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Sample records for strong spatial dependency

  1. Spatial arrangement of prey affects the shape of ratio-dependent functional response in strongly antagonistic predators.

    PubMed

    Hossie, Thomas J; Murray, Dennis L

    2016-04-01

    Predators play a key role in shaping natural ecosystems, and understanding the factors that influence a predator's kill rate is central to predicting predator-prey dynamics. While prey density has a well-established effect on predation, it is increasingly apparent that predator density also can critically influence predator kill rates. The effects of both prey and predator density on the functional response will, however, be determined in part by their distribution on the landscape. To examine this complex relationship we experimentally manipulated prey density, predator density, and prey distribution using a tadpole (prey)-dragonfly nymph (predator) system. Predation was strongly ratio-dependent irrespective of prey distribution, but the shape of the functional response changed from hyperbolic to sigmoidal when prey were clumped in space. This sigmoidal functional response reflected a relatively strong negative effect of predator interference on kill rates at low prey: predator ratios when prey were clumped. Prey aggregation also appeared to promote stabilizing density-dependent intraguild predation in our system. We conclude that systems with highly antagonistic predators and patchily distributed prey are more likely to experience stable dynamics, and that our understanding of the functional response will be improved by research that examines directly the mechanisms generating interference. PMID:27220200

  2. Spatial Structure of Seagrass Suggests That Size-Dependent Plant Traits Have a Strong Influence on the Distribution and Maintenance of Tropical Multispecies Meadows

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Jillian L. S.; Van Niel, Kimberly P.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Holmes, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Seagrass species in the tropics occur in multispecies meadows. How these meadows are maintained through species co-existence and what their ecological drivers may be has been an overarching question in seagrass biogeography. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of four co-existing species and infer potential ecological processes from these structures. Methods and Results Species presence/absence data were collected using underwater towed and dropped video cameras in Pulau Tinggi, Malaysia. The geostatistical method, utilizing semivariograms, was used to describe the spatial structure of Halophila spp, Halodule uninervis, Syringodium isoetifolium and Cymodocea serrulata. Species had spatial patterns that were oriented in the along-shore and across-shore directions, nested with larger species in meadow interiors, and consisted of multiple structures that indicate the influence of 2–3 underlying processes. The Linear Model of Coregionalization (LMC) was used to estimate the amount of variance contributing to the presence of a species at specific spatial scales. These distances were <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–50 m (fine-scale) and >50 m (broad-scale) in the along-shore; and <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–140 m (fine-scale) and >140 m (broad-scale) in the across-shore. The LMC suggests that smaller species (Halophila spp and H. uninervis) were most influenced by broad-scale processes such as hydrodynamics and water depth whereas large, localised species (S. isoetifolium and C. serrulata) were more influenced by finer-scale processes such as sediment burial, seagrass colonization and growth, and physical disturbance. Conclusion In this study, we provide evidence that spatial structure is distinct even when species occur in well-mixed multispecies meadows, and we suggest that size-dependent plant traits have a strong influence on the distribution and maintenance of tropical marine plant communities. This study offers a contrast from previous spatial

  3. Incorporating spatial dependence in regional frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of regional frequency analysis (RFA) is undermined by intersite dependence, which is usually ignored in parameter estimation. We propose a spatial index flood model where marginal generalized extreme value distributions are joined by an extreme-value copula characterized by a max-stable process for the spatial dependence. The parameters are estimated with a pairwise likelihood constructed from bivariate marginal generalized extreme value distributions. The estimators of model parameters and return levels can be more efficient than those from the traditional index flood model when the max-stable process fits the intersite dependence well. Through simulation, we compared the pairwise likelihood method with an L-moment method and an independence likelihood method under various spatial dependence models and dependence levels. The pairwise likelihood method was found to be the most efficient in mean squared error if the dependence model was correctly specified. When the dependence model was misspecified within the max-stable models, the pairwise likelihood method was still competitive relative to the other two methods. When the dependence model was not a max-stable model, the pairwise likelihood method led to serious bias in estimating the shape parameter and return levels, especially when the dependence was strong. In an illustration with annual maximum precipitation data from Switzerland, the pairwise likelihood method yielded remarkable reduction in the standard errors of return level estimates in comparison to the L-moment method. PMID:25745273

  4. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. PMID:24229128

  5. Spatial mode cleaning in radically asymmetric strongly focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heins, Alan M.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that a femtosecond laser pulse strongly focused in air can produce a highly symmetric damage pattern on glass. This damage pattern contains a series of near-perfect radial rings, with diameters much larger than the predicted focal spot diameter. These rings disappear when the experiment is conducted in vacuum, indicating atmospheric involvement. Surprisingly, the shape and size of the rings seem to be nearly independent of the shape of the generating laser beam, showing dramatic spatial mode cleaning. A "half moon" initial laser mode created by obscuring one side of the round beam produces rings of similar quality to those obtained with the unclipped beam. While spatial mode cleaning has previously been reported in filaments, this is the most dramatic demonstration of the effect that we are aware of. We argue that the effect is due primarily to ionization, in contrast to studies in longer filaments that attribute it to self-focusing.

  6. Spatial dependences among precipitation maxima over Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, S.; Naveau, P.

    2007-09-01

    For a wide range of applications in hydrology, the probability distribution of precipitation maxima represents a fundamental quantity to build dykes, propose flood planning policies, or more generally, to mitigate the impact of precipitation extremes. Classical Extreme Value Theory (EVT) has been applied in this context by usually assuming that precipitation maxima can be considered as Independent and Identically Distributed (IID) events, which approximately follow a Generalized Extreme Value distribution (GEV) at each recording site. In practice, weather stations records can not be considered as independent in space. Assessing the spatial dependences among precipitation maxima provided by two Belgium measurement networks is the main goal of this work. The pairwise dependences are estimated by a variogram of order one, also called madogram, that is specially tailored to be in compliance with spatial EVT and to capture EVT bivariate structures. Our analysis of Belgium precipitation maxima indicates that the degree of dependence varies greatly according to three factors: the distance between two stations, the season (summer or winter) and the precipitation accumulation duration (hourly, daily, monthly, etc.). Increasing the duration (from one hour to 20 days) strengthens the spatial dependence. The full independence is reached after about 50 km (100 km) for summer (winter) for a duration of one hour, while for long durations only after a few hundred kilometers. In addition this dependence is always larger in winter than in summer whatever is the duration. An explanation of these properties in terms of the dynamical processes dominating during the two seasons is advanced.

  7. Learning Visual Spatial Pooling by Strong PCA Dimension Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Haruo; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2016-07-01

    In visual modeling, invariance properties of visual cells are often explained by a pooling mechanism, in which outputs of neurons with similar selectivities to some stimulus parameters are integrated so as to gain some extent of invariance to other parameters. For example, the classical energy model of phase-invariant V1 complex cells pools model simple cells preferring similar orientation but different phases. Prior studies, such as independent subspace analysis, have shown that phase-invariance properties of V1 complex cells can be learned from spatial statistics of natural inputs. However, those previous approaches assumed a squaring nonlinearity on the neural outputs to capture energy correlation; such nonlinearity is arguably unnatural from a neurobiological viewpoint but hard to change due to its tight integration into their formalisms. Moreover, they used somewhat complicated objective functions requiring expensive computations for optimization. In this study, we show that visual spatial pooling can be learned in a much simpler way using strong dimension reduction based on principal component analysis. This approach learns to ignore a large part of detailed spatial structure of the input and thereby estimates a linear pooling matrix. Using this framework, we demonstrate that pooling of model V1 simple cells learned in this way, even with nonlinearities other than squaring, can reproduce standard tuning properties of V1 complex cells. For further understanding, we analyze several variants of the pooling model and argue that a reasonable pooling can generally be obtained from any kind of linear transformation that retains several of the first principal components and suppresses the remaining ones. In particular, we show how the classic Wiener filtering theory leads to one such variant. PMID:27171856

  8. Spatial aspects of tree mortality strongly differ between young and old-growth forests.

    PubMed

    Larson, Andrew J; Lutz, James A; Donato, Daniel C; Freund, James A; Swanson, Mark E; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Sprugel, Douglas G; Franklin, Jerry F

    2015-11-01

    Rates and spatial patterns of tree mortality are predicted to change during forest structural development. In young forests, mortality should be primarily density dependent due to competition for light, leading to an increasingly spatially uniform pattern of surviving trees. In contrast, mortality in old-growth forests should be primarily caused by contagious and spatially autocorrelated agents (e.g., insects, wind), causing spatial aggregation of surviving trees to increase through time. We tested these predictions by contrasting a three-decade record of tree mortality from replicated mapped permanent plots located in young (< 60-year-old) and old-growth (> 300-year-old) Abies amabilis forests. Trees in young forests died at a rate of 4.42% per year, whereas trees in old-growth forests died at 0.60% per year. Tree mortality in young forests was significantly aggregated, strongly density dependent, and caused live tree patterns to become more uniform through time. Mortality in old-growth forests was spatially aggregated, but was density independent and did not change the spatial pattern of surviving trees. These results extend current theory by demonstrating that density-dependent competitive mortality leading to increasingly uniform tree spacing in young forests ultimately transitions late in succession to a more diverse tree mortality regime that maintains spatial heterogeneity through time. PMID:27070005

  9. Coexisting orchid species have distinct mycorrhizal communities and display strong spatial segregation.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Because orchids are dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and establishment of seedlings, differences in the mycorrhizal communities associating with orchids can be expected to mediate the abundance, spatial distribution and coexistence of terrestrial orchids in natural communities. We assessed the small-scale spatial distribution of seven orchid species co-occurring in 25 × 25 m plots in two Mediterranean grasslands. In order to characterize the mycorrhizal community associating with each orchid species, 454 pyrosequencing was used. The extent of spatial clustering was assessed using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis. The community of mycorrhizal fungi consisted mainly of members of the Tulasnellaceae, Thelephoraceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, although sporadically members of the Sebacinaceae, Russulaceae and Cortinariaceae were observed. Pronounced differences in mycorrhizal communities were observed between species, whereas strong clustering and significant segregation characterized the spatial distribution of orchid species. However, spatial segregation was not significantly related to phylogenetic dissimilarity of fungal communities. Our results indicate that co-occurring orchid species have distinctive mycorrhizal communities and show strong spatial segregation, suggesting that mycorrhizal fungi are important factors driving niche partitioning in terrestrial orchids and may therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:24325257

  10. Spatial variation and density-dependent dispersal in competitive coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that dispersal from localities favourable to a species' growth and reproduction (sources) can prevent competitive exclusion in unfavourable localities (sinks). What is perhaps less well known is that too much emigration can undermine the viability of sources and cause regional competitive exclusion. Here, I investigate two biological mechanisms that reduce the cost of dispersal to source communities. The first involves increasing the spatial variation in the strength of competition such that sources can withstand high rates of emigration; the second involves reducing emigration from sources via density-dependent dispersal. I compare how different forms of spatial variation and modes of dispersal influence source viability, and hence source-sink coexistence, under dominance and pre-emptive competition. A key finding is that, while spatial variation substantially reduces dispersal costs under both types of competition, density-dependent dispersal does so only under dominance competition. For instance, when spatial variation in the strength of competition is high, coexistence is possible (regardless of the type of competition) even when sources experience high emigration rates; when spatial variation is low, coexistence is restricted even under low emigration rates. Under dominance competition, density-dependent dispersal has a strong effect on coexistence. For instance, when the emigration rate increases with density at an accelerating rate (Type III density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is possible even when spatial variation is quite low; when the emigration rate increases with density at a decelerating rate (Type II density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is restricted even when spatial variation is quite high. Under pre-emptive competition, density-dependent dispersal has only a marginal effect on coexistence. Thus, the diversity-reducing effects of high dispersal rates persist under pre-emptive competition even when dispersal is density

  11. Parrondo Games with Spatial Dependence, III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethier, S. N.; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-10-01

    We study Toral’s Parrondo games with N players and one-dimensional spatial dependence as modified by Xie et al. Specifically, we use computer graphics to sketch the Parrondo and anti-Parrondo regions for 3 ≤ N ≤ 9. Our work was motivated by a recent paper of Li et al., who applied a state space reduction method to this model, reducing the number of states from 2N to N + 1. We show that their reduced Markov chains are inconsistent with the model of Xie et al.

  12. Strong neutral spatial effects shape tree species distributions across life stages at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Hua; Lan, Guo-Yu; Sha, Li-Qing; Cao, Min; Tang, Yong; Li, Yi-De; Xu, Da-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, ecologists use lattice (regional summary) count data to simulate tree species distributions to explore species coexistence. However, no previous study has explicitly compared the difference between using lattice count and basal area data and analyzed species distributions at both individual species and community levels while simultaneously considering the combined scenarios of life stage and scale. In this study, we hypothesized that basal area data are more closely related to environmental variables than are count data because of strong environmental filtering effects. We also address the contribution of niche and the neutral (i.e., solely dependent on distance) factors to species distributions. Specifically, we separately modeled count data and basal area data while considering life stage and scale effects at the two levels with simultaneous autoregressive models and variation partitioning. A principal coordinates of neighbor matrix (PCNM) was used to model neutral spatial effects at the community level. The explained variations of species distribution data did not differ significantly between the two types of data at either the individual species level or the community level, indicating that the two types of data can be used nearly identically to model species distributions. Neutral spatial effects represented by spatial autoregressive parameters and the PCNM eigenfunctions drove species distributions on multiple scales, different life stages and individual species and community levels in this plot. We concluded that strong neutral spatial effects are the principal mechanisms underlying the species distributions and thus shape biodiversity spatial patterns. PMID:22666497

  13. Strong Neutral Spatial Effects Shape Tree Species Distributions across Life Stages at Multiple Scales

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Hua; Lan, Guo-Yu; Sha, Li-Qing; Cao, Min; Tang, Yong; Li, Yi-De; Xu, Da-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, ecologists use lattice (regional summary) count data to simulate tree species distributions to explore species coexistence. However, no previous study has explicitly compared the difference between using lattice count and basal area data and analyzed species distributions at both individual species and community levels while simultaneously considering the combined scenarios of life stage and scale. In this study, we hypothesized that basal area data are more closely related to environmental variables than are count data because of strong environmental filtering effects. We also address the contribution of niche and the neutral (i.e., solely dependent on distance) factors to species distributions. Specifically, we separately modeled count data and basal area data while considering life stage and scale effects at the two levels with simultaneous autoregressive models and variation partitioning. A principal coordinates of neighbor matrix (PCNM) was used to model neutral spatial effects at the community level. The explained variations of species distribution data did not differ significantly between the two types of data at either the individual species level or the community level, indicating that the two types of data can be used nearly identically to model species distributions. Neutral spatial effects represented by spatial autoregressive parameters and the PCNM eigenfunctions drove species distributions on multiple scales, different life stages and individual species and community levels in this plot. We concluded that strong neutral spatial effects are the principal mechanisms underlying the species distributions and thus shape biodiversity spatial patterns. PMID:22666497

  14. Satellite measurements reveal strong anisotropy in spatial coherence of climate variations over the Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Tian, Yudong; Yao, Tandong; Ou, Tinghai

    2016-01-01

    This study uses high-resolution, long-term satellite observations to evaluate the spatial scales of the climate variations across the Tibet Plateau (TP). Both land surface temperature and precipitation observations of more than 10 years were analysed with a special attention to eight existing ice-core sites in the TP. The temporal correlation for the monthly or annual anomalies between any two points decreases exponentially with their spatial distance, and we used the e-folding decay constant to quantify the spatial scales. We found that the spatial scales are strongly direction-dependent, with distinctive patterns in the west-east and south-north orientations, for example. Meanwhile, in the same directions the scales are largely symmetric backward and forward. Focusing on the west-east and south-north directions, we found the spatial coherence in the first is generally stronger than in the second. The annual surface temperature had typical spatial scales of 302-480 km, while the annual precipitation showed smaller scales of 111-182 km. The majority of the eight ice-core sites exhibit scales much smaller than the typical scales over the TP as a whole. These results provide important observational basis for the selection of appropriate downscaling strategies, deployment of climate-data collection networks, and interpreting paleoclimate reconstructions. PMID:27553388

  15. Satellite measurements reveal strong anisotropy in spatial coherence of climate variations over the Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Tian, Yudong; Yao, Tandong; Ou, Tinghai

    2016-01-01

    This study uses high-resolution, long-term satellite observations to evaluate the spatial scales of the climate variations across the Tibet Plateau (TP). Both land surface temperature and precipitation observations of more than 10 years were analysed with a special attention to eight existing ice-core sites in the TP. The temporal correlation for the monthly or annual anomalies between any two points decreases exponentially with their spatial distance, and we used the e-folding decay constant to quantify the spatial scales. We found that the spatial scales are strongly direction-dependent, with distinctive patterns in the west-east and south-north orientations, for example. Meanwhile, in the same directions the scales are largely symmetric backward and forward. Focusing on the west-east and south-north directions, we found the spatial coherence in the first is generally stronger than in the second. The annual surface temperature had typical spatial scales of 302–480 km, while the annual precipitation showed smaller scales of 111–182 km. The majority of the eight ice-core sites exhibit scales much smaller than the typical scales over the TP as a whole. These results provide important observational basis for the selection of appropriate downscaling strategies, deployment of climate-data collection networks, and interpreting paleoclimate reconstructions. PMID:27553388

  16. Dynamics of strongly coupled spatially distributed logistic equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, I. S.; Kashchenko, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a system of two logistic delay equations with spatially distributed coupling is studied. The coupling coefficient is assumed to be sufficiently large. Special nonlinear systems of parabolic equations are constructed such that the behavior of their solutions is determined in the first approximation by the dynamical properties of the original system.

  17. Role of density modulation in the spatially resolved dynamics of strongly confined liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Shibu; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-08-01

    Confinement by walls usually produces a strong modulation in the density of dense liquids near the walls. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we examine the effects of the density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics of a liquid confined between two parallel walls, using a resolution of a fraction of the interparticle distance in the liquid. The local dynamics is quantified by the relaxation time associated with the temporal autocorrelation function of the local density. We find that this local relaxation time varies in phase with the density modulation. The amplitude of the spatial modulation of the relaxation time can be quite large, depending on the characteristics of the wall and thermodynamic parameters of the liquid. To disentangle the effects of confinement and density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics, we compare the dynamics of a confined liquid with that of an unconfined one in which a similar density modulation is induced by an external potential. We find several differences indicating that density modulation alone cannot account for all the features seen in the spatially resolved dynamics of confined liquids. We also examine how the dynamics near a wall depends on the separation between the two walls and show that the features seen in our simulations persist in the limit of large wall separation.

  18. Role of density modulation in the spatially resolved dynamics of strongly confined liquids.

    PubMed

    Saw, Shibu; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-08-01

    Confinement by walls usually produces a strong modulation in the density of dense liquids near the walls. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we examine the effects of the density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics of a liquid confined between two parallel walls, using a resolution of a fraction of the interparticle distance in the liquid. The local dynamics is quantified by the relaxation time associated with the temporal autocorrelation function of the local density. We find that this local relaxation time varies in phase with the density modulation. The amplitude of the spatial modulation of the relaxation time can be quite large, depending on the characteristics of the wall and thermodynamic parameters of the liquid. To disentangle the effects of confinement and density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics, we compare the dynamics of a confined liquid with that of an unconfined one in which a similar density modulation is induced by an external potential. We find several differences indicating that density modulation alone cannot account for all the features seen in the spatially resolved dynamics of confined liquids. We also examine how the dynamics near a wall depends on the separation between the two walls and show that the features seen in our simulations persist in the limit of large wall separation. PMID:27497572

  19. Spatial Heterogeneity Induces Scale Dependent Rock Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, F.; Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.; Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.

    2014-12-01

    We carried out large-scale biaxial friction experiments (Fukuyama et al., 2012; 2014) using a pair of meter-sized Indian gabbro as specimens, whose contacting area was 1.5 × 0.1 m2, normal stress was up to 6.7 MPa and loading velocity was up to 3 × 10-2 m/s. After each experiment, we found localized damages (i.e. grooves) were generated on the fault surface and gouges were distributed around them. We confirmed work rate dependency of rock friction as revealed by centimeter-sized rock samples (Di Toro et al., 2011), but further found that the meter-sized rock friction starts to decrease at one order of magnitude smaller work rate than that of the centimeter sized rock (Yamashita et al., 2013, AGU fall meeting). Here, we concluded that this difference is caused by stress localization and associated increase in heterogeneity on the fault as shown by: 1) Total amount of deviations of each local shear stress from the average, which were monitored by strain gauge array, increased with the decrease in friction. 2) Friction coefficients were negatively correlated with degree of spatial heterogeneity evaluated from the distribution of grooves and gouges. 3) Melt textures were found in the collected gouges by microscopic observation using HRSEM. Based on these observations, we propose a stress localization model; the fault surfaces are composed of patched and non-patched areas with high and low normal stress, respectively. The high normal stress patch leads to high shear stress, high mechanical work and thus production of much wear material (gouge), which further causes additional increase in normal stress. Assuming that the local friction follows the results by centimeter-sized gabbro experiments, we numerically simulated a slip-dependent friction for both patched and non-patched areas, and successively reproduced a weakening in macroscopic friction. We confirmed that the work rate dependency of simulated friction was consistent with that of biaxial experiments (Fig. 1

  20. Spatial Dependence of Condensates in Strongly Coupled Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Shrock, Robert; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-03-25

    We analyze quark and gluon condensates in quantum chromodynamics. We suggest that these are localized inside hadrons, because the particles whose interactions are responsible for them are confined within these hadrons. This can explain the results of recent studies of gluon condensate contributions to vacuum correlators. We also give a general discussion of condensates in asymptotically free vectorial and chiral gauge theories.

  1. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  2. Parity-dependent localization in N strongly coupled chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Dietmar; Evangelou, S. N.

    2014-10-01

    Anderson localization of wave functions at zero energy in quasi-one-dimensional (1D) systems of N disordered chains with interchain coupling t is examined. Localization becomes weaker than for the 1D disordered chain (t =0) when t is smaller than the longitudinal hopping t'=1, and localization becomes usually much stronger when t ≫t'. This is not so for all N. We find "immunity" to strong localization for open (periodic) lateral boundary conditions when N is odd (a multiple of 4), with localization that is weaker than for t =0 and rather insensitive to t when t ≫t'. The peculiar N dependence and a critical scaling with N are explained by a perturbative treatment in t'/t, and the correspondence to a weakly disordered effective chain is shown. Our results could be relevant for experimental studies of localization in photonic waveguide arrays.

  3. Extinction risk depends strongly on factors contributing to stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Melbourne, Brett A; Hastings, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Extinction risk in natural populations depends on stochastic factors that affect individuals, and is estimated by incorporating such factors into stochastic models. Stochasticity can be divided into four categories, which include the probabilistic nature of birth and death at the level of individuals (demographic stochasticity), variation in population-level birth and death rates among times or locations (environmental stochasticity), the sex of individuals and variation in vital rates among individuals within a population (demographic heterogeneity). Mechanistic stochastic models that include all of these factors have not previously been developed to examine their combined effects on extinction risk. Here we derive a family of stochastic Ricker models using different combinations of all these stochastic factors, and show that extinction risk depends strongly on the combination of factors that contribute to stochasticity. Furthermore, we show that only with the full stochastic model can the relative importance of environmental and demographic variability, and therefore extinction risk, be correctly determined. Using the full model, we find that demographic sources of stochasticity are the prominent cause of variability in a laboratory population of Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle), whereas using only the standard simpler models would lead to the erroneous conclusion that environmental variability dominates. Our results demonstrate that current estimates of extinction risk for natural populations could be greatly underestimated because variability has been mistakenly attributed to the environment rather than the demographic factors described here that entail much higher extinction risk for the same variability level. PMID:18596809

  4. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals. PMID:27608987

  5. Measuring Spatial Dependence for Infectious Disease Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, M. Kate; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Global spatial clustering is the tendency of points, here cases of infectious disease, to occur closer together than expected by chance. The extent of global clustering can provide a window into the spatial scale of disease transmission, thereby providing insights into the mechanism of spread, and informing optimal surveillance and control. Here the authors present an interpretable measure of spatial clustering, τ, which can be understood as a measure of relative risk. When biological or temporal information can be used to identify sets of potentially linked and likely unlinked cases, this measure can be estimated without knowledge of the underlying population distribution. The greater our ability to distinguish closely related (i.e., separated by few generations of transmission) from more distantly related cases, the more closely τ will track the true scale of transmission. The authors illustrate this approach using examples from the analyses of HIV, dengue and measles, and provide an R package implementing the methods described. The statistic presented, and measures of global clustering in general, can be powerful tools for analysis of spatially resolved data on infectious diseases. PMID:27196422

  6. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  7. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  8. Uncertainty Quantification for Characterizing Spatial Tail Dependence under Statistical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S.; Paciorek, C. J.; Prabhat, M.; Byna, S.; Collins, W.; Wehner, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale weather systems such as Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) may affect extreme climate events, in particular resulting in high spatial coherence across regions. We use methods from statistical extreme value theory to characterize the spatial dependence of extremes as a function of spatial distance. Our focus in this work is characterizing uncertainty in our understanding of how the spatial dependence of extremes in climate models We investigate the influence of ARs on the spatial dependence structure of extreme precipitation from CMIP5 simulations under climate change. We fit statistical models that treat initial condition ensemble members as independent data replicates and uses bootstrapping (across yearlong blocks of data) to estimate uncertainty from having only limited model runs. We also focus on multi-model ensembles as random draws of CMIP5 model runs and approximate the uncertainty for simulating the behavior of tail dependence across models. Preliminary results from four CMIP5 models show that projected AR events bring more severe rainfall with less dependent pattern between locations under high emissions scenario (RCP8.5) during 2076-2100 than for the historical run during 1981-2005. Within the UQ framework, spatial dependence between nearby locations is estimated more precisely, showing narrower confidence intervals, than the spatial dependence measure for locations further apart.

  9. Strong Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption from Peat Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M. S.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Knue, J.; Samburova, V.; Watts, A.; Moosmüller, H.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Zielinska, B.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Tsibart, A.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, organic soils and peats may store as much as 600 Gt of terrestrial carbon, representing 20 - 30% of the planet's terrestrial organic carbon mass. This is approximately the same carbon mass as that contained in Earth's atmosphere, despite peatlands occupying only 3% of its surface. Effects of fires in these ecosystems are of global concern due to their potential for enormous carbon release into the atmosphere. The implications for contributions of peat fires to the global carbon cycle and radiative forcing scenarios are significant. Combustion of peat mostly takes place in the low temperature, smoldering phase of a fire. It consumes carbon that may have accumulated over a period of hundreds to thousands of years. In comparison, combustion of aboveground biomass fuels releases carbon that has accumulated much more recently, generally over a period of years or decades. Here, we report our findings on characterization of emissions from laboratory combustion of peat soils from three locations representing the biomes in which these soils occur. Peat samples from Alaska and Florida (USA) and Siberia (Russia) were burned at two different fuel moisture levels. Burns were conducted in an 8-m3 volume combustion chamber located at the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV, USA. We report significant brown carbon production from combustion of all three peat soils. We used a multispectral (405, 532, 781 nm) photoacoustic instrument equipped with integrating nephelometer to measure the wavelength-dependent aerosol light absorption and scattering. Absorption Ångström exponents (between 405 and 532 nm) as high as ten were observed, revealing strongly enhanced aerosol light absorption in the violet and blue wavelengths. Single scattering albedos (SSA) of 0.94 and 0.99 were observed at 405 and 532 nm, respectively, for the same sample. Variability of these optical parameters will be discussed as a function of fuel and combustion conditions. Other real-time measurements

  10. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-21

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/r{sup D}propor tor{sup -D} where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A 'box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the 'capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term 'fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis.The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial

  11. Spatial dependence of pairing in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Balbutsev, E. B.; Malov, L. A.; Schuck, P.

    2011-11-15

    The solution of time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations by the Wignerfunction-moments method leads to the appearance of refined low-lying modes whose description requires the accurate knowledge of the anomalous density matrix. It is shown that calculations with Woods-Saxon potential satisfy this requirement, producing an anomalous density matrix of the same quality as more complicated calculations with realistic forces.

  12. The Developmental Dependency Between Two Piagetian Spatial Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guay, Roland B.

