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Sample records for strong spatial dependency

  1. Spatial Structure of Seagrass Suggests That Size-Dependent Plant Traits Have a Strong Influence on the Distribution and Maintenance of Tropical Multispecies Meadows

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Jillian L. S.; Van Niel, Kimberly P.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Holmes, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Seagrass species in the tropics occur in multispecies meadows. How these meadows are maintained through species co-existence and what their ecological drivers may be has been an overarching question in seagrass biogeography. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of four co-existing species and infer potential ecological processes from these structures. Methods and Results Species presence/absence data were collected using underwater towed and dropped video cameras in Pulau Tinggi, Malaysia. The geostatistical method, utilizing semivariograms, was used to describe the spatial structure of Halophila spp, Halodule uninervis, Syringodium isoetifolium and Cymodocea serrulata. Species had spatial patterns that were oriented in the along-shore and across-shore directions, nested with larger species in meadow interiors, and consisted of multiple structures that indicate the influence of 2–3 underlying processes. The Linear Model of Coregionalization (LMC) was used to estimate the amount of variance contributing to the presence of a species at specific spatial scales. These distances were <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–50 m (fine-scale) and >50 m (broad-scale) in the along-shore; and <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–140 m (fine-scale) and >140 m (broad-scale) in the across-shore. The LMC suggests that smaller species (Halophila spp and H. uninervis) were most influenced by broad-scale processes such as hydrodynamics and water depth whereas large, localised species (S. isoetifolium and C. serrulata) were more influenced by finer-scale processes such as sediment burial, seagrass colonization and growth, and physical disturbance. Conclusion In this study, we provide evidence that spatial structure is distinct even when species occur in well-mixed multispecies meadows, and we suggest that size-dependent plant traits have a strong influence on the distribution and maintenance of tropical marine plant communities. This study offers a contrast from previous spatial models of seagrasses which have largely focused on monospecific temperate meadows. PMID:24497978

  2. Spatially: resolved heterogeneous dynamics in a strong colloidal gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Alaimo, Matteo David; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    We re-examine the classical problem of irreversible colloid aggregation, showing that the application of Digital Fourier Imaging (DFI), a class of optical correlation methods that combine the power of light scattering and imaging, allows one to pick out novel useful evidence concerning the restructuring processes taking place in a strong colloidal gel. In particular, the spatially-resolved displacement fields provided by DFI strongly suggest that the temporally-intermittent local rearrangements taking place in the course of gel ageing are characterized by very long-ranged spatial correlations.

  3. Spatially dependent electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Radwell, N; Clark, T W; Piccirillo, B; Barnett, S M; Franke-Arnold, S

    2015-03-27

    Recent years have seen vast progress in the generation and detection of structured light, with potential applications in high capacity optical data storage and continuous variable quantum technologies. Here we measure the transmission of structured light through cold rubidium atoms and observe regions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), using the phase profile as control parameter for the atomic opacity. With q plates we generate a probe beam with azimuthally varying phase and polarization structure, and its right and left circular polarization components provide the probe and control of an EIT transition. We observe an azimuthal modulation of the absorption profile that is dictated by the phase and polarization structure of the probe laser. Conventional EIT systems do not exhibit phase sensitivity. We show, however, that a weak transverse magnetic field closes the EIT transitions, thereby generating phase-dependent dark states which in turn lead to phase-dependent transparency, in agreement with our measurements. PMID:25860744

  4. Spatially dependent Kondo effect in quantum corrals.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Enrico; Morr, Dirk K

    2006-12-01

    We study the Kondo screening of a single magnetic impurity inside a nonmagnetic quantum corral located on the surface of a metallic host system. We show that the spatial structure of the corral's eigenmodes leads to a spatially dependent Kondo effect whose signatures are spatial variations of the Kondo temperature T K. Moreover, we predict that the Kondo screening is accompanied by the formation of multiple Kondo resonances with characteristic spatial patterns. Our results open new possibilities to manipulate and explore the Kondo effect by using quantum corrals. PMID:17280221

  5. Spatial mode cleaning in radically asymmetric strongly focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heins, Alan M.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that a femtosecond laser pulse strongly focused in air can produce a highly symmetric damage pattern on glass. This damage pattern contains a series of near-perfect radial rings, with diameters much larger than the predicted focal spot diameter. These rings disappear when the experiment is conducted in vacuum, indicating atmospheric involvement. Surprisingly, the shape and size of the rings seem to be nearly independent of the shape of the generating laser beam, showing dramatic spatial mode cleaning. A "half moon" initial laser mode created by obscuring one side of the round beam produces rings of similar quality to those obtained with the unclipped beam. While spatial mode cleaning has previously been reported in filaments, this is the most dramatic demonstration of the effect that we are aware of. We argue that the effect is due primarily to ionization, in contrast to studies in longer filaments that attribute it to self-focusing.

  6. Spatial dependences among precipitation maxima over Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, S.; Naveau, P.

    2007-09-01

    For a wide range of applications in hydrology, the probability distribution of precipitation maxima represents a fundamental quantity to build dykes, propose flood planning policies, or more generally, to mitigate the impact of precipitation extremes. Classical Extreme Value Theory (EVT) has been applied in this context by usually assuming that precipitation maxima can be considered as Independent and Identically Distributed (IID) events, which approximately follow a Generalized Extreme Value distribution (GEV) at each recording site. In practice, weather stations records can not be considered as independent in space. Assessing the spatial dependences among precipitation maxima provided by two Belgium measurement networks is the main goal of this work. The pairwise dependences are estimated by a variogram of order one, also called madogram, that is specially tailored to be in compliance with spatial EVT and to capture EVT bivariate structures. Our analysis of Belgium precipitation maxima indicates that the degree of dependence varies greatly according to three factors: the distance between two stations, the season (summer or winter) and the precipitation accumulation duration (hourly, daily, monthly, etc.). Increasing the duration (from one hour to 20 days) strengthens the spatial dependence. The full independence is reached after about 50 km (100 km) for summer (winter) for a duration of one hour, while for long durations only after a few hundred kilometers. In addition this dependence is always larger in winter than in summer whatever is the duration. An explanation of these properties in terms of the dynamical processes dominating during the two seasons is advanced.

  7. Spatial Dependencies between Large-Scale Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Robert; Scott, Gregory; Carhart-Harris, Robin; Turkheimer, Federico; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Sharp, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging reveals both increases (task-positive) and decreases (task-negative) in neural activation with many tasks. Many studies show a temporal relationship between task positive and task negative networks that is important for efficient cognitive functioning. Here we provide evidence for a spatial relationship between task positive and negative networks. There are strong spatial similarities between many reported task negative brain networks, termed the default mode network, which is typically assumed to be a spatially fixed network. However, this is not the case. The spatial structure of the DMN varies depending on what specific task is being performed. We test whether there is a fundamental spatial relationship between task positive and negative networks. Specifically, we hypothesize that the distance between task positive and negative voxels is consistent despite different spatial patterns of activation and deactivation evoked by different cognitive tasks. We show significantly reduced variability in the distance between within-condition task positive and task negative voxels than across-condition distances for four different sensory, motor and cognitive tasks - implying that deactivation patterns are spatially dependent on activation patterns (and vice versa), and that both are modulated by specific task demands. We also show a similar relationship between positively and negatively correlated networks from a third ‘rest’ dataset, in the absence of a specific task. We propose that this spatial relationship may be the macroscopic analogue of microscopic neuronal organization reported in sensory cortical systems, and that this organization may reflect homeostatic plasticity necessary for efficient brain function. PMID:24887067

  8. Coexisting orchid species have distinct mycorrhizal communities and display strong spatial segregation.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Because orchids are dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and establishment of seedlings, differences in the mycorrhizal communities associating with orchids can be expected to mediate the abundance, spatial distribution and coexistence of terrestrial orchids in natural communities. We assessed the small-scale spatial distribution of seven orchid species co-occurring in 25 × 25 m plots in two Mediterranean grasslands. In order to characterize the mycorrhizal community associating with each orchid species, 454 pyrosequencing was used. The extent of spatial clustering was assessed using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis. The community of mycorrhizal fungi consisted mainly of members of the Tulasnellaceae, Thelephoraceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, although sporadically members of the Sebacinaceae, Russulaceae and Cortinariaceae were observed. Pronounced differences in mycorrhizal communities were observed between species, whereas strong clustering and significant segregation characterized the spatial distribution of orchid species. However, spatial segregation was not significantly related to phylogenetic dissimilarity of fungal communities. Our results indicate that co-occurring orchid species have distinctive mycorrhizal communities and show strong spatial segregation, suggesting that mycorrhizal fungi are important factors driving niche partitioning in terrestrial orchids and may therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:24325257

  9. Parrondo Games with Spatial Dependence, III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethier, S. N.; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-10-01

    We study Toral’s Parrondo games with N players and one-dimensional spatial dependence as modified by Xie et al. Specifically, we use computer graphics to sketch the Parrondo and anti-Parrondo regions for 3 ≤ N ≤ 9. Our work was motivated by a recent paper of Li et al., who applied a state space reduction method to this model, reducing the number of states from 2N to N + 1. We show that their reduced Markov chains are inconsistent with the model of Xie et al.

  10. Configuration dependence of scotopic spatial summation

    PubMed Central

    Sakitt, B.

    1971-01-01

    1. Psychophysical experiments were done under conditions of complete dark adaptation, 7° in the human temporal retina, using blue-green flashes brief enough to be within the range of complete temporal summation. 2. Frequency-of-seeing experiments were done for two 3·4? squares separated by 20? or 23? and for each square separately. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that the squares acted independently in determining the absolute threshold. There was no observable summation occurring between them. 3. The absolute threshold (50% seeing) for two 3·4? squares (the centre-to-centre separation varied from 3·4? to 56?) was measured relative to the absolute threshold for just one such square. It required more photons at the cornea at threshold for two spots than for one such spot, except when they were actually touching. 4. The same subject, in the same retinal region and under otherwise identical test conditions, showed complete spatial summation at absolute threshold for circular spots up to 30? in diameter. 5. Similar experiments were done on other subjects using 3·4? squares and lines of width 3·4?. All subjects showed complete summation at absolute threshold for lines 34? long. All showed lack of spatial summation for two squares unless the two squares touched to form a rectangle. 6. The absolute threshold for N small spots was compared to the absolute threshold for 1 spot, where N varied from 2 to 25. Again complete spatial summation broke down even when all the spots lay within the Ricco area. 7. It was shown that the results are inconsistent with the hypothesis of a linear output and a linear summation of excitations. 8. Various hypotheses are examined and it is shown that no simple hypothesis can explain all the results. The conclusion is that spatial summation at absolute threshold is configuration dependent. PMID:5565639

  11. Dynamics of strongly coupled spatially distributed logistic equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, I. S.; Kashchenko, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a system of two logistic delay equations with spatially distributed coupling is studied. The coupling coefficient is assumed to be sufficiently large. Special nonlinear systems of parabolic equations are constructed such that the behavior of their solutions is determined in the first approximation by the dynamical properties of the original system.

  12. The Spatial Region of Photoionization in a Strong Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    In the framework of the Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss theory in the velocity gauge we investigate the magnitude of the space region, where photoionization in a strong laser field takes place. We find substantial differences between the short-range and the long-range (Coulomb) potentials, and between linear and circular polarizations of incident radiation. It appears that only for the initial state in the Coulomb potential the region of space, where ionization is held, expands significantly with increasing intensity for a typical optical frequency and non-relativistic but strong circularly polarized laser field. As a result of our considerations, we suggest to modify the idea of Reiss and Krainov of a certain simple Coulomb correction to the Volkov wave function. We show that photoionization rate calculated for the H(1s) atom, using our approach, is in better agreement with other theoretical results for moderately strong circularly polarized laser field.

  13. Spatial Heterogeneity Induces Scale Dependent Rock Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, F.; Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.; Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.

    2014-12-01

    We carried out large-scale biaxial friction experiments (Fukuyama et al., 2012; 2014) using a pair of meter-sized Indian gabbro as specimens, whose contacting area was 1.5 × 0.1 m2, normal stress was up to 6.7 MPa and loading velocity was up to 3 × 10-2 m/s. After each experiment, we found localized damages (i.e. grooves) were generated on the fault surface and gouges were distributed around them. We confirmed work rate dependency of rock friction as revealed by centimeter-sized rock samples (Di Toro et al., 2011), but further found that the meter-sized rock friction starts to decrease at one order of magnitude smaller work rate than that of the centimeter sized rock (Yamashita et al., 2013, AGU fall meeting). Here, we concluded that this difference is caused by stress localization and associated increase in heterogeneity on the fault as shown by: 1) Total amount of deviations of each local shear stress from the average, which were monitored by strain gauge array, increased with the decrease in friction. 2) Friction coefficients were negatively correlated with degree of spatial heterogeneity evaluated from the distribution of grooves and gouges. 3) Melt textures were found in the collected gouges by microscopic observation using HRSEM. Based on these observations, we propose a stress localization model; the fault surfaces are composed of patched and non-patched areas with high and low normal stress, respectively. The high normal stress patch leads to high shear stress, high mechanical work and thus production of much wear material (gouge), which further causes additional increase in normal stress. Assuming that the local friction follows the results by centimeter-sized gabbro experiments, we numerically simulated a slip-dependent friction for both patched and non-patched areas, and successively reproduced a weakening in macroscopic friction. We confirmed that the work rate dependency of simulated friction was consistent with that of biaxial experiments (Fig. 1). This result suggests this scale dependency should be taken into consideration since such heterogeneity should be common in nature.

  14. Spatial Dependence of Condensates in Strongly Coupled Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Shrock, Robert; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-03-25

    We analyze quark and gluon condensates in quantum chromodynamics. We suggest that these are localized inside hadrons, because the particles whose interactions are responsible for them are confined within these hadrons. This can explain the results of recent studies of gluon condensate contributions to vacuum correlators. We also give a general discussion of condensates in asymptotically free vectorial and chiral gauge theories.

  15. The Spatial Scale of Attention Strongly Modulates Saccade Latencies

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Mark R.; Madelain, Laurent; Krauzlis, Richard J.; Wallman, Josh

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that when a stimulus consisting of two concentric rings moves, saccade latencies are much longer (by 150 ms) when attention is directed to the larger ring than to the smaller ring. Here, we investigated whether this effect can be explained by a deferral of the “cost” of making a saccade while the target remains inside the attentional field, or by purely visual factors (eccentricity or contrast). We found 1) latencies were shorter when attention was directed to small features irrespective of retinal eccentricity; 2) saccade latency distributions were systematically determined by the ratio between the amplitude of the stimulus step and the diameter of the attended ring: stimulus steps that were larger than the attended ring resulted in short latencies, whereas steps smaller than the attended ring resulted in proportionally longer and more variable latencies; 3) this effect was not seen in manual reaction times to the same target movement; and 4) suprathreshold changes in the contrast of targets, mimicking possible attentional effects on perceived contrast and saliency, had little effect on latency. We argue that the spatial scale of attention determines the urgency of saccade motor preparation processes by changing the rate and rate variability of the underlying decision signal, to defer the cost of saccades that result in little visual benefit. PMID:18234988

  16. Corresponding Delay-Dependent Biases in Spatial Language and Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, John; Spencer, John P.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the relationship between linguistic and non-linguistic spatial representations. In three experiments we probe spatial language and spatial memory at the same time points in the task sequence. Experiments 1 and 2 show analogous delay-dependent biases in spatial language and spatial memory. Experiment 3 extends this correspondence, showing that additional perceptual structure along the vertical axis reduces delay-dependent effects in both tasks. These results indicate that linguistic and non-linguistic spatial systems depend on shared underlying representational processes. In addition, we also address how these delay-dependent biases can arise within a single theoretical framework without positing differing prototypes for linguistic and non-linguistic spatial systems. PMID:19727805

  17. Perceived Lightness Depends on Perceived Spatial Arrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrist, Alan L.

    1977-01-01

    Shows that the perceived shade of gray depends on the luminance relationship between surfaces perceived to be in the same plane and not between surfaces that are merely adjacent in the retinal image. This implies that lateral inhibition cannot explain lightness constancy. (MLH)

  18. Uncertainty Quantification for Characterizing Spatial Tail Dependence under Statistical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S.; Paciorek, C. J.; Prabhat, M.; Byna, S.; Collins, W.; Wehner, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale weather systems such as Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) may affect extreme climate events, in particular resulting in high spatial coherence across regions. We use methods from statistical extreme value theory to characterize the spatial dependence of extremes as a function of spatial distance. Our focus in this work is characterizing uncertainty in our understanding of how the spatial dependence of extremes in climate models We investigate the influence of ARs on the spatial dependence structure of extreme precipitation from CMIP5 simulations under climate change. We fit statistical models that treat initial condition ensemble members as independent data replicates and uses bootstrapping (across yearlong blocks of data) to estimate uncertainty from having only limited model runs. We also focus on multi-model ensembles as random draws of CMIP5 model runs and approximate the uncertainty for simulating the behavior of tail dependence across models. Preliminary results from four CMIP5 models show that projected AR events bring more severe rainfall with less dependent pattern between locations under high emissions scenario (RCP8.5) during 2076-2100 than for the historical run during 1981-2005. Within the UQ framework, spatial dependence between nearby locations is estimated more precisely, showing narrower confidence intervals, than the spatial dependence measure for locations further apart.

  19. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-21

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/r{sup D}propor tor{sup -D} where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A 'box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the 'capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term 'fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis.The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial distribution, which are: - Simple way to quantify scale-invariant distributions of complex objects or phenomena by a small number of parameters. - It is becoming evident that the applicability of fractal distributions to geological problems could have a more fundamental basis. Chaotic behaviour could underlay the geotectonic processes and the applicable statistics could often be fractal.The application of fractal distribution analysis has, however, some specific aspects. It is usually difficult to present an adequate interpretation of the obtained values of fractal coefficients for earthquake epicenter or hypocenter distributions. That is why in this paper we aimed at other goals - to verify how a fractal coefficient depends on different spatial distributions. We simulated earthquake spatial data by generating randomly points first in a 3D space - cube, then in a parallelepiped, diminishing one of its sides. We then continued this procedure in 2D and 1D space. For each simulated data set we calculated the points' fractal coefficient (correlation fractal dimension of epicentres) and then checked for correlation between the coefficients values and the type of spatial distribution.In that way one can obtain a set of standard fractal coefficients' values for varying spatial distributions. These then can be used when real earthquake data is analyzed by comparing the real data coefficients values to the standard fractal coefficients. Such an approach can help in interpreting the fractal analysis results through different types of spatial distributions.

  20. Strong Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption from Peat Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M. S.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Knue, J.; Samburova, V.; Watts, A.; Moosmüller, H.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Zielinska, B.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Tsibart, A.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, organic soils and peats may store as much as 600 Gt of terrestrial carbon, representing 20 - 30% of the planet's terrestrial organic carbon mass. This is approximately the same carbon mass as that contained in Earth's atmosphere, despite peatlands occupying only 3% of its surface. Effects of fires in these ecosystems are of global concern due to their potential for enormous carbon release into the atmosphere. The implications for contributions of peat fires to the global carbon cycle and radiative forcing scenarios are significant. Combustion of peat mostly takes place in the low temperature, smoldering phase of a fire. It consumes carbon that may have accumulated over a period of hundreds to thousands of years. In comparison, combustion of aboveground biomass fuels releases carbon that has accumulated much more recently, generally over a period of years or decades. Here, we report our findings on characterization of emissions from laboratory combustion of peat soils from three locations representing the biomes in which these soils occur. Peat samples from Alaska and Florida (USA) and Siberia (Russia) were burned at two different fuel moisture levels. Burns were conducted in an 8-m3 volume combustion chamber located at the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV, USA. We report significant brown carbon production from combustion of all three peat soils. We used a multispectral (405, 532, 781 nm) photoacoustic instrument equipped with integrating nephelometer to measure the wavelength-dependent aerosol light absorption and scattering. Absorption Ångström exponents (between 405 and 532 nm) as high as ten were observed, revealing strongly enhanced aerosol light absorption in the violet and blue wavelengths. Single scattering albedos (SSA) of 0.94 and 0.99 were observed at 405 and 532 nm, respectively, for the same sample. Variability of these optical parameters will be discussed as a function of fuel and combustion conditions. Other real-time measurements included CO2, CO, NOx (NO and NO2), and SO2 concentrations, PM size-distributions, and PM and black carbon mass concentrations. In addition, Teflon-membrane, quartz-fiber, and Teflon-impregnated glass fiber (TIGF) filters followed by XAD-4 cartridges were collected for detailed chemical analysis.

  1. Dependence on frequency of strong-field atomic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that strong-field atomic stabilization can occur at any frequency, that analytical methods exist that can describe all essential features of stabilization, that relativistic effects enhance the stabilization phenomenon, and that a simple physical picture exists that explains these properties. A necessary prelude is to show that the frequency properties of the three methods often conjoined by the KFR (Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss) label are quite different. Applicability of the SFA (Strong-Field Approximation) to stabilization at any frequency is shown, and verified by exhibiting close correspondence to numerical predictions by Popov et al. that also span both low and high frequencies.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  3. Effects of Randomness and Spatial Dependent Relaxation on Sandpile Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Pui-Man

    1996-03-01

    We investigate two types of randomness in the relaxation of sandpile models when the slope at some point becomes over critical. In one type of randomness, the number of particles n_f, falling to its nearest neighbors in the resulting relaxation, is not constant but random, even though an equal number falls in each direction. We find that this kind of randomness does not change the universality class of the model. Another type of randomness is introduced by having all nf particles to fall in one single direction, but with the direction chosen randomly. We find that this type of randomness has a strong effect on the universality of the models. For this latter type of randomness, if we make the probability for choosing the random direction spatially dependent, we can go continuously from the undirected model of Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) to the directed model of Dhar-Ramaswamy (DR). We also investigate the the effect of randomness on the "running" sandpile model of Hwa-Kardar (HK). We find that the running sandpile model is robust with respect to both types of randomness.

  4. A strong seasonal dependence in the Martian hydrogen exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Clarke, John T.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Mayyasi, Majd

    2015-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope and Mars Express observed unexpected rapid changes in the Martian hydrogen exosphere involving a decrease in scattered Lyman ? intensity in fall 2007 (solar longitude, Ls = 331°-345°). These changes detected were speculated to be a combination of seasonal variation and/or dust storms and lower atmospheric dynamics. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope observations of Mars in 2014 over a broad range of heliocentric distances and seasons (Ls = 138°-232°) which indicate a factor of ~3.5 change in Martian Lyman ? brightness associated with a factor of ~5.4 variation of hydrogen escape flux in the absence of global dust storms and significant solar variability. We thus conclude that seasonal effects have a strong influence on the hydrogen exosphere, which in turn has major implications for the processes that control water supply to the Martian upper atmosphere and the history of water escape from Mars.

  5. Pair production from space- and time-dependent strong fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Dániel; Varró, Sándor; Lévai, Péter; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2015-03-01

    The recent development of laser technology and the large number of extreme laser experiments under construction renewed the research related to pair production in strong fields. If the predicted threshold of nonlinear QED is reached, pair production may be observed and the measurements must be compared with appropriate theoretical predictions. However the theoretical side still lacks the understanding of the relevant quantum processes including the effect of laser field parameters on the number and spectrum of created particles. We use the Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism to investigate the role of the pure electric inhomogeneity on the spectra of created pairs. This simplified model may also be relevant in high energy physics for the description of string fragmentation in the early stages of heavy ion collisions.

