the <111>, <110> and <100> directions within the temperature range 128-295 K, field-induced phase transitions between collinear and canted phases are observed in the vicinity of Tcomp at critical fields, Hc2. In comparison with the measurement at zero external magnetic field, the specific heat, Cp(T) at 80 kOe along <111> shows an excess around Tcomp characterized by an anomaly which has a width in the boundaries of the canted phase and a maximum at 252 K, the more accurate value of the critical temperature, TC* of the MPD in the (Hc2-T) plane. Better determinations of the molecular field coefficients which represent the magnetic interactions on the Tb sublattice are obtained by an improved molecular field model based on the saturation effects of the Tb sublattice and the differential susceptibility contribution due to the Fe sublattices to the total magnetic susceptibility of TbIG. The results are discussed in terms of the previous theoretical studies of the MPD predicted for weakly anisotropic ferrimagnets.

  4. Synchro-curvature radiation of charged particles in the strong curved magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kelner, S. R.; Prosekin, A. Yu.; Aharonian, F. A. E-mail: Anton.Prosekin@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that the radiation of relativistic particles in a curved magnetic field proceeds in either the synchrotron or the curvature radiation modes. In this paper we show that in strong curved magnetic fields a significant fraction of the energy of relativistic electrons can be radiated away in the intermediate, the so-called synchro-curvature regime. Because of the persistent change of the trajectory curvature, the radiation varies with the frequency of particle gyration. While this effect can be ignored in the synchrotron and curvature regimes, the variability plays a key role in the formation of the synchro-curvature radiation. Using the Hamiltonian formalism, we find that the particle trajectory has the form of a helix wound around the drift trajectory. This allows us to calculate analytically the intensity and energy distribution of prompt radiation in the general case of magnetic bremsstrahlung in the curved magnetic field. We show that the transition to the limit of the synchrotron and curvature radiation regimes is determined by the relation between the drift velocity and the component of the particle velocity perpendicular to the drift trajectory. The detailed numerical calculations, which take into account the energy losses of particles, confirm the principal conclusions based on the simplified analytical treatment of the problem, and allow us to analyze quantitatively the transition between different radiation regimes for a broad range of initial pitch angles. These calculations demonstrate that even very small pitch angles may lead to significant deviations from the spectrum of the standard curvature radiation when it is formally assumed that a charged particle moves strictly along the magnetic line. We argue that in the case of realization of specific configurations of the electric and magnetic fields, the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar magnetospheres can be dominated by the component radiated in the synchro-curvature regime.

  5. Quasiparticles of strongly correlated Fermi liquids at high temperatures and in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shaginyan, V. R.

    2011-08-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing, best experimentally studied and fundamental systems in physics. There is, however, lack of theoretical understanding in this field of physics. The ideas based on the concepts like Kondo lattice and involving quantum and thermal fluctuations at a quantum critical point have been used to explain the unusual physics. Alas, being suggested to describe one property, these approaches fail to explain the others. This means a real crisis in theory suggesting that there is a hidden fundamental law of nature. It turns out that the hidden fundamental law is well forgotten old one directly related to the Landau-Migdal quasiparticles, while the basic properties and the scaling behavior of the strongly correlated systems can be described within the framework of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). The phase transition comprises the extended quasiparticle paradigm that allows us to explain the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior observed in these systems. In contrast to the Landau paradigm stating that the quasiparticle effective mass is a constant, the effective mass of new quasiparticles strongly depends on temperature, magnetic field, pressure, and other parameters. Our observations are in good agreement with experimental facts and show that FCQPT is responsible for the observed NFL behavior and quasiparticles survive both high temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  6. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-01

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup. PMID:24862946

  7. The mass limit of white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Hua; Liu, He-Lei; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    Recently, U. Das and B. Mukhopadhyay proposed that the Chandrasekhar limit of a white dwarf could reach a new high level (2.58M⊙) if a superstrong magnetic field were considered (Das U and Mukhopadhyay B 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 071102), where the structure of the strongly magnetized white dwarf (SMWD) is calculated in the framework of Newtonian theory (NT). As the SMWD has a far smaller size, in contrast with the usual expectation, we found that there is an obvious general relativistic effect (GRE) in the SMWD. For example, for the SMWD with a one Landau level system, the super-Chandrasekhar mass limit in general relativity (GR) is approximately 16.5% lower than that in NT. More interestingly, the maximal mass of the white dwarf will be first increased when the magnetic field strength keeps on increasing and reaches the maximal value M = 2.48M⊙ with BD = 391.5. Then if we further increase the magnetic fields, surprisingly, the maximal mass of the white dwarf will decrease when one takes the GRE into account.

  8. Bending of electromagnetic wave in an ultra-strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young

    2012-10-01

    We consider the bending of light by nonlinear electrodynamics when the magnetic field B exceeds the critical value B{sub c} = m{sup 2}c{sup 2}/e h-bar = 4.4 × 10{sup 9}T. Using the index of refraction derived from the analytic series representation in one-loop effective action of QED, we found the trajectory and the bending angle of light in geometric optics. The angle bent by ultra-strong magnetic field of magnetar was estimated and compared with the gravitational bending. The result may be useful in studying the lensing, birefringence, and other nonlinear quantum electrodynamic effects above B{sub c}.

  9. Turbulent convection in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2014-11-01

    Convection in a horizontal duct with one heated wall is studied computationally. The work is motivated by the concept of a blanket for fusion reactors, according to which liquid metal slowly flows in toroidal ducts aligned with the main component of the magnetic field. We first assume that the magnetic field is sufficiently strong for the flow to be purely two-dimensional and analyze chaotic flow regimes at very high Grashof numbers. Furthermore, three-dimensional perturbations are considered and the relation between the length of the duct and the critical Hartmann number, below which the flow becomes three-dimensional, is determined. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  10. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    field in addition to the orthogonal field does not affect the electrostatic correction technique. However, rotation of the x-ray tube by 30° toward the MR bore increases the parallel magnetic field magnitude (∼72 mT). The presence of this larger parallel field along with the orthogonal field leads to incomplete correction. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum is not noticeably affected by the electrostatic correction, but the output flux is reduced by 7.5%. Conclusions: The maximum orthogonal magnetic field magnitude that can be compensated for using the proposed design is 65 mT. Larger orthogonal field magnitudes cannot be completely compensated for because a pure electrostatic approach is limited by the dielectric strength of the vacuum inside the x-ray tube insert. The electrostatic approach also suffers from limitations when there are strong magnetic fields in both the orthogonal and parallel directions because the electrons prefer to stay aligned with the parallel magnetic field. These challenging field conditions can be addressed by using a hybrid correction approach that utilizes both active shielding coils and biasing electrodes.

  11. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    field in addition to the orthogonal field does not affect the electrostatic correction technique. However, rotation of the x-ray tube by 30° toward the MR bore increases the parallel magnetic field magnitude (∼72 mT). The presence of this larger parallel field along with the orthogonal field leads to incomplete correction. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum is not noticeably affected by the electrostatic correction, but the output flux is reduced by 7.5%. Conclusions: The maximum orthogonal magnetic field magnitude that can be compensated for using the proposed design is 65 mT. Larger orthogonal field magnitudes cannot be completely compensated for because a pure electrostatic approach is limited by the dielectric strength of the vacuum inside the x-ray tube insert. The electrostatic approach also suffers from limitations when there are strong magnetic fields in both the orthogonal and parallel directions because the electrons prefer to stay aligned with the parallel magnetic field. These challenging field conditions can be addressed by using a hybrid correction approach that utilizes both active shielding coils and biasing electrodes. PMID:25370658

  12. The Ground State of Monolayer Graphene in a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Guidry, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Experiments indicate that the ground state of graphene in a strong magnetic field exhibits spontaneous breaking of SU(4) symmetry. However, the nature of the corresponding emergent state is unclear because existing theoretical methods approximate the broken-symmetry solutions, yielding nearly-degenerate candidate ground states having different emergent orders. Resolving this ambiguity in the nature of the strong-field ground state is highly desirable, given the importance of graphene for both fundamental physics and technical applications. We have discovered a new SO(8) symmetry that recovers standard graphene SU(4) quantum Hall physics, but predicts two new broken-SU(4) phases and new properties for potential ground states. Our solutions are analytical; thus we capture the essential physics of spontaneously-broken SU(4) states in a powerful yet solvable model useful both in correlating existing data and in suggesting new experiments.

  13. Internal structure modification and decay of hadrons in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the influence of external magnetic field on strong decays of K∗(892), ϕ(1020) and ρ0(770) mesons. Due to increasing energy of n=0 Landau level of charged decay products, particular decay channels may become suppressed and isospin rules for strong decays can be violated. In the case of ρ0 meson, enhanced production of photons and dileptons (with modified invariant mass) may occur. Similar considerations are applied to decays of Ξ∗(1530) baryon. We also suggest that static electromagnetic field of sufficient strength can modify the internal structure (wavefunction) of ηc, J/Ψ and Υ(ns) mesons, and specific decay channels (e.g. CP — violating η → π+π-) can become enhanced.

  14. The Ground State of Monolayer Graphene in a Strong Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Guidry, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Experiments indicate that the ground state of graphene in a strong magnetic field exhibits spontaneous breaking of SU(4) symmetry. However, the nature of the corresponding emergent state is unclear because existing theoretical methods approximate the broken-symmetry solutions, yielding nearly-degenerate candidate ground states having different emergent orders. Resolving this ambiguity in the nature of the strong-field ground state is highly desirable, given the importance of graphene for both fundamental physics and technical applications. We have discovered a new SO(8) symmetry that recovers standard graphene SU(4) quantum Hall physics, but predicts two new broken-SU(4) phases and new properties for potential ground states. Our solutions are analytical; thus we capture the essential physics of spontaneously-broken SU(4) states in a powerful yet solvable model useful both in correlating existing data and in suggesting new experiments. PMID:26927477

  15. COOLING RATES FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS UNDERGOING COMPTON SCATTERING IN STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L. E-mail: zw1@rice.edu

    2011-05-20

    For inner magnetospheric models of hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating continuum radiation. This is in part due to the proximity of a hot soft photon bath from the stellar surface to putative radiation dissipation regions in the inner magnetosphere. Moreover, because the scattering process becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and the cooling of relativistic electrons. This paper presents computations of the electron cooling rates for this process, which are needed for resonant Compton models of non-thermal radiation from such highly magnetized pulsars. The computed rates extend previous calculations of magnetic Thomson cooling to the domain of relativistic quantum effects, sampled near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TG. This is the first exposition of fully relativistic, quantum magnetic Compton cooling rates for electrons, and it employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann cross section and a newer Sokolov and Ternov (ST) formulation of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields. Such ST formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects that are important in the cyclotron resonance and has not been addressed before in the context of cooling by Compton scattering. The QED effects are observed to profoundly lower the rates below extrapolations of the familiar magnetic Thomson results, as expected, when recoil and Klein-Nishina reductions become important.

  16. Properties of a two-dimensional semimetal in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Batyev, E. G.

    2010-01-15

    A system of two-dimensional electrons and holes ha s been investigated in a strong magnetic field, when it is sufficient to take into account only the ground Landau level. It has been shown that the interaction of electrons and holes can lead to an ordered state. In this problem, the exchange interaction in electron and hole subsystems is significant. The following two cases have been considered: (a) there are one electron and one hole valleys, and at some magnetic field strength, there exists an ordered state, as in an excitonic insulator; and (b) there exist one electron and two equivalent hole valleys (as in the experiment performed by Kvon et al. [1]), and the hole system has an ordered state of the Stoner ferromagnetic type in a specific range of magnetic field strengths. The spectra of elementary excitations of the Bose and Fermi types have been obtained. The Fermi excitations have a gap in the energy spectrum, whereas the Bose excitations in the ordered states begin with zero (to these excitations there corresponds an electric dipole moment). The self-consistent field approximation has been used, which is exact when the numbers of electrons and holes are equal to each other.

  17. Study of Fluid Flow Control In Protein Crystallization Using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F.; Ciszak, E.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in 'microgravity', researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  18. Investigation on macrosegregation and dendrite morphology during directional solidification of Al-Cu hypereutectic alloys under a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Du, DaFan; Fautrelle, Yves; Ren, ZhongMing; Moreau, Rene

    2015-08-01

    The effect of a strong magnetic field (up to 12 T) on the macrosegregation and dendrite morphology during directional solidification of the Al-22at.%Cu alloy has been investigated. Experimental results show that the application of the magnetic field caused the freckle macrosegregation and the fracture of the Al2Cu dendrites during directional solidification. With the increase of the magnetic field, the size of the freckle and dendrite decreases. Moreover, the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to study the effect of the magnetic field on the morphology and orientation of the Al2Cu dendrite. The EBSD results revealed that although the dendrites were destroyed under the magnetic field, the magnetic field did not yet change the orientation of the Al2Cu crystal. The formation of the freckles and the fracture of the dendrites under the magnetic field may be attributed to the TE magnetic effects.

  19. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  20. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  1. Revisiting heavy ion collisions under the influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Paoli, M. G. de; Menezes, D. P.

    2013-05-06

    The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase refers to matter where quarks and gluons are believed to be deconfined and it probably takes place at temperatures of the order of 150 to 170 MeV. In large colliders around the world (RHIC/BNL, ALICE/CERN, GSI, etc), physicists are trying to convert hadronic matter at these order of temperatures into QGP by looking at non-central heavy ion collisions. Possible experiments towards this search are Au-Au collisions at RHIC/BNL and Pb-Pb collisions at SPS/CERN, where the hadron abundances and particle ratios are used in order to determine the temperature and baryonic chemical potential of the possibly present hadronic matter-QGP phase transition. The magnetic fields involved in heavy-ion collisions, although time dependent and short-lived, can reach intensities higher than the ones considered in magnetars, around 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Gauss. In fact, the densities related to the chemical potentials obtained within the relativistic models framework developed in previous works are very low (of the order of 10{sup -3} fm{sup -3}). At these densities the nuclear interactions are indeed very small and this fact made us consider the possibility of free Fermi and Boson gases under the unfluence of strong magnetic fields. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} G through a {chi}{sup 2} fit to some data sets of the STAR experiment. Our results shown that a field of the order of 10{sup 19} G can produce a much better fit to the experimental data than the calculations without magnetic fields.

  2. The onset of layer undulations in smectic A liquid crystals due to a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, A.; Garcia-Azpeitia, C.; García-Cervera, C. J.; Joo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of a strong magnetic field on a three dimensional smectic A liquid crystal. We identify a critical field above which the uniform layered state loses stability; this is associated to the onset of layer undulations. In a previous work García-Cervera and Joo (2012 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 203 1–43), García-Cervera and Joo considered the two dimensional case and analyzed the transition to the undulated state via a simple bifurcation. In dimension n  =  3 the situation is more delicate because the first eigenvalue of the corresponding linearized problem is not simple. We overcome the difficulties inherent to this higher dimensional setting by identifying the irreducible representations for natural actions on the functional that take into account the invariances of the problem thus allowing for reducing the bifurcation analysis to a subspace with symmetries. We are able to describe at least two bifurcation branches, highlighting the richer landscape of energy critical states in the three dimensional setting. Finally, we analyze a reduced two dimensional problem, assuming the magnetic field is very strong, and are able to relate this to a model in micromagnetics studied in Alouges et al (2002 ESAIM Control Optim. Calc. Var. 8 31–68), from where we deduce the periodicity property of minimizers.

  3. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-01

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 1014 G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 1018 G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  4. Cancellation properties in Hall magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Martin, L N; De Vita, G; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Dmitruk, P; Nigro, G; Primavera, L; Carbone, V

    2013-12-01

    We present a signed measure analysis of compressible Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. Signed measure analysis allows us to characterize the scaling behavior of the sign-oscillating flow structures and their geometrical properties (fractal dimensions of structures). A reduced numerical model, valid when a strong guide magnetic field is present, is used here. In order to discuss the effect of the Hall term, different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. Results show that as the Hall term is increased, the fractal dimension of the current and vorticity sheets decreases. This observation, together with previous analysis of the same fields, provides a comprehensive description of the effect of the Hall force on the formation of structures. Two main processes are identified, namely, the widening and unraveling of the sheets. PMID:24483577

  5. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields: Spin-dependent influences at the cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Eiles, Matthew T.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Taylor, Caitlin A.; Fitch, Catherine J.

    2014-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamical (QED) process of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields is commonly invoked in atmospheric and inner magnetospheric models of x-ray and soft gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars. A major influence of the field is to introduce resonances at the cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, where the incoming photon accesses thresholds for the creation of virtual electrons or positrons in intermediate states with excited Landau levels. At these resonances, the effective cross section typically exceeds the classical Thomson value by over 2 orders of magnitude. Near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TeraGauss, relativistic corrections must be incorporated when computing this cross section. This profound enhancement underpins the anticipation that resonant Compton scattering is a very efficient process in the environs of highly magnetized neutron stars. This paper presents formalism for the QED magnetic Compton differential cross section valid for both subcritical and supercritical fields, yet restricted to scattered photons that are below pair creation threshold. Calculations are developed for the particular case of photons initially propagating along the field, and in the limit of zero vacuum dispersion, mathematically simple specializations that are germane to interactions involving relativistic electrons frequently found in neutron star magnetospheres. This exposition of relativistic, quantum, magnetic Compton cross sections treats electron spin dependence fully, since this is a critical feature for describing the finite decay lifetimes of the intermediate states. Such lifetimes are introduced to truncate the resonant cyclotronic divergences via standard Lorentz profiles. The formalism employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann (JL) wave functions and the Sokolov and Ternov (ST) electron eigenfunctions of the magnetic Dirac equation. The ST states are formally correct for self

  6. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains' electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state. PMID:26426063

  7. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J.; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M.; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state. PMID:26426063

  8. Dynamics of the plasma injected into the gap of a plasma opening switch across a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgachev, G. I.; Maslennikov, D. D.; Ushakov, A. G.; Fedotkin, A. S.; Khodeev, I. A.; Shvedov, A. A.

    2011-02-15

    A method is proposed to increase the linear charge density transferred through a plasma opening switch (POS) and, accordingly, reduce the POS diameter by enhancing the external magnetic field in the POS gap. Results are presented from experimental studies of the dynamics of the plasma injected into the POS gap across a strong magnetic field. The possibility of closing the POS gap by the plasma injected across an external magnetic field of up to 60 kG is demonstrated.

  9. Pair production and annihilation in strong magnetic fields. [of neutron stars and pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the presence of strong magnetic fields are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. In particular, the process of pair production by single photons in the presence of fields of order 10 to the 12th power Gauss is of importance in cascade models of pulsar gamma ray emission, and may also become significant in theories of other radiation phenomena whose sources may be neutron stars (e.g., gamma ray bursts). In addition to pair production, the inverse process of pair annihilation is greatly affected by the presence of superstrong magnetic fields. The most significant departures from annihilation processes in free space are a reduction in the total rate for annihilation into two photons, a broadening of the familiar 511-keV line for annihilation at rest, and the possibility for annihilation into a single photon which dominates the two-photon annihilation for B (10 to 13th power Gauss) The physics of these pair conversion processes, which is reviewed briefly, can become quite complex in the teragauss regime, and can involve calculations which are technically difficult to incorporate into models of emission mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres. However, theoretical work, especially the case of pair annihilation, also suggests potential techniques for more direct measurements of field strengths near the stellar surface.

  10. Cooling of neutron stars and emissivity of neutrinos by the direct Urca process under influence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, E. L.; Chiapparini, M.; Negreiros, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Neutron stars are born with high temperatures and during a few seconds suffer rapid cooling by emission of neutrinos. The direct Urca process is the main mechanism to explain this loss of energy. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population for a parametrized magnetic field. We calculate the cooling of neutron stars with different mass and magnetic fields due to direct Urca process.

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD-DECAY-INDUCED ELECTRON CAPTURES: A STRONG HEAT SOURCE IN MAGNETAR CRUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Randall L.; Kaplan, David L. E-mail: dkaplan@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2010-01-10

    We propose a new heating mechanism in magnetar crusts. Magnetars' crustal magnetic fields are much stronger than their surface fields; therefore, magnetic pressure partially supports the crust against gravity. The crust loses magnetic pressure support as the field decays and must compensate by increasing the electron degeneracy pressure; the accompanying increase in the electron Fermi energy induces nonequilibrium, exothermic electron captures. The total heat released via field-decay electron captures is comparable to the total magnetic energy in the crust. Thus, field-decay electron captures are an important, if not the primary, mechanism powering magnetars' soft X-ray emission.

  12. Neutrino emissivity from e sup minus e+ annihilation in a strong magnetic field: Hot, nondegenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, A.D.; Gnedin, O.Y.; Yakovlev, D.G. ); Amsterdamski, P.; Haensel, P. )

    1992-11-15

    The neutrino emissivity from {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital e+} pair annihilation is calculated for a hot, nondegenerate plasma, {ital T}{much gt}{ital T}{sub {ital F}} ({ital T}{sub {ital F}} is the electron degeneracy temperature), in a magnetic field {bold B} of arbitrary strength. The results are fitted by an analytic expression. A not-very-strong magnetic field, {ital b}={ital B}/{ital B}{sub {ital c}}{much lt}1 ({ital B}{sub {ital c}}=4.41{times}10{sup 13} G), enhances the emissivity of a nonrelativistic plasma, {ital t}={ital T}/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{approx lt}{ital b} ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}=6{times}10{sup 9} K), and does not affect the emissivity at higher {ital T}. Stronger fields, {ital b}{much gt}1, influence the pair annihilation if {ital t}{approx lt} {radical}{ital b} . At {ital t}{approx gt}{ital b}{sup 1/4} they suppress the process, and at {ital t}{much lt}{ital b}{sup 1/4} they enhance it. As a rule the pair annihilation dominates over other neutrino production mechanisms in a hot plasma of neutron-star envelopes.

  13. Calculation of energies of three-electron systems in a strong magnetic field using Explicitly Correlated Gaussian Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Jorge; Varga, Kalman

    2015-03-01

    Strong magnetic fields can significantly alter the properties of atoms and allow the formation of stable negative ions such as He-. We have calculated the energies of systems comprised of three electrons in the presence of strong magnetic fields by using the Stochastic Variational Method with deformed Explicitly Correlated Gaussian basis. This approach yields accurate values for three-electron systems and predicts that the He- ion in a strong magnetic field has stable states, within the non-relativistic framework, in the infinite nuclear mass approximation. The energy spectrum and the properties of three-electron systems as a function of the strength of the magnetic field show the effect of the rivalry between the Coulomb interaction and the magnetic confinement.

  14. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-03-26

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one canmore » infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 10(15) G, where n(i, f) similar to 10(12)-10(13), from the results for n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  15. Phase diagram of the itinerant helical magnet MnSi at high pressures and strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stishov, Sergei

    We performed a series of resistivity, heat capacity and ultrasound speed measurements of a MnSi single crystal at high pressures and strong magnetic fields [1-3]. Two notable features of the phase transition in MnSi that disappear on pressure increasin are a sharp peak marking the first order phase transition and a shallow maximum, situated slightly above the critical temperature and pointing to the domain of prominent helical fluctuations. The longitudinal and transverse ultrasound speeds and attenuation were measured in a MnSi single crystal in the temperature range of 2-40 K and magnetic fields to 7 Tesla. The magnetic phase transition in MnSi in zero magnetic field is signified by a quasi-discontinuity in the c11 elastic constant, which almost vanishes at the skyrmion - paramagnetic transition at high magnetic fields. The powerful fluctuations at the minima of c11 make the mentioned crossing point of the minima and the phase transition lines similar to a critical end point, where a second order phase transition meets a first order one.

  16. Properties of strong-coupling magneto-bipolaron qubit in quantum dot under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu-Fang, Bai; Ying, Zhang; Wuyunqimuge; Eerdunchaolu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the variational method of Pekar type, we study the energies and the wave-functions of the ground and the first-excited states of magneto-bipolaron, which is strongly coupled to the LO phonon in a parabolic potential quantum dot under an applied magnetic field, thus built up a quantum dot magneto-bipolaron qubit. The results show that the oscillation period of the probability density of the two electrons in the qubit decreases with increasing electron–phonon coupling strength α, resonant frequency of the magnetic field ω c, confinement strength of the quantum dot ω 0, and dielectric constant ratio of the medium η the probability density of the two electrons in the qubit oscillates periodically with increasing time t, angular coordinate φ 2, and dielectric constant ratio of the medium η the probability of electron appearing near the center of the quantum dot is larger, and the probability of electron appearing away from the center of the quantum dot is much smaller. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2013407119) and the Items of Institution of Higher Education Scientific Research of Hebei Province and Inner Mongolia, China (Grant Nos. ZD20131008, Z2015149, Z2015219, and NJZY14189).

  17. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauss, T.; Croell, A.; SorgenFrei, T.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Solar cells made from directionally solidified silicon cover 57% of the photovoltaic industry's market [1]. One major issue during directional solidification of silicon is the precipitation of foreign phase particles. These particles, mainly SiC and Si3N4, are precipitated from the dissolved crucible coating, which is made of silicon nitride, and the dissolution of carbon monoxide from the furnace atmosphere. Due to their hardness and size of several hundred micrometers, those particles can lead to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Additionally, SiC particles can act as a shunt, short circuiting the solar cell. Even if the particles are too small to disturb the wafering process, they can lead to a grit structure of silicon micro grains and serve as sources for dislocations. All of this lowers the yield of solar cells and reduces the performance of cells and modules. We studied the behaviour of SiC particle depots during float-zone growth under an oxide skin, and strong static magnetic fields. For high field strengths of 3T and above and an oxide layer on the sample surface, convection is sufficiently suppressed to create a diffusive like regime, with strongly dampened convection [2, 3]. To investigate the difference between atomically rough phase boundaries and facetted growth, samples with [100] and [111] orientation were processed.

  18. Mobility inhibition of 1-phenylethanol chiral molecules in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, Svetlana G.; Kompankov, Nikolay B.; Ryzhikov, Maxim R.; Slepkov, Vladimir A.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental evidences are first obtained to demonstrate the effect of external magnetic field on the mobility of 1-phenylethanol molecules characterized by conjugated ring bonds. Enantiomers of these molecules are shown to have different mobilities in chiral polarized mediums composed of these enantiomers taken in various proportions. The difference diminishes when the external magnetic field increases.

  19. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  20. Interaction-driven capacitance in graphene electron-hole double layer in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, Bahman

    2015-12-01

    Fabrication of devices made by isolated graphene layers has opened up possibility of examining highly correlated states of electron systems in parts of their phase diagram that is impossible to access in their counterpart devices such as semiconductor heterostructures. An example of such states are graphene double monolayer electron-hole systems under strong magnetic fields where the separation between layers can be adjusted to be as small as one magnetic length with interlayer tunneling still suppressed. In those separations, it is known that correlations between electrons and holes are of crucial importance and must be included in determination of observable quantities. Here we report the results of our full numerical Hartree-Fock study of coherent and crystalline ground states of the interacting balanced electron-hole graphene systems in small and intermediate separations with each layer occupying up to four lowest lying Landau levels. We show that in the Hartree-Fock approximation the electrons and holes pair to form a homogeneous Bose-condensed (excitonic) state, while crystalline states of such exciton systems remain incoherent at intermediate layer separations. Our results of calculation of capacitance of such states as a function of interlayer separation and filling factor provides quantitative and qualitative signatures that can be examined in real experiments. We show that the capacitance of some crystallized states as well as uniform coherent states are significantly enhanced compared to geometrical values solely due to Coulomb interactions and quantum corrections.