    Piaget and Inhelder, in The Child's Conception of Space (1956), described the coordination of viewpoints (CV) spatial operation as one of the prerequisites to the development of the rotation and development (RD) spatial operation. This study investigated this developmental dependency notion and also evaluated the effects of age and sex on the…

  13. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  14. A strong seasonal dependence in the Martian hydrogen exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Clarke, John T.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Mayyasi, Majd

    2015-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope and Mars Express observed unexpected rapid changes in the Martian hydrogen exosphere involving a decrease in scattered Lyman α intensity in fall 2007 (solar longitude, Ls = 331°-345°). These changes detected were speculated to be a combination of seasonal variation and/or dust storms and lower atmospheric dynamics. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope observations of Mars in 2014 over a broad range of heliocentric distances and seasons (Ls = 138°-232°) which indicate a factor of ~3.5 change in Martian Lyman α brightness associated with a factor of ~5.4 variation of hydrogen escape flux in the absence of global dust storms and significant solar variability. We thus conclude that seasonal effects have a strong influence on the hydrogen exosphere, which in turn has major implications for the processes that control water supply to the Martian upper atmosphere and the history of water escape from Mars.

  15. Strongly scale-dependent polyspectra from curvaton self-interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Christian T.; Enqvist, Kari; Nurmi, Sami; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kari.enqvist@helsinki.fi E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2011-11-01

    We study the scale dependence of the non-linearity parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} in curvaton models with self-interactions. We show that the spectral indices n{sub f{sub N{sub L}}} = d ln|f{sub NL}|/d ln k and n{sub g{sub N{sub L}}} = d ln|g{sub NL}|/d ln k can take values much greater than the slow-roll parameters and the spectral index of the power spectrum. This means that the scale-dependence of the bi and trispectrum could be easily observable in this scenario with Planck, which would lead to tight additional constraints on the model. Inspite of the highly non-trivial behaviour of f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} in the curvaton models with self-interactions, we find that the model can be falsified if g{sub NL}(k) is also observed.

  16. PARTICLE CLUMPING AND PLANETESIMAL FORMATION DEPEND STRONGLY ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Youdin, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2009-10-20

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle clumping and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks with varying amounts of solid material. As centimeter-size pebbles settle to the mid-plane, turbulence develops through vertical shearing and streaming instabilities. We find that when the pebble-to-gas column density ratio is 0.01, corresponding roughly to solar metallicity, clumping is weak, so the pebble density rarely exceeds the gas density. Doubling the column density ratio leads to a dramatic increase in clumping, with characteristic particle densities more than 10 times the gas density and maximum densities reaching several thousand times the gas density. This is consistent with unstratified simulations of the streaming instability that show strong clumping in particle-dominated flows. The clumps readily contract gravitationally into interacting planetesimals on the order of 100 km in radius. Our results suggest that the correlation between host star metallicity and exoplanets may reflect the early stages of planet formation. We further speculate that initially low-metallicity disks can be particle enriched during the gas dispersal phase, leading to a late burst of planetesimal formation.

  17. Probing the strong boundary shape dependence of the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Emig, T; Hanke, A; Golestanian, R; Kardar, M

    2001-12-24

    We study the geometry dependence of the Casimir energy for deformed metal plates by a path integral quantization of the electromagnetic field. For the first time, we give a complete analytical result for the deformation induced change in Casimir energy delta E in an experimentally testable, nontrivial geometry, consisting of a flat and a corrugated plate. Our results show an interesting crossover for delta E as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H, to the corrugation length lambda: For lambdaH. PMID:11800828

  18. Spatial dependence of the pairing gap in superfluid nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vigezzi, E.; Pastore, A.; Potel, G.; Barranco, F.

    2009-05-04

    The spatial structure of pairing correlations in {sup 120}Sn is investigated making use of both the bare nucleon-nucleon potential and the interaction induced by the exchange of collective vibrations, taking into account self-energy effects. The resulting pairing gap is strongly peaked on the nuclear surface.

  19. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  20. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  1. Modeling Spatial Dependencies and Semantic Concepts in Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is the process of discovering new patterns and relationships in large datasets. However, several studies have shown that general data mining techniques often fail to extract meaningful patterns and relationships from the spatial data owing to the violation of fundamental geospatial principles. In this tutorial, we introduce basic principles behind explicit modeling of spatial and semantic concepts in data mining. In particular, we focus on modeling these concepts in the widely used classification, clustering, and prediction algorithms. Classification is the process of learning a structure or model (from user given inputs) and applying the known model to the new data. Clustering is the process of discovering groups and structures in the data that are ``similar,'' without applying any known structures in the data. Prediction is the process of finding a function that models (explains) the data with least error. One common assumption among all these methods is that the data is independent and identically distributed. Such assumptions do not hold well in spatial data, where spatial dependency and spatial heterogeneity are a norm. In addition, spatial semantics are often ignored by the data mining algorithms. In this tutorial we cover recent advances in explicitly modeling of spatial dependencies and semantic concepts in data mining.

  2. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven

  3. Balanced Networks of Spiking Neurons with Spatially Dependent Recurrent Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Doiron, Brent

    2014-04-01

    Networks of model neurons with balanced recurrent excitation and inhibition capture the irregular and asynchronous spiking activity reported in cortex. While mean-field theories of spatially homogeneous balanced networks are well understood, a mean-field analysis of spatially heterogeneous balanced networks has not been fully developed. We extend the analysis of balanced networks to include a connection probability that depends on the spatial separation between neurons. In the continuum limit, we derive that stable, balanced firing rate solutions require that the spatial spread of external inputs be broader than that of recurrent excitation, which in turn must be broader than or equal to that of recurrent inhibition. Notably, this implies that network models with broad recurrent inhibition are inconsistent with the balanced state. For finite size networks, we investigate the pattern-forming dynamics arising when balanced conditions are not satisfied. Our study highlights the new challenges that balanced networks pose for the spatiotemporal dynamics of complex systems.

  4. (1 + 2)-Dimensional sub-strongly nonlocal spatial optical solitons: Perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongyan; Ouyang, Shigen; Guo, Qi; Wu, Lijun

    2007-07-01

    By extending the (1 + 1)-dimensional [(1 + 1)-D] perturbation method suggested by Ouyang et al. [S. Ouyang, Q. Guo, W. Hu, Phys. Rev. E. 74 (2006) 036622] to the (1 + 2)-D case, we obtain a fundamental soliton solution to the (1 + 2)-D nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NNLSE) with a Gaussian-type response function for the sub-strongly nonlocal case. Numerical simulations show that the soliton solution obtained in this paper can describe the soliton states in both the sub-strongly nonlocal case and the strongly nonlocal case. It is found that the phase constant and the power of the (1 + 2)-D strongly nonlocal spatial optical soliton with a Gaussian-type response function are both in inverse proportion to the 4th power of its beam width.

  5. Level dependence of spatial processing in the primate auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization in both humans and monkeys is tolerant to changes in sound levels. The underlying neural mechanism, however, is not well understood. This study reports the level dependence of individual neurons' spatial receptive fields (SRFs) in the primary auditory cortex (A1) and the adjacent caudal field in awake marmoset monkeys. We found that most neurons' excitatory SRF components were spatially confined in response to broadband noise stimuli delivered from the upper frontal sound field. Approximately half the recorded neurons exhibited little change in spatial tuning width over a ∼20-dB change in sound level, whereas the remaining neurons showed either expansion or contraction in their tuning widths. Increased sound levels did not alter the percent distribution of tuning width for neurons collected in either cortical field. The population-averaged responses remained tuned between 30- and 80-dB sound pressure levels for neuronal groups preferring contralateral, midline, and ipsilateral locations. We further investigated the spatial extent and level dependence of the suppressive component of SRFs using a pair of sequentially presented stimuli. Forward suppression was observed when the stimuli were delivered from “far” locations, distant to the excitatory center of an SRF. In contrast to spatially confined excitation, the strength of suppression typically increased with stimulus level at both the excitatory center and far regions of an SRF. These findings indicate that although the spatial tuning of individual neurons varied with stimulus levels, their ensemble responses were level tolerant. Widespread spatial suppression may play an important role in limiting the sizes of SRFs at high sound levels in the auditory cortex. PMID:22592309

  6. Neural correlates of stimulus spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianjun; Liu, Ruilong; Wang, Ke; Hua, Tianmiao; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Psychophysical studies on human and non-human vertebrate species have shown that visual contrast sensitivity function (CSF) peaks at a certain stimulus spatial frequency and declines in both lower and higher spatial frequencies. The underlying neural substrate and mechanisms remain in debate. Here, we investigated the role of primary visual cortex (V1: area 17) in spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection in cats. Perceptual CSFs of three cats were measured using a two-alternative forced choice task. The responses of V1 neurons to their optimal visual stimuli in a range of luminance contrast levels (from 0 to 1.0) were recorded subsequently using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques. The contrast sensitivity of each neuron was determined. The neuronal CSF for each cat was constructed from the mean contrast sensitivity of neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. Results (1) The perceptual and neuronal CSFs of each of the three cats exhibited a similar shape with peak amplitude near 0.4 c/deg. (2) The neuronal CSF of each cat was highly correlated with its perceptual CSF. (3) V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies had different contrast gains. Conclusion (1) Contrast detection of visual stimuli with different spatial frequencies may likely involve population coding of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. (2) Difference in contrast-gain may underlie the observed contrast sensitivity variation of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies, possibly from either evolution or postnatal visual experiences. PMID:23314692

  7. The goodness of generalized STAR in spatial dependency observations modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhaiyar, Utriweni

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and time dependencies among observations are demanded for space time modeling. In order to estimate unobserved sites in the near future, we may apply Kriging methods to the forecast results of observed sites. Here we considered two ways of forecasting, first is by using AR model and second is by using GSTAR model. We compare both ways and observe the goodness of GSTAR model, relative to the AR model, in spatial dependence observations through some numerical studies and case study. It is obtained that GSTAR model gives the better forecasting result than AR model, which always perform overestimate values. Since the Kriging interpolation is better for linear approximation then AR model will give better interpolated observations if the site has higher real observations than other sites. This result also confirms the stationarity of GSTAR model.

  8. Strong terahertz radiation generation by beating of two spatial-triangular beams in collisional magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hematizadeh, Ayoob; Bakhtiari, Farhad; Jazayeri, Seyed Masud; Ghafary, Bijan

    2016-05-01

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) radiation generation is proposed by beating of two spatial-triangular laser beams in plasma with a spatially periodic density when electron-neutral collisions have taken into account. In this process, the laser beams exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons of the plasma and impart the oscillatory velocity at the difference frequency in the presence of a static magnetic field which is applied parallel to the direction of the lasers. We show that higher efficiency and stronger THz radiation are achieved when the parallel magnetic field is used to compare the perpendicular magnetic field. The effects of beam width of lasers, collision frequency, periodicity of density ripples, and magnetic field strength are analyzed for strong THz radiation generation. The THz field of the emitted radiations is found to be highly sensitive to collision frequency and magnetic field strength. In this scheme with the optimization of plasma parameters, the efficiency of order 21% is achieved.

  9. Spatial dependence clusters in the estimation of forest structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulder, Michael Albert

    1999-12-01

    In this thesis we provide a summary of the methods by which remote sensing may be applied in forestry, while also acknowledging the various limitations which are faced. The application of spatial statistics to high spatial resolution imagery is explored as a means of increasing the information which may be extracted from digital images. A number of high spatial resolution optical remote sensing satellites that are soon to be launched will increase the availability of imagery for the monitoring of forest structure. This technological advancement is timely as current forest management practices have been altered to reflect the need for sustainable ecosystem level management. The low accuracy level at which forest structural parameters have been estimated in the past is partly due to low image spatial resolution. A large pixel is often composed of a number of surface features, resulting in a spectral value which is due to the reflectance characteristics of all surface features within that pixel. In the case of small pixels, a portion of a surface feature may be represented by a single pixel. When a single pixel represents a portion of a surface object, the potential to isolate distinct surface features exists. Spatial statistics, such as the Gets statistic, provide for an image processing method to isolate distinct surface features. In this thesis, high spatial resolution imagery sensed over a forested landscape is processed with spatial statistics to combine distinct image objects into clusters, representing individual or groups of trees. Tree clusters are a means to deal with the inevitable foliage overlap which occurs within complex mixed and deciduous forest stands. The generation of image objects, that is, clusters, is necessary to deal with the presence of spectrally mixed pixels. The ability to estimate forest inventory and biophysical parameters from image clusters generated from spatially dependent image features is tested in this thesis. The inventory

  10. Spatial frequency dependence of target signature for infrared performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Bosq, Todd; Olson, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    The standard model used to describe the performance of infrared imagers is the U.S. Army imaging system target acquisition model, based on the targeting task performance metric. The model is characterized by the resolution and sensitivity of the sensor as well as the contrast and task difficulty of the target set. The contrast of the target is defined as a spatial average contrast. The model treats the contrast of the target set as spatially white, or constant, over the bandlimit of the sensor. Previous experiments have shown that this assumption is valid under normal conditions and typical target sets. However, outside of these conditions, the treatment of target signature can become the limiting factor affecting model performance accuracy. This paper examines target signature more carefully. The spatial frequency dependence of the standard U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision 12 and 8 tracked vehicle target sets is described. The results of human perception experiments are modeled and evaluated using both frequency dependent and independent target signature definitions. Finally the function of task difficulty and its relationship to a target set is discussed.

  11. Reference frames in virtual spatial navigation are viewpoint dependent

    PubMed Central

    Török, Ágoston; Nguyen, T. Peter; Kolozsvári, Orsolya; Buchanan, Robert J.; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the mammalian brain relies on a cognitive map of the environment. Such cognitive maps enable us, for example, to take the optimal route from a given location to a known target. The formation of these maps is naturally influenced by our perception of the environment, meaning it is dependent on factors such as our viewpoint and choice of reference frame. Yet, it is unknown how these factors influence the construction of cognitive maps. Here, we evaluated how various combinations of viewpoints and reference frames affect subjects' performance when they navigated in a bounded virtual environment without landmarks. We measured both their path length and time efficiency and found that (1) ground perspective was associated with egocentric frame of reference, (2) aerial perspective was associated with allocentric frame of reference, (3) there was no appreciable performance difference between first and third person egocentric viewing positions and (4) while none of these effects were dependent on gender, males tended to perform better in general. Our study provides evidence that there are inherent associations between visual perspectives and cognitive reference frames. This result has implications about the mechanisms of path integration in the human brain and may also inspire designs of virtual reality applications. Lastly, we demonstrated the effective use of a tablet PC and spatial navigation tasks for studying spatial and cognitive aspects of human memory. PMID:25249956

  12. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  13. Temporal and spatial characteristics of the formation of strong noctilucent clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliani, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Hoffmann, P.

    2013-11-01

    The 3-D Lagrangian model LIMA/ICE is used to track ice particles forming noctilucent clouds (NLC). Fifty strong NLC events at three different latitudes are analyzed. Visible particles are traced back to their nucleation sites as well as traced forward until sublimation. Particle nucleation occurs in bursts within areas of high supersaturation. We characterize NLC particle growth and vertical transport: Slow growth occurs below the mesopause up to ≈6 h before observation. It is followed by rapid growth within the high water vapor zone around 83 km during phases of upward winds. At the same time temperature perturbations in these cold phases of waves lead to a high supersaturation. Sublimation occurs quickly after maximum brightness, since sedimentation into subsaturated altitudes is accelerated by downward winds. The duration of particle visibility (β>10% of observed backscatter) is only ≈5 h. The mean particle age of all NLC events at 69°N is around 36 h, but particle age varies by more than 24 h for the different events studied. Although the age of particles in strong NLC depends on latitude, the visibility period does not. The brightness of strong NLC depends mainly on background conditions during the last 3 h before observation. This implies that local measurements, e.g. by lidar, are representative for the morphology of strong NLC on scales of several hundred kilometers.

  14. Correlated multielectron systems in strong laser fields: A multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Koch, O.; Kreuzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach for the description of correlated few-electron dynamics in the presence of strong laser fields is introduced and a comprehensive description of the method is given. Total ionization and electron spectra for the ground and first excited ionic channels are calculated for one-dimensional model systems with up to six active electrons. Strong correlation effects are found in the shape of photoelectron peaks and the dependence of ionization on molecule size.

  15. Spatially heterogeneous populations with mixed negative and positive local density dependence.

    PubMed

    Knipl, Diána; Röst, Gergely

    2016-06-01

    Identifying the steady states of a population is a key issue in theoretical ecology, that includes the study of spatially heterogeneous populations. There are several examples of real ecosystems in patchy environments where the habitats are heterogeneous in their local density dependence. We investigate a multi-patch model of a single species with spatial dispersal, where the growth of the local population is logistic in some localities (negative density dependence) while other patches exhibit a strong Allee effect (positive density dependence). When the local dynamics is logistic in each patch and the habitats are interconnected by dispersal then the total population has only the extinction steady state and a componentwise positive equilibrium, corresponding to persistence in each patch. We show that animal populations in patchy environments can have a large number of steady states if local density dependence varies over the locations. It is demonstrated that, depending on the network topology of migration routes between the patches, the interaction of spatial dispersal and local density dependence can create a variety of coexisting stable positive equilibria. We give a detailed description of the multiple ways dispersal can rescue local populations from extinction. PMID:26801607

  16. Spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses in vivo are strongly dependent on network context.

    PubMed

    Civillico, Eugene F; Contreras, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Sensory responses in neocortex are strongly modulated by changes in brain state, such as those observed between sleep stages or attentional levels. However, the specific effects of network state changes on the spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses are poorly understood. The slow oscillation, which is observed in neocortex under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia and is characterized by alternating depolarizing (up-states) and hyperpolarizing (down-states) phases, provides an opportunity to study the state-dependence of primary sensory responses in large networks. Here we used voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to record the spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses and local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) recordings to monitor the ongoing brain state in which the sensory responses occurred. Despite a rich variability of slow oscillation patterns, sensory responses showed a consistent relationship with the ongoing oscillation and triggered a new up-state only after the termination of the refractory period that followed the preceding oscillatory cycle. We show that spatiotemporal properties of whisker-evoked responses are highly dependent on their timing with regard to the ongoing oscillation. In both the up- and down-states, responses spread across large portions of the barrel field, although the up-state responses were reduced in total area due to their sparseness. The depolarizing response in the up-state showed a tendency to propagate along the rows, with an amplitude and slope favoring the higher-numbered arcs. In the up-state, but not in the down-state, the depolarizing response was followed by a hyperpolarizing wave with a consistent spatial structure. We measured the suppression of whisker-evoked responses by a preceding response at 100 ms, and found that suppression showed the same spatial asymmetry as the depolarization. Because the resting level of cells in the up-state is likely to be closer to that in the awake animal, we

  17. Temporal and spatial manipulation of the recolliding wave packet in strong-field photoelectron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingrui; Li, Yang; Zhou, Yueming; Li, Min; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically demonstrate temporal and spatial manipulation of electron wave packets involved in strong-field photoelectron holography (SFPH) with the orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. By varying the relative phase of the two-color fields, the recollision time of the returning wave packet can be accurately controlled, which allows us to switch off and on the holographic interference. Moreover, the recollision angles of the returning electron wave packet can be arbitrarily controlled via changing the relative intensity of the two-color fields, and thus the structure information of the target is encoded in the hologram by the recollision electron wave packet from different angles. This makes the SFPH a powerful technique of imaging the molecular structure as well as ultrafast dynamics on an attosecond time scale.

  18. Non-monotonic temperature dependence of thermopower in strongly correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2011-01-01

    We examine the temperature dependence of thermopower in the single-band Hubbard model using dynamical mean-field theory. The strong Coulomb interaction brings about the coherent-to-incoherent crossover as temperature increases. As a result, the thermopower exhibits nonmonotonic temperature dependence and asymptotically approaches values given by the Mott-Heikes formula. In the light of our theoretical result, we discuss the thermopower in some transition metal oxides. The magnetic field dependence of the thermopower is also discussed.

  19. Spatially dependent relative diffusion of nanoparticles in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2013-08-01

    We formulate and apply a microscopic statistical-mechanical theory for the non-hydrodynamic relative diffusion coefficient of a pair of spherical nanoparticles in entangled polymer melts based on a combination of Brownian motion, mode-coupling, and polymer physics ideas. The focus is on the mesoscopic regime where particles are larger than the entanglement spacing. The dependence of the non-hydrodynamic friction on interparticle separation, degree of entanglement, and tube diameter is systematically studied. The overall magnitude of the relative diffusivity is controlled by the ratio of the particle to tube diameter and the number of entanglements in a manner reminiscent of single-particle self-diffusion and Stokes-Einstein violations. A rich spatial separation dependence of mobility enhancement relative to the hydrodynamic behavior is predicted even for very large particles, and the asymptotic dependence is derived analytically in the small and large separation limits. Particle separations in excess of 100 nm are sometimes required to recover the hydrodynamic limit. The effects of local polymer-particle packing correlations are found to be weak, and the non-hydrodynamic effects are also small for unentangled melts.

  20. Urban Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Neighborhoods: An Examination of Spatial Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Judith K.; Lambert, Sharon F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatial dependence exists when the variation between observations is dependent on spatial location. In the present study, geostatistical methods were used to examine spatial dependence in adolescents' perceptions of their neighborhoods: whether adolescents living in close proximity perceived their neighborhoods more similarly than adolescents…

  1. Identifying the spatial scale of land use that most strongly influences overall river ecosystem health score.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Fran; Peterson, Erin E; Boone, Ed L; Sippel, Suzanne; Bunn, Stuart E; Harch, Bronwyn D

    2012-12-01

    Catchment and riparian degradation has resulted in declining ecosystem health of streams worldwide. With restoration a priority in many regions, there is an increasing interest in the scale at which land use influences stream ecosystem health. Our goal was to use a substantial data set collected as part of a monitoring program (the Southeast Queensland, Australia, Ecological Health Monitoring Program data set, collected at 116 sites over six years) to identify the spatial scale of land use, or the combination of spatial scales, that most strongly influences overall ecosystem health. In addition, we aimed to determine whether the most influential scale differed for different aspects of ecosystem health. We used linear-mixed models and a Bayesian model-averaging approach to generate models for the overall aggregated ecosystem health score and for each of the five component indicators (fish, macroinvertebrates, water quality, nutrients, and ecosystem processes) that make up the score. Dense forest close to the survey site, mid-dense forest in the hydrologically active near-stream areas of the catchment, urbanization in the riparian buffer, and tree cover at the reach scale were all significant in explaining ecosystem health, suggesting an overriding influence of forest cover, particularly close to the stream. Season and antecedent rainfall were also important explanatory variables, with some land-use variables showing significant seasonal interactions. There were also differential influences of land use for each of the component indicators. Our approach is useful given that restoring general ecosystem health is the focus of many stream restoration projects; it allowed us to predict the scale and catchment position of restoration that would result in the greatest improvement of ecosystem health in the regions streams and rivers. The models we generated suggested that good ecosystem health can be maintained in catchments where 80% of hydrologically active areas in close

  2. Thermal convection in a 3D spherical shell with strongly temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, K.; Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2004-12-01

    The style of convection in planetary mantles is presumably dominated by the strong dependence of the viscosity of the mantle material on temperature and pressure. While several efforts have been undertaken in cartesian geometry to investigate convection in media with strong temperature dependent viscosity, spherical models are still in their infancy and still limited to modest parameters. Spectral approaches are usually employed for spherical convection models which do not allow to take into account lateral variations, like temperature dependent viscosity. We have developed a scheme, based on a finite volume discretization, to treat convection in a spherical shell with strong temperature dependent viscosity. Our approach has been particularly tailored to run efficiently on parallel computers. The spherical shell is topologically divided into six cubes. The equations are formulated in primitive variables, and are treated in the cartesian cubes. In order to ensure mass conservation a SIMPLER pressure correction procedure is applied and to handle strong viscosity variations up to Δ η =106 and high Rayleigh-numbers up to Ra=108 the pressure correction algorithm is combined with a pressure weighted interpolation method to satisfy the incompressibility condition and to avoid oscillations. We study thermal convection in a basal and mixed-mode heated shell with stress free and isothermal boundary conditions, as a function of the Rayleigh-number and viscosity contrast. Besides the temperature dependence we have further explored the effects of pressure on the viscosity. As a general result we observe the existence of three regimes (mobile, sluggish and stagnant lid), characterized by the type of surface motion. Laterally averaged depth-profiles of velocity, temperature and viscosity exhibit significant deviations from the isoviscous case. As compared to cartesian geometries, convection in a spherical shell possesses strong memory for the initial state. At strong

  3. TE-dependent spatial and spectral specificity of functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changwei W; Gu, Hong; Zou, Qihong; Lu, Hanbing; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2012-02-15

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous fluctuations in the resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) signal may reflect fluctuations in transverse relaxation time (T(2)(*)) rather than spin density (S(0)). However, such S(0) and T(2)(*) features have not been well characterized. In this study, spatial and spectral characteristics of functional connectivity on sensorimotor, default-mode, dorsal attention, and primary visual systems were examined using a multiple gradient-echo sequence at 3T. In the spatial domain, we found broad, local correlations at short echo times (TE ≤ 14 ms) due to dominant S(0) contribution, whereas long-range connections mediated by T(2)(*) became explicit at TEs longer than 22 ms. In the frequency domain, compared with the flat spectrum of S(0), spectral power of the T(2)(*)-weighted signal elevated significantly with increasing TE, particularly in the frequency ranges of 0.008-0.023 Hz and 0.037-0.043 Hz. Using the S(0) spectrum as a reference, we propose two indices to measure spectral signal change (SSC) and spectral contrast-to-noise ratio (SCNR), respectively, for quantifying the RS-fMRI signal. These indices demonstrated TE dependency of connectivity-related fluctuation strength, resembling functional contrasts in activation-based fMRI. These findings further confirm that large-scale functional circuit connectivity based on BOLD contrast may be constrained within specific frequency ranges in every brain network, and the spectral features of S(0) and T(2)(*) could be valuable for interpreting and quantifying RS-fMRI data. PMID:22119650

  4. Spatial Visualization Abilities of Field Dependent/Independent Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Ersen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Spatial skills have been a significant area of research in educational psychology for more years and it has two major dimensions as spatial visualization and spatial orientation. Mathematics educators acknowledge the influence of cognitive styles in the learning of mathematics. There are various recognized cognitive styles in the…

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution of GPS-TEC anomalies prior to the strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuying; Wu, Yun; Zhou, Yiyan; Gao, Yang

    2013-06-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most destructive and harmful natural disasters, especially in recent years, the 2008/5/12 Wenchuan M7.9 earthquake, the 2011/3/11 Tohoku M9.0 earthquake and the 2012/4/11 Sumatra M8.6 earthquake have caused a significant impact to the human life. In this paper, we make a study of the temporal and spatial distribution of the Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS TEC) anomalies prior to the three strong earthquakes by the method of statistical analysis. Our results show that the pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies are mainly positive anomalies and take the shape of a double-crest structure with a trough near the epicenter. The ionospheric anomalies do not coincide with the vertical projection of the epicenter of the subsequent earthquake, but mainly localize in the near-epicenter region and corresponding ionospheric anomalies are also simultaneously observed in the magnetic conjugate region prior to the three earthquakes. In addition, the amplitude and scale-size of the ionospheric ΔTEC are different with the magnitude of the earthquake, and the horizontal scale-size of the greatest anomalies before the Tohoku M9.0 earthquake is ˜30∘ in longitude and ˜10∘ in latitude, with the maximum amplitude of TEC disturbances reaching ˜20 TECu relative to the background. The peak of anomaly enhancement usually occurs in the afternoon to sunset (i.e. between 14:00 and 18:00 local time) which lasts for approximate 2 hours. Possible causes of these anomalies are discussed, and after eliminating the effect of solar activities and magnetic storms it can be concluded that the detected obvious and regular anomalous behavior in TEC within just a few days before the earthquakes is related with the forthcoming earthquakes with high probability.

  6. Pulse-shape-dependent strong-field ionization viewed with velocity-map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus

    2011-11-15

    We explore strong field molecular ionization with velocity map imaging of fragment ions produced by dissociation following ionization. Our measurements and ab initio electronic structure calculations allow us to identify various electronic states of the molecular cation populated during ionization, with multiple pathways to individual states highlighted by the pulse shape dependence. In addition, we show that relative populations can be reconstructed from our measurements. The results illustrate how strong field molecular ionization can be complicated by the presence and interaction of multiple cationic states during ionization.

  7. Multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach for electron-nuclear correlation in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jhala, Chirag; Lein, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach is applied to study the electron-nuclear correlation in the dynamics of molecules subject to strong external laser fields, using the example of a model hydrogen molecular ion. The ground state of the system is well described by as few as two single-particle functions per degree of freedom. A significantly larger but moderate number of configurations is required to predict laser-induced fragmentation probabilities and high-order harmonic generation spectra accurately, showing that the correlation between electronic and nuclear degree of freedom is strongly increased by the presence of the laser field.