  6. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  7. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p?spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  8. Modeling Spatial Dependencies and Semantic Concepts in Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is the process of discovering new patterns and relationships in large datasets. However, several studies have shown that general data mining techniques often fail to extract meaningful patterns and relationships from the spatial data owing to the violation of fundamental geospatial principles. In this tutorial, we introduce basic principles behind explicit modeling of spatial and semantic concepts in data mining. In particular, we focus on modeling these concepts in the widely used classification, clustering, and prediction algorithms. Classification is the process of learning a structure or model (from user given inputs) and applying the known model to the new data. Clustering is the process of discovering groups and structures in the data that are ``similar,'' without applying any known structures in the data. Prediction is the process of finding a function that models (explains) the data with least error. One common assumption among all these methods is that the data is independent and identically distributed. Such assumptions do not hold well in spatial data, where spatial dependency and spatial heterogeneity are a norm. In addition, spatial semantics are often ignored by the data mining algorithms. In this tutorial we cover recent advances in explicitly modeling of spatial dependencies and semantic concepts in data mining.

  9. Spatially Dependent Polya Tree Modeling for Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luping; Hanson, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary With the proliferation of spatially oriented time-to-event data, spatial modeling in the survival context has received increased recent attention. A traditional way to capture a spatial pattern is to introduce frailty terms in the linear predictor of a semiparametric model, such as proportional hazards or accelerated failure time. We propose a new methodology to capture the spatial pattern by assuming a prior based on a mixture of spatially dependent Polya trees for the baseline survival in the proportional hazards model. Thanks to modern Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, this approach remains computationally feasible in a fully hierarchical Bayesian framework. We compare the spatially dependent mixture of Polya trees (MPT) approach to the traditional spatial frailty approach, and illustrate the usefulness of this method with an analysis of Iowan breast cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. Our method provides better goodness of fit over the traditional alternatives as measured by log pseudo marginal likelihood (LPML), the deviance information criterion (DIC) and full sample score (FSS) statistics. PMID:20731644

  10. Strongly scale-dependent polyspectra from curvaton self-interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Christian T.; Enqvist, Kari; Nurmi, Sami; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kari.enqvist@helsinki.fi E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2011-11-01

    We study the scale dependence of the non-linearity parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} in curvaton models with self-interactions. We show that the spectral indices n{sub f{sub N{sub L}}} = d ln|f{sub NL}|/d ln k and n{sub g{sub N{sub L}}} = d ln|g{sub NL}|/d ln k can take values much greater than the slow-roll parameters and the spectral index of the power spectrum. This means that the scale-dependence of the bi and trispectrum could be easily observable in this scenario with Planck, which would lead to tight additional constraints on the model. Inspite of the highly non-trivial behaviour of f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} in the curvaton models with self-interactions, we find that the model can be falsified if g{sub NL}(k) is also observed.

  11. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven composites should be considered to be a structure specific response rather than generic homogenised material properties.

  12. PARTICLE CLUMPING AND PLANETESIMAL FORMATION DEPEND STRONGLY ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Youdin, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2009-10-20

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle clumping and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks with varying amounts of solid material. As centimeter-size pebbles settle to the mid-plane, turbulence develops through vertical shearing and streaming instabilities. We find that when the pebble-to-gas column density ratio is 0.01, corresponding roughly to solar metallicity, clumping is weak, so the pebble density rarely exceeds the gas density. Doubling the column density ratio leads to a dramatic increase in clumping, with characteristic particle densities more than 10 times the gas density and maximum densities reaching several thousand times the gas density. This is consistent with unstratified simulations of the streaming instability that show strong clumping in particle-dominated flows. The clumps readily contract gravitationally into interacting planetesimals on the order of 100 km in radius. Our results suggest that the correlation between host star metallicity and exoplanets may reflect the early stages of planet formation. We further speculate that initially low-metallicity disks can be particle enriched during the gas dispersal phase, leading to a late burst of planetesimal formation.

  13. Strong dependence of ultracold chemical rates on electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-02-15

    We use the quantum threshold laws combined with a classical capture model to provide an analytical estimate of the chemical quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of two colliding particles at ultralow temperatures. We apply this quantum threshold model (QT model) to indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules in an electric field. At ultracold temperatures and in weak electric fields, the cross sections and rate coefficients depend only weakly on the electric dipole moment d induced by the electric field. In stronger electric fields, the quenching processes scale as d{sup 4(L+(1/2))} where L>0 is the orbital angular-momentum quantum number between the two colliding particles. For p-wave collisions (L=1) of indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules at ultracold temperatures, the quenching rate thus scales as d{sup 6}. We also apply this model to pure two-dimensional collisions and find that chemical rates vanish as d{sup -4} for ultracold indistinguishable fermions. This model provides a quick and intuitive way to estimate chemical rate coefficients of reactions occuring with high probability.

  14. Level dependence of spatial processing in the primate auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization in both humans and monkeys is tolerant to changes in sound levels. The underlying neural mechanism, however, is not well understood. This study reports the level dependence of individual neurons' spatial receptive fields (SRFs) in the primary auditory cortex (A1) and the adjacent caudal field in awake marmoset monkeys. We found that most neurons' excitatory SRF components were spatially confined in response to broadband noise stimuli delivered from the upper frontal sound field. Approximately half the recorded neurons exhibited little change in spatial tuning width over a ?20-dB change in sound level, whereas the remaining neurons showed either expansion or contraction in their tuning widths. Increased sound levels did not alter the percent distribution of tuning width for neurons collected in either cortical field. The population-averaged responses remained tuned between 30- and 80-dB sound pressure levels for neuronal groups preferring contralateral, midline, and ipsilateral locations. We further investigated the spatial extent and level dependence of the suppressive component of SRFs using a pair of sequentially presented stimuli. Forward suppression was observed when the stimuli were delivered from “far” locations, distant to the excitatory center of an SRF. In contrast to spatially confined excitation, the strength of suppression typically increased with stimulus level at both the excitatory center and far regions of an SRF. These findings indicate that although the spatial tuning of individual neurons varied with stimulus levels, their ensemble responses were level tolerant. Widespread spatial suppression may play an important role in limiting the sizes of SRFs at high sound levels in the auditory cortex. PMID:22592309

  15. Localized attacks on spatially embedded networks with dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Yehiel; Bashan, Amir; Danziger, Michael M.; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-03-01

    Many real world complex systems such as critical infrastructure networks are embedded in space and their components may depend on one another to function. They are also susceptible to geographically localized damage caused by malicious attacks or natural disasters. Here, we study a general model of spatially embedded networks with dependencies under localized attacks. We develop a theoretical and numerical approach to describe and predict the effects of localized attacks on spatially embedded systems with dependencies. Surprisingly, we find that a localized attack can cause substantially more damage than an equivalent random attack. Furthermore, we find that for a broad range of parameters, systems which appear stable are in fact metastable. Though robust to random failures--even of finite fraction--if subjected to a localized attack larger than a critical size which is independent of the system size (i.e., a zero fraction), a cascading failure emerges which leads to complete system collapse. Our results demonstrate the potential high risk of localized attacks on spatially embedded network systems with dependencies and may be useful for designing more resilient systems.

  16. Localized attacks on spatially embedded networks with dependencies.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Yehiel; Bashan, Amir; Danziger, Michael M; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Many real world complex systems such as critical infrastructure networks are embedded in space and their components may depend on one another to function. They are also susceptible to geographically localized damage caused by malicious attacks or natural disasters. Here, we study a general model of spatially embedded networks with dependencies under localized attacks. We develop a theoretical and numerical approach to describe and predict the effects of localized attacks on spatially embedded systems with dependencies. Surprisingly, we find that a localized attack can cause substantially more damage than an equivalent random attack. Furthermore, we find that for a broad range of parameters, systems which appear stable are in fact metastable. Though robust to random failures-even of finite fraction-if subjected to a localized attack larger than a critical size which is independent of the system size (i.e., a zero fraction), a cascading failure emerges which leads to complete system collapse. Our results demonstrate the potential high risk of localized attacks on spatially embedded network systems with dependencies and may be useful for designing more resilient systems. PMID:25757572

  17. Localized attacks on spatially embedded networks with dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Yehiel; Bashan, Amir; Danziger, Michael M.; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Many real world complex systems such as critical infrastructure networks are embedded in space and their components may depend on one another to function. They are also susceptible to geographically localized damage caused by malicious attacks or natural disasters. Here, we study a general model of spatially embedded networks with dependencies under localized attacks. We develop a theoretical and numerical approach to describe and predict the effects of localized attacks on spatially embedded systems with dependencies. Surprisingly, we find that a localized attack can cause substantially more damage than an equivalent random attack. Furthermore, we find that for a broad range of parameters, systems which appear stable are in fact metastable. Though robust to random failures—even of finite fraction—if subjected to a localized attack larger than a critical size which is independent of the system size (i.e., a zero fraction), a cascading failure emerges which leads to complete system collapse. Our results demonstrate the potential high risk of localized attacks on spatially embedded network systems with dependencies and may be useful for designing more resilient systems. PMID:25757572

  18. Drivers of bacterial ?-diversity depend on spatial scale

    PubMed Central

    Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Penn, Kevin; Allison, Steven D.; Horner-Devine, M. Claire

    2011-01-01

    The factors driving ?-diversity (variation in community composition) yield insights into the maintenance of biodiversity on the planet. Here we tested whether the mechanisms that underlie bacterial ?-diversity vary over centimeters to continental spatial scales by comparing the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria communities in salt marsh sediments. As observed in studies of macroorganisms, the drivers of salt marsh bacterial ?-diversity depend on spatial scale. In contrast to macroorganism studies, however, we found no evidence of evolutionary diversification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria taxa at the continental scale, despite an overall relationship between geographic distance and community similarity. Our data are consistent with the idea that dispersal limitation at local scales can contribute to ?-diversity, even though the 16S rRNA genes of the relatively common taxa are globally distributed. These results highlight the importance of considering multiple spatial scales for understanding microbial biogeography. PMID:21518859

  19. The goodness of generalized STAR in spatial dependency observations modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhaiyar, Utriweni

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and time dependencies among observations are demanded for space time modeling. In order to estimate unobserved sites in the near future, we may apply Kriging methods to the forecast results of observed sites. Here we considered two ways of forecasting, first is by using AR model and second is by using GSTAR model. We compare both ways and observe the goodness of GSTAR model, relative to the AR model, in spatial dependence observations through some numerical studies and case study. It is obtained that GSTAR model gives the better forecasting result than AR model, which always perform overestimate values. Since the Kriging interpolation is better for linear approximation then AR model will give better interpolated observations if the site has higher real observations than other sites. This result also confirms the stationarity of GSTAR model.

  20. Improved dependent component analysis for hyperspectral unmixing with spatial correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi; Wan, Jianwei; Huang, Bingchao; Lan, Tian

    2014-11-01

    In highly mixed hyerspectral datasets, dependent component analysis (DECA) has shown its superiority over other traditional geometric based algorithms. This paper proposes a new algorithm that incorporates DECA with the infinite hidden Markov random field (iHMRF) model, which can efficiently exploit spatial dependencies between image pixels and automatically determine the number of classes. Expectation Maximization algorithm is derived to infer the model parameters, including the endmembers, the abundances, the dirichlet distribution parameters of each class and the classification map. Experimental results based on synthetic and real hyperspectral data show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Reference frames in virtual spatial navigation are viewpoint dependent

    PubMed Central

    Török, Ágoston; Nguyen, T. Peter; Kolozsvári, Orsolya; Buchanan, Robert J.; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the mammalian brain relies on a cognitive map of the environment. Such cognitive maps enable us, for example, to take the optimal route from a given location to a known target. The formation of these maps is naturally influenced by our perception of the environment, meaning it is dependent on factors such as our viewpoint and choice of reference frame. Yet, it is unknown how these factors influence the construction of cognitive maps. Here, we evaluated how various combinations of viewpoints and reference frames affect subjects' performance when they navigated in a bounded virtual environment without landmarks. We measured both their path length and time efficiency and found that (1) ground perspective was associated with egocentric frame of reference, (2) aerial perspective was associated with allocentric frame of reference, (3) there was no appreciable performance difference between first and third person egocentric viewing positions and (4) while none of these effects were dependent on gender, males tended to perform better in general. Our study provides evidence that there are inherent associations between visual perspectives and cognitive reference frames. This result has implications about the mechanisms of path integration in the human brain and may also inspire designs of virtual reality applications. Lastly, we demonstrated the effective use of a tablet PC and spatial navigation tasks for studying spatial and cognitive aspects of human memory. PMID:25249956

  2. Density-dependent dispersal and spatial population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ims, Rolf A; Andreassen, Harry P

    2005-01-01

    The synchronization of the dynamics of spatially subdivided populations is of both fundamental and applied interest in population biology. Based on theoretical studies, dispersal movements have been inferred to be one of the most general causes of population synchrony, yet no empirical study has mapped distance-dependent estimates of movement rates on the actual pattern of synchrony in species that are known to exhibit population synchrony. Northern vole and lemming species are particularly well-known for their spatially synchronized population dynamics. Here, we use results from an experimental study to demonstrate that tundra vole dispersal movements did not act to synchronize population dynamics in fragmented habitats. In contrast to the constant dispersal rate assumed in earlier theoretical studies, the tundra vole, and many other species, exhibit negative density-dependent dispersal. Simulations of a simple mathematical model, parametrized on the basis of our experimental data, verify the empirical results, namely that the observed negative density-dependent dispersal did not have a significant synchronizing effect. PMID:16024345

  3. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  4. Retrieval induces hippocampal-dependent reconsolidation of spatial memory

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R.M.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Nonreinforced retrieval can cause extinction and/or reconsolidation, two processes that affect subsequent retrieval in opposite ways. Using the Morris water maze task we show that, in the rat, repeated nonreinforced expression of spatial memory causes extinction, which is unaffected by inhibition of protein synthesis within the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. However, if the number of nonreinforced retrieval trials is insufficient to induce long-lasting extinction, then a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process recovers the original memory. Inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis after reversal learning sessions impairs retention of the reversed preference and blocks persistence of the original one, suggesting that reversal learning involves reconsolidation rather than extinction of the original memory. Our results suggest the existence of a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process that operates to recover or update retrieval-weakened memories from incomplete extinction. PMID:16882860

  5. Spatial Resolution Dependence of Convective Organization Parameterization in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, I. K.; Chen, B.; Mapes, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the role of convective organization at various spatial resolutions, using a unique parameterization of convective organization ? as a prognostic variable in the Community Atmosphere Model. A unified shallow+deep convection scheme (a N-plume version of the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, currently with N=2) has ? governing the properties and relative contributions of the plumes. Rain evaporation is the main source of convective organization, and the functions of organization within a plume ensemble include 1) plume radius enhancement (entrainment rate reduction) 2) the plume coverage (area or mass) that reaches the Level of Free Convection, and 3) the probabilities of overlap, and thus interactions, between plume ensemble members. Following from previous works (Mapes and Neale 2011, Chen and Mapes 2014), which used constant, linear coefficients to link ? to the aforementioned functions, we test resolution-dependent and spatially-dependent coefficients for these functions to probe, and try to improve, simulations of regional climate systems such as South Asian Summer Monsoon.

  6. Correlated multielectron systems in strong laser fields: A multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Koch, O.; Kreuzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach for the description of correlated few-electron dynamics in the presence of strong laser fields is introduced and a comprehensive description of the method is given. Total ionization and electron spectra for the ground and first excited ionic channels are calculated for one-dimensional model systems with up to six active electrons. Strong correlation effects are found in the shape of photoelectron peaks and the dependence of ionization on molecule size.

  7. Spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses in vivo are strongly dependent on network context

    PubMed Central

    Civillico, Eugene F.; Contreras, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Sensory responses in neocortex are strongly modulated by changes in brain state, such as those observed between sleep stages or attentional levels. However, the specific effects of network state changes on the spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses are poorly understood. The slow oscillation, which is observed in neocortex under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia and is characterized by alternating depolarizing (up-states) and hyperpolarizing (down-states) phases, provides an opportunity to study the state-dependence of primary sensory responses in large networks. Here we used voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to record the spatiotemporal properties of sensory responses and local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) recordings to monitor the ongoing brain state in which the sensory responses occurred. Despite a rich variability of slow oscillation patterns, sensory responses showed a consistent relationship with the ongoing oscillation and triggered a new up-state only after the termination of the refractory period that followed the preceding oscillatory cycle. We show that spatiotemporal properties of whisker-evoked responses are highly dependent on their timing with regard to the ongoing oscillation. In both the up- and down-states, responses spread across large portions of the barrel field, although the up-state responses were reduced in total area due to their sparseness. The depolarizing response in the up-state showed a tendency to propagate along the rows, with an amplitude and slope favoring the higher-numbered arcs. In the up-state, but not in the down-state, the depolarizing response was followed by a hyperpolarizing wave with a consistent spatial structure. We measured the suppression of whisker-evoked responses by a preceding response at 100 ms, and found that suppression showed the same spatial asymmetry as the depolarization. Because the resting level of cells in the up-state is likely to be closer to that in the awake animal, we suggest that the polarities in signal propagation which we observed in the up-state could be used as computational mechanisms in the behaving animal. These results demonstrate the critical importance of ongoing network activity on the dynamics of sensory responses and their integration. PMID:22509158

  8. Spatially resolved x-ray studies of liquid crystals with strongly developed bond-orientational order.

    PubMed

    Zaluzhnyy, I A; Kurta, R P; Sulyanova, E A; Gorobtsov, O Y; Shabalin, A G; Zozulya, A V; Menushenkov, A P; Sprung, M; Ostrovskii, B I; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-04-01

    We present an x-ray study of freely suspended hexatic films of the liquid crystal 3(10)OBC. Our results reveal spatial inhomogeneities of the bond-orientational (BO) order in the vicinity of the hexatic-smectic phase transition and the formation of large-scale hexatic domains at lower temperatures. Deep in the hexatic phase up to 25 successive sixfold BO order parameters have been directly determined by means of angular x-ray cross-correlation analysis (XCCA). Such strongly developed hexatic order allowed us to determine higher order correction terms in the scaling relation predicted by the multicritical scaling theory over a full temperature range of the hexatic phase existence. PMID:25974515

  9. Temporal and spatial manipulation of the recolliding wave packet in strong-field photoelectron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingrui; Li, Yang; Zhou, Yueming; Li, Min; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically demonstrate temporal and spatial manipulation of electron wave packets involved in strong-field photoelectron holography (SFPH) with the orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. By varying the relative phase of the two-color fields, the recollision time of the returning wave packet can be accurately controlled, which allows us to switch off and on the holographic interference. Moreover, the recollision angles of the returning electron wave packet can be arbitrarily controlled via changing the relative intensity of the two-color fields, and thus the structure information of the target is encoded in the hologram by the recollision electron wave packet from different angles. This makes the SFPH a powerful technique of imaging the molecular structure as well as ultrafast dynamics on an attosecond time scale.

  10. Optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy for spatially, temperature, and wavelength dependent refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Joel D.

    A microfluidic refractometer was designed based on previous optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) chips utilized to distinguish healthy and cancerous cells. The optofluidic cavity is realized by adding high reflectivity dielectric mirrors to the top and bottom of a microfluidic channel. This creates a plane-plane Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the resonant wavelengths are highly dependent on the optical path length inside the cavity. Refractometry is a useful method to determine the nature of fluids, including the concentration of a solute in a solvent as well as the temperature of the fluid. Advantages of microfluidic systems are the easy integration with lab-on-chip devices and the need for only small volumes of fluid. The unique abilities of the microfluidic refractometer in this thesis include its spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence. Spatial dependence of the transmission spectrum is inherent through a spatial filtering process implemented with an optical fiber and microscope objective. A sequence of experimental observations guided the change from using the OFIS chip as a cell discrimination device to a complimentary refractometer. First, it was noted the electrode structure within the microfluidic channel, designed to trap and manipulate biological cells with dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, caused the resonant wavelengths to blue-shift when the electrodes were energized. This phenomenon is consistent with the negative dn/dT property of water and water-based solutions. Next, it was necessary to develop a method to separate the optical path length into physical path length and refractive index. Air holes were placed near the microfluidic channel to exclusively measure the cavity length with the known refractive index of air. The cavity length was then interpolated across the microfluidic channel, allowing any mechanical changes to be taken into account. After the separation of physical path length and refractive index, it was of interest to characterize the temperature dependent refractive index relationship, n(T), for phosphate buffered saline. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) is a water-based solution used with our biological cells because it maintains an ion concentration similar to that found in body fluids. The n(T) characterization was performed using a custom-built isothermal apparatus in which the temperature could be controlled. To check for the accuracy of the PBS refractive index measurements, water was also measured and compared with known values in the literature. The literature source of choice has affiliations to NIST and a formulation of refractive index involving temperature and wavelength dependence, two parameters which are necessary for our specialized infrared wavelength range. From the NIST formula, linear approximations were found to be dn/dT = -1.4x10-4 RIU °C-1 and dn/dlambda = -1.5x10-5 RIU nm-1 for water. A comparison with the formulated refractive indices of water indicated the measured values were off. This was attributed to the fact that light penetration into the HfO2/SiO2 dielectric mirrors had not been considered. Once accounted for, the refractive indices of water were consistent with the literature, and the values for PBS are believed to be accurate. A further discovery was the refractive index values at the discrete resonant wavelengths were monotonically decreasing, such that the dn/dlambda slope for water was considerably close to the NIST formula. Thus, n(T,lambda) was characterized for both water and PBS. A refractive index relationship for PBS with spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence is particularly useful for non-uniform temperature distributions caused by DEP electrodes. First, a maximum temperature can be inferred, which is the desired measurement for cell viability concerns. In addition, a lateral refractive index distribution can be measured to help quantify the gradient index lenses that are formed by the energized electrodes. The non-uniform temperature distribution was also simulated with a finite element analysis software package. Th

  11. Spatial dynamics of a population with stage-dependent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, F.; Coutinho, R. M.; Kraenkel, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the spatial dynamics of a population whose individuals go through life stages with very different dispersal capacities. We model it through a system of partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion kind, with nonlinear diffusion terms that may depend on population density and on the stage. This model includes a few key biological ingredients: growth and saturation, life stage structure, small population effects, and diffusion dependent on the stage. In particular, we consider that adults exhibit two distinct classes: one highly mobile and the other less mobile but with higher fecundity rate, and the development of juveniles into one or the other depends on population density. We parametrize the model with estimated parameters of an insect species, the brown planthopper. We focus on a situation akin to an invasion of the species in a new habitat and find that the front of invasion is led by the most mobile adult class. We also show that the trade-off between dispersal and fecundity leads to invasion speed attaining its maximum at an intermediate value of the diffusion coefficient of the most mobile class.

  12. Urban Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Neighborhoods: An Examination of Spatial Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Judith K.; Lambert, Sharon F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatial dependence exists when the variation between observations is dependent on spatial location. In the present study, geostatistical methods were used to examine spatial dependence in adolescents' perceptions of their neighborhoods: whether adolescents living in close proximity perceived their neighborhoods more similarly than adolescents…

  13. Wavelength dependence of light diffusion in strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, W. H.; Vellekoop, I. M.; Mosk, A. P.; Lagendijk, A.

    2008-03-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of light transport through strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide at various vacuum wavelengths between 705 nm and 855 nm. Within this range the transport mean free path is strongly wavelength dependent, whereas the observed energy velocity is shown to be independent of the wavelength. We conclude that microscopic resonances, which can strongly slow down the diffusion process in, e.g., granular TiO2 , are absent in macroporous gallium phosphide in the wavelength region of concern.