  1. Disorder effects on helical edge transport in graphene under a strong tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chunli; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2015-10-01

    In a recent experiment, Young et al. [Nature (London) 505, 528 (2014), 10.1038/nature12800] observed a metal to insulator transition as well as transport through helical edge states in monolayer graphene under a strong, tilted magnetic field. Under such conditions, the bulk is a magnetic insulator which can exhibit metallic conduction through helical edges. It was found that the two-terminal conductance of the helical channels deviates from the expected quantized value (=e2/h per edge, at zero temperature). Motivated by this observation, we study the effect of disorder on the conduction through the edge channels. We show that, unlike for helical edges of topological insulators in semiconducting quantum wells, a disorder Rashba spin-orbit coupling does not lead to backscattering, at least to leading order. Instead, we find that the lack of perfect antialignment of the electron spins in the helical channels to be the most likely cause for backscattering arising from scalar (i.e., spin-independent) impurities. The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and other time-reversal symmetry-breaking and/or sublattice parity-breaking potentials also lead to (subleading) corrections to the channel conductance.

  2. Effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in a quantum well: strong to weak coupling conversion.

    PubMed

    Pervishko, A A; Kibis, O V; Shelykh, I A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in an asymmetric quantum well placed inside an optical resonator. It is demonstrated that the field-induced diamagnetic shift of electron subbands in the well increases the broadening of optical lines corresponding to intersubband electron transitions. As a consequence, the magnetic field can switch the polariton system from the regime of strong light-matter coupling to the regime of a weak one. This effect paves a way for the effective control of polaritonic devices with a magnetic field. PMID:27472627

  3. Effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in a quantum well: strong to weak coupling conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in an asymmetric quantum well placed inside an optical resonator. It is demonstrated that the field-induced diamagnetic shift of electron subbands in the well increases the broadening of optical lines corresponding to intersubband electron transitions. As a consequence, the magnetic field can switch the polariton system from the regime of strong light-matter coupling to the regime of weak one. This effect paves a way to the effective control of polaritonic devices with a magnetic field.

  4. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological MHD simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body / SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of approximately 3*10^{12} solar masses and a virial radius of approximately 270 kpc. The simulations in a LCDM cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10^{-10} to 10^{-34} G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes.There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales.Magnetic field strengths of microG are reached in the center of the halo and drop to nG in the IGM. Analyzing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations. Additionally, we investigate magnetic seed fields created self-consistently by supernova explosions naturally occuring during the star formation in galaxies. Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr.In our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields, the seed magnetic field determined self-consistently by the star formation process

  5. Effects of strong magnetic fields on cell growth and radiation response of human T-lymphocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Norimura, T; Imada, H; Kunugita, N; Yoshida, N; Nikaido, M

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were undertaken in order to verify whether or not a strong magnetic field would have any biological effects on the cell growth, viability and radiation response of mammalian cells. Magnetic field exposures were conducted using a superconducting magnet with freshly-isolated human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes maintained at their normal growing temperature of 37 degrees C. The static magnetic fields with intensities up to 6.3-tesla (T) exerted little influence on the cell growth and viability of actively-growing T-lymphocytes under normal cell-culture conditions. On the other hand, the T cells exposed to the magnetic fields (4 T-6.3 T) during PHA stimulation were inhibited in their cell growth when compared to controls. The effects of the magnetic fields with intensities up to 2 T on cell growth properties, however, were minimal in this system. Also, the radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes previously exposed to the strong magnetic fields was more sensitive than that of control cells. These results suggest that exposure to a static magnetic field of 4 T or stronger might lead to physiological and growth abnormalities at the cellular level. PMID:8316709

  6. Disaggregation of stacked red blood cells under strong pulse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Do-Guwn; Park, Hyeji; Kim, Woori; Lee, Jinyoung; Lee, Hyun Sook

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the dependence of magnetic field intensity and stimulation time on stacking formation of red blood cells (RBCs) to study blood circulation in human body. The pulse magnetic field with the maximum intensity of 0.27-0.07 T, pulse transition time of 0.102 ms, and pulse intervals of 1 s was applied to the distal end of palm for 5-20 min. The aggregation of RBCs was measured using microscopy. After the magnetic stimulation for 10 min, the fully stacked RBCs were almost separated from each other and moved much faster than those in unstimulated state. The disaggregation was maintained at a decreasing intensity of 0.19 T, and a few cells were stacked at the weak intensity of 0.07 T. In this work, we investigated the degree of RBCs aggregation and activity time by varying the intensity and time of magnetic stimulation to get the optimum condition of pulse magnetic field stimulus.

  7. Influence of a strong longitudinal magnetic field on laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the beam quality and electronic trapped charge in the cavity are key issues of laser wake field acceleration. The effect of an initially applied uniform magnetic field, parallel to the direction of propagation of the pump pulse, on the laser wakefield is explored. First, an analytic model for the laser wakefield is built up in the case when such an external magnetic field is applied. Then, simulations are performed with a 3D quasi-cylindrical particle in cell code in the blowout (or bubble) regime. Transverse currents are generated at the rear of the bubble which amplify the longitudinal magnetic field. For several plasma and laser parameters, the wake shape is altered and trapping can be reduced or cancelled by the magnetic field. When considering optical injection, and when two counterpropagating waves interact with a rather high plasma density, trapping is not affected by the magnetic field. In this range of plasma and laser parameters, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field can reduce or even prevent self-injection and enhance beam quality.

  8. Experimental realization of strong effective magnetic fields in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Aidelsburger, M; Atala, M; Nascimbène, S; Trotzky, S; Chen, Y-A; Bloch, I

    2011-12-16

    We use Raman-assisted tunneling in an optical superlattice to generate large tunable effective magnetic fields for ultracold atoms. When hopping in the lattice, the accumulated phase shift by an atom is equivalent to the Aharonov-Bohm phase of a charged particle exposed to a staggered magnetic field of large magnitude, on the order of 1 flux quantum per plaquette. We study the ground state of this system and observe that the frustration induced by the magnetic field can lead to a degenerate ground state for noninteracting particles. We provide a measurement of the local phase acquired from Raman-induced tunneling, demonstrating time-reversal symmetry breaking of the underlying Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the quantum cyclotron orbit of single atoms in the lattice exposed to the magnetic field is directly revealed. PMID:22243087

  9. Regional Mapping of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field: Correlation of Strong Anomalies with Curvilinear Albedo Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Zakharian, A.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Using high-resolution regional Lunar Prospector magnetometer magnetic field maps, we report here a close correlation of the strongest individual crustal anomalies with unusual curvilinear albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class.

  10. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on all scales in the Universe (see e.g. Kronberg 1994), but little is known about the origin and evolution of those fields with cosmic time. Seed fields of arbitrary source must be amplified to present-day values and distributed among cosmic structures. Therefore, the emergence of cosmic magnetic fields and corresponding dynamo processes (see e.g. Zel'dovich et al. 1983; Kulsrud et al. 1997) can only be jointly understood with the very basic processes of structure and galaxy formation (see e.g. Mo et al. 2010).

  11. Draping of strongly flow-aligned interplanetary magnetic field about the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinec, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Many dynamic processes of the magnetosphere are directly driven by the solar wind and the occurrence of magnetic merging at the magnetopause. The location of magnetopause magnetic merging, or reconnection, is now fairly well understood when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) contains large By and Bz components in relation to the Bx component (in Geocentric Solar Magnetospheric (GSM) coordinates). However, when the IMF contains a large X-component (i.e., is closely flow-aligned), it is not yet well understood how the shocked IMF drapes about the magnetopause, and how this affects the occurrence and location of magnetic merging. In this initial study, we examine from observations how a nearly flow-aligned IMF drapes about the magnetopause. The results of this study are expected to be useful for comparisons with both analytic and global numerical models of the magnetosheath magnetic field.

  12. Estimation of the effects of strong static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent studies we extensively used ponderomotive magnetic forces in high gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) for displacing organelles inside plant gravity receptor cells. Such displacement is a convenient tool both for investigating plant gravity perception mechanism and for physical characterization of the cell interior, and can have future practical applications in providing a directional stimulus for plants in microgravity. This method takes advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the receptor cells, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (? æ < 0). Such particles are repelled from the zones of stronger field in a non-uniform field. To exert a force on amyloplasts, which is comparable to the gravity force, the dynamic factor of the field grad(H2 /2) needs to be 109 - 1 01 0 Oe 2 /cm, and the field intensity in the experimental magnetic systems typically varies from 0 to 2.5-104 Oe, while the size of the area of non-uniformity is 10-2 to 1 cm. Possible effects of such static magnetic fields on plants other than magnetophoresis of amyloplasts were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5-104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are

  13. Efficient dynamic nuclear polarization of phosphorus in silicon in strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, J.; Ahokas, J.; Sheludyakov, S.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Zvezdov, D.; Fujii, Y.; Mitsudo, S.; Mizusaki, T.; Gwak, M.; Lee, SangGap; Lee, Soonchil; Vlasenko, L.

    2014-12-01

    Efficient manipulation of nuclear spins is important for utilizing them as qubits for quantum computing. In this work we report record high polarizations of 31P and 29Si nuclear spins in P-doped silicon in a strong magnetic field (4.6 T) and at temperatures below 1 K. We reached 31P nuclear polarization values exceeding 98 % after 20 min of pumping the high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) line with a very small microwave power of 0.4 μ W . We evaluate that the ratio of the hyperfine-state populations increases by three orders of magnitude after 2 hours of pumping, and an extremely pure nuclear spin state can be created, with less than 0.01 ppb impurities. A negative dynamic nuclear polarization has been observed by pumping the low-field ESR line of 31P followed by the flip-flip cross relaxation, the transition which is fully forbidden for isolated donors. We estimate that while pumping the ESR transitions of 31P also the nuclei of 29Si get polarized, and polarization exceeding 60 % has been obtained. We performed measurements of relaxation rates of flip-flop and flip-flip transitions which turned out to be nearly temperature independent. Temperature dependence of the 31P nuclear relaxation was studied down to 0.75 K, below which the relaxation time became too long to be measured. We found that the polarization evolution under pumping and during relaxation deviates substantially from a simple exponential function of time. We suggest that the nonexponential polarization dynamics of 31P donors is mediated by the orientation of 29Si nuclei, which affect the transition probabilities of the forbidden cross-relaxation processes.

  14. Influence of calculation error of total field anomaly in strongly magnetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoyu; Yao, Changli; Zheng, Yuanman; Li, Zelin

    2016-04-01

    An assumption made in many magnetic interpretation techniques is that ΔTact (total field anomaly - the measurement given by total field magnetometers, after we remove the main geomagnetic field, T0) can be approximated mathematically by ΔTpro (the projection of anomalous field vector in the direction of the earth's normal field). In order to meet the demand for high-precision processing of magnetic prospecting, the approximate error E between ΔTact and ΔTpro is studied in this research. Generally speaking, the error E is extremely small when anomalies not greater than about 0.2T0. However, the errorE may be large in highly magnetic environments. This leads to significant effects on subsequent quantitative inference. Therefore, we investigate the error E through numerical experiments of high-susceptibility bodies. A systematic error analysis was made by using a 2-D elliptic cylinder model. Error analysis show that the magnitude of ΔTact is usually larger than that of ΔTpro. This imply that a theoretical anomaly computed without accounting for the error E overestimate the anomaly associated with the body. It is demonstrated through numerical experiments that the error E is obvious and should not be ignored. It is also shown that the curves of ΔTpro and the error E had a certain symmetry when the directions of magnetization and geomagnetic field changed. To be more specific, the Emax (the maximum of the error E) appeared above the center of the magnetic body when the magnetic parameters are determined. Some other characteristics about the error Eare discovered. For instance, the curve of Emax with respect to the latitude was symmetrical on both sides of magnetic equator, and the extremum of the Emax can always be found in the mid-latitudes, and so on. It is also demonstrated that the error Ehas great influence on magnetic processing transformation and inversion results. It is conclude that when the bodies have highly magnetic susceptibilities, the error E can

  15. Ionization of the hydrogen atom in strong magnetic fields. Beyond the adiabatic approximation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Ventura, J.

    1997-01-01

    High magnetic fields in neutron stars, B~10^11^-10^13^G, substantially modify the properties of atoms and their interaction with radiation. In particular, the photoionization cross section becomes anisotropic and polarization dependent, being strongly reduced when the radiation is polarized perpendicular to the field. In a number of previous works based on the adiabatic approximation the conclusion was drawn that this transverse cross section vanishes for frequencies ω smaller than the electron cyclotron frequency ω_c_=eB/(m_e_c). In other works (which employed a different form of the interaction operator) appreciable finite values were obtained, ~σ_0gamma^-1^ near the photoionization threshold, where σ_0_ is the cross section without magnetic field, and γ=B/(2.35x10^9^G). Since it is the transverse cross section which determines the properties of radiation emitted from neutron star atmospheres, an adequate interpretation of the neutron star thermal-like radiation requires a resolution of this controversy. In the present work we calculate the atomic wave functions for both discrete and continuum states by solving the coupled channel equations allowing the admixture between different Landau levels, which provides much higher accuracy than the adiabatic approximation. This enables us to resolve the above contradiction in favour of the finite transverse cross sections at ω<ω_c_. Moreover, for any form of the interaction operator the non-adiabatic corrections appear to be substantial for frequencies ω> 0.3ω_c_. The non-adiabatic treatment of the continuum includes coupling between closed and open channels, which leads to the autoionization of quasi-bound energy levels associated with the electron cyclotron (Landau) excitations and gives rise to Beutler-Fano resonances of the photoionization cross section. We calculate the autoionization widths of these quasi-bound levels and compare them with the radiative widths. The correlation of the open channels is

  16. Internal composition of proto-neutron stars under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Dexheimer, V.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the structure and composition of proto-neutron stars. A hadronic chiral SU(3) model is applied to cold neutron stars and proto-neutron stars with trapped neutrinos and at fixed entropy per baryon. We obtain general relativistic solutions for neutron and proto-neutron stars endowed with a poloidal magnetic field by solving Einstein-Maxwell field equations in a self-consistent way. As the neutrino chemical potential decreases in value over time, this alters the chemical equilibrium and the composition inside the star, leading to a change in the structure and in the particle population of these objects. We find that the magnetic field deforms the star and significantly alters the number of trapped neutrinos in the stellar interior, together with strangeness content and temperature in each evolution stage.

  17. The 1-loop self-energy of an electron in a strong external magnetic field revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machet, B.

    2016-05-01

    I calculate the 1-loop self-energy of the lowest Landau level of an electron of mass m in a strong, constant and uniform external magnetic field B, beyond its always used truncation at (ln L)2, L = |e|B m2. This is achieved by evaluating the integral deduced in 1953 by Demeur and incompletely calculated in 1969 by Jancovici, which I recover from Schwinger’s techniques of calculation. It yields δm ≃ αm 4π ln L ‑ γE ‑3 22 ‑9 4 + π β‑1 + π2 6 + πΓ[1‑β] Lβ‑1 + 1 L π 2‑β ‑ 5 + 𝒪 1 L≥2 with β ≃ 1.175 for 75 ≤ L ≤ 10, 000. The (ln L)2 truncation exceeds the precise estimate by 45% at L = 100 and by more at lower values of L, due to neglecting, among others, the single logarithmic contribution. This is doubly unjustified because it is large and because it is needed to fulfill appropriate renormalization conditions. Technically challenging improvements look therefore necessary, for example, when resumming higher loops and incorporating the effects of large B on the photonic vacuum polarization, like investigated in recent years.

  18. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  19. Multi-wavelength Study of a Delta-spot. I. A Region of Very Strong, Horizontal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Active region NOAA 11035 appeared in 2009 December, early in the new solar activity cycle. This region achieved a delta sunspot (δ spot) configuration when parasitic flux emerged near the rotationally leading magnetic polarity and traveled through the penumbra of the largest sunspot in the group. Both visible and infrared imaging spectropolarimetry of the magnetically sensitive Fe i line pairs at 6302 and 15650 Å show large Zeeman splitting in the penumbra between the parasitic umbra and the main sunspot umbra. The polarized Stokes spectra in the strongest field region display anomalous profiles, and strong blueshifts are seen in an adjacent region. Analysis of the profiles is carried out using a Milne-Eddington inversion code capable of fitting either a single magnetic component with stray light or two independent magnetic components to verify the field strength. The inversion results show that the anomalous profiles cannot be produced by the combination of two profiles with moderate magnetic fields. The largest field strengths are 3500-3800 G in close proximity to blueshifts as strong as 3.8 km s-1. The strong, nearly horizontal magnetic field seen near the polarity inversion line in this region is difficult to understand in the context of a standard model of sunspot magnetohydrostatic equilibrium.

  20. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-17

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 10{sup 14} G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 10{sup 18} G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  1. Synthesis of crystallographically oriented olivine aggregates using colloidal processing in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Sanae; Suzuki, Tohru S.; Sakka, Yoshio; Yabe, Kosuke; Hiraga, Takehiko

    2016-07-01

    This study develops a fabrication technique to obtain Fe-free and Fe-bearing (Fe:Mg = 1:9) olivine aggregates not only with high density and fine grain size but with crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). A magnetic field (≤12 T) is applied to synthetic, fine-grained (~120 nm), olivine particles dispersed in solvent. The alignment of certain crystallographic axes of the particles with respect to a magnetic direction is anticipated due to magnetic anisotropy of olivine. The dispersed particles are gradually consolidated on a porous alumina mold covered with a solid-liquid separation filter during drainage of the solvent. The resultant aligned consolidated aggregate is then isostatically pressed and vacuum sintered. We find that (1) preparation of fully reacted olivine particles, with less propensity to coalesce; (2) preparation of a suspension with highly dispersed particles; and (3) application of a certain strength of the magnetic field are essential to obtain well-sintered and well-aligned aggregates. High density (i.e., <1 vol% porosity) and fine grain size (~1 μm) Fe-free and Fe-bearing olivine aggregates were successfully synthesized with uniaxially aligned a- and c-axes, respectively. Attempts to uniaxially align the magnetization hard axis and to triaxially align Fe-bearing olivine by rotating the suspension in the magnetic field succeeded in obtaining weakly developed CPO aggregates.

  2. Coupled-cluster theory for atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stopkowicz, Stella; Gauss, Jürgen; Lange, Kai K; Tellgren, Erik I; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-08-21

    An implementation of coupled-cluster (CC) theory to treat atoms and molecules in finite magnetic fields is presented. The main challenges for the implementation stem from the magnetic-field dependence in the Hamiltonian, or, more precisely, the appearance of the angular momentum operator, due to which the wave function becomes complex and which introduces a gauge-origin dependence. For this reason, an implementation of a complex CC code is required together with the use of gauge-including atomic orbitals to ensure gauge-origin independence. Results of coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples (CCSD(T)) calculations are presented for atoms and molecules with a focus on the dependence of correlation and binding energies on the magnetic field. PMID:26298118

  3. Coupled-cluster theory for atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stopkowicz, Stella Lange, Kai K.; Tellgren, Erik I.; Helgaker, Trygve; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-08-21

    An implementation of coupled-cluster (CC) theory to treat atoms and molecules in finite magnetic fields is presented. The main challenges for the implementation stem from the magnetic-field dependence in the Hamiltonian, or, more precisely, the appearance of the angular momentum operator, due to which the wave function becomes complex and which introduces a gauge-origin dependence. For this reason, an implementation of a complex CC code is required together with the use of gauge-including atomic orbitals to ensure gauge-origin independence. Results of coupled-cluster singles–doubles–perturbative-triples (CCSD(T)) calculations are presented for atoms and molecules with a focus on the dependence of correlation and binding energies on the magnetic field.

  4. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in a strong external magnetic field and the neutrino emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bavarsad, E.; Mohammadi, R.; Haghighat, M.

    2010-11-15

    The nucleon-nucleon scattering in a large magnetic background is considered to find its potential to change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars. For this purpose, we consider the one-pion-exchange approximation to find the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross section in a background field as large as 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} G. We show that the NN cross section in neutron stars with temperatures in the range 0.1-5 MeV can be changed up to the 1 order of magnitude with respect to the one in the absence of the magnetic field. In the limit of the soft neutrino emission, the neutrino emissivity can be written in terms of the NN-scattering amplitude; therefore, the large magnetic fields can dramatically change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars as well.

  5. Energy loss of a nonaccelerating quark moving through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills vacuum or plasma in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.

    2016-08-01

    Using AdS /CFT correspondence, we find that a massless quark moving at the speed of light v =1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) vacuum at T =0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B , loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/} 6 π B . We also show that a heavy quark of mass M ≠0 moving at near the speed of light v2=v*2=1 -4/π2T2 B ≃1 , in arbitrary direction, through a strongly coupled N =4 SYM plasma at finite temperature T ≠0 , in the presence of strong magnetic field B ≫T2, loses its energy at a rate linearly dependent on B , i.e., d/E d t =-√{λ/}6 π B v*2≃-√{λ/}6 π B . Moreover, we argue that, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD theories (when the adjoint QCD theory has four flavors of Weyl fermions and is at its conformal IR fixed point λ =λ*) have the same microscopic degrees of freedom (i.e., gluons and lowest Landau levels of Weyl fermions) even though they have quite different microscopic degrees of freedom in the UV when we consider higher Landau levels. Therefore, in the strong magnetic field B ≫T2 (IR) regime, the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties of N =4 SYM and adjoint QCD plasmas, as well as the rates of energy loss of a quark moving through the plasmas, should be the same.

  6. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Kotarba, H.; Geng, A.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body/SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of ≈3 × 1012 M⊙ and a virial radius of ≈270 kpc. The simulations in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10-10 to 10-34 G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes. There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales. Magnetic field strengths of ≈10-6 G are reached in the centre of the halo and drop to ≈10-9 G in the intergalactic medium. Analysing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations.

  7. Generation of strong quasistatic magnetic fields in interactions of ultraintense and short laser pulses with overdense plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Hongbo; Zhu Shaoping; Zhou Cangtao; Yu Wei

    2007-09-15

    An analytical fluid model is proposed for the generation of strong quasistatic magnetic fields during normal incidence of a short ultraintense Gaussian laser pulse with a finite spot size on an overdense plasma. The steepening of the electron density profile in the originally homogeneous overdense plasma and the formation of electron cavitation as the electrons are pushed inward by the laser are included self-consistently. It is shown that the appearance of the cavitation plays an important role in the generation of quasistatic magnetic fields: the strong plasma inhomogeneities caused by the formation of the electron cavitation lead to the generation of a strong axial quasistatic magnetic field B{sub z}. In the overdense regime, the generated quasistatic magnetic field increases with increasing laser intensity, while it decreases with increasing plasma density. It is also found that, in a moderately overdense plasma, highly intense laser pulses can generate magnetic fields {approx}100 MG and greater due to the transverse linear mode conversion process.

  8. Hall viscosity and momentum transport in lattice and continuum models of the integer quantum Hall effect in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuegel, Thomas I.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2015-10-01

    The Hall viscosity describes a nondissipative response to strain in systems with broken time-reversal symmetry. We develop a method for computing the Hall viscosity of lattice systems in strong magnetic fields based on momentum transport, which we compare to the method of momentum polarization used by Tu et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 195412 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.195412] and Zaletel et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 236801 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.236801] for noninteracting systems. We compare the Hall viscosity of square-lattice tight-binding models in magnetic field to the continuum integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) showing agreement when the magnetic length is much larger than the lattice constant, but deviation as the magnetic field strength increases. We also relate the Hall viscosity of relativistic electrons in magnetic field (the Dirac IQHE) to the conventional IQHE. The Hall viscosity of the lattice Dirac model in magnetic field agrees with the continuum Dirac Hall viscosity when the magnetic length is much larger than the lattice constant. We also show that the Hall viscosity of the lattice model deviates further from the continuum model if the C4 symmetry of the square lattice is broken to C2, but the deviation is again minimized as the magnetic length increases.

  9. Dopant segregation during vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger growth with melt stabilization by strong axial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, D. H.; Wargo, M. J.; Motakef, S.; Carlson, D. J.; Nakos, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ga-doped germanium was grown in a vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger system with melt stabilization by axial magnetic fields of 30 kG. It was found that radial segregation of gallium is negligible and that the initial transient of axial macro-segregation is in apparent compliance with the theory of diffusion controlled plane front solidification.

  10. Landau levels of cold dense quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The occupied Landau levels of strange quark matter are investigated in the framework of the SU(3) NJL model with a conventional coupling and a magnetic-field dependent coupling respectively. At lower density, the Landau levels are mainly dominated by u and d quarks. Threshold values of the chemical potential for the s quark onset are shown in the μ -B plane. The magnetic-field-dependent running coupling can broaden the region of three-flavor matter by decreasing the dynamical masses of s quarks. Before the onset of s quarks, the Landau level number of light quarks is directly dependent on the magnetic field strength B by a simple inverse proportional relation ki ,max≈Bi0/B with Bd0=5 ×1 019 G , which is approximately 2 times Bu0 of u quarks at a common chemical potential. When the magnetic field increases up to Bd0, almost all three flavors are lying in the lowest Landau level.

  11. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  12. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho-Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-01

    We compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥ , in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B , respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs . We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αse B ≪T2≪e B , so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κ⊥LO∝αs2T e B in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1 +1 )-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets no contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κ∥LO come from the two separate effects: (1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and (2) a finite light-quark mass mq . The former leads to κ∥LO ,gluon∝αs2T3 and the latter to κ∥LO ,massive∝αs(αse B )1 /2mq2 . Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥≫κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.

  13. Statistical Plasma Physics in a Strong Magnetic Field: Paradigms and Problems

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Krommes

    2004-03-19

    An overview is given of certain aspects of fundamental statistical theories as applied to strongly magnetized plasmas. Emphasis is given to the gyrokinetic formalism, the historical development of realizable Markovian closures, and recent results in the statistical theory of turbulent generation of long-wavelength flows that generalize and provide further physical insight to classic calculations of eddy viscosity. A Hamiltonian formulation of turbulent flow generation is described and argued to be very useful.

  14. A strong, highly-tilted interstellar magnetic field near the Solar System.

    PubMed

    Opher, M; Bibi, F Alouani; Toth, G; Richardson, J D; Izmodenov, V V; Gombosi, T I

    2009-12-24

    Magnetic fields play an important (sometimes dominant) role in the evolution of gas clouds in the Galaxy, but the strength and orientation of the field in the interstellar medium near the heliosphere has been poorly constrained. Previous estimates of the field strength range from 1.8-2.5 microG and the field was thought to be parallel to the Galactic plane or inclined by 38-60 degrees (ref. 2) or 60-90 degrees (ref. 3) to this plane. These estimates relied either on indirect observational inferences or modelling in which the interstellar neutral hydrogen was not taken into account. Here we report measurements of the deflection of the solar wind plasma flows in the heliosheath to determine the magnetic field strength and orientation in the interstellar medium. We find that the field strength in the local interstellar medium is 3.7-5.5 microG. The field is tilted approximately 20-30 degrees from the interstellar medium flow direction (resulting from the peculiar motion of the Sun in the Galaxy) and is at an angle of about 30 degrees from the Galactic plane. We conclude that the interstellar medium field is turbulent or has a distortion in the solar vicinity. PMID:20033043

  15. THE DISCOVERY OF A STRONG MAGNETIC FIELD AND COROTATING MAGNETOSPHERE IN THE HELIUM-WEAK STAR HD 176582

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlender, David A.; Monin, Dmitry

    2011-05-15

    We report the detection of a strong, reversing magnetic field and variable H{alpha} emission in the bright helium-weak star HD 176582 (HR 7185). Spectrum, magnetic, and photometric variability of the star are all consistent with a precisely determined period of 1.5819840 {+-} 0.0000030 days which we assume to be the rotation period of the star. From the magnetic field curve, and assuming a simple dipolar field geometry, we derive a polar field strength of approximately 7 kG and a lower limit of 52 deg. for the inclination of the rotation axis. However, based on the behavior of the H{alpha} emission, we adopt a large inclination angle of 85 deg. and this leads to a large magnetic obliquity of 77{sup 0}. The H{alpha} emission arises from two distinct regions located at the intersections of the magnetic and rotation equators and which corotate with the star at a distance of about 3.5 R{sub *} above its surface. We estimate that the emitting regions have radial and meridional sizes on the order of 2 R{sub *} and azimuthal extents (perpendicular to the magnetic equator) of less than approximately 0.6 R{sub *}. HD 176582 therefore appears to show many of the cool magnetospheric phenomena as that displayed by other magnetic helium-weak and helium-strong stars such as the prototypical helium-strong star {sigma} Ori E. The observations are consistent with current models of magnetically confined winds and rigidly rotating magnetospheres for magnetic Bp stars.