  8. Density-Dependent Differentiation of Bacteria in Spatially Structured Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Ribbe, Jan; Maier, Berenike

    2016-04-12

    Bacterial quorum sensing is usually studied in well-mixed populations residing within closed systems. The latter do not exchange mass with their surroundings; however, in their natural environment, such as the rhizosphere, bacteria live in spatially structured open systems. Here, we tested the hypothesis that trapping of bacteria within microscopic pockets of an open system triggers density-dependent differentiation. We designed a microfluidic device that trapped swimming bacteria within microscopic compartments. The geometry of the traps controlled their diffusive coupling to fluid flow that played a dual role as nutrient source and autoinducer sink. Bacillus subtilis differentiates into a state of competence in response to quorum sensing and nutrient limitation. Using a mutant strain with a high differentiation rate and fluorescent reporters for competence, we found that the cell density required for differentiation was 100-fold higher than that required in closed systems. A direct comparison of strongly and moderately coupled reservoirs showed that strong coupling supported early differentiation but required a higher number of bacteria for its initiation. Weak coupling resulted in retardation of growth and differentiation. We conclude that spatial heterogeneity can promote density-dependent differentiation in open systems, and propose that the minimal quorum is determined by diffusive coupling to the environment through a trade-off between retaining autoinducers and accessing nutrients. PMID:27074689

  9. Spatial Dependency and Contextual Effects on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlock, Ki; Song, Joon Jin; Goering, Christian Z.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of district-related variables on a district's academic performance. Arkansas augmented benchmark examination scores were used to measure a district's scholastic achievement. Spatial analysis fit each district's performance to its geographical location; spatial autocorrelation measured the amount of influence…

  10. Time-dependent many-variable variational Monte Carlo method for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We develop a time-dependent variational Monte Carlo (t-VMC) method for quantum dynamics of strongly correlated electrons. The t-VMC method has been recently applied to bosonic systems and quantum spin systems. Here we propose a time-dependent trial wave function with many variational parameters, which is suitable for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems. As the trial state, we adopt the generalized pair-product wave function with correlation factors and quantum-number projections. This trial wave function has been proven to accurately describe ground states of strongly correlated electron systems. To show the accuracy and efficiency of our trial wave function in nonequilibrium states as well, we present our benchmark results for relaxation dynamics during and after interaction quench protocols of fermionic Hubbard models. We find that our trial wave function well reproduces the exact results for the time evolution of physical quantities such as energy, momentum distribution, spin structure factor, and superconducting correlations. These results show that the t-VMC with our trial wave function offers an efficient and accurate way to study challenging problems of nonequilibrium dynamics in strongly correlated electron systems.

  11. A spatially filtered multilevel model to account for spatial dependency: application to self-rated health status in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to suggest an approach that integrates multilevel models and eigenvector spatial filtering methods and apply it to a case study of self-rated health status in South Korea. In many previous health-related studies, multilevel models and single-level spatial regression are used separately. However, the two methods should be used in conjunction because the objectives of both approaches are important in health-related analyses. The multilevel model enables the simultaneous analysis of both individual and neighborhood factors influencing health outcomes. However, the results of conventional multilevel models are potentially misleading when spatial dependency across neighborhoods exists. Spatial dependency in health-related data indicates that health outcomes in nearby neighborhoods are more similar to each other than those in distant neighborhoods. Spatial regression models can address this problem by modeling spatial dependency. This study explores the possibility of integrating a multilevel model and eigenvector spatial filtering, an advanced spatial regression for addressing spatial dependency in datasets. Methods In this spatially filtered multilevel model, eigenvectors function as additional explanatory variables accounting for unexplained spatial dependency within the neighborhood-level error. The specification addresses the inability of conventional multilevel models to account for spatial dependency, and thereby, generates more robust outputs. Results The findings show that sex, employment status, monthly household income, and perceived levels of stress are significantly associated with self-rated health status. Residents living in neighborhoods with low deprivation and a high doctor-to-resident ratio tend to report higher health status. The spatially filtered multilevel model provides unbiased estimations and improves the explanatory power of the model compared to conventional multilevel models although there are no changes in the

  12. Luminosity Dependence and Redshift Evolution of Strong Emission-Line Diagnostics in Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Songaila, A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the redshift evolution of standard strong emission-line diagnostics for Hβ-selected star-forming galaxies using the local SDSS sample and a new z=0.2{--}2.3 sample obtained from Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 grism and Keck DEIMOS and MOSFIRE data. We use the SDSS galaxies to show that there is a systematic dependence of the strong emission-line properties on Balmer-line luminosity, which we interpret as showing that both the N/O abundance and the ionization parameter increase with increasing line luminosity. Allowing for the luminosity dependence tightens the diagnostic diagrams and the metallicity calibrations. The combined SDSS and high-redshift samples show that there is no redshift evolution in the line properties once the luminosity correction is applied, i.e., all galaxies with a given L({{H}}β ) have similar strong emission-line distributions at all the observed redshifts. We argue that the best metal diagnostic for the high-redshift galaxies may be a luminosity-adjusted version of the [N ii]6584/Hα metallicity relation. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Density dependence in marine fish populations revealed at small and large spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Darren W

    2006-02-01

    Experimental manipulation of population density has frequently been used to demonstrate demographic density dependence. However, such studies are usually small scale and typically provide evidence of spatial (within-generation) density dependence. It is often unclear whether small-scale, experimental tests of spatial density dependence will accurately describe temporal (between-generation) density dependence required for population regulation. Understanding the mechanisms generating density dependence may provide a link between spatial experiments and temporal regulation of populations. In this study, I manipulated the density of recently settled kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens) in both the presence and absence of predators to test for density-dependent mortality and whether predation was the mechanism responsible. I also examined mortality of rockfish cohorts within kelp beds throughout central California to evaluate temporal (between-generation) density dependence in mortality. Experiments suggested that short-term behavioral responses of predators and/or a shortage of prey refuges caused spatial density dependence. Temporal density dependence in mortality was also detected at larger spatial scales for several species of rockfish. It is likely that short-term responses of predators generated both spatial and temporal density dependence in mortality. Spatial experiments that describe the causal mechanisms generating density dependence may therefore be valuable in describing temporal density dependence and population regulation. PMID:16637357

  14. [Scale-dependency of spatial variability of soil available nutrients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Yong; Yang, Jing-Song; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2011-02-01

    With the support of GIS and by using classical statistics and geostatistics methods, the spatial variability of soil available P (AP) and available K (AK) in cultivated lands in Yucheng City of Shandong Province was approached at county and township scales. The results showed that both the soil AP and AK followed the logarithmic normal distribution, with the coefficient of variation (CV) at the two scales being 26.5% - 36.6% and presenting a moderate variation. With the decrease of the scale, the CV of the soil AP and AK increased. Both the soil AP and AK were spatially correlated with scale. At county scale, the soil AP and AK had a larger spatial correlation distance, being 9.0 km and 26.5 km, respectively; while at township scale, the soil AP and AK had a smaller spatial correlation distance, being 1.7 km and 2.8 km, respectively. The spatial distribution of the soil AP and AK at the two scales was obviously different, which was mainly affected by structural factors and random factors. PMID:21608258

  15. A two-species occupancy model accommodating simultaneous spatial and interspecific dependence.

    PubMed

    Rota, Christopher T; Wikle, Christopher K; Kays, Roland W; Forrester, Tavis D; McShea, William J; Parsons, Arielle W; Millspaugh, Joshua J

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy models are popular for estimating the probability a site is occupied by a species of interest when detection is imperfect. Occupancy models have been extended to account for interacting species and spatial dependence but cannot presently allow both factors to act simultaneously. We propose a two-species occupancy model that accommodates both interspecific and spatial dependence. We use a point-referenced multivariate hierarchical spatial model to account for both spatial and interspecific dependence. We model spatial random effects with predictive process models and use probit regression to improve efficiency of posterior sampling. We model occupancy probabilities of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and coyote (Canis latrans) with camera trap data collected from six mid-Atlantic states in the eastern United States. We fit four models comprising a fully factorial combination of spatial and interspecific dependence to two-thirds of camera trapping sites and validated models with the remaining data. Red fox and coyotes each exhibited spatial dependence at distances > 0.8 and 0.4 km, respectively, and exhibited geographic variation in interspecific dependence. Consequently, predictions from the model assuming simultaneous spatial and interspecific dependence best matched test data observations. This application highlights the utility of simultaneously accounting for spatial and interspecific dependence. PMID:27008774

  16. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH SPATIALLY VARIANT POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-12-10

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  17. Strong Gravitational Lens Modeling with Spatially Variant Point-spread Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-12-01

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  18. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey; Daughton, W; Yin, L

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  19. Strongly Correlated Quantum Gases Trapped in 3D Spin-Dependent Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    2011-03-01

    Optical lattices have emerged as ideal systems for exploring Hubbard model physics, since the equivalent of material parameters such as the ratio of tunneling to interaction energy are easily and widely tunable. In this talk I will discuss our recent measurements using novel lattice potentials to realize more complex Hubbard models for bosonic 87 Rb atoms. In these experiments, we adjust the polarization of the lattice laser beams to realize fully three-dimensional, spin-dependent cubic optical lattices. We demonstrate that atoms can be trapped in combinations of spin states for which superfluid and Mott-insulator phases exist simultaneously in the lattice. We also co-trap states that experience a strong lattice potential and no lattice potential whatsoever. I will discuss recent measurements revealing a mechanism similar to Kapitza resistance that leads to thermal decoupling in this latter combination. The implications for sympathetic cooling and thermometry using species-dependent lattices will be outlined.

  20. Universal pulse dependence of the low-energy structure in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Diesen, Elias; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Xu, Junliang; Gorman, Timothy T.; Légaré, Françis; Saalmann, Ulf; Agostini, Pierre; Rost, Jan M.; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-02-01

    We determine quantitatively the laser pulse duration dependence of the low-energy structure (LES) in strong-field atomic ionization and establish its universal character. The electron energy measurement is performed on krypton and argon by varying the duration of a 1.8 μ m midinfrared pulse from two to ten cycles. Comparing the experiment with analytical and numerical results, the soft-recollision mechanism leading to electron momentum bunching is confirmed as the origin of the LES. The universal behavior of the LES peak energy on pulse duration emerges from an analytical description as a product of two factors: one contains the influence of the laser parameters and the target, while the other one describes the pulse duration dependence in terms of optical cycles.

  1. Retrieval Induces Hippocampal-Dependent Reconsolidation of Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossato, Janine I.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Nonreinforced retrieval can cause extinction and/or reconsolidation, two processes that affect subsequent retrieval in opposite ways. Using the Morris water maze task we show that, in the rat, repeated nonreinforced expression of spatial memory causes extinction, which is unaffected by inhibition of protein synthesis within the CA1 region of the…

  2. INCLINATION-DEPENDENT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FLUX PROFILES FROM STRONG LENSING OF THE KERR SPACETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.

    2013-01-10

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the X-ray emission sizes of quasars to be about 10 gravitational radii, one order of magnitude smaller than the optical emission sizes. Using a new ray-tracing code for the Kerr spacetime, we find that the observed X-ray flux is strongly influenced by the gravity field of the central black hole, even for observers at moderate inclination angles. We calculate inclination-dependent flux profiles of active galactic nuclei in the optical and X-ray bands by combining the Kerr lensing and projection effects for future reference. We further study the dependence of the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio on the inclination angle caused by differential lensing distortion of the X-ray and optical emission, assuming several corona geometries. The strong lensing X-ray-to-optical magnification ratio can change by a factor of {approx}10 for normal quasars in some cases, and a further factor of {approx}10 for broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and obscured quasars. Comparing our results with the observed distributions in normal and BAL quasars, we find that the inclination angle dependence of the magnification ratios can significantly change the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio distributions. In particular, the mean value of the spectrum slope parameter {alpha}{sub ox}, 0.3838log F {sub 2keV}/F {sub 2500A}, can differ by {approx}0.1-0.2 between normal and BAL quasars, depending on corona geometries, suggesting larger intrinsic absorptions in BAL quasars.

  3. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  4. Strong Spatial Influence on Colonization Rates in a Pioneer Zooplankton Metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Dagmar; Cottenie, Karl; Badosa, Anna; Green, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude of community-wide dispersal is central to metacommunity models, yet dispersal is notoriously difficult to quantify in passive and cryptic dispersers such as many freshwater invertebrates. By overcoming the problem of quantifying dispersal rates, colonization rates into new habitats can provide a useful estimate of the magnitude of effective dispersal. Here we study the influence of spatial and local processes on colonization rates into new ponds that indicate differential dispersal limitation of major zooplankton taxa, with important implications for metacommunity dynamics. We identify regional and local factors that affect zooplankton colonization rates and spatial patterns in a large-scale experimental system. Our study differs from others in the unique setup of the experimental pond area by which we were able to test spatial and environmental variables at a large spatial scale. We quantified colonization rates separately for the Copepoda, Cladocera and Rotifera from samples collected over a period of 21 months in 48 newly constructed temporary ponds of 0.18–2.95 ha distributed in a restored wetland area of 2,700 ha in Doñana National Park, Southern Spain. Species richness upon initial sampling of new ponds was about one third of that in reference ponds, although the rate of detection of new species from thereon were not significantly different, probably owing to high turnover in the dynamic, temporary reference ponds. Environmental heterogeneity had no detectable effect on colonization rates in new ponds. In contrast, connectivity, space (based on latitude and longitude) and surface area were key determinants of colonization rates for copepods and cladocerans. This suggests dispersal limitation in cladocerans and copepods, but not in rotifers, possibly due to differences in propagule size and abundance. PMID:22792241

  5. Strong suppression of forward or backward Mie scattering by using spatial coherence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyundou; Schouten, Hugo F; Visser, Taco D

    2016-04-01

    We derive analytic expressions relating Mie scattering with partially coherent fields to scattering with fully coherent fields. These equations are then used to demonstrate how the intensity of the forward- or backward-scattered field can be suppressed several orders of magnitude by tuning the spatial coherence properties of the incident field. This method allows the creation of cone-like scattered fields, with the angle of maximum intensity given by a simple formula. PMID:27140758

  6. Explicit off-line criteria for stable accurate time filtering of strongly unstable spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Grote, Marcus J

    2007-01-23

    Many contemporary problems in science involve making predictions based on partial observation of extremely complicated spatially extended systems with many degrees of freedom and physical instabilities on both large and small scales. Various new ensemble filtering strategies have been developed recently for these applications, and new mathematical issues arise. Here, explicit off-line test criteria for stable accurate discrete filtering are developed for use in the above context and mimic the classical stability analysis for finite difference schemes. First, constant coefficient partial differential equations, which are randomly forced and damped to mimic mesh scale energy spectra in the above problems are developed as off-line filtering test problems. Then mathematical analysis is used to show that under natural suitable hypothesis the time filtering algorithms for general finite difference discrete approximations to an sxs partial differential equation system with suitable observations decompose into much simpler independent s-dimensional filtering problems for each spatial wave number separately; in other test problems, such block diagonal models rigorously provide upper and lower bounds on the filtering algorithm. In this fashion, elementary off-line filtering criteria can be developed for complex spatially extended systems. The theory is illustrated for time filters by using both unstable and implicit difference scheme approximations to the stochastically forced heat equation where the combined effects of filter stability and model error are analyzed through the simpler off-line criteria. PMID:17227864

  7. A strong redshift dependence of the broad absorption line quasar fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, James T.; Hewett, Paul C.; Maddox, Natasha; Richards, Gordon T.; Belokurov, Vasily

    2011-01-01

    We describe the application of non-negative matrix factorization to generate compact reconstructions of quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with particular reference to broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). BAL properties are measured for Si IVλ1400, C IVλ1550, Al IIIλ1860 and Mg IIλ2800, resulting in a catalogue of 3547 BALQSOs. Two corrections, based on extensive testing of synthetic BALQSO spectra, are applied in order to estimate the intrinsic fraction of C IV BALQSOs. First, the probability of an observed BALQSO spectrum being identified as such by our algorithm is calculated as a function of redshift, signal-to-noise ratio and BAL properties. Secondly, the different completenesses of the SDSS target selection algorithm for BALQSOs and non-BAL quasars are quantified. Combining the detection probabilities with an intrinsic E(B-V) distribution capable of reproducing the observed increase in mean E(B-V) with increasing redshift, the intrinsic C IV BALQSO fraction is 41 ± 5 per cent. Our analysis of the selection effects allows us to measure the dependence of the intrinsic C IV BALQSO fraction on luminosity and redshift. We find a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 decrease in the intrinsic fraction from the highest redshifts, z≃ 4.0, down to z≃ 2.0. The redshift dependence implies that an orientation effect alone is not sufficient to explain the presence of BAL troughs in some but not all quasar spectra. Our results are consistent with the intrinsic BALQSO fraction having no strong luminosity dependence, although with 3σ limits on the rate of change of the intrinsic fraction with luminosity of -6.9 and 7.0 per cent dex-1 we are unable to rule out such a dependence.

  8. Runoff source or sink? Biocrust hydrological function strongly depends on the relative abundance of mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, M. A.; Eldridge, D. J.; Maestre, F. T.

    2012-04-01

    The redistribution of water in semi-arid environments is critical for overall ecosystem productivity. To a large degree, ecosystem engineers may determine the redistribution of water. Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are one such group of ecosystem engineers. Their effects on infiltration have been somewhat controversial, varying from place to place and ranging from strongly positive to strongly negative. In addition, they coexist with and are modified by additional ecosystem engineers. We used a systems approach to examine the interactive effects of multiple engineers on infiltration processes across two analogous sets of interactors. First in Spain, we examined interactions among Stipa tenacissima, biocrusts, and the European rabbit; and in Australia, the interaction between biocrusts and the bilby (a rabbit-like marsupial). We focused on the effects of particular community properties of biocrusts such as species richness, total cover, species composition, and spatial patterning to characterize their variable effects on infiltration. We measured the early (sorptivity) and later (steady-state infiltration) stages of infiltration at two supply potentials using disk permeameters, which allowed us to determine the relative effects of different engineers and soil micropores on water flow through large macropores. In the Spanish case, structural equation modeling showed that both Stipa and biocrust cover exerted substantial and equal positive effects on infiltration under ponding, whereas indirectly, rabbit disturbance negatively affected infiltration by reducing crust cover; rabbits had negligible direct effects. The biocrust influence could be partitioned roughly equally between total cover and composition. All lichen species were negatively related to infiltration and almost all mosses were positively related to infiltration. In the Australian study, bilby forage pits had a direct and strong positive influence on steady state infiltration under ponding and most

  9. Fast gain recovery rates with strong wavelength dependence in a non-linear SOA.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Power, Mark J; Schneider, Simon; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2010-12-01

    We report remarkably fast and strongly wavelength-dependent gain recovery in a single SOA without the aid of an offset filter. Full gain recovery times as short as 9 ps were observed in pump-probe measurements when pumping to the blue wavelength side of a continuous wave probe, in contrast to times of 25 to 30 ps when pumping to the red wavelength side. Experimental and numerical analysis indicate that the long effective length and high gain led to deep saturation of the second half of the SOA by the probe. The consequent absorption of blue-shifted pump pulses in this region resulted in device dynamics analogous to those of the Turbo-Switch. PMID:21164918

  10. Experimental investigation of the energy dependence of the strong coupling strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethke, S.; Allison, J.; Ambrus, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartel, W.; Bowdery, C. K.; Cartwright, S. L.; Chrin, J.; Clarke, D.; Dieckmann, A.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Greenshaw, T.; Hagemann, J.; Haidt, D.; Heintze, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Hellenbrand, K. H.; Hill, P.; Hughes, G.; Kado, H.; Kawagoe, K.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Kobayashi, T.; Komamiya, S.; Krehbiel, H.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhlen, M.; Loebinger, F. K.; Macbeth, A. A.; Magnussen, N.; Marshall, R.; Meinke, R.; Middleton, R. P.; Minowa, M.; Murphy, P. G.; Naroska, B.; Nye, J. M.; Olsson, J.; Ould-Saada, F.; Petersen, A.; Ramcke, R.; Rieseberg, H.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, H. vd.; Smolik, L.; Schneekloth, U.; Skard, J. A. J.; Spitzer, J.; Steffen, P.; Stephens, K.; Wagner, A.; Walker, I. W.; Warming, P.; Weber, G.; Zimmer, M.; Zorn, G. T.; JADE Collaboration

    1988-10-01

    The energy dependence of the relative production rate of three-jet events is studied in hadronic e +e - annihilation events at center of mass energies between 22 and 46.7 GeV. Three-jet events are defined by a jet finding algorithm which is closely related to the definition of resolvable jets used in O( αs2) perturbative QCD calculations, where the relative production rate of three-jet events is roughly proportional to the size of the strong coupling strength. The production rates of three-jet events in the data decrease significantly with increasing centre of mass energy. The experimental rates, which are independent of fragmentation model calculations, can be directly compared to theoretically calculated jet production rates and are in good agreement with the QCD expectations of a running coupling strength. The hypothesis of an energy independent coupling constant can be excluded with a significance of four standard derivations.

  11. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  12. Spatial dependence of color assimilation by the watercolor effect.

    PubMed

    Devinck, Frédéric; Delahunt, Peter B; Hardy, Joseph L; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2006-01-01

    Color assimilation with bichromatic contours was quantified for spatial extents ranging from von Bezold-type color assimilation to the watercolor effect. The magnitude and direction of assimilative hue change was measured as a function of the width of a rectangular stimulus. Assimilation was quantified by hue cancellation. Large hue shifts were required to null the color of stimuli < or = 9.3 min of arc in width, with an exponential decrease for stimuli increasing up to 7.4 deg. When stimuli were viewed through an achromatizing lens, the magnitude of the assimilation effect was reduced for narrow stimuli, but not for wide ones. These results demonstrate that chromatic aberration may account, in part, for color assimilation over small, but not large, surface areas. PMID:16700289

  13. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  14. Renormalization-scheme dependence of the strong coupling constantin quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, A.; Moshe, M.

    1982-08-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) lacks a limit analogous to the Thomson limit of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for defining its coupling constant. Nevertheless, the strong coupling constant in QCD can be determined from measurable quantities in an approximately scheme-independent manner as -q/sup 2/..-->..infinity. At finite q/sup 2/, however, high-order terms in the renormalization-group functions introduce scheme-dependent terms into ..cap alpha../sub s/(q/sup 2/). A recently suggested method for estimating high-order terms in solutions of Callan-Symanzik equation, which is similar in nature to techniques employed in QED, enables us to determine the size of these scheme-dependent terms. We also discuss a modified minimal-subtraction (MS) scheme which is very appealing. It has the same ..beta.. function as the MS scheme (to all orders) but it equals the momentum-subtraction (MOM) scheme up to two-loop calculations and differs from it at higher orders. We denote this scheme as MOM.

  15. Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Spatial Resolution Dependence of Precipitation Extremes in Aquaplanet Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the resolution dependency of precipitation extremes in an aqua-planet framework. Strong resolution dependency of precipitation extremes is seen over both tropics and extra-tropics, and the magnitude of this dependency also varies with dynamical cores. Moisture budget analyses based on aqua-planet simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores but the same physics parameterizations suggest that during precipitation extremes moisture supply for surface precipitation is mainly derived from advective moisture convergence. The resolution dependency of precipitation extremes mainly originates from advective moisture transport in the vertical direction. At most vertical levels over the tropics and in the lower atmosphere over the subtropics, the vertical eddy transport of mean moisture field dominates the contribution to precipitation extremes and its resolution dependency. Over the subtropics, the source of moisture, its associated energy, and the resolution dependency during extremes are dominated by eddy transport of eddies moisture at the mid- and upper-troposphere. With both MPAS and HOMME dynamical cores, the resolution dependency of the vertical advective moisture convergence is mainly explained by dynamical changes (related to vertical velocity or omega), although the vertical gradients of moisture act like averaging kernels to determine the sensitivity of the overall resolution dependency to the changes in omega at different vertical levels. The natural reduction of variability with coarser resolution, represented by areal data averaging (aggregation) effect, largely explains the resolution dependency in omega. The thermodynamic changes, which likely result from non-linear feedback in response to the large dynamical changes, are small compared to the overall changes in dynamics (omega). However, after excluding the

  16. Phase-dependent Impact of Strong Tropical Volcanic Eruption on predicting ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, M.; Shiogama, H.; Yokohata, T.; Watanabe, M.

    2012-04-01

    Impact of tropical strong volcanic eruption (SVE) on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its phase-dependency is investigated by using a coupled general circulation model. Since warm and cold phases of ENSO exhibit a significant asymmetry in their transition/duration, we separately investigate the response of warm and cold ENSO to the idealized SVE forcing of similar magnitude to 1992 Pinatubo event, producing a peak top-of-atmosphere radiative perturbation larger than -3.5 Wm-2. The radiative forcing due to the volcanic aerosols injected into the stratosphere induces tropical cooling around the time the volcanic forcing peaks. Identical-twin forecast experiments with/without the SVE forcing are conducted to investigate the phase-dependency of the SVE on predicting ENSO. The experiments show that a without SVE condition extends the skillful prediction of the ENSO warm phase by about one year, which was about half year under the SVE forcing, in which a significant drop of the prediction skill is found after the peak of forcing. The SVE significantly counteract the evolution of the warm phase of ENSO, and then the following transition from warm to cold ENSO is interfered. However, the effect of the SVE forcing on the predictability of the tropical Pacific SST is much weaker in La Niña. The SVE forcing during the cold phase of ENSO rather facilitate the La Niña duration. This result implies that the impact of SVE on ENSO could be significantly dependent on the phase of ENSO, and then various experiments (e.g., a change in magnitude of SVE and ENSO phase) in advance will contribute to instantly speculate the impact of future SVEs in ENSO forecast.

  17. Spatial, Temporal, and Density-Dependent Components of Habitat Quality for a Desert Owl

    PubMed Central

    Flesch, Aaron D.; Hutto, Richard L.; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches

  18. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields: Spin-dependent influences at the cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Eiles, Matthew T.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Taylor, Caitlin A.; Fitch, Catherine J.

    2014-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamical (QED) process of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields is commonly invoked in atmospheric and inner magnetospheric models of x-ray and soft gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars. A major influence of the field is to introduce resonances at the cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, where the incoming photon accesses thresholds for the creation of virtual electrons or positrons in intermediate states with excited Landau levels. At these resonances, the effective cross section typically exceeds the classical Thomson value by over 2 orders of magnitude. Near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TeraGauss, relativistic corrections must be incorporated when computing this cross section. This profound enhancement underpins the anticipation that resonant Compton scattering is a very efficient process in the environs of highly magnetized neutron stars. This paper presents formalism for the QED magnetic Compton differential cross section valid for both subcritical and supercritical fields, yet restricted to scattered photons that are below pair creation threshold. Calculations are developed for the particular case of photons initially propagating along the field, and in the limit of zero vacuum dispersion, mathematically simple specializations that are germane to interactions involving relativistic electrons frequently found in neutron star magnetospheres. This exposition of relativistic, quantum, magnetic Compton cross sections treats electron spin dependence fully, since this is a critical feature for describing the finite decay lifetimes of the intermediate states. Such lifetimes are introduced to truncate the resonant cyclotronic divergences via standard Lorentz profiles. The formalism employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann (JL) wave functions and the Sokolov and Ternov (ST) electron eigenfunctions of the magnetic Dirac equation. The ST states are formally correct for self

  19. Conditional versus unconditional industrial agglomeration: disentangling spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity in the analysis of ICT firms' distribution in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espa, Giuseppe; Arbia, Giuseppe; Giuliani, Diego

    2013-01-01

    A series of recent papers have introduced some explorative methods based on Ripley's K-function (Ripley in J R Stat Soc B 39(2):172-212, 1977) analyzing the micro-geographical patterns of firms. Often the spatial heterogeneity of an area is handled by referring to a case-control design, in which spatial clusters occur as over-concentrations of firms belonging to a specific industry as opposed to the distribution of firms in the whole economy. Therefore, positive, or negative, spatial dependence between firms occurs when a specific sector of industry is seen to present a more aggregated pattern (or more dispersed) than is common in the economy as a whole. This approach has led to the development of relative measures of spatial concentration which, as a consequence, are not straightforwardly comparable across different economies. In this article, we explore a parametric approach based on the inhomogeneous K-function (Baddeley et al. in Statistica Nederlandica 54(3):329-350, 2000) that makes it possible to obtain an absolute measure of the industrial agglomeration that is also able to capture spatial heterogeneity. We provide an empirical application of the approach taken with regard to the spatial distribution of high-tech industries in Milan (Italy) in 2001.

  20. Strong Reduction of the Degree of Spatial Coherence of a Laser Beam Propagating through a Preformed Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Labaune, C.; Bandulet, H. C.; Lewis, K.; Depierreux, S.; Hulin, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Weber, S.; Riazuelo, G.; Baldis, H. A.; Michard, A.