  14. Spatial Visualization Abilities of Field Dependent/Independent Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Ersen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Spatial skills have been a significant area of research in educational psychology for more years and it has two major dimensions as spatial visualization and spatial orientation. Mathematics educators acknowledge the influence of cognitive styles in the learning of mathematics. There are various recognized cognitive styles in the…

  15. Spatial Visualization Abilities of Field Dependent/Independent Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Ersen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Spatial skills have been a significant area of research in educational psychology for more years and it has two major dimensions as spatial visualization and spatial orientation. Mathematics educators acknowledge the influence of cognitive styles in the learning of mathematics. There are various recognized cognitive styles in the…

  16. Exchange and spin states in quantum dots under strong spatial correlations. Computer simulation by the Feynman path integral method

    SciTech Connect

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2013-10-15

    The fundamental laws in the behavior of electrons in model quantum dots that are caused by exchange and strong Coulomb correlations are studied. The ab initio path integral method is used to numerically simulate systems of two, three, four, and six interacting identical electrons confined in a three-dimensional spherical potential well with a parabolic confining potential against the background of thermal fluctuations. The temperature dependences of spin and collective spin magnetic susceptibility are calculated for model quantum dots of various spatial sizes. A basically exact procedure is proposed for taking into account the permutation symmetry and the spin state of electrons, which makes it possible to perform numerical calculations using modern computer facilities. The conditions of applicability of a virial energy estimator and its optimum form in exchange systems are determined. A correlation estimator of kinetic energy, which is an alternative to a basic estimator, is suggested. A fundamental relation between the kinetic energy of a quantum particle and the character of its virtual diffusion in imaginary time is demonstrated. The process of natural 'pairing' of electron spins during the compression of a quantum dot and cooling of a system is numerically reproduced in terms of path integrals. The temperature dependences of the spin magnetic susceptibility of electron pairs with a characteristic maximum caused by spin pairing are obtained.

  17. Exchange and spin states in quantum dots under strong spatial correlations. Computer simulation by the Feynman path integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    The fundamental laws in the behavior of electrons in model quantum dots that are caused by exchange and strong Coulomb correlations are studied. The ab initio path integral method is used to numerically simulate systems of two, three, four, and six interacting identical electrons confined in a three-dimensional spherical potential well with a parabolic confining potential against the background of thermal fluctuations. The temperature dependences of spin and collective spin magnetic susceptibility are calculated for model quantum dots of various spatial sizes. A basically exact procedure is proposed for taking into account the permutation symmetry and the spin state of electrons, which makes it possible to perform numerical calculations using modern computer facilities. The conditions of applicability of a virial energy estimator and its optimum form in exchange systems are determined. A correlation estimator of kinetic energy, which is an alternative to a basic estimator, is suggested. A fundamental relation between the kinetic energy of a quantum particle and the character of its virtual diffusion in imaginary time is demonstrated. The process of natural "pairing" of electron spins during the compression of a quantum dot and cooling of a system is numerically reproduced in terms of path integrals. The temperature dependences of the spin magnetic susceptibility of electron pairs with a characteristic maximum caused by spin pairing are obtained.

  18. Spatial dependency of trapezius muscle activity during repetitive shoulder flexion.

    PubMed

    Falla, D; Farina, D; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in spatial muscle activation within the three divisions of the trapezius muscle during a dynamic, cyclic task of the upper limb. Surface EMG signals were detected from thirteen healthy subjects from the upper, middle and lower divisions of the trapezius muscle at multiple electrode sites in the cephalad-caudal direction during a repetitive shoulder flexion task. Initial values and rate of change of average rectified value (ARV) and of instantaneous mean power spectral frequency (iMNF) were estimated at 45 degrees , 90 degrees and 120 degrees of shoulder flexion throughout the 5-min task. The location of the electrodes had a significant effect on initial EMG ARV for both the upper and middle division of the trapezius muscle (P<0.05). Both the rate of change and normalized rate of change of ARV were greatest for the most cranial muscle fibers of the upper division (P<0.05). Initial values and rates of change of iMNF were also affected by electrode location for the upper and lower divisions of the trapezius muscle (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that muscle activity and its changes over time depend on position within the three divisions of the trapezius muscle during a dynamic, cyclic task of the upper limb. This suggests non-uniform muscle fiber distribution and/or recruitment. The results also highlight the importance of multiple recording sites when investigating trapezius muscle function in dynamic tasks. PMID:16740396

  19. Modeling Spatial Dependencies in High-Resolution Overhead Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bright, Eddie A; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Human settlement regions with different physical and socio-economic attributes exhibit unique spatial characteristics that are often illustrated in high-resolution overhead imageries. For example- size, shape and spatial arrangements of man-made structures are key attributes that vary with respect to the socioeconomic profile of the neighborhood. Successfully modeling these attributes is crucial in developing advanced image understanding systems for interpreting complex aerial scenes. In this paper we present three different approaches to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. First, we show that the frequency domain of the image can be used to model the spatial context [1]. The shape of the spectral energy contours characterize the scene context and can be exploited as global features. Secondly, we explore a discriminative framework based on the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) [2] to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. The features derived from the edge orientation distribution calculated for a neighborhood and the associated class labels are used as input features to model the spatial context. Our third approach is based on grouping spatially connected pixels based on the low-level edge primitives to form support-regions [3]. The statistical parameters generated from the support-region feature distributions characterize different geospatial neighborhoods. We apply our approaches on high-resolution overhead imageries. We show that proposed approaches characterize the spatial context in overhead imageries.

  20. A matrix-dependent transfer multigrid method for strongly variable viscosity infinite Prandtl number thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Woo-Sun; Baumgardner, John R.

    We apply a two-dimensional Cartesian finite element treatment to investigate infinite Prandtl number thermal convection with temperature, strain rate and yield stress dependent rheology using parameters in the range estimated for the mantles of the terrestrial planets. To handle the strong viscosity variations that arise from such nonlinear rheology in solving the momentum equation, we exploit a multigrid method based on matrix-dependent intergrid transfer and the Galerkin coarse grid approximation. We observe that the matrix-dependent transfer algorithm provides an exceptionally robust and efficient means for solving convection problems with extreme viscosity gradients. Our algorithm displays a convergence rate per multigrid cycle about five times better than what other published methods (e.g., CITCOM of Moresi and Solomatov, 1995) offer for cases with similar extreme viscosity variation. The algorithm is explained in detail in this paper. When this method is applied to problems with temperature and strain rate dependent rheologies, we obtain strongly time dependent solutions characterized by episodic avalanching of cold material from the upper boundary layer to the bottom of the convecting domain for a significantly broad range of parameter values. In particular, we observe this behavior for the relatively simple case of temperature dependent Newtonian rheology with a plastic yield stress. The intensity and temporal character of the episodic behavior depends sensitively on the yield stress value. The regions most strongly affected by the yield stress are thickened portions of the cold upper boundary layer which can suddenly become unstable and form downgoing diapirs. These computational results suggest that the finite yield properties of silicate rocks must play a vitally important role in planetary mantle dynamics. Although our example calculations were selected mainly to illustrate the power of our multigrid method, they suggest that many possible exotic behaviors in planetary mantles have yet to be discovered.

  1. Spatial Distribution and Extent of Electroporation by Strong Internal Shock in Intact Structurally Normal and Chronically Infarcted Rabbit Hearts

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SEOK C.; VASANJI, AMIT; EFIMOV, IGOR R.; CHENG, YUANNA

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Although life-saving, a strong internal defibrillation shock may temporarily or permanently damage the heart via disruption of cell membranes (electroporation). Spatial extent of electroporation in intact, normal, or infarcted hearts has not been investigated. In this study, shock-induced electroporation in intact rabbit hearts with and without chronic (>4 weeks) left ventricular myocardial infarction (MI) was characterized. Methods and Results A coil shock electrode was inserted in the right ventricle of Langendorff-perfused hearts. One truncated exponential monophasic shock (+300 V, 8 ms) was delivered by a 150 ?F capacitor clinical defibrillator while the heart was perfused with membrane-impermeant dye propidium iodide (PI). The heart was sectioned transversely, and uptake of PI into ventricular myocardium through electropores was quantified. Histological evaluation was performed via Masson’s trichrome staining. PI accumulation was minimal in the control (n = 3) and MI (n = 3) hearts without shock. Following shock delivery, (1) in control (n = 5) and MI (n = 5) hearts, electroporation mostly occurred near the shock electrode and was longitudinally distributed along the active region of the shock electrode; (2) in MI group, electroporation was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the surviving anterior epicardial layers of the infarcted region; and (3) between the control and MI groups, the overall extent of electroporation was similar. Conclusion Shock-induced electroporation was spatially dependent on the location and dimension of the active region of the shock electrode. The overall extent of electroporation in the MI heart was comparable with the control heart, but the surviving anterior epicardial layers in the infarcted region were more susceptible to electroporation. PMID:18479336

  2. Pulse-shape-dependent strong-field ionization viewed with velocity-map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus

    2011-11-15

    We explore strong field molecular ionization with velocity map imaging of fragment ions produced by dissociation following ionization. Our measurements and ab initio electronic structure calculations allow us to identify various electronic states of the molecular cation populated during ionization, with multiple pathways to individual states highlighted by the pulse shape dependence. In addition, we show that relative populations can be reconstructed from our measurements. The results illustrate how strong field molecular ionization can be complicated by the presence and interaction of multiple cationic states during ionization.

  3. A spatially filtered multilevel model to account for spatial dependency: application to self-rated health status in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to suggest an approach that integrates multilevel models and eigenvector spatial filtering methods and apply it to a case study of self-rated health status in South Korea. In many previous health-related studies, multilevel models and single-level spatial regression are used separately. However, the two methods should be used in conjunction because the objectives of both approaches are important in health-related analyses. The multilevel model enables the simultaneous analysis of both individual and neighborhood factors influencing health outcomes. However, the results of conventional multilevel models are potentially misleading when spatial dependency across neighborhoods exists. Spatial dependency in health-related data indicates that health outcomes in nearby neighborhoods are more similar to each other than those in distant neighborhoods. Spatial regression models can address this problem by modeling spatial dependency. This study explores the possibility of integrating a multilevel model and eigenvector spatial filtering, an advanced spatial regression for addressing spatial dependency in datasets. Methods In this spatially filtered multilevel model, eigenvectors function as additional explanatory variables accounting for unexplained spatial dependency within the neighborhood-level error. The specification addresses the inability of conventional multilevel models to account for spatial dependency, and thereby, generates more robust outputs. Results The findings show that sex, employment status, monthly household income, and perceived levels of stress are significantly associated with self-rated health status. Residents living in neighborhoods with low deprivation and a high doctor-to-resident ratio tend to report higher health status. The spatially filtered multilevel model provides unbiased estimations and improves the explanatory power of the model compared to conventional multilevel models although there are no changes in the signs of parameters and the significance levels between the two models in this case study. Conclusions The integrated approach proposed in this paper is a useful tool for understanding the geographical distribution of self-rated health status within a multilevel framework. In future research, it would be useful to apply the spatially filtered multilevel model to other datasets in order to clarify the differences between the two models. It is anticipated that this integrated method will also out-perform conventional models when it is used in other contexts. PMID:24571639

  4. Spatial distribution of strong and weak coupled exciton polaritons in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Dario; Amo, Alberto; Sanvitto, Daniele; Viña, Luis; Skolnick, Maurice; Roberts, John

    2008-04-01

    The coexistence of polaritons in different coupling regimes inside the same excited area is experimentally studied in InGaAs semiconductor microcavities by means of spatially and time-resolved photoluminescence. Different positions inside the spot are selected with a resolution of 10 ?m in order to analyze the spatial distribution of polaritons, which present different emission energies. Island with a high density of polaritons are present at every scanned position and their spatial distribution follows the Gaussian profile of the excitation intensity.

  5. Force- and kinesin-8-dependent effects in the spatial regulation of fission yeast microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Christian; Brunner, Damian; Dogterom, Marileen

    2009-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are central to the organisation of the eukaryotic intracellular space and are involved in the control of cell morphology. For these purposes, MT polymerisation dynamics are tightly regulated. Using automated image analysis software, we investigate the spatial dependence of MT dynamics in interphase fission yeast cells with unprecedented statistical accuracy. We find that MT catastrophe frequencies (switches from polymerisation to depolymerisation) strongly depend on intracellular position. We provide evidence that compressive forces generated by MTs growing against the cell pole locally reduce MT growth velocities and enhance catastrophe frequencies. Furthermore, we find evidence for an MT length-dependent increase in the catastrophe frequency that is mediated by kinesin-8 proteins (Klp5/6). Given the intrinsic susceptibility of MT dynamics to compressive forces and the widespread importance of kinesin-8 proteins, we propose that similar spatial regulation of MT dynamics plays a role in other cell types as well. In addition, our systematic and quantitative data should provide valuable input for (mathematical) models of MT organisation in living cells. PMID:19293830

  6. Time-dependent many-variable variational Monte Carlo method for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We develop a time-dependent variational Monte Carlo (t-VMC) method for quantum dynamics of strongly correlated electrons. The t-VMC method has been recently applied to bosonic systems and quantum spin systems. Here we propose a time-dependent trial wave function with many variational parameters, which is suitable for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems. As the trial state, we adopt the generalized pair-product wave function with correlation factors and quantum-number projections. This trial wave function has been proven to accurately describe ground states of strongly correlated electron systems. To show the accuracy and efficiency of our trial wave function in nonequilibrium states as well, we present our benchmark results for relaxation dynamics during and after interaction quench protocols of fermionic Hubbard models. We find that our trial wave function well reproduces the exact results for the time evolution of physical quantities such as energy, momentum distribution, spin structure factor, and superconducting correlations. These results show that the t-VMC with our trial wave function offers an efficient and accurate way to study challenging problems of nonequilibrium dynamics in strongly correlated electron systems.

  7. Strong Gravitational Lens Modeling with Spatially Variant Point-spread Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-12-01

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  8. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH SPATIALLY VARIANT POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D.

    2011-12-10

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  9. Luminosity Dependence and Redshift Evolution of Strong Emission-Line Diagnostics in Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Songaila, A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the redshift evolution of standard strong emission-line diagnostics for Hβ-selected star-forming galaxies using the local SDSS sample and a new z=0.2{--}2.3 sample obtained from Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 grism and Keck DEIMOS and MOSFIRE data. We use the SDSS galaxies to show that there is a systematic dependence of the strong emission-line properties on Balmer-line luminosity, which we interpret as showing that both the N/O abundance and the ionization parameter increase with increasing line luminosity. Allowing for the luminosity dependence tightens the diagnostic diagrams and the metallicity calibrations. The combined SDSS and high-redshift samples show that there is no redshift evolution in the line properties once the luminosity correction is applied, i.e., all galaxies with a given L({{H}}β ) have similar strong emission-line distributions at all the observed redshifts. We argue that the best metal diagnostic for the high-redshift galaxies may be a luminosity-adjusted version of the [N ii]6584/Hα metallicity relation. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Retrieval Induces Hippocampal-Dependent Reconsolidation of Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossato, Janine I.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Nonreinforced retrieval can cause extinction and/or reconsolidation, two processes that affect subsequent retrieval in opposite ways. Using the Morris water maze task we show that, in the rat, repeated nonreinforced expression of spatial memory causes extinction, which is unaffected by inhibition of protein synthesis within the CA1 region of the…

  11. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey; Daughton, W; Yin, L

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  12. The combination of vision and touch depends on spatial proximity

    PubMed Central

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Burge, Johannes; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    The nervous system often combines visual and haptic information about object properties such that the combined estimate is more precise than with vision or haptics alone. We examined how the system determines when to combine the signals. Presumably, signals should not be combined when they come from different objects. The likelihood that signals come from different objects is highly correlated with the spatial separation between the signals, so we asked how the spatial separation between visual and haptic signals affects their combination. To do this, we first created conditions for each observer in which the effect of combination—the increase in discrimination precision with two modalities relative to performance with one modality—should be maximal. Then under these conditions, we presented visual and haptic stimuli separated by different spatial distances and compared human performance with predictions of a model that combined signals optimally. We found that discrimination precision was essentially optimal when the signals came from the same location, and that discrimination precision was poorer when the signals came from different locations. Thus, the mechanism of visual-haptic combination is specialized for signals that coincide in space. PMID:16441199

  13. Universal pulse dependence of the low-energy structure in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Diesen, Elias; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Xu, Junliang; Gorman, Timothy T.; Légaré, Françis; Saalmann, Ulf; Agostini, Pierre; Rost, Jan M.; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-02-01

    We determine quantitatively the laser pulse duration dependence of the low-energy structure (LES) in strong-field atomic ionization and establish its universal character. The electron energy measurement is performed on krypton and argon by varying the duration of a 1.8 μ m midinfrared pulse from two to ten cycles. Comparing the experiment with analytical and numerical results, the soft-recollision mechanism leading to electron momentum bunching is confirmed as the origin of the LES. The universal behavior of the LES peak energy on pulse duration emerges from an analytical description as a product of two factors: one contains the influence of the laser parameters and the target, while the other one describes the pulse duration dependence in terms of optical cycles.

  14. Strong pressure-dependent electron-phonon coupling in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Subhasish; Cohen, R. E.; Haule, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have computed the correlated electronic structure of FeSe and its dependence on the A1g mode versus compression. Using the self-consistent density functional theory-dynamical mean field theory (DFT-DMFT) with continuous time quantum Monte Carlo, we find that there is greatly enhanced coupling between some correlated electron states and the A1g lattice distortion. Superconductivity in FeSe shows a very strong sensitivity to pressure, with an increase in Tc of almost a factor of 5 within a few GPa, followed by a drop, despite monotonic pressure dependence of almost all electronic properties. We find that the maximum A1g deformation potential behaves similar to the experimental Tc. In contrast, the maximum deformation potential in DFT for this mode increases monotonically with increasing pressure.

  15. Strong Spatial Influence on Colonization Rates in a Pioneer Zooplankton Metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Dagmar; Cottenie, Karl; Badosa, Anna; Green, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude of community-wide dispersal is central to metacommunity models, yet dispersal is notoriously difficult to quantify in passive and cryptic dispersers such as many freshwater invertebrates. By overcoming the problem of quantifying dispersal rates, colonization rates into new habitats can provide a useful estimate of the magnitude of effective dispersal. Here we study the influence of spatial and local processes on colonization rates into new ponds that indicate differential dispersal limitation of major zooplankton taxa, with important implications for metacommunity dynamics. We identify regional and local factors that affect zooplankton colonization rates and spatial patterns in a large-scale experimental system. Our study differs from others in the unique setup of the experimental pond area by which we were able to test spatial and environmental variables at a large spatial scale. We quantified colonization rates separately for the Copepoda, Cladocera and Rotifera from samples collected over a period of 21 months in 48 newly constructed temporary ponds of 0.18–2.95 ha distributed in a restored wetland area of 2,700 ha in Doñana National Park, Southern Spain. Species richness upon initial sampling of new ponds was about one third of that in reference ponds, although the rate of detection of new species from thereon were not significantly different, probably owing to high turnover in the dynamic, temporary reference ponds. Environmental heterogeneity had no detectable effect on colonization rates in new ponds. In contrast, connectivity, space (based on latitude and longitude) and surface area were key determinants of colonization rates for copepods and cladocerans. This suggests dispersal limitation in cladocerans and copepods, but not in rotifers, possibly due to differences in propagule size and abundance. PMID:22792241

  16. INCLINATION-DEPENDENT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FLUX PROFILES FROM STRONG LENSING OF THE KERR SPACETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.

    2013-01-10

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the X-ray emission sizes of quasars to be about 10 gravitational radii, one order of magnitude smaller than the optical emission sizes. Using a new ray-tracing code for the Kerr spacetime, we find that the observed X-ray flux is strongly influenced by the gravity field of the central black hole, even for observers at moderate inclination angles. We calculate inclination-dependent flux profiles of active galactic nuclei in the optical and X-ray bands by combining the Kerr lensing and projection effects for future reference. We further study the dependence of the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio on the inclination angle caused by differential lensing distortion of the X-ray and optical emission, assuming several corona geometries. The strong lensing X-ray-to-optical magnification ratio can change by a factor of {approx}10 for normal quasars in some cases, and a further factor of {approx}10 for broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and obscured quasars. Comparing our results with the observed distributions in normal and BAL quasars, we find that the inclination angle dependence of the magnification ratios can significantly change the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio distributions. In particular, the mean value of the spectrum slope parameter {alpha}{sub ox}, 0.3838log F {sub 2keV}/F {sub 2500A}, can differ by {approx}0.1-0.2 between normal and BAL quasars, depending on corona geometries, suggesting larger intrinsic absorptions in BAL quasars.

  17. Subsurface water flow simulated for hill slopes with spatially dependent soil hydraulic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; DeAngelis, R.; Ward, R.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    Water flow through hill slopes consisting of five soil layers, with varying spatial dependence in hydraulic characteristics in the lateral plane was simulated by solving Richards' equation in three dimensions under varying rainfall intensities and for two complexities of terrain. By concepts of similar media the variability in soil hydraulic characteristics was expressed by a single dimensionless parameter, the scaling factor ..cap alpha... The moments of log normally distributed ..cap alpha.. were set as: Mean = 1.0 and standard deviation = 1.0. Four cases of spatial dependence of ..cap alpha.. in the lateral plane were selected for simulation, using exponential variogram functions ranging in spatial structure from random (no spatial dependence) to large dependence (large correlation lengths). The simulations showed that the rates of subsurface flow from the 30/sup 0/ hillslope, during and following rainfall, were significantly enhanced with an increase in spatial dependence. Subsurface drainage was also increased with increases in rainfall intensity and slop complexity. For hill slopes the relative effects of spatial dependence in soil hydraulic characteristics was smaller with 30/sup 0/ horizontal pitching than without pitching. Hill slopes with a random distribution of hydraulic characteristics provided greater opportunity for soil units with differing water capacities to interact than in cases with spatially correlated distributions. This greater interaction is associated with a greater lag in subsurface flow generation. These studies illustrate some of the expected effects of spatial dependence of soil hydraulic characteristics of the integrated hydrologic response of land areas.

  18. [Dependence of "macroscopic fluctuations" from cosmophysical factors. Spatial anisotropy].

    PubMed

    Shnol', S E; Zenchenko, K I; Berulis, I I; Udal'tsova, N V; Zhirkov, S S; RubinshteÄ­n, I A

    2004-01-01

    It was shown in experiments with collimators that the changes with time in the shape of histograms constructed from the measurements of the alpha-activity of 239Pu microsamples depend on the direction of the flow alpha-particles. If the flow of alpha-particles was directed to the Polar Star, the dependence of the probability of the realization of histograms of similar shape on time disappeared. The measurements of alpha-particle flows directed to the East and West revealed a high probability of the repeated realization of histograms of similar shape in 1436 min, i.e., in a sederal day. A comparison of "west" and "east" histograms showed a high probability of the realization of similar "west" histograms 718 min (half a sideral day) later than "east" histograms. The results suggest that the shape of histograms depends on the pattern of the starry sky and the space-time inhomogeneity corresponding to this pattern. PMID:15029729

  19. GMM and 2SLS estimation of panel data models with spatially lagged dependent variables and spatially correlated error components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Bao, Shuming; Zhu, Pingfang

    2007-06-01

    In this article, the GMM based estimation of a typical family of spatial panel models with spatially lagged dependent variables and error components that are both spatially and time-wise correlated is addressed. We derive the best GMM (BGMM) estimator within certain class of optimal GMM estimators. We also discuss the asymptotic efficiency of BGMM estimator relative to the panel analogue of generalized spatial two stage least squares (GS2SLS) estimators and maximum likelihood (ML) estimators. We show that by including GS2SLS estimators as a special case, the BGMM estimator is generally more efficient than GS2SLS estimator and able to be as efficient as ML estimator under normality.