  16. Charged perfect fluid tori in strong central gravitational and dipolar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír; Trova, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    We study electrically charged perfect fluid toroidal structures encircling a spherically symmetric gravitating object with Schwarzschild spacetime geometry and endowed with a dipole magnetic field. The work represents a direct continuation of our previous general-relativistic studies of electrically charged fluid in the approximation of zero conductivity, which formed tori around a Reissner-Nordström black hole or a Schwarzschild black hole equipped with a test electric charge and immersed in an asymptotically uniform magnetic field. After a general introduction of the zero-conductivity charged fluid model, we discuss a variety of possible topologies of the toroidal fluid configurations. Along with the charged equatorial tori forming interesting coupled configurations, we demonstrate the existence of the off-equatorial tori, for which the dipole type of magnetic field seems to be necessary. We focus on orbiting structures with constant specific angular momentum and on those in permanent rigid rotation. We stress that the general analytical treatment developed in our previous works is enriched here by the integrated form of the pressure equations. To put our work into an astrophysical context, we identify the central object with an idealization of a nonrotating magnetic neutron star. Constraining ranges of its parameters and also parameters of the circling fluid, we discuss a possible relevance of the studied toroidal structures, presenting along with their topology also pressure, density, temperature and charge profiles.

  17. Laboratory Experiment of Magnetic Reconnection between Merging Flux Tubes with Strong Guide FIeld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomoto, M.; Kamio, S.; Kuwahata, A.; Ono, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection governs variety of energy release events in the universe, such as solar flares, geomagnetic substorms, and sawtooth crash in laboratory nuclear fusion experiments. Differently from the classical steady reconnection models, non-steady behavior of magnetic reconnection is often observed. In solar flares, intermittent enhancement of HXR emission is observed synchronously with multiple ejection of plammoids [1]. In laboratory reconnection experiments, the existence of the guide field, that is perpendicular to the reconnection field, makes significant changes on reconnection process. Generally the guide field will slow down the reconnection rate due to the increased magnetic pressure inside the current sheet. It also brings about asymmetric structure of the separatrices or effective particle acceleration in collisionless conditions. We have conducted laboratory experiments to study the behavior of the guide-field magnetic reconnection using plasma merging technique (push reconnection). Under substantial guide field even larger than the reconnection field, the reconnection generally exhibits non-steady feature which involves intermittent detachment of X-point and reconnection current center[2]. Transient enhancement of reconnection rate is observed simultaneously with the X-point motion[3]. We found two distinct phenomena associated with the guide-field non-steady reconnection. The one is the temporal and localized He II emission from X-point region, suggesting the production of energetic electrons which could excite the He ions in the vicinity of the X-point. The other is the excitation of large-amplitude electromagnetic waves which have similar properties with kinetic Alfven waves, whose amplitude show positive correlation with the enhancement of the reconnection electric field[4]. Electron beam instability caused by the energetic electrons accelerated to more than twice of the electron thermal velocity could be a potential driver of the

  18. The crystallization of apo-form UMP kinase from Xanthomonas campestris is significantly improved in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Jhe-Le; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2007-05-01

    A bacterial UMP kinase from the plant pathogen X. campestris pathovar campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in a strong magnetic field. The crystals diffracted to 2.35 Å. Bacterial UMP kinases (UMPKs) are crucial enzymes that are responsible for microbial UTP biosynthesis. Interestingly, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells use different enzymes for UMP-phosphorylation reactions. Prokaryotic UMPKs are thus believed to be potential targets for antimicrobial drug development. Here, the cloning, expression and crystallization of SeMet-substituted XC1936, a bacterial UMPK from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris, are reported. The crystallization of the apo-form UMPK was found to be significantly improved in a strong magnetic field; the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.35 Å, a dramatic improvement over the original value of 3.6 Å. Preliminary structural analyses of apo-form XC1936 using crystals grown in a strong magnetic field clearly reveal well defined loop regions involved in substrate-analogue binding that were previously not visible. Crystallization in a strong magnetic field thus was found to be indispensable in determining the flexible region of the XC1936 UMPK structure.

  19. Steady flows of a laterally heated ferrofluid layer: Influence of inclined strong magnetic field and gravity level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennenberg, M.; Weyssow, B.; Slavtchev, S.; Desaive, Th.; Scheid, B.

    2006-09-01

    A horizontal ferrofluid layer is submitted to a lateral heating and to a strong oblique magnetic field. The problem, combining the momentum and heat balance equations with the Maxwell equations, introduces two Rayleigh numbers, Ra the gravitational one and Ram the magnetic one, to represent the buoyancy and the Kelvin forces, which induce motion, versus the momentum viscous diffusion and heat diffusion. Whatever the inclination of the magnetic field, the steady solution of the problem is presented as a power series of a small parameter ɛH measuring the ratio of variation of the magnetization across the layer divided by the magnitude of the external imposed field. For cases of physical relevance, comparisons between analytical and numerical studies have lead to a major statement: in the strong field region (ɛH≪1) the zero order solution is the product of the Birikh solution that corresponds to the usual Newtonian fluid submitted to a lateral gradient, multiplied by a modulating factor accounting for inclination and both Rayleigh numbers. Physically, this simplified solution is valid for microgravity conditions where the magnetic field competes enough with microgravity effects to invert the laminar flow and thus suppress the motion for two specific values of the inclination angle.

  20. Particles with Low Binding Energy in a Strong Stationary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Kravtsova, G. A.; Rodionov, V. N.

    2009-01-01

    The equations for the bound one-active electron states based on analytic solutions of the Schrödinger and Pauli equations for the uniform magnetic field and a single attractive δ(r)-potential are discussed. We show that binding energy equations for spin-1/2 particles can be obtained without using the language of boundary conditions in the δ-potential model. We use the obtained equations to calculate the energy level displacements analytically and to demonstrate nonlinear dependence on the field intensity.

  1. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from Γ4 to Γ2 via Γ24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100 K, while it can be switched back to Γ4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between Γ4 and Γ2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd3+ ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices.

  2. Characterizing the response of Juno's JADE-E energy analyzers in the presence of Jupiter's strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G. B.; Allegrini, F.; Crary, F. J.; Louarn, P.; McComas, D. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Valek, P. W.; Weidner, S.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Juno mission, which is scheduled to launch this August, will be the first spacecraft to achieve polar orbit around Jupiter. The Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE), onboard Juno, measures the full pitch angle distribution of electrons (JADE-E) and the 3D velocity-space distribution of ions and ion composition (JADE-I). JADE-E consists of three identical energy analyzers covering the range from ~0.1-100 keV. Below ~5keV and in the relatively strong Jovian magnetic field (up to ~8 G along the orbit) the gyro-radius of electrons is comparable to the radius of curvature of the analyzers. Therefore, the response at low energies will be strongly affected by the magnetic field. To better understand, predict, and correct for the response of JADE-E in the presence of Jupiter's strong magnetic field we are characterizing its response in the laboratory. A set of Helmholtz coils capable of producing a magnetic field up to about 9 G with three axis control was built around the vacuum test chamber. We also compare the laboratory measurements with electro-optics simulations. We will present both simulations and measurement results taken with the engineering model of JADE-E and discuss expected performance of the flight instruments when they arrive at Jupiter.

  3. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, A V

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices. PMID:27484892

  4. Ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in strong magnetic field with allowance for pressure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, P.; Pavlov, G. ); Potekhin, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization equilibrium in highly magnetized (B = 10[sup 10] to 10[sup 12]G) hydrogen is investigated at temperatures from 5 eV to 50 keV and densities in the range 10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 3] g/cm[sup 3]. We have used the occupation probability formalism in order to take into account the pressure and density effects. The occupation probabilities used are slightly modified as compared to those derived by Hummer and Mihalas. We find that pressure ionization degree varies with the form of microfield distribution function. The non-ionized fraction is increased by the magnetic field in most of the parameter space. It is large enough so that the bound-free absorption must be taken into account in realistic models of neutron star atmospheres.

  5. The surface magnetic field and chemical abundance distributions of the B2V helium-strong star HD 184927

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, I.; Wade, G.; Bohlender, D.; Kochukhov, O.; Marcolino, W.; Shultz, M.; Monin, D.; Grunhut, J.; Sitnova, T.; Tsymbal, V.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    A new time series of high-resolution Stokes I and V spectra of the magnetic B2V star HD 184927 has been obtained in the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars Large Program with an Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars (ESPaDOnS) spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and dimaPol liquid crystal spectropolarimeter at 1.8-m telescope of Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. We model the optical and UV spectrum obtained from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archive to infer the stellar physical parameters. Using magnetic field measurements, we derive an improved rotational period of 9.531 02 ± 0.0007 d. We infer the longitudinal magnetic field from lines of H, He, and various metals, revealing large differences between the apparent field strength variations determined from different elements. Magnetic Doppler Imaging using He and O lines yields strongly non-uniform surface distributions of these elements. We demonstrate that the diversity of longitudinal field variations can be understood as due to the combination of element-specific surface abundance distributions in combination with a surface magnetic field that is comprised of dipolar and quadrupolar components. We have reanalysed IUE high-resolution spectra, confirming strong modulation of wind-sensitive C IV and S IV resonance lines. However, we are unable to detect any modulation of the Hα profile attributable to a stellar magnetosphere. We conclude that HD 184927 hosts a centrifugal magnetosphere (η _*˜ 2.4^{+22}_{-1.1}× 104), albeit one that is undetectable at optical wavelengths. The magnetic braking time-scale of HD 184927 is computed to be τJ = 0.96 or 5.8 Myr. These values are consistent with the slow rotation and estimated age of the star.

  6. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-10-15

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ{sub D} (electron Debye length), ρ{sub i} (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ{sub D}≪ρ{sub i}≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε{sub Dm}(λ{sub D}/ρ{sub i})→0 and ε{sub mc}(ρ{sub i}/ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε{sub Dm}→0 and ε{sub mc}→0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities.

  7. TURBULENCE IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. STRONG ACCRETION DRIVEN BY A VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Beckwith, Kris; Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2013-09-20

    We carry out a series of local, vertically stratified shearing box simulations of protoplanetary disks that include ambipolar diffusion and a net vertical magnetic field. The ambipolar diffusion profiles we employ correspond to 30 AU and 100 AU in a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) disk model, which consists of a far-ultraviolet-ionized surface layer and low-ionization disk interior. These simulations serve as a follow-up to Simon et al., in which we found that without a net vertical field, the turbulent stresses that result from the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are too weak to account for observed accretion rates. The simulations in this work show a very strong dependence of the accretion stresses on the strength of the background vertical field; as the field strength increases, the stress amplitude increases. For a net vertical field strength (quantified by β{sub 0}, the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure at the disk mid-plane) of β{sub 0} = 10{sup 4} and β{sub 0} = 10{sup 5}, we find accretion rates M-dot ∼10{sup -8}-10{sup –7} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These accretion rates agree with observational constraints, suggesting a vertical magnetic field strength of ∼60-200 μG and 10-30 μG at 30 AU and 100 AU, respectively, in a MMSN disk. Furthermore, the stress has a non-negligible component due to a magnetic wind. For sufficiently strong vertical field strengths, MRI turbulence is quenched, and the flow becomes largely laminar, with accretion proceeding through large-scale correlations in the radial and toroidal field components as well as through the magnetic wind. In all simulations, the presence of a low-ionization region near the disk mid-plane, which we call the ambipolar damping zone, results in reduced stresses there.

  8. Synthesis of the a-Axis Textured Forsterite Aggregate Using Slip Casting in a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, S.; Suzuki, T. S.; Sakka, Y.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is commonly observed in nature, it is important to understand how physical properties of rocks change with the development of CPO. For this purpose, we fabricated highly dense and fine grained mineral aggregates with controlling crystal orientation. Fine forsterite powders were prepared from high purity and fine grained reagents (<100 nm). Such powders were milled by zirconia beads under wet condition with changing milling duration and beads diameter to minimize particle size. To control the surface potential of the particles, we applied various types of polymer modification. The green compact prepared by a slip casting in a high magnetic field (12T) was sintered under vacuum condition. The resultant materials were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), secondary electron microscopy (SEM) and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The specimen prepared without an exposure to a strong magnetic field exhibited a randomly orientated forsterite grains whereas the specimen exposed to the magnetic field exhibited strong a-axis alignmentparallel to the magnetic direction with random distributions of b and c-axes on the plane perpendicular to the magnetic direction.

  9. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; LaPointe, M. A.

    2006-11-27

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field ({approx}5.2 T, length {approx}1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to {approx}75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6{mu}m laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 {mu}m waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow ({approx}1%) energy-spread.

  10. Strong magnetic field fluctuations within filamentary auroral density cavities interpreted as VLF saucer sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Kabirzadeh, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Wallis, D. D.; Bounds, S. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Pinçon, J.-L.

    2012-02-01

    The Geoelectrodynamics and Electro-Optical Detection of Electron and Suprathermal Ion Currents (GEODESIC) sounding rocket encountered more than 100 filamentary density cavities associated with enhanced plasma waves at ELF (<3 kHz) and VLF (3-10 kHz) frequencies and at altitudes of 800-990 km during an auroral substorm. These cavities were similar in size (˜20 m diameter in most cases) to so-called lower-hybrid cavities (LHCs) observed by previous sounding rockets and satellites; however, in contrast, many of the GEODESIC cavities exhibited up to tenfold enhancements in magnetic wave power throughout the VLF band. GEODESIC also observed enhancements of ELF and VLF electric fields both parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field B0 within cavities, though the VLF E field increases were often not as large proportionally as seen in the magnetic fields. This behavior is opposite to that predicted by previously published theories of LHCs based on passive scattering of externally incident auroral hiss. We argue that the GEODESIC cavities are active wave generation sites capable of radiating VLF waves into the surrounding plasma and producing VLF saucers, with energy supplied by cold, upward flowing electron beams composing the auroral return current. This interpretation is supported by the observation that the most intense waves, both inside and outside cavities, occurred in regions where energetic electron precipitation was largely inhibited or absent altogether. We suggest that the wave-enhanced cavities encountered by GEODESIC were qualitatively different from those observed by earlier spacecraft because of the fortuitous timing of the GEODESIC launch, which placed the payload at apogee within a substorm-related return current during its most intense phase, lasting only a few minutes.

  11. Distributions of transverse relaxation times for soft-solids measured in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelcea, R. I.; Fechete, R.; Culea, E.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2009-02-01

    The single-sided NMR-MOUSE sensor that operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields is used to record a CPMG 1H transverse relaxation decay by CPMG echo trains for a series of cross-linked natural rubber samples. Effective transverse relaxation rates 1/ T2,short and 1/ T2,long were determined by a bi-exponential fit. A linear dependence of transverse relaxation rates on cross-link density is observed for medium to large values of cross-link density. As an alternative to multi-exponential fits the possibility to analyze the dynamics of soft polymer network in terms of multi-exponential decays via the inverse Laplace transformation was studied. The transient regime and the effect of the T1/ T2 ratio in inhomogeneous static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on the CPMG decays were studied numerically using a dedicated C++ program to simulate the temporal and spatial dependence of the CPMG response. A correction factor T2/ T2,eff is derived as a function of the T1/ T2 ratio from numerical simulations and compared with earlier results from two different well logging devices. High-resolution T1- T2 correlations maps are obtained by two-dimensional Laplace inversion of CPMG detected saturation recovery curves. The T1- T2 experimental correlations maps were corrected for the T1/ T2 effect using the derived T2/ T2,eff correction factor.

  12. Hot Electromagnetic Outflows. III. Displaced Fireball in a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher; Gill, Ramandeep

    2014-08-01

    The evolution of a dilute electron-positron fireball is calculated in the regime of strong magnetization and high compactness (l ~ 103-108). Heating is applied at a low effective temperature (<25 keV), appropriate to breakout from a confining medium, so that relaxation to a blackbody is inhibited by pair annihilation. The diffusion equation for Compton scattering by thermal pairs is coupled to a trans-relativistic cyclo-synchrotron source. We find that the photon spectrum develops a quasi-thermal peak at energy ~0.1 mec 2 in the comoving frame, with a power-law slope below it that is characteristic of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; F ω ~ const). The formation of a thermal high-energy spectrum is checked using the full kinetic equations. Calculations for a baryon-dominated photosphere reveal a lower spectral peak energy, and a harder low-energy spectrum, unless ion rest mass carries <~ 10-5 of the energy flux. We infer that (1) the GRB spectrum is inconsistent with the neutron-rich wind emitted by a young magnetar or neutron torus, and points to an event horizon in the engine; (2) neutrons play a negligible role in prompt gamma-ray emission; (3) the relation between observed peak frequency and burst energy is bounded below by the observed Amati relation if the Lorentz factor ~(opening angle)-1 at breakout, and the jet is surrounded by a broader sheath that interacts with a collapsing stellar core; (4) X-ray flashes are consistent with magnetized jets with ion-dominated photospheres; (5) high-frequency Alfvén waves may become charge starved in the dilute pair gas; (6) limitations on magnetic reconnection from plasma collisionality have been overestimated.

  13. Hot electromagnetic outflows. III. Displaced fireball in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher; Gill, Ramandeep

    2014-08-10

    The evolution of a dilute electron-positron fireball is calculated in the regime of strong magnetization and high compactness (ℓ ∼ 10{sup 3}-10{sup 8}). Heating is applied at a low effective temperature (<25 keV), appropriate to breakout from a confining medium, so that relaxation to a blackbody is inhibited by pair annihilation. The diffusion equation for Compton scattering by thermal pairs is coupled to a trans-relativistic cyclo-synchrotron source. We find that the photon spectrum develops a quasi-thermal peak at energy ∼0.1 m{sub e}c {sup 2} in the comoving frame, with a power-law slope below it that is characteristic of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; F{sub ω} ∼ const). The formation of a thermal high-energy spectrum is checked using the full kinetic equations. Calculations for a baryon-dominated photosphere reveal a lower spectral peak energy, and a harder low-energy spectrum, unless ion rest mass carries ≲ 10{sup –5} of the energy flux. We infer that (1) the GRB spectrum is inconsistent with the neutron-rich wind emitted by a young magnetar or neutron torus, and points to an event horizon in the engine; (2) neutrons play a negligible role in prompt gamma-ray emission; (3) the relation between observed peak frequency and burst energy is bounded below by the observed Amati relation if the Lorentz factor ∼(opening angle){sup –1} at breakout, and the jet is surrounded by a broader sheath that interacts with a collapsing stellar core; (4) X-ray flashes are consistent with magnetized jets with ion-dominated photospheres; (5) high-frequency Alfvén waves may become charge starved in the dilute pair gas; (6) limitations on magnetic reconnection from plasma collisionality have been overestimated.

  14. Hall effect in a strong magnetic field: Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2010-11-15

    In this work we numerically test a model of Hall magnetohydrodynamics in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field: the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic model (RHMHD) derived by [Gomez et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102303 (2008)] with the addition of weak compressible effects. The main advantage of this model lies in the reduction of computational cost. Nevertheless, up until now the degree of agreement with the original Hall MHD system and the range of validity in a regime of turbulence were not established. In this work direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional Hall MHD turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of the weak compressible RHMHD model. The results show that the degree of agreement is very high (when the different assumptions of RHMHD, such as spectral anisotropy, are satisfied). Nevertheless, when the initial conditions are isotropic but the mean magnetic field is maintained strong, the results differ at the beginning but asymptotically reach a good agreement at relatively short times. We also found evidence that the compressibility still plays a role in the dynamics of these systems, and the weak compressible RHMHD model is able to capture these effects. In conclusion the weak compressible RHMHD model is a valid approximation of the Hall MHD turbulence in the relevant physical context.

  15. Strong Magnetic Field Fluctuations within Filamentary Auroral Density Cavities Interpreted as VLF Saucer Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, D. L.; Kabirzadeh, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Wallis, D. D.; Bounds, S. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Pincon, J.-L.

    2012-01-01

    The Geoelectrodynamics and Electro-Optical Detection of Electron and SuprathermalIon Currents (GEODESIC) sounding rocket encountered more than 100 filamentary densitycavities associated with enhanced plasma waves at ELF (3 kHz) and VLF (310 kHz)frequencies and at altitudes of 800990 km during an auroral substorm. These cavities weresimilar in size (20 m diameter in most cases) to so-called lower-hybrid cavities (LHCs)observed by previous sounding rockets and satellites; however, in contrast, many of theGEODESIC cavities exhibited up to tenfold enhancements in magnetic wave powerthroughout the VLF band. GEODESIC also observed enhancements of ELF and VLFelectric fields both parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field B0 within cavities,though the VLF E field increases were often not as large proportionally as seen in themagnetic fields. This behavior is opposite to that predicted by previously published theoriesof LHCs based on passive scattering of externally incident auroral hiss. We argue thatthe GEODESIC cavities are active wave generation sites capable of radiating VLF wavesinto the surrounding plasma and producing VLF saucers, with energy supplied by cold,upward flowing electron beams composing the auroral return current. This interpretation issupported by the observation that the most intense waves, both inside and outside cavities,occurred in regions where energetic electron precipitation was largely inhibited orabsent altogether. We suggest that the wave-enhanced cavities encountered by GEODESICwere qualitatively different from those observed by earlier spacecraft because of thefortuitous timing of the GEODESIC launch, which placed the payload at apogee within asubstorm-related return current during its most intense phase, lasting only a few minutes.

  16. Magnetic Reconnection Turbulence in Strong Guide Fields: Basic Properties and Application to Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Told, D.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Zweibel, E. G.; Zhdankin, V.; Lesch, H.

    2014-08-01

    A current sheet susceptible to the tearing instability is used to drive reconnection turbulence in the presence of a strong guide field. Through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, the dependencies of central quantities such as the heating rate on parameters like collisionality or plasma β are studied, revealing that linear physics tends to predict only some aspects of the quasi-saturated state, with the nonlinear cascade responsible for additional features. For the solar corona, it is demonstrated that the kinetic heating associated with this type of turbulence agrees quantitatively with observational volumetric heating rates. In the context of short particle acceleration events, the self-consistent emergence of plasmoids or flux ropes in the turbulent bath is found to be important: ubiquitously occurring merger events of these objects cause strong bursts in the heating rate, the timescale of which is consistent with nanoflare observations. Furthermore, anisotropy of the temperature fluctuations is seen to emerge, hinting at a new means of generating coronal ion temperature anisotropy in the absence of cyclotron resonances.

  17. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TURBULENCE IN STRONG GUIDE FIELDS: BASIC PROPERTIES AND APPLICATION TO CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Zweibel, E. G.; Zhdankin, V.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.; Lesch, H.

    2014-08-01

    A current sheet susceptible to the tearing instability is used to drive reconnection turbulence in the presence of a strong guide field. Through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, the dependencies of central quantities such as the heating rate on parameters like collisionality or plasma β are studied, revealing that linear physics tends to predict only some aspects of the quasi-saturated state, with the nonlinear cascade responsible for additional features. For the solar corona, it is demonstrated that the kinetic heating associated with this type of turbulence agrees quantitatively with observational volumetric heating rates. In the context of short particle acceleration events, the self-consistent emergence of plasmoids or flux ropes in the turbulent bath is found to be important: ubiquitously occurring merger events of these objects cause strong bursts in the heating rate, the timescale of which is consistent with nanoflare observations. Furthermore, anisotropy of the temperature fluctuations is seen to emerge, hinting at a new means of generating coronal ion temperature anisotropy in the absence of cyclotron resonances.

  18. Commensurability oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas subject to strong in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrčka, L.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the commensurability oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas modulated by a unidirectional periodic potential and subject to tilted magnetic fields with a strong in-plane component. As a result of coupling of the in-plane field component and the confining potential in the finite-width quantum well, the originally circular cyclotron orbits become anisotropic and tilted out of the sample plane. A quasi-classical approach to the theory, that relates the magneto-resistance oscillations to the guiding-center drift, is extended to this case.

  19. The magnetoresonance operation of microwiggler on the piezoelectrics with a strong magnetic guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; So, C.H.; Moon, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    We proposed that a new type of the electrostatic microwiggler with a wiggler period (0.1 mm {le}1{sub w}{le}1 mm) and the wiggler field strength (E{sub w}{le} 100 kV/m) can be produced on the surface of a PZT when a high power and high frequency ultrasonic wave travels through a PZT bar. Numerical simulations in the linear and nonlinear gain regime show that a weak microwiggler (E{sub w}100 kV/m,{lambda}{sub w}{approx}100 periods), operating in magnetoresonance with a strong guide field (B{sub o}{approx} 3.6T), can generate a millimeter and submillimeter radiations with medium electronic efficiency of few percents. It is shown that the maximum output power of the compact FEL using the wiggler system generated on the surface of the piezoelectric material may be upto a few Watts with a relatively low energy and low current electron beam (Ew {approx}100 keV and I{sub b}1 mA).

  20. Study of the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo L.; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Bracco, Mirian E.

    2013-03-25

    Magnetars are neutron stars with a strong surface magnetic field. Observations of soft gamma-ray and anomalous X-ray pulsars pointed out that the surface magnetic field of magnetars is equal or even greater than 10{sup 15} G. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons and with magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density.

  1. Cyclotron absorption of X rays by a classical plasma in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelezniakov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron absorption of electromagnetic waves in an equilibrium classical plasma in a strong magnetic field is investigated on the basis of a kinetic equation and by means of Kirchhoff's law. A study is carried out of the influence of vacuum polarization by the magnetic field on the polarization of the ordinary and extraordinary waves and on the coefficients of cyclotron absorption of these waves in the plasma. The results obtained are of interest for the theory of the emission of X-ray sources associated with neutron stars in binary systems and above all for the theory of the origin of the X rays in the spectrum of the source Her X-1.

  2. EIT resonance features in strong magnetic fields in rubidium atomic columns with length varying by 4 orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Wojciechowski, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Gawlik, W.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances are investigated with the 85Rb D 1 line (795 nm) in strong magnetic fields (up to 2 kG) with three different types of spectroscopic vapor cells: the nano-cell with a thickness along the direction of laser light L ≈ 795 nm, the micro-cell with L = 30 μm with the addition of a neon buffer gas, and the centimeter-long glass cell. These cells allowed us to observe systematic changes of the EIT spectra when the increasing magnetic field systematically decoupled the total atomic electron and nuclear angular moments (the Paschen-Back/Back-Goudsmit effects). The observations agree well with a theoretical model. The advantages and disadvantages of a particular type of cell are discussed along with the possible practical applications.