    2004-04-01

    A strong reduction of the spatial coherence of a laser beam after its propagation through a plasma has been measured using a Fresnel biprism interferometer. The laser beam was diffraction limited; the coherence width was reduced from 40mm in vacuum down to a few mm with the plasma. Numerical results based on a paraxial model exhibit a coherence degree close to the experimental one; they also prove the importance of taking into account the nonlocal transport effects in numerical simulations for such plasma conditions.

  1. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics model of He plasma surface interaction in tungsten for fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and, in particular, the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low-energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behaviour of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials' modelling results are described here that investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten. The aim of this study is to understand and predict sub-surface helium bubble growth under high flux helium ion implantation (˜1022 m-2 s-1) at high temperatures (>1000 K). We report results from a spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution of the microstructure under these conditions. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic modelling and available experimental data. The results are in good agreement with results of an analytical model that is presented in a separate paper. In particular, it is found that the sub-surface evolution with respect to bubble size and concentration of the helium bubbles strongly depends on the flux and temperature.

  2. Sonic phase delay from trachea to chest wall: spatial and inhaled gas dependency.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Lu, S; Doerschuk, P C; Wodicka, G R

    1995-07-01

    A parametric phase delay estimation technique is used to determine the spatial and inhaled gas composition dependencies of sound propagation time through an intact human lung at frequencies of 150-1200 Hz. Noise transmission measurements from the mouth to the extrathoracic trachea and six sites on the posterior chest wall are performed in 11 healthy adult subjects at resting lung volume after equilibration with air, an 80% helium-20% oxygen mixture, and an 80% sulfurhexafluoride-20% oxygen mixture. The phase delay, tau(f), exhibits a bilateral asymmetry with relatively decreased delays to the left posterior chest as compared with the right. The phase delay to lower lung sites is greater than to upper sites at frequencies below 300 Hz; yet the opposite is found at higher frequencies, indicating changing propagation pathways with frequency. There is no measurable effect of inhaled gas composition on tau(f) below 300 Hz. At higher frequencies, changes in tau(f) that reflect the relative sound speed of the particular inhaled gas are observed. These findings support and extend previous measurements and hypotheses concerning the strong frequency dependence of the acoustical properties of the intact respiratory system. PMID:7475389

  3. Pressures at larger spatial scales strongly influence the ecological status of heavily modified river water bodies in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kail, Jochem; Wolter, Christian

    2013-06-01

    River biota are influenced by anthropogenic pressures that operate at different spatial scales. Understanding which pressures at which spatial scales affect biota is essential to manage and restore degraded rivers. In Europe, many river reaches were designated as Heavily Modified Water Bodies (HMWB) according to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD), where the ecological potential might mainly be determined by pressures at larger spatial scales outside the HMWB (e.g. hydromorphological alterations at the river network and land use at the catchment scale). In Germany, hydromorphological alterations and diffuse pollution were the main pressures. Therefore, the three objectives of this study were to (i) identify the hydromorphological pressures at the site, reach, and river network scale, and land use categories at the catchment scale which significantly affect the ecological status of HMWB in Germany, (ii) quantify the relative importance of these pressures at different spatial scales, and (iii) analyse the differences in response between fish and macroinvertebrates. The results indicated that: (i) At the reach scale, fish were most strongly influenced by channel-bank conditions whilst the naturalness of channel-planform was the best proxy for the ecological status of macroinvertebrates. At the catchment scale, urbanization was the most detrimental land use. (ii) The pressures at larger spatial scales (catchment land use and hydromorphological alterations in the river network) generally were more important than hydromorphological alterations at the reach scale. (iii) Fish were affected equally by both, hydromorphological alterations at the reach scale and large-scale pressures whereas the latter were far more important for the ecological status of macroinvertebrates. In conclusion, these results indicated that large-scale pressures may often limit the efficiency of reach-scale restoration, especially for macroinvertebrates, even in the absence of saprobic

  4. Laser pulse duration dependence of the low-energy structure in strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu Hang; Zhang, Kaikai; Blaga, Cosmin; Xu, Junliang; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis; Schmidt, Bruno; Légaré, François; The Ohio State University Team; Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique Team

    2015-05-01

    Low-energy structure (LES) in strong field ionization is a spike-like feature appearing in the low energy part (a few eV) of photoelectron spectra along the laser polarization. It has been observed in rare gas atoms and diatomic molecules. In the classical picture, the formation of LES is due to the Coulomb interaction between the ionized electron and its parent ion via the process of multiple forward scattering, which can happen only if the electron is ionized with a small drift momentum. We have studied the LES in rare gas atoms with few-cycle laser pulses centered at 1800nm. We observed that the LES peak shifts to lower energy as the pulse duration decreases from 5 down to 2 optical cycles, which is in qualitative agreement with classical-trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. Classically, the shift could be attributed to the dependence of the ratio between the field amplitude of the central cycle and the adjacent cycle on the pulse duration. Our data support the classical nature of the LES.

  5. Probability of loss of assured safety in temperature dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig

    2004-12-01

    Relationships to determine the probability that a weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) safety system will fail to function as intended in a fire environment are investigated. In the systems under study, failure of the WL system before failure of the SL system is intended to render the overall system inoperational and thus prevent the possible occurrence of accidents with potentially serious consequences. Formal developments of the probability that the WL system fails to deactivate the overall system before failure of the SL system (i.e., the probability of loss of assured safety, PLOAS) are presented for several WWSL configurations: (i) one WL, one SL, (ii) multiple WLs, multiple SLs with failure of any SL before any WL constituting failure of the safety system, (iii) multiple WLs, multiple SLs with failure of all SLs before any WL constituting failure of the safety system, and (iv) multiple WLs, multiple SLs and multiple sublinks in each SL with failure of any sublink constituting failure of the associated SL and failure of all SLs before failure of any WL constituting failure of the safety system. The indicated probabilities derive from time-dependent temperatures in the WL/SL system and variability (i.e., aleatory uncertainty) in the temperatures at which the individual components of this system fail and are formally defined as multidimensional integrals. Numerical procedures based on quadrature (i.e., trapezoidal rule, Simpson's rule) and also on Monte Carlo techniques (i.e., simple random sampling, importance sampling) are described and illustrated for the evaluation of these integrals. Example uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for PLOAS involving the representation of uncertainty (i.e., epistemic uncertainty) with probability theory and also with evidence theory are presented.

  6. CONCERNING THE CLASSICAL CEPHEID VI{sub C} WESENHEIT FUNCTION'S STRONG METALLICITY DEPENDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Gieren, W.

    2011-11-10

    Evidence is presented which supports findings that the classical Cepheid VI{sub C} period Wesenheit function is relatively insensitive to metallicity. The viability of a recently advocated strong metallicity dependence was evaluated by applying the proposed correction ({gamma} = -0.8 mag dex{sup -1}) to distances established for the Magellanic Clouds via a Galactic VI{sub C} Wesenheit calibration, which is anchored to 10 nearby classical Cepheids with measured Hubble Space Telescope (HST) parallaxes. The resulting {gamma}-corrected distances for the Magellanic Clouds (e.g., Small Magellanic Cloud, {mu}{sub 0,{gamma}} {approx} 18.3) are in significant disagreement with that established from a mean of >300 published estimates (NED-D), and a universal Wesenheit template featuring 11 {delta} Scuti, SX Phe, RR Lyrae, and Type II Cepheid variables with HST/Hipparcos parallaxes. Conversely, adopting a null correction (i.e., {gamma} = 0 mag dex{sup -1}) consolidates the estimates. In tandem with existing evidence, the results imply that variations in chemical composition among Cepheids are a comparatively negligible source of uncertainty for W{sub VIc}-based extragalactic distances and determinations of H{sub 0}. A new approach is described which aims to provide additional Galactic Cepheid calibrators to facilitate subsequent assessments of the VI{sub C} Wesenheit function's relative (in) sensitivity to abundance changes. VVV/UKIDSS/Two Micron All Sky Survey JHK{sub s} photometry for clusters in spiral arms shall be employed to establish a precise galactic longitude-distance relation, which can be applied in certain cases to determine the absolute Wesenheit magnitudes for younger Cepheids.

  7. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  8. Hourly global irradiance from satellite data in Badajoz, Spain: Spatial and temporal dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, M.; Serrano, A.; Cancillo, M. L.

    2013-05-01

    Satellite estimates of solar radiation at the hourly scale depend on the spatial and temporal variability of solar radiation within a region. To examine this effect, a field program was established near Badajoz, Spain (38.88°N, 7.01°W) consisting in deployment of seven pyranometers at or adjoining the Meteosat pixel for the area. A simple semiempirical retrieval approach based on the satellite reflectance was developed using data from one pyranometer station at the University campus and subsequently tested with an independent data set for the same station. The accuracy of the satellite estimate is a strong function of the averaging period and the frequency of satellite scans used. At the hourly scale, best estimates of solar irradiance are obtained with satellite data taken every 5 min, giving a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.883. Within-pixel spatial variability of measured irradiance is substantial but only for averaging periods less than 1 h. Comparison of surface point measurements with the satellite retrieval algorithm at the 5 min scale are associated with a relative RMS difference of 20.2% out of which 19.5% is due to model-induced uncertainties and 5.2% is due to instrumentation uncertainties involved in the retrieval process. Within-pixel point sampling will lower both the instrument uncertainty and the uncertainty in the retrieval algorithm for averaging periods lower than 1 h. Beyond this time, a single pyranometer is well representative of the overhead cloud structure, reaching root mean square difference values of 14% at the hourly scale.

  9. Scale dependency of fracture energy and estimates thereof via dynamic rupture solutions with strong thermal weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological estimates of fracture energy show a scaling with the total slip of an earthquake [e.g., Abercrombie and Rice, GJI 2005]. Potential sources for this scale dependency are coseismic fault strength reductions that continue with increasing slip or an increasing amount of off-fault inelastic deformation with dynamic rupture propagation [e.g., Andrews, JGR 2005; Rice, JGR 2006]. Here, we investigate the former mechanism by solving for the slip dependence of fracture energy at the crack tip of a dynamically propagating rupture in which weakening takes place by strong reductions of friction via flash heating of asperity contacts and thermal pressurization of pore fluid leading to reductions in effective normal stress. Laboratory measurements of small characteristic slip evolution distances for friction (~10 μm at low slip rates of μm-mm/s, possibly up to 1 mm for slip rates near 0.1 m/s) [e.g., Marone and Kilgore, Nature 1993; Kohli et al., JGR 2011] imply that flash weakening of friction occurs at small slips before any significant thermal pressurization and may thus have a negligible contribution to the total fracture energy [Brantut and Rice, GRL 2011; Garagash, AGU 2011]. The subsequent manner of weakening under thermal pressurization (the dominant contributor to fracture energy) spans a range of behavior from the deformation of a finite-thickness shear zone in which diffusion is negligible (i.e., undrained-adiabatic) to that in which large-scale diffusion obscures the existence of a thin shear zone and thermal pressurization effectively occurs by the heating of slip on a plane. Separating the contribution of flash heating, the dynamic rupture solutions reduce to a problem with a single parameter, which is the ratio of the undrained-adiabatic slip-weakening distance (δc) to the characteristic slip-on-a-plane slip-weakening distance (L*). However, for any value of the parameter, there are two end-member scalings of the fracture energy: for small slip

  10. Microscopic calculation and local approximation of the spatial dependence of the pairing field with bare and induced interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.

    2008-08-15

    The bare nucleon-nucleon interaction is essential for the production of pair correlations in nuclei, but an important contribution also arises from the induced interaction resulting from the exchange of collective vibrations between nucleons moving in time reversal states close to the Fermi energy. The pairing field resulting from the summed interaction is strongly peaked at the nuclear surface. It is possible to reproduce the detailed spatial dependence of this field by using either a local approximation, which fully takes into account finite size effects, or a contact interaction, with parameters that are quite different from those commonly used in more phenomenological approaches.

  11. Prokaryotes in Subsoil—Evidence for a Strong Spatial Separation of Different Phyla by Analysing Co-occurrence Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uksa, Marie; Schloter, Michael; Endesfelder, David; Kublik, Susanne; Engel, Marion; Kautz, Timo; Köpke, Ulrich; Fischer, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil provide a wide range of ecosystem services. On the small scale, nutrient rich hotspots in soil developed from the activities of animals or plants are important drivers for the composition of microbial communities and their functional patterns. However, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with differing lifestyles has been rarely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in top- and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophic and copiotrophic microbes was assessed. Four bacterial clusters were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, representing mostly copiotrophic bacteria, were affiliated mainly to the rhizosphere and drilosphere—both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, bacterial phyla which harbor many oligotrophic bacteria, were the most abundant groups in bulk subsoil. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated to cover 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads including both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. In contrast the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea build a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes due to their low variability in the different soil compartments. PMID:26635741

  12. Strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic cats may explain low hybridization rates on the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Gil-Sánchez, J M; Jaramillo, J; Barea-Azcón, J M

    2015-12-01

    The European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is an endangered felid impacted by genetic introgression with the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus). The problem of hybridization has had different effects in different areas. In non-Mediterranean regions pure forms of wildcats became almost extinct, while in Mediterranean regions genetic introgression is a rare phenomenon. The study of the potential factors that prevent the gene flow in areas of lower hybridization may be key to wildcat conservation. We studied the population size and spatial segregation of wildcats and domestic cats in a typical Mediterranean area of ancient sympatry, where no evidence of hybridization had been detected by genetic studies. Camera trapping of wild-living cats and walking surveys of stray cats in villages were used for capture-recapture estimations of abundance and spatial segregation. Results showed (i) a low density of wildcats and no apparent presence of putative hybrids; (ii) a very low abundance of feral cats in spite of the widespread and large population sources of domestic cats inhabiting villages; (iii) strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic/feral cats; and (iv) no relationship between the size of the potential population sources and the abundance of feral cats. Hence, domestic cats were limited in their ability to become integrated into the local habitat of wildcats. Ecological barriers (habitat preferences, food limitations, intra-specific and intra-guild competition, predation) may explain the severe divergences of hybridization impact observed at a biogeographic level. This has a direct effect on key conservation strategies for wildcats (i.e., control of domestic cats). PMID:26358989

  13. Visualisation of structural inhomogeneities in strongly scattering media using the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry: Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, Risto A

    2011-06-30

    Two-dimensional spatial intensity distributions of diffuse scattering of near-infrared laser radiation from a strongly scattering medium, whose optical properties are close to those of skin, are obtained using Monte Carlo simulation. The medium contains a cylindrical inhomogeneity with the optical properties, close to those of blood. It is shown that stronger absorption and scattering of light by blood compared to the surrounding medium leads to the fact that the intensity of radiation diffusely reflected from the surface of the medium under study and registered at its surface has a local minimum directly above the cylindrical inhomogeneity. This specific feature makes the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry potentially applicable for imaging blood vessels and determining their sizes. It is also shown that blurring of the vessel image increases almost linearly with increasing vessel embedment depth. This relation may be used to determine the depth of embedment provided that the optical properties of the scattering media are known. The optimal position of the sources and detectors of radiation, providing the best imaging of the vessel under study, is determined. (biophotonics)

  14. Restricted dispersal reduces the strength of spatial density dependence in a tropical bird population

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Malcolm D; Nicoll, Malcolm A.C; Jones, Carl G; Norris, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Spatial processes could play an important role in density-dependent population regulation because the disproportionate use of poor quality habitats as population size increases is widespread in animal populations—the so-called buffer effect. While the buffer effect patterns and their demographic consequences have been described in a number of wild populations, much less is known about how dispersal affects distribution patterns and ultimately density dependence. Here, we investigated the role of dispersal in spatial density dependence using an extraordinarily detailed dataset from a reintroduced Mauritius kestrel (Falco punctatus) population with a territorial (despotic) breeding system. We show that recruitment rates varied significantly between territories, and that territory occupancy was related to its recruitment rate, both of which are consistent with the buffer effect theory. However, we also show that restricted dispersal affects the patterns of territory occupancy with the territories close to release sites being occupied sooner and for longer as the population has grown than the territories further away. As a result of these dispersal patterns, the strength of spatial density dependence is significantly reduced. We conclude that restricted dispersal can modify spatial density dependence in the wild, which has implications for the way population dynamics are likely to be impacted by environmental change. PMID:18285284

  15. Strong strain dependence of ferroelectric coercivity in a BiFeO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegalski, M. D.; Kim, D. H.; Choudhury, S.; Chen, L. Q.; Christen, H. M.; Dörr, K.

    2011-04-01

    The ferroelectric polarization loop of an epitaxial BiFeO3 film on a piezoelectric substrate has been investigated as a function of continuously and reversibly varied biaxial strain of ɛ =0.36%-0.51%. Over this range, the ferroelectric coercive field (EC) at 80 K increases reversibly by 36% with the increasing tensile strain. In contrast, phase-field simulations predict the opposite trend of dEC/dɛ<0. Therefore, we attribute the observed EC(ɛ) dependence to the strain dependence of domain dynamics, which are not included in thermodynamic models. The strain dependence of the remanent polarization agrees with previous results.

  16. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; et al

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  17. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  18. Strongly bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in manganite spin filter tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2015-05-20

    A highly unconventional bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) response is observed in Sm0.75 Sr0.25 MnO3 -based nanopillar spin filter tunnel junctions (SFTJs) with two different behaviors in two different thickness regimes of the barrier layer. Thinner barrier devices exhibit conventional SFTJ behaviors; however, for larger barrier thicknesses, the TMR-bias dependence is more complex and reverses sign at higher bias. PMID:25845706

  19. Spatial cognition following early-life seizures in rats: Performance deficits are dependent on task demands.

    PubMed

    Barry, Jeremy M; Tian, Chengju; Spinella, Anthony; Page, Matias; Holmes, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common comorbidity in childhood epilepsy. Studies in rodents have demonstrated that frequent seizures during the first weeks of life result in impaired spatial cognition when the rats are tested as juvenile or adults. To determine if spatial cognitive deficits following early-life seizures are task-specific or similar across spatial tasks, we compared the effects of early-life seizures in two spatial assays: 1) the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent task of spatial cognition and 2) the active avoidance task, a task that associates an aversive shock stimulus with a static spatial location that requires intact hippocampal-amygdala networks. Rats with early-life seizures tested as adults did not differ from control rats in the water maze. However, while animals with early-life seizures showed some evidence of learning the active avoidance task, they received significantly more shocks in later training trials, particularly during the second training day, than controls. One possibility for the performance differences between the tasks is that the active avoidance task requires multiple brain regions and that interregional communication could be affected by alterations in white matter integrity. However, there were no measurable group differences with regard to levels of myelination. The study suggests that elucidation of mild cognitive deficits seen following early-life seizures may be dependent on task features of active avoidance. PMID:27152463

  20. A comparison of egocentric and allocentric age-dependent spatial learning in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Christie, Lori-Ann; Studzinski, Christa M; Araujo, Joseph A; Leung, Cleo S K; Ikeda-Douglas, Candace J; Head, Elizabeth; Cotman, Carl W; Milgram, Norton W

    2005-03-01

    Spatial discriminations can be performed using either egocentric information based on body position or allocentric information based on the position of landmarks in the environment. Beagle dogs ranging from 2 to 16 years of age were tested for their ability to learn a novel egocentric spatial discrimination task that used two identical blocks paired in three possible spatial positions (i.e. left, center and right). Dogs were rewarded for responding to an object furthest to either their left or right side. Therefore, when the center location was used, it was correct on half of the trials and incorrect on the other half. Upon successful acquisition of the task, the reward contingencies were reversed, and the dogs were rewarded for responding to the opposite side. A subset of dogs was also tested on an allocentric spatial discrimination task, landmark discrimination. Egocentric spatial reversal learning and allocentric discrimination learning both showed a significant age-dependent decline, while initial egocentric learning appeared to be age-insensitive. Intra-subject correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between egocentric reversal learning and allocentric learning. However, the correlation only accounted for a small proportion of the variance, suggesting that although there might be some common mechanism underlying acquisition of the two tasks, additional unique neural substrates were involved depending on whether allocentric or egocentric spatial information processing was required. PMID:15795044

  1. Spatial moment dynamics for collective cell movement incorporating a neighbour-dependent directional bias

    PubMed Central

    Binny, Rachelle N.; Plank, Michael J.; James, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to undergo collective movement plays a fundamental role in tissue repair, development and cancer. Interactions occurring at the level of individual cells may lead to the development of spatial structure which will affect the dynamics of migrating cells at a population level. Models that try to predict population-level behaviour often take a mean-field approach, which assumes that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density and ignores the presence of any small-scale spatial structure. In this work, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) that uses random walk theory to model the stochastic interactions occurring at the scale of individual migrating cells. We incorporate a mechanism for local directional bias such that an individual's direction of movement is dependent on the degree of cell crowding in its neighbourhood. As an alternative to the mean-field approach, we also employ spatial moment theory to develop a population-level model which accounts for spatial structure and predicts how these individual-level interactions propagate to the scale of the whole population. The IBM is used to derive an equation for dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells) which incorporates the neighbour-dependent directional bias, and we solve this numerically for a spatially homogeneous case. PMID:25904529

  2. Modality dependence and intermodal transfer in the Corsi Spatial Sequence Task: Screen vs. Floor.

    PubMed

    Röser, Andrea; Hardiess, Gregor; Mallot, Hanspeter A

    2016-07-01

    Four versions of the Corsi Spatial Sequence Task (CSST) were tested in a complete within-subject design, investigating whether participants' performance depends on the modality of task presentation and reproduction that put different demands on spatial processing. Presentation of the sequence (encoding phase) and the reproduction (recall phase) were each carried out either on a computer screen or on the floor of a room, involving actual walking in the recall phase. Combinations of the two different encoding and recall procedures result in the modality conditions Screen-Screen, Screen-Floor, Floor-Screen, and Floor-Floor. Results show the expected decrease in performance with increasing sequence length, which is likely due to processing limitations of working memory. We also found differences in performance between the modality conditions indicating different involvements of spatial working memory processes. Participants performed best in the Screen-Screen modality condition. Floor-Screen and Floor-Floor modality conditions require additional working memory resources for reference frame transformation and spatial updating, respectively; the resulting impairment of the performance was about the same in these two conditions. Finally, the Screen-Floor modality condition requires both types of additional spatial demands and led to the poorest performance. Therefore, we suggest that besides the well-known spatial requirements of CSST, additional working memory resources are demanded in walking CSST supporting processes such as spatial updating, mental rotation, reference frame transformation, and the control of walking itself. PMID:26892885

  3. Need for space: the key distance effect depends on spatial stimulus configurations.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Melanie; Eloka, Owino; Stephan, Julia; Franz, Volker H

    2014-01-01

    In numerous psychological experiments, participants classify stimuli by pressing response keys. According to Lakens, Schneider, Jostmann, and Schubert (2011), classification performance is affected by physical distance between response keys--indicating a cognitive tendency to represent categories in spatial code. However, previous evidence for a key distance effect (KDE) from a color-naming Stroop task is inconclusive as to whether: (a) key separation automatically leads to an internal spatial representation of non-spatial stimulus characteristics in participants, or if the KDE rather depends on physical spatial characteristics of the stimulus configuration; (b) the KDE attenuates the Stroop interference effect. We therefore first adopted the original Stroop task in Experiment 1, confirming that wider key distance facilitated responses, but did not modulate the Stroop effect as was previously found. In Experiments 2 and 3 we controlled potential mediator variables in the original design. When we did not display instructions about stimulus-response mappings, thereby removing the unintended spatial context from the Stroop stimuli, no KDE emerged. Presenting the instructions at a central position in Experiment 4 confirmed that key separation alone is not sufficient for a KDE, but correspondence between spatial configurations of stimuli and responses is also necessary. Evidence indicates that the KDE on Stroop performance is due to known mechanisms of stimulus-response compatibility and response discriminability. The KDE does, however, not demonstrate a general disposition to represent any stimulus in spatial code. PMID:24642888

  4. Paramagnetic Meissner effect and strong time dependence at high fields in melt-textured high- T C superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva Gouvêa, Cristol; Dias, Fábio Teixeira; das Neves Vieira, Valdemar; da Silva, Douglas Langie; Schaf, Jacob; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Rovira, Joan Josep Roa

    2013-05-01

    In this work we report on systematic field-cooled magnetization experiments in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7- δ samples containing Y211 precipitates. Magnetic fields up to 14 T were applied either parallel or perpendicular to the ab planes and a strong paramagnetic response related to the superconducting state was observed. This effect is known as paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME). The magnitude of the PME increases when the field is augmented. This effect shows a strong paramagnetic relaxation, such that the paramagnetic moment increases as a function of the time. The pinning by the Y211 particles plays a crucial role in the explanation of this effect and our results suggest that the pinning capacity can produce a strong flux compression into the sample, originating the PME and the strong time dependence.

  5. Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: strong dependence on external focusing.

    PubMed

    Théberge, Francis; Liu, Weiwei; Simard, Patrick Tr; Becker, Andreas; Chin, See Leang

    2006-09-01

    Our experiment shows that external focusing strongly influences the plasma density and the diameter of femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser filaments generated in air. The control of plasma filament parameters is suitable for many applications such as remote spectroscopy, laser induced electrical discharge, and femtosecond laser material interactions. The measurements of the filament showed the plasma density increases from 10(15)cm(-3) to 2 x 10(18)cm(-3) when the focal length decreases from 380 cm to 10 cm while the diameter of the plasma column varies from 30 microm to 90 microm. The experimental results are in good qualitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations. PMID:17025753

  6. Strong Narrow-Band Luminescence from Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Spatially Localized Sub-10 nm Nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Catledge, Shane A.; Singh, Sonal

    2011-01-01

    Discrete nanodiamond particles of 500 nm and 6 nm average size were seeded onto silicon substrates and plasma treated using chemical vapor deposition to create silicon-vacancy color centers. The resulting narrow-band room temperature photoluminescence is intense, and readily observed even for weakly agglomerated sub-10 nm size diamond. This is in contrast to the well-studied nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond which has luminescence properties that are strongly dependant on particle size, with low probability for incorporation of centers in sub-10 nm crystals. We suggest the silicon-vacancy center to be a viable alternative to nitrogen-vacancy defects for use as a biomarker in the clinically-relevant sub-10 nm size regime, for which nitrogen defect-related luminescent activity and stability is reportedly poor. PMID:21603120

  7. Influence of Low-Level Stimulus Features, Task Dependent Factors, and Spatial Biases on Overt Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    König, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Visual attention is thought to be driven by the interplay between low-level visual features and task dependent information content of local image regions, as well as by spatial viewing biases. Though dependent on experimental paradigms and model assumptions, this idea has given rise to varying claims that either bottom-up or top-down mechanisms dominate visual attention. To contribute toward a resolution of this discussion, here we quantify the influence of these factors and their relative importance in a set of classification tasks. Our stimuli consist of individual image patches (bubbles). For each bubble we derive three measures: a measure of salience based on low-level stimulus features, a measure of salience based on the task dependent information content derived from our subjects' classification responses and a measure of salience based on spatial viewing biases. Furthermore, we measure the empirical salience of each bubble based on our subjects' measured eye gazes thus characterizing the overt visual attention each bubble receives. A multivariate linear model relates the three salience measures to overt visual attention. It reveals that all three salience measures contribute significantly. The effect of spatial viewing biases is highest and rather constant in different tasks. The contribution of task dependent information is a close runner-up. Specifically, in a standardized task of judging facial expressions it scores highly. The contribution of low-level features is, on average, somewhat lower. However, in a prototypical search task, without an available template, it makes a strong contribution on par with the two other measures. Finally, the contributions of the three factors are only slightly redundant, and the semi-partial correlation coefficients are only slightly lower than the coefficients for full correlations. These data provide evidence that all three measures make significant and independent contributions and that none can be neglected in a model

  8. Optimized weak measurement for spatial spin-dependent shifts at Brewster angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Han, Lei; Cheng, Huachao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-07-01

    As Brewster law goes, the polarization selectivity when a light beam reflected at Brewster angle is feasible. We find that this polarization selectivity is still effective incorporated with weak measurement. So we realize an optimized weak measurement technique without preselection polarizer. This scheme is exploited to observe the spatial spin-dependent shifts when a linearly polarized beam is reflected at Brewster angle. The theoretical and experimental results show that by changing the polarization orientation of incident beam, the in-plane spin-dependent shift direction can be reversed, while the out-of-plane spin-dependent shift direction keeps unchanged. Our results may enrich the application of weak measurement.