  20. Stimulus-dependent effects on tactile spatial acuity

    PubMed Central

    Tannan, V; Dennis, RG; Tommerdahl, M

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that spatio-tactile acuity is influenced by the clarity of the cortical response in primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Stimulus characteristics such as frequency, amplitude, and location of tactile stimuli presented to the skin have been shown to have a significant effect on the response in SI. The present study observes the effect of changing stimulus parameters of 25 Hz sinusoidal vertical skin displacement stimulation ("flutter") on a human subject's ability to discriminate between two adjacent or near-adjacent skin sites. Based on results obtained from recent neurophysiological studies of the SI response to different conditions of vibrotactile stimulation, we predicted that the addition of 200 Hz vibration to the same site that a two-point flutter stimulus was delivered on the skin would improve a subject's spatio-tactile acuity over that measured with flutter alone. Additionally, similar neurophysiological studies predict that the presence of either a 25 Hz flutter or 200 Hz vibration stimulus on the unattended hand (on the opposite side of the body from the site of two-point limen testing – the condition of bilateral stimulation – which has been shown to evoke less SI cortical activity than the contralateral-only stimulus condition) would decrease a subject's ability to discriminate between two points on the skin. Results A Bekesy tracking method was employed to track a subject's ability to discriminate between two-point stimuli delivered to the skin. The distance between the two points of stimulation was varied on a trial-by-trial basis, and several different stimulus conditions were examined: (1) The "control" condition, in which 25 Hz flutter stimuli were delivered simultaneously to the two points on the skin of the attended hand, (2) the "complex" condition, in which a combination of 25 Hz flutter and 200 Hz vibration stimuli were delivered to the two points on the attended hand, and (3) a "bilateral" condition, in which 25 Hz flutter was delivered to the two points on the attended hand and a second stimulus (either flutter or vibration) was delivered to the unattended hand. The two-point limen was reduced (i.e., spatial acuity was improved) under the complex stimulus condition when compared to the control stimulus condition. Specifically, whereas adding vibration to the unilateral two-point flutter stimulus improved spatial acuity by 20 to 25%, the two-point limen was not significantly affected by substantial changes in stimulus amplitude (between 100 – 200 ?m). In contrast, simultaneous stimulation of the unattended hand (contralateral to the attended site), impaired spatial acuity by 20% with flutter stimulation and by 30% with vibration stimulation. Conclusion It was found that the addition of 200 Hz vibration to a two-point 25 Hz flutter stimulus significantly improved a subject's ability to discriminate between two points on the skin. Since previous studies showed that 200 Hz vibration preferentially evokes activity in cortical area SII and reduces or inhibits the spatial extent of activity in SI in the same hemisphere, the findings in this paper raise the possibility that although SI activity plays a major role in two-point discrimination on the skin, influences relayed to SI from SII in the same hemisphere may contribute importantly to SI's ability to differentially respond to stimuli applied to closely spaced skin points on the same side of the body midline. PMID:16216121

  1. Spatial dependence of color assimilation by the watercolor effect

    PubMed Central

    Devinck, Frédéric; Delahunt, Peter B; Hardy, Joseph L; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2008-01-01

    Color assimilation with bichromatic contours was quantified for spatial extents ranging from von Bezold-type color assimilation to the watercolor effect. The magnitude and direction of assimilative hue change was measured as a function of the width of a rectangular stimulus. Assimilation was quantified by hue cancellation. Large hue shifts were required to null the color of stimuli ? 9.3 min of arc in width, with an exponential decrease for stimuli increasing up to 7.4 deg. When stimuli were viewed through an achromatizing lens, the magnitude of the assimilation effect was reduced for narrow stimuli, but not for wide ones. These results demonstrate that chromatic aberration may account, in part, for color assimilation over small, but not large, surface areas. PMID:16700289

  2. Spatially dependent heating and ionization: From CME to ICME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, S. T.; Laming, J.; Rakowski, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    The January 21st 2005 Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) observed by multiple spacecraft at L1 was also observed further out in the heliosphere at Ulysses (~3.25 AU). Previous multi-spacecraft studies of this ICME found evidence suggesting that the flanks of a magnetic cloud like structure associated with this ICME were observed at L1 while a more central cut through the associated magnetic cloud was observed at Ulysses. This event presents a unique opportunity to study the spatial variation of the ionic composition contained within a single ICME and relate it to the eruption at the Sun. Using SWICS, we compare and contrast the heavy ion composition across the two different observations cuts through the ICME. We will compare the results from ACE and Ulysses with predictions from ionization models in the corona and with remote observations of phenomena indicative of electron heating in the inner corona.

  3. Spatial phase dependence in motion mechanisms serving Ocular Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Meso, Andrew Isaac; Masson, Guillaume S

    2015-09-01

    The fast, reflexive Ocular Following Response to large field motion (OFR) is thought to be driven by low level motion energy computation. When moving images contain broadband spatial frequencies, localised interactions between them can result in features like edges. Spatial phase invariant motion energy models should remain agnostic to such features. Here, we tested that assumption considering OFR as highly sensitive to contrast and total energy. We sought to create well controlled phase-varied stimuli to probe differences in the eye speed of human volunteers recorded with a video eye tracker over a 250ms task epoch from stimulus onset. We exploited Phase Congruency (PC): a dimensionless measure of the localised alignment of sinusoidal luminance components at different scales. PC is proportional to local luminance energy, normalised by the sum of the local amplitudes of the separate composite frequencies, making it awkward to compute and susceptible to noise. We used dynamic luminance noise textures as stimuli and exploited published PC estimation methods implemented with appropriately adjusted filters and sensitivity parameters (Morrone & Burr, 1988, Proc.Roy.Soc.B 235:221-245; Kovesi, 2000 Psych. Res 64:136-148). We ranked 250 stimulus cases based on PC repeating this to build a test bank of 2-6 octave bandwidth stimuli. Parameterised movies running from low to high phase coherence were used in an OFR task with trials containing motion at 24deg/s preceded by a centralising saccade. For the narrower (2 octave) bandwidth there was no difference in eye traces over the 250ms. Stronger responses for high-PC stimuli emerged after 140ms for images with over 3 octaves of bandwidth, relatively late in a computation with an 80ms latency from onset. The early 60ms is consistent with motion energy computation; phase sensitivity emerges later possibly from a dynamic accumulation of broadband signals necessary for the neural implementation of a separate motion feature sensitive process. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325904

  4. Spatial resolution of the volume emission coefficient in strongly self-absorbing sources of cylindrical symmetry.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, J W; Oss, J P

    1968-08-01

    It is shown that the equations relating the radial profiles of the volume emission and absorption coefficients to the transmission and emitted intensity profiles in self-absorbing cylindrically symmetric sources, can be written in such a way that the problem of spatially resolving the volume emission coefficient gives rise to a Volterra integral equation of the second kind in a standard form. The theory of equations of this type is invoked to show the formal convergence of an iterative solution to the problem, subject only to a finite transmission and bounded slope to the absorption coefficient. A prescription for applying this iterative procedure is given that involves a series of numerical integrations and Abel inversions, and the convergence of some numerical solutions is demonstrated. PMID:20068850

  5. Runoff source or sink? Biocrust hydrological function strongly depends on the relative abundance of mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, M. A.; Eldridge, D. J.; Maestre, F. T.

    2012-04-01

    The redistribution of water in semi-arid environments is critical for overall ecosystem productivity. To a large degree, ecosystem engineers may determine the redistribution of water. Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are one such group of ecosystem engineers. Their effects on infiltration have been somewhat controversial, varying from place to place and ranging from strongly positive to strongly negative. In addition, they coexist with and are modified by additional ecosystem engineers. We used a systems approach to examine the interactive effects of multiple engineers on infiltration processes across two analogous sets of interactors. First in Spain, we examined interactions among Stipa tenacissima, biocrusts, and the European rabbit; and in Australia, the interaction between biocrusts and the bilby (a rabbit-like marsupial). We focused on the effects of particular community properties of biocrusts such as species richness, total cover, species composition, and spatial patterning to characterize their variable effects on infiltration. We measured the early (sorptivity) and later (steady-state infiltration) stages of infiltration at two supply potentials using disk permeameters, which allowed us to determine the relative effects of different engineers and soil micropores on water flow through large macropores. In the Spanish case, structural equation modeling showed that both Stipa and biocrust cover exerted substantial and equal positive effects on infiltration under ponding, whereas indirectly, rabbit disturbance negatively affected infiltration by reducing crust cover; rabbits had negligible direct effects. The biocrust influence could be partitioned roughly equally between total cover and composition. All lichen species were negatively related to infiltration and almost all mosses were positively related to infiltration. In the Australian study, bilby forage pits had a direct and strong positive influence on steady state infiltration under ponding and most infiltration variables, and moderate effects on biocrust properties. Biocrust total cover and composition were again the most influential of biocrust community properties on infiltration, especially in the case of the composition effect on steady state infiltration under ponding. The key difference was that the Australian biocrusts primarily decreased infiltration. On dune runoff zones, later successional biocrusts (lichens, mosses, dark cyanobacterial crusts) of any type decreased infiltration rates compared to early successional crusts. On swale run-on zones, lichens impeded infiltration and mosses did not. These results highlight the importance of biocrusts as key players in the redistribution of water, and demonstrate the modulating role played by animal ecosystem engineers through their localized surface disturbances. Our studies highlight the central role of the relative abundance of mosses compared to other biocrust organisms as an underappreciated, and perhaps a key, determinant of biocrust hydrology.

  6. Gauge dependence of the strong-field approximation: Theory vs. experiment for photodetachment of F -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazibegovi?-Busuladži?, A.; Miloševi?, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2007-07-01

    The dependence of the strong-field approximation on the gauge used for the description of the driving laser field is reviewed in connection with the choice of the initial bound state of the unperturbed atom or ion. Electron energy spectra are calculated for the various combinations of gauge and wave function and compared with experimental data for photodetachment of F - by a circularly polarized laser field [B. Bergues, Y. Ni, H. Helm, I. Yu. Kiyan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 263002]. If the laser intensity is considered a fitting parameter, then our length-gauge results reproduce the experimental results very well. In contrast, in velocity gauge no satisfactory fit can be obtained for any intensity.

  7. Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Spatial Resolution Dependence of Precipitation Extremes in Aquaplanet Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the resolution dependency of precipitation extremes in an aqua-planet framework. Strong resolution dependency of precipitation extremes is seen over both tropics and extra-tropics, and the magnitude of this dependency also varies with dynamical cores. Moisture budget analyses based on aqua-planet simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores but the same physics parameterizations suggest that during precipitation extremes moisture supply for surface precipitation is mainly derived from advective moisture convergence. The resolution dependency of precipitation extremes mainly originates from advective moisture transport in the vertical direction. At most vertical levels over the tropics and in the lower atmosphere over the subtropics, the vertical eddy transport of mean moisture field dominates the contribution to precipitation extremes and its resolution dependency. Over the subtropics, the source of moisture, its associated energy, and the resolution dependency during extremes are dominated by eddy transport of eddies moisture at the mid- and upper-troposphere. With both MPAS and HOMME dynamical cores, the resolution dependency of the vertical advective moisture convergence is mainly explained by dynamical changes (related to vertical velocity or omega), although the vertical gradients of moisture act like averaging kernels to determine the sensitivity of the overall resolution dependency to the changes in omega at different vertical levels. The natural reduction of variability with coarser resolution, represented by areal data averaging (aggregation) effect, largely explains the resolution dependency in omega. The thermodynamic changes, which likely result from non-linear feedback in response to the large dynamical changes, are small compared to the overall changes in dynamics (omega). However, after excluding the data aggregation effect in omega, thermodynamic changes become relatively significant in offsetting the effect of dynamics leading to reduce differences between the simulated and aggregated results. Compared to MPAS, the simulated stronger vertical motion with HOMME also results in larger resolution dependency. Compared to the simulation at fine resolution, the vertical motion during extremes is insufficiently resolved/parameterized at the coarser resolution even after accounting for the natural reduction in variability with coarser resolution, and this is more distinct in the simulation with HOMME. To reduce uncertainties in simulated precipitation extremes, future development in cloud parameterizations must address their sensitivity to spatial resolution as well as dynamical cores.

  8. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  9. Spatial, Temporal, and Density-Dependent Components of Habitat Quality for a Desert Owl

    PubMed Central

    Flesch, Aaron D.; Hutto, Richard L.; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches that consider habitat resources, stochastic factors, and conspecifics are necessary to accurately assess habitat quality. PMID:25786257

  10. Spatial, temporal, and density-dependent components of habitat quality for a desert owl.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Aaron D; Hutto, Richard L; van Leeuwen, Willem J D; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches that consider habitat resources, stochastic factors, and conspecifics are necessary to accurately assess habitat quality. PMID:25786257

  11. Federal state differentials in the efficiency of health production in Germany: an artifact of spatial dependence?

    PubMed

    Felder, Stefan; Tauchmann, Harald

    2013-02-01

    Due to regional competition and patient migration, the efficiency of healthcare provision at the regional level is subject to spatial dependence. We address this issue by applying a spatial autoregressive model to longitudinal data from Germany at the district ('Kreis') level. The empirical model is specified to explain efficiency scores, which we derive through non-parametric order-m efficiency analysis of regional health production. The focus is on the role of health policy of federal states ('Bundesländer') for district efficiency. Regression results reveal significant spatial spillover effects. Notably, accounting for spatial dependence does not decrease but increases the estimated effect of federal states on district efficiency. It appears that genuinely more efficient states are less affected by positive efficiency spillovers, so that taking into account spatial dependence clarifies the importance of health policy at the state level. PMID:21901473

  12. Linear wave equations with time-dependent propagation speed and strong damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisi, Marina; Gobbino, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We consider a second order linear equation with a time-dependent coefficient c (t) in front of the "elastic" operator. For these equations it is well-known that a higher space-regularity of initial data compensates a lower time-regularity of c (t). In this paper we investigate the influence of a strong dissipation, namely a friction term which depends on a power of the elastic operator. What we discover is a threshold effect. When the exponent of the elastic operator in the friction term is greater than 1/2, the damping prevails and the equation behaves as if the coefficient c (t) were constant. When the exponent is less than 1/2, the time-regularity of c (t) comes into play. If c (t) is regular enough, once again the damping prevails. On the contrary, when c (t) is not regular enough the damping might be ineffective, and there are examples in which the dissipative equation behaves as the non-dissipative one. As expected, the stronger is the damping, the lower is the time-regularity threshold. We also provide counterexamples showing the optimality of our results.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Emission Kinetics of Colloidal Semiconductor Nanoplatelets Strongly Modified by Stacking.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Onur; Olutas, Murat; Guzelturk, Burak; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-02-01

    We systematically studied temperature-dependent emission kinetics in solid films of solution-processed CdSe nanoplatelets (NPLs) that are either intentionally stacked or nonstacked. We observed that the steady-state photoluminescence (PL) intensity of nonstacked NPLs considerably increases with decreasing temperature, whereas there is only a slight increase in stacked NPLs. Furthermore, PL decay time of the stacked NPL ensemble is comparatively much shorter than that of the nonstacked NPLs, and this result is consistent at all temperatures. To account for these observations, we developed a probabilistic model that describes excitonic processes in a stack using Markov chains, and we found excellent agreement between the model and experimental results. These findings develop the insight that the competition between the radiative channels and energy transfer-assisted hole trapping leads to weakly temperature-dependent PL intensity in the case of the stacked NPL ensembles as compared to the nonstacked NPLs lacking strong energy transfer. This study shows that it is essential to account for the effect of NPL stacking to understand their resulting PL emission properties. PMID:26789646

  14. Velocity dependence of baryon screening in a hot strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2008-05-01

    The L-dependence of the static potential between Nc quarks arranged in a circle of radius L (a ``baryon") immersed in the hot plasma of a gauge theory with Nc colors defines a screening length Ls. We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to compute this screening length for the case of heavy quarks in the plasma of strongly coupled Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory moving with velocity v relative to the baryon. We find that in the v ? 1 limit, Ls propto (1-v2)1/4/T, and find that corrections to this velocity dependence are small at lower velocities. This result provides evidence for the robustness of the analogous behavior of the screening length defined by the static quark-antiquark pair, which has been computed previously and in QCD is relevant to quarkonium physics in heavy ion collisions. Our results also show that as long as the hot wind is not blowing precisely perpendicular to the plane of the baryon configuration that we analyze, the Nc different quarks are not all affected by the wind velocity to the same degree, with those quarks lying perpendicular to the wind direction screened most effectively.

  15. Conditional versus unconditional industrial agglomeration: disentangling spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity in the analysis of ICT firms' distribution in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espa, Giuseppe; Arbia, Giuseppe; Giuliani, Diego

    2013-01-01

    A series of recent papers have introduced some explorative methods based on Ripley's K-function (Ripley in J R Stat Soc B 39(2):172-212, 1977) analyzing the micro-geographical patterns of firms. Often the spatial heterogeneity of an area is handled by referring to a case-control design, in which spatial clusters occur as over-concentrations of firms belonging to a specific industry as opposed to the distribution of firms in the whole economy. Therefore, positive, or negative, spatial dependence between firms occurs when a specific sector of industry is seen to present a more aggregated pattern (or more dispersed) than is common in the economy as a whole. This approach has led to the development of relative measures of spatial concentration which, as a consequence, are not straightforwardly comparable across different economies. In this article, we explore a parametric approach based on the inhomogeneous K-function (Baddeley et al. in Statistica Nederlandica 54(3):329-350, 2000) that makes it possible to obtain an absolute measure of the industrial agglomeration that is also able to capture spatial heterogeneity. We provide an empirical application of the approach taken with regard to the spatial distribution of high-tech industries in Milan (Italy) in 2001.

  16. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics model of He plasma surface interaction in tungsten for fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and, in particular, the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low-energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behaviour of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials' modelling results are described here that investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten. The aim of this study is to understand and predict sub-surface helium bubble growth under high flux helium ion implantation (˜1022 m-2 s-1) at high temperatures (>1000 K). We report results from a spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution of the microstructure under these conditions. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic modelling and available experimental data. The results are in good agreement with results of an analytical model that is presented in a separate paper. In particular, it is found that the sub-surface evolution with respect to bubble size and concentration of the helium bubbles strongly depends on the flux and temperature.

  17. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields: Spin-dependent influences at the cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Eiles, Matthew T.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Taylor, Caitlin A.; Fitch, Catherine J.

    2014-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamical (QED) process of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields is commonly invoked in atmospheric and inner magnetospheric models of x-ray and soft gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars. A major influence of the field is to introduce resonances at the cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, where the incoming photon accesses thresholds for the creation of virtual electrons or positrons in intermediate states with excited Landau levels. At these resonances, the effective cross section typically exceeds the classical Thomson value by over 2 orders of magnitude. Near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TeraGauss, relativistic corrections must be incorporated when computing this cross section. This profound enhancement underpins the anticipation that resonant Compton scattering is a very efficient process in the environs of highly magnetized neutron stars. This paper presents formalism for the QED magnetic Compton differential cross section valid for both subcritical and supercritical fields, yet restricted to scattered photons that are below pair creation threshold. Calculations are developed for the particular case of photons initially propagating along the field, and in the limit of zero vacuum dispersion, mathematically simple specializations that are germane to interactions involving relativistic electrons frequently found in neutron star magnetospheres. This exposition of relativistic, quantum, magnetic Compton cross sections treats electron spin dependence fully, since this is a critical feature for describing the finite decay lifetimes of the intermediate states. Such lifetimes are introduced to truncate the resonant cyclotronic divergences via standard Lorentz profiles. The formalism employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann (JL) wave functions and the Sokolov and Ternov (ST) electron eigenfunctions of the magnetic Dirac equation. The ST states are formally correct for self-consistently treating spin-dependent effects that are so important in the resonances. It is found that the values of the polarization-dependent differential cross section depend significantly on the choice of ST or JL eigenstates when in the fundamental resonance but not outside of it, a characteristic that is naturally expected. Relatively compact analytic forms for the cross sections are presented that will prove useful for astrophysical modelers.

  18. Exact probabilistic solution of spatial-dependent stochastics and associated spatial potential landscape for the bicoid protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepzelter, David; Wang, Jin

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the spatial-dependent stochastic effects originating from the finite number of bicoid proteins in Drosophila melanogaster, which are crucial to cell development. We obtained an exact solution to the spatial-dependent stochastic chemical master equation and recovered the usual reaction-diffusion solution for the average of the bicoid concentration, valid in the bulk. We also used the steady state probability to get the spatial potential landscape. The stochastic effects are captured by the Poisson distribution; so, as the average of the bicoid concentration decreases from the anterior (A) to the posterior (P) of the embryo, the statistical fluctuations also decrease. An alternative way of interpreting this is that the shape of the spatial potential landscape shrinks from A to P. While the mathematical result is known, we offer a simple approach to understanding why it is what it is and give associated physical intuitions. The approach can be generalized and applied to any problem with a particle that diffuses, decays, and has a stochastic source.

  19. Spatial dependency of V. cholera prevalence on open space refuse dumps in Kumasi, Ghana: a spatial statistical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Frank B; Duker, Alfred A

    2008-01-01

    Background Cholera has persisted in Ghana since its introduction in the early 70's. From 1999 to 2005, the Ghana Ministry of Health officially reported a total of 26,924 cases and 620 deaths to the WHO. Etiological studies suggest that the natural habitat of V. cholera is the aquatic environment. Its ability to survive within and outside the aquatic environment makes cholera a complex health problem to manage. Once the disease is introduced in a population, several environmental factors may lead to prolonged transmission and secondary cases. An important environmental factor that predisposes individuals to cholera infection is sanitation. In this study, we exploit the importance of two main spatial measures of sanitation in cholera transmission in an urban city, Kumasi. These are proximity and density of refuse dumps within a community. Results A spatial statistical modelling carried out to determine the spatial dependency of cholera prevalence on refuse dumps show that, there is a direct spatial relationship between cholera prevalence and density of refuse dumps, and an inverse spatial relationship between cholera prevalence and distance to refuse dumps. A spatial scan statistics also identified four significant spatial clusters of cholera; a primary cluster with greater than expected cholera prevalence, and three secondary clusters with lower than expected cholera prevalence. A GIS based buffer analysis also showed that the minimum distance within which refuse dumps should not be sited within community centres is 500 m. Conclusion The results suggest that proximity and density of open space refuse dumps play a contributory role in cholera infection in Kumasi. PMID:19087235

  20. Density Dependent Strong Coupling Constant of QCD Derived from Compact Star Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    Since 1996 there is major influx of X-ray and ?-ray data from binary stars, one or both of which are compact objects that are difficult to explain as neutron stars since they contain a mass M in too small a radius R. The suggestion has been put forward that these are strange quark stars (SS) explainable in a simple model with chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) for the quarks and the M, R and other properties like QPOs (quasi-periodic oscillations) in their X-ray power spectrum. It would be nice if this astrophysical data could shed some light on fundamental properties of quarks obeying QCD. One can relate the strong coupling constant of QCD, ?s to the quark mass through the Dyson-Schwinger gap equation using the real time formalism of Dolan and Jackiw. This enables us to obtain the density dependence of ?s from the simple CSR referred to above. This way fundamental physics, difficult to extract from other models like for example lattice QCD, can be constrained from present-day compact star data and may be put back to modeling the dense quark phase of early universe.