  3. Analytical GIAO and hybrid-basis integral derivatives: application to geometry optimization of molecules in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tellgren, Erik I; Reine, Simen S; Helgaker, Trygve

    2012-07-14

    Analytical integral evaluation is a central task of modern quantum chemistry. Here we present a general method for evaluating differentiated integrals over standard Gaussian and mixed Gaussian/plane-wave hybrid orbitals. The main idea is to have a representation of basis sets that is flexible enough to enable differentiated integrals to be reinterpreted as standard integrals over modified basis functions. As an illustration of the method, we report a very simple implementation of Hartree-Fock level geometrical derivatives in finite magnetic fields for gauge-origin independent atomic orbitals, within the London program. As a quantum-chemical application, we optimize the structure of helium clusters and some well-known covalently bound molecules (water, ammonia and benzene) subject to strong magnetic fields. PMID:22653039

  4. Density-functional-theory calculations of matter in strong magnetic fields. II. Infinite chains and condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Lai Dong

    2006-12-15

    We present calculations of the electronic structure of one-dimensional infinite chains and three-dimensional condensed matter in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10{sup 12} G to 2x10{sup 15} G, appropriate for observed magnetic neutron stars. At these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function appropriate in the strong field regime. The band structures of electrons in different Landau orbitals are computed self-consistently. Numerical results of the ground-state energies and electron work functions are given for one-dimensional chains H{sub {infinity}}, He{sub {infinity}}, C{sub {infinity}}, and Fe{sub {infinity}}. Fitting formulae for the B dependence of the energies are also provided. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon chains are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x10{sup 12} G, carbon infinite chains are very weakly bound relative to individual atoms). Iron chains are significantly bound for B > or approx. 10{sup 14} G and are weakly bound if at all at B < or approx. 10{sup 13} G. We also study the cohesive property of three-dimensional condensed matter of H, He, C, and Fe at zero pressure, constructed from interacting chains in a body-centered tetragonal lattice. Such three-dimensional condensed matter is found to be bound relative to individual atoms, with the cohesive energy increasing rapidly with increasing B.

  5. Scalar and spinor particles with low binding energy in a strong stationary magnetic field in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, V. N.

    2007-06-01

    We discuss the equations for the bound one-active electron states based on analytic solutions of the Schrödinger and Pauli equations for a uniform magnetic field and a single attractive δ(r) potential. It is very important that the electron ground states in a magnetic field differ essentially from the analogous state of spin-0 particles, whose binding energy was intensively studied more than forty years ago. We show that the binding-energy equations for spin- 1/2 particles can be obtained without using the language of boundary conditions in the δ -potential model developed in the pioneering works. We use the obtained equations to calculate the energy level displacements analytically and to demonstrate nonlinear dependences on the field intensity. We show that the magnetic field indeed plays a stabilizing role in the considered systems in the case of weak intensity, but the opposite occurs in the case of strong intensity. These properties may be important for real quantum mechanical fermionic systems in two and three dimensions.

  6. Strong Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses during Solar Cycle 23 and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. In this investigation, we first present a statistical study on the properties of strong dynamic pressure pulses in the solar wind during solar cycle 23. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here we found that, a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, being stronger at the noon sector.

  7. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression. PMID:22296880

  8. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  9. B fields in OB stars (BOB). Detection of a strong magnetic field in the O9.7 V star HD 54879

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, N.; Fossati, L.; Hubrig, S.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Schöller, M.; Ilyin, I.; Carrol, T. A.; Langer, N.; Morel, T.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Przybilla, N.; Herrero, A.; de Koter, A.; Oskinova, L. M.; Reisenegger, A.; Sana, H.; BOB Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The number of magnetic stars detected among massive stars is small; nevertheless, the role played by the magnetic field in stellar evolution cannot be disregarded. Links between line profile variability, enhancements/depletions of surface chemical abundances, and magnetic fields have been identified for low-mass B-stars, but for the O-type domain this is almost unexplored. Based on FORS 2 and HARPS spectropolarimetric data, we present the first detection of a magnetic field in HD 54879, a single slowly rotating O9.7 V star. Using two independent and different techniques we obtained the firm detection of a surface average longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum amplitude of about 600 G, in modulus. A quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the star with the stellar atmosphere code fastwind results in an effective temperature and a surface gravity of 33 000 ± 1000 K and 4.0 ± 0.1 dex. The abundances of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, and magnesium are found to be slightly lower than solar, but compatible within the errors. We investigate line-profile variability in HD 54879 by complementing our spectra with spectroscopic data from other recent OB-star surveys. The photospheric lines remain constant in shape between 2009 and 2014, although Hα shows a variable emission. The Hα emission is too strong for a standard O9.7 V and is probably linked to the magnetic field and the presence of circumstellar material. Its normal chemical composition and the absence of photospheric line profile variations make HD 54879 the most strongly magnetic, non-variable single O-star detected to date. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal observatories under programme ID 191.D-0255(C, F).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Enhanced betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y.; Cao, L. H.; Liu, Z. J.; He, X. T.

    2016-04-01

    Betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma is investigated by two dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The results show that the betatron radiation in magnetized plasmas is strongly enhanced and is more collimated compared to that in unmagnetized plasma. Single particle model analysis shows that the frequency and the amplitude of the electrons's betatron oscillation are strongly influenced by the axial external magnetic field and the axial self-generated magnetic field. And the 2D PIC simulation shows that the axial magnetic field is actually induced by the external magnetic field and tends to increase the betatron frequency. By disturbing the perturbation of the plasma density in the laser-produced channel, the hosing instability is also suppressed, which results in a better angular distribution and a better symmetry of the betatron radiation.

  11. Weak Broadband Electromagnetic Fields are More Disruptive to Magnetic Compass Orientation in a Night-Migratory Songbird (Erithacus rubecula) than Strong Narrow-Band Fields

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Susanne; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Reichl, Thomas; Dreyer, David; Lefeldt, Nele; Engels, Svenja; Baker, Neville; Hore, P. J.; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in night-migratory songbirds is embedded in the visual system and seems to be based on a light-dependent radical pair mechanism. Recent findings suggest that both broadband electromagnetic fields ranging from ~2 kHz to ~9 MHz and narrow-band fields at the so-called Larmor frequency for a free electron in the Earth’s magnetic field can disrupt this mechanism. However, due to local magnetic fields generated by nuclear spins, effects specific to the Larmor frequency are difficult to understand considering that the primary sensory molecule should be organic and probably a protein. We therefore constructed a purpose-built laboratory and tested the orientation capabilities of European robins in an electromagnetically silent environment, under the specific influence of four different oscillating narrow-band electromagnetic fields, at the Larmor frequency, double the Larmor frequency, 1.315 MHz or 50 Hz, and in the presence of broadband electromagnetic noise covering the range from ~2 kHz to ~9 MHz. Our results indicated that the magnetic compass orientation of European robins could not be disrupted by any of the relatively strong narrow-band electromagnetic fields employed here, but that the weak broadband field very efficiently disrupted their orientation. PMID:27047356

  12. Weak Broadband Electromagnetic Fields are More Disruptive to Magnetic Compass Orientation in a Night-Migratory Songbird (Erithacus rubecula) than Strong Narrow-Band Fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Susanne; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Reichl, Thomas; Dreyer, David; Lefeldt, Nele; Engels, Svenja; Baker, Neville; Hore, P J; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in night-migratory songbirds is embedded in the visual system and seems to be based on a light-dependent radical pair mechanism. Recent findings suggest that both broadband electromagnetic fields ranging from ~2 kHz to ~9 MHz and narrow-band fields at the so-called Larmor frequency for a free electron in the Earth's magnetic field can disrupt this mechanism. However, due to local magnetic fields generated by nuclear spins, effects specific to the Larmor frequency are difficult to understand considering that the primary sensory molecule should be organic and probably a protein. We therefore constructed a purpose-built laboratory and tested the orientation capabilities of European robins in an electromagnetically silent environment, under the specific influence of four different oscillating narrow-band electromagnetic fields, at the Larmor frequency, double the Larmor frequency, 1.315 MHz or 50 Hz, and in the presence of broadband electromagnetic noise covering the range from ~2 kHz to ~9 MHz. Our results indicated that the magnetic compass orientation of European robins could not be disrupted by any of the relatively strong narrow-band electromagnetic fields employed here, but that the weak broadband field very efficiently disrupted their orientation. PMID:27047356

  13. Influence of a strong magnetic field on the hydrogen molecular ion using B-spline-type basis-sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue-Xia; Xiao-Long, Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an improvement on our previous work [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 085101 (2012)], an accurate method combining the spheroidal coordinates and B-spline basis is applied to study the ground state 1σg and low excited states 1σu, 1πg,u,1δg,u,2σg of the in magnetic fields ranging from 109 Gs (1 Gs = 10-4 T) to 4.414 × 1013 Gs. Comparing the one-center method used in our previous work, the present method has a higher precision with a shorter computing time. Equilibrium distances of the states of the in strong magnetic fields were found to be accurate to 3˜5 significant digits (s.d.) and the total energies 6˜11 s.d., even for some antibonding state, such as 1πg, which is difficult for the one-center method to give reliable results while the field strength is B ≥ 1013 Gs. For the large disagreement in previous works, such as the equilibrium distances of the 1πg state at B = 109 Gs, the present data may be used as a reference. Further, the potential energy curves (PECs) and the electronic probability density distributions (EPDDs) of the bound states 1σg, 1πu, 1δg and antibonding states 1σu, 1πg, 1δu for B = 1, 10, 100, 1000 a.u. (atomic unit) are compared, so that the different influences of the magnetic fields on the chemical bonds of the bound states and antibonding states are discussed in detail. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11204389) and the Natural Science Foundation Project of Chongqing (Grant Nos. CSTC2012jjA50015 and CSTC2012jjA00012).

  14. Suppression of superconductivity by strong magnetic fields in PbTe/PbS heterostructures with a superconducting interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengus, S. V.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Yuzephovich, S. I.

    2013-08-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the effect of strong magnetic fields on superconductivity in PbTe/PbS heterostructures with semiconducting layers of different thicknesses. Metallic conductivity and superconductivity (critical temperature Tc ≤ 6.5 K) in PbTe/PbS heterostructures are caused by inversion of bands along a continuous network of misfit dislocations that develops at the interfaces between semiconductor layers of sufficient thickness (d > 80 nm). With decreasing d the continuity of the superconducting interface is disrupted, Tc decreases, and the metallic conductivity changes to a semiconducting type. Disruption of the continuity of the superconducting interface is found to be a necessary condition for observing a magnetic-field induced superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) and has a significant influence on its features: a fan-like set of resistance curves R(T); intersection of the R(B) curves for fields perpendicular, as well as parallel, to the interface; and, negative magnetoresistance. A scaling analysis based on Fisher's theoretical model is carried out for these samples. No evidence of a SIT was observed in heterostructures with a perfect interface. It appears that the SIT effect is related to percolation phenomena characteristic of granular superconductors.

  15. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  16. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  17. Tunable High-Field Magnetization in Strongly Exchange-Coupled Freestanding Co/CoO Core/Shell Coaxial Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Alvarez, German; Geshev, Julian; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro; Sort, Jordi; Nogués, Josep

    2016-08-31

    The exchange bias properties of Co/CoO coaxial core/shell nanowires were investigated with cooling and applied fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This configuration leads to unexpected exchange-bias effects. First, the magnetization value at high fields is found to depend on the field-cooling conditions. This effect arises from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy and the Zeeman energies for cooling fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This allows imprinting predefined magnetization states to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) shell, as corroborated by micromagnetic simulations. Second, the system exhibits a high-field magnetic irreversibility, leading to open hysteresis loops attributed to the AFM easy axis reorientation during the reversal (effect similar to athermal training). A distinct way to manipulate the high-field magnetization in exchange-biased systems, beyond the archetypical effects, was thus experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. PMID:27502034

  18. Quasilongitudinal soliton in a two-dimensional strongly coupled complex dusty plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Samiran

    2014-09-01

    The propagation of a nonlinear low-frequency mode in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer hexagonal dusty plasma crystal in presence of external magnetic field and dust-neutral collision is investigated. The standard perturbative approach leads to a 2D Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) soliton for the well-known dust-lattice mode. However, the Coriolis force due to crystal rotation and Lorentz force due to magnetic field on dust particles introduce a linear forcing term, whereas dust-neutral drag introduce the usual damping term in the 2D KdV equation. This new nonlinear equation is solved both analytically and numerically to show the competition between the linear forcing and damping in the formation of quasilongitudinal soliton in a 2D strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma. Numerical simulation on the basis of the typical experimental plasma parameters and the analytical solution reveal that the neutral drag force is responsible for the usual exponential decay of the soliton, whereas Coriolis and/or Lorentz force is responsible for the algebraic decay as well as the oscillating tail formation of the soliton. The results are discussed in the context of the plasma crystal experiment. PMID:25314548

  19. Influence of super-strong magnetic fields on beta decay of nuclide ^{59}Co in magnetar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Liu, Dong-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Based on the relativistic theory in super-strong magnetic fields (SMFs), we investigate the influence of SMFs on beta decay and the change rates of electron fraction (CREF) of nuclei ^{59}Co in magnetars. Firstly, we find the magnetic fields have a slight influence on the beta decay rates for a given temperature when ρ7<1. However, the beta decay rates decrease greatly by more than five orders of magnitude when ρ7>1. Secondly, our results show that this effect of SMFs can increase beta reaction rates by two orders magnitude when 10 ≤ B_{12} ≤ 104 G. For instance, the beta decay rate for ^{56}Co increases from 4.797×10^{-3} to 3.284×10^{-1} at ρ7=4.32. Finally, we find that the CREF increases about by two orders of magnitude in SMFs and the enhancement factor will be high as 95.95 for ρ7=4.32.

  20. Two strongly contrasting Λ-systems in the D 1 line of 87Rb in a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Margalit, L.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    Four different types of spectroscopic cells that cover all possible existing versions of sealed-off cells (containing alkali atomic vapor) characterized by drastically different relaxation rates γrel are used to study the electromagnetically induced transparency spectra of two Λ-systems in the D 1 line of 87Rb in the presence of transverse magnetic field. Two cw narrowband diode-lasers are used to form the coupling laser radiation (with a fixed frequency) and the probe radiation with a tunable frequency. Two strongly contrasting Λ-systems are found: the first shows resonances that are transformed from dark resonances to bright resonances in all cases apart from nanocells, whereas the second shows four dark resonances in all four different types of cell. The theoretical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. B fields in OB stars (BOB): Detection of a magnetic field in the He-strong star CPD -57° 3509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Fossati, L.; Hubrig, S.; Nieva, M.-F.; Järvinen, S. P.; Castro, N.; Schöller, M.; Ilyin, I.; Butler, K.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Oskinova, L. M.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; de Koter, A.; BOB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We report the detection of a magnetic field in the helium-strong star CPD -57° 3509 (B2 IV), a member of the Galactic open cluster NGC 3293, and characterise the star's atmospheric and fundamental parameters. Methods: Spectropolarimetric observations with FORS2 and HARPSpol are analysed using two independent approaches to quantify the magnetic field strength. A high-S/N FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrum is analysed using a hybrid non-LTE model atmosphere technique. Comparison with stellar evolution models constrains the fundamental parameters of the star. Results: We obtain a firm detection of a surface averaged longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum amplitude of about 1 kG. Assuming a dipolar configuration of the magnetic field, this implies a dipolar field strength larger than 3.3 kG. Moreover, the large amplitude and fast variation (within about 1 day) of the longitudinal magnetic field implies that CPD -57° 3509 is spinning very fast despite its apparently slow projected rotational velocity. The star should be able to support a centrifugal magnetosphere, yet the spectrum shows no sign of magnetically confined material; in particular, emission in Hα is not observed. Apparently, the wind is either not strong enough for enough material to accumulate in the magnetosphere to become observable or, alternatively, some leakage process leads to loss of material from the magnetosphere. The quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the star yields an effective temperature and a logarithmic surface gravity of 23 750 ± 250 K and 4.05 ± 0.10, respectively, and a surface helium fraction of 0.28 ± 0.02 by number. The surface abundances of C, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar are compatible with the cosmic abundance standard, whereas Mg, Al, Si, and Fe are depleted by about a factor of 2. This abundance pattern can be understood as the consequence of a fractionated stellar wind. CPD -57° 3509 is one of the most evolved He-strong stars known with an independent age constraint due to its

  2. Dynamo Activity in Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-01-01

    Strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes have many attractive features that may explain the enigmatic behavior observed from X-ray binaries. The physics and structure of these disks are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability into an ordered toroidal magnetic field. To study dynamo activity, we performed three-dimensional, stratified, isothermal, ideal magnetohydrodynamic shearing box simulations. In our simulations, the strength of this self-sustained toroidal magnetic field depends on the net vertical magnetic flux we impose, which allows us to study weak-to-strong magnetization regimes. We find that the entire disk develops into a magnetic pressure-dominated state for a sufficiently strong net vertical magnetic flux. Over the two orders of magnitude in net vertical magnetic flux that we consider, the effective α-viscosity parameter scales as a power-law. We quantify dynamo properties of toroidal magnetic flux production and its buoyant escape as a function of disk magnetization. Finally, we compare our simulations to an analytic model for the vertical structure of strongly magnetized disks applicable to the high/soft state of X-ray binaries.

  3. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauss, T.; SorgenFrei, T.; Croell, A.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the photovoltaics industry, the largest market share is represented by solar cells made from multicrystalline silicon, which is grown by directional solidification. During the growth process, the silicon melt is in contact with the silicon nitride coated crucible walls and the furnace atmosphere which contains carbon monoxide. The dissolution of the crucible coating, the carbon bearing gas, and the carbon already present in the feedstock, lead to the precipitation of silicon carbide, and silicon nitride, at later stages of the growth process. The precipitation of Si3N4 and SiC particles of up to several hundred micrometers in diameter leads to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Furthermore the growth of the silicon grains can be negatively influenced by the presence of particles, which act as nucleation sources and lead to a grit structure of small grains and are sources for dislocations. If doped with Nitrogen from the dissolved crucible coating, SiC is a semi conductive material, and can act as a shunt, short circuiting parts of the solar cell. For these reasons, the incorporation of such particles needs to be avoided. In this contribution we performed model experiments in which the transport of intentionally added SiC particles and their interaction with the solid-liquid interface during float zone growth of silicon in strong steady magnetic fields was investigated. SiC particles of 7µm and 60µm size are placed in single crystal silicon [100] and [111] rods of 8mm diameter. This is achieved by drilling a hole of 2mm diameter, filling in the particles and closing the hole by melting the surface of the rod until a film of silicon covers the hole. The samples are processed under a vacuum of 1x10(exp -5) mbar or better, to prevent gas inclusions. An oxide layer to suppress Marangoni convection is applied by wet oxidation. Experiments without and with static magnetic field are carried out to investigate the influence of melt

  4. The magnetic field and circumstellar environment of the helium-strong star HD36485 = δOriC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.; Bohlender, D. A.; Bolton, C. T.; Buemi, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Hill, G. M.; Stift, M. J.

    2010-02-01

    Extensive Hα spectroscopy of the cool, helium-strong star δOriC obtained over two decades has enabled a detailed analysis of the variable Hα emission observed in this sharp-lined and strongly magnetic B3V star. Radial velocity measurements from these and other spectra have also confirmed the binary nature of the star, the first detection of the secondary being provided, and permitted an improved determination of the system's orbital parameters. The amplitude of the radial velocities and a preliminary spectroscopic analysis indicate that the secondary component is an early A-type star. Disentangling the contribution of the two components to the Balmer line profiles, we determine an effective temperature for δOriC slightly larger than previously adopted in the literature. The Hα emission is variable with a period of 1.47775 +/- 0.00004d, assumed to be the rotation period of the primary component. After removal of the binary system's photospheric contribution to the Hα line, we find that the emission arises from two distinct, but asymmetrical, optically translucent circumstellar clouds. When strongest the emission peaks have intensities of approximately 15 per cent of the continuum level at about 150kms-1 on either side of the line centre, and emission is apparent to +/-225kms-1, or 6R* above the photosphere if we assume that the magnetic field forces the circumstellar material into rigid rotation about the star. New 6cm Very Large Array radio measurements, when combined with archival data, suggest that the radio flux of the star is also variable. An analysis of new and previously published magnetic field observations enabled us to derive a value for the inclination of the rotation axis of i = 12° +/- 3° and an obliquity of the magnetic axis of β <= 52°. The nature of the emission variability is similar to that of the prototypical helium-strong star σ Ori E, but since the latter object has an inclination of >75°, δOriC provides us with an opportunity to

  5. EBSD Study on the Effect of a Strong Axial Magnetic Field on the Microstructure and Crystallography of Al-Ni Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Moreau, Rene; Du, Dafan; Ren, Zhongming; Lu, Xionggang

    2016-03-01

    The effect of a strong magnetic field on the microstructure and crystallography of the primary and eutectic Al3Ni phases in Al-Ni alloys was investigated by using EBSD. The results show that the magnetic field significantly affected the microstructures and crystallography during both volume and directional solidification. As a result, the Al3Ni primary phases were aligned with the <001> crystal direction along the magnetic field and formed a layer-like structure. The magnetic field intensity, solidification temperature, growth speed, and alloy composition played important roles during the alignment process of the Al3Ni primary phase. Indeed, the alignment degree increased with the magnetic field and the solidification temperature during normal solidification. Moreover, the effect of the magnetic field on the crystallography of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic in the Al-Ni alloys was also studied. The applied magnetic field modified the orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber and the crystallographic orientation relationship of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic. The orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber depended mainly on the solidification direction and the alignment of the Al3Ni primary phase. Furthermore, a method for controlling the crystallization process by adjusting the angle between the solidification direction and the magnetic field was proposed.

  6. HELIOSPHERIC ASYMMETRIES AND 2-3 kHz RADIO EMISSION UNDER STRONG INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Zank, Gary P.; Mitchell, Jeremy J.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2009-04-10

    We discuss the asymmetry of the major heliospheric discontinuities obtained from the analysis of three-dimensional modeling of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM). The flow of charged particles is governed by the ideal MHD equations and the transport of neutral particles is described by the Boltzmann equation. The emphasis is on the asymmetries of the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause under the combined action of the interstellar and interplanetary magnetic fields (ISMF and IMF) in the presence of neutral hydrogen atoms. It is shown that an ISMF of a strength greater than 4 {mu}G can account for the 10 AU difference in the TS heliocentric distances observed by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft. We analyze the deflection of neutral hydrogen flow from its original direction in the unperturbed LISM and conclude that it remains within the range measured in the SOHO SWAN experiment. The impact is analyzed of a strong ISMF on the 2-3 kHz radio emission observed by the Voyager spacecraft, using new estimates of the radio emission conditions.

  7. Magnetostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields using iterative optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Conolly, Steven M.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combining x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging systems for guidance of interventional procedures has become more commonplace. By designing an x-ray tube that is immune to the magnetic fields outside of the MR bore, the two systems can be placed in close proximity to each other. A major obstacle to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the magnetic fields on the x-ray tube focal spot. A potential solution is to design active shielding that locally cancels the magnetic fields near the focal spot. Methods: An iterative optimization algorithm is implemented to design resistive active shielding coils that will be placed outside the x-ray tube insert. The optimization procedure attempts to minimize the power consumption of the shielding coils while satisfying magnetic field homogeneity constraints. The algorithm is composed of a linear programming step and a nonlinear programming step that are interleaved with each other. The coil results are verified using a finite element space charge simulation of the electron beam inside the x-ray tube. To alleviate heating concerns an optimized coil solution is derived that includes a neodymium permanent magnet. Any demagnetization of the permanent magnet is calculated prior to solving for the optimized coils. The temperature dynamics of the coil solutions are calculated using a lumped parameter model, which is used to estimate operation times of the coils before temperature failure. Results: For a magnetic field strength of 88 mT, the algorithm solves for coils that consume 588 A/cm2. This specific coil geometry can operate for 15 min continuously before reaching temperature failure. By including a neodymium magnet in the design the current density drops to 337 A/cm2, which increases the operation time to 59 min. Space charge simulations verify that the coil designs are effective, but for oblique x-ray tube geometries there is still distortion of the focal spot shape along with deflections of approximately

  8. A cascade of e ‑ e + pair production by a photon with subsequent annihilation to a single photon in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Novak, O. P.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-06-01

    The process of electron–positron pair production by a photon with subsequent annihilation to a single photon in a strong magnetic field has been studied. The general amplitude has been calculated and the process rates have been found in a low Landau levels approximation (resonant and nonresonant cases). The comparison of resonant and nonresonant cases shows a significant excess of the resonant rate. The polarization of the final photon in a strong magnetic field has also been found. It has been shown that polarizations of the initial and final photons are independent except for the case of normal linear polarization of the initial photon.

  9. The Zeeman effect in astrophysical water masers and the observation of strong magnetic fields in regions of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study solves the transfer equations for the polarized radiation of astrophysical 22-GHz water masers in the presence of a magnetic field which causes a Zeeman splitting that is much smaller than the spectral line breadth. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between the recently detected circular polarization in this maser radiation and the strength of the magnetic field. When the observed spectral line breadth is smaller than about 0.8 km/s (FWHM), it is calculated that the uncertainty is less than a factor of about 2. The accuracy is improved significantly when the angle between the line of sight and the direction of the magnetic field does not exceed about 45 deg. Uncertainty in the strength of the magnetic field due to lack of knowledge about which hyperfine transition is the source of the 22-GHz masers is removed. The 22-GHz maser feature is found to be the result of a merger of the three strongest hyperfine components.

  10. Attempt to Generate a Strong and Uniform Magnetic Field by Face-to-face HTS Bulk Elements in a Magnet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Hirayama, Eri; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kanai, Tomoaki; Ogawa, Jun; Fukui, Satoshi; Sato, Takao; Yokoyama, Kazuya; Nakamura, Takashi

    A unique experimental attempt aiming to obtain a uniform magnetic field space as required for NMR has been carried out with use of HTS bulk magnets. The magnetic poles were activated as 1.8 T (North) and 1.4 T (South) at 30 K by applyinga pulsed magnetic field up to 7 T, and positioned face-to-face with gaps less than 70 mm. The uniformity of the magnetic field required for detecting the NMR signals isless than 1,500 ppm at more than 0.3 T in the cross sectional plane of 2 x 2 mm2. After thepreliminary trials whichrevealed auniformity of 5,421 ppm at 0.44 T in a70 mm gap, we attached a ferromagnetic iron plate to a magnetic pole surface to change the magnetic field distribution to be concave. The best uniformity of 358 ppm at 1.11 T was obtained at 9 mm distance from the iron plate surface in a gap of 30 mm. It is stated that the concave magnetic field distribution was compensated by the counter conical-shape field, resulting in the uniform field plane.