  9. Hippocampus-dependent place learning enables spatial flexibility in C57BL6/N mice.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, Karl R; Bedenk, Benedikt T; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F; Grünecker, Barbara; Yen, Yi-Chun; Czisch, Michael; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2012-01-01

    Spatial navigation is a fundamental capability necessary in everyday life to locate food, social partners, and shelter. It results from two very different strategies: (1) place learning which enables for flexible way finding and (2) response learning that leads to a more rigid "route following." Despite the importance of knockout techniques that are only available in mice, little is known about mice' flexibility in spatial navigation tasks. Here we demonstrate for C57BL6/N mice in a water-cross maze (WCM) that only place learning enables spatial flexibility and relearning of a platform position, whereas response learning does not. This capability depends on an intact hippocampal formation, since hippocampus lesions by ibotenic acid (IA) disrupted relearning. In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a volume loss of ≥60% of the hippocampus as a critical threshold for relearning impairments. In particular the changes in the left ventral hippocampus were indicative of relearning deficits. In summary, our findings establish the importance of hippocampus-dependent place learning for spatial flexibility and provide a first systematic analysis on spatial flexibility in mice. PMID:23293591

  10. Hippocampus-dependent place learning enables spatial flexibility in C57BL6/N mice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinknecht, Karl R.; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F.; Grünecker, Barbara; Yen, Yi-Chun; Czisch, Michael; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial navigation is a fundamental capability necessary in everyday life to locate food, social partners, and shelter. It results from two very different strategies: (1) place learning which enables for flexible way finding and (2) response learning that leads to a more rigid “route following.” Despite the importance of knockout techniques that are only available in mice, little is known about mice' flexibility in spatial navigation tasks. Here we demonstrate for C57BL6/N mice in a water-cross maze (WCM) that only place learning enables spatial flexibility and relearning of a platform position, whereas response learning does not. This capability depends on an intact hippocampal formation, since hippocampus lesions by ibotenic acid (IA) disrupted relearning. In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a volume loss of ≥60% of the hippocampus as a critical threshold for relearning impairments. In particular the changes in the left ventral hippocampus were indicative of relearning deficits. In summary, our findings establish the importance of hippocampus-dependent place learning for spatial flexibility and provide a first systematic analysis on spatial flexibility in mice. PMID:23293591

  11. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-07-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov loop potential (μ PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the μ -dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of u , d quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyze the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and properties of the mixed phase would bring relevant information on the expected chemical potential dependence of the Polyakov loop contribution.

  12. Informing surveillance programmes by investigating spatial dependency of subclinical Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Benschop, J; Stevenson, M A; Dahl, J; Morris, R S; French, N P

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate local spatial dependency with regard to Salmonella seropositivity in data from the Danish swine salmonellosis control programme and its application in informing surveillance strategies. We applied inhomogeneous and observed-difference K-function estimation, and geo-statistical modelling to data from the Danish swine salmonellosis control programme. Slaughter-pig farm density showed large variation at both the country-wide and local level in Denmark (median 0.23, range 0.02-0.47 farms/km(2)). The spatial distribution of pig farms followed a random inhomogeneous Poisson process but was not aggregated. We found evidence for aggregation of Salmonella case farms over that of all farms at distances of up to 6 km and semivariogram analyses of Salmonella seropositivity revealed spatial dependency between pairs of farms up to 4 km apart. The strength of the spatial dependency was positively associated with slaughter-pig farm density. We proposed sampling more intensively those farms within a 4 km radius of farms that were identified with a high Salmonella status, and reduced sampling of farms that are within this radius of 'Salmonella-free' farms. Our approach has the potential to optimize sampling strategies while maintaining consumer confidence in food safety and also has potential to be used for other zoonotic disease surveillance systems. PMID:19224653

  13. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  14. Polarization and molecular-orbital dependence of strong-field enhanced ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei; Guo, Chunlei

    2016-04-01

    In this work we perform a polarization dependence study of enhanced ionization (EI) in diatomic molecules. We find that EI exists when the field polarization is parallel to the molecular axis but disappears when polarization is perpendicular. We further study EI with circular polarization and find that EI exists with circular polarization indicating that rescattering does not play a significant role for EI. Furthermore, we study molecular orbital effect on EI. We find that EI exists in σ type but not π type outmost molecular orbitals.

  15. A temperature dependent infrared absorption study of strong hydrogen bonds in bis(glycinium)oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Himal; Deo, M. N.; Murli, C.; Vishwakarma, S. R.; Chitra, R.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2016-05-01

    We report infrared absorption studies on Bis(glycinium)oxalate, an organic complex of the simplest amino acid Glycine, under varying temperatures in the range 77 - 350 K. The measurements have been carried out in the spectral range 400 - 4000 cm-1 and the strongest O-H---O hydrogen bond, which plays a vital role in the structural stabilization, has been studied. Subtle changes in widths of modes and temperature dependent frequency variations have been observed near 250 K. The hydrogen bonding network remains stable in the entire temperature range. This is in contrast to its reported high pressure behavior.

  16. Strong Temperature Dependence in the Reactivity of H2 on RuO2(110).

    PubMed

    Henderson, Michael A; Dahal, Arjun; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the reactivity of H2 is of critical importance in controlling and optimizing many heterogeneous catalytic processes, particularly in cases where its adsorption on the catalyst surface is rate-limiting. In this work, we examine the temperature-dependent adsorption of H2/D2 on the clean RuO2(110) surface using the King and Wells molecular beam approach, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We show that the adsorption probability of H2/D2 on this surface is highly temperature-dependent, decreasing from ∼0.4 below 25 K to <0.01 at 300 K. Both STM and TPD reveal that adsorption (molecular or dissociative) is severely limited once the temperature exceeds the trailing edge temperature of the H2 TPD state (∼150 K). The presence of coadsorbed water or oxygen does not appear to alter this situation. Previous literature reports of extensive RuO2(110) surface hydroxylation from H2/D2 exposures at 300 K may instead be the result of background contamination brought about by chamber backfilling. PMID:27434420

  17. Plant adaptation to fluctuating environment and biomass production are strongly dependent on guard cell potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lebaudy, Anne; Vavasseur, Alain; Hosy, Eric; Dreyer, Ingo; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Simonneau, Thierry; Sentenac, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    At least four genes encoding plasma membrane inward K+ channels (Kin channels) are expressed in Arabidopsis guard cells. A double mutant plant was engineered by disruption of a major Kin channel gene and expression of a dominant negative channel construct. Using the patch-clamp technique revealed that this mutant was totally deprived of guard cell Kin channel (GCKin) activity, providing a model to investigate the roles of this activity in the plant. GCKin activity was found to be an essential effector of stomatal opening triggered by membrane hyperpolarization and thereby of blue light-induced stomatal opening at dawn. It improved stomatal reactivity to external or internal signals (light, CO2 availability, and evaporative demand). It protected stomatal function against detrimental effects of Na+ when plants were grown in the presence of physiological concentrations of this cation, probably by enabling guard cells to selectively and rapidly take up K+ instead of Na+ during stomatal opening, thereby preventing deleterious effects of Na+ on stomatal closure. It was also shown to be a key component of the mechanisms that underlie the circadian rhythm of stomatal opening, which is known to gate stomatal responses to extracellular and intracellular signals. Finally, in a meteorological scenario with higher light intensity during the first hours of the photophase, GCKin activity was found to allow a strong increase (35%) in plant biomass production. Thus, a large diversity of approaches indicates that GCKin activity plays pleiotropic roles that crucially contribute to plant adaptation to fluctuating and stressing natural environments. PMID:18367672

  18. Spin dependence of K mixing, strong configuration mixing, and electromagnetic properties of Hf178

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. B.; Cline, D.; Wu, C. Y.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Beausang, C.; Casten, R. F.; Gerl, J.; Hecht, A. A.; Heinz, A.; Hua, H.; Hughes, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lister, C. J.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Meyer, D. A.; Moore, E. F.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pardo, R. C.; Schlegel, Ch.; Seweryniak, D.; Simon, M. W.; Srebrny, J.; Teng, R.; Vetter, K.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2007-03-01

    The combined data of two Coulomb excitation experiments has verified the purely electromagnetic population of the Kπ=4+,6+,8-, and 16+ rotational bands in Hf178 via 2≤ν≤14 K-forbidden transitions, quantifying the breakdown of the K-selection rule with increasing spin in the low-K bands. The γ-, 4+, and 6+ bands were extended, and four new states in a rotational band were tentatively assigned to a previously known Kπ=0+ band. The quasiparticle structure of the 6+ (t(1)/(2)=77 ns) and 8- (t(1)/(2)=4 s) isomer bands were evaluated, showing that the gyromagnetic ratios of the 6+ isomer band are consistent with a pure π(7)/(2)+[404],π(5)/(2)+[402] structure. The 8- isomer band at 1147 keV and the second 8- band at 1479 keV, thought to be predominantly ν(7)/(2)-[514],ν(9)/(2)+[624] and π(9)/(2)-[514],π(7)/(2)+[404], respectively, are mixed to a degree approaching the strong-mixing limit. Based on measured matrix elements, it was shown that heavy-ion bombardment could depopulate the 16+ isomer at the ~1% level, although no states were found that would mediate photodeexcitation of the isomer via low-energy x-ray absorption.

  19. Cy3-DNA Stacking Interactions Strongly Depend on the Identity of the Terminal Basepair

    PubMed Central

    Spiriti, Justin; Binder, Jennifer K.; Levitus, Marcia; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the effect of the first basepair on the conformational dynamics of the fluorescent dye Cy3 attached to the 5′ end of double-stranded DNA using Gaussian-mixture adaptive umbrella sampling simulations. In the simulations, the sampling of all five dihedral angles along the linker was enhanced, so that both stacked and unstacked states were sampled. The affinity of Cy3 for a T·A basepair (with the dye attached to T) was found to be significantly less than for the other basepairs. This was verified experimentally by measuring the activation energies for cis-trans isomerization of the dye. The simulation and experimental results indicate the existence of partially unstacked conformations amenable to photoisomerization. The simulations also showed that stacking of Cy3 straightens the DNA while stabilizing the first basepair. Our findings indicate that fluorescence is modulated by Cy3-DNA interactions in a sequence-dependent manner. PMID:21320450

  20. Spin dependence of k-mixing, strong configuration mixing and electromagnetic properties of {sup 178}Hf.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.B.; Cline, D.; Wu, C.Y.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Beausang, C.; Casten, R.F.; Gerl, J.; Hecht, A.A.; Heinz, A.; Hua, H.; Hughes, R.; Janssens, R.V.F; Lister, C.J.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Meyer, D.A.; Moore, E.F.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pardo, R.C.; Schlegel, Ch.; Seweryniak, D.; Simon, W.M.; Srebrny, J.; Teng, R.; Vetter, K.; Physics; Univ. of Rochester; LLNL; Yale Univ.; Univ. of Richmond; GSI; Peking Univ.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.; Warsaw Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The combined data of two Coulomb excitation experiments has verified the purely electromagnetic population of the K{pi} = 4{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 8{sup -}, and 16{sup +} rotational bands in {sup 178}Hf via 2 {le} {nu} {le} 14 K-forbidden transitions, quantifying the breakdown of the K-selection rule with increasing spin in the low-K bands. The {gamma}{sup -}, 4{sup +}, and 6{sup +} bands were extended, and four new states in a rotational band were tentatively assigned to a previously known K{pi} = 0{sup +} band. The quasiparticle structure of the 6{sup +} (t 1/2 = 77 ns) and 8{sup -} (t 1/2 = 4s) isomer bands were evaluated, showing that the gyromagnetic ratios of the 6{sup +} isomer band are consistent with a pure {pi} 7/2{sup +}[404],{pi} 5/2{sup +}[402] structure. The 8{sup -} isomer band at 1147 keV and the second 8{sup -} band at 1479 keV, thought to be predominantly {nu} 7/2{sup -}[514], {nu} 9/2{sup +}[624] and {pi} 9/2{sup -}[514], {pi}7/2{sup +}[404], respectively, are mixed to a degree approaching the strong-mixing limit. Based on measured matrix elements, it was shown that heavy-ion bombardment could depopulate the 16{sup +} isomer at the {approx}1% level, although no states were found that would mediate photodeexcitation of the isomer via low-energy x-ray absorption.

  1. Biphase micro/nanometer sized single crystals of organic semiconductors: Control synthesis and their strong phase dependent optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengliang; Liu, Yaling; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Hongxiang; Xu, Wei; Hu, Wenping

    2010-04-01

    The control synthesis of α and β phase micro/nanometer sized single crystals of semiconductor 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene were achieved; the device performance of individual α and β phase single crystals showed strong phase dependence; devices of β phase single crystals exhibited very high photoswitch performance (on/off current ratio ˜6×103, one of the highest values reported for organic materials), and those of α phase displayed high field-effect performance.

  2. Angular Dependence of Jet Quenching Indicates Its Strong Enhancement Near the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shuryak, Edward

    2008-10-22

    We study dependence of jet quenching on matter density, using 'tomography' of the fireball provided by RHIC data on azimuthal anisotropy v{sub 2} of high p{sub t} hadron yield at different centralities. Slicing the fireball into shells with constant (entropy) density, we derive a 'layer-wise geometrical limit' v{sub 2}{sup max} which is indeed above the data v{sub 2} < v{sub x}{sup max}. Interestingly, the limit is reached only if quenching is dominated by shells with the entropy density exactly in the near-T{sub c} region. We show two models that simultaneously describe the high p{sub t} v{sub 2} and R{sub AA} data and conclude that such a description can be achieved only if the jet quenching is few times stronger in the near-T{sub c} region relative to QGP at T > T{sub c}. One possible reason for that may be recent indications that the near-T{sub c} region is a magnetic plasma of relatively light color-magnetic monopoles.

  3. Relativistic scattering with a spatially dependent effective mass in the Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Bahlouli, H.; Abdelmonem, M. S.; Al-Hasan, A.

    2007-06-15

    We formulate a relativistic algebraic method of scattering for systems with spatially dependent mass based on the J-matrix method. The reference Hamiltonian is the three-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian but with a mass that is position-dependent with a constant asymptotic limit. Additionally, this effective mass distribution is locally represented in a finite dimensional function subspace. The spinor couples to spherically symmetric vector and pseudo scalar potentials that are short-range such that they are accurately represented by their matrix elements in the same finite dimensional subspace. We calculate the relativistic phase shift as a function of energy for a given configuration and study the effect of spatial variation of the mass on the energy resonance structure.

  4. Isothermal Langevin dynamics in systems with power-law spatially dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regev, Shaked; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics of Brownian particles in a heterogeneous one-dimensional medium with a spatially dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D (x ) ˜|x| c , at constant temperature. The particle's probability distribution function (PDF) is calculated both analytically, by solving Fick's diffusion equation, and from numerical simulations of the underdamped Langevin equation. At long times, the PDFs calculated by both approaches yield identical results, corresponding to subdiffusion for c <0 and superdiffusion for 0 1 , the diffusion equation predicts that the particles accelerate. Here we show that this phenomenon, previously considered in several works as an illustration for the possible dramatic effects of spatially dependent thermal noise, is unphysical. We argue that in an isothermal medium, the motion cannot exceed the ballistic limit (˜t2 ). The ballistic limit is reached when the friction coefficient drops sufficiently fast at large distances from the origin and is correctly captured by Langevin's equation.

  5. The abundance of satellites depends strongly on the morphology of the host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo; Trujillo, Ignacio; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Using the spectroscopic catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10, we have explored the abundance of satellites around a sample of 254 massive (1011 < M⋆ < 2 × 1011 M⊙) local (z < 0.025) galaxies. We have divided our sample into four morphological groups (E, S0, Sa, Sb/c). We find that the number of satellites with M⋆ ≳ 109 M⊙ and R < 300 kpc depends drastically on the morphology of the central galaxy. The average number of satellites per galaxy host (NSat/NHost) down to a mass ratio of 1:100 is 4.5 ± 0.3 for E hosts, 2.6 ± 0.2 for S0, 1.5 ± 0.1 for Sa and 1.2 ± 0.2 for Sb/c. The amount of stellar mass enclosed by the satellites around massive E-type galaxies is a factor of 2, 4 and 5 larger than the mass in the satellites of S0, Sa and Sb/c types, respectively. If these satellites would eventually infall into the host galaxies, for all the morphological types, the merger channel will be largely dominated by satellites with a mass ratio satellite-host μ > 0.1. The fact that massive elliptical galaxies have a significant larger number of satellites than massive spirals could point out that elliptical galaxies inhabit heavier dark matter haloes than equally massive galaxies with later morphological types. If this hypothesis is correct, the dark matter haloes of late-type spiral galaxies are a factor of ˜2-3 more efficient on producing galaxies with the same stellar mass than those dark matter haloes of early-type galaxies.

  6. Spatial dependence of the sheath power transmission factor in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Futch, A.H.; Hill, D.N.; Porter, G.D. ); Matthews, G.F. ); Buchenauer, D. )

    1991-02-01

    The spatial dependence of the power transmission factor, d, associated with an ion-electron pair passing through the sheath at the DIII-D divertor plate has been determined by sweeping the edge plasma across Langmuir probe detectors. Our results show that d decreases from the classically expected value of eight near the low density edge of the scrape-off-layer plasma to values less than unity at the peak of the profile. 13 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Native Birds and Alien Insects: Spatial Density Dependence in Songbird Predation of Invading Oak Gallwasps

    PubMed Central

    Schönrogge, Karsten; Begg, Tracey; Stone, Graham N.

    2013-01-01

    Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris) at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource. PMID:23342048

  8. Neural Correlates of Reward-Based Spatial Learning in Persons with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Tau, Gregory Z; Marsh, Rachel; Wang, Zhishun; Torres-Sanchez, Tania; Graniello, Barbara; Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Packard, Mark G; Duan, Yunsuo; Kangarlu, Alayar; Martinez, Diana; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional learning systems are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of and impair recovery from addictions. The functioning of the brain circuits for episodic memory or learning that support goal-directed behavior has not been studied previously in persons with cocaine dependence (CD). Thirteen abstinent CD and 13 healthy participants underwent MRI scanning while performing a task that requires the use of spatial cues to navigate a virtual-reality environment and find monetary rewards, allowing the functional assessment of the brain systems for spatial learning, a form of episodic memory. Whereas both groups performed similarly on the reward-based spatial learning task, we identified disturbances in brain regions involved in learning and reward in CD participants. In particular, CD was associated with impaired functioning of medial temporal lobe (MTL), a brain region that is crucial for spatial learning (and episodic memory) with concomitant recruitment of striatum (which normally participates in stimulus-response, or habit, learning), and prefrontal cortex. CD was also associated with enhanced sensitivity of the ventral striatum to unexpected rewards but not to expected rewards earned during spatial learning. We provide evidence that spatial learning in CD is characterized by disturbances in functioning of an MTL-based system for episodic memory and a striatum-based system for stimulus-response learning and reward. We have found additional abnormalities in distributed cortical regions. Consistent with findings from animal studies, we provide the first evidence in humans describing the disruptive effects of cocaine on the coordinated functioning of multiple neural systems for learning and memory. PMID:23917430

  9. Time-dependent analysis of 8 days of CN spatial profiles in comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael; Huang, Bormin; Cochran, Anita; Fink, Uwe; Schulz, Rita

    1994-01-01

    CN profiles in comet P/Halley were constructed from observations taken at three observatories during an 8 day period in April 1986. These data provide a time series of CN spatial profiles spanning just over one 7.37 day period from 1986 April 7 to April 15 and sample distances from the nucleus from just over 10(exp 3) km to 10(exp 6) km. The effect of the 7.37 day periodic variation on the CN distribution in P/Halley has been examined by using the time-dependent model applied earlier to a subset of the data. Because of the large spatial scale of the data on April 7, 8, and 9 (approx. 10(exp 6) km), and the corresponding transport time in the coma, information present in the spatial profiles regarding the gas production rate actually covers nearly two full periods. These spatially extended profiles clearly show the wavy structures outside 10(exp 5) km. Such structures were predicted in a previous analysis (Combi & Fink 1993) that was based solely on the photometric light curve and on profiles which only extended to distances less than 10(exp 5) km. We are now able to reproduce the highly variable Halley correction for the variation in gas production rate.

  10. The spatial frequency tuning of optic-flow-dependent behaviors in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens

    PubMed Central

    Dyhr, Jonathan P.; Higgins, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Insects use visual estimates of flight speed for a variety of behaviors, including visual navigation, odometry, grazing landings and flight speed control, but the neuronal mechanisms underlying speed detection remain unknown. Although many models and theories have been proposed for how the brain extracts the angular speed of the retinal image, termed optic flow, we lack the detailed electrophysiological and behavioral data necessary to conclusively support any one model. One key property by which different models of motion detection can be differentiated is their spatiotemporal frequency tuning. Numerous studies have suggested that optic-flow-dependent behaviors are largely insensitive to the spatial frequency of a visual stimulus, but they have sampled only a narrow range of spatial frequencies, have not always used narrowband stimuli, and have yielded slightly different results between studies based on the behaviors being investigated. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of the spatial frequency dependence of the centering response in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens using sinusoidal and square wave patterns. PMID:20435814

  11. Natal departure timing from spatially varying environments is dependent of individual ontogenetic status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucherousset, Julien; Paillisson, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Jean-Marc

    2013-08-01

    Natal departure timing represents one of the first crucial decisions for juveniles born in spatially varying environments that ultimately disappear, but our knowledge on its determinants is limited. The present study aimed at understanding the determinants of juvenile natal departure by releasing individually tagged juvenile pike ( Esox lucius L.) with variable body size and trophic position in a temporary flooded grassland. Specifically, we investigated whether natal departure depends on individual competitive status (`competition hypothesis'), physiological tolerance to environmental conditions (`physiological hypothesis') or individual trophic position and the spatial heterogeneity of trophic resources (`trophic hypothesis'). The results indicated that departure timing was negatively correlated with body size at release, showing that the dominance status among competing individuals was not the main trigger of juvenile departure. A positive correlation between departure timing and individual body size at departure was observed, suggesting that inter-individual variability in physiological tolerance did not explain departure patterns. While individual growth performances were similar irrespective of the timing of natal departure, stable isotope analyses revealed that juveniles with higher trophic position departed significantly earlier than individuals with lower trophic position. Therefore, the trade-off driving the use of spatially varying environments was most likely dependent upon the benefits associated with energetic returns than the costs associated with inter-individual competition or physiological stress. This result highlighted how ontogeny, and particularly ontogenetic niche shift, can play a central role in juvenile's decision to depart from natal habitats in a predatory species.

  12. Surface-termination-dependent magnetism and strong perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy of an FeRh(001) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jekal, Soyoung; Rhim, S. H.; Hong, S. C.; Son, Won-joon; Shick, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    The magnetism of FeRh (001) films strongly depends on film thickness and surface terminations. While the magnetic ground state of bulk FeRh is G -type antiferromagnetism, the Rh-terminated films exhibit ferromagnetism with strong perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy whose energy +2.1 meV/□ is two orders of magnitude greater than bulk 3 d conventional magnetic metals (□ is the area of a two-dimensional unit cell). While the Goodenough-Kanamori-Anderson rule on the superexchange interaction is crucial in determining the magnetic ground phases of FeRh bulk and thin films, the magnetic phases are the results of interplay and competition between three mechanisms—the superexchange interaction, the Zener-type direct interaction, and energy gain by Rh magnetization.

  13. A gender- and sexual orientation-dependent spatial attentional effect of invisible images.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Costello, Patricia; Fang, Fang; Huang, Miner; He, Sheng

    2006-11-01

    Human observers are constantly bombarded with a vast amount of information. Selective attention helps us to quickly process what is important while ignoring the irrelevant. In this study, we demonstrate that information that has not entered observers' consciousness, such as interocularly suppressed (invisible) erotic pictures, can direct the distribution of spatial attention. Furthermore, invisible erotic information can either attract or repel observers' spatial attention depending on their gender and sexual orientation. While unaware of the suppressed pictures, heterosexual males' attention was attracted to invisible female nudes, heterosexual females' attention was attracted to invisible male nudes, gay males behaved similarly to heterosexual females, and gay/bisexual females performed in-between heterosexual males and females. PMID:17075055

  14. A model of grid cell development through spatial exploration and spike time-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Widloski, John; Fiete, Ila R

    2014-07-16

    Grid cell responses develop gradually after eye opening, but little is known about the rules that govern this process. We present a biologically plausible model for the formation of a grid cell network. An asymmetric spike time-dependent plasticity rule acts upon an initially unstructured network of spiking neurons that receive inputs encoding animal velocity and location. Neurons develop an organized recurrent architecture based on the similarity of their inputs, interacting through inhibitory interneurons. The mature network can convert velocity inputs into estimates of animal location, showing that spatially periodic responses and the capacity of path integration can arise through synaptic plasticity, acting on inputs that display neither. The model provides numerous predictions about the necessity of spatial exploration for grid cell development, network topography, the maturation of velocity tuning and neural correlations, the abrupt transition to stable patterned responses, and possible mechanisms to set grid period across grid modules. PMID:25033187

  15. A gender- and sexual orientation-dependent spatial attentional effect of invisible images

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Costello, Patricia; Fang, Fang; Huang, Miner; He, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Human observers are constantly bombarded with a vast amount of information. Selective attention helps us to quickly process what is important while ignoring the irrelevant. In this study, we demonstrate that information that has not entered observers' consciousness, such as interocularly suppressed (invisible) erotic pictures, can direct the distribution of spatial attention. Furthermore, invisible erotic information can either attract or repel observers' spatial attention depending on their gender and sexual orientation. While unaware of the suppressed pictures, heterosexual males' attention was attracted to invisible female nudes, heterosexual females' attention was attracted to invisible male nudes, gay males behaved similarly to heterosexual females, and gay/bisexual females performed in-between heterosexual males and females. PMID:17075055

  16. Spatial scale dependence of the long-range memory properties of Earth surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, H.; Rypdal, K.; Rypdal, M.; Løvsletten, O.

    2013-12-01

    We present a study of the long-range memory properties of the Earth surface temperature. Different spatial scales are analyzed, and it is observed that the persistence of the time series increases with increasing spatial scale. It is also observed that sea surface temperatures are more persistent than land temperatures. The analysis is performed by coarse-graining gridded temperature data, starting out with boxes of 5 x 5 degrees, and then averaging them up to global scales. As a measure of the strength of persistence we have the Hurst exponent, which we have estimated using methods like wavelet variance and maximum likelihood. In the search of an explanation for the differences in the degree of persistence we have studied the strength of the cross-covariances between the temperatures at different locations. If this is strong it will have an impact on the autocovariance function for the average temperature within the area studied. In this way we can see that the spatial covariance is closely linked to the temporal covariance.

  17. Novel scatter compensation of list-mode PET data using spatial and energy dependent corrections

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Bastien

    2011-01-01

    With the widespread use of PET crystals with greatly improved energy resolution (e.g., 11.5% with LYSO as compared to 20% with BGO) and of list-mode acquisitions, the use of the energy of individual events in scatter correction schemes becomes feasible. We propose a novel scatter approach that incorporates the energy of individual photons in the scatter correction and reconstruction of list-mode PET data in addition to the spatial information presently used in clinical scanners. First, we rewrite the Poisson likelihood function of list-mode PET data including the energy distributions of primary and scatter coincidences and show that this expression yields an MLEM reconstruction algorithm containing both energy and spatial dependent corrections. To estimate the spatial distribution of scatter coincidences we use the single scatter simulation (SSS). Next, we derive two new formulae which allow estimation of the 2D (coincidences) energy probability density functions (E-PDF) of primary and scatter coincidences from the 1D (photons) E-PDFs associated with each photon. We also describe an accurate and robust object-specific method for estimating these 1D E-PDFs based on a decomposition of the total energy spectra detected across the scanner into primary and scattered components. Finally, we show that the energy information can be used to accurately normalize the scatter sinogram to the data. We compared the performance of this novel scatter correction incorporating both the position and energy of detected coincidences to that of the traditional approach modeling only the spatial distribution of scatter coincidences in 3D Monte Carlo simulations of a medium cylindrical phantom and a large, non uniform NCAT phantom. Incorporating the energy information in the scatter correction decreased bias in the activity distribution estimation by ~20% and ~40% in the cold regions of the large NCAT phantom at energy resolutions 11.5 and 20% at 511 keV, respectively, compared to when

  18. Spatial estimation of debris flows-triggering rainfall and its dependence on rainfall severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destro, Elisa; Marra, Francesco; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios; Zoccatelli, Davide; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the occurrence of landslides and debris flows (collectively termed 'debris flows' hereinafter) is fundamental for issuing hazard warnings, and focuses largely on rainfall as a triggering agent. Debris flow forecasting relies very often on the identification of combinations of depth and duration of rainfall - rainfall thresholds - that trigger widespread debris flows. Rainfall estimation errors related to the sparse nature of raingauge data are enhanced in case of convective rainfall events characterized by limited spatial extent. Such errors have been shown to cause underestimation of the rainfall thresholds and, thus, less efficient forecasts of debris flows occurrence. This work examines the spatial organization of debris flows-triggering rainfall around the debris flow initiation points using high-resolution, carefully corrected radar data for a set of short duration (<30 h) storm events occurred in the eastern Italian Alps. The set includes eleven debris-flow triggering rainfall events that occurred in the study area between 2005 and 2014. The selected events are among the most severe in the region during this period and triggered a total of 99 debris flows that caused significant damage to people and infrastructures. We show that the spatial rainfall organisation depends on the severity (measured via the estimated return time-RT) of the debris flow-triggering rainfall. For more frequent events (RT<20 yrs) the rainfall spatial pattern systematically shows that debris flow location coincides with a local minimum, whereas for less frequent events (RT>20 yrs) the triggering rainfall presents a local peak corresponding to the debris flow initiation point. Dependence of these features on rainfall duration is quite limited. The characteristics of the spatial rainfall organisation are exploited to understand the performances and results of three different rainfall interpolation techniques: nearest neighbour (NN), inverse distance weighting (IDW) and

  19. Spatial dependences in the distant solar wind: Pioneers 10 and 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Barnes, A.