  1. [Spatial distribution pattern and space dependence of Contarinia sp. and Erigonidium graminicola in jujube orchard].

    PubMed

    Bi, Shoudong; Liu, Li; Gao, Caiqiu; Zou, Yunding; Ding, Chengcheng; Cao, Chuanwang; Liu, Xiaolin; Meng, Qinglei

    2005-11-01

    With the principles and methodologies of geostatistics, this paper studied the spatial structure and space dependence of Contarinia sp. and its natural enemy Erigonidium graminicola in a jujube orchard at different date. The results indicated that the semivariogram of Contarinia sp. on 8 June, 27 August and 19 October could be described by spherical model, showing an aggregated spatial distribution with the ranges of spatial dependence being 26.3, 7.8 and 22.0 m, and the degrees of spatial dependence being 88.05%, 85.77% and 87.58%, respectively. The semivariogram of Erigonidium graminicola could be also described by spherical model, showing an aggregated distribution with the ranges of spatial dependence being 28.3, 22.5 and 22.2 m, and the degrees of spatial dependence being 90.09%, 87.96% and 85.72%, respectively. It is suggested that Erigonidium graminicola is the dominant natural enemy against Contarinia sp. population in the examined jujube orchard. PMID:16471352

  2. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (?FC) and zero-field-cooled (?ZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher ?-ratio (? = ?FC/?ZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower ?-ratio, larger ?FC and ?ZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  3. Brightness induction by local contrast and the spatial dependence of assimilation.

    PubMed

    Reid, R C; Shapley, R

    1988-01-01

    Two mechanisms of brightness perception (1) brightness induction by local contrast and (2) assimilation, were examined for a variety of visual stimuli. Local contrast is the primary determinant of brightness perception, making objects appear brighter on a background of lower luminance and darker on a background of greater luminance. Assimilation is the opposite effect, whereby objects on a brighter (but not necessarily more luminant) background appear brighter or on a dark background appear darker. We have compared the relative strength of the two effects using stimuli which permit them to be studied separately. Brightness induction by local contrast is quantitatively stronger in all situations. Further, the strength of assimilation is strongly dependent on spatial parameters in the visual scene. These results are shown to be true both for simple visual stimuli as well as for complicated Mondrian-like patterns. The Retinex theory of brightness perception predicts that the two effects are equal. Our results show a range of relative strengths (assimilation vs brightness induction due to contrast) from 0.59 to 0.63 at 5' down to 0.34 at 43'. PMID:3413989

  4. Strong spatial genetic structure in five tropical Piper species: should the Baker–Fedorov hypothesis be revived for tropical shrubs?

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, E; Dalling, J W; Bermingham, E

    2011-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Baker and Fedorov proposed that the high species diversity of tropical forests could arise from the combined effects of inbreeding and genetic drift leading to population differentiation and eventually to sympatric speciation. Decades of research, however have failed to support the Baker–Fedorov hypothesis (BFH), and it has now been discarded in favor of a paradigm where most trees are self-incompatible or strongly outcrossing, and where long-distance pollen dispersal prevents population drift. Here, we propose that several hyper-diverse genera of tropical herbs and shrubs, including Piper (>1,000 species), may provide an exception. Species in this genus often have aggregated, high-density populations with self-compatible breeding systems; characteristics which the BFH would predict lead to high local genetic differentiation. We test this prediction for five Piper species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. All species showed strong genetic structure at both fine- and large-spatial scales. Over short distances (200–750 m) populations showed significant genetic differentiation (Fst 0.11–0.46, P < 0.05), with values of spatial genetic structure that exceed those reported for other tropical tree species (Sp = 0.03–0.136). This genetic structure probably results from the combined effects of limited seed and pollen dispersal, clonal spread, and selfing. These processes are likely to have facilitated the diversification of populations in response to local natural selection or genetic drift and may explain the remarkable diversity of this rich genus. PMID:22393518

  5. Prokaryotes in Subsoil-Evidence for a Strong Spatial Separation of Different Phyla by Analysing Co-occurrence Networks.

    PubMed

    Uksa, Marie; Schloter, Michael; Endesfelder, David; Kublik, Susanne; Engel, Marion; Kautz, Timo; Köpke, Ulrich; Fischer, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil provide a wide range of ecosystem services. On the small scale, nutrient rich hotspots in soil developed from the activities of animals or plants are important drivers for the composition of microbial communities and their functional patterns. However, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with differing lifestyles has been rarely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in top- and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophic and copiotrophic microbes was assessed. Four bacterial clusters were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, representing mostly copiotrophic bacteria, were affiliated mainly to the rhizosphere and drilosphere-both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, bacterial phyla which harbor many oligotrophic bacteria, were the most abundant groups in bulk subsoil. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated to cover 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads including both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. In contrast the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea build a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes due to their low variability in the different soil compartments. PMID:26635741

  6. Prokaryotes in Subsoil—Evidence for a Strong Spatial Separation of Different Phyla by Analysing Co-occurrence Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uksa, Marie; Schloter, Michael; Endesfelder, David; Kublik, Susanne; Engel, Marion; Kautz, Timo; Köpke, Ulrich; Fischer, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil provide a wide range of ecosystem services. On the small scale, nutrient rich hotspots in soil developed from the activities of animals or plants are important drivers for the composition of microbial communities and their functional patterns. However, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with differing lifestyles has been rarely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in top- and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophic and copiotrophic microbes was assessed. Four bacterial clusters were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, representing mostly copiotrophic bacteria, were affiliated mainly to the rhizosphere and drilosphere—both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, bacterial phyla which harbor many oligotrophic bacteria, were the most abundant groups in bulk subsoil. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated to cover 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads including both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. In contrast the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea build a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes due to their low variability in the different soil compartments. PMID:26635741

  7. Strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic cats may explain low hybridization rates on the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Gil-Sánchez, J M; Jaramillo, J; Barea-Azcón, J M

    2015-12-01

    The European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is an endangered felid impacted by genetic introgression with the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus). The problem of hybridization has had different effects in different areas. In non-Mediterranean regions pure forms of wildcats became almost extinct, while in Mediterranean regions genetic introgression is a rare phenomenon. The study of the potential factors that prevent the gene flow in areas of lower hybridization may be key to wildcat conservation. We studied the population size and spatial segregation of wildcats and domestic cats in a typical Mediterranean area of ancient sympatry, where no evidence of hybridization had been detected by genetic studies. Camera trapping of wild-living cats and walking surveys of stray cats in villages were used for capture-recapture estimations of abundance and spatial segregation. Results showed (i) a low density of wildcats and no apparent presence of putative hybrids; (ii) a very low abundance of feral cats in spite of the widespread and large population sources of domestic cats inhabiting villages; (iii) strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic/feral cats; and (iv) no relationship between the size of the potential population sources and the abundance of feral cats. Hence, domestic cats were limited in their ability to become integrated into the local habitat of wildcats. Ecological barriers (habitat preferences, food limitations, intra-specific and intra-guild competition, predation) may explain the severe divergences of hybridization impact observed at a biogeographic level. This has a direct effect on key conservation strategies for wildcats (i.e., control of domestic cats). PMID:26358989

  8. Visualisation of structural inhomogeneities in strongly scattering media using the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry: Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, Risto A

    2011-06-30

    Two-dimensional spatial intensity distributions of diffuse scattering of near-infrared laser radiation from a strongly scattering medium, whose optical properties are close to those of skin, are obtained using Monte Carlo simulation. The medium contains a cylindrical inhomogeneity with the optical properties, close to those of blood. It is shown that stronger absorption and scattering of light by blood compared to the surrounding medium leads to the fact that the intensity of radiation diffusely reflected from the surface of the medium under study and registered at its surface has a local minimum directly above the cylindrical inhomogeneity. This specific feature makes the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry potentially applicable for imaging blood vessels and determining their sizes. It is also shown that blurring of the vessel image increases almost linearly with increasing vessel embedment depth. This relation may be used to determine the depth of embedment provided that the optical properties of the scattering media are known. The optimal position of the sources and detectors of radiation, providing the best imaging of the vessel under study, is determined. (biophotonics)

  9. Need for Space: The Key Distance Effect Depends on Spatial Stimulus Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Julia; Franz, Volker H.

    2014-01-01

    In numerous psychological experiments, participants classify stimuli by pressing response keys. According to Lakens, Schneider, Jostmann, and Schubert (2011), classification performance is affected by physical distance between response keys – indicating a cognitive tendency to represent categories in spatial code. However, previous evidence for a key distance effect (KDE) from a color-naming Stroop task is inconclusive as to whether: (a) key separation automatically leads to an internal spatial representation of non-spatial stimulus characteristics in participants, or if the KDE rather depends on physical spatial characteristics of the stimulus configuration; (b) the KDE attenuates the Stroop interference effect. We therefore first adopted the original Stroop task in Experiment 1, confirming that wider key distance facilitated responses, but did not modulate the Stroop effect as was previously found. In Experiments 2 and 3 we controlled potential mediator variables in the original design. When we did not display instructions about stimulus-response mappings, thereby removing the unintended spatial context from the Stroop stimuli, no KDE emerged. Presenting the instructions at a central position in Experiment 4 confirmed that key separation alone is not sufficient for a KDE, but correspondence between spatial configurations of stimuli and responses is also necessary. Evidence indicates that the KDE on Stroop performance is due to known mechanisms of stimulus-response compatibility and response discriminability. The KDE does, however, not demonstrate a general disposition to represent any stimulus in spatial code. PMID:24642888

  10. Meaning is Not a Reflex: Context Dependence of Spatial Congruity Effects.

    PubMed

    Casasanto, Daniel; Brookshire, Geoffrey; Ivry, Richard

    2015-11-01

    In two experiments, Brookshire, Ivry, and Casasanto (2010) showed that words with positive and negative emotional valence can activate spatial representations with a high degree of automaticity, but also that this activation is highly context dependent. Lebois, Wilson-Mendenhall, and Barsalou (2015) reported that they "aimed to replicate" our study but found only null results in the "Brookshire et al. replication" conditions. Here we express concerns about three aspects of this paper. First, the study was not an attempt to replicate ours; it was a different study that adapted our method. Second, Lebois et al. did not accurately represent our theoretical position. Third, Lebois et al.'s main conclusion, that spatial congruity effects depend on the task context, was not supported by their data. Despite these concerns, we agree with Lebois et al.'s overall message that spatial aspects of words' meanings are activated differently in different contexts. This was a main conclusion of our study as well. PMID:26432077

  11. Spatially-resolved dust, molecular gas, and star formation maps of an exceptional strongly lensed giant arc at z=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerer, Daniel; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Walth, Gregory; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Richard, Johan; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Lensing Survey of massive galaxy clusters has led to the discovery of an extremely bright Herschel source with its SED peaking at 290 mJy at 350 microns. It appears to be a giant arc that is strongly magnified by a factor of more than 30. Its brightness is well suited for successful multi-wavelength follow-up observations.A first set of observations on the IRAM/30m telescope allowed us to secure its redshift z=2.04 with the detections of the CO(3-4) and CO(4-3) emission lines. We have then obtained deep, high spatial resolution maps of the 892 micron continuum with SMA, the CO(1-0) emission with the EVLA, and the Halpha emission with VLT/SINFONI. These maps are, respectively, tracing dust, molecular gas, and star formation within the giant arc.We do observe a patchy distribution of matter in all these different physical states, spread over five main clumps, which we spatially resolve down to a 0.8-1 kpc scale thanks to the high stretching along the direction of the arc. The access to the resolved kinematics of this galaxy shows that the clumps are embedded in a global galactic rotation best highlighted by the Halpha kinematics. The CO(1-0) kinematics, in addition, highlights the possible presence of an inflowing molecular gas clump, or an ongoing minor merger with the main disk. The respective comparison of the far-IR, CO(1-0), and Halpha emissions within the resolved clumps allows us to explore the star formation Kennicutt-Schmidt relation at sub-kpc scales in a z~2 galaxy, and to reveal intrinsic spatial offsets between star formation, dust, and molecular gas within the galaxy. The detection of the [NII] line shows significant variations in the [NII]/Halpha ratio along the disk. The measured [NII]/Halpha ratios are at some radii so high that we need to invoke the presence of an AGN or photo-dissociation to explain them.

  12. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z-K; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J.-X.; Lee, J.J.; Moore, R.G.; Schmitt, F.T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S.C.; Chu, J.-H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S.-K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z.Q.; Chu, C.W.; Fisher, I.R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z.-X.; Lu, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. These observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors. PMID:26204461

  13. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; et al

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  14. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  15. Strongly bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in manganite spin filter tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2015-05-20

    A highly unconventional bias-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) response is observed in Sm0.75 Sr0.25 MnO3 -based nanopillar spin filter tunnel junctions (SFTJs) with two different behaviors in two different thickness regimes of the barrier layer. Thinner barrier devices exhibit conventional SFTJ behaviors; however, for larger barrier thicknesses, the TMR-bias dependence is more complex and reverses sign at higher bias. PMID:25845706

  16. The spatial and energy dependence of gold nanoparticle dose enhancement using deterministic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifter, Fulya

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the detailed dose enhancement characteristics of Gold Nanoparticle Aided Radiotherapy using deterministic computations, which offer several advantages over Monte Carlo simulations. In the first chapter, computations were preformed to obtain the parametric representation of gold nanoparticle (GNP) dose enhancement as function of space and incident photon energy, which can be regarded as the Green's function of GNP aided radiotherapy. The Green's function describes the spatial distribution of dose response in water due to a specific photon energy incident on single or clustered GNPs of defined size, located at a given depth in the phantom. In this way, using convolution-superposition, the dose enhancement may be determined for any incident photon spectrum and combinations of GNP sizes and depths. In obtaining the parameterized Green's function, dose enhancement as function of incident energy, GNP size, and GNP depth was calculated at nanometric spatial resolution for a series of monoenergetic beams. In addition, the dose enhancement was also determined for clinical beams in which the incident photon spectra were obtained using Monte Carlo. Based on the systematic computations of DER as function of x-ray energy and GNP size, optimal photon energies and optimal GNP sizes were determined. In the second chapter, dosimetric properties of GNP-laden target volumes (TV) embedded in a water phantom were investigated as a function of GNP concentration, geometry, and volume. In addition, the characteristics of GNP dose enhancement due to clustering versus homogeneous concentrations are studied. These parameters have importance in today's sophisticated beam delivery techniques, when modifying the beam intensity and direction provides a conformal dose delivery during treatment. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport computations were performed in high spatial resolution (1 nm -- 10 mum mesh sizes) using the CEPXS/ONEDANT code package. For macroscopic target volumes (>>200 mum thick) the dose enhancement is strongly influenced by self-shielding. Dose uniformity can be achieved only in small volumes with gold concentrations less than 300 mg/g. Charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists inside the GNP-TV but not at is edges. The dose enhancement ratio (DER) can become <1 at sufficiently far from the target volume. Substantial differences exist on the proximal versus distal sides of the GNP-TV in terms of DER and the effective range within which DER is greater than unity, which forms a disequilibrium (CPDE) rim about the TV. The size of the CPDE rim can significantly vary depending on gold concentration and geometry, ranging from 30-1400 mum on the proximal and 8-120 mum on the distal sides. Due to CPE inside macroscopic GNP-TV volumes, spatially averaged (over ?200 mum) can be approximated using kerma ratios. However, locally varying DER(x) (nanoscopic) and DER within the CPDE rim can only be accurately determined using detailed coupled electron-photon radiation transport computations. The assumption of uniform homogeneous gold distribution in the TV as a surrogate for the presence of GNP clusters can lead to significant discrepancies from the actual DER, ranging from 100% at low energies to 5% at high energies.

  17. Nicotine dependence more strongly correlates with psychological distress in disadvantaged areas of Kazakhstan than Germany.

    PubMed

    Ignatyev, Yuriy; Mundt, Adrian P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with psychological distress in socially disadvantaged urban areas of Germany and Kazakhstan. Random samples of people living in disadvantaged areas of Berlin, Germany, and Almaty, Kazakhstan, were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire with 28 items and the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. The association of both current smoking and nicotine dependence with psychological distress was assessed for each sample using linear regression analyses and compared between the two samples calculating t-values for the comparison of B-coefficients. Current smoking was equally associated with psychological distress in both countries, whereas the association of nicotine dependence and psychological distress was only seen for the Kazakh sample and significantly stronger than for the German sample. The results could not be explained by social characteristics. Possibly due to the lack of outpatient community mental health services for the treatment of common mental disorders, nicotine dependence was associated with psychological distress in the disadvantaged area of Kazakhstan. PMID:23807567

  18. Hippocampus-dependent place learning enables spatial flexibility in C57BL6/N mice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinknecht, Karl R.; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F.; Grünecker, Barbara; Yen, Yi-Chun; Czisch, Michael; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial navigation is a fundamental capability necessary in everyday life to locate food, social partners, and shelter. It results from two very different strategies: (1) place learning which enables for flexible way finding and (2) response learning that leads to a more rigid “route following.” Despite the importance of knockout techniques that are only available in mice, little is known about mice' flexibility in spatial navigation tasks. Here we demonstrate for C57BL6/N mice in a water-cross maze (WCM) that only place learning enables spatial flexibility and relearning of a platform position, whereas response learning does not. This capability depends on an intact hippocampal formation, since hippocampus lesions by ibotenic acid (IA) disrupted relearning. In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a volume loss of ?60% of the hippocampus as a critical threshold for relearning impairments. In particular the changes in the left ventral hippocampus were indicative of relearning deficits. In summary, our findings establish the importance of hippocampus-dependent place learning for spatial flexibility and provide a first systematic analysis on spatial flexibility in mice. PMID:23293591

  19. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:21805301

  20. Influence of Low-Level Stimulus Features, Task Dependent Factors, and Spatial Biases on Overt Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    König, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Visual attention is thought to be driven by the interplay between low-level visual features and task dependent information content of local image regions, as well as by spatial viewing biases. Though dependent on experimental paradigms and model assumptions, this idea has given rise to varying claims that either bottom-up or top-down mechanisms dominate visual attention. To contribute toward a resolution of this discussion, here we quantify the influence of these factors and their relative importance in a set of classification tasks. Our stimuli consist of individual image patches (bubbles). For each bubble we derive three measures: a measure of salience based on low-level stimulus features, a measure of salience based on the task dependent information content derived from our subjects' classification responses and a measure of salience based on spatial viewing biases. Furthermore, we measure the empirical salience of each bubble based on our subjects' measured eye gazes thus characterizing the overt visual attention each bubble receives. A multivariate linear model relates the three salience measures to overt visual attention. It reveals that all three salience measures contribute significantly. The effect of spatial viewing biases is highest and rather constant in different tasks. The contribution of task dependent information is a close runner-up. Specifically, in a standardized task of judging facial expressions it scores highly. The contribution of low-level features is, on average, somewhat lower. However, in a prototypical search task, without an available template, it makes a strong contribution on par with the two other measures. Finally, the contributions of the three factors are only slightly redundant, and the semi-partial correlation coefficients are only slightly lower than the coefficients for full correlations. These data provide evidence that all three measures make significant and independent contributions and that none can be neglected in a model of human overt visual attention. PMID:20502672

  1. Frequency Dependence of Signal Power and Spatial Reach of the Local Field Potential

    PubMed Central

    ??ski, Szymon; Lindén, Henrik; Tetzlaff, Tom; Pettersen, Klas H.; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its century-old use, the interpretation of local field potentials (LFPs), the low-frequency part of electrical signals recorded in the brain, is still debated. In cortex the LFP appears to mainly stem from transmembrane neuronal currents following synaptic input, and obvious questions regarding the ‘locality’ of the LFP are: What is the size of the signal-generating region, i.e., the spatial reach, around a recording contact? How far does the LFP signal extend outside a synaptically activated neuronal population? And how do the answers depend on the temporal frequency of the LFP signal? Experimental inquiries have given conflicting results, and we here pursue a modeling approach based on a well-established biophysical forward-modeling scheme incorporating detailed reconstructed neuronal morphologies in precise calculations of population LFPs including thousands of neurons. The two key factors determining the frequency dependence of LFP are the spatial decay of the single-neuron LFP contribution and the conversion of synaptic input correlations into correlations between single-neuron LFP contributions. Both factors are seen to give low-pass filtering of the LFP signal power. For uncorrelated input only the first factor is relevant, and here a modest reduction (<50%) in the spatial reach is observed for higher frequencies (>100 Hz) compared to the near-DC () value of about . Much larger frequency-dependent effects are seen when populations of pyramidal neurons receive correlated and spatially asymmetric inputs: the low-frequency () LFP power can here be an order of magnitude or more larger than at 60 Hz. Moreover, the low-frequency LFP components have larger spatial reach and extend further outside the active population than high-frequency components. Further, the spatial LFP profiles for such populations typically span the full vertical extent of the dendrites of neurons in the population. Our numerical findings are backed up by an intuitive simplified model for the generation of population LFP. PMID:23874180

  2. Paramagnetic Meissner effect and strong time dependence at high fields in melt-textured high- T C superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva Gouvêa, Cristol; Dias, Fábio Teixeira; das Neves Vieira, Valdemar; da Silva, Douglas Langie; Schaf, Jacob; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Rovira, Joan Josep Roa

    2013-05-01

    In this work we report on systematic field-cooled magnetization experiments in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7- δ samples containing Y211 precipitates. Magnetic fields up to 14 T were applied either parallel or perpendicular to the ab planes and a strong paramagnetic response related to the superconducting state was observed. This effect is known as paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME). The magnitude of the PME increases when the field is augmented. This effect shows a strong paramagnetic relaxation, such that the paramagnetic moment increases as a function of the time. The pinning by the Y211 particles plays a crucial role in the explanation of this effect and our results suggest that the pinning capacity can produce a strong flux compression into the sample, originating the PME and the strong time dependence.

  3. Ideal gas in a strong gravitational field: Area dependence of entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Sanved; Padmanabhan, T.

    2011-03-15

    We study the thermodynamic parameters like entropy, energy etc. of a box of gas made up of indistinguishable particles when the box is kept in various static background spacetimes having a horizon. We compute the thermodynamic variables using both statistical mechanics as well as by solving the hydrodynamical equations for the system. When the box is far away from the horizon, the entropy of the gas depends on the volume of the box except for small corrections due to background geometry. As the box is moved closer to the horizon with one (leading) edge of the box at about Planck length (L{sub p}) away from the horizon, the entropy shows an area dependence rather than a volume dependence. More precisely, it depends on a small volume A{sub perpendicular}L{sub p}/2 of the box, up to an order O(L{sub p}/K){sup 2} where A{sub perpendicular} is the transverse area of the box and K is the (proper) longitudinal size of the box related to the distance between leading and trailing edge in the vertical direction (i.e. in the direction of the gravitational field). Thus the contribution to the entropy comes from only a fraction O(L{sub p}/K) of the matter degrees of freedom and the rest are suppressed when the box approaches the horizon. Near the horizon all the thermodynamical quantities behave as though the box of gas has a volume A{sub perpendicular}L{sub p}/2 and is kept in a Minkowski spacetime. These effects are: (i) purely kinematic in their origin and are independent of the spacetime curvature (in the sense that the Rindler approximation of the metric near the horizon can reproduce the results) and (ii) observer dependent. When the equilibrium temperature of the gas is taken to be equal to the horizon temperature, we get the familiar A{sub perpendicular}/L{sub p}{sup 2} dependence in the expression for entropy. All these results hold in a D+1 dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime. The analysis based on methods of statistical mechanics and the one based on thermodynamics applied to the gas treated as a fluid in static geometry, lead to the same results showing the consistency. The implications are discussed.