  11. Increasing the oscillation frequency of strong magnetic fields above 101 kHz significantly raises peripheral nerve excitation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Irving N.; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Fricke, Stanley T.; Probst, Roland; Urdaneta, Mario; Warnow, Daniel; Sanders, Howard; Glidden, Steven C.; McMillan, Alan; Starewicz, Piotr M.; Reilly, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A time-varying magnetic field can cause unpleasant peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) when the maximum excursion of the magnetic field (ΔB) is above a frequency-dependent threshold level [P. Mansfield and P. R. Harvey, Magn. Reson. Med. 29, 746–758 (1993)]. Clinical and research magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gradient systems have been designed to avoid such bioeffects by adhering to regulations and guidelines established on the basis of clinical trials. Those trials, generally employing sinusoidal waveforms, tested human responses to magnetic fields at frequencies between 0.5 and 10 kHz [W. Irnich and F. Schmitt, Magn. Reson. Med. 33, 619–623 (1995), T. F. Budinger et al., J. Comput. Assist. Tomogr. 15, 909–914 (1991), and D. J. Schaefer et al., J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 12, 20–29 (2000)]. PNS thresholds for frequencies higher than 10 kHz had been extrapolated, using physiological models [J. P. Reilly et al., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-32(12), 1001–1011 (1985)]. The present study provides experimental data on human PNS thresholds to oscillating magnetic field stimulation from 2 to 183 kHz. Sinusoidal waveforms were employed for several reasons: (1) to facilitate comparison with earlier reports that used sine waves, (2) because prior designers of fast gradient hardware for generalized waveforms (e.g., including trapezoidal pulses) have employed quarter-sine-wave resonant circuits to reduce the rise- and fall-times of pulse waveforms, and (3) because sinusoids are often used in fast pulse sequences (e.g., spiral scans) [S. Nowak, U.S. patent 5,245,287 (14 September 1993) and K. F. King and D. J. Schaefer, J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 12, 164–170 (2000)]. Methods: An IRB-approved prospective clinical trial was performed, involving 26 adults, in which one wrist was exposed to decaying sinusoidal magnetic field pulses at frequencies from 2 to 183 kHz and amplitudes up to 0.4 T. Sham exposures (i.e., with no magnetic fields) were applied to all

  12. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  13. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  14. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  15. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignitiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Y.; Ivancic, S.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H.; Lei, A. L.; Theobald, W.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ˜ 1011 V/m and B ˜ 108 G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  16. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Y; Ivancic, S; Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Lei, A L; Theobald, W; Tanaka, K A

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10(11) V/m and B ∼ 10(8) G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma. PMID:25430358

  17. Induced quadrupole effects near a crossover in a tetragonal TbLiF{sub 4} sheelite in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Snegirev, V. V.; Broto, J.-M.; Abdulsabirov, R. Yu.; Korableva, S. L.

    2012-12-15

    The anomalies of magnetic properties of TbLiF{sub 4} caused by the interaction of the energy levels of a rare-earth ion in a strong magnetic field up to 50 T directed along the [100] and [110] axes are studied experimentally and theoretically. The jumps in magnetization M(H) and the maxima of the differential magnetic susceptibility dM(H)/dH are found in critical fields H{sub c} = 28 and 31 T, where the lower component of the excited doublet approaches the ground-state singlet of a Tb{sup 3+} ion. Based on the crystal-field model with known interaction parameters, we calculated the Zeeman effect and the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility curves for the TbLiF{sub 4} crystal, which adequately describe magnetic anomalies and critical parameters of a crossover. It is shown that the jumpwise change in the {alpha}- and {gamma}-symmetry quadrupole interactions in TbLiF{sub 4} caused by changes in the corresponding quadrupole moments during the crossing of energy levels leads, in accordance with experiments, to a decrease in the critical field H{sub c} by approximately 4 T and an increase in the maximum of the differential susceptibility dM(H)/dH near the crossover more than twofold. This behavior can be considered as an analog of the induced quadrupole transition caused by a change of the ground state of the rare-earth ion during crossover.

  18. Strong dependence of spin dynamics on the orientation of an external magnetic field for InSb and InAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, K. L.; Leontiadou, M. A.; Li, Juerong; Clowes, S. K.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Cohen, L. F.; Murdin, B. N.

    2010-03-01

    Electron spin relaxation times have been measured in InSb and InAs epilayers in a moderate (<4 T) external magnetic field. A strong and opposite field dependence of the spin lifetime was observed for longitudinal (Faraday) and transverse (Voigt) configuration. In the Faraday configuration the spin lifetime increases because the D'yakonov-Perel' dephasing process is suppressed. At the high field limit the Elliot-Yafet spin flip relaxation process dominates, enabling its direct determination. Conversely, as predicted theoretically for narrow band gap semiconductors, an additional efficient spin dephasing mechanism dominates in the Voigt configuration significantly decreasing the electron spin lifetime with increasing field.

  19. Magnetic field effects on edge and bulk states in topological insulators based on HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells with strong natural interface inversion asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durnev, M. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theory of the electron structure and the Zeeman effect for the helical edge states emerging in two-dimensional topological insulators based on HgTe/HgCdTe quantum wells with strong natural interface inversion asymmetry. The interface inversion asymmetry, reflecting the real atomistic structure of the quantum well, drastically modifies both bulk and edge states. For the in-plane magnetic field, this asymmetry leads to a strong anisotropy of the edge-state effective g factor, which becomes dependent on the edge orientation. The interface inversion asymmetry also couples the counterpropagating edge states in the out-of-plane magnetic field leading to the opening of the gap in the edge-state spectrum by arbitrary small fields.

  20. An Assessment of Magnetic Conditions for Strong Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions by Comparing Observed Loops with Computed Potential Field Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Falconer, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    We report further results on the magnetic origins of coronal heating found from registering coronal images with photospheric vector magnetograms. For two complementary active regions, we use computed potential field lines to examine the global non-potentiality of bright extended coronal loops and the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field at their feet, and assess the role of these magnetic conditions in the strong coronal heating in these loops. The two active regions are complementary, in that one is globally potential and the other is globally nonpotential, while each is predominantly bipolar, and each has an island of included polarity in its trailing polarity domain. We find the following: (1) The brightest main-arch loops of the globally potential active region are brighter than the brightest main- arch loops of the globally strongly nonpotential active region. (2) In each active region, only a few of the mainarch magnetic loops are strongly heated, and these are all rooted near the island. (3) The end of each main-arch bright loop apparently bifurcates above the island, so that it embraces the island and the magnetic null above the island. (4) At any one time, there are other main-arch magnetic loops that embrace the island in the same manner as do the bright loops but that are not selected for strong coronal heating. (5) There is continual microflaring in sheared core fields around the island, but the main-arch bright loops show little response to these microflares. From these observational and modeling results we draw the following conclusions: (1) The heating of the main-arch bright loops arises mainly from conditions at the island end of these loops and not from their global non-potentiality. (2) There is, at most, only a loose coupling between the coronal heating in the bright loops of the main arch and the coronal heating in the sheared core fields at their feet, although in both the heating is driven by conditions/events in and around the

  1. An Assessment of Magnetic Conditions for Strong Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions by Comparing Observed Loops with Computed Potential Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Gary, G. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We report further results on the magnetic origins of coronal heating found from registering coronal images with photospheric vector magnetograms. For two complementary active regions, we use computed potential field lines to examine the global nonpotentiality of bright extended coronal loops and the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field at their feet, and assess the role of these magnetic conditions in the strong coronal heating in these loops. The two active regions are complementary, in that one is globally potential and the other is globally nonpotential, while each is predominantly bipolar, and each has an island of included polarity in its trailing polarity domain. We find the following: (1) The brightest main-arch loops of the globally potential active region are brighter than the brightest main-arch loops of the globally strongly nonpotential active region. (2) In each active region, only a few of the mainarch magnetic loops are strongly heated, and these are all rooted near the island. (3) The end of each main-arch bright loop apparently bifurcates above the island, so that it embraces the island and the magnetic null above the island. (4) At any one time, there are other main-arch magnetic loops that embrace the island in the same manner as do the bright loops but that are not selected for strong coronal heating. (5) There is continual microflaring in sheared core fields around the island, but the main-arch bright loops show little response to these microflares. From these observational and modeling results we draw the following conclusions: (1) The heating of the main-arch bright loops arises mainly from conditions at the island end of these loops and not from their global nonpotentiality. (2) There is, at most, only a loose coupling between the coronal heating in the bright loops of the main arch and the coronal heating in the sheared core fields at their feet, although in both the heating is driven by conditions/events in and around the

  2. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  3. Study of Increased Radiation When an X-ray Tube is Placed in a Strong Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z.F.; Pelc, N.J.; Nelson, W.R.; Fahrig, R.; /Stanford U., Dept. Radiol.

    2007-01-12

    When a fixed anode x-ray tube is placed in a magnetic field (B) that is parallel to the anode-cathode axis, the x-ray exposure increases with increasing B. It was hypothesized that the increase was caused by backscattered electrons which were constrained by B and reaccelerated by the electric field onto the x-ray tube target. We performed computer simulations and physical experiments to study the behavior of the backscattered electrons in a magnetic field, and their effects on the radiation output, x-ray spectrum, and off-focal radiation. A Monte Carlo program (EGS4) was used to generate the combined energy and angular distribution of the backscattered electrons. The electron trajectories were traced and their landing locations back on the anode were calculated. Radiation emission from each point was modeled with published data (IPEM Report 78), and thus the exposure rate and x-ray spectrum with the contribution of backscattered electrons could be predicted. The point spread function for a pencil beam of electrons was generated and then convolved with the density map of primary electrons incident on the anode as simulated with a finite element program (Opera-3d, Vector Fields, UK). The total spatial distribution of x-ray emission could then be calculated. Simulations showed that for an x-ray tube working at 65 kV, about 54% of the electrons incident on the target were backscattered. In a magnetic field of 0.5 T, although the exposure would be increased by 33%, only a small fraction of the backscattered electrons landed within the focal spot area. The x-ray spectrum was slightly shifted to lower energies and the half value layer (HVL) was reduced by about 6%. Measurements of the exposure rate, half value layer and focal spot distribution were acquired as functions of B. Good agreement was observed between experimental data and simulation results. The wide spatial distribution of secondary x-ray emission can degrade the MTF of the x-ray system at low spatial

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance Knight shifts in the presence of strong spin–orbit and crystal-field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisson, D. M.; Curro, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in materials with strong spin–orbit coupling (SOC). Nuclear magnetic resonance is a valuable microscopic probe of such systems because of the hyperfine interactions between the nuclear spins and the electron degrees of freedom. In materials with weak SOC the NMR Knight shift contains two contributions: one from the electron orbital susceptibility and the other from the electron spin susceptibility. These contributions can be separated by plotting the Knight shift versus the bulk susceptibility and extracting the slope and intercept. Here we examine the case where the SOC is non-negligible, in which case the slope and intercept are no longer simply related to these two contributions. These results have important implications for NMR studies of heavy fermions, as well as 4d and 5d systems.

  5. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  6. Quasi-two-dimensional spin-split Fermi-liquid behavior of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, N.; Mielke, C.H.; Rickel, D.G.; Wosnitza, J.; Qualls, J.S.; Brooks, J.S.; Balthes, E.; Schweitzer, D.; Heinen, I.; Strunz, W.

    1998-10-01

    Measurements of both the magnetization and magnetotransport of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} (BEDT-TTF is bisethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalene) in magnetic fields extending to 60 T at 0.4 K and 20 T at 35 mK are reported. Strong eddy currents observed in the magnetization are found to exhibit critical currentlike behavior. This might be connected with the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect, as proposed previously for {alpha}-phase salts. The strong two dimensionality leads to an apparent fall of the effective mass together with an overall suppression of the amplitude of the magnetic quantum oscillations at high magnetic fields or very low temperatures. These effects are more pronounced for the Shubnikov{endash}de Haas (SdH) effect but clearly visible also for the de Haas{endash}van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations. The apparent fall of the effective mass and the deviations of the dHvA signal from the behavior predicted by the standard Lifshitz-Kosevich theory can quantitatively be explained by the influence of chemical-potential oscillations on the wave form in a two-dimensional, spin-split Fermi liquid. The much stronger deviations from the conventional behavior in the transport data hint to an additional mechanism unique to the SdH effect. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Impact of nucleic acid self-alignment in a strong magnetic field on the interpretation of indirect spin-spin interactions.

    PubMed

    Vavřinská, Andrea; Zelinka, Jiří; Šebera, Jakub; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Fiala, Radovan; Boelens, Rolf; Sklenář, Vladimír; Trantírek, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear and homonuclear direct (D) and indirect (J) spin-spin interactions are important sources of structural information about nucleic acids (NAs). The Hamiltonians for the D and J interactions have the same functional form; thus, the experimentally measured apparent spin-spin coupling constant corresponds to a sum of J and D. In biomolecular NMR studies, it is commonly presumed that the dipolar contributions to Js are effectively canceled due to random molecular tumbling. However, in strong magnetic fields, such as those employed for NMR analysis, the tumbling of NA fragments is anisotropic because the inherent magnetic susceptibility of NAs causes an interaction with the external magnetic field. This motional anisotropy is responsible for non-zero D contributions to Js. Here, we calculated the field-induced D contributions to 33 structurally relevant scalar coupling constants as a function of magnetic field strength, temperature and NA fragment size. We identified two classes of Js, namely (1)JCH and (3)JHH couplings, whose quantitative interpretation is notably biased by NA motional anisotropy. For these couplings, the magnetic field-induced dipolar contributions were found to exceed the typical experimental error in J-coupling determinations by a factor of two or more and to produce considerable over- or under-estimations of the J coupling-related torsion angles, especially at magnetic field strengths >12 T and for NA fragments longer than 12 bp. We show that if the non-zero D contributions to J are not properly accounted for, they might cause structural artifacts/bias in NA studies that use solution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26685997

  8. Study of the Rb D 2-line splitting in a strong transverse magnetic field with Doppler-free spectroscopy in a nanocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Hakhumyan, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Petrov, P. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    Atomic transitions of 85Rb and 87Rb isotopes in a strong transverse magnetic field with induction of up to 7 kG have been studied experimentally. High spectral resolution is achieved owing to the application of the linear Doppler-free spectroscopy method to a nanometric thin cell with the thickness of L = λ/2 = 390 nm, where λ is the wavelength of laser emission tuned to the resonance with the Rb D 2-line (λ/2-method). It has been observed that the number of atomic transitions in the transmission spectrum of linearly polarized (π) radiation decreases from 64 down to 20 transitions as the field strength increases above B > 5 kG. Four atomic transitions (two of 85Rb and two of 87Rb), which are forbidden in the absence of magnetic field, acquire significant strength in the strong magnetic field. Experimental results are in a good agreement with theory. Several practical applications of alkali-vapor-filled nanometric thin cells have been proposed.

  9. Symmetry-breaking magnetic fields create a vortex fluid that exhibits a negative viscosity, active wetting, and strong mixing.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Solis, Kyle J

    2014-06-14

    There are many areas of science and technology where being able to generate vigorous, noncontact flow would be desirable. We have discovered that three dimensional, time-dependent electric or magnetic fields having key symmetries can be used to generate controlled fluid motion by the continuous injection of energy. Unlike natural convection, this approach does not require a thermal gradient as an energy source, nor does it require gravity, so space applications are feasible. The result is a highly active material we call a vortex fluid. The homogeneous torque density of this fluid enables it to climb walls, induce ballistic droplet motion, and mix vigorously, even in such complex geometries as porous media. This vortex fluid can also exhibit a negative viscosity, which can immeasurably extend the control range of the "smart fluids" used in electro- and magnetorheological devices and can thus significantly increase their performance. Because the applied fields are uniform and modest in strength, vortex fluids of any scale can be created, making applications of any size, from directing microdroplet motion to controlling damping in magnetorheological dampers that protect bridges and buildings from earthquakes, feasible. PMID:24733404

  10. Progress on The GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong) Theory of Field Unification and Its Application to Space Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2008-01-21

    Progress on the GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong), theory is presented as well as its application to space problems. The GEMS theory is now validated through the Standard Model of physics. Derivation of the value of the Gravitation constant based on the observed variation of {alpha} with energy: results in the formula G congruent with ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c/M{sub {eta}}{sub c}{sup 2} exp(-1/(1.61{alpha})), where {alpha} is the fine structure constant,({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), is Planck's constant, c, is the speed of light, and M{sub {eta}}{sub c} is the mass of the {eta}{sub cc} Charmonium meson that is shown to be identical to that derived from the GEM postulates. Covariant formulation of the GEM theory is now possible through definition of the spacetime metric tensor as a portion of the EM stress tensor normalized by its own trace: g{sub ab} = 4(F{sup c}{sub a}F{sub cb})/(F{sup ab}F{sub ab}), it is found that this results in a massless ground state vacuum and a Newtonian gravitation potential {phi} = 1/2 E{sup 2}/B{sup 2}. It is also found that a Lorentz or flat-space metric is recovered in the limit of a full spectrum ZPF.

  11. Electrophoresis in strong electric fields.

    PubMed

    Barany, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of non-linear electrophoresis (ef) that can be detected in strong electric fields (several hundred V/cm) are considered. The first ("classical" non-linear ef) is due to the interaction of the outer field with field-induced ionic charges in the electric double layer (EDL) under conditions, when field-induced variations of electrolyte concentration remain to be small comparatively to its equilibrium value. According to the Shilov theory, the non-linear component of the electrophoretic velocity for dielectric particles is proportional to the cubic power of the applied field strength (cubic electrophoresis) and to the second power of the particles radius; it is independent of the zeta-potential but is determined by the surface conductivity of particles. The second one, the so-called "superfast electrophoresis" is connected with the interaction of a strong outer field with a secondary diffuse layer of counterions (space charge) that is induced outside the primary (classical) diffuse EDL by the external field itself because of concentration polarization. The Dukhin-Mishchuk theory of "superfast electrophoresis" predicts quadratic dependence of the electrophoretic velocity of unipolar (ionically or electronically) conducting particles on the external field gradient and linear dependence on the particle's size in strong electric fields. These are in sharp contrast to the laws of classical electrophoresis (no dependence of V(ef) on the particle's size and linear dependence on the electric field gradient). A new method to measure the ef velocity of particles in strong electric fields is developed that is based on separation of the effects of sedimentation and electrophoresis using videoimaging and a new flowcell and use of short electric pulses. To test the "classical" non-linear electrophoresis, we have measured the ef velocity of non-conducting polystyrene, aluminium-oxide and (semiconductor) graphite particles as well as Saccharomice cerevisiae yeast cells as a

  12. Electrodeposited thin FeCo films with highly thermal stable properties in high frequency range obtained by annealing in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, B. Y.; Phuoc, N. N.; Wu, Y. P.; Ho, P.; Yang, Y.; Li, Z. W.

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of thin ferromagnetic films with thermally stable properties in the high frequency gigahertz range is crucial for applications in different advanced devices. However, it is a challenge to attain such films as the mechanism and correlation between the crystallographic structure and dynamic magnetic properties remain unclear. Herein, through an appropriate annealing process involving a temperature of 510-580 K and an applied strong magnetic field of 10 kOe along the easy-axis of electrodeposited FeCo films, magnetic properties of the films (300-450 nm) in the gigahertz range are significantly improved. Typically, the magnetic soft nanofilms display highly stable dynamic microwave properties from room temperature to 420 K, even in the presence of a high frequency of ˜1.5 GHz and a large magnetic permeability of ˜460 (the maximum value in real part). The origin of the high thermal stability is attributed to the recrystallized uniformity in crystalline orientations and larger particle sizes after the annealing, which leads to slightly increased anisotropy, stress, Curie temperature, and difference in the magnetic coercivity between the easy and hard axes for the crystalline films, thus giving rise to the steady static magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic moment of 2.02-2.05 T) against environmental temperature fluctuation. This is in contrast to conventional as-prepared thin films without annealing or annealed in a transverse applied field. This method can be applied to other ferromagnetic films to improve their thermal stability for the utilization in various high frequency devices.

  13. Estimation of changes in fitness components and antioxidant defense of Drosophila subobscura (Insecta, Diptera) after exposure to 2.4 T strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Dajana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Mirčić, Dejan; Ristić-Djurović, Jasna; Prolić, Zlatko; Petković, Branka; Savić, Tatjana

    2015-04-01

    As an ecological factor, a magnetic field can affect insects causing a wide range of responses. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the fitness components (postembryonic development and viability of individuals) and the antioxidant defense (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and total glutathione) in laboratory strains of Drosophila subobscura, originating from oak and beech forests after exposure to the strong static magnet (2.4 T, VINCY Cyclotron magnet). The first instar larvae were placed near the north pole (N group) or the south pole (S group) of the magnet for 2 h. Oak and beech populations of D. subobscura had longer development time and lower viability in N and S groups compared to controls. These differences were significant only in S group of oak population and in N group of beech population. Total glutathione content was significantly decreased in both exposed groups of oak population, while catalase activity was significantly increased in both exposed groups of beech population. Being significantly decreased in both exposed groups of oak population and significantly increased in S group of beech population in comparison to controls, superoxide dismutase activity was observed in different values. According to the results, it can be stated that applied static magnetic field could be considered a potential stressor influencing the fitness components and antioxidant defense in Drosophila flies. PMID:25475617

  14. Dynamics of exciton recombination in strong magnetic fields in ultrathin GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with indirect band gap and type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamirzaev, T. S.; Debus, J.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Bayer, M.

    2016-07-01

    The exciton recombination dynamics is studied experimentally and theoretically in two-monolayer-thick GaAs/AlAs quantum wells characterized by an indirect band gap and a type-II band alignment. At cryogenic temperatures, the lifetimes of the excitons that are indirect both in real and k space are in the millisecond range. The exciton recombination time and the photoluminescence (PL) intensity are strongly dependent on strength and orientation of an applied magnetic field. In contrast to the very weak influence of an in-plane field, at 2 K temperature a field applied parallel to the growth axis drastically slows down the recombination and reduces the PL intensity. With increasing temperature the magnetic field effects on PL intensity and decay time are vanishing. The experimental data are well described by a model for the exciton dynamics that takes into account the magnetic-field-induced redistribution of the indirect excitons between their bright and dark states. It allows us to evaluate the lower bound of the heavy-hole longitudinal g factor of 2.5, the radiative recombination time for the bright excitons of 0.34 ms, and the nonradiative recombination time of the bright and dark excitons of 8.5 ms.

  15. On the theory of phase transitions in dense neutron matter with generalized Skyrme interactions and anisotropic spin-triplet p-wave pairing in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of the generalized non-relativistic Fermi-liquid approach we study phase transitions in spatially uniform dense pure neutron matter from normal to superfluid states with a spin-triplet p-wave pairing (similar to anisotropic superfluid phases 3He-A1 and 3He-A2) in a steady and homogeneous strong magnetic field H (but |\\mu_{\\text{n}}| H\\ll E_{\\text{c}}<\\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) , where \\mu_{\\text{n}} is the magnetic dipole moment of a neutron, E_{\\text{c}} is the cutoff energy and \\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) is the Fermi energy in neutron matter with density of particles n). The previously derived general formulas (valid for the arbitrary parametrization of the effective Skyrme interaction in neutron matter) for phase transition (PT) temperatures T_{\\text{c}1,2}(n,H) (which are nonlinear functions of the density n and linear functions of the magnetic field H) are specified here for new generalized BSk20 and BSk21 parameterizations of the Skyrme forces (with additional terms dependent on the density n) in the interval 0.1\\cdot n_{0} < n<3.0\\cdot n_{0} , where n_{0}=0.17\\ \\text{fm}^{-3} is the nuclear density. Our main results are mathematical expressions and figures for PT temperatures in the absence of magnetic field, T_{\\text{c0,BSk20}}(n)< 0.17\\ \\text{MeV} and T_{\\text{c0,BSk21}}(n)< 0.064\\ \\text{MeV} (at E_{\\text{c}}=10\\ \\text{MeV} ), and T_{\\text{c1,2}}(n,H) in strong magnetic fields (which may approach to 10^{17}\\ \\text{G} or even more as in the liquid outer core of magnetars —strongly magnetized neutron stars). These are realistic non-monotone functions with a bell-shaped density profile.

  16. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:23919764

  17. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  18. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  19. MAVEN observations of magnetic flux ropes with a strong field amplitude in the Martian magnetosheath during the ICME passage on 8 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takuya; Luhmann, Janet G.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Espley, Jared R.; Seki, Kanako; Brain, David A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; McFadden, James P.; Mitchell, David L.; Mazelle, Christian; Harada, Yuki; Livi, Roberto; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Connerney, John E. P.; Andersson, Lailla; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-05-01

    We present initial results of strong field amplitude flux ropes observed by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission around Mars during the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) passage on 8 March 2015. The observed durations were shorter than 5 s and the magnetic field magnitudes peaked above 80 nT, which is a few times stronger than those usually seen in the magnetosheath barrier. These are the first unique observations that MAVEN detected such flux ropes with a strong field at high altitudes (>5000 km). Across these structures, MAVEN coincidentally measured planetary heavy ions with energies higher than a few keV. The spatial properties inferred from the Grad-Shafranov equation suggest that the speed of the structure can be estimated at least an order of magnitude faster than those previously reported quiet-time counterparts. Hence, the space weather event like the ICME passage can be responsible for generating the observed strong field, fast-traveling flux ropes.

  20. Fractional effective action at strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Hagen; Strobel, Eckhard; Xue, She-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    In 1936, Weisskopf [K. Dan. Vidensk. Selsk. Mat. Fys. Medd. XIV (1936)] showed that for vanishing electric or magnetic fields the strong-field behavior of the one-loop Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian of quantum electro dynamics (QED) is logarithmic. Here we generalize this result for different limits of the Lorentz invariants E→2-B→2 and B→·E→. The logarithmic dependence can be interpreted as a lowest-order manifestation of an anomalous power behavior of the effective Lagrangian of QED, with critical exponents δ=e2/(12π) for spinor QED, and δS=δ/4 for scalar QED.

  1. Magnetic Field, Density Current, and Lorentz Force Full Vector Maps of the NOAA 10808 Double Sunspot: Evidence of Strong Horizontal Current Flows in the Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Schmieder, B.; Gelly, B.

    2011-04-01

    The context is that of the so-called “fundamental ambiguity” (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the “simulated annealing” algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I λ 6301.5 and Fe I λ 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the δ-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line Fe I λ 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I λ 6302.5).

  2. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  3. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  4. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  5. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  6. Tuning magnetoresistance and magnetic-field-dependent electroluminescence through mixing a strong-spin-orbital-coupling molecule and a weak-spin-orbital-coupling polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Xu, Zhihua; Hu, Bin; Howe, Jane Y

    2007-01-01

    We report a tunable magnetoresistance by uniformly mixing strong-spin-orbital-coupling molecule fac-tris (2-phenylpyridinato) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] and weak-spin-orbital-coupling polymer poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK). Three possible mechanisms, namely charge transport distribution, energy transfer, and intermolecular spin-orbital interaction, are discussed to interpret the Ir(ppy)3 concentration-dependent magnetoresistance in the PVK+Ir(ppy)3 composite. The comparison between the magnetic field effects measured from energy-transfer and non-energy-transfer Ir(ppy)3 doped polymer composites indicates that energy transfer and intermolecular spin-orbital interaction lead to rough and fine tuning for the magnetoresistance, respectively. Furthermore, the photocurrent dependence of magnetic field implies that the excited states contribute to the magnetoresistance through dissociation. As a result, the modification of singlet or triplet ratio of excited states through energy transfer and intermolecular spin-orbital interaction form a mechanism to tune the magnetoresistance in organic semiconducting materials.