    1983-01-01

    Pioneer 10, 11 observations of the solar wind and magnetic field between 1 and 20 AU are reviewed. Spatial dependences, which are emphasized, must be inferred in the presence of large temporal variations including solar cycle effects. The separation of spatial and temporal dependences is achieved principally through the use of multipoint observations including baseline measurements at 1 AU. Measurements of the solar wind parameters (radial speed, flux, proton temperature) and of the magnetic field magnitude and components are compared with two theories, the Parker theory which assumes radial, azimuthally symmetric flow and the Goldstein-Jokipii theory which includes effects associated with stream-stream interactions. The observed radial gradients in the proton density and velocity and the magnetic field are consistent with the Parker model. A qualitative dependence of field magnitude on heliomagnetic latitude, i.e., referred to the observed location of the heliospheric current sheet, was derived. The field strength was found to decrease with distance from the current sheet.

  20. Dependency of parameter values of a crop model on the spatial scale of simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Toshichika; Tanaka, Yukiko; Sakurai, Gen; Ishigooka, Yasushi; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    Reliable regional-scale representation of crop growth and yields has been increasingly important in earth system modeling for the simulation of atmosphere-vegetation-soil interactions in managed ecosystems. While the parameter values in many crop models are location specific or cultivar specific, the validity of such values for regional simulation is in question. We present the scale dependency of likely parameter values that are related to the responses of growth rate and yield to temperature, using the paddy rice model applied to Japan as an example. For all regions, values of the two parameters that determine the degree of yield response to low temperature (the base temperature for calculating cooling degree days and the curvature factor of spikelet sterility caused by low temperature) appeared to change relative to the grid interval. Two additional parameters (the air temperature at which the developmental rate is half of the maximum rate at the optimum temperature and the value of developmental index at which point the crop becomes sensitive to the photoperiod) showed scale dependency in a limited region, whereas the remaining three parameters that determine the phenological characteristics of a rice cultivar and the technological level show no clear scale dependency. These results indicate the importance of using appropriate parameter values for the spatial scale at which a crop model operates. We recommend avoiding the use of location-specific or cultivar-specific parameter values for regional crop simulation, unless a rationale is presented suggesting these values are insensitive to spatial scale.

  1. Spatial dependence of high energy electrons and their radiations in pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang-Wu; Gao, Quan-Gui; Zhang, Li

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the spatial dependence of high energy electrons and their radiations in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). By assuming a time-dependent broken power-law injection and spatial dependence of convection velocity, magnetic field strength and diffusion coefficient on the radial distance of an expanding system, we numerically solve the Fokker-Planck transport equation including convection, diffusion, adiabatic loss and radiative loss in spherical coordinates, and investigate the effects of magnetic field, PWN age, maximum energy of electrons, and diffusion coefficient on electron spectra and non-thermal photon emissions. Our results indicate that (1) electron spectra and the corresponding photon spectra are a function of radial distance r of the expanding system; (2) for a given expansion velocity, the increase of the PWN age causes a slower decrease of the convection velocity (V ∝ r ‑β) and a more rapid decrease of the magnetic field strength (B ∝ r ‑1+β), but a more rapid increase of the diffusion coefficient (κ ∝ r 1‑β) because the index β decreases with the PWN age; and (3) the lower energy part of the electron spectra is dominated by convection and adiabatic loss, but the higher energy part is dominated by the competition between synchrotron loss and diffusion, and such a competition is a function of radial distance. Therefore the diffusion effect has an important role in the evolution of electron spectra as well as non-thermal photon spectra in a PWN.

  2. Density-dependent home-range size revealed by spatially explicit capture–recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, M.G.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Jhala, Y.V.; Qureshi, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The size of animal home ranges often varies inversely with population density among populations of a species. This fact has implications for population monitoring using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR) models, in which both the scale of home-range movements σ and population density D usually appear as parameters, and both may vary among populations. It will often be appropriate to model a structural relationship between population-specific values of these parameters, rather than to assume independence. We suggest re-parameterizing the SECR model using kp = σp √Dp, where kp relates to the degree of overlap between home ranges and the subscript p distinguishes populations. We observe that kp is often nearly constant for populations spanning a range of densities. This justifies fitting a model in which the separate kp are replaced by the single parameter k and σp is a density-dependent derived parameter. Continuous density-dependent spatial variation in σ may also be modelled, using a scaled non-Euclidean distance between detectors and the locations of animals. We illustrate these methods with data from automatic photography of tigers (Panthera tigris) across India, in which the variation is among populations, from mist-netting of ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) in Maryland, USA, in which the variation is within a single population over time, and from live-trapping of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, modelling spatial variation within one population. Possible applications and limitations of the methods are discussed. A model in which kp is constant, while density varies, provides a parsimonious null model for SECR. The parameter k of the null model is a concise summary of the empirical relationship between home-range size and density that is useful in comparative studies. We expect deviations from this model, particularly the dependence of kp on covariates, to be biologically interesting.

  3. Soil microbial community variation correlates most strongly with plant species identity, followed by soil chemistry, spatial location and plant genus

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jean H.; Anacker, Brian L.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; Burke, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil ecologists have debated the relative importance of dispersal limitation and ecological factors in determining the structure of soil microbial communities. Recent evidence suggests that ‘everything is not everywhere’, and that microbial communities are influenced by both dispersal limitation and ecological factors. However, we still do not understand the relative explanatory power of spatial and ecological factors, including plant species identity and even plant relatedness, for different fractions of the soil microbial community (i.e. bacterial and fungal communities). To ask whether factors such as plant species, soil chemistry, spatial location and plant relatedness influence rhizosphere community composition, we examined field-collected rhizosphere soil of seven congener pairs that occur at Bodega Bay Marine Reserve, CA, USA. We characterized differences in bacterial and fungal communities using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plant species identity was the single best statistical predictor of both bacterial and fungal community composition in the root zone. Soil microbial community structure was also correlated with soil chemistry. The third best predictor of bacterial and fungal communities was spatial location, confirming that everything is not everywhere. Variation in microbial community composition was also related to combinations of spatial location, soil chemistry and plant relatedness, suggesting that these factors do not act independently. Plant relatedness explained less of the variation than plant species, soil chemistry, or spatial location. Despite some congeners occupying different habitats and being spatially distant, rhizosphere fungal communities of plant congeners were more similar than expected by chance. Bacterial communities from the same samples were only weakly similar between plant congeners. Thus, plant relatedness might influence soil fungal, more than soil bacterial, community composition. PMID:25818073

  4. The time dependent propensity function for acceleration of spatial stochastic simulation of reaction–diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-10-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy.

  5. On the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Phan Hong; Hai, Do Thi Hong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional (6D) space-time. The 4-brane is assumed to be a de Sitter space. Based on the form of the brane-world energy-momentum tensor proposed by Shiromizu et al. and the five dimensions by Peter K. F. Kuhfittic, we extended the theory to the 2-codimension embedded in higher dimensions. The inflation scenario in 6D is investigated in two cases of cosmological constant: Ʌ > 0 and Ʌ < 0. The energy of two extra dimensions is calculated too.

  6. The Time Dependent Propensity Function for Acceleration of Spatial Stochastic Simulation of Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy. PMID:26609185

  7. Spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's tropospheric temperatures, 1980-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padmavati A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Baines, Kevin H.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Veeder, Glenn J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's temperature near 250-millibar pressure were measured through a jovian year by imaging thermal emission at 18 micrometers. The temperature field is influenced by seasonal radiative forcing, and its banded organization is closely correlated with the visible cloud field. Evidence was found for a quasi-periodic oscillation of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone, a correlation between tropospheric and stratospheric waves in the North Equatorial Belt, and slowly moving thermal features in the North and South Equatorial Belts. There appears to be no common relation between temporal changes of temperature and changes in the visual albedo of the various axisymmetric bands.

  8. Strong dependence of surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering on the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can be tuned by varying the liquid environment. Due to surface passivation and reaction with thiolated ligands, the nanoalloys obtained by our synthetic protocol are structurally and colloidally stable. Hence, we studied the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the iron fraction and, for the first time, we observed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in Au-Fe nanoalloys. SPR and SERS performances are strongly affected by the iron content and are investigated using analytical and numerical models. By demonstrating the strong modification of plasmonic properties on the composition, our results provide important insights into the exploitation of Au-Fe nanoalloys in photonics, nanomedicine, magneto-plasmonic and plasmon-enhanced catalysis. Moreover, our findings show that several other plasmonic materials exist beyond gold and silver nanostructures. PMID:24309909

  9. Strong frequency dependence of vibrational relaxation in bulk and surface water reveals sub-picosecond structural heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sietse T.; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Okuno, Masanari; Nagata, Yuki; Bakker, Huib J.; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Because of strong hydrogen bonding in liquid water, intermolecular interactions between water molecules are highly delocalized. Previous two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy experiments have indicated that this delocalization smears out the structural heterogeneity of neat H2O. Here we report on a systematic investigation of the ultrafast vibrational relaxation of bulk and interfacial water using time-resolved infrared and sum-frequency generation spectroscopies. These experiments reveal a remarkably strong dependence of the vibrational relaxation time on the frequency of the OH stretching vibration of liquid water in the bulk and at the air/water interface. For bulk water, the vibrational relaxation time increases continuously from 250 to 550 fs when the frequency is increased from 3,100 to 3,700 cm−1. For hydrogen-bonded water at the air/water interface, the frequency dependence is even stronger. These results directly demonstrate that liquid water possesses substantial structural heterogeneity, both in the bulk and at the surface. PMID:26382651

  10. Spatial hearing in Cope's gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael S; Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M; Johns, Anastasia R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of tympanum vibrations were 1-4 dB greater than sound pressure differences adjacent to the two tympana, while interaural differences in the phase of tympanum vibration were similar to or smaller than those in sound phase. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibration were highly dependent on sound frequency, and directionality in amplitude varied slightly with signal level. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tone- and call-evoked responses did not differ between sexes. Lung inflation strongly affected tympanum directionality over a narrow frequency range that, in females, included call frequencies. This study provides a foundation for further work on the biomechanics and neural mechanisms of spatial hearing in H. chrysoscelis, and lends valuable perspective to behavioral studies on the use of spatial information by this species and other frogs. PMID:24504183

  11. Temperature dependence, spatial scale, and tree species diversity in eastern Asia and North America

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Brown, James H.; Tang, Zhiyao; Fang, Jingyun

    2009-01-01

    The increase of biodiversity from poles to equator is one of the most pervasive features of nature. For 2 centuries since von Humboldt, Wallace, and Darwin, biogeographers and ecologists have investigated the environmental and historical factors that determine the latitudinal gradient of species diversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The recently proposed metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) aims to explain ecological patterns and processes, including geographical patterns of species richness, in terms of the effects of temperature and body size on the metabolism of organisms. Here we use 2 comparable databases of tree distributions in eastern Asia and North America to investigate the roles of environmental temperature and spatial scale in shaping geographical patterns of species diversity. We find that number of species increases exponentially with environmental temperature as predicted by the MTE, and so does the rate of spatial turnover in species composition (slope of the species-area relationship). The magnitude of temperature dependence of species richness increases with spatial scale. Moreover, the relationship between species richness and temperature is much steeper in eastern Asia than in North America: in cold climates at high latitudes there are more tree species in North America, but the reverse is true in warmer climates at lower latitudes. These patterns provide evidence that the kinetics of ecological and evolutionary processes play a major role in the latitudinal pattern of biodiversity. PMID:19628692

  12. Three-dimensional electromagnetic strong turbulence: Dependence of the statistics and dynamics of strong turbulence on the electron to ion temperature ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Skjaeraasen, O.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-02-01

    The temperature ratio Ti/Te of ions to electrons affects both the ion-damping rate and the ion-acoustic speed in plasmas. The effects of changing the ion-damping rate and ion-acoustic speed are investigated for electrostatic strong turbulence and electromagnetic strong turbulence in three dimensions. When ion damping is strong, density wells relax in place and act as nucleation sites for the formation of new wave packets. In this case, the density perturbations are primarily density wells supported by the ponderomotive force. For weak ion damping, corresponding to low Ti/Te, ion-acoustic waves are launched radially outwards when wave packets dissipate at burnout, thereby increasing the level of density perturbations in the system and thus raising the level of scattering of Langmuir waves off density perturbations. Density wells no longer relax in place so renucleation at recent collapse sites no longer occurs, instead wave packets form in background low density regions, such as superpositions of troughs of propagating ion-acoustic waves. This transition is found to occur at Ti/Te ≈ 0.1. The change in behavior with Ti/Te is shown to change the bulk statistical properties, scaling behavior, spectra, and field statistics of strong turbulence. For Ti/Te>rsim0.1, the electrostatic results approach the predictions of the two-component model of Robinson and Newman, and good agreement is found for Ti/Te>rsim0.15.

  13. Isothermal Langevin dynamics in systems with power-law spatially dependent friction.

    PubMed

    Regev, Shaked; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics of Brownian particles in a heterogeneous one-dimensional medium with a spatially dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D(x)∼|x|^{c}, at constant temperature. The particle's probability distribution function (PDF) is calculated both analytically, by solving Fick's diffusion equation, and from numerical simulations of the underdamped Langevin equation. At long times, the PDFs calculated by both approaches yield identical results, corresponding to subdiffusion for c<0 and superdiffusion for 01, the diffusion equation predicts that the particles accelerate. Here we show that this phenomenon, previously considered in several works as an illustration for the possible dramatic effects of spatially dependent thermal noise, is unphysical. We argue that in an isothermal medium, the motion cannot exceed the ballistic limit (〈x^{2}〉∼t^{2}). The ballistic limit is reached when the friction coefficient drops sufficiently fast at large distances from the origin and is correctly captured by Langevin's equation. PMID:27575086

  14. SPATIALLY DEPENDENT HEATING AND IONIZATION IN AN ICME OBSERVED BY BOTH ACE AND ULYSSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Susan T.; Laming, J. Martin; Rakowski, Cara E.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The 2005 January 21 interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) observed by multiple spacecraft at L1 was also observed from January 21-February 4 at Ulysses (5.3 AU). Previous studies of this ICME have found evidence suggesting that the flanks of a magnetic cloud like structure associated with this ICME were observed at L1 while a more central cut through the associated magnetic cloud was observed at Ulysses. This event allows us to study spatial variation across the ICME and relate it to the eruption at the Sun. In order to examine the spatial dependence of the heating in this ICME, we present an analysis and comparison of the heavy ion composition observed during the passage of the ICME at L1 and at Ulysses. Using SWICS, we compare the heavy ion composition across the two different observation cuts through the ICME and compare it with predictions for heating during the eruption based on models of the time-dependent ionization balance throughout the event.

  15. Determination of spatially dependent diffusion parameters in bovine bone using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Abdallah; Ståhle, Per; Svensson, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have been made for homogenous constant diffusion, bone is an inhomogeneous material. It has been suggested that bone porosity decreases from the inner boundaries to the outer boundaries of the long bones. The diffusivity of substances in the bone matrix is believed to increase as the bone porosity increases. In this study, an experimental set up is used where bovine bone samples, saturated with potassium chloride (KCl), were put into distilled water and the conductivity of the water was followed. Chloride ions in the bone samples escaped out in the water through diffusion and the increase of the conductivity was measured. A one-dimensional, spatially dependent mathematical model describing the diffusion process is used. The diffusion parameters in the model are determined using a Kalman filter technique. The parameters for spatially dependent at endosteal and periosteal surfaces are found to be (12.8 ± 4.7) × 10(-11) and (5 ± 3.5) × 10(-11)m(2)/s respectively. The mathematical model function using the obtained diffusion parameters fits very well with the experimental data with mean square error varies from 0.06 × 10(-6) to 0.183 × 10(-6) (μS/m)(2). PMID:26275499

  16. Context-dependent effects of background colour in free recall with spatially grouped words.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Isarida, Toshiko K; Isarida, Takeo

    2010-10-01

    Three experiments investigated context-dependent effects of background colour in free recall with groups of items. Undergraduates (N=113) intentionally studied 24 words presented in blocks of 6 on a computer screen with two different background colours. The two background colours were changed screen-by-screen randomly (random condition) or alternately (alternation condition) during the study period. A 30-second filled retention interval was imposed before an oral free-recall test. A signal for free recall was presented throughout the test on one of the colour background screens presented at study. Recalled words were classified as same- or different-context words according to whether the background colours at study and test were the same or different. The random condition produced significant context-dependent effects, whereas the alternation condition showed no context-dependent effects, regardless of whether the words were presented once or twice. Furthermore, the words presented on the same screen were clustered in recall, whereas the words presented against the same background colour but on different screens were not clustered. The present results imply: (1) background colours can cue spatially massed words; (2) background colours act as temporally local context; and (3) predictability of the next background colour modulates the context-dependent effect. PMID:20835947

  17. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  18. Strong dependence of surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering on the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can be tuned by varying the liquid environment. Due to surface passivation and reaction with thiolated ligands, the nanoalloys obtained by our synthetic protocol are structurally and colloidally stable. Hence, we studied the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the iron fraction and, for the first time, we observed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in Au-Fe nanoalloys. SPR and SERS performances are strongly affected by the iron content and are investigated using analytical and numerical models. By demonstrating the strong modification of plasmonic properties on the composition, our results provide important insights into the exploitation of Au-Fe nanoalloys in photonics, nanomedicine, magneto-plasmonic and plasmon-enhanced catalysis. Moreover, our findings show that several other plasmonic materials exist beyond gold and silver nanostructures.Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can

  19. Strong domain configuration dependence of the nonlinear dielectric response in (K,Na)NbO{sub 3}-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huan, Yu; Wang, Xiaohui Li, Longtu; Koruza, Jurij

    2015-11-16

    The nonlinear dielectric response in (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.4425}Li{sub 0.0375})(Nb{sub 0.92−x}Ta{sub x}Sb{sub 0.08})O{sub 3} ceramics with different amounts of Ta was measured using subcoercive electric fields and quantified by the Rayleigh model. The irreversible extrinsic contribution, mainly caused by the irreversible domain wall translation, was strongly dependent on the domain configuration. The irreversible extrinsic contributions remained approximately the same within the single-phase regions, either orthorhombic or tetragonal, due to the similar domain morphology. However, in the polymorphic phase transition region, the domain wall density was increased by minimized domain size, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. This resulted in constrained domain wall motion due to self-clamping and reduced the irreversible extrinsic contribution.

  20. Three-Point Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters in Cosmological Models - a Strong Dependence on Triangle Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Y. P.; Borner, G.; Valdarnini, R.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, we use large P^3^M N-body simulations to study the three- point correlation function {ζ of clusters in two theoretical models. The first model (LCDM) is a low-density flat model of {OMEGA}_0_ = 0.3, {LAMBDA}_0_ = 0.7 and h = 0.75, and the second model (PIM) is an Einstein-de Sitter model with its linear power spectrum obtained from observations We find that the scaled function Q(r, u, v), which is defined as the ratio of ζ(r, ru, ru + rv) to the hierarchical sum ξ(r)ξ(ru) + ξ(ru)ξ(ru + rv) + ξ(ru + rv)ξ(r) (where ξ is the two-point correlation function of clusters), depends weakly on r and u, but very strongly on v. Q(r, u, v) is about 0.2 at v = 0.1 and 1.8 at v = 0.9. A model of Q(r, u, v) = {THETA}10^1.3_v_^2^ can fit the data of ζ very nicely with {THETA} ~ 0.14. This model is found to be universal for the LCDM clusters and for the PIM clusters. Furthermore, Q(r, u, v) is found to be insensitive to the cluster richness. We compare our N-body results with simple analytical theories of cluster formation, like the peak theories or the local maxima theories. We find that these theories do not provide an adequate description for the three-point function of clusters. We also examine the observational data of ζ presently available, and do not find any contradiction between the observations and our model predictions. The v- dependence of 4 in a projected catalogue of clusters is shown to be much weaker than the v-dependence of Q found in the three-dimensional case. This is probably the reason why the v-dependence of Q has not been found in an angular correlation function analysis of the Abell catalogue. The v-dependence found in this paper might be an important feature of clusters formed in the Gaussian gravitational instability theories. Therefore it would be important to search for the v-dependence on Q in redshift samples of rich clusters.

  1. Defining neighborhood boundaries in studies of spatial dependence in child behavior problems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to extend the analysis of neighborhood effects on child behavioral outcomes in two ways: (1) by examining the geographic extent of the relationship between child behavior and neighborhood physical conditions independent of standard administrative boundaries such as census tracts or block groups and (2) by examining the relationship and geographic extent of geographic peers’ behavior and individual child behavior. Methods The study neighborhood was a low income, ethnic minority neighborhood of approximately 20,000 residents in a large city in the southwestern United States. Observational data were collected for 11,552 parcels and 1,778 face blocks in the neighborhood over a five week period. Data on child behavior problems were collected from the parents of 261 school-age children (81% African American, 14% Latino) living in the neighborhood. Spatial analysis methods were used to examine the spatial dependence of child behavior problems in relation to physical conditions in the neighborhood for areas surrounding the child’s home ranging from a radius of 50 meters to a radius of 1000 meters. Likewise, the spatial dependence of child behavior problems in relation to the behavior problems of neighborhood peers was examined for areas ranging from a radius 255 meters to a radius of 600 meters around the child’s home. Finally, we examined the joint influence of neighborhood physical conditions and geographic peers. Results Poor conditions of the physical environment of the neighborhood were related to more behavioral problems, and the geographic extent of the physical environment that mattered was an area with a radius between 400 and 800 meters surrounding the child’s home. In addition, the average level of behavior problems of neighborhood peers within 255 meters of the child’s home was also positively associated with child behavior problems. Furthermore, these effects were independent of one another. Conclusions These

  2. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  3. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  4. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields.

    PubMed

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN. PMID:27179472

  5. Strong dependence of mechanical properties on fiber diameter for polymer-nanotube composite fibers: differentiating defect from orientation effects.

    PubMed

    Young, Karen; Blighe, Fiona M; Vilatela, Juan J; Windle, Alan H; Kinloch, Ian A; Deng, Libo; Young, Robert J; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2010-11-23

    We have prepared polyvinylalcohol-SWNT fibers with diameters from ∼1 to 15 μm by coagulation spinning. When normalized to nanotube volume fraction, V(f), both fiber modulus, Y, and strength, σ(B), scale strongly with fiber diameter, D: Y/V(f) ∝ D(-1.55) and σ(B)/V(f) ∝ D(-1.75). We show that much of this dependence is attributable to correlation between V(f) and D due to details of the spinning process: V(f) ∝ D(0.93). However, by carrying out Weibull failure analysis and measuring the orientation distribution of the nanotubes, we show that the rest of the diameter dependence is due to a combination of defect and orientation effects. For a given nanotube volume fraction, the fiber strength scales as σ(B) ∝ D(-0.29)D(-0.64), with the first and second terms representing the defect and orientation contributions, respectively. The orientation term is present and dominates for fibers of diameter between 4 and 50 μm. By preparing fibers with low diameter (1-2 μm), we have obtained mean mechanical properties as high as Y = 244 GPa and σ(B) = 2.9 GPa. PMID:20945879

  6. Density-dependent productivity in a colonial vulture at two spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bellon, Darío; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Arenas, Rafael; Donázar, José Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how density dependence modifies demographic parameters in long-lived vertebrates is a challenge for ecologists. Two alternative hypotheses have been used to explain the mechanisms behind density-dependent effects on breeding output: habitat heterogeneity and individual adjustment (also known as interference competition). A number of studies have highlighted the importance of habitat heterogeneity in density dependence in territorial species, but less information exists on demographic processes in colonial species. For these, we expect density-dependent mechanisms to operate at two spatial scales: colony and breeding unit. In this study, we used long-term data from a recovering population of Cinereous Vultures (Aegypius monachus) in southern Spain. We analyzed a long-term data set with information on 2162 breeding attempts at four colonies over a nine-year period (2002-2010) to evaluate environmental and population parameters influencing breeding output. Our results suggest that breeding productivity is subject to density-dependent processes at the colony and the nest site scale and is best explained by interference competition. Factors intrinsic to each colony, as well as environmental constraints linked to physiography and human presence, also play a role in regulatory processes. We detected the existence of a trade-off between the disadvantages of nesting too close to conspecifics and the benefits of coloniality. These could be mediated by the agonistic interactions between breeding pairs and the benefits derived from social sharing of information by breeding individuals. We propose that this trade-off may play a role in defining colony structure and may hold true for other colonial breeding bird species. Our findings also have important management implications for the conservation of this threatened species. PMID:27145615

  7. Density-dependent prey mortality is determined by the spatial scale of predator foraging.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Erin K; White, J Wilson

    2016-02-01

    Foraging theory predicts which prey patches predators should target. However, in most habitats, what constitutes a 'patch' and how prey density is calculated are subjective concepts and depend on the spatial scale at which the predator (or scientist) is observing. Moreover, the predator's 'foraging scale' affects prey population dynamics: predators should produce directly density-dependent (DDD) prey mortality at the foraging scale, but inversely density-dependent (IDD) mortality (safety-in-numbers) at smaller scales. We performed the first experimental test of these predictions using behavioral assays with guppies (Poecilia reticulata) feeding on bloodworm 'prey' patches. The guppy's foraging scale had already been estimated in a prior study. Our experimental results confirmed theoretical predictions: predation was IDD when prey were aggregated at a scale smaller than the foraging scale, but not when prey were aggregated at larger scales. These results could be used to predict outcomes of predator-prey interactions in continuous, non-discrete habitats in the field. PMID:26116266

  8. Strong topographic sheltering effects lead to spatially complex treeline advance and increased forest density in a subtropical mountain region.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Sarah; Chen, Jan-Chang; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Jump, Alistair S

    2014-12-01

    Altitudinal treelines are typically temperature limited such that increasing temperatures linked to global climate change are causing upslope shifts of treelines worldwide. While such elevational increases are readily predicted based on shifting isotherms, at the regional level the realized response is often much more complex, with topography and local environmental conditions playing an important modifying role. Here, we used repeated aerial photographs in combination with forest inventory data to investigate changes in treeline position in the Central Mountain Range of Taiwan over the last 60 years. A highly spatially variable upslope advance of treeline was identified in which topography is a major driver of both treeline form and advance. The changes in treeline position that we observed occurred alongside substantial increases in forest density, and lead to a large increase in overall forest area. These changes will have a significant impact on carbon stocking in the high altitude zone, while the concomitant decrease in alpine grassland area is likely to have negative implications for alpine species. The complex and spatially variable changes that we report highlight the necessity for considering local factors such as topography when attempting to predict species distributional responses to warming climate. PMID:25141823

  9. Seed harvesting by a generalist consumer is context-dependent: Interactive effects across multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostoja, Steven M.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Klinger, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Granivore foraging decisions affect consumer success and determine the quantity and spatial pattern of seed survival. These decisions are influenced by environmental variation at spatial scales ranging from landscapes to local foraging patches. In a field experiment, the effects of seed patch variation across three spatial scales on seed removal by western harvester ants Pogonomyrmex occidentalis were evaluated. At the largest scale we assessed harvesting in different plant communities, at the intermediate scale we assessed harvesting at different distances from ant mounds, and at the smallest scale we assessed the effects of interactions among seed species in local seed neighborhoods on seed harvesting (i.e. resource–consumer interface). Selected seed species were presented alone (monospecific treatment) and in mixture with Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass; mixture treatment) at four distances from P. occidentalis mounds in adjacent intact sagebrush and non-native cheatgrass-dominated communities in the Great Basin, Utah, USA. Seed species differed in harvest, with B. tectorum being least preferred. Large and intermediate scale variation influenced harvest. More seeds were harvested in sagebrush than in cheatgrass-dominated communities (largest scale), and the quantity of seed harvested varied with distance from mounds (intermediate-scale), although the form of the distance effect differed between plant communities. At the smallest scale, seed neighborhood affected harvest, but the patterns differed among seed species considered. Ants harvested fewer seeds from mixed-seed neighborhoods than from monospecific neighborhoods, suggesting context dependence and potential associational resistance. Further, the effects of plant community and distance from mound on seed harvest in mixtures differed from their effects in monospecific treatments. Beyond the local seed neighborhood, selection of seed resources is better understood by simultaneously evaluating removal at