  4. Strong strain dependence of ferroelectric coercivity in a BiFeO3 film

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Michael D; Kim, Dae Ho; Dorr, Kathrin; Christen, Hans M

    2011-01-01

    The ferroelectric polarization loop of an epitaxial BiFeO3 film on a piezoelectric substrate has been measured as a function of the continuously and reversibly varied biaxial strain of e = 0.36 0.51 %. Over this range, the ferroelectric coercive field (Ec) at 80 K increases reversibly by 36 % with the increasing tensile strain. The strain dependence of the remanent polarization agrees with previous experimental results and simulations based on thermodynamic considerations. In contrast, such calculations predict dEc/de <0, contradicting our experiments. Thus, the strain dependence of kinetic barriers influencing the rates of domain wall nucleation and propagation which are neglected in thermodynamic models may dominate the observed positive dEc/de.

  5. Strong molecular alignment dependence of H2 electron impact ionization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Pflüger, T; Xu, S; Colgan, J; Pindzola, M S; Senftleben, A; Ullrich, J; Dorn, A

    2012-09-21

    Low-energy (E(0) = 54 eV) electron impact single ionization of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has been investigated as a function of molecular alignment in order to benchmark recent theoretical predictions [Colgan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 233201 (2008) and Al-Hagan et al., Nature Phys. 5, 59 (2009)]. In contrast to any previous work, we observe distinct alignment dependence of the (e,2e) cross sections in the perpendicular plane in good overall agreement with results from time-dependent close-coupling calculations. The cross section behavior can be consistently explained by a rescattering of the ejected electron in the molecular potential resulting in an effective focusing along the molecular axis. PMID:23005945

  6. Laser based imaging of time depending microscopic scenes with strong light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Wilhelm, Eugen; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Investigating volume scatterometry methods based on short range LIDAR devices for non-static objects we achieved interesting results aside the intended micro-LIDAR: the high speed camera recording of the illuminated scene of an exploding wire -intended for Doppler LIDAR tests - delivered a very effective method of observing details of objects with extremely strong light emission. As a side effect a schlieren movie is gathered without any special effort. The fact that microscopic features of short time processes with high emission and material flow might be imaged without endangering valuable equipment makes this technique at least as interesting as the intended one. So we decided to present our results - including latest video and photo material - instead of a more theoretical paper on our progress concerning the primary goal.

  7. Host selection by an insect herbivore with spatially variable density dependence.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, William C; Strong, Donald R

    2015-11-01

    Many species of phytophagous insects do not oviposit preferentially on plants that yield high offspring performance. One proposed explanation is that negatively density-dependent offspring performance would select for females that disperse eggs among plants to minimize competition. Recent work showing larval density dependence often varies substantially among plants suggests that ovipositing females should not only respond to the density of competitors but also to traits predictive of the strength of density dependence mediated by plants. In this study, we used field and greenhouse experiments to examine oviposition behavior in an insect herbivore that experiences density-dependent larval performance and variability in the strength of that density dependence among host-plant individuals. We found females moved readily among plants in the field and had strong preferences for plants that mediate weak offspring density dependence. Females, however, did not avoid plants with high densities of competitors, despite the fact that offspring performance declines steeply with density on most plants in natural populations. This means females minimize the effects of density dependence on their offspring by choosing plants that mediate only weak larval density dependence, not by choosing plants with low densities of competitors. Our results suggest that explaining the lack of positive preference-performance correlations in many systems may not be as simple as invoking density dependence. Resource selection behavior may depend not just on the presence or absence of density-dependent offspring performance but also on variation in the strength of offspring density dependence among sites within populations. PMID:26120095

  8. Pulse-duration dependence of the isotopic effect in simple molecular ions driven by strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castiglia, G.; Corso, P. P.; Fiordilino, E.; Persico, F.

    2011-05-15

    In this paper we discuss isotopic effects in simple molecular ions subjected to strong laser fields. We show that the intensity of the emitted spectra strongly depends upon both the nuclear mass of the molecular ions and the laser pulse duration. In particular, for short pulse duration [up to 8 optical cycles (o.c.)], we confirm the trend described in the most studied case in which the high-order harmonic generation is more efficient for heavier isotopes; in contrast, an interesting physical phenomenon is predicted for pulses longer than 16 o.c. characterized by an inverse effect in which lighter molecular species are responsible for higher-order harmonic emission.

  9. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  10. Sensitive polarization dependence for helium Rydberg atoms driven by strong microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, S.A.; Bellermann, M.R.W.; Smith, L.L.; Koch, P.M.

    1996-05-01

    The authors prepare n{sup 3}S He Rydberg atoms with selected values n {ge} 25 in a fast beam using CO{sub 2} lasers and double-resonance excitation. They then fly through a TE{sub 121} mode cavity, exposing them to a half-sine pulse (about 350 field osc.) of 9.904 GHz electric field whose polarization can be varied; linear (LP), elliptical (EP), and circular (CP). Making EP close to LP can lead to substantial changes in microwave-power-dependent transitions to nearby bound states. In at least one case, a sharp dip in the LP signal is transformed by EP into a pattern reminiscent of Stueckelberg oscillations, previously observed with LP at higher frequencies. Calculations suggest that pulse-shape-induced dynamics at Floquet avoided-crossing(s) explain the LP behavior. Changing the field to EP clearly must modify this behavior. The authors will discuss this kind of data as well as the polarization dependence of microwave ionization of n{sup 3}S He Rydberg atoms.

  11. Selective temporal resections and spatial memory impairment: cue dependent lateralization effects.

    PubMed

    Barkas, Lisa J; Henderson, Jenni L; Hamilton, Derek A; Redhead, Edward S; Gray, William P

    2010-04-01

    Patients who had undergone a unilateral trans-sylvian selective amygdalohippocampectomy as treatment for chronic intractable epilepsy were tested in a virtual Morris Water Maze (MWM) task where they were required to locate a hidden platform as a measure of spatial learning. These individuals' performance on spatial tasks was compared to age-matched healthy controls and drug-matched healthy controls. Training occurred in two different maze environments, one with conventional cues such as windows and doors, and another with abstract cues, such as colours and patterns. Participants searched for a hidden platform in the virtual pool, guided by either the conventional or abstract cues. There was a significant impairment in the surgery group compared to the control groups in all environments, however in the abstract environment only the patients with right-sided lesions were significantly worse than the controls. There was no difference between the groups on a control egocentric navigation task. These results suggest that people who have had right-sided surgery are impaired in spatial tasks, and that the level of impairment on the spatial task may be dependent on the characteristics of the cues such as how easily the cues are verbalised. These results support the notion of the functional lateralization of specific elements of spatial memory and functional lateralization, and may shed light on previous inconsistencies in this area of research. PMID:20064564

  12. Strong Asymmetric Charge Carrier Dependence in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Zhao, Yue; Wyrick, Jonathan; Chan, Yang-Hao; Ruan, Wen-Ying; Chou, Mei-Yin; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.; Stroscio, Joseph A.

    2015-06-01

    The observation of phonons in graphene by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy has been met with limited success in previous measurements arising from weak signals and other spectral features which inhibit a clear distinction between phonons and miscellaneous excitations. Utilizing a back-gated graphene device that allows adjusting the global charge carrier density, we introduce an averaging method where individual tunneling spectra at varying charge carrier density are combined into one representative spectrum. This method improves the signal for inelastic transitions while it suppresses dispersive spectral features. We thereby map the total graphene phonon density of states, in good agreement with density functional calculations. Unexpectedly, an abrupt change in the phonon intensity is observed when the graphene charge carrier type is switched through a variation of the back-gate electrode potential. This sudden variation in phonon intensity is asymmetric in the carrier type, depending on the sign of the tunneling bias.

  13. Spatial dependence of gain nonlinearities in InGaAs semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Iglesias, Alvaro; Fenn, Julia G.; Mazilu, Michael; Miller, Alan

    2005-09-01

    Counter-propagating sub-picosecond pulses are used to monitor gain saturation along the waveguide of an InGaAs superlattice semiconductor optical amplifier at 1550nm wavelength. The functional form of the spatial dependence of gain saturation is found to depend on pulse energy. These observations are interpreted by combining the optical nonlinearities associated with interband carrier dynamics and carrier heating together and their respective time constants. We show that the results are consistent with the predictions of a propagation model. Implications for all-optical switching, particularly in the limit of full saturation across the whole amplifier, are discussed.

  14. On Spatial Processes and Asymptotic Inference under Near-Epoch Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jenish, Nazgul; Prucha, Ingmar R.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a general inferential theory for nonlinear models with cross-sectionally or spatially dependent data has been hampered by a lack of appropriate limit theorems. To facilitate a general asymptotic inference theory relevant to economic applications, this paper first extends the notion of near-epoch dependent (NED) processes used in the time series literature to random fields. The class of processes that is NED on, say, an α-mixing process, is shown to be closed under infinite transformations, and thus accommodates models with spatial dynamics. This would generally not be the case for the smaller class of α-mixing processes. The paper then derives a central limit theorem and law of large numbers for NED random fields. These limit theorems allow for fairly general forms of heterogeneity including asymptotically unbounded moments, and accommodate arrays of random fields on unevenly spaced lattices. The limit theorems are employed to establish consistency and asymptotic normality of GMM estimators. These results provide a basis for inference in a wide range of models with spatial dependence. PMID:22984323

  15. On Spatial Processes and Asymptotic Inference under Near-Epoch Dependence.

    PubMed

    Jenish, Nazgul; Prucha, Ingmar R

    2012-09-01

    The development of a general inferential theory for nonlinear models with cross-sectionally or spatially dependent data has been hampered by a lack of appropriate limit theorems. To facilitate a general asymptotic inference theory relevant to economic applications, this paper first extends the notion of near-epoch dependent (NED) processes used in the time series literature to random fields. The class of processes that is NED on, say, an ?-mixing process, is shown to be closed under infinite transformations, and thus accommodates models with spatial dynamics. This would generally not be the case for the smaller class of ?-mixing processes. The paper then derives a central limit theorem and law of large numbers for NED random fields. These limit theorems allow for fairly general forms of heterogeneity including asymptotically unbounded moments, and accommodate arrays of random fields on unevenly spaced lattices. The limit theorems are employed to establish consistency and asymptotic normality of GMM estimators. These results provide a basis for inference in a wide range of models with spatial dependence. PMID:22984323

  16. Native Birds and Alien Insects: Spatial Density Dependence in Songbird Predation of Invading Oak Gallwasps

    PubMed Central

    Schönrogge, Karsten; Begg, Tracey; Stone, Graham N.

    2013-01-01

    Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris) at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource. PMID:23342048

  17. The abundance of satellites depends strongly on the morphology of the host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo; Trujillo, Ignacio; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Using the spectroscopic catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10, we have explored the abundance of satellites around a sample of 254 massive (1011 < M⋆ < 2 × 1011 M⊙) local (z < 0.025) galaxies. We have divided our sample into four morphological groups (E, S0, Sa, Sb/c). We find that the number of satellites with M⋆ ≳ 109 M⊙ and R < 300 kpc depends drastically on the morphology of the central galaxy. The average number of satellites per galaxy host (NSat/NHost) down to a mass ratio of 1:100 is 4.5 ± 0.3 for E hosts, 2.6 ± 0.2 for S0, 1.5 ± 0.1 for Sa and 1.2 ± 0.2 for Sb/c. The amount of stellar mass enclosed by the satellites around massive E-type galaxies is a factor of 2, 4 and 5 larger than the mass in the satellites of S0, Sa and Sb/c types, respectively. If these satellites would eventually infall into the host galaxies, for all the morphological types, the merger channel will be largely dominated by satellites with a mass ratio satellite-host μ > 0.1. The fact that massive elliptical galaxies have a significant larger number of satellites than massive spirals could point out that elliptical galaxies inhabit heavier dark matter haloes than equally massive galaxies with later morphological types. If this hypothesis is correct, the dark matter haloes of late-type spiral galaxies are a factor of ˜2-3 more efficient on producing galaxies with the same stellar mass than those dark matter haloes of early-type galaxies.

  18. Environmental drivers and spatial dependency in wildfire ignition patterns of northwestern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Ignacio A; Wiegand, Thorsten; Kanagaraj, Rajapandian; Kitzberger, Thomas

    2013-07-15

    Fire management requires an understanding of the spatial characteristics of fire ignition patterns and how anthropogenic and natural factors influence ignition patterns across space. In this study we take advantage of a recent fire ignition database (855 points) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the spatial pattern of fire ignitions in the western area of Neuquén province (57,649 km(2)), Argentina, for the 1992-2008 period. The objectives of our study were to better understand the spatial pattern and the environmental drivers of the fire ignitions, with the ultimate aim of supporting fire management. We conducted our analyses on three different levels: statistical "habitat" modelling of fire ignition (natural, anthropogenic, and all causes) based on an information theoretic approach to test several competing hypotheses on environmental drivers (i.e. topographic, climatic, anthropogenic, land cover, and their combinations); spatial point pattern analysis to quantify additional spatial autocorrelation in the ignition patterns; and quantification of potential spatial associations between fires of different causes relative to towns using a novel implementation of the independence null model. Anthropogenic fire ignitions were best predicted by the most complex habitat model including all groups of variables, whereas natural ignitions were best predicted by topographic, climatic and land-cover variables. The spatial pattern of all ignitions showed considerable clustering at intermediate distances (<40 km) not captured by the probability of fire ignitions predicted by the habitat model. There was a strong (linear) and highly significant increase in the density of fire ignitions with decreasing distance to towns (<5 km), but fire ignitions of natural and anthropogenic causes were statistically independent. A two-dimensional habitat model that quantifies differences between ignition probabilities of natural and anthropogenic causes allows fire managers to delineate target areas for consideration of major preventive treatments, strategic placement of fuel treatments, and forecasting of fire ignition. The techniques presented here can be widely applied to situations where a spatial point pattern is jointly influenced by extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic point interactions. PMID:23583868

  19. Dependency of planned dose perturbation (PDP) on the spatial resolution of MapCHECK 2 detectors.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Vance P; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Algan, Ozer; Jin, Hosang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dependency of the planned dose perturbation (PDP) algorithm (used in Sun Nuclear 3DVH software) on spatial resolution of the MapCHECK 2 detectors. In this study, ten brain (small target), ten brain (large target), ten prostate, and ten head-and-neck (H&N) cases were retrospectively selected for QA measurement. IMRT validation plans were delivered using the field-by-field technique with the MapCHECK 2 device. The measurements were performed using standard detector density (standard resolution; SR) and a doubled detector density (high resolution; HR) by merging regular with shifted measurements. SR and HR measurements were fed into the 3DVH software and ROI (region of interest), planning target volume (PTV), and organ at risk (OAR)) dose statistics (D95, Dmean, and Dmax) were determined for each. Differences of the dose statistics normalized to prescription dose for ROIs between original planning and PDP-perturbed planning were calculated for SR (?DSR) and HR (?DHR), and difference between ?DSR and ?DHR (?DSR-HR = ?DSR - ?DHR) was also calculated. In addition, 2D and 3D ? passing rates (GPRs) were determined for both resolutions, and a correlation between GPRs and ?DSR or ?DHR for PTV dose metrics was determined. No considerably high mean differences between ?DSR and ?DHR were found for almost all ROIs and plans (< 2%); however, |?DSR|, |?DHR|, and |?DSR-HR| for PTV were found to significantly increase as the PTV size decreased (e.g., PTV size < 5 cc). And statistically significant differences between SR and HR were observed for OARs proximal to targets in large brain target and H&N cases. As plan modulation represented by fractional MU/prescription dose (MU/cGy) became more complex, the 2D/3D GPRs tended to decrease; however, the modulation complexity did not make any noticeable distinctions in the DVH statistics of PTV between SR and HR, excluding the small brain cases whose PTVs were extremely small (PTV = 11.0 ± 10.1 cc). Moderate to strong negative correlations (-1 < r < -0.3) between GPRs and PTV dose metrics indicated that small clinical errors for PTV occur at the higher GPRs. In conclusion, doubling the detector density of the MapCHECK 2 device is recommended for small targets (i.e., PTV < 5 cc) and multiple targets with complex geometry with minimum setup error in the DVH-based plan evaluation. PMID:24423843

  20. Trapping of surface-plasmon polaritons in a graded Bragg structure: Frequency-dependent spatially separated localization of the visible spectrum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wang, Guo Ping; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Bartoli, Filbert J.

    2009-10-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that a metallic film covered by a dielectric grating of graded thickness can strongly slow light as the propagation velocities of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are reduced over a large frequency bandwidth at visible frequencies. Since the dispersive relation of SPPs is dependent on the dielectric grating thickness, the guided SPPs at different frequencies can be localized at different spatial positions of the plasmonic grating. We numerically demonstrate that a true rainbow from violet to red colors can be separately localized, resulting in the spatial separation of the visible spectrum on a chip.

  1. Sex-biased dispersal patterns depend on the spatial scale in a social rodent

    PubMed Central

    Gauffre, B.; Petit, E.; Brodier, S.; Bretagnolle, V.; Cosson, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Dispersal is a fundamental process in ecology because it influences the dynamics, genetic structure and persistence of populations. Furthermore, understanding the evolutionary causes of dispersal pattern, particularly when they differ between genders, is still a major question in evolutionary ecology. Using a panel of 10 microsatellite loci, we investigated at different spatial scales the genetic structure and the sex-specific dispersal patterns in the common vole Microtus arvalis, a small colonial mammal. This study was conducted in an intensive agricultural area of western France. Hierarchical FST analyses, relatedness and assignment tests suggested (i) that females are strongly kin-clustered within colonies; (ii) that dispersal is strongly male-biased at a local scale; and (iii) long-distance dispersal is not rare and more balanced between genders. We conclude that males migrate continuously from colony to colony to reproduce, whereas females may disperse just once and would be mainly involved in new colony foundation. PMID:19586945

  2. Solute-solute spatial distribution in hydrogen bonding liquids probed with time-dependent intermolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, H. L.; Fayer, M. D.

    2001-03-01

    Solute-solute spatial distribution in strongly hydrogen bonding solvents is investigated using photoinduced electron transfer dynamics between rhodamine 3B (R3B) and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) in a series of monoalcohols, polyalcohols, and alcohol mixtures. Fluorescence up-conversion data are presented on electron transfer in ethylene glycol and are compared to data characterizing electron transfer in seven other solvents. The data are analyzed with a detailed statistical mechanical theory that includes a distance-dependent Marcus rate constant, diffusion with the hydrodynamic effect, and solute-solute radial distribution functions. When the standard assumption is made that for low concentration solutes the solute-solute spatial distribution follows that of the solvent's radial distribution function, a single parameter fit to the electronic coupling matrix element results in the same value, independent of solvent, for data from five solvents. However, it is impossible to fit the data from the solvent ethylene glycol using the model based on the solvent radial distribution function. When the assumption that the solute-solute spatial distribution tracks the single molecule solvent radial distribution function is relaxed by using a large "effective" solvent diameter to establish the donor-acceptor distance distribution and hydrodynamic effect, excellent fits to the electron transfer data are obtained. The fits give the same parameters for ethylene glycol and two other solvents with high OH/C ratios as the five "normal" solvents. The results suggest that the solute-solute (donor-acceptor) spatial distributions in the high OH/C ratio solvents are determined by multiple hydrogen bond solvent "aggregates" that inhibit solute molecules from distributing freely among solvent molecules.

  3. Early visual processing deficits in patients with schizophrenia during spatial frequency-dependent facial affect processing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Won; Shim, Miseon; Song, Myeong Ju; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal facial emotion recognition is considered as one of the key symptoms of schizophrenia. Only few studies have considered deficits in the spatial frequency (SF)-dependent visual pathway leading to abnormal facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Twenty-one patients with schizophrenia and 19 matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited for this study. Event-related potentials (ERP) were measured during presentation of SF-modulated face stimuli and their source imaging was analyzed. The patients showed reduced P100 amplitude for low-spatial frequency (LSF) pictures of fearful faces compared with the HC group. The P100 amplitude for high-spatial frequency (HSF) pictures of neutral faces was increased in the schizophrenia group, but not in the HC group. The neural source activities of the LSF fearful faces and HSF neutral faces led to hypo- and hyperactivation of the frontal lobe of subjects from the schizophrenia group and HC group, respectively. In addition, patients with schizophrenia showed enhanced N170 activation in the right hemisphere in the LSF condition, while the HC group did not. Our results suggest that deficits in the LSF-dependent visual pathway, which involves magnocellular neurons, impair early visual processing leading to dysfunctional facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Moreover, it suggests impaired bottom-up processing rather than top-down dysfunction for facial emotion recognition in these patients. PMID:25553978

  4. Natal departure timing from spatially varying environments is dependent of individual ontogenetic status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucherousset, Julien; Paillisson, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Jean-Marc

    2013-08-01

    Natal departure timing represents one of the first crucial decisions for juveniles born in spatially varying environments that ultimately disappear, but our knowledge on its determinants is limited. The present study aimed at understanding the determinants of juvenile natal departure by releasing individually tagged juvenile pike ( Esox lucius L.) with variable body size and trophic position in a temporary flooded grassland. Specifically, we investigated whether natal departure depends on individual competitive status (`competition hypothesis'), physiological tolerance to environmental conditions (`physiological hypothesis') or individual trophic position and the spatial heterogeneity of trophic resources (`trophic hypothesis'). The results indicated that departure timing was negatively correlated with body size at release, showing that the dominance status among competing individuals was not the main trigger of juvenile departure. A positive correlation between departure timing and individual body size at departure was observed, suggesting that inter-individual variability in physiological tolerance did not explain departure patterns. While individual growth performances were similar irrespective of the timing of natal departure, stable isotope analyses revealed that juveniles with higher trophic position departed significantly earlier than individuals with lower trophic position. Therefore, the trade-off driving the use of spatially varying environments was most likely dependent upon the benefits associated with energetic returns than the costs associated with inter-individual competition or physiological stress. This result highlighted how ontogeny, and particularly ontogenetic niche shift, can play a central role in juvenile's decision to depart from natal habitats in a predatory species.

  5. N-phenyl-carbazole-based two-photon fluorescent probes: strong sequence dependence of the duplex vs quadruplex selectivity.

    PubMed

    Dumat, B; Bordeau, G; Faurel-Paul, E; Mahuteau-Betzer, F; Saettel, N; Bombled, M; Metgé, G; Charra, F; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C; Teulade-Fichou, M-P

    2011-08-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis and DNA recognition properties of a series of three N-phenyl carbazole-based light-up probes initially designed for two-photon absorption. The vinylic derivatives (Cbz-2Py, Cbz-3Py) display strong fluorescence enhancement when bound to various duplex- and quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides whereas the oxazole derivative is not fluorescent in DNA. Determination of affinity constants by fluorimetric titrations evidenced that Cbz-2Py has a clear preference for AT-rich duplex structures. Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements confirmed the sequence-dependent binding of this compound and suggest insertion in the minor groove as shown by a strong induced CD (ICD) signal and further supported by molecular modeling. Altogether the data indicate that duplex vs quadruplex selectivity of the dyes is strongly dependent on the sequence of the duplex. Finally, the dyes exhibit high two-photon absorption cross-sections (up to 540GM in glycerol) and allow a fine and bright staining of nuclear DNA with low background fluorescence as shown by one and two-photon confocal microscopy imaging of fixed cells. PMID:21672604

  6. Carrier type dependence on spatial asymmetry of unipolar resistive switching of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Kazuki; Yanagida, Takeshi; Kanai, Masaki; Celano, Umberto; Rahong, Sakon; Meng, Gang; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Ho Park, Bae; Kawai, Tomoji

    2013-10-01

    We report a carrier type dependence on the spatial asymmetry of unipolar resistive switching for various metal oxides, including NiOx, CoOx, TiO2-x, YSZ, and SnO2-x. n-type oxides show a unipolar resistive switching at the anode side whereas p-type oxides switch at the cathode side. During the forming process, the electrical conduction path of p-type oxides extends from the anode to cathode while that of n-type oxides forms from the cathode to anode. The carrier type of switching oxide layer critically determines the spatial inhomogeneity of unipolar resistive switching during the forming process possibly triggered via the oxygen ion drift.