  7. NGC 1624-2: a slowly rotating, X-ray luminous Of?cp star with an extraordinarily strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Martins, F.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J.; Walborn, N. R.; Barbá, R. H.; Gagné, M.; García-Melendo, E.; Jose, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Nazé, Y.; Neiner, C.; Pellerin, A.; Penadés Ordaz, M.; Shultz, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Sota, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a first observational investigation of the faint Of?p star NGC 1624-2, yielding important new constraints on its spectral and physical characteristics, rotation, magnetic field strength, X-ray emission and magnetospheric properties. Modelling the spectrum and spectral energy distribution, we conclude that NGC 1624-2 is a main-sequence star of mass M ≃ 30 M⊙, and infer an effective temperature of 35 ± 2 kK and log g = 4.0 ± 0.2. Based on an extensive time series of optical spectral observations we report significant variability of a large number of spectral lines, and infer a unique period of 157.99 ± 0.94 d which we interpret as the rotational period of the star. We report the detection of a very strong (5.35 ± 0.5 kG) longitudinal magnetic field , coupled with probable Zeeman splitting of the Stokes I profiles of metal lines confirming a surface field modulus of 14 ± 1 kG, consistent with a surface dipole of polar strength ≳20 kG. This is the largest magnetic field ever detected in an O-type star, and the first report of Zeeman splitting of Stokes I profiles in such an object. We also report the detection of reversed Stokes V profiles associated with weak, high-excitation emission lines of O III, which we propose may form in the close magnetosphere of the star. We analyse archival Chandra ACIS-I X-ray data, inferring a very hard spectrum with an X-ray efficiency of log Lx/Lbol = -6.4, a factor of 4 larger than the canonical value for O-type stars and comparable to that of the young magnetic O-type star θ1 Ori C and other Of?p stars. Finally, we examine the probable magnetospheric properties of the star, reporting in particular very strong magnetic confinement of the stellar wind, with η* ≃ 1.5 × 104, and a very large Alfvén radius, RAlf = 11.4 R*. Based on spectropolarimetric observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National

  8. Caution: Strong Gravitational Field Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reif, Marc

    2014-01-01

    I came up with a new way to introduce the concept of a constant gravitational field near the surface of the Earth. I made "g-field detectors" (see Fig. 1 ) and suspended them by strings from the ceiling in a regular spacing. The detectors are cardstock arrows with a hole punched out of them and the letter "g" in the center.

  9. Mars nightside electrons over strong crustal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, Alexander D.; Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael W.; Mitchell, David L.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated 7 years worth of data from the electron reflectometer and magnetometer aboard Mars Global Surveyor to quantify the deposition of photoelectron and solar wind electron populations on the nightside of Mars, over the strong crustal field region located in the southern hemisphere. Just under 600,000 observations, each including energy and pitch angle distributions, were examined. For solar zenith angles (SZA) less than 110°, photoelectrons have the highest occurrence rate; beyond that, plasma voids occur most often. In addition, for SZA >110°, energy deposition of electrons mainly occurs on vertical field lines with median pitch angle averaged energy flux values on the order of 107-108 eV cm-2 s-1. The fraction of downward flux that is deposited at a given location was typically low (16% or smaller), implying that the majority of precipitated electrons are magnetically reflected or scattered back out. The average energy of the deposited electrons is found to be 20-30 eV, comparable to typical energies of photoelectrons and unaccelerated solar wind electrons. Median electron flux values, from near-vertical magnetic field lines past solar zenith angle of 110°, calculated in this study produced a total electron content of 4.2 × 1014 m-2 and a corresponding peak density of 4.2 × 103 cm-3.

  10. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  11. Fast ignition realization experiment with high-contrast kilo-joule peta-watt LFEX laser and strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Kojima, Sadaoki; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sawada, Hiroshi; Lee, Seung Ho; Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Morace, Alessio; Vaisseau, Xavier; Sakata, Shohei; Abe, Yuki; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Zhang, Zhe; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Kotaro; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Bellei, Claudio; Santos, João Jorge; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    plasma. Following the above improvements, conversion of 13% of the LFEX laser energy to a low energy portion of the REB, whose slope temperature is 0.7 MeV, which is close to the ponderomotive scaling value, was achieved. To meet the second requirement, the compression of a solid spherical ball with a diameter of 200-μm to form a dense core with an areal density of ˜0.07 g/cm2 was induced by a laser-driven spherically converging shock wave. Converging shock compression is more hydrodynamically stable compared to shell implosion, while a hot spot cannot be generated with a solid ball target. Solid ball compression is preferable also for compressing an external magnetic field to collimate the REB to the fuel core, due to the relatively small magnetic Reynolds number of the shock compressed region. To meet the third requirement, we have generated a strong kilo-tesla magnetic field using a laser-driven capacitor-coil target. The strength and time history of the magnetic field were characterized with proton deflectometry and a B-dot probe. Guidance of the REB using a 0.6-kT field in a planar geometry has been demonstrated at the LULI 2000 laser facility. In a realistic FI scenario, a magnetic mirror is formed between the REB generation point and the fuel core. The effects of the strong magnetic field on not only REB transport but also plasma compression were studied using numerical simulations. According to the transport calculations, the heating efficiency can be improved from 0.4% to 4% by the GEKKO and LFEX laser system by meeting the three requirements described above. This efficiency is scalable to 10% of the heating efficiency by increasing the areal density of the fuel core.

  12. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  13. How strong is localization in the integer quantum Hall effect: Relevant quantum corrections to conductivity in non-zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnov, A. A.; Kolesnikova, E. N.; Utesov, O. I.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2010-02-01

    The divergent at ω=0 quantum correction to conductivity δσ2(ω) of the leading order in (kFl)-1 has been calculated neglecting Cooperon-type contributions suppressed by moderate or strong magnetic field. In the so-called diffusion approximation this quantity is equal to zero up to the second order in (kFl)-1. More subtle treatment of the problem shows that δσ2(ω) is non-zero due to ballistic contributions neglected previously. Knowledge of δσ2(ω) allows to estimate value of the so-called unitary localization length as ξu≈lexp(1.6g2) where Drude conductivity is given by σ0=ge2/h. This estimation underpins the statement of the linear growth of σxx peaks with Landau level number n in the integer quantum Hall effect regime [1] (Greshnov and Zegrya, 2008; Greshnov et al., 2008) at least for n≤2 and calls Pruisken-Khmelnitskii hypothesis of universality [2] (Levine et al., 1983; Khmelnitskii, 1983) in question.

  14. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  15. Fast Ignition Realization Experiment with High-Contrast Kilo-Joule Peta-Watt Laser ``LFEX'' and Strong External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We report on progresses of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project that has been curried out at the Institute of Laser Engineering to assess the feasibility of high density core heating with a high-power, short-pulse laser including the construction of the Kilo-Joule, Petawatt class LFEX laser system. Our recent studies identify three scientific challenges to achieve high heating efficiency in the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser systems: (i) control of energy distribution of relativistic electron beam (REB), (ii) guiding and focusing of REB to a fuel core, and (iii) formation of a high areal-density core. The control of the electron energy distribution has been experimentally confirmed by improving the intensity contrast of the LFEX laser up to >109 and an ultra-high contrast of 1011 with a plasma mirror. After the contrast improvement, 50% of the total REB energy is carried by a low energy component of the REB, which slope temperature is close to the ponderomotive scaling value (~ 1 MeV). To guide the electron beam, we apply strong external magnetic field to the REB transport region. Guiding of the REB by 0.6 kT field in a planar geometry has already been demonstrated at LULI 2000 laser facility in a collaborative experiment lead by CELIA-Univ. Bordeaux. Considering more realistic FI scenario, we have performed a similar experiment using the Kilo-Joule LFEX laser to study the effect of guiding and magnetic mirror on the electron beam. A high density core of a laser-imploded 200 μm-diameter solid CD ball was radiographed with picosecond LFEX-produced K-alpha backlighter. Comparisons of the experimental results and integrated simulations using hydrodynamic and electron transport codes suggest that 10% of the efficiency can be achievable with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser system with the success of the above challenges. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR

  16. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  17. Laser propagation and soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, W.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation characteristics of various laser modes with different polarization, as well as the soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas are studied numerically through one-dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and analytically by solving the laser wave equation. PIC simulations show that the laser heating efficiency substantially depends on the magnetic field strength, the propagation modes of the laser pulse and their intensities. Generally, large amplitude laser can efficiently heat the plasma with strong magnetic field. Theoretical analyses on the linear propagation of the laser pulse in both under-dense and over-dense magnetized plasmas are well confirmed by the numerical observations. Most interestingly, it is found that a standing or moving soliton with frequency lower than the laser frequency is generated in certain magnetic field strength and laser intensity range, which can greatly enhance the laser heating efficiency. The range of magnetic field strength for the right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) soliton formation with high and low frequencies is identified by solving the soliton equations including the contribution of ion's motion and the finite temperature effects under the quasi-neutral approximation. In the limit of immobile ions, the RCP soliton tends to be peaked and stronger as the magnetic field increases, while the enhanced soliton becomes broader as the temperature increases. These findings in 1D model are well validated by 2D simulations.

  18. Mass-radius relation of strongly magnetized white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    We study the strongly magnetized white dwarf configurations in a self-consistent manner as a progenitor of the over-luminous type-Ia supernovae. We compute static equilibria of white dwarf stars containing a strong magnetic field and present the modification of white dwarf mass-radius relation caused by the magnetic field. From a static equilibrium study, we find that a maximum white dwarf mass of about 1.9 M_{⊙} may be supported if the interior poloidal field is as strong as approximately 10^{10} T. On the other hand, if the field is purely toroidal the maximum mass can be more than 5 M_⊙. All these modifications are mainly from the presence of Lorenz force. The effects of i) modification of equation of state due to Landau quantization ii) electrostatic interaction due to ions, ii) general relativistic calculation on the stellar structure and, iii) field geometry are also considered. These strongly magnetised configurations are sensitive to magnetic instabilities where the perturbations grow at the corresponding Alfven time scales.

  19. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  20. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  1. Electron-positron pair equilibrium in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.K.

    1984-11-01

    Steady states of thermal electron-positron pair plasmas at mildly relativistic temperatures and in strong magnetic fields are investigated. The pair density in steady-state equilibrium, where pair production balances annihilation, is found as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength and source size, by a numerical calculation which includes pair production attenuation and Compton scattering of the photons. It is found that there is a maximum pair density for each value of temperature and field strength, and also a source size above which optically thin equilibrium states do not exist. (ESA)

  2. CLASSSTRONG: Classical simulations of strong field processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Like in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA was proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems interact with strong and short laser pulses and temporal synthesized fields are routinely generated in attosecond laboratories around the world. Temporal and spatial synthesized fields have received special attention nowadays because they would allow to exceed considerably the conventional harmonic and electron energy frontiers. Classical simulations are an invaluable tool to explore exhaustively the parameters domain at a cheap computational cost, before massive quantum mechanical calculations, absolutely indispensable for the detailed analysis, are performed.

  3. Comparing supernova remnants around strongly magnetized and canonical pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Papitto, A.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the strong magnetic fields measured in magnetars is one of the main uncertainties in the neutron star field. On the other hand, the recent discovery of a large number of such strongly magnetized neutron stars is calling for more investigation on their formation. The first proposed model for the formation of such strong magnetic fields in magnetars was through alpha-dynamo effects on the rapidly rotating core of a massive star. Other scenarios involve highly magnetic massive progenitors that conserve their strong magnetic moment into the core after the explosion, or a common envelope phase of a massive binary system. In this work, we do a complete re-analysis of the archival X-ray emission of the supernova remnants (SNRs) surrounding magnetars, and compare our results with all other bright X-ray emitting SNRs, which are associated with compact central objects (which are proposed to have magnetar-like B-fields buried in the crust by strong accretion soon after their formation), high-B pulsars and normal pulsars. We find that emission lines in SNRs hosting highly magnetic neutron stars do not differ significantly in elements or ionization state from those observed in other SNRs, neither averaging on the whole remnants, nor studying different parts of their total spatial extent. Furthermore, we find no significant evidence that the total X-ray luminosities of SNRs hosting magnetars, are on average larger than that of typical young X-ray SNRs. Although biased by a small number of objects, we found that for a similar age, there is the same percentage of magnetars showing a detectable SNR than for the normal pulsar population.

  4. Neutrino emissivity from e sup minus synchrotron and e sup minus e+ annihilation processes in a strong magnetic field: General formalism and nonrelativistic limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, A.D.; Levenfish, K.P.; Yakovlev, D.G. ); Amsterdamski, P.; Haensel, P. )

    1992-10-15

    A general formalism is developed for calculating the neutrino emissivities of synchrotron and {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital e+} annihilation radiations in a plasma in the presence of a large magnetic field {ital B}{similar to}10{sup 12}--10{sup 14} G. As a first step, the formalism is used to calculate the synchrotron and annihilation radiations from a nonrelativistic electron plasma (density {rho}{approx lt}10{sup 6} g cm{sup {minus}3}, temperature {ital T}{approx lt}6{times}10{sup 9} K) including the cases of nondegenerate and degenerate electrons, and of quantizing and nonquantizing magnetic fields. We conclude that these processes can be important for neutrino production in a hot plasma of neutron star envelopes.

  5. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  6. A search for cataclysmic binaries containing strongly magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, H. E.; Chanmugam, G.

    1982-01-01

    The AM Herculis type binaries which contain accreting white dwarfs with surface magnetic fields of a few times 10 to the seventh power gauss were studied. If white dwarfs in cataclysmic binaries have a range of field strengths similar to that among single white dwarfs. AM Her like systems should exist with fields as high as 3 x 10 to the eighth power gauss. It is suggested that such objects will not have the strong optical polarization of the AM Her variables; however, they exhibit high harmonic cyclotron emission, making them spectacular UV sources. We made IUE observations of seven candidate cataclysmic variables selected for optical similarity to AM Her binaries. Although all seven objects were detected in the UV, none display unusually strong UV continua. It is suggested that the distribution of magnetic field strengths among single white dwarfs may be different from that among binaries.

  7. Sensitivity degradation of an anger camera operated in SPECT-like mode under the influence of a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiano, Eduardo; Aldarwish, Huda

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally determine the degradation in sensitivity of an Anger camera rotated in SPECT-like orbits around the transverse and sagittal planes of the magnetic field produced by a conventional, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet. A 74 photomultiplier Siemens Basicam Anger camera with a 29 cm radius crystal and an Isotrak 35 cm diameter, 46 MBq (1.25 mCi), Co-57 disk source attached to a low energy general purpose collimator, were used for all measurements. A custom made, air-cooled, dual coil, 1 T electromagnet was used to produce the external magnetic field. A map of the magnetic field was obtained by taking intensity measurements around the sagittal and transverse planes of the magnet. Camera sensitivity - defined as the measured count rate for a given activity of a radionuclide in a defined geometry - was first measured around the transverse plane at angles of 0°, 90°, and 270°, with, and without, the magnetic field present. At each angle, three 30 min measurements were made and the average count rate was calculated. A similar protocol was used for measurements upon rotation in the sagittal plane: counts per 30 min interval were measured for 20 angles, with a 15° increment between measurements. Camera sensitivity as a function of field strength was also determined by collecting counts over 30 min intervals at a fixed angle (90°) with magnet currents of 0.00 A, 2.65 A, and 5.30 A. In the transverse plane, at 0° under a field intensity of 21 mT, the loss in sensitivity was 18.14%, at 90° (B=37 mT) the loss was 30.5%, and at 270° (B=38 mT) the loss was 34.9%. Thus for rotation in the transverse plane, the sensitivity is monotonically reduced with an increase in field intensity. On rotation in the sagittal plane, sensitivity degradation ranged between 50.3% at a 22° angle, and 59.1% at 315°. Broad sensitivity peaks were observed at 105° and 195°, with minima at 60°, 135°, and 260°, consistent with our theoretical

  8. Trapping and evolution dynamics of strongly magnetized cold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon

    Cold Rydberg atoms and ultracold plasmas have been studied in the strong-magnetization regime. In this new territory, novel atomic and plasma states---such as guiding-center drift Rydberg attains and strongly magnetized, quasi-neutral, ultracold plasmas---have been created and investigated. The evolution dynamics studies of these exotic diamagnetic forms of matter, made possible by implementing a superconducting magnetic atom trap, revealed rich dynamical features in the systems: The Landau-quantized energy structure has led to entirely different evolutions of the highly excited atoms in laser-excited or drift Rydberg states than in magnetic-field-free cases; and the presence of the strong magnetic field has drastically altered the collisional behavior and expansion dynamics of the plasmas. Furthermore, atom cooling and trapping methodology has been extended in multiple directions. Firstly, laser cooling and magnetic trapping of ground-state atoms has been demonstrated in magnetic; fields exceeding 3 Tesla, representing a 20-fold increase in the field-strength of cold-atom traps. Secondly, the trapping of Rydberg atoms with a lifetime of 80 ms has been achieved. This trapping technique exploits the quasi-free nature of Rydberg electrons, which can be adopted in other forms of Rydberg-atom trapping. Lastly; the trapping of two-component, ultracold plasmas has been demonstrated in a nested Penning-trap configuration. The confinement of quasi-neutral ultracold plasmas allowed us to observe novel effects such as the correlation between the ionic oscillation and the electron energy distribution.

  9. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  10. Vacuum birefringence in strong inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Gies, Holger; Reuter, Maria; Zepf, Matt

    2015-10-01

    Birefringence is one of the fascinating properties of the vacuum of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong electromagnetic fields. The scattering of linearly polarized incident probe photons into a perpendicularly polarized mode provides a distinct signature of the optical activity of the quantum vacuum and thus offers an excellent opportunity for a precision test of nonlinear QED. Precision tests require accurate predictions and thus a theoretical framework that is capable of taking the detailed experimental geometry into account. We derive analytical solutions for vacuum birefringence which include the spatio-temporal field structure of a strong optical pump laser field and an x-ray probe. We show that the angular distribution of the scattered photons depends strongly on the interaction geometry and find that scattering of the perpendicularly polarized scattered photons out of the cone of the incident probe x-ray beam is the key to making the phenomenon experimentally accessible with the current generation of FEL/high-field laser facilities.

  11. Intermittency in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Imazio, P.; Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.

    2013-05-15

    We present a detailed study of intermittency in the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations of compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. To solve the equations numerically, a reduced model valid when a strong guide field is present is used. Different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. The resulting data are analyzed computing field increments in several directions perpendicular to the guide field, and building structure functions and probability density functions. In the magnetohydrodynamic limit, we recover the usual results with the magnetic field being more intermittent than the velocity field. In the presence of the Hall effect, field fluctuations at scales smaller than the ion skin depth show a substantial decrease in the level of intermittency, with close to monofractal scaling.

  12. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum -Kyu; Kim, Ju -Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-18

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drivemore » this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Lastly, our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.« less

  13. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics. PMID:26888147

  14. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I; Kim, D

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics. PMID:26888147

  15. Semimetallization of dielectrics in strong optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ojoon; Paasch-Colberg, Tim; Apalkov, Vadym; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Jin; Stockman, Mark I.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-01

    At the heart of ever growing demands for faster signal processing is ultrafast charge transport and control by electromagnetic fields in semiconductors. Intense optical fields have opened fascinating avenues for new phenomena and applications in solids. Because the period of optical fields is on the order of a femtosecond, the current switching and its control by an optical field may pave a way to petahertz optoelectronic devices. Lately, a reversible semimetallization in fused silica on a femtosecond time scale by using a few-cycle strong field (~1 V/Å) is manifested. The strong Wannier-Stark localization and Zener-type tunneling were expected to drive this ultrafast semimetallization. Wider spread of this technology demands better understanding of whether the strong field behavior is universally similar for different dielectrics. Here we employ a carrier-envelope-phase stabilized, few-cycle strong optical field to drive the semimetallization in sapphire, calcium fluoride and quartz and to compare this phenomenon and show its remarkable similarity between them. The similarity in response of these materials, despite the distinguishable differences in their physical properties, suggests the universality of the physical picture explained by the localization of Wannier-Stark states. Our results may blaze a trail to PHz-rate optoelectronics.

  16. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  17. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  18. [The lack of the effect of a strong constant magnetic field on isolated membrane preparations of Na,K-dependent ATPase].

    PubMed

    Savich, M L; Nazarova, N M; Raĭkhman, L M; Kuznetsov, A N

    1985-01-01

    Effect of constant magnetic field (CMF) with induction 10 T on membrane preparations of Na,K-dependent ATPase of bovine brain (lipoproteid vesicules with 300-500 A diameter) were studied. No CMF effect on the activity of Na,K-dependent ATPase was observed under different experimental conditions (three temperature points 15, 20 and 37 degrees C and great variation of Na+,K+ concentrations ratio). CMF also produced no effect on the preparations of Na,K-dependent ATPase immobilized by adsorption on millipore filters. PMID:2983778

  19. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  20. Survival of atoms in strong microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Alexandr; Gallagher, Thomas F.

    2014-05-01

    Recent experimental work on the ionization of atoms by intense laser and microwave fields has shown that bound atoms in highly excited states remain after the intense radiation pulse, even though the orbital period of the detected atoms exceeds the duration of the laser or microwave pulse. In both cases the fields are orders of magnitude larger than required for static field ionization of the highly excited atoms. Here we report a large population (10-25%) left bound in the states with n >350, when atoms are exposed to strong 16.9-GHz microwave fields in the presence of a well-controlled static field of 6 mV/cm. A production of such extremely high lying states is observed for a wide range of initial Rydberg states, as low as n = 21, for Li and Na, and is, in fact, a general feature of microwave ionization. As well as the survival of the highly excited states in quasi stable orbits, threshold ionization fields also appear to depend strongly on the static field during the experiment. We observe the 1/3n5 dependence only if the static fields are non-zero, and larger fields are required to ionize 50% of atoms if the static field is canceled out.

  1. Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

  2. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  3. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  4. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  5. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  6. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  7. Strong field laser control of photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Solá, Ignacio R; González-Vázquez, Jesús; de Nalda, Rebeca; Bañares, Luis

    2015-05-28

    Strong ultrashort laser pulses have opened new avenues for the manipulation of photochemical processes like photoisomerization or photodissociation. The presence of light intense enough to reshape the potential energy surfaces may steer the dynamics of both electrons and nuclei in new directions. A controlled laser pulse, precisely defined in terms of spectrum, time and intensity, is the essential tool in this type of approach to control chemical dynamics at a microscopic level. In this Perspective we examine the current strategies developed to achieve control of chemical processes with strong laser fields, as well as recent experimental advances that demonstrate that properties like the molecular absorption spectrum, the state lifetimes, the quantum yields and the velocity distributions in photodissociation processes can be controlled by the introduction of carefully designed strong laser fields. PMID:25835746

  8. Frustrated magnets in high magnetic fields-selected examples.

    PubMed

    Wosnitza, J; Zvyagin, S A; Zherlitsyn, S

    2016-07-01

    An indispensable parameter to study strongly correlated electron systems is the magnetic field. Application of high magnetic fields allows the investigation, modification and control of different states of matter. Specifically for magnetic materials experimental tools applied in such fields are essential for understanding their fundamental properties. Here, we focus on selected high-field studies of frustrated magnetic materials that have been shown to host a broad range of fascinating new and exotic phases. We will give brief insights into the influence of geometrical frustration on the critical behavior of triangular-lattice antiferromagnets, the accurate determination of exchange constants in the high-field saturated state by use of electron spin resonance measurements, and the coupling of magnetic degrees of freedom to the lattice evidenced by ultrasound experiments. The latter technique as well allowed new, partially metastable phases in strong magnetic fields to be revealed. PMID:27310818

  9. Propagation of intense laser pulses in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. H. Ge, Z. Y.; Xu, B. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Xu, H.; Yu, M. Y.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Propagation of intense circularly polarized laser pulses in strongly magnetized inhomogeneous plasmas is investigated. It is shown that a left-hand circularly polarized laser pulse propagating up the density gradient of the plasma along the magnetic field is reflected at the left-cutoff density. However, a right-hand circularly polarized laser can penetrate up the density gradient deep into the plasma without cutoff or resonance and turbulently heat the electrons trapped in its wake. Results from particle-in-cell simulations are in good agreement with that from the theory.

  10. Comparative studies of microwave absorption in the singlet paramagnets HoVO{sub 4} and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} in strong pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Snegirev, V. V.; Goaran, M.; Kozeeva, L. P.; Kameneva, M. Yu.

    2008-03-15

    Microwave absorption in the tetragonal singlet paramagnets HoVO{sub 4} (zircon structure) and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (x {approx} 6, layered perovskite structure) is studied and compared in pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T at low temperatures. These paramagnets are characterized by a singlet-doublet scheme of the low-lying levels of the Ho{sup 3+} ion in a crystal field. In a magnetic field directed along the tetragonal axis, HoVO{sub 4} exhibits resonance absorption lines at wavelengths of 871, 406, and 305 {mu}m, which correspond to electron transitions between the low-lying levels of the Ho{sup 3+} ion in the crystal field. The positions and intensities of these absorption lines in HoVO{sub 4} are well described in terms of the crystal-field formalism with the well-known interaction parameters. The absorption spectra of HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} at a wavelength of 871 {mu}m exhibit broad resonance absorption lines against the background of strong nonresonance absorption. The effects of low-symmetry (orthorhombic, monoclinic) crystal-field components, the deviation of a magnetic field from a symmetry axis, and various pair interactions on the absorption spectra of the HoVO{sub 4} and HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} crystals are discussed.

  11. Magnetizing technique for permanent magnets by intense static fields generated by HTS bulk magnets: Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N. Kawasaki; Oka, T.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Terasawa, T.; Itoh, Y.

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned in the strong magnetic field space just above the magnetic pole containing a HTS bulk magnet which generates the magnetic field 3.4 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. The finite element method was carried out for the static field magnetization of a permanent magnet using a HTS bulk magnet. Previously, our research group experimentally demonstrated the possibility of full magnetization of rare earth permanent magnets with high-performance magnetic properties with use of the static field of HTS bulk magnets. In the present study, however, we succeeded for the first time in visualizing the behavior of the magnetizing field of the bulk magnet during the magnetization process and the shape of the magnetic field inside the body being magnetized. By applying this kind of numerical analysis to the magnetization for planned motor rotors which incorporate rare-earth permanent magnets, we hope to study the fully magnetized regions for the new magnetizing method using bulk magnets and to give motor designing a high degree of freedom.

  12. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  13. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  14. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  15. Scaled Strong Field Interactions at Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistrunk, Emily Frances

    The strong field regime describes interactions between light and matter where the electric field of the laser is a significant fraction of the binding field of the atom. Short pulsed lasers are capable of producing local fields on the order of the atomic unit of electric field. Under the influence of such strong fields, the ionization regime and electron dynamics are highly dependent on the wavelength used to drive the interaction. Few studies have been performed in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range. Using MIR wavelengths, the ponderomotive energy, Up, imposed on the electrons can be a factor of 20 greater than in the visible and near-infrared. Experiments on above threshold ionization (ATI) of cesium, nonsequential ionization (NSI) of noble gases, and high harmonic generation (HHG) in condensed phase media highlight the benefits of performing strong field investigations in the MIR. The photoelectron energy spectrum from above threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms provides details about the strong field interaction. Cesium atoms driven by a 3.6 mum laser indicate that excited states can play a large role in ionization from the ground state. Previous experiments on argon in the near-infrared can be compared to cesium at 3.6 im due to their similar Keldysh-scaling. Unlike argon, the measured ionization yield in cesium saturates at a higher intensity than predicted due to the Stark shift of the ground state. Such shifts have not been detected in argon. The low-lying 6P excited states of cesium produce a strong effect on the photoelectron energy spectrum, resulting in a splitting of each ATI peak. Enhancements in the photoelectron energy spectrum similar to those found in argon are observed in cesium. These enhancements are relatively insensitive to ellipticity of the drive laser. To take advantage of the large ponderomotive energy associated with Mid-IR lasers, ionization of argon, krypton and xenon is studied at 3.6 im. The factor of 20 increase in Up between the

  16. Modified Coulomb Law in a Strongly Magnetized Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shabad, Anatoly E.; Usov, Vladimir V.