  10. Dependence of auditory spatial updating on vestibular, proprioceptive, and efference copy signals.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Daria; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Humans localize sounds by comparing inputs across the two ears, resulting in a head-centered representation of sound-source position. When the head moves, information about head movement must be combined with the head-centered estimate to correctly update the world-centered sound-source position. Spatial updating has been extensively studied in the visual system, but less is known about how head movement signals interact with binaural information during auditory spatial updating. In the current experiments, listeners compared the world-centered azimuthal position of two sound sources presented before and after a head rotation that depended on condition. In the active condition, subjects rotated their head by ∼35° to the left or right, following a pretrained trajectory. In the passive condition, subjects were rotated along the same trajectory in a rotating chair. In the cancellation condition, subjects rotated their head as in the active condition, but the chair was counter-rotated on the basis of head-tracking data such that the head effectively remained fixed in space while the body rotated beneath it. Subjects updated most accurately in the passive condition but erred in the active and cancellation conditions. Performance is interpreted as reflecting the accuracy of perceived head rotation across conditions, which is modeled as a linear combination of proprioceptive/efference copy signals and vestibular signals. Resulting weights suggest that auditory updating is dominated by vestibular signals but with significant contributions from proprioception/efference copy. Overall, results shed light on the interplay of sensory and motor signals that determine the accuracy of auditory spatial updating. PMID:27169504

  11. The Molecular Bronchoscope: A Tool for Measurement of Spatially Dependent CO2 Concentrations in the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Luca; Couper, John H; Richmond, Graham; Hancock, Gus; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory physicians use bronchoscopy for visual assessment of the lungs' topography and collecting tissue samples for external analysis. We propose a novel bronchoscope tool that would enable spatially dependent measurements of the functioning of the lungs by determining local concentrations of carbon dioxide, which will be produced by healthy parts of the lung at rates that are higher than from portions where gas exchange is impaired. The gas analyzer is based on a compact laser absorption spectrometer making use of fiber optics for delivery and return of low intensity diode laser radiation to and from the measurement chamber at the distal end of a flexible conduit. The appropriate optical wavelength was chosen such that light is selectively absorbed only by gaseous CO2. The optical absorption takes place over a short path (8.8 mm) within a rigid, 12 mm long, perforated probe tip. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy was adopted as the analytical technique to reduce the noise on the optical signal and yield measurements of relative CO2 concentration every 180 ms with a precision as low as 600 part-per-million by volume. The primary objective of such a device is to see if additional spatial information about the lungs functionality can be gathered, which will complement visual observation. PMID:27487178

  12. Introducing context-dependent and spatially-variant viewing biases in saccadic models.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Olivier; Coutrot, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Previous research showed the existence of systematic tendencies in viewing behavior during scene exploration. For instance, saccades are known to follow a positively skewed, long-tailed distribution, and to be more frequently initiated in the horizontal or vertical directions. In this study, we hypothesize that these viewing biases are not universal, but are modulated by the semantic visual category of the stimulus. We show that the joint distribution of saccade amplitudes and orientations significantly varies from one visual category to another. These joint distributions are in addition spatially variant within the scene frame. We demonstrate that a saliency model based on this better understanding of viewing behavioral biases and blind to any visual information outperforms well-established saliency models. We also propose a saccadic model that takes into account classical low-level features and spatially-variant and context-dependent viewing biases. This model outperforms state-of-the-art saliency models, and provides scanpaths in close agreement with human behavior. The better description of viewing biases will not only improve current models of visual attention but could also influence many other applications such as the design of human-computer interfaces, patient diagnosis or image/video processing applications. PMID:26898752

  13. Thermal maps of Jupiter - Spatial organization and time dependence of stratospheric temperatures, 1980 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Baines, Kevin H.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Malcolm, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's stratospheric temperatures have been measured by observing thermal emission from the 7.8-micrometer CH4 band. These temperatures, observed through the greater part of a Jovian year, exhibit the influence of seasonal radiative forcing. Distinct bands of high temperature are located at the poles and midlatitudes, while the equator alternates between warm and cold with a period of approximately 4 years. Substantial longitudinal variability is often observed within the warm midlatitude bands, and occasionally elsewhere on the planet. This variability includes small, localized structures, as well as large-scale waves with wavelengths longer than about 30,000 kilometers. The amplitudes of the waves vary on a time scale of about 1 month; structures on a smaller scale may have lifetimes of only days. Waves observed in 1985, 1987, and 1988 propagated with group velocities less than + or - 30 meters/sec.

  14. Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Massive Quiescent Galaxy at z = 2.636: Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Indications of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Andrew B.; Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of RG1M0150, a massive, recently quenched galaxy at z = 2.636 that is multiply imaged by the cluster MACSJ0150.3-1005. We derive a stellar mass of {log}{M}*={11.49}-0.16+0.10 and a half-light radius of {R}e,{maj}=1.8+/- 0.4 {{kpc}}. Taking advantage of the lensing magnification, we are able to spatially resolve a remarkably massive yet compact quiescent galaxy at z\\gt 2 in ground-based near-infrared spectroscopic observations using Magellan/FIRE and Keck/MOSFIRE. We find no gradient in the strength of the Balmer absorption lines over 0.6{R}e-1.6{R}e, which are consistent with an age of 760 Myr. Gas emission in [N ii] broadly traces the spatial distribution of the stars and is coupled with weak Hα emission (log [N ii]/{{H}}α =0.6+/- 0.2), indicating that OB stars are not the primary ionizing source. The velocity dispersion within the effective radius is {σ }e,{stars}=271+/- 41 km s{}-1. We detect rotation in the stellar absorption lines for the first time beyond z∼ 1. Using a two-integral Jeans model that accounts for observational effects, we measure a dynamical mass of {log}{M}{{dyn}}=11.24+/- 0.14 and V/σ =0.70+/- 0.21. This is a high degree of rotation considering the modest observed ellipticity of 0.12 ± 0.08, but it is consistent with predictions from dissipational merger simulations that produce compact remnants. The mass of RG1M0150 implies that it is likely to become a slowly rotating elliptical. If it is typical, this suggests that the progenitors of massive ellipticals retain significant net angular momentum after quenching which later declines, perhaps through accretion of satellites.

  15. Casimir dependence of transverse distribution of pairs produced from a strong constant chromo-electric background field

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Fred M; Mihaila, Bogdan; Dawson, John F

    2008-01-01

    Recently the transverse distribution of particle production from strong constant chromo-electric fields has been explicitly calculated in Ref. 1 for soft-gluon production and in Ref. 2 for quark (antiquark) production. This particle production method, originally discussed by Heisenberg and Euler, Schwinger and Weisskopf, has a long history as a model of the production of the quark gluon plasma following a relativistic heavy ion collision. The physical picture considered here is that of two relativistic heavy nuclei colliding and leaving behind a semi-classical gluon field which then non-perturbatively produces gluon and quark-antiquark pairs via the Schwinger mechanism. At high energy large hadron colliders, such as RHIC (Au-Au collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 200 GeV) and LHC (Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 5.5 TeV), about half the total center-of-mass energy, E{sub cm}, goes into the production of a semi-classical gluon field, which can be thought to be initially in a Lorentz contracted disc. The gluon field in SU(3) is described by two Casimir invariants, the first one, C{sub 1} = E{sup a}E{sup a}, being related to the energy density of the initial field, where the second one, C{sub 2} = [d{sub abc}E{sup a}E{sup b}E{sup c}]{sup 2}, is related to the SU(3) color hypercharge left behind by the leading particles. So the question we want to study in this short note is how sensitive the transverse distribution is to this second Casimir invariant C{sub 2}. We have considered the dependence of the pair production rate of quarks and gluons from a strong chromo-electric field and have discovered that the effect of the second Casimir invariant of SU(3), which was not present in the electric field problem, effects the distribution by less than 15%. This event by event dependence of the transverse momentum distribution of jets on C{sub 2} may be something of interest at heavy ion colliders.

  16. Scale dependent importance of spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical cycling at aquifer-river interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan; Blaen, Phillip; Hannah, David; Romejn, Paul; Gomez, Jesus; Kurz, Marie; Fleckenstein, Jan; Schmidt, Christian; Zarnetske, Jay; Cullin, Joe; Ward, Adam; Marti, Eugenia; Drummond, Jennifer; Schmadel, Noah; Knapp, Julia; Klaar, Megan; Mendoza, Clara

    2016-04-01

    The transport and transformation of carbon and nitrogen across aquifer - river interfaces are significantly altered along the streambed passage. Recent investigations have substantially improved the understanding of controls on streambed biogeochemical cycling, outlining a critical impact of exchange fluxes, temporal and spatial coincidence of reaction partners and streambed residence time distributions. Still, there is little understanding of the drivers of the widely observed strong spatial and temporal variability of interlinked carbon and nitrogen turnover at aquifer-river interfaces, including hotspots (locations) and hot moments (time periods) of increased reactivity. Previous research, predominantly with a surface water perspective, has mainly focused on the impact of bedform controlled hyporheic exchange fluxes and the chemical transformation of surface solutes transported along a hyporheic flow path. While such studies may explain nutrient turnover in the hyporheic zones of low-order streams in rather pristine headwater catchments, they fail to explain observations of spatially and temporally more variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and relevant concentrations of autochthonous carbon and nitrogen. Here we combine laboratory, field and numerical modeling experiments from plot to stream reach/subcatchment scales to quantify the impacts of variability in physical and biogeochemical streambed properties on hyporheic nutrient (C, N, O) cycling. At the plot scale, hotspots of biogeochemical cycling have been found to be associated with peat and clay layers within streambed sediments, representing areas of significantly increased residence times and oxygen consumption what results in enhanced microbial metabolic activity and nitrogen removal capacity. We present distributed sensor network based up-scaling methods that allow identification of such features at larger reach scale. Numerical modeling based generalization

  17. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ogbechi, Joy; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Hall, Belinda S.; Bodman-Smith, Katherine; Vogel, Moritz; Wu, Hua-Lin; Stainer, Alexander; Esmon, Charles T.; Ahnström, Josefin; Pluschke, Gerd; Simmonds, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU) is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM) expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) at doses as low as 2ng/ml and as early as 8hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin’s substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells’ ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques) was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone’s effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this. Fibrin

  18. What determines the spatial variability of soil respiration and its temperature dependence (Q10) at catchment scale (Rur Catchment, Germany)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is suspected to alter temperature, soil moisture, and nutrient inputs to the soil. These factors are supposed to strongly influence soil respiration. The degree by which respiration will respond to these changes is crucial for assessing future CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere. We assume that the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) differs spatially depending on land use, soil unit, and texture owing to their diverse properties of soil organic matter quantity and quality. We further hypothesize that the Q10 value is additionally regulated by soil moisture and nutrient status. On the basis of soil and land use maps we divided the Rur catchment (Western Germany, 2350 km²) into so called environmental soil classes (ESC) that combine each a unique combination of the factors land use, soil unit, and texture. We took nine samples from each of the 12 most common ESC's and incubated them at five temperatures (5-25°C), at four soil moisture levels (30-75% water holding capacity), and with an unfertilized and a fertilized treatment. So far, our results indicate that both soil respiration and the Q10 value are spatially highly variable with Q10 values ranging from 1 to 4. The Q10 value is altered by the level of soil moisture and decreases when soils are as moist as 75% water holding capacity. Fertilization has no effect on the Q10 value. Currently, we are processing the whole data-set to derive the effect of ESC's on the Q10 value. Recent data suggest that forest soils are more sensitive to warming than cropland soils.

  19. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2015-01-01

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  20. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Grasselli, Federico Goldoni, Guido

    2015-01-21

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  1. A comparison of the spatial dependence of body mass index among adults and children in a Swiss general population

    PubMed Central

    Guessous, I; Joost, S; Jeannot, E; Theler, J-M; Mahler, P; Gaspoz, J-M; Cantoreggi, Nicola; Chételat, Joël; Simos, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body mass index (BMI) may cluster in space among adults and be spatially dependent. Whether BMI clusters among children and how age-specific BMI clusters are related remains unknown. We aimed to identify and compare the spatial dependence of BMI in adults and children in a Swiss general population, taking into account the area's income level. Methods: Geo-referenced data from the Bus Santé study (adults, n=6663) and Geneva School Health Service (children, n=3601) were used. We implemented global (Moran's I) and local (local indicators of spatial association (LISA)) indices of spatial autocorrelation to investigate the spatial dependence of BMI in adults (35–74 years) and children (6–7 years). Weight and height were measured using standardized procedures. Five spatial autocorrelation classes (LISA clusters) were defined including the high–high BMI class (high BMI participant's BMI value correlated with high BMI-neighbors' mean BMI values). The spatial distributions of clusters were compared between adults and children with and without adjustment for area's income level. Results: In both adults and children, BMI was clearly not distributed at random across the State of Geneva. Both adults' and children's BMIs were associated with the mean BMI of their neighborhood. We found that the clusters of higher BMI in adults and children are located in close, yet different, areas of the state. Significant clusters of high versus low BMIs were clearly identified in both adults and children. Area's income level was associated with children's BMI clusters. Conclusions: BMI clusters show a specific spatial dependence in adults and children from the general population. Using a fine-scale spatial analytic approach, we identified life course-specific clusters that could guide tailored interventions. PMID:24614662

  2. Field Observations Of The 29 September Tsunami In American Samoa: Spatial Variability And Indications Of Strong Return Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, B. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Watt, S.; Apotsos, A. A.; Buckley, M. L.; Dudley, W. C.; Peck, B.

    2009-12-01

    The 29 September 2009 tsunami caused 181 fatalities and displaced more than 5000 people on the islands of Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga. This is the first tsunami to cause significant damage and fatalities on U.S. soil in more than 30 years. Scientists from around the world quickly mobilized to help document the tsunami water levels before this ephemeral data was forever lost as recovery activities and natural processes overtook the effected area. A USGS team collected data in American Samoa from October 6-22 and November 5-12, 2009. The tsunami was large, reaching elevations of greater than 15 m, however wave heights and devastation varied from village to village in American Samoa. Even within villages, some structures were completely destroyed, some flooded and left standing, and others barely touched. Wave heights, flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, and flow directions were collected for use in ground-truthing inundation models. The team also collected nearshore bathymetry, topography and reef flat elevation, sediment samples, and documented the distribution and characteristics of both sand and boulder deposits. Eyewitness accounts of the tsunami were also videotaped. One striking aspect of this tsunami was the abundance of indicators of strong return flow. For example at Poloa in the northwest of Tutuila, where the runup was greater than 11 m along a 300-m stretch of coast and flow depths exceeded 4 m, the coral reef flat was strewn with debris including chairs, desks, and books from a school. On land, River channels were excavated and new channels formed as return flow scoured sediment and transported it offshore. Possible causes for the strong return flow and the relation between the stength of the return flow, inundation distance, and runup in American Samoa are presented. These relationships and others based on data collected by field survey teams will ultimately reduce loss of life and destruction from tsunamis in the Pacific and

  3. Facile synthesis and strongly microstructure-dependent electrochemical properties of graphene/manganese dioxide composites for supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention since it was firstly stripped from graphite by two physicists in 2004, and the supercapacitor based on graphene has obtained wide attention and much investment as well. For practical applications of graphene-based supercapacitors, however, there are still many challenges to solve, for instance, to simplify the technological process, to lower the fabrication cost, and to improve the electrochemical performance. In this work, graphene/MnO2 composites are prepared by a microwave sintering method, and we report here a relatively simple method for the supercapacitor packaging, i.e., dipping Ni-foam into a graphene/MnO2 composite solution directly for a period of time to coat the active material on a current collector. It is found that the microwave reaction time has a significant effect on the microstructure of graphene/MnO2 composites, and consequently, the electrochemical properties of the supercapacitors based on graphene/MnO2 composites are strongly microstructure dependent. An appropriately longer microwave reaction time, namely, 15 min, facilitates a very dense and homogeneous microstructure of the graphene/MnO2 composites, and thus, excellent electrochemical performance is achieved in the supercapacitor device, including a high specific capacitance of 296 F/g and a high capacitance retention of 93% after 3,000 times of charging/discharging cycles. PACS 81.05.ue; 78.67.Sc; 88.80.fh PMID:25258609

  4. Facile synthesis and strongly microstructure-dependent electrochemical properties of graphene/manganese dioxide composites for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caiyun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Wang, Zhongxing; Sun, Ping; Ren, Yinjuan; Zhu, Jiliang; Zhu, Jianguo; Xiao, Dingquan

    2014-09-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention since it was firstly stripped from graphite by two physicists in 2004, and the supercapacitor based on graphene has obtained wide attention and much investment as well. For practical applications of graphene-based supercapacitors, however, there are still many challenges to solve, for instance, to simplify the technological process, to lower the fabrication cost, and to improve the electrochemical performance. In this work, graphene/MnO2 composites are prepared by a microwave sintering method, and we report here a relatively simple method for the supercapacitor packaging, i.e., dipping Ni-foam into a graphene/MnO2 composite solution directly for a period of time to coat the active material on a current collector. It is found that the microwave reaction time has a significant effect on the microstructure of graphene/MnO2 composites, and consequently, the electrochemical properties of the supercapacitors based on graphene/MnO2 composites are strongly microstructure dependent. An appropriately longer microwave reaction time, namely, 15 min, facilitates a very dense and homogeneous microstructure of the graphene/MnO2 composites, and thus, excellent electrochemical performance is achieved in the supercapacitor device, including a high specific capacitance of 296 F/g and a high capacitance retention of 93% after 3,000 times of charging/discharging cycles.

  5. Microplastic interactions with freshwater microalgae: Hetero-aggregation and changes in plastic density appear strongly dependent on polymer type.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Fabienne; Olivier, Ophélie; Zanella, Marie; Daniel, Philippe; Hiard, Sophie; Caruso, Aurore

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the interactions between microplastics, chosen among the most widely used in industry such as polypropylene (PP) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and a model freshwater microalgae, Chlamydomas reinhardtii, were investigated. It was shown that the presence of high concentrations of microplastics with size >400 μm did not directly impact the growth of microalgae in the first days of contact and that the expression of three genes involved in the stress response was not modified after 78 days. In parallel, a similar colonization was observed for the two polymers. However, after 20 days of contact, in the case of PP only, hetero-aggregates constituted of microalgae, microplastics and exopolysaccharides were formed. An estimation of the hetero-aggregates composition was approximately 50% of PP fragments and 50% of microalgae, which led to a final density close to 1.2. Such hetero-aggregates appear as an important pathway for the vertical transport of PP microplastics from the water surface to sediment. Moreover, after more than 70 days of contact with microplastics, the microalgae genes involved in the sugar biosynthesis pathways were strongly over-expressed compared to control conditions. The levels of over-expression were higher in the case of HDPE than in PP condition. This work presents the first evidence that depending on their chemical nature, microplastics will follow different fates in the environment. PMID:27236494

  6. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from Γ4 to Γ2 via Γ24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100 K, while it can be switched back to Γ4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between Γ4 and Γ2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd3+ ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices.

  7. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  8. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  9. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-wei; Xie, Xiao-lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-jiao; Zheng, Li-bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  10. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Yuan; Shen, Kai-Li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-Jiao; Zheng, Li-Bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  11. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hayrapetyan, A.G.; Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G.; Fritzsche, S.

    2013-06-15

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period τ is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods τ between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  12. Activation and survival of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus with spatial memory is dependent on time of exposure to spatial learning and age of cells at examination.

    PubMed

    Epp, Jonathan R; Haack, Andrew K; Galea, Liisa A M

    2011-03-01

    Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and may be related to hippocampus-dependent learning. We have recently reported that there is an enhancement of neurogenesis in the hippocampus only when BrdU is administered 6 days prior to starting spatial training but not when training started either 1 day or 11 days following BrdU administration. In that study, all rats were perfused on day 16 after BrdU injection in order to compare cells of the same age (i.e. 16 day old cells) and thus the survival time after learning was different between groups. This study was designed to address whether the amount of time that passed following training could also contribute to the effects of spatial learning on hippocampal neurogenesis and whether there was differential new neuron activation in response to spatial learning that depended on the age of new cells at the time of spatial learning. Here we tested whether a survival period of 5 days following spatial learning at either 1-5, 6-10 or 11-15 days following BrdU administration would alter cell survival and/or activation of new neurons. Our results indicate that 5 days after training in the Morris water task cell survival is unaltered by training on days 1-5, increased by training at days 6-10 and decreased when training occurs on days 11-15. Furthermore spatial learners trained on days 6-10 or 11-15 show greater activation of new neurons compared to cue-trained rats during a probe trial 5 days after training. In addition, rats trained on the spatial task on days 11-15 had a greater number of activated new neurons compared to rats trained on the spatial task on days 6-10. These results suggest there is a gradual removal of older BrdU-labeled new neurons following spatial learning perhaps due to a competitive interaction with a population of younger BrdU-labeled new neurons. PMID:21216298

  13. Up, Down, and All Around: Scale-Dependent Spatial Variation in Rocky-Shore Communities of Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Nelson; Díaz, María J.; Holtheuer, Jorge; Garrido, Ignacio; Huovinen, Pirjo; Gómez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variation of biodiversity along environmental gradients and multiple spatial scales is relevant for theoretical and management purposes. Hereby, we analysed the spatial variability in diversity and structure of intertidal and subtidal macrobenthic Antarctic communities along vertical environmental stress gradients and across multiple horizontal spatial scales. Since biotic interactions and local topographic features are likely major factors for coastal assemblages, we tested the hypothesis that fine-scale processes influence the effects of the vertical environmental stress gradients on the macrobenthic diversity and structure. We used nested sampling designs in the intertidal and subtidal habitats, including horizontal spatial scales ranging from few centimetres to 1000s of metres along the rocky shore of Fildes Peninsula, King George Island. In both intertidal and subtidal habitats, univariate and multivariate analyses showed a marked vertical zonation in taxon richness and community structure. These patterns depended on the horizontal spatial scale of observation, as all analyses showed a significant interaction between height (or depth) and the finer spatial scale analysed. Variance and pseudo-variance components supported our prediction for taxon richness, community structure, and the abundance of dominant species such as the filamentous green alga Urospora penicilliformis (intertidal), the herbivore Nacella concinna (intertidal), the large kelp-like Himantothallus grandifolius (subtidal), and the red crustose red alga Lithothamnion spp. (subtidal). We suggest that in coastal ecosystems strongly governed by physical factors, fine-scale processes (e.g. biotic interactions and refugia availability) are still relevant for the structuring and maintenance of the local communities. The spatial patterns found in this study serve as a necessary benchmark to understand the dynamics and adaptation of natural assemblages in response to observed and

  14. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  15. Spatial Dependence of Physical Attributes and Mechanical Properties of Ultisol in a Sugarcane Field

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Uilka Elisa; Monteiro Rolim, Mário; Souza de Oliveira, Veronildo; Maria Regis Pedrosa, Elvira; Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Guedes Magalhães, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of conventional tillage and application of the monoculture of sugar cane on soil health. Variables like density, moisture, texture, consistency limits, and preconsolidation stress were taken as indicators of soil quality. The measurements were made at a 120 × 120 m field cropped with sugar cane under conventional tillage. The objective of this work was to characterize the soil and to study the spatial dependence of the physical and mechanical attributes. Then, undisturbed soil samples were collected to measure bulk density, moisture content and preconsolidation stress and disturbed soil samples for classification of soil texture, and consistency limits. The soil texture indicated that soil can be characterized as sandy clay soil and a sandy clay loam soil, and the consistency limits indicated that the soil presents an inorganic low plasticity clay. The preconsolidation tests tillage in soil moisture content around 19% should be avoided or should be chosen a management of soil with lighter vehicles in this moisture content, to avoid risk of compaction. Using geostatistical techniques mapping was possible to identify areas of greatest conservation soil and greater disturbance of the ground. PMID:26167528

  16. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics modeling of microstructure evolution in low energy helium irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and in particular the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behavior of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials modeling has been used to investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten following high dose, high temperature helium exposure. The aim of this study is to understand and predict helium implantation, primary defect production and defect diffusion, helium-defect clustering and interactions below a tungsten surface exposed to low energy helium irradiation. The important defects include interstitial clusters, vacancy clusters, helium interstitials and helium-vacancy clusters. We report results from a one-dimensional, spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on the continuum reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution in space and time of all these defects. The key parameter inputs to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic materials modeling and available experimental data.

  17. The phenology of space: Spatial aspects of bison density dependence in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taper, M.L.; Meagher, M.; Jerde, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Yellowstone bison represent the only bison population in the United States that survived in the wild the near-extermination of the late 1800's. This paper capitalizes on a unique opportunity provided by the record of the bison population of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). This population has been intensely monitored for almost four decades. The analysis of long-term spatio-temporal data from 1970-1997 supports the following conclusions. 1) Even though the Yellowstone bison herd exhibits an extended period of what appears to be linear growth, this pattern can be explained with classical density dependent dynamics if one realizes that perhaps the primary response of the herd to increased density is range expansion. 2) Several spatial aspects of social behavior in the YNP bison may be behavioral adaptations by the bison to environmental changes. These behavioral strategies may buffer, temporarily at least, bison population dynamics from the immediate repercussions of possible environmental stress and habitat deterioration. 3) Bison ecological carrying capacity for YNP is on the order of 2800 to 3200 animals. 4) There do appear to be indications of changes in the bison dynamics that are associated with increasing use of sections of the interior road system in winter. 5) The possibility of habitat degradation is indicated.

  18. Spatial Dependence of Physical Attributes and Mechanical Properties of Ultisol in a Sugarcane Field.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Uilka Elisa; Rolim, Mário Monteiro; de Oliveira, Veronildo Souza; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Regis; Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Magalhães, Adriana Guedes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of conventional tillage and application of the monoculture of sugar cane on soil health. Variables like density, moisture, texture, consistency limits, and preconsolidation stress were taken as indicators of soil quality. The measurements were made at a 120 × 120 m field cropped with sugar cane under conventional tillage. The objective of this work was to characterize the soil and to study the spatial dependence of the physical and mechanical attributes. Then, undisturbed soil samples were collected to measure bulk density, moisture content and preconsolidation stress and disturbed soil samples for classification of soil texture, and consistency limits. The soil texture indicated that soil can be characterized as sandy clay soil and a sandy clay loam soil, and the consistency limits indicated that the soil presents an inorganic low plasticity clay. The preconsolidation tests tillage in soil moisture content around 19% should be avoided or should be chosen a management of soil with lighter vehicles in this moisture content, to avoid risk of compaction. Using geostatistical techniques mapping was possible to identify areas of greatest conservation soil and greater disturbance of the ground. PMID:26167528

  19. Spatial characteristics of the EML plasma armature and the dependence on plasma composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollweg, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    A simplified picture of a radiation-dominated plasma armature of an electromagnetic launcher (EML) is developed to evaluate in quasi-steady-state its spatial characteristics and their dependence on plasma composition, applied electric and magnetic fields, and possible temporal changes. A graphical solution of the energy balance equation is found which permits quick visualization of the effects of changing rail voltage or bore diameter. It is found that metallic vapor armatures will have plasmas extending to the highest expected pressures near the projectile. However, armatures consisting of the ablation products of G-9 or Lexan insulators or other nonmetallic plasmas such as hydrogen or argon cannot satisfy the energy balance conditions at high pressures unless the electric field is sufficiently high. Such armatures may not develop the desired magnetic pressure gradient in their leading edge to accelerate the projectile, with possible performance degradation. At low pressures (1-10 atm) in the trailing edge of the armature, the electrical conductivity can be significantly reduced by the high transverse magnetic field. It is concluded that this extended tail of low temperature plasma could be of importance in restrike phenomena.

  20. Nonlocal diffusion problems that approximate a parabolic equation with spatial dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molino, Alexis; Rossi, Julio D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that smooth solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the parabolic equation v_t(x,t)=sum_{i,j=1}N a_{ij}(x)partial2v(x,t)/partial{xipartial{x}j} + sum_{i =1}N bi(x)partial{v}(x,t)/partial{x_i} qquad x in Ω, with v( x, t) = g( x, t), {x in partial Ω,} can be approximated uniformly by solutions of nonlocal problems of the form ut^{\\varepsilon}(x,t)=int_{mathbb{R}n} K_{\\varepsilon}(x,y)(u^{\\varepsilon}(y,t)-u^{\\varepsilon}(x,t))dy, quad x in Ω, with {u^{\\varepsilon}(x,t)=g(x,t)}, {x notin Ω}, as {\\varepsilon to 0}, for an appropriate rescaled kernel {K_{\\varepsilon}}. In this way, we show that the usual local evolution problems with spatial dependence can be approximated by nonlocal ones. In the case of an equation in divergence form, we can obtain an approximation with symmetric kernels, that is, {K_{\\varepsilon}(x,y) = K_{\\varepsilon}(y,x)}.