  7. Cell type and spatial location dependence of cytoplasmic viscosity measured by time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Krishnamoorthy, G

    1997-04-15

    Information on the cell type and spatial location dependence of cytoplasmic viscosity would be very useful in understanding some of the processes occurring in the cell. For this purpose, fluorescent dye kiton red (sulforhodamine B) was loaded into a variety of cells such as Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, human mononuclear cells, Sarcoma-180 tumor cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, plant cells from Digitalis lanata, stamen hair cells of Tradescantia, and guard mother cells of Allium cepa. Space-resolved measurements of cytoplasmic viscosity were carried out by using an experimental set-up wherein a picosecond laser system was coupled with an epifluorescence microscope. The spatial resolution of this set-up was approximately 1.0 micron, and reliable dynamic fluorescence measurements could be obtained from 10(2) to 10(3) fluorescent molecules. Fluorescence lifetime measurements showed that a large fraction (approximately 70%) of kiton red was in the free form. Fluorescence anisotropy decay of kiton red in cells was analyzed by a two population (free and bound) model. The microviscosity of cytoplasm was estimated from the anisotropy decay kinetics of the free probe. It was found that the cytoplasmic viscosity is dependent on both the cell type and spatial location within a cell. Furthermore, both the average value of viscosity and spatial variation within a cell were larger in the plant cells when compared to the animal cells. Model studies in various simpler systems have shown that the higher viscosity observed in some part of the cell could be due to either physical restriction and/or the presence of high concentrations of small solutes and macromolecules. PMID:9143317

  8. Strong photon energy dependence of the photocatalytic dissociation rate of methanol on TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenbiao; Xu, Chengbiao; Yang, Wenshao; Ren, Zefeng; Dai, Dongxu; Guo, Qing; Minton, Timothy K; Yang, Xueming

    2013-12-18

    Photocatalytic dissociation of methanol (CH3OH) on a TiO2(110) surface has been studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) at 355 and 266 nm. Primary dissociation products, CH2O and H atoms, have been detected. The dependence of the reactant and product TPD signals on irradiation time has been measured, allowing the photocatalytic reaction rate of CH3OH at both wavelengths to be directly determined. The initial dissociation rate of CH3OH at 266 nm is nearly 2 orders of magnitude faster than that at 355 nm, suggesting that CH3OH photocatalysis is strongly dependent on photon energy. This experimental result raises doubt about the widely accepted photocatalysis model on TiO2, which assumes that the excess potential energy of charge carriers is lost to the lattice via strong coupling with phonon modes by very fast thermalization and the reaction of the adsorbate is thus only dependent on the number of electron-hole pairs created by photoexcitation. PMID:24299197

  9. Time-dependent density-functional theory of strong-field ionization of atoms by soft x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford-Uranga, A.; De Giovannini, U.; Räsänen, E.; Oliveira, M. J. T.; Mowbray, D. J.; Nikolopoulos, G. M.; Karamatskos, E. T.; Markellos, D.; Lambropoulos, P.; Kurth, S.; Rubio, A.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the capabilities of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for strong-field, short-wavelength (soft x-ray) physics, as compared to a formalism based on rate equations. We find that TDDFT provides a very good description of the total and individual ionization yields for Ne and Ar atoms exposed to strong laser pulses. We assess the reliability of different adiabatic density functionals and conclude that an accurate description of long-range interactions by the exchange and correlation potential is crucial for obtaining the correct ionization yield over a wide range of intensities (from 1013 to 5×1015W/cm2). Our TDDFT calculations disentangle the contribution from each ionization channel based on the Kohn-Sham wave functions.

  10. Moving Forward in Space and Time: How Strong is the Conceptual Link between Spatial and Temporal Frames of Reference?

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Rothe-Wulf, Annelie; Hüther, Lisa; Beller, Sieghard

    2012-01-01

    People often use spatial vocabulary to describe temporal relations, and this increasingly has motivated attempts to map spatial frames of reference (FoRs) onto time. Recent research suggested that speech communities, which differ in how they conceptualize space, may also differ in how they conceptualize time and, more specifically, that the preferences for spatial FoRs should carry over to the domain of time. Here, we scrutinize this assumption (a) by reviewing data from recent studies on temporal references, (b) by comparing data we had collected in previous studies on preferences for spatial and temporal FoRs in four languages, (c) by analyzing new data from dynamic spatial tasks that resemble the temporal tasks more closely, and (d) by assessing the co-variation of individual preferences of English speakers across space and time. While the first set of data paints a mixed picture, the latter three do not support the assumption of a close link between referencing preferences across domains. We explore possible reasons for this lack of consistency and discuss implications for research on temporal references. PMID:23162519

  11. Comparison of strong gravitational lens model software I. Redshift and model dependence of time delay and mass calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefor, A. T.; Futamase, T.

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of strong gravitational lensing depends on software analysis of observational data. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behavior of strong gravitational lens modeling software with changes in redshift. Four different strong gravitational lens software modeling codes are directly compared (Lenstool/glafic, two light traces mass codes, and GRALE/PixeLens, two non-light traces mass codes) in the analysis of a mock model as well as analysis of SDSSJ1004 + 4112. The calculated time delay is proportional to DdDs /Dds. The percent change in time delays calculated at each redshift tested is compared with percent change in DdDs /Dds. A mock model with a singular isothermal ellipsoid and four images is tested with each code. Five models are used with a constant zlens and a varying zsource, and five models with a constant zsource and a varying zlens. The effects of changing geometry are similarly investigated for SDSSJ1004 + 4112. In general, the changes in time delay are of a similar magnitude and direction, although some calculated time delays did not follow changes in DdDs /Dds. This variation is explained by changes in image position calculated by glafic and GRALE, which varied according to Dds /Ds. Changes in enclosed mass for the mock model with a constant zsource are similar to changes in DdDs /Dds for three of the four codes tested. These data demonstrate the effect of changes in redshift on parameters calculated by each of the codes as compared to changes in DdDs /Dds. The paucity of comparative studies in strong gravitational lensing suggests the need for further studies. These results show that small changes in redshift affect the calculated time delay and mass, and that the effect on the calculations is dependent on the particular software used.

  12. Soil microbial community variation correlates most strongly with plant species identity, followed by soil chemistry, spatial location and plant genus.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jean H; Anacker, Brian L; Strauss, Sharon Y; Burke, David J

    2015-01-01

    Soil ecologists have debated the relative importance of dispersal limitation and ecological factors in determining the structure of soil microbial communities. Recent evidence suggests that 'everything is not everywhere', and that microbial communities are influenced by both dispersal limitation and ecological factors. However, we still do not understand the relative explanatory power of spatial and ecological factors, including plant species identity and even plant relatedness, for different fractions of the soil microbial community (i.e. bacterial and fungal communities). To ask whether factors such as plant species, soil chemistry, spatial location and plant relatedness influence rhizosphere community composition, we examined field-collected rhizosphere soil of seven congener pairs that occur at Bodega Bay Marine Reserve, CA, USA. We characterized differences in bacterial and fungal communities using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plant species identity was the single best statistical predictor of both bacterial and fungal community composition in the root zone. Soil microbial community structure was also correlated with soil chemistry. The third best predictor of bacterial and fungal communities was spatial location, confirming that everything is not everywhere. Variation in microbial community composition was also related to combinations of spatial location, soil chemistry and plant relatedness, suggesting that these factors do not act independently. Plant relatedness explained less of the variation than plant species, soil chemistry, or spatial location. Despite some congeners occupying different habitats and being spatially distant, rhizosphere fungal communities of plant congeners were more similar than expected by chance. Bacterial communities from the same samples were only weakly similar between plant congeners. Thus, plant relatedness might influence soil fungal, more than soil bacterial, community composition. PMID:25818073

  13. Soil microbial community variation correlates most strongly with plant species identity, followed by soil chemistry, spatial location and plant genus

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jean H.; Anacker, Brian L.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; Burke, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil ecologists have debated the relative importance of dispersal limitation and ecological factors in determining the structure of soil microbial communities. Recent evidence suggests that ‘everything is not everywhere’, and that microbial communities are influenced by both dispersal limitation and ecological factors. However, we still do not understand the relative explanatory power of spatial and ecological factors, including plant species identity and even plant relatedness, for different fractions of the soil microbial community (i.e. bacterial and fungal communities). To ask whether factors such as plant species, soil chemistry, spatial location and plant relatedness influence rhizosphere community composition, we examined field-collected rhizosphere soil of seven congener pairs that occur at Bodega Bay Marine Reserve, CA, USA. We characterized differences in bacterial and fungal communities using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plant species identity was the single best statistical predictor of both bacterial and fungal community composition in the root zone. Soil microbial community structure was also correlated with soil chemistry. The third best predictor of bacterial and fungal communities was spatial location, confirming that everything is not everywhere. Variation in microbial community composition was also related to combinations of spatial location, soil chemistry and plant relatedness, suggesting that these factors do not act independently. Plant relatedness explained less of the variation than plant species, soil chemistry, or spatial location. Despite some congeners occupying different habitats and being spatially distant, rhizosphere fungal communities of plant congeners were more similar than expected by chance. Bacterial communities from the same samples were only weakly similar between plant congeners. Thus, plant relatedness might influence soil fungal, more than soil bacterial, community composition. PMID:25818073

  14. Spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's tropospheric temperatures, 1980-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padmavati A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Baines, Kevin H.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Veeder, Glenn J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's temperature near 250-millibar pressure were measured through a jovian year by imaging thermal emission at 18 micrometers. The temperature field is influenced by seasonal radiative forcing, and its banded organization is closely correlated with the visible cloud field. Evidence was found for a quasi-periodic oscillation of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone, a correlation between tropospheric and stratospheric waves in the North Equatorial Belt, and slowly moving thermal features in the North and South Equatorial Belts. There appears to be no common relation between temporal changes of temperature and changes in the visual albedo of the various axisymmetric bands.

  15. High spatial resolution models of time-dependent, layered mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Sacks, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    Time-dependent models of Boussinesq convection are analyzed in order to determine the potential existence of the transient phase of multiple layered convection initially described by Ross and Sacks (1982, 1984). The initial thermal profile for subsolidus mantle convection is examined in terms of an adiabatic or a conductive profile. The effects of varied spatial resolution, aspect ratio, Rayleigh number, initial buoyancy, and supersolidus temperature cutoffs on mantle convection are investigated. It is observed that the data supports the existence of the transient phase of multiple layered convection.

  16. The time dependent propensity function for acceleration of spatial stochastic simulation of reaction–diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-10-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy.

  17. Numerical simulations of three-dimensional thermal convection in a fluid with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Masaki; Schubert, Gerald; Zebib, Abdelfattah

    1991-12-01

    A numerical simulation of three-dimensional thermal-convection structure in a fluid with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity filling a bottom-heated rectangular box is presented. It is shown that the convective flow patterns obtained in the numerical simulation are consistent with predictions of Busse and Frick (1985). The planform of the convection obtained for a fluid in a bottom-heated box of aspect ratio a(x) = 3 and a(y) = 1.5 at R sub t = 10 exp 5 was the same as the one obtained by Travis et al. (1990).

  18. Spatial hearing in Cope's gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael S; Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M; Johns, Anastasia R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of tympanum vibrations were 1-4 dB greater than sound pressure differences adjacent to the two tympana, while interaural differences in the phase of tympanum vibration were similar to or smaller than those in sound phase. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibration were highly dependent on sound frequency, and directionality in amplitude varied slightly with signal level. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tone- and call-evoked responses did not differ between sexes. Lung inflation strongly affected tympanum directionality over a narrow frequency range that, in females, included call frequencies. This study provides a foundation for further work on the biomechanics and neural mechanisms of spatial hearing in H. chrysoscelis, and lends valuable perspective to behavioral studies on the use of spatial information by this species and other frogs. PMID:24504183

  19. Relative spatial frequency tuning and its contrast dependency in human perception.

    PubMed

    Naito, Tomoyuki; Suematsu, Naofumi; Matsumoto, Eriko; Sato, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Several physiological studies in cats and monkeys have reported that the spatial frequency (SF) tuning of visual neurons varies depending on the luminance contrast and size of stimulus. However, comparatively little is known about the effect of changing the stimulus contrast and size on SF tuning in human perception. In the present study, we investigated the effects of stimulus size and luminance contrast on human SF tuning using the subspace-reverse-correlation method. Measuring SF tunings at six different stimulus sizes and three different luminance contrast conditions (90%, 10%, and 1%), we found that human perception exhibits significant stimulus-size-dependent SF tunings. At 90% and 10% contrast, participants exhibited relative SF tuning (cycles/image) rather than absolute SF tuning (cycles/°) at response peak latency. On the other hand, at 1% contrast, the magnitude of the size-dependent-peak SF shift was too small for strictly relative SF tuning. These results show that human SF tuning is not fixed, but varies depending on the stimulus size and contrast. This dependency may contribute to size-invariant object recognition within an appropriate contrast rage. PMID:25413628

  20. Temperature dependence, spatial scale, and tree species diversity in eastern Asia and North America

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Brown, James H.; Tang, Zhiyao; Fang, Jingyun

    2009-01-01

    The increase of biodiversity from poles to equator is one of the most pervasive features of nature. For 2 centuries since von Humboldt, Wallace, and Darwin, biogeographers and ecologists have investigated the environmental and historical factors that determine the latitudinal gradient of species diversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The recently proposed metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) aims to explain ecological patterns and processes, including geographical patterns of species richness, in terms of the effects of temperature and body size on the metabolism of organisms. Here we use 2 comparable databases of tree distributions in eastern Asia and North America to investigate the roles of environmental temperature and spatial scale in shaping geographical patterns of species diversity. We find that number of species increases exponentially with environmental temperature as predicted by the MTE, and so does the rate of spatial turnover in species composition (slope of the species-area relationship). The magnitude of temperature dependence of species richness increases with spatial scale. Moreover, the relationship between species richness and temperature is much steeper in eastern Asia than in North America: in cold climates at high latitudes there are more tree species in North America, but the reverse is true in warmer climates at lower latitudes. These patterns provide evidence that the kinetics of ecological and evolutionary processes play a major role in the latitudinal pattern of biodiversity. PMID:19628692

  1. Strong frequency dependence of vibrational relaxation in bulk and surface water reveals sub-picosecond structural heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sietse T.; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Okuno, Masanari; Nagata, Yuki; Bakker, Huib J.; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Because of strong hydrogen bonding in liquid water, intermolecular interactions between water molecules are highly delocalized. Previous two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy experiments have indicated that this delocalization smears out the structural heterogeneity of neat H2O. Here we report on a systematic investigation of the ultrafast vibrational relaxation of bulk and interfacial water using time-resolved infrared and sum-frequency generation spectroscopies. These experiments reveal a remarkably strong dependence of the vibrational relaxation time on the frequency of the OH stretching vibration of liquid water in the bulk and at the air/water interface. For bulk water, the vibrational relaxation time increases continuously from 250 to 550 fs when the frequency is increased from 3,100 to 3,700 cm−1. For hydrogen-bonded water at the air/water interface, the frequency dependence is even stronger. These results directly demonstrate that liquid water possesses substantial structural heterogeneity, both in the bulk and at the surface. PMID:26382651

  2. Spatial dependency of cholera prevalence on potential cholera reservoirs in an urban area, Kumasi, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, Frank B.; Duker, Alfred A.; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien; Stein, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    Cholera has been a public health burden in Ghana since the early 1970s. Between 1999 and 2005, a total of 25,636 cases and 620 deaths were officially reported to the WHO. In one of the worst affected urban cities, fecal contamination of surface water is extremely high, and the disease is reported to be prevalent among inhabitants living in close proximity to surface water bodies. Surface runoff from dump sites is a major source of fecal and bacterial contamination of rivers and streams in the study area. This study aims to determine (a) the impacts of surface water contamination on cholera infection and (b) detect and map arbitrary shaped clusters of cholera. A Geographic Information System (GIS) based spatial analysis is used to delineate potential reservoirs of the cholera vibrios; possibly contaminated by surface runoff from open space refuse dumps. Statistical modeling using OLS model reveals a significant negative association between (a) cholera prevalence and proximity to all the potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.18, p < 0.001) and (b) cholera prevalence and proximity to upstream potential cholera reservoirs ( R2 = 0.25, p < 0.001). The inclusion of spatial autoregressive coefficients in the OLS model reveals the dependency of the spatial distribution of cholera prevalence on the spatial neighbors of the communities. A flexible scan statistic identifies a most likely cluster with a higher relative risk (RR = 2.04, p < 0.01) compared with the cluster detected by circular scan statistic (RR = 1.60, p < 0.01). We conclude that surface water pollution through runoff from waste dump sites play a significant role in cholera infection.

  3. SPATIALLY DEPENDENT HEATING AND IONIZATION IN AN ICME OBSERVED BY BOTH ACE AND ULYSSES

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Susan T.; Laming, J. Martin; Rakowski, Cara E.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The 2005 January 21 interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) observed by multiple spacecraft at L1 was also observed from January 21-February 4 at Ulysses (5.3 AU). Previous studies of this ICME have found evidence suggesting that the flanks of a magnetic cloud like structure associated with this ICME were observed at L1 while a more central cut through the associated magnetic cloud was observed at Ulysses. This event allows us to study spatial variation across the ICME and relate it to the eruption at the Sun. In order to examine the spatial dependence of the heating in this ICME, we present an analysis and comparison of the heavy ion composition observed during the passage of the ICME at L1 and at Ulysses. Using SWICS, we compare the heavy ion composition across the two different observation cuts through the ICME and compare it with predictions for heating during the eruption based on models of the time-dependent ionization balance throughout the event.

  4. Determination of spatially dependent diffusion parameters in bovine bone using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Abdallah; Ståhle, Per; Svensson, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have been made for homogenous constant diffusion, bone is an inhomogeneous material. It has been suggested that bone porosity decreases from the inner boundaries to the outer boundaries of the long bones. The diffusivity of substances in the bone matrix is believed to increase as the bone porosity increases. In this study, an experimental set up is used where bovine bone samples, saturated with potassium chloride (KCl), were put into distilled water and the conductivity of the water was followed. Chloride ions in the bone samples escaped out in the water through diffusion and the increase of the conductivity was measured. A one-dimensional, spatially dependent mathematical model describing the diffusion process is used. The diffusion parameters in the model are determined using a Kalman filter technique. The parameters for spatially dependent at endosteal and periosteal surfaces are found to be (12.8 ± 4.7) × 10(-11) and (5 ± 3.5) × 10(-11)m(2)/s respectively. The mathematical model function using the obtained diffusion parameters fits very well with the experimental data with mean square error varies from 0.06 × 10(-6) to 0.183 × 10(-6) (?S/m)(2). PMID:26275499

  5. Three-dimensional electromagnetic strong turbulence: Dependence of the statistics and dynamics of strong turbulence on the electron to ion temperature ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Skjaeraasen, O.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-02-01

    The temperature ratio Ti/Te of ions to electrons affects both the ion-damping rate and the ion-acoustic speed in plasmas. The effects of changing the ion-damping rate and ion-acoustic speed are investigated for electrostatic strong turbulence and electromagnetic strong turbulence in three dimensions. When ion damping is strong, density wells relax in place and act as nucleation sites for the formation of new wave packets. In this case, the density perturbations are primarily density wells supported by the ponderomotive force. For weak ion damping, corresponding to low Ti/Te, ion-acoustic waves are launched radially outwards when wave packets dissipate at burnout, thereby increasing the level of density perturbations in the system and thus raising the level of scattering of Langmuir waves off density perturbations. Density wells no longer relax in place so renucleation at recent collapse sites no longer occurs, instead wave packets form in background low density regions, such as superpositions of troughs of propagating ion-acoustic waves. This transition is found to occur at Ti/Te ? 0.1. The change in behavior with Ti/Te is shown to change the bulk statistical properties, scaling behavior, spectra, and field statistics of strong turbulence. For Ti/Te>rsim0.1, the electrostatic results approach the predictions of the two-component model of Robinson and Newman, and good agreement is found for Ti/Te>rsim0.15.

  6. Spatial Organization of the Cell Cytoplasm by Position-Dependent Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiu Fan; Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Gharakhani, Jöbin; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2013-08-01

    During asymmetric cell division, cytoplasmic components are segregated to opposite sides of the cell. We discuss how the observed segregation can be achieved by a position-dependent phase separation mechanism controlled by a protein concentration gradient. We show that effects of even a weak gradient can be amplified by the phase transition to achieve strong segregation. We compare our theory to the segregation of germ granules observed during the divisions in the C. elegans embryo. Our study demonstrates how liquid-liquid phase separation can play a key role in the organization of the cytoplasm.

  7. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes or slower oscillation phase codes, may resolve conflicting experimental observations on gamma phase coding. Our modeling results offer clear testable experimental predictions. We conclude that input-dependency of gamma frequencies could be essential rather than detrimental for meaningful gamma-mediated temporal organization of cortical activity. PMID:25679780

  8. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (?25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes or slower oscillation phase codes, may resolve conflicting experimental observations on gamma phase coding. Our modeling results offer clear testable experimental predictions. We conclude that input-dependency of gamma frequencies could be essential rather than detrimental for meaningful gamma-mediated temporal organization of cortical activity. PMID:25679780

  9. Strong-field absorption and emission of radiation in two-electron systems calculated with time-dependent natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brics, M.; Rapp, J.; Bauer, D.

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced time-dependent renormalized-natural-orbital theory (TDRNOT) is based on the equations of motion for the so-called natural orbitals, i.e., the eigenfunctions of the one-body reduced density matrix. Exact TDRNOT can be formulated for any time-dependent two-electron system in either spin configuration. In this paper, the method is tested against high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and Fano profiles in absorption spectra with the help of a numerically exactly solvable one-dimensional-model He atom, starting from the spin-singlet ground state. Such benchmarks are challenging because Fano profiles originate from transitions involving autoionizing states, and HHG is a strong-field phenomenon well beyond the linear response. TDRNOT with just one natural orbital per spin in the helium spin-singlet case is equivalent to time-dependent Hartree-Fock or time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the exact exchange-only approximation. It is not unexpected that TDDFT fails in reproducing Fano profiles due to the lack of doubly excited, autoionizing states. HHG spectra, on the other hand, are widely believed to be well captured by TDDFT. However, HHG spectra of helium may display a second plateau that originates from simultaneous HHG in +He and neutral He. It is found that TDRNOT with two natural orbitals per spin is already sufficient to capture this effect as well as the Fano profiles on a qualitative level. With more natural orbitals (6-8 per spin), quantitative agreement can be reached. Errors due to the truncation to a finite number of orbitals are identified.