    2007-05-04

    We study the electric potential of a charge placed in a strong magnetic field B>>B{sub 0}{approx_equal}4.4x10{sup 13} G, as modified by the vacuum polarization. In such a field the electron Larmour radius is much less than its Compton length. At the Larmour distances a scaling law occurs, with the potential determined by a magnetic-field-independent function. The scaling regime implies short-range interaction, expressed by the Yukawa law. The electromagnetic interaction regains its long-range character at distances larger than the Compton length, the potential decreasing across B faster than along. Correction to the nonrelativistic ground-state energy of a hydrogenlike atom is found. In the limit B={infinity}, the modified potential becomes the Dirac {delta} function plus a regular background. With this potential the ground-state energy is finite - the best pronounced effect of the vacuum polarization.

  17. Dirac particle spin in strong gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yu. N.; Silenko, A. J.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of the Dirac particle spin in general strong gravitational fields is discussed. The Hermitian Dirac Hamiltonian is derived and transformed to the Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) representation for an arbitrary metric. The quantum mechanical equations of spin motion are found. These equations agree with corresponding classical ones. The new restriction on the anomalous gravitomagnetic moment (AGM) by the reinterpretation of Lorentz invariance tests is obtained.

  18. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  19. Mars Crustal Magnetic Field Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The radial magnetic field measured is color coded on a global perspective view that shows measurements derived from spacecraft tracks below 200 km overlain on a monochrome shaded relief map of the topography.

    This image shows especially strong Martian magnetic fields in the southern highlands near the Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum regions, centered around 180 degrees longitude from the equator to the pole. It is where magnetic stripes possibly resulting from crustal movement are most prominent. The bands are oriented approximately east - west and are about 100 miles wide and 600 miles long, although the longest band stretches more than 1200 miles.

    The false blue and red colors represent invisible magnetic fields in the Martian crust that point in opposite directions. The magnetic fields appear to be organized in bands, with adjacent bands pointing in opposite directions, giving these stripes a striking similarity to patterns seen in the Earth's crust at the mid-oceanic ridges.

    These data were compiled by the MGS Magnetometer Team led by Mario Acuna at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

  20. Magnetic fields in irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T.

    Radio data of large irregular galaxies reveal some extended synchrotron emission with a substantial degree of polarization. In the case of NGC 4449 strong galaxy-scale regular magnetic fields were found, in spite of the lack of ordered rotation required for the conventional dynamo action. The rigidly rotating large irregular NGC 55 shows vertical polarized spurs connected with a network of ionized gas filaments. Small dwarf irregulars show only isolated polarized spots.

  1. Strongly magnetized cold degenerate electron gas: Mass-radius relation of the magnetized white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-08-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two, or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar’s celebrated nonmagnetic results. The maximum number of occupied Landau levels is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely, the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level, and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an exciting result that it is possible to have an electron-degenerate static star, namely, magnetized white dwarfs, with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit in the range 2.3-2.6M⊙, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density. In fact, recent observations of peculiar type Ia supernovae—SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg—seem to suggest super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with masses up to 2.4-2.8M⊙ as their most likely progenitors. Interestingly, our results seem to lie within these observational limits.

  2. Strongly coupled plasma with electric and magnetic charges

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinfeng; Shuryak, Edward

    2007-05-15

    A number of theoretical and lattice results lead us to believe that quark-gluon plasma not too far from T{sub c} contains not only electrically charged quasiparticles - quarks and gluons - but magnetically charged ones--monopoles and dyons--as well. Although binary systems such as charge-monopole and charge-dyon were considered in detail before in both classical and quantum settings, this is the first study of coexisting electric and magnetic particles in a many-body context. We perform a molecular dynamics study of strongly coupled plasmas with {approx}1000 particles and differing fractions of magnetic charge. Correlation functions and Kubo formulas lead to transport properties such as the diffusion constant, the shear viscosity, and electric conductivity: We compare the first two with empirical data from RHIC experiments as well as with results from anti-de-Sitter space/conformal field theory correspondence. We also study a number of collective excitations in these systems.

  3. Fast collisionless reconnection and electron heating in strongly magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, N F; Schekochihin, A A; Zocco, A

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized (low-beta), weakly collisional plasmas is investigated by using a novel fluid-kinetic model [Zocco and Schekochihin, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102309 (2011)] which retains nonisothermal electron kinetics. It is shown that electron heating via Landau damping (linear phase mixing) is the dominant dissipation mechanism. In time, electron heating occurs after the peak of the reconnection rate; in space, it is concentrated along the separatrices of the magnetic island. For sufficiently large systems, the peak reconnection rate is cE(∥)(max) ≈ 0.2v(A)B(y,0), where v(A) is the Alfvén speed based on the reconnecting field B(y,0). The island saturation width is the same as in magnetohydrodynamics models except for small systems, when it becomes comparable to the kinetic scales. PMID:23889411

  4. Magnetic Doppler Imaging of He-strong star HD 184927

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, I.; Wade, G.; Bohlender, D.; Kochukhov, O.; Tsymbal, V.; Tsymbal

    2014-08-01

    We have employed an extensive new timeseries of Stokes I and V spectra obtained with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to investigate the physical parameters, chemical abundance distributions and magnetic field topology of the slowly-rotating He-strong star HD 184927. We infer a rotation period of 9 d .53071 +/- 0.00120 from Hα, Hβ, LSD magnetic measurements and EWs of helium lines. We used an extensive NLTE TLUSTY grid along with the SYNSPEC code to model the observed spectra and find a new value of luminosity. In this poster we present the derived physical parameters of the star and the results of Magnetic Doppler Imaging analysis of the Stokes I and V profiles. Wide wings of helium lines can be described only under the assumption of the presence of a large, very helium-rich spot.

  5. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  6. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  7. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED.

    PubMed

    Mueller, N; Hebenstreit, F; Berges, J

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments. PMID:27541456

  8. Anomaly-Induced Dynamical Refringence in Strong-Field QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.; Hebenstreit, F.; Berges, J.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the nonequilibrium evolution of strong-field quantum electrodynamics (QED) using real-time lattice gauge theory techniques. For field strengths exceeding the Schwinger limit for pair production, we encounter a highly absorptive medium with anomaly induced dynamical refractive properties. In contrast to earlier expectations based on equilibrium properties, where net anomalous effects vanish because of the trivial vacuum structure, we find that out-of-equilibrium conditions can have dramatic consequences for the presence of quantum currents with distinctive macroscopic signatures. We observe an intriguing tracking behavior, where the system spends longest times near collinear field configurations with maximum anomalous current. Apart from the potential relevance of our findings for future laser experiments, similar phenomena related to the chiral magnetic effect are expected to play an important role for strong QED fields during initial stages of heavy-ion collision experiments.

  9. Vacuum birefringence by Compton backscattering through a strong field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistisen, Tobias N.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a novel scheme to measure nonlinear effects in electrodynamics arising from QED corrections. Our theoretical starting point is the Heisenberg-Euler-Schwinger effective Lagrangian which predicts that a vacuum with a strong static electromagnetic field turns birefringent. We propose to employ a pulsed laser to create Compton backscattered photons off a high energy electron beam. These photons will pass through a strong static magnetic field, which according to the QED prediction changes the state of polarization of the radiation—an effect proportional to the photon energy. This change will be measured by using an aligned single crystal, since a large difference in the pair production cross sections at high energies can be achieved with proper orientation of the crystal. As an example we will consider the machine, LHeC, under consideration at CERN as the source of these electrons, and an LHC dipole magnet as the source of the strong static magnetic field. In the proposed experimental setup the birefringence effect will be manifested in a difference in the number of pairs created in the polarizer crystal as the initial laser light has a varying state of polarization, achieved with a rotating quarter wave plate. This will be seen as a clear peak in the Fourier transform spectrum of the pair-production rate signal, which can be obtained with 3 hours of measurement. We also comment on the sensitivity of the experiment, to the existence of an axion, a hypothetical spin-0 particle that couples to two photons.

  10. Thermalization of Strongly Coupled Field Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, V.; Bernamonti, A.; Copland, N.; Craps, B.; Staessens, W.; Boer, J. de; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Mueller, B.; Schaefer, A.; Shigemori, M.

    2011-05-13

    Using the holographic mapping to a gravity dual, we calculate 2-point functions, Wilson loops, and entanglement entropy in strongly coupled field theories in d=2, 3, and 4 to probe the scale dependence of thermalization following a sudden injection of energy. For homogeneous initial conditions, the entanglement entropy thermalizes slowest and sets a time scale for equilibration that saturates a causality bound. The growth rate of entanglement entropy density is nearly volume-independent for small volumes but slows for larger volumes. In this setting, the UV thermalizes first.

  11. Thermalization of strongly coupled field theories.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Bernamonti, A; de Boer, J; Copland, N; Craps, B; Keski-Vakkuri, E; Müller, B; Schäfer, A; Shigemori, M; Staessens, W

    2011-05-13

    Using the holographic mapping to a gravity dual, we calculate 2-point functions, Wilson loops, and entanglement entropy in strongly coupled field theories in d=2, 3, and 4 to probe the scale dependence of thermalization following a sudden injection of energy. For homogeneous initial conditions, the entanglement entropy thermalizes slowest and sets a time scale for equilibration that saturates a causality bound. The growth rate of entanglement entropy density is nearly volume-independent for small volumes but slows for larger volumes. In this setting, the UV thermalizes first. PMID:21668141

  12. STRONG FIELD PHYSICS WITH MID INFRARED LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-08-27

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 {micro}m wavelength CO{sub 2} laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 {micro}m wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO{sub 2} lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science.

  13. Quantum dynamics in strong fluctuating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor; Hänggi, Peter

    A large number of multifaceted quantum transport processes in molecular systems and physical nanosystems, such as e.g. nonadiabatic electron transfer in proteins, can be treated in terms of quantum relaxation processes which couple to one or several fluctuating environments. A thermal equilibrium environment can conveniently be modelled by a thermal bath of harmonic oscillators. An archetype situation provides a two-state dissipative quantum dynamics, commonly known under the label of a spin-boson dynamics. An interesting and nontrivial physical situation emerges, however, when the quantum dynamics evolves far away from thermal equilibrium. This occurs, for example, when a charge transferring medium possesses nonequilibrium degrees of freedom, or when a strong time-dependent control field is applied externally. Accordingly, certain parameters of underlying quantum subsystem acquire stochastic character. This may occur, for example, for the tunnelling coupling between the donor and acceptor states of the transferring electron, or for the corresponding energy difference between electronic states which assume via the coupling to the fluctuating environment an explicit stochastic or deterministic time-dependence. Here, we review the general theoretical framework which is based on the method of projector operators, yielding the quantum master equations for systems that are exposed to strong external fields. This allows one to investigate on a common basis, the influence of nonequilibrium fluctuations and periodic electrical fields on those already mentioned dynamics and related quantum transport processes. Most importantly, such strong fluctuating fields induce a whole variety of nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena. A characteristic feature of such dynamics is the absence of thermal (quantum) detailed balance.ContentsPAGE1. Introduction5262. Quantum dynamics in stochastic fields531 2.1. Stochastic Liouville equation531 2.2. Non-Markovian vs. Markovian discrete

  14. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  15. Magnetization dynamics in arrays of strongly interacting magnetic nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telem-Shafir, Tamar; Markovich, Gil

    2005-11-01

    Arrays of 6.6nm iron oxide nanocrystals coated with fatty acid molecules were produced using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. The arrays had a varying number of layers stacked together, going from two dimensional to three dimensional and two different in-plane interparticle separations. While temperature-dependent ac susceptibility measurements of the isolated nanocrystals obeyed the Néel-Brown relaxation law, the array relaxation deviated significantly from this simple law. This deviation together with the observed dc field influence on the susceptibility-temperature curves, the large shifts in blocking temperatures and reduction in susceptibility-temperature curve widths on going from isolated particles to the arrays indicated collective magnetization dynamics during magnetization freezing. A scaling law analysis of this freezing dynamics yielded different powers for the two different interparticle separations with no dependence on dimensionality. In spite of the spin-glass-like behavior, it is possible that small, magnetically ordered domains of nanocrystals form at low temperature.

  16. The magnetic configuration of the high-latitude cusp and dayside magnetopause under strong magnetic shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Dunlop, M.; Ma, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Q.; Yan, G. Q.; Liu, Z. X.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carr, C. M.; Zhang, Q. H.; Lucek, E.

    2011-09-01

    This paper investigates the structure of the magnetic field near the magnetopause (MP) by analyzing the multiple-point magnetic measurements from the Cluster mission. In this paper, the spatial distribution of the curvature radius of the MP surface at the noon-midnight meridian and for situations with moderate dynamical pressure of solar wind is implied from direct measurements of magnetic field curvature for the first time. The investigation focused on conditions of strong magnetic shear and in which a clear boundary layer is present at the MP. It has been confirmed that the magnetic field lines surrounding the cusp bend sunward at the precusp region and tailward at the postcusp region, implying the existence of a cusp field indentation. The minimum curvature radius of the near-MP field at both precusp and postcusp regions is about 2 RE. As the latitude decreases, the curvature radius at the MP increases gradually, so that, as the subsolar point is approached, the curvature radius of the MP is nearly equal to the geocentric distance. These results compare well with existing MP models but reveal the limitations inherent in such statistical estimates of local MP curvature, particularly surrounding the cusp regions. The analysis of the magnetic measurements has also verified the existence of the magnetic bottles at both precusp and postcusp regions, which may play a role for the trapping of the charged particles of magnetosphere.

  17. Turbulence-induced disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Klessen, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    We present collapse simulations of strongly magnetized, turbulent molecular cloud cores with masses ranging from 2.6 to 1000 M⊙ in order to study the influence of the initial conditions on the turbulence-induced disc formation mechanism proposed recently by Seifried et al. We find that Keplerian discs are formed in all cases independently of the core mass, the strength of turbulence or the presence of global rotation. The discs appear within a few kyr after the formation of the protostar, are 50-150 au in size, and have masses between 0.05 and a few 0.1 M⊙. During the formation of the discs the mass-to-flux ratio stays well below the critical value of 10 for Keplerian disc formation. Hence, flux-loss alone cannot explain the formation of Keplerian discs. The formation of rotationally supported discs at such early phases is rather due to the disordered magnetic field structure and due to turbulent motions in the surroundings of the discs, two effects lowering the classical magnetic braking efficiency. Binary systems occurring in the discs are mainly formed via the disc capturing mechanism rather than via disc fragmentation, which is largely suppressed by the presence of magnetic fields.

  18. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  19. Breakdown of the dipole approximation in strong-field ionization.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, A; Maurer, J; Mayer, B W; Phillips, C R; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2014-12-12

    We report the breakdown of the electric dipole approximation in the long-wavelength limit in strong-field ionization with linearly polarized few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses at intensities on the order of 10¹³ W/cm². Photoelectron momentum distributions were recorded by velocity map imaging and projected onto the beam propagation axis. We observe an increasing shift of the peak of this projection opposite to the beam propagation direction with increasing laser intensities. From a comparison with semiclassical simulations, we identify the combined action of the magnetic field of the laser pulse and the Coulomb potential as the origin of our observations. PMID:25541770

  20. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  1. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  2. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  3. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  4. The topological description of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Mitchell A.

    1986-01-01

    Determining the structure and behavior of solar coronal magnetic fields is a central problem in solar physics. At the photosphere, the field is believed to be strongly localized into discrete flux tubes. After providing a rigorous definition of field topology, how the topology of a finite collection of flux tubes may be classified is discussed.

  5. Highly ionized plasma plume generation by long-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation of solid targets in strong axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A L; Crawford, E A

    1982-01-01

    The present work utilizes high f number optics and is directed primarily at controlling the conditions in the magnetically confined plume. Typically, fully ionized carbon plasmas have been produced with 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ electron densities and 100 to 150 eV electron temperatures. These carbon plasmas have been doped with high Z atoms in order to study ionization and emission rates at the above conditions.

  6. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  7. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  8. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of strongly interacting matter across the deconfinement transition.

    PubMed

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Mariti, Marco; Negro, Francesco; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    We propose a method to determine the total magnetic susceptibility of strongly interacting matter by lattice QCD simulations and present numerical results for the theory with two light flavors, which suggest a weak magnetic activity in the confined phase and the emergence of strong paramagnetism in the deconfined, quark-gluon plasma phase. PMID:24237508

  10. Levitation of a magnet by an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, W.; Hunt, M. O.; Summerskill, W. S. H.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment is described in which a small strong cylindrical magnet is levitated by a vertical non-uniform alternating magnetic field. Surprisingly, no superimposed constant field is necessary, but the levitation can be explained when the vertical motion of the magnet is taken into account. The theoretical mean levitation force is (0.26 ± 0.06) N, which is in good agreement with the levitated weight of (0.239 ± 0.001) N. This experiment is suitable for an undergraduate laboratory, particularly as a final year project. Students have found it interesting, and it sharpens up knowledge of basic magnetism.

  11. GB 790305 as a very strongly magnetized neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    The March 5 1979 event was the strongest gamma-ray burst ever observed. Its location in the sky is known with an accuracy of about 10 arcsec, and it coincides with the N49 supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The main burst was followed by a soft tail with the periodic 8 s modulation, and 16 soft gamma events over the following few years. If the source is a magnetic neutron star with the 8 s rotation period and the age of about 10 exp 4 years as indicated by N49 then the field strength of about 5 x 10 exp 14 gauss is implied. The corresponding critical luminosity is about 10 exp 4 L(Edd), as the electron scattering opacity is suppressed by the strong magnetic field. This luminosity is consistent with the observed peak flux of the soft tail and the soft repeaters. The soft spectrum may be approximated with the photospheric emission at kT(eff) = 17 keV. The corresponding photospheric radius is about 14 km, compatible with a neutron star hypothesis. The total magnetic energy of the star is about 4 x 10 exp 46 erg, more than enough to power the March 5 event and all its repeaters.

  12. Strong radial electric field shear and reduced fluctuations in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, B.E.; Chiang, C.S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    A strongly sheared radial electric field is observed in enhanced confinement discharges in the MST reversed-field pinch. The strong shear develops in a narrow region in the plasma edge. Electrostatic fluctuations are reduced over the entire plasma edge with an extra reduction in the shear region. Magnetic fluctuations, resonant in the plasma core but global in extent, are also reduced. The reduction of fluctuations in the shear region is presumably due to the strong shear, but the causes of the reductions outside this region have not been established.

  13. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  14. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  15. Fundamental studies and applications of strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu

    In an intense laser field, atoms and molecules experience tunneling ionization directly to the continuum. We used this method to study several aspects and applications of strong field ionization (SFI) in atoms and molecules. One study used SFI to probe the photofragments produced by photodissociation using DC sliced imaging. The photodissociation mechanism of two polyatomic molecules (sulfur dioxide and nitromethane) were investigated. In a second study, we show the strong field ionization rate depends on the sign of the magnetic number distribution. We detect the signal of sequential double ionization of argon dications by a pump-probe method to investigate the ionization rate sensitivity to circularly polarized light. In a third study, we also found that the modest fragmentation that accompanies strong field ionization may be used to identify isomers and molecules in a complex mixture based on their mass spectral "finger print". The experiments were carried out in a DC sliced imaging apparatus. For the isomer selective detection experiment, the machine was used simply as a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectrum of each isomer was used as "basis function" to characterize the complex mixtures quantitatively.

  16. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  17. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  18. Multi-electron systems in strong magnetic fields II: A fixed-phase diffusion quantum Monte Carlo application based on trial functions from a Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boblest, S.; Meyer, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present a quantum Monte Carlo application for the computation of energy eigenvalues for atoms and ions in strong magnetic fields. The required guiding wave functions are obtained with the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan code described in the accompanying publication (Schimeczek and Wunner, 2014). Our method yields highly accurate results for the binding energies of symmetry subspace ground states and at the same time provides a means for quantifying the quality of the results obtained with the above-mentioned Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method. Catalogue identifier: AETV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 72 284 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 604 948 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Cluster of 1-˜500 HP Compaq dc5750. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Code includes MPI directives. RAM: 500 MB per node Classification: 2.1. External routines: Boost::Serialization, Boost::MPI, LAPACK BLAS Nature of problem: Quantitative modelings of features observed in the X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars are hampered by the lack of sufficiently large and accurate databases for atoms and ions up to the last fusion product iron, at high magnetic field strengths. The predominant amount of line data in the literature has been calculated with Hartree-Fock methods, which are intrinsically restricted in precision. Our code is intended to provide a powerful tool for calculating very accurate energy values from, and thereby improving the quality of, existing Hartree-Fock results. Solution method: The Fixed-phase quantum Monte Carlo method is used in combination with guiding functions obtained in Hartree

  19. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  20. On the magnetic fields in voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Hanasz, M.; Lesch, H.; Remus, R.-S.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2013-02-01

    We study the possible magnetization of cosmic voids by void galaxies. Recently, observations revealed isolated star-forming galaxies within the voids. Furthermore, a major fraction of a voids volume is expected to be filled with magnetic fields of a minimum strength of about 10-15 G on Mpc scales. We estimate the transport of magnetic energy by cosmic rays (CR) from the void galaxies into the voids. We assume that CRs and winds are able to leave small isolated void galaxies shortly after they assembled, and then propagate within the voids. For a typical void, we estimate the magnetic field strength and volume-filling factor depending on its void galaxy population and possible contributions of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs) which border the voids. We argue that the lower limit on the void magnetic field can be recovered, if a small fraction of the magnetic energy contained in the void galaxies or void bordering AGNs is distributed within the voids.

  1. Magnetic field evolution in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Jurusik, W.; Wiórkiewicz, K.

    2011-09-01

    morphological distortions induced by tidal interactions than are the random fields. As a result the polarized emission could be yet another indicator of an ongoing merging process. The found evolution of magnetic field with advancing interaction would definitely imply a stronger effect of magnetic fields on the galaxy surroundings in the earlier cosmological epochs. The process of strong gravitational interactions can efficiently magnetize the merger's surroundings, having a similar magnetizing effect on intergalactic medium as supernova explosions or galactic winds. If interacting galaxies generate some ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), the disk or magnetized outflows can deflect them (up to 23°), and make an association of the observed UHECRs with the sites of their origin very uncertain.

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  4. Strong-Field Physics with Mid-IR Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Benjamin; Pullen, Michael G.; Baudisch, Matthias; Sclafani, Michele; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Biegert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Strong-field physics is currently experiencing a shift towards the use of mid-IR driving wavelengths. This is because they permit conducting experiments unambiguously in the quasistatic regime and enable exploiting the effects related to ponderomotive scaling of electron recollisions. Initial measurements taken in the mid-IR immediately led to a deeper understanding of photoionization and allowed a discrimination among different theoretical models. Ponderomotive scaling of rescattering has enabled new avenues towards time-resolved probing of molecular structure. Essential for this paradigm shift was the convergence of two experimental tools: (1) intense mid-IR sources that can create high-energy photons and electrons while operating within the quasistatic regime and (2) detection systems that can detect the generated high-energy particles and image the entire momentum space of the interaction in full coincidence. Here, we present a unique combination of these two essential ingredients, namely, a 160-kHz mid-IR source and a reaction microscope detection system, to present an experimental methodology that provides an unprecedented three-dimensional view of strong-field interactions. The system is capable of generating and detecting electron energies that span a 6 order of magnitude dynamic range. We demonstrate the versatility of the system by investigating electron recollisions, the core process that drives strong-field phenomena, at both low (meV) and high (hundreds of eV) energies. The low-energy region is used to investigate recently discovered low-energy structures, while the high-energy electrons are used to probe atomic structure via laser-induced electron diffraction. Moreover, we present, for the first time, the correlated momentum distribution of electrons from nonsequential double ionization driven by mid-IR pulses.

  5. Ram pressure stripping in elliptical galaxies - II. Magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min-Su; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic fields and turbulence on ram pressure stripping in elliptical galaxies using ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We consider weakly magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) characterized by subsonic turbulence, and two orientations of the magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) - parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the galaxy motion through the ICM. While the stronger turbulence enhances the ram pressure stripping mass-loss, the magnetic fields tend to suppress the stripping rates, and the suppression is stronger for parallel fields. However, the effect of magnetic fields on the mass stripping rate is mild. Nevertheless, the morphology of the stripping tails depends significantly on the direction of the ICM magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field geometry on the tail morphology is much stronger than that of the level of the ISM turbulence. The tail has a highly collimated shape for parallel fields, while it has a sheet-like morphology in the plane of the ICM magnetic field for perpendicular fields. The magnetic field in the tail is amplified irrespectively of the orientation of the ICM field. More strongly magnetized regions in the ram pressure stripping tails are expected to have systematically higher metallicity due to the strong concentration of the stripped ISM than the less magnetized regions. Strong dependence of the morphology of the stripped ISM on the magnetic field could potentially be used to constrain the relative orientation of the ram pressure direction and the dominant component of the ICM magnetic field.

  6. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  7. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  8. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.

    2006-12-15

    We present a theory of ionization of diatomic molecules by a strong laser field. A diatomic molecule is considered as a three-particle system, which consists of two heavy atomic (ionic) centers and an electron. After the separation of the center-of-mass coordinate, the dynamics of this system is reduced to the relative electronic and nuclear coordinates. The exact S-matrix element for ionization is presented in a form in which the laser-molecule interaction is emphasized. This form is useful for application of the molecular strong-field approximation (SFA). We introduced two forms of the molecular SFA, one with the field-free and the other with the field-dressed initial molecular bound state. We relate these two forms of our modified molecular SFA to the standard molecular SFAs, introduced previously using the length gauge and the velocity gauge. Numerical examples of the ionization rates of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} molecules are shown and compared for all four versions of the molecular SFA and we suggest that our modified molecular SFA should be used instead of the standard molecular SFA.

  9. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  10. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  11. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  12. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  13. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  14. Strongly magnetized cold electron degenerate gas: Mass-radius relation of the collapsed star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-07-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero-temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar's celebrated non-magnetic results. The maximum number of Landau levels occupied is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an interesting theoretical result that, it is possible to have an electron degenerate static star with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density.

  15. Nonlinear cell response to strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardos, D. C.; Thompson, C. J.; Yang, Y. S.; Joyner, K. H.

    2000-07-01

    The response of living cells to externally applied electric fields is of widespread interest. In particular, the intensification of electric fields across cell membranes is believed to be responsible, through membrane rupture and reversible membrane breakdown processes, for certain types of tissue damage in electrical trauma cases which cannot be attributed to Joule heating. Large elongated cells such as skeletal muscle fibres are particularly vulnerable to such damage. Previous theoretical studies of field intensification across cell membranes in such cells have assumed the membrane current to be linear in the applied field (Ohmic membrane conductivity) and were limited to sinusoidal applied fields. In this paper, we investigate a simple model of a long cylindrical cell, corresponding to nerve or skeletal muscle cells. Employing the electroquasistatic approximation, a system of coupled first-order differential equations for the membrane electric field is derived which incorporates arbitrary time dependence in the external field and nonlinear membrane response (non-Ohmic conductivity). The behaviour of this model is investigated for a variety of applied fields in both the linear and highly nonlinear regimes. We find that peak membrane fields predicted by the nonlinear model are approximately twice as intense, for low-frequency electrical trauma conditions, as those of the linear theory.