  1. Spatial structure arising from neighbour-dependent bias in collective cell movement.

    PubMed

    Binny, Rachelle N; Haridas, Parvathi; James, Alex; Law, Richard; Simpson, Matthew J; Plank, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of collective cell movement often neglect the effects of spatial structure, such as clustering, on the population dynamics. Typically, they assume that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density (the mean-field assumption) which means that cell-cell interactions occurring over short spatial ranges are not accounted for. However, in vitro cell culture studies have shown that spatial correlations can play an important role in determining collective behaviour. Here, we take a combined experimental and modelling approach to explore how individual-level interactions give rise to spatial structure in a moving cell population. Using imaging data from in vitro experiments, we quantify the extent of spatial structure in a population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To understand how this spatial structure arises, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) and simulate cell movement in two spatial dimensions. Our model allows an individual's direction of movement to be affected by interactions with other cells in its neighbourhood, providing insights into how directional bias generates spatial structure. We consider how this behaviour scales up to the population level by using the IBM to derive a continuum description in terms of the dynamics of spatial moments. In particular, we account for spatial correlations between cells by considering dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells). Our numerical results suggest that the moment dynamics description can provide a good approximation to averaged simulation results from the underlying IBM. Using our in vitro data, we estimate parameters for the model and show that it can generate similar spatial structure to that observed in a 3T3 fibroblast cell population. PMID:26893970

  2. Spatial structure arising from neighbour-dependent bias in collective cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Parvathi; James, Alex; Law, Richard; Simpson, Matthew J.; Plank, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of collective cell movement often neglect the effects of spatial structure, such as clustering, on the population dynamics. Typically, they assume that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density (the mean-field assumption) which means that cell–cell interactions occurring over short spatial ranges are not accounted for. However, in vitro cell culture studies have shown that spatial correlations can play an important role in determining collective behaviour. Here, we take a combined experimental and modelling approach to explore how individual-level interactions give rise to spatial structure in a moving cell population. Using imaging data from in vitro experiments, we quantify the extent of spatial structure in a population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To understand how this spatial structure arises, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) and simulate cell movement in two spatial dimensions. Our model allows an individual’s direction of movement to be affected by interactions with other cells in its neighbourhood, providing insights into how directional bias generates spatial structure. We consider how this behaviour scales up to the population level by using the IBM to derive a continuum description in terms of the dynamics of spatial moments. In particular, we account for spatial correlations between cells by considering dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells). Our numerical results suggest that the moment dynamics description can provide a good approximation to averaged simulation results from the underlying IBM. Using our in vitro data, we estimate parameters for the model and show that it can generate similar spatial structure to that observed in a 3T3 fibroblast cell population. PMID:26893970

  3. Strong Dependence of Hydration State of F-Actin on the Bound Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Imao, Asato; Mogami, George; Chishima, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Takaya; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Wazawa, Tetsuichi

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the hydration state is an important issue in the chemomechanical energetics of versatile biological functions of polymerized actin (F-actin). In this study, hydration-state differences of F-actin by the bound divalent cations are revealed through precision microwave dielectric relaxation (DR) spectroscopy. G- and F-actin in Ca- and Mg-containing buffer solutions exhibit dual hydration components comprising restrained water with DR frequency f2 (fw). The hydration state of F-actin is strongly dependent on the ionic composition. In every buffer tested, the HMW signal Dhyme (≡ (f1 - fw)δ1/(fwδw)) of F-actin is stronger than that of G-actin, where δw is DR-amplitude of bulk solvent and δ1 is that of HMW in a fixed-volume ellipsoid containing an F-actin and surrounding water in solution. Dhyme value of F-actin in Ca2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Ca(2+)) is markedly higher than in Mg2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Mg(2+)). Moreover, in the presence of 2 mM Mg(2+), the hydration state of F-actin is changed by adding a small fraction of Ca(2+) (∼0.1 mM) and becomes closer to that of the Ca-bound form in Ca2.0-buffer. This is consistent with the results of the partial specific volume and the Cotton effect around 290 nm in the CD spectra, indicating a change in the tertiary structure and less apparent change in the secondary structure of actin. The number of restrained water molecules per actin (N2) is estimated to be 1600-2100 for Ca2.0- and F-buffer and ∼2500 for Mg2.0-buffer at 10-15 °C. These numbers are comparable to those estimated from the available F-actin atomic structures as in the first water layer. The number of HMW molecules is roughly explained by the volume between the equipotential surface of -kT/2e and the first water layer of the actin surface by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation using UCSF Chimera. PMID:27332748

  4. Bright, dark, and singular solitons in optical fibers with spatio-temporal dispersion and spatially dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Zerrad, Essaid; Biswas, Anjan; Belic, Milivoj

    2016-05-01

    Investigated in this work is the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with space-dependent parameters, which models the propagation of optical solitons in spatially inhomogeneous optical fiber with detuning, spatiotemporal dispersion, intermodal dispersion, and fiber gain or loss. Through the ansatz scheme, analytical bell, kink, and singular soliton solutions under certain coefficient constraints are obtained.

  5. Using IBMs to Investigate Spatially-dependent Processes in Landscape Genetics Theory

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of landscape and conservation genetics theory has been derived using non-spatialmathematical models. Here, we use a mechanistic, spatially-explicit, eco-evolutionary IBM to examine the utility of this theoretical framework in landscapes with spatial structure. Our analysis...

  6. Numbers Are Associated with Different Types of Spatial Information Depending on the Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijck, Jean-Philippe; Gevers, Wim; Fias, Wim

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature of the spatial-numerical associations underlying the SNARC-effect by imposing a verbal or spatial working memory load during a parity judgment and a magnitude comparison task. The results showed a double dissociation between the type of working memory load and type of task. The SNARC-effect disappeared under…

  7. Spatial Dependence and Heterogeneity in Bayesian Factor Analysis: A Cross-National Investigation of Schwartz Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakhovych, Stanislav; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Wedel, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayesian spatial factor analysis model. We extend previous work on confirmatory factor analysis by including geographically distributed latent variables and accounting for heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. The simulation study shows excellent recovery of the model parameters and demonstrates the consequences…

  8. Alignment- and orientation-dependent strong-field ionization of molecules: Field-induced orbital distortion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewanowski, Maciej Dominik; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-05-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) is a starting point for many strong-field phenomena, e.g., high-order harmonic generation, as well as a source of fundamental information about the ionized target. Therefore, investigation of SFI of atoms and molecules has been the aim for research since the first strong laser pulses became available. We present a recently developed method, adiabatic strong-field approximation, to study ionization yields as a function of alignment angle for CO2, CO, and OCS molecules. We show that orbital distortion plays an important role in explaining the position and relative strength of maxima in the yields for both polar and nonpolar molecules, even for targets with low polarizabilities at low laser intensities. In particular, we report that for ionization of CO2 the maximum in ionization yield shifts towards the experimentally-measured maximum with respect to the strong-field approximation. For ionization of the CO molecule, not only does the theory predict the preferred direction of ionization correctly, but also the ratio between yields for the two molecular orientations where the electric field points either towards the C or towards the O end. Finally, we find that ionization of OCS is more probable for the laser pointing from the O end towards the S end. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the ERC-StG (Project No. 277767-TDMET), and the VKR center of excellence, QUS- COPE.

  9. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task’s demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal

  10. SPATIAL AGGREGATION IN A FOREST FLOOR INSECT DEPENDS ON SEASONAL CONGREGATION AND SCATTERING EFFECTS OF PREDATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial aggregations arising from gregarious behavior are common in nature and have important implications for population dynamics, community stability, and conservation. However, the translation of aggregation behaviors into emergent properties of populations and communities de...

  11. Brazilian spatial dynamics in the long term (1872-2000): ``path dependency'' or ``reversal of fortune''?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasterio, Leonardo Monteiro

    2010-03-01

    This paper analyzes the spatial dynamics of Brazilian regional inequalities between 1872 and 2000 using contemporary tools. The first part of the paper provides new estimates of income per capita in 1872 by municipality using census and electoral information on income by occupation. The level of analysis is the Minimum Comparable Areas 1872-2000 developed by Reis et al. (Áreas mínimas comparáveis para os períodos intercensitários de 1872 a 2000, 2007). These areas are the least aggregation of adjacent municipalities required to allow consistent geographic area comparisons between census years. In the second section of the paper, Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis, Markov chains and stochastic kernel techniques (spatially conditioned) are applied to the dataset. The results suggest that, in broad terms, the spatial pattern of income distribution in Brazil during that period of time has remained stable.

  12. Spatial scale-dependent land-atmospheric methane exchange in the northern high latitudes from 1993 to 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Zhuang, Q.; Lu, X.; Song, L.

    2013-11-01

    Effects of various spatial scales of water table dynamics on the land-atmospheric methane (CH4) exchange have not yet been assessed for large regions. Here we used a coupled hydrology-biogeochemistry model to quantify daily CH4 exchange over the pan-Arctic from 1993 to 2004 at two spatial scales (100 km and 5 km). The effects of sub-grid spatial variability of the water table depth (WTD) on CH4 emissions were examined with a TOPMODEL-based parameterization scheme for northern high latitudes regions. Our results indicate that 5 km CH4 emissions (38.1-55.4 Tg CH4 yr-1, considering the spatial heterogeneity of WTD) were 42% larger than 100 km CH4 emissions (using grid-cell-mean WTD) and the differences in annual CH4 emissions were due to increased emitting area and enhanced flux density after WTD redistribution. Further, the inclusion of sub-grid WTD spatial heterogeneity also influences the inter-annual variability of CH4 emissions. Soil temperature plays a more important role in the 100 km estimates, while the 5 km estimates are more influenced by WTD. This study suggests that previous macro-scale biogeochemical models using grid-cell-mean WTD might have underestimated the regional CH4 budget. The spatial scale-dependent effects of WTD should be considered in future quantifications of regional CH4 emissions.

  13. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beeker, Willem P.; Lee, Chris J.; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Gross, Petra; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum and that the frequency of the sidebands depends on the intensity of the control laser light field. We show that analyzing the sideband frequency upon scanning the beams across the sample allows one to spatially resolve emitter positions where a spatial resolution of 65 nm, which is well below the diffraction limit, can be obtained.

  14. Species richness effects on ecosystem multifunctionality depend on evenness, composition and spatial pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maestre, F.T.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.; Bowker, M.A.; Ochoa-Hueso, R.

    2012-01-01

    1. Recent studies have suggested that the simultaneous maintenance of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) is positively supported by species richness. However, little is known regarding the relative importance of other community attributes (e.g. spatial pattern, species evenness) as drivers of multifunctionality. 2. We conducted two microcosm experiments using model biological soil crust communities dominated by lichens to: (i) evaluate the joint effects and relative importance of changes in species composition, spatial pattern (clumped and random distribution of lichens), evenness (maximal and low evenness) and richness (from two to eight species) on soil functions related to nutrient cycling (β-glucosidase, urease and acid phosphatase enzymes, in situ N availability, total N, organic C, and N fixation), and (ii) assess how these community attributes affect multifunctionality. 3. Species richness, composition and spatial pattern affected multiple ecosystem functions (e.g. organic C, total N, N availability, β-glucosidase activity), albeit the magnitude and direction of their effects varied with the particular function, experiment and soil depth considered. Changes in species composition had effects on organic C, total N and the activity of β-glucosidase. Significant species richness × evenness and spatial pattern × evenness interactions were found when analysing functions such as organic C, total N and the activity of phosphatase. 4. The probability of sustaining multiple ecosystem functions increased with species richness, but this effect was largely modulated by attributes such as species evenness, composition and spatial pattern. Overall, we found that model communities with high species richness, random spatial pattern and low evenness increased multifunctionality. 5. Synthesis. Our results illustrate how different community attributes have a diverse impact on ecosystem functions related to nutrient cycling, and provide new

  15. Luminance-dependence of spatial vision in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii).

    PubMed

    Lind, Olle; Sunesson, Tony; Mitkus, Mindaugas; Kelber, Almut

    2012-01-01

    Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Bourke's parrots (Neopsephotus bourkii) are closely related birds with different activity patterns. Budgerigars are strictly diurnal while Bourke's parrots are active in dim twilight. Earlier studies show that the intensity threshold of colour vision is similar in both species while Bourke's parrots have larger eyes with a higher density of rods than budgerigars. In this study, we investigate whether this could be an adaptation for better spatial vision in dim light. We used two alternative forced-choice experiments to determine the spatial acuity of both species at light intensities ranging from 0.08 to 73 cd/m(2). We also determined the spatial contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for bright light in Bourke's parrots and compare it to existing data for budgerigars. The spatial acuity of Bourke's parrots was found to be similar to that of budgerigars at all light levels. Also the CSF of Bourke's parrots is similar to that of budgerigars with a sensitivity peak located between 2.1 and 2.6 cycles/degree. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that Bourke's parrots have superior spatial acuity in dim light compared to budgerigars and the adaptive value of the relatively rod-rich and large eyes of Bourke's parrots remains unclear. PMID:22001888

  16. Spatial scale-dependent land-atmospheric methane exchanges in the northern high latitudes from 1993 to 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Zhuang, Q.; Lu, X.; Song, L.

    2014-04-01

    Effects of various spatial scales of water table dynamics on land-atmospheric methane (CH4) exchanges have not yet been assessed for large regions. Here we used a coupled hydrology-biogeochemistry model to quantify daily CH4 exchanges over the pan-Arctic from 1993 to 2004 at two spatial scales of 100 km and 5 km. The effects of sub-grid spatial variability of the water table depth (WTD) on CH4 emissions were examined with a TOPMODEL-based parameterization scheme for the northern high latitudes. We found that both WTD and CH4 emissions are better simulated at a 5 km spatial resolution. By considering the spatial heterogeneity of WTD, net regional CH4 emissions at a 5 km resolution are 38.1-55.4 Tg CH4 yr-1 from 1993 to 2004, which are on average 42% larger than those simulated at a 100 km resolution using a grid-cell-mean WTD scheme. The difference in annual CH4 emissions is attributed to the increased emitting area and enhanced flux density with finer resolution for WTD. Further, the inclusion of sub-grid WTD spatial heterogeneity also influences the inter-annual variability of CH4 emissions. Soil temperature plays an important role in the 100 km estimates, while the 5 km estimates are mainly influenced by WTD. This study suggests that previous macro-scale biogeochemical models using a grid-cell-mean WTD scheme might have underestimated the regional CH4 emissions. The spatial scale-dependent effects of WTD should be considered in future quantification of regional CH4 emissions.

  17. Spatially dependent parameter estimation and nonlinear data assimilation by autosynchronization of a system of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Sean; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-09-01

    Given multiple images that describe chaotic reaction-diffusion dynamics, parameters of a partial differential equation (PDE) model are estimated using autosynchronization, where parameters are controlled by synchronization of the model to the observed data. A two-component system of predator-prey reaction-diffusion PDEs is used with spatially dependent parameters to benchmark the methods described. Applications to modeling the ecological habitat of marine plankton blooms by nonlinear data assimilation through remote sensing are discussed.

  18. Corrected mean-field models for spatially dependent advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2011-05-01

    In the exclusion-process literature, mean-field models are often derived by assuming that the occupancy status of lattice sites is independent. Although this assumption is questionable, it is the foundation of many mean-field models. In this work we develop methods to relax the independence assumption for a range of discrete exclusion-process-based mechanisms motivated by applications from cell biology. Previous investigations that focused on relaxing the independence assumption have been limited to studying initially uniform populations and ignored any spatial variations. By ignoring spatial variations these previous studies were greatly simplified due to translational invariance of the lattice. These previous corrected mean-field models could not be applied to many important problems in cell biology such as invasion waves of cells that are characterized by moving fronts. Here we propose generalized methods that relax the independence assumption for spatially inhomogeneous problems, leading to corrected mean-field descriptions of a range of exclusion-process-based models that incorporate (i) unbiased motility, (ii) biased motility, and (iii) unbiased motility with agent birth and death processes. The corrected mean-field models derived here are applicable to spatially variable processes including invasion wave-type problems. We show that there can be large deviations between simulation data and traditional mean-field models based on invoking the independence assumption. Furthermore, we show that the corrected mean-field models give an improved match to the simulation data in all cases considered.

  19. Auditory attention strategy depends on target linguistic properties and spatial configurationa)

    PubMed Central

    McCloy, Daniel R.; Lee, Adrian K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Whether crossing a busy intersection or attending a large dinner party, listeners sometimes need to attend to multiple spatially distributed sound sources or streams concurrently. How they achieve this is not clear—some studies suggest that listeners cannot truly simultaneously attend to separate streams, but instead combine attention switching with short-term memory to achieve something resembling divided attention. This paper presents two oddball detection experiments designed to investigate whether directing attention to phonetic versus semantic properties of the attended speech impacts listeners' ability to divide their auditory attention across spatial locations. Each experiment uses four spatially distinct streams of monosyllabic words, variation in cue type (providing phonetic or semantic information), and requiring attention to one or two locations. A rapid button-press response paradigm is employed to minimize the role of short-term memory in performing the task. Results show that differences in the spatial configuration of attended and unattended streams interact with linguistic properties of the speech streams to impact performance. Additionally, listeners may leverage phonetic information to make oddball detection judgments even when oddballs are semantically defined. Both of these effects appear to be mediated by the overall complexity of the acoustic scene. PMID:26233011

  20. Model-dependent spatial skill in pseudoproxy experiments testing climate field reconstruction methods for the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Jason E.; Coats, Sloan; Ault, Toby R.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial skill of four climate field reconstruction (CFR) methods is investigated using pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) based on five last millennium and historical simulations from the Coupled and Paleo Model Intercomparison Projects Phases 5 and 3 (CMIP5/PMIP3) data archives. These simulations are used for the first time in a PPE context, the frameworks of which are constructed to test a recently assembled multiproxy network and multiple CFR techniques. The experiments confirm earlier findings demonstrating consistent methodological performance across the employed methods and spatially dependent reconstruction errors in all of the derived CFRs. Spectral biases in the reconstructed fields demonstrate that CFR methods can alone alter the ratio of spectral power at all locations in the field, independent of whether there are any spectral biases inherent in the underlying pseudoproxy series. The patterns of spectral biases are model dependent and indicate the potential for regions in the derived CFRs to be biased by changes in either low or high-frequency spectral power. CFR methods are also shown to alter the pattern of mean differences in the tropical Pacific during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, with some model experiments indicating that CFR methodologies enhance the statistical likelihood of achieving larger mean differences between independent 300-year periods in the region. All of the characteristics of CFR performance are model dependent, indicating that CFR methods must be evaluated across multiple models and that conclusions from PPEs should be carefully connected to the spatial statistics of real-world climatic fields.

  1. Assessments of habitat preferences and quality depend on spatial scale and metrics of fitness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chalfoun, A.D.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    1. Identifying the habitat features that influence habitat selection and enhance fitness is critical for effective management. Ecological theory predicts that habitat choices should be adaptive, such that fitness is enhanced in preferred habitats. However, studies often report mismatches between habitat preferences and fitness consequences across a wide variety of taxa based on a single spatial scale and/or a single fitness component. 2. We examined whether habitat preferences of a declining shrub steppe songbird, the Brewer's sparrow Spizella breweri, were adaptive when multiple reproductive fitness components and spatial scales (landscape, territory and nest patch) were considered. 3. We found that birds settled earlier and in higher densities, together suggesting preference, in landscapes with greater shrub cover and height. Yet nest success was not higher in these landscapes; nest success was primarily determined by nest predation rates. Thus landscape preferences did not match nest predation risk. Instead, nestling mass and the number of nesting attempts per pair increased in preferred landscapes, raising the possibility that landscapes were chosen on the basis of food availability rather than safe nest sites. 4. At smaller spatial scales (territory and nest patch), birds preferred different habitat features (i.e. density of potential nest shrubs) that reduced nest predation risk and allowed greater season-long reproductive success. 5. Synthesis and applications. Habitat preferences reflect the integration of multiple environmental factors across multiple spatial scales, and individuals may have more than one option for optimizing fitness via habitat selection strategies. Assessments of habitat quality for management prescriptions should ideally include analysis of diverse fitness consequences across multiple ecologically relevant spatial scales. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  2. Area dependence of interlayer tunneling in strongly correlated bilayer two-dimensional electron systems at νT=1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Champagne, A. R.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2008-08-01

    The area and perimeter dependences of the Josephson-like interlayer tunneling signature of the coherent νT=1 quantum Hall phase in bilayer two-dimensional electron systems is examined. Electrostatic top gates of various sizes and shapes are used to locally define distinct νT=1 regions in the same sample. Near the phase boundary with the incoherent νT=1 state at large layer separation, our results demonstrate that the tunneling conductance in the coherent phase is closely proportional to the total area of the tunneling region. This implies that tunneling at νT=1 is a bulk phenomenon in this regime.

  3. Spatial climate-dependent growth response of boreal mixedwood forest in western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xinyu; Huang, Jian-Guo; Stadt, Kenneth J.; Comeau, Philip G.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-04-01

    The western Canadian mixedwood boreal forests were projected to be significantly affected by regional drought. However, drought degrees were spatially different across elevations, longitudes and latitudes, which might cause different tree growth responses to climate change in different sub-regions within western Canada. In this way, regional classification of western Canadian boreal forests and understanding spatial tree growth responses to climate might be necessary for future forest management and monitoring. In this paper, tree-ring chronologies of two dominant tree species, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss), were obtained from mixed forest stands distributed across western Canada to study spatial tree growth response to climate based on three regional classification schemes (a phytogeographic sub-region classification, a natural sub-region classification and non-classification). Phytogeographic sub-region classification was estimated based on tree ring samples we collected in this study, while natural sub-region classification was previously developed based on analysis of regional differences in vegetation, soil, site and climate conditions. Results showed that air temperature did not significantly increase, while drought stress became more severe between 1985 to 2010. Relationships between trembling aspen growth and temperature differed between north and south parts of the study area, resulting from spatial difference in water supply. Trembling aspen growth was influenced by temperature or moisture variables of the previous years. White spruce growth was influenced primarily by moisture variables (current or previous year), and response coefficients between white spruce and drought conditions (represented by drought code) were negative in all phytogeographic sub-regions, suggesting that white spruce was more sensitive to drought stress under climate change. As a late-successional dominant species

  4. Debris spatial density dependence on control volume resolution in the geosynchronous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Martin, C. E.; Smith, D. A. J.

    The debris environment of the Earth can be characterised using spatial density within the cells, or bins, of a spherical control volume, which has dimensions of geocentric radius (altitude), declination and right ascension. The characterisation of the debris environment in this way allows model predictions and measurement data from the USSTRATCOM catalogue, radar and returned surfaces to be compared. In addition, the volume-centred approach enables semi-deterministic models to compute debris fluxes relative to given target spacecraft orbits, provided the volume cells are of sufficiently high resolution. In this way semi-deterministic models employ the spatial density representation of the debris environment to predict future collision events and the future environment. The determination of debris spatial density for discrete sectors of near-Earth space is an integral part of the semi-deterministic models, IDES (Integrated Debris Evolution Suite), LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model) and DAMAGE (Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture for the Geosynchronous Environment). Comparative model studies for the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) utilise an agreed baseline incorporating the sizes of control volume cells but the sensitivity to the choice of these sizes has not been previously explored due to the computational expense involved. The results of two such sensitivity studies performed using DAMAGE are presented in this paper. DAMAGE characterized the current debris environment by simulating the debris source (launch and fragmentations only) and sink processes for objects larger than 10 cm from the beginning of the space age to May 2001. The simulated environment in the altitude range 35,000 km to 36,800 km was found to be generally consistent with the equivalent historical evolution performed using IDES and the two-line element (TLE) catalogue. Results from the sensitivity studies suggest that computed spatial densities are stable

  5. CHRNB3 is more strongly associated with FTCD-based nicotine dependence than cigarettes per day: phenotype definition changes GWAS results

    PubMed Central

    Rice, John P.; Hartz, Sarah; Agrawal, Arpana; Almasy, Laura; Bennett, Siiri; Breslau, Naomi; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Goate, Alison M.; Hesselbrock, Victor; Howells, William B.; Johnson, Eric O.; Kramer, John; Krueger, Robert F.; Kuperman, Samuel; Laurie, Cathy; Manolio, Teri A.; Neuman, Rosalind J.; Nurnberger, John I.; Porjesz, Bernice; Pugh, Elizabeth; Ramos, Erin M.; Saccone, Nancy; Saccone, Scott; Schuckit, Marc; Bierut, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Nicotine dependence is a highly heritable disorder associated with severe medical morbidity and mortality. Recent meta-analyses have found novel genetic loci associated with cigarettes per day (CPD), a proxy for nicotine dependence. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the importance of phenotype definition (i.e. CPD versus Fagerström Test for Cigarette Dependence (FTCD) score as a measure of nicotine dependence) on genome-wide association studies of nicotine dependence. Design Genome-wide association study Setting Community sample Participants A total of 3,365 subjects who had smoked at least one cigarette were selected from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE). Of the participants, 2,267 were European Americans,999 were African Americans. Measurements Nicotine dependence defined by FTCD score ≥4, CPD Findings The genetic locus most strongly associated with nicotine dependence was rs1451240 on chromosome 8 in the region of CHRNB3 (OR=0.65, p=2.4×10−8). This association was further strengthened in a meta-analysis with a previously published dataset (combined p=6.7 ×10−16, total n=4,200).When CPD was used as an alternate phenotype, the association no longer reached genome-wide significance (β=−0.08, p=0.0007). Conclusions Daily cigarette consumption and the Fagerstrom Test for Cigarette Dependence (FTCD) show different associations with polymorphisms in genetic loci. PMID:22524403

  6. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  7. Abnormal dependence of strong-field-ionization-induced nitrogen lasing on polarization ellipticity of the driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Li, Guihua; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya

    2013-12-01

    We experimentally investigate lasing behaviors of population-inverted N2+ ions for the transitions between the vibrational level (v' = 0) of excited electronic B 2Σu+ state and the two lowest vibrational levels (v = 0, 1) of the ground X 2Σg+ state in an elliptically polarized laser field. It is found that, as the polarization of the pump laser evolves from linear to circular, the lasing signal for the 0 → 0 transition at 391 nm first increases with a maximum enhancement of ˜40% at the ellipticity of 0.3 and then decreases, whereas for the 0 → 1 transition at 428 nm, the lasing signal decreases monotonically. This difference between the 391- and 428-nm lasing signals is ascribed to the high sensitivity of the strong-field response of the molecular ion to molecular vibrations, which indicates the possibility to control the vibrational state distribution of molecules by tuning the ellipticity of the laser pulse.

  8. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  9. Driving force dependence of charge separation and recombination processes in dyads of nucleotides and strongly electron-donating oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Mayuka; Majima, Tetsuro

    2014-10-23

    Charge transfer in DNA has attracted great attention of scientists because of its importance in biological processes. However, our knowledge on excess-electron transfer in DNA still remains limited in comparison to numerous studies of hole transfer in DNA. To clarify the dynamics of excess-electron transfer in DNA by photochemical techniques, new electron-donating photosensitizers should be developed. Herein, a terthiophene and two 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene oligomers were used as photosensitizers in dyads including natural nucleobases as electron acceptors. The charge separation and recombination processes in the dyads were investigated by femtosecond laser flash photolysis, and the driving force dependence of these rate constants was discussed on the basis of the Marcus theory. From this study, the conformation effect on charge recombination process was found. We expect that 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene oligomers are useful in investigation of excess-electron-transfer dynamics in DNA. PMID:25265410

  10. Strong spin-orbit interaction and quadratic temperature dependence of electron-phonon scattering in disorder V75X25 (X = Pd, Al) alloys at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, R. N.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of weak electron localization (WEL) and electron-electron interaction (EEI) effects in disordered V75X25 (X = Pd, Al) alloys has been reported. The resistivity in absence of magnetic field shows a minimum at temperature T = Tm and follows T1/2 law within the temperature range 5K ≤ T ≤ Tm, which suggests predominant EEI effect. Magnetoresistivity is positive due to strong spin-orbit interaction. The dephasing scattering time is dominated by the electron-phonon scattering. The electron-phonon scattering rate shows quadratic temperature dependence behavior, which is explained by the theory of incomplete dragging at the random scattering potential by phonons. The zero temperature scattering time strongly depends on the disorder and its magnitude decreases with increasing disorder.