  10. Density-dependent prey mortality is determined by the spatial scale of predator foraging.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Erin K; White, J Wilson

    2016-02-01

    Foraging theory predicts which prey patches predators should target. However, in most habitats, what constitutes a 'patch' and how prey density is calculated are subjective concepts and depend on the spatial scale at which the predator (or scientist) is observing. Moreover, the predator's 'foraging scale' affects prey population dynamics: predators should produce directly density-dependent (DDD) prey mortality at the foraging scale, but inversely density-dependent (IDD) mortality (safety-in-numbers) at smaller scales. We performed the first experimental test of these predictions using behavioral assays with guppies (Poecilia reticulata) feeding on bloodworm 'prey' patches. The guppy's foraging scale had already been estimated in a prior study. Our experimental results confirmed theoretical predictions: predation was IDD when prey were aggregated at a scale smaller than the foraging scale, but not when prey were aggregated at larger scales. These results could be used to predict outcomes of predator-prey interactions in continuous, non-discrete habitats in the field. PMID:26116266

  11. Mixing-Scale Dependent Effective Dispersion for Solute Transport in Spatially Heterogeneous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F.; Dentz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Dispersion quantifies the impact of micro-scale velocity fluctuations on the effective movement of particles and the evolution of scalar distributions in heterogeneous flows. Dispersion coefficients depend on the interaction between the velocity fluctuation scales and the scale on which the scalar is homogenized. The mixing, or coarse grained scale is the characteristic length below which the scalar is well mixed. The mixing scale evolves in time as a result of dispersion and deformation of material fluid elements in the heterogeneous flow. We propose to use the mixing scale as a natural coarse graining scale for dispersion in heterogeneous flows. Using a stochastic modeling framework, we derive explicit expressions for the mixing-scale dependent dispersion tensor and its variance for a spatially heterogeneous steady-state flow field within a porous formation. The fundamental mechanisms of local scale dispersion and compression of material fluid elements on evolving velocity scales determine the evolution of mixing-scale dependent dispersion and its self-averaging behavior.

  12. Improving neutron multiplicity counting for the spatial dependence of multiplication: Results for spherical plutonium samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttsche, Malte; Kirchner, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    The fissile mass deduced from a neutron multiplicity counting measurement of high mass dense items is underestimated if the spatial dependence of the multiplication is not taken into account. It is shown that an appropriate physics-based correction successfully removes the bias. It depends on four correction coefficients which can only be exactly determined if the sample geometry and composition are known. In some cases, for example in warhead authentication, available information on the sample will be very limited. MCNPX-PoliMi simulations have been performed to obtain the correction coefficients for a range of spherical plutonium metal geometries, with and without polyethylene reflection placed around the spheres. For hollow spheres, the analysis shows that the correction coefficients can be approximated with high accuracy as a function of the sphere's thickness depending only slightly on the radius. If the thickness remains unknown, less accurate estimates of the correction coefficients can be obtained from the neutron multiplication. The influence of isotopic composition is limited. The correction coefficients become somewhat smaller when reflection is present.

  13. Strong topographic sheltering effects lead to spatially complex treeline advance and increased forest density in a subtropical mountain region.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Sarah; Chen, Jan-Chang; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Jump, Alistair S

    2014-12-01

    Altitudinal treelines are typically temperature limited such that increasing temperatures linked to global climate change are causing upslope shifts of treelines worldwide. While such elevational increases are readily predicted based on shifting isotherms, at the regional level the realized response is often much more complex, with topography and local environmental conditions playing an important modifying role. Here, we used repeated aerial photographs in combination with forest inventory data to investigate changes in treeline position in the Central Mountain Range of Taiwan over the last 60 years. A highly spatially variable upslope advance of treeline was identified in which topography is a major driver of both treeline form and advance. The changes in treeline position that we observed occurred alongside substantial increases in forest density, and lead to a large increase in overall forest area. These changes will have a significant impact on carbon stocking in the high altitude zone, while the concomitant decrease in alpine grassland area is likely to have negative implications for alpine species. The complex and spatially variable changes that we report highlight the necessity for considering local factors such as topography when attempting to predict species distributional responses to warming climate. PMID:25141823

  14. Three-Point Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters in Cosmological Models - a Strong Dependence on Triangle Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Y. P.; Borner, G.; Valdarnini, R.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, we use large P^3^M N-body simulations to study the three- point correlation function {? of clusters in two theoretical models. The first model (LCDM) is a low-density flat model of {OMEGA}_0_ = 0.3, {LAMBDA}_0_ = 0.7 and h = 0.75, and the second model (PIM) is an Einstein-de Sitter model with its linear power spectrum obtained from observations We find that the scaled function Q(r, u, v), which is defined as the ratio of ?(r, ru, ru + rv) to the hierarchical sum ?(r)?(ru) + ?(ru)?(ru + rv) + ?(ru + rv)?(r) (where ? is the two-point correlation function of clusters), depends weakly on r and u, but very strongly on v. Q(r, u, v) is about 0.2 at v = 0.1 and 1.8 at v = 0.9. A model of Q(r, u, v) = {THETA}10^1.3_v_^2^ can fit the data of ? very nicely with {THETA} ~ 0.14. This model is found to be universal for the LCDM clusters and for the PIM clusters. Furthermore, Q(r, u, v) is found to be insensitive to the cluster richness. We compare our N-body results with simple analytical theories of cluster formation, like the peak theories or the local maxima theories. We find that these theories do not provide an adequate description for the three-point function of clusters. We also examine the observational data of ? presently available, and do not find any contradiction between the observations and our model predictions. The v- dependence of 4 in a projected catalogue of clusters is shown to be much weaker than the v-dependence of Q found in the three-dimensional case. This is probably the reason why the v-dependence of Q has not been found in an angular correlation function analysis of the Abell catalogue. The v-dependence found in this paper might be an important feature of clusters formed in the Gaussian gravitational instability theories. Therefore it would be important to search for the v-dependence on Q in redshift samples of rich clusters.

  15. Generalization of visuomotor adaptation depends on the spatial characteristic of visual workspace.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Müsseler, Jochen

    2012-11-01

    The present study aims to address a novel aspect of visuomotor adaptation and its generalization. It is based on the assumption that the spatial structure of the distal action space is crucial for generalization. In the experiments, the distal action spaces could manifest either a symmetric or parallel structure. The imposed visuomotor rotations in the adaptation and the following generalization were either the same or opposing each other. In the generalization phase, motor bias resulting from prior adaptation was observed, and it turned out to substantially depend on the property of the workspace. In Experiment 1 with a parallel workspace, preceding adaptation to the same rotation was more advantageous than adaptation to an opposing rotation. This observation was reversed in Experiment 2 with the symmetrical workspace: prior adaptation to an opposing rotation was more advantageous for the generalization than prior adaptation to the same rotation. Mechanisms possibly underlying the observed influence of the workspace configuration were discussed. PMID:22990294

  16. Spatial dependent van der Waals energy between graphene and boron-nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois; Condensed Matter Group, University of Antwerp Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The small mismatch between the honeycomb lattices of graphene (GE) and boron nitrate (h-BN) leads to long wavelength Moiré patterns. In order to describe such patterns it will require large size unit cells that are unattainable with ab-initio calculations. Earlier density functional theory calculations imposed lattice matching between graphene and h-BN which induces strain and opens a gap of 4 meV. In previous works the Moiré pattern in GE/h-BN was connected to the van der Waals interaction, but a clear theoretical microscopic analysis is still missing. We used atomistic simulations with very large unit cells to investigate quantitative aspects of the connection between the vdW interaction and the Moiré patterns. The value and symmetry of the spatial dependent vdW energy is obtained which agrees with the recently reported Moiré patterns. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by FWO-Vl, EU-Marie Curie and the Methusalem foundation.

  17. Redox-dependent spatially resolved electrochemistry at graphene and graphite step edges.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Cuharuc, Anatolii S; Kim, Yang-Rae; Zhang, Guohui; Tan, Sze-yin; Ebejer, Neil; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-04-28

    The electrochemical (EC) behavior of mechanically exfoliated graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is studied at high spatial resolution in aqueous solutions using Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) as a redox probe whose standard potential sits close to the intrinsic Fermi level of graphene and graphite. When scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) data are coupled with that from complementary techniques (AFM, micro-Raman) applied to the same sample area, different time-dependent EC activity between the basal planes and step edges is revealed. In contrast, other redox couples (ferrocene derivatives) whose potential is further removed from the intrinsic Fermi level of graphene and graphite show uniform and high activity (close to diffusion-control). Macroscopic voltammetric measurements in different environments reveal that the time-dependent behavior after HOPG cleavage, peculiar to Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+), is not associated particularly with any surface contaminants but is reasonably attributed to the spontaneous delamination of the HOPG with time to create partially coupled graphene layers, further supported by conductive AFM measurements. This process has a major impact on the density of states of graphene and graphite edges, particularly at the intrinsic Fermi level to which Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) is most sensitive. Through the use of an improved voltammetric mode of SECCM, we produce movies of potential-resolved and spatially resolved HOPG activity, revealing how enhanced activity at step edges is a subtle effect for Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+). These latter studies allow us to propose a microscopic model to interpret the EC response of graphene (basal plane and edges) and aged HOPG considering the nontrivial electronic band structure. PMID:25758160

  18. Order-dependent mappings: Strong-coupling behavior from weak-coupling expansions in non-Hermitian theories

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn-Justin, Jean; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2010-07-15

    A long time ago, it has been conjectured that a Hamiltonian with a potential of the form x{sup 2}+ivx{sup 3}, v real, has a real spectrum. This conjecture has been generalized to a class of the so-called PT symmetric Hamiltonians and some proofs have been given. Here, we show by numerical investigation that the divergent perturbation series can be summed efficiently by an order-dependent mapping (ODM) in the whole complex plane of the coupling parameter v{sup 2}, and that some information about the location of level-crossing singularities can be obtained in this way. Furthermore, we discuss to which accuracy the strong-coupling limit can be obtained from the initially weak-coupling perturbative expansion, by the ODM summation method. The basic idea of the ODM summation method is the notion of order-dependent 'local' disk of convergence and analytic continuation by an ODM of the domain of analyticity augmented by the local disk of convergence onto a circle. In the limit of vanishing local radius of convergence, which is the limit of high transformation order, convergence is demonstrated both by numerical evidence as well as by analytic estimates.

  19. Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Massive Quiescent Galaxy at z = 2.636: Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Indications of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Andrew B.; Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of RG1M0150, a massive, recently quenched galaxy at z = 2.636 that is multiply imaged by the cluster MACSJ0150.3-1005. We derive a stellar mass of {log}{M}*={11.49}-0.16+0.10 and a half-light radius of {R}e,{maj}=1.8+/- 0.4 {{kpc}}. Taking advantage of the lensing magnification, we are able to spatially resolve a remarkably massive yet compact quiescent galaxy at z\\gt 2 in ground-based near-infrared spectroscopic observations using Magellan/FIRE and Keck/MOSFIRE. We find no gradient in the strength of the Balmer absorption lines over 0.6{R}e-1.6{R}e, which are consistent with an age of 760 Myr. Gas emission in [N ii] broadly traces the spatial distribution of the stars and is coupled with weak Hα emission (log [N ii]/{{H}}α =0.6+/- 0.2), indicating that OB stars are not the primary ionizing source. The velocity dispersion within the effective radius is {σ }e,{stars}=271+/- 41 km s{}-1. We detect rotation in the stellar absorption lines for the first time beyond z∼ 1. Using a two-integral Jeans model that accounts for observational effects, we measure a dynamical mass of {log}{M}{{dyn}}=11.24+/- 0.14 and V/σ =0.70+/- 0.21. This is a high degree of rotation considering the modest observed ellipticity of 0.12 ± 0.08, but it is consistent with predictions from dissipational merger simulations that produce compact remnants. The mass of RG1M0150 implies that it is likely to become a slowly rotating elliptical. If it is typical, this suggests that the progenitors of massive ellipticals retain significant net angular momentum after quenching which later declines, perhaps through accretion of satellites.

  20. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Grasselli, Federico Goldoni, Guido

    2015-01-21

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  1. Field Observations Of The 29 September Tsunami In American Samoa: Spatial Variability And Indications Of Strong Return Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, B. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Watt, S.; Apotsos, A. A.; Buckley, M. L.; Dudley, W. C.; Peck, B.

    2009-12-01

    The 29 September 2009 tsunami caused 181 fatalities and displaced more than 5000 people on the islands of Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga. This is the first tsunami to cause significant damage and fatalities on U.S. soil in more than 30 years. Scientists from around the world quickly mobilized to help document the tsunami water levels before this ephemeral data was forever lost as recovery activities and natural processes overtook the effected area. A USGS team collected data in American Samoa from October 6-22 and November 5-12, 2009. The tsunami was large, reaching elevations of greater than 15 m, however wave heights and devastation varied from village to village in American Samoa. Even within villages, some structures were completely destroyed, some flooded and left standing, and others barely touched. Wave heights, flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, and flow directions were collected for use in ground-truthing inundation models. The team also collected nearshore bathymetry, topography and reef flat elevation, sediment samples, and documented the distribution and characteristics of both sand and boulder deposits. Eyewitness accounts of the tsunami were also videotaped. One striking aspect of this tsunami was the abundance of indicators of strong return flow. For example at Poloa in the northwest of Tutuila, where the runup was greater than 11 m along a 300-m stretch of coast and flow depths exceeded 4 m, the coral reef flat was strewn with debris including chairs, desks, and books from a school. On land, River channels were excavated and new channels formed as return flow scoured sediment and transported it offshore. Possible causes for the strong return flow and the relation between the stength of the return flow, inundation distance, and runup in American Samoa are presented. These relationships and others based on data collected by field survey teams will ultimately reduce loss of life and destruction from tsunamis in the Pacific and elsewhere.

  2. Site-dependent spectra from the 1999 Turkey earthquakes considering different sets of strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.; Ende, C.; Habenberger, J.; Lang, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    In the last decade extensive strong-motion measurements were carried out by the reconnaissance team of the German TaskForce for Earthquakes. Aftershocks were recorded by a mesh of temporarily installed strong-motion recorders during the field surveys to Turkey in 1998 (Adana/Ceyhan), 1999 (Izmit/Kocaeli and Duezce/Bolu) and 2002 (Sultandagi/Afyon). Particularly the two missions in 1999 provided a unique and comprehensive database of recorded aftershocks at sites where building damage occurred. In addition, post-earthquake investigations were initiated around the provinces Adana and Kocaeli in October 2000 to gain more insight into the effect of local site conditions. Therefore, microtremors were recorded at sites of the previously installed strong-motion accelerographs and locations of evident concentration or remarkable scatter of building damage. By applying H/V-spectral ratio method on microtremor data, a classification of the recording sites (into soft soil, stiff soil, rock-type conditions) was performed. For the derivation of attenuation laws different databases were applied. In addition to the aftershock records of the strong-motion stations of German TaskForce for Earthquakes (Schwarz et al., 2002), a small dataset of main- and aftershocks from the 1999 Turkey earthquakes provided by the Kandilli Observatory (KOERI, 2002) and the General Directorate of Disaster Affairs (AFET) could be implied. The magnitude-distance composition of both datasets are quite different in terms of the covered magnitude and distance range. While the dataset of the German TaskForce mainly consists of small magnitude aftershocks (at the present state of elaboration: Ml <= 4.9) being recorded in epicentral distances Re < 70 km, the KOERI dataset is featured by larger magnitudes (Ml = 4.8-7.2) and by a distance range of about 10--250 km. The aftershock database of German TaskForce consists of 538 triaxial acceleration records (rock 53, stiff 52, soft 433), while that of KOERI comprises 145 triaxial acceleration records (rock 6, stiff 36, soft 103). On this basis, three sets of strong motion records were investigated by an one-step as well as a two-step regression analysis (similar to the approach by Ambraseys et al., 1996). Furthermore, parametric studies with respect to the lower bounds of magnitude and source depth were performed. Results indicate that the composition of the dataset and in particular the decision on the lower bound magnitude significantly determine the qualitative spectrum shape. In comparison to the spectra determined by Ambraseys et al. (1996) attenuation functions, the recorded data lead to significant lower accelerations for the borizontal as well as for the vertical components. Furthermore, no significant differences between data from soft and stiff soil recording sites can be observed, supporting the authors opinion that the severity of ground motion during earthquakes is less responsible for the high extent of building damage than the vulnerability of the building stock (which seem to be quite different for one particular building type in dependence on the date of construction). Therefore more attention should be attributed to the investigation of the building inventory.

  3. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hayrapetyan, A.G.; Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G.; Fritzsche, S.; Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena

    2013-06-15

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period τ is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods τ between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  4. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ogbechi, Joy; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Hall, Belinda S.; Bodman-Smith, Katherine; Vogel, Moritz; Wu, Hua-Lin; Stainer, Alexander; Esmon, Charles T.; Ahnström, Josefin; Pluschke, Gerd; Simmonds, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU) is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM) expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) at doses as low as 2ng/ml and as early as 8hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin’s substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells’ ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques) was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone’s effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this. Fibrin-driven tissue ischemia could contribute to the development of the tissue necrosis seen in BU lesions. PMID:26181660

  5. Fitness Effects of Chlorpyrifos in the Damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum Strongly Depend upon Temperature and Food Level and Can Bridge Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between pollutants and suboptimal environmental conditions can have severe consequences for the toxicity of pollutants, yet are still poorly understood. To identify patterns across environmental conditions and across fitness-related variables we exposed Enallagma cyathigerum damselfly larvae to the pesticide chlorpyrifos at two food levels or at two temperatures and quantified four fitness-related variables (larval survival, development time, mass at emergence and adult cold resistance). Food level and temperature did not affect survival in the absence of the pesticide, yet the pesticide reduced survival only at the high temperature. Animals reacted to the pesticide by accelerating their development but only at the high food level and at the low temperature; at the low food level, however, pesticide exposure resulted in a slower development. Chlorpyrifos exposure resulted in smaller adults except in animals reared at the high food level. Animals reared at the low food level and at the low temperature had a higher cold resistance which was not affected by the pesticide. In summary our study highlight that combined effects of exposure to chlorpyrifos and the two environmental conditions (i) were mostly interactive and sometimes even reversed in comparison with the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, (ii) strongly differed depending on the fitness-related variable under study, (iii) were not always predictable based on the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, and (iv) bridged metamorphosis depending on which environmental condition was combined with the pesticide thereby potentially carrying over from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems. These findings are relevant when extrapolating results of laboratory tests done under ideal environmental conditions to natural communities. PMID:23840819

  6. Fitness Effects of Chlorpyrifos in the Damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum Strongly Depend upon Temperature and Food Level and Can Bridge Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between pollutants and suboptimal environmental conditions can have severe consequences for the toxicity of pollutants, yet are still poorly understood. To identify patterns across environmental conditions and across fitness-related variables we exposed Enallagma cyathigerum damselfly larvae to the pesticide chlorpyrifos at two food levels or at two temperatures and quantified four fitness-related variables (larval survival, development time, mass at emergence and adult cold resistance). Food level and temperature did not affect survival in the absence of the pesticide, yet the pesticide reduced survival only at the high temperature. Animals reacted to the pesticide by accelerating their development but only at the high food level and at the low temperature; at the low food level, however, pesticide exposure resulted in a slower development. Chlorpyrifos exposure resulted in smaller adults except in animals reared at the high food level. Animals reared at the low food level and at the low temperature had a higher cold resistance which was not affected by the pesticide. In summary our study highlight that combined effects of exposure to chlorpyrifos and the two environmental conditions (i) were mostly interactive and sometimes even reversed in comparison with the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, (ii) strongly differed depending on the fitness-related variable under study, (iii) were not always predictable based on the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, and (iv) bridged metamorphosis depending on which environmental condition was combined with the pesticide thereby potentially carrying over from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems. These findings are relevant when extrapolating results of laboratory tests done under ideal environmental conditions to natural communities. PMID:23840819

  7. Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Heinemeyer, A; Ineson, P; Ostle, N; Fitter, A H

    2006-01-01

    * Although arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a major pathway in the global carbon cycle, their basic biology and, in particular, their respiratory response to temperature remain obscure. * A pulse label of the stable isotope (13)C was applied to Plantago lanceolata, either uninoculated or inoculated with the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. The extra-radical mycelium (ERM) of the fungus was allowed to grow into a separate hyphal compartment excluding roots. We determined the carbon costs of the ERM and tested for a direct temperature effect on its respiration by measuring total carbon and the (13)C:(12)C ratio of respired CO(2). With a second pulse we tested for acclimation of ERM respiration after 2 wk of soil warming. * Root colonization remained unchanged between the two pulses but warming the hyphal compartment increased ERM length. delta(13)C signals peaked within the first 10 h and were higher in mycorrhizal treatments. The concentration of CO(2) in the gas samples fluctuated diurnally and was highest in the mycorrhizal treatments but was unaffected by temperature. Heating increased ERM respiration only after the first pulse and reduced specific ERM respiration rates after the second pulse; however, both pulses strongly depended on radiation flux. * The results indicate a fast ERM acclimation to temperature, and that light is the key factor controlling carbon allocation to the fungus. PMID:16771991

  8. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Structural Relaxation: From ``Super-fragile'' Polymers to ``Super-strong'' Behavior of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexei

    2014-03-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the steep temperature dependence of structural relaxation upon approaching Tg still remains a puzzle in the field of dynamics of polymers and soft materials in general. The steepness of the temperature behavior and its deviation from classical Arrhenius law is usually characterized by the fragility index m. This contribution presents an overview of several models proposed to connect molecular parameters to the fragility. We emphasize the Generalized Entropy Theory and its prediction on the role of chain packing in fragility of polymers. Based on this theory and many experimental studies we unravel the role of chain structure, intermolecular interactions and molecular weight in polymer fragility, providing a qualitative explanations of why many polymers exhibit extremely fragile behavior. Next we show that similar qualitative ideas about frustration in packing might be applicable to other glass forming systems. In the last part we discuss the recent discovery of ``super-strong'' behavior of deeply supercooled water and the role of quantum effects in this anomalously low fragility.

  10. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  11. Time-dependent density-functional-theory calculation of strong-field ionization rates of H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Xi

    2010-08-15

    We report a numerical study of strong-field ionization rates of the H{sub 2} molecule using time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). In the dc field limit, TDDFT results for the rate of tunneling ionization agree with molecular Ammosov-Delone-Kralnov (MO-ADK) predictions, as well as results from a complex scaling method at the full configuration interaction level. Our study demonstrates the effect of photon energy, molecular vibration, and orientation on the ionization. Calculated rates for 800-nm lasers are about four times greater than the values predicted by the slowly varying field approximation for tunneling ionization. The rate for the ground vibrational state is higher than that of the fixed nuclei value at the equilibrium distance. This difference decreases with increasing field intensity. When the field intensity is sufficiently high, the two rates are very similar, and the fixed nuclear distance rate may be used to approximate the ground-vibrational-state rate. TDDFT methods predict an anisotropy slightly larger than the prediction obtained from the MO-ADK method. We also find that the field intensity plays a role in the anisotropy, which the MO-ADK results do not show.

  12. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-23

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from ?4 to ?2 via ?24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100?K, while it can be switched back to ?4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between ?4 and ?2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd(3+) ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices. PMID:26895549

  13. Facile synthesis and strongly microstructure-dependent electrochemical properties of graphene/manganese dioxide composites for supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention since it was firstly stripped from graphite by two physicists in 2004, and the supercapacitor based on graphene has obtained wide attention and much investment as well. For practical applications of graphene-based supercapacitors, however, there are still many challenges to solve, for instance, to simplify the technological process, to lower the fabrication cost, and to improve the electrochemical performance. In this work, graphene/MnO2 composites are prepared by a microwave sintering method, and we report here a relatively simple method for the supercapacitor packaging, i.e., dipping Ni-foam into a graphene