  16. QCD phase transition in a strong magnetic background

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Mukherjee, Swagato; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the properties of the deconfining/chiral restoring transition for two flavor QCD in the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. We adopt standard staggered fermions and a lattice spacing of the order of 0.3 fm. We explore different values of the bare quark mass, corresponding to pion masses in the range 200-480 MeV, and magnetic fields up to |e|B{approx}0.75 GeV{sup 2}. The deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration temperatures remain compatible with each other and rise very slightly (<2% for our largest magnetic field) as a function of the magnetic field. On the other hand, the transition seems to become sharper as the magnetic field increases.

  17. Strong-Field Resonant Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismer, Michael S.; Kruchinin, Stanislav Yu.; Ciappina, Marcelo; Stockman, Mark I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict that a direct band gap semiconductor (GaAs) resonantly excited by a strong ultrashort laser pulse exhibits a novel regime: kicked anharmonic Rabi oscillations. In this regime, Rabi oscillations are strongly coupled to intraband motion, and interband transitions mainly take place when electrons pass near the Brillouin zone center where electron populations undergo very rapid changes. The asymmetry of the residual population distribution induces an electric current controlled by the carrier-envelope phase of the driving pulse. The predicted effects are experimentally observable using photoemission and terahertz spectroscopies.

  18. Strong-Field Resonant Dynamics in Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wismer, Michael S; Kruchinin, Stanislav Yu; Ciappina, Marcelo; Stockman, Mark I; Yakovlev, Vladislav S

    2016-05-13

    We predict that a direct band gap semiconductor (GaAs) resonantly excited by a strong ultrashort laser pulse exhibits a novel regime: kicked anharmonic Rabi oscillations. In this regime, Rabi oscillations are strongly coupled to intraband motion, and interband transitions mainly take place when electrons pass near the Brillouin zone center where electron populations undergo very rapid changes. The asymmetry of the residual population distribution induces an electric current controlled by the carrier-envelope phase of the driving pulse. The predicted effects are experimentally observable using photoemission and terahertz spectroscopies. PMID:27232043

  19. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  20. Possible Frohlich superconductivity in strong magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, C. H.; Harrison, N.; Ardavan, A.; Goddard, P.; Singleton, J.; Narduzzo, A.; Montgomery, Lawrence; Balicas, L.; Brooks, J. S.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of some of the arguments pointing towards the possibility of organic conductors of the form {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF)&J3g(SCN)4 (where M=K, T1 and Rb) being candidates for Frohlich superconductivity is given.

  1. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  4. The magnetic field of ζ Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.

    2015-10-01

    Context. ζ Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ζ Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ζ Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ζ Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ζ Ori Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ζ Ori Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  6. Spin generation by strong inhomogeneous electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkler, Ilya; Engel, Hans-Andreas; Rashba, Emmanuel; Halperin, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments [1], we propose a model with extrinsic spin-orbit interaction, where an inhomogeneous electric field E in the x-y plane can give rise, through nonlinear effects, to a spin polarization with non-zero sz, away from the sample boundaries. The field E induces a spin current js^z= z x(αjc+βE), where jc=σE is the charge current, and the two terms represent,respectively, the skew scattering and side-jump contributions. [2]. The coefficients α and β are assumed to be E- independent, but conductivity σ is field dependent. We find the spin density sz by solving the equation for spin diffusion and relaxation with a source term ∇.js^z. For sufficiently low fields, jc is linear in E, and the source term vanishes, implying that sz=0 away from the edges. However, for large fields, σ varies with E. Solving the diffusion equation in a T-shaped geometry, where the electric current propagates along the main channel, we find spin accumulation near the entrance of the side channel, similar to experimental findings [1]. Also, we present a toy model where spin accumulation away from the boundary results from a nonlinear and anisotropic conductivity. [1] V. Sih, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 096605 (2006). [2] H.-A. Engel, B.I. Halperin, E.I.Rashba, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166605 (2005).

  7. Strong terahertz radiation generation by beating of two spatial-triangular beams in collisional magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hematizadeh, Ayoob; Bakhtiari, Farhad; Jazayeri, Seyed Masud; Ghafary, Bijan

    2016-05-01

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) radiation generation is proposed by beating of two spatial-triangular laser beams in plasma with a spatially periodic density when electron-neutral collisions have taken into account. In this process, the laser beams exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons of the plasma and impart the oscillatory velocity at the difference frequency in the presence of a static magnetic field which is applied parallel to the direction of the lasers. We show that higher efficiency and stronger THz radiation are achieved when the parallel magnetic field is used to compare the perpendicular magnetic field. The effects of beam width of lasers, collision frequency, periodicity of density ripples, and magnetic field strength are analyzed for strong THz radiation generation. The THz field of the emitted radiations is found to be highly sensitive to collision frequency and magnetic field strength. In this scheme with the optimization of plasma parameters, the efficiency of order 21% is achieved.

  8. How do galaxies get their magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in high-redshift and present-day galaxies is a long-standing problem. In this talk, we present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in protogalaxies. Supernova (SN) explosions during the assembly of a protogalaxy self-consistently provide magnetic seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions.Our model explains the origin of strong magnetic fields of $\\mu$G amplitude within the first starforming protogalactic structures shortly after the first stars have formed.We present cosmological simulations with the GADGET code of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation using a standard LCDM cosmology and analyse the strength and distribution of the evolving magnetic field.Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr. Subsequently, the magnetic field strength increases exponentially on timescales of a few ten million years within the innermost regions of the halo.Furthermore, turbulent diffusion, shocks and gas motions transport the magnetic field towards the halo outskirts. At redshift z=0, the entire galactic structures are magnetized and the field amplitude is of the order of a few microG in the center of the halo and nG at the virial radius. Additionally, we analyse the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) of the forming galactic halo over redshift. The mean halo intrinsic RM peaks between redshifts z=4 and z=2 and reaches absolute values around 1000 rad/m^2. Towards redshift z=0, the intrinsic RM values decline to a mean value below 10 rad/m^2. At high redshifts, the distribution of individual starforming and thus magnetized regions is widespread leading to a widespread distribution of large intrinsic RMs. Our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields solves the joint problem of magnetic field seeding and subsequent amplification and distribution

  9. How do galaxies get their magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander M.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in high-redshift and present-day galaxies is a long-standing problem. In this talk, we present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in protogalaxies. Supernova (SN) explosions during the assembly of a protogalaxy self-consistently provide magnetic seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions.Our model explains the origin of strong magnetic fields of μG amplitude within the first starforming protogalactic structures shortly after the first stars have formed.We present cosmological simulations with the GADGET code of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation using a standard LCDM cosmology and analyse the strength and distribution of the evolving magnetic field.Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr. Subsequently, the magnetic field strength increases exponentially on timescales of a few ten million years within the innermost regions of the halo.Furthermore, turbulent diffusion, shocks and gas motions transport the magnetic field towards the halo outskirts. At redshift z=0, the entire galactic structures are magnetized and the field amplitude is of the order of a few microG in the center of the halo and nG at the virial radius. Additionally, we analyse the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) of the forming galactic halo over redshift. The mean halo intrinsic RM peaks between redshifts z=4 and z=2 and reaches absolute values around 1000 rad/m^2. Towards redshift z=0, the intrinsic RM values decline to a mean value below 10 rad/m^2. At high redshifts, the distribution of individual starforming and thus magnetized regions is widespread leading to a widespread distribution of large intrinsic RMs. Our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields solves the joint problem of magnetic field seeding and subsequent amplification and distribution. The

  10. Bending of magnetic filaments under a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Valera P.; Winklhofer, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic beads and superparamagnetic (SP) colloid particles have successfully been employed for micromechanical manipulation of soft material, in situ probing of elastic properties, and design of smart materials (ferrogels). Here we derive analytical expressions for the equilibrium shape of magnetic fibers, considering two end-member cases, (a) SP or single-domain particles concentrated at the free end of cantilevered rods or tubes, and (b) filaments consisting of SP particles, with this case being mathematically equivalent to tubes containing SP particles. Our analysis yields also metastable equilibrium states (MES’s), which only exist above a critical filament length, but become more stable with increasing magnetic field. The MES’s for case (a) are, like the ground state, circular arcs, but more strongly bent. The multiform MES’s in case (b), which comprise hairpin, sinuous, or even closed shapes, have recently been observed in experiments, too. We also study the effect of gravity on the balance between bending and magnetic energy, which leads to curves with inflection point if the influence of gravity is stronger than that of the magnetic field. Because of their simple experimental realization, case (a) magnetic filaments are deemed highly suitable for micromechanical experiments on long chains of polymer molecules. Another potential application of cantilevered magnetic filaments with magnetic material attached to the free end is in scanning probe microscopes. Because the magnetic field due to the magnetic tip is comparatively weak, the magnetization structure of the sample to be investigated would not be affected by the probe. Thus, for the examination of magnetically soft materials, probes in the form of magnetic filaments may hold advantages over tips usually employed in magnetic force microscopy.

  11. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  12. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)  G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)  GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  13. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Violation of Chandrasekhar Mass Limit: the Exciting Potential of Strongly Magnetized White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-10-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate, electron gas under the influence of a strong magnetic field, which describes magnetized white dwarfs. Landau quantization changes the density of states available to the electrons, thus modifying the underlying equation of state. In the presence of very strong magnetic fields a maximum of either one, two or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. We obtain the mass-radius relations for such white dwarfs and their detailed investigation leads us to propose the existence of white dwarfs having a mass 2.3M⊙, which overwhelmingly exceeds the Chandrasekhar mass limit.

  15. Magnetic fields in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Åke; Rögnvaldsson, Örnólfur

    We have studied the fate of initial magnetic fields in the hot halo gas out of which the visible parts of galaxies form, using three-dimensional numerical MHD-experiments. The halo gas undergoes compression by several orders of magnitude in the subsonic cooling flow that forms the cold disk. The magnetic field is carried along and is amplified considerably in the process, reaching μG levels for reasonable values of the initial ratio of magnetic to thermal energy density.

  16. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  17. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  18. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  19. Inhomogeneous thermalization in strongly coupled field theories.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Bernamonti, A; de Boer, J; Craps, B; Franti, L; Galli, F; Keski-Vakkuri, E; Müller, B; Schäfer, A

    2013-12-01

    To describe theoretically the creation and evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, one typically employs three ingredients: a model for the initial state, nonhydrodynamic early time evolution, and hydrodynamics. In this Letter we study the nonhydrodynamic early time evolution using the AdS/CFT correspondence in the presence of inhomogeneities. We find that the AdS description of the early time evolution is well matched by free streaming. Near the end of the early time interval where our analytic computations are reliable, the stress tensor agrees with the second order hydrodynamic stress tensor computed from the local energy density and fluid velocity. Our techniques may also be useful for the study of far-from-equilibrium strongly coupled systems in other areas of physics. PMID:24476254

  20. Magnetic tunnel junctions for low magnetic field sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyong

    In this thesis, we did a comprehensive investigation on the relationship between spin-dependent tunneling and structural variation in junction devices. Magnetic, microstructural, and transport studies have shown a significant improvement in exchange-bias, a reduced barrier roughness, and an enhanced magnetoresistance for samples after magnetic annealing. We have examined different magnetic configurations required for sensing applications and presented some results of using MTJ sensors to detect AC magnetic fields created by electrical current flow and DC stray field distributions of patterned magnetic materials. We have studied the low frequency noise in MTJ sensors. We have found that the 1/f noise in MTJs has magnetic as well as electrical origins, and is strongly affected by the junction's internal structure. The magnetic noise comes from magnetization fluctuations in the free FM layer and can be understood using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. While the field-independent electrical noise due to charge trapping in the barrier, is observed in the less optimized MTJs sensors, and has an amplitude at least one order of magnitude higher than the noise component due to magnetization fluctuations. In addition, we have studied the magnetization switching of Cobalt rings with varying anisotropy utilizing scanning magnetoresistive microscopy. We have for the first time observed a complicated multi-domain intermediate phase during the transition between onion states for samples with strong anisotropy. This is in contrast to as deposited samples, which reverse by simple domain wall motion and feature an intermediate vortex state. The result is further analyzed by micro magnetic simulations.

  1. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  2. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  3. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  4. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned. PMID:17183319

  5. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  6. Constraints on the origins of lunar magnetism from electron reflection measurements of surface magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a new method of detecting lunar surface magnetic fields, summarizes electron reflection measurements and correlations of surface field anomalies to moon geologic features, and discusses the constraints on the origin of lunar magnetism. Apollo 15 and 16 measurements of lunar surface magnetic fields by the electron reflection method show patches of strong surface fields distributed over the lunar surface, and a positive statistical correlation is found in lunar mare regions between the surface field strength and the geologic age of the surface. However, there is a lack of correlation of surface field with impact craters indicating that the mare does not have a strong large-scale uniform magnetization as may be expected from an ancient lunar dynamo. Fields were found in lunar highlands which imply that the rille has a strong magnetization associated with it as intrusive, magnetized rock or as a gap in a uniformly magnetic layer of rock.

  7. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  8. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  9. Dynamo magnetic-field generation in turbulent accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic fields can play important roles in the dynamics and evolution of accretion disks. The presence of strong differential rotation and vertical density gradients in turbulent disks allows the alpha-omega dynamo mechanism to offset the turbulent dissipation and maintain strong magnetic fields. It is found that MHD dynamo magnetic-field normal modes in an accretion disk are highly localized to restricted regions of a disk. Implications for the character of real, dynamically constrained magnetic fields in accretion disks are discussed. The magnetic stress due to the mean magnetic field is found to be of the order of a viscous stress. The dominant stress, however, is likely to come from small-scale fluctuating magnetic fields. These fields may also give rise to energetic flares above the disk surface, providing a possible explanation for the highly variable hard X-ray emission from objects like Cyg X-l.

  10. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  11. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  12. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  13. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  14. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  15. Ferromagnetism and strong magnetic anisotropy of the PbMnBO4 orthoborate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankrats, A.; Sablina, K.; Eremin, M.; Balaev, A.; Kolkov, M.; Tugarinov, V.; Bovina, A.

    2016-09-01

    The PbMnBO4 orthoborate single crystals were first grown and their magnetic properties and ferromagnetic resonance were studied. It was found that the ferromagnetic state below the Curie temperature TC=31 K is characterized by the strong magnetic anisotropy. The significant effective anisotropy fields of PbMnBO4 determine the energy gap in the FMR spectrum, which is extraordinary large for ferromagnets (112 GHz at T=4.2 K). It was shown that the static Jahn-Teller effect characteristic of the Mn3+ ion leads to both the ferromagnetic ordering and the strong magnetic anisotropy in the crystal. In the strong external magnetic field the induced ferromagnetic ordering is retained in the crystal above the Curie temperature up to the temperatures multiply higher than TC. A weak anomaly of the dielectric permittivity was observed in PbMnBO4 at the Curie temperature at which the long-range ferromagnetic order is established.

  16. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  17. Anisotropic pressure in the quark core of a strongly magnetized hybrid star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The impact of a strong magnetic field, varying with the total baryon number density, on thermodynamic properties of strange quark matter (SQM) in the core of a magnetized hybrid star is considered at zero temperature within the framework of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model. It is clarified that the central magnetic field strength is bound from above by the value at which the derivative of the longitudinal pressure with respect to the baryon number density vanishes first somewhere in the quark core under varying the central field. Above this upper bound, the instability along the magnetic field is developed in magnetized SQM. The total energy density, longitudinal and transverse pressures are found as functions of the total baryon number density.

  18. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  19. Magnetic field structure of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently planet Mercury - an unexplored territory in our solar system - has been of much interest to the scientific community due to recent flybys of the spacecraft MESSENGER that discovered its intrinsic stationary and large-scale dipole like magnetic field structure with an intensity of ˜300nT confirming Mariner 10 observations. In the present study, with the observed constraint of Mercury's atmospheric magnetic field structure, internal magnetic field structure is modeled as a solution of magnetic diffusion equation. In this study, Mercury's internal structure mainly consists of a stable stratified fluid core and the convective mantle. For simplicity, magnetic diffusivity in both parts of the structure is considered to be uniform and constant with a value represented by a suitable averages. It is further assumed that vigorous convection in the mantle disposes of the electric currents leading to a very high diffusivity in that region. Thus, in order to satisfy observed atmospheric magnetic field structure, Mercury's most likely magnetic field structure consists of a solution of MHD diffusion equation in the core and a combined multipolar (dipole and quadrupole like magnetic field structures embedded in the uniform field) solution of a current free like magnetic field structure in the mantle and in the atmosphere. With imposition of appropriate boundary conditions at the core-mantle boundary for the first two diffusion eigen modes, in order to satisfy the observed field structure, present study puts the constraint on Mercury's core radius to be ˜2000km. From the estimated magnetic diffusivity and the core radius, it is also possible to estimate the two diffusion eigen modes with their diffusion time scales of ˜8.6 and 3.7 billion years respectively suggesting that the planet inherits its present-day magnetic field structure from the solar Nebula. It is proposed that permanency of such a large-scale magnetic field structure of the planet is attained during

  20. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  1. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  2. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  3. Slowly rotating pulsars and magnetic field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.

    1997-02-01

    Two dozen long period pulsars are separated from the swarm of ordinary pulsars by an obvious gap in the P versus Sd diagram (where Sd=log˙(P)+21.0), with a plausible upper boundary for ordinary pulsars. Possible pulsar evolutionary tracks are discussed to explain the diagram in terms of previously suggested scenarios of magnetic field decay. The (P-Sd) diagram is difficult to understand if there is no magnetic field decay during the active life of pulsars. However, if the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay exponentially, almost all slowly rotating pulsars must have been injected with a very long initial spin period of about 2 seconds, which seems impossible. Based on qualitative analyses, it is concluded that magnetic fields of neutron stars decay as a power-law, with a time scale related to the initial field strengths. The plausible boundary and the gap are suggested to naturally divide pulsars with distinct magnetic "genes", ie. pulsars which were born from strongly magnetized progenitors -- such as Bp stars, and pulsars born from normal massive stars. The possibility remains open that a fraction of slowly rotating pulsars were injected with long initial spin periods, while others would have a classical pulsar evolution history. It is suggested that PSR B1849+00 was born in the supernova remnant Kes-79 with an initial period of about 2 seconds.

  4. Super Strong Permanent Magnet Quadrupole for a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, Takanori

    2004-02-19

    The field strength generated by permanent magnets has been further extended by the introduction of saturated iron. A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) lens with such saturated iron is one of the candidates for the final focus lens for an e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Collider accelerator, because of its compactness and low power consumption. The first prototype of the PMQ has been fabricated and demonstrated to have an integrated strength of 28.5T with an overall length of 10 cm and a 7mm bore radius. Two drawbacks should be considered: its negative temperature coefficient of field strength and its fixed strength. A thermal compensation material is being tested to cure the first problem. The other problem may be solved by rotating sectioned magnet bricks, but that may lead to movement of the magnetic center and introduction of multipoles beyond some strict requirements.

  5. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  6. Damping of Sound Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    A method for numerical calculation of the sound wave damping and dispersion law in a strong centrifugal field of the order of 106 g is considered. The damping is defined from the width of the resonance peak for different wave vectors. In the strong centrifugal field damping of the sound waves essentially exceeds the damping in the quiescent gas.

  7. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  8. Lunar magnetic fields: Implications for resource utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1992-09-01

    It is well known that solar-wind-implanted hydrogen and helium-3 in lunar soils are potentially usable resources for future manned activities. For economical mining of these implanted gases, it is desirable that relative concentrations exceed that of typical soils. It has previously been noted that the monthly variation of solar wind flux on the surface due to lunar immersion in the geomagnetic tail may have measurable consequences for resource utilization. It is pointed out that, for a constant external flux, locally strong lunar crustal magnetic fields will exert the dominant influence on solar wind volatile implantation rates. In particular, the strongest lunar crustal magnetic fields will both deflect and focus incident ions in local regions leading to local enhancements of the incident ion flux. Thus, the most economical sites for extraction of solar-wind-implanted volatiles may be within or adjacent to strong crustal magnetic fields. In addition, solar wind ion deflection by crustal magnetic fields must be considered in evaluating the issue of whether remnant cometary ice or water-bearing minerals have survived in permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles. This is because sputter erosion of water ice by solar wind ions has been suggested to be an important ice loss mechanism within permanently shadowed regions. Thus, permanently shadowed regions that are also shielded from the solar wind by locally strong crustal fields could be the most promising locations for the survival of cometary ice. Additional numerical simulations are employed to show that solar wind ion deflection by strong lunar magnetic anomalies can produce local increases in the implantation rate of solar wind gases such as hydrogen.

  9. Lunar Magnetic Fields: Implications for Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that solar-wind-implanted hydrogen and helium-3 in lunar soils are potentially usable resources for future manned activities. For economical mining of these implanted gases, it is desirable that relative concentrations exceed that of typical soils. It has previously been noted that the monthly variation of solar wind flux on the surface due to lunar immersion in the geomagnetic tail may have measurable consequences for resource utilization. It is pointed out that, for a constant external flux, locally strong lunar crustal magnetic fields will exert the dominant influence on solar wind volatile implantation rates. In particular, the strongest lunar crustal magnetic fields will both deflect and focus incident ions in local regions leading to local enhancements of the incident ion flux. Thus, the most economical sites for extraction of solar-wind-implanted volatiles may be within or adjacent to strong crustal magnetic fields. In addition, solar wind ion deflection by crustal magnetic fields must be considered in evaluating the issue of whether remnant cometary ice or water-bearing minerals have survived in permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles. This is because sputter erosion of water ice by solar wind ions has been suggested to be an important ice loss mechanism within permanently shadowed regions. Thus, permanently shadowed regions that are also shielded from the solar wind by locally strong crustal fields could be the most promising locations for the survival of cometary ice. Additional numerical simulations are employed to show that solar wind ion deflection by strong lunar magnetic anomalies can produce local increases in the implantation rate of solar wind gases such as hydrogen.

  10. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  11. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of <4.2 ± 1.8 μG, three times lower than in the normal spirals. The strongest field among all LG dwarfs of 10 μG (at 2.64 GHz) is observed in the starburst dwarf IC 10. The production of total magnetic fields in dwarf systems appears to be regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization

  12. Strongly correlated states of a small cold-atom cloud from geometric gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Guenter, K. J.; Dalibard, J.; Grass, T.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    Using exact diagonalization for a small system of cold bosonic atoms, we analyze the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field is generated by a laser beam that couples two internal atomic states, and it is related to Berry's geometrical phase that emerges when an atom follows adiabatically one of the two eigenstates of the atom-laser coupling. Our approach allows us to go beyond the adiabatic approximation, and to characterize the generalized Laughlin wave functions that appear in the strong magnetic-field limit.

  13. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-drivenmore » system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.« less

  14. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  15. Rigorous numerical study of strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in all-dielectric magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Hutomo, Jessica; Nam, Donghee; Kostylev, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically a ˜350-fold local enhancement of the intensity of the in-plane microwave magnetic field in multilayered structures made from a magneto-insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer sandwiched between two non-magnetic layers with a high dielectric constant matching that of YIG. The enhancement is predicted for the excitation regime when the microwave magnetic field is induced inside the multilayer by the transducer of a stripline Broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (BFMR) setup. By means of a rigorous numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation consistently with the Maxwell's equations, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics in the multilayer. We reveal a strong photon-magnon coupling, which manifests itself as anti-crossing of the ferromagnetic resonance magnon mode supported by the YIG layer and the electromagnetic resonance mode supported by the whole multilayered structure. The frequency of the magnon mode depends on the external static magnetic field, which in our case is applied tangentially to the multilayer in the direction perpendicular to the microwave magnetic field induced by the stripline of the BFMR setup. The frequency of the electromagnetic mode is independent of the static magnetic field. Consequently, the predicted photon-magnon coupling is sensitive to the applied magnetic field and thus can be used in magnetically tuneable metamaterials based on simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability achievable thanks to the YIG layer. We also suggest that the predicted photon-magnon coupling may find applications in microwave quantum information systems.

  16. Rigorous numerical study of strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in all-dielectric magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Hutomo, Jessica; Nam, Donghee; Kostylev, Mikhail

    2015-05-21

    We demonstrate theoretically a ∼350-fold local enhancement of the intensity of the in-plane microwave magnetic field in multilayered structures made from a magneto-insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) layer sandwiched between two non-magnetic layers with a high dielectric constant matching that of YIG. The enhancement is predicted for the excitation regime when the microwave magnetic field is induced inside the multilayer by the transducer of a stripline Broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (BFMR) setup. By means of a rigorous numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation consistently with the Maxwell's equations, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics in the multilayer. We reveal a strong photon-magnon coupling, which manifests itself as anti-crossing of the ferromagnetic resonance magnon mode supported by the YIG layer and the electromagnetic resonance mode supported by the whole multilayered structure. The frequency of the magnon mode depends on the external static magnetic field, which in our case is applied tangentially to the multilayer in the direction perpendicular to the microwave magnetic field induced by the stripline of the BFMR setup. The frequency of the electromagnetic mode is independent of the static magnetic field. Consequently, the predicted photon-magnon coupling is sensitive to the applied magnetic field and thus can be used in magnetically tuneable metamaterials based on simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability achievable thanks to the YIG layer. We also suggest that the predicted photon-magnon coupling may find applications in microwave quantum information systems.

  17. Quantum oscillations in strong magnetic fields, berry phase, and superconductivity in three-dimensional topological Bi{sub 2–x}Cu{sub x}Se{sub 3} insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vedeneev, S. I. Knyazev, D. A.; Prudkoglyad, V. A.; Romanova, T. A.; Sadakov, A. V.

    2015-07-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations and 2D Hall oscillations are observed in 3D copper-doped Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} single crystals in magnetic fields up to 19.5 T at temperatures down to 0.3 K. Three samples with a high bulk carrier concentration (n ≈ 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} cm{sup –3}) are studied. The rotation of the samples in a magnetic field shows that these oscillations are related to numerous parallel 2D conducting channels 1–5 nm thick. Their basic kinetic parameters are found. Quantized Hall resistance R{sub xy} is detected in 1-nm-thick 2D conducting channels at high fields. The distance Δ(1/R{sub xy}) between the steps in the field dependence of 1/R{sub xy} is found to be constant for different Landau levels, 1.3e{sup 2}/h per 1-nm-thick layer. The constructed fan diagrams of 2D Landau levels for various angles of sample inclination with respect to the magnetic field direction allowed us to conclude that the Berry phase in the 2D conducting channels is γ ≈ π and independent of the magnetic field direction. When studying the angular dependence of upper resistive critical magnetic field H{sub c2} in one of the superconducting samples, we showed that it can be considered as a bulk superconductor consisting of superconducting layers with an effective thickness of about 50 nm.

  18. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, S.; Sidis, Y.; Lamago, D.; Heid, R.; Mignot, J.-M.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Ivanov, A.; Steffens, P.; Keller, T.; Wang, L.; Goering, E.; Weber, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron–phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron–phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe–Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin–phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  19. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi.

    PubMed

    Krannich, S; Sidis, Y; Lamago, D; Heid, R; Mignot, J-M; Löhneysen, H v; Ivanov, A; Steffens, P; Keller, T; Wang, L; Goering, E; Weber, F

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron-phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron-phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe-Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin-phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  20. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raedler, Karl-Heinz; Ness, Norman F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus only the dipole and quadrupole contributions are considered. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of earth and Jupiter. Compared to earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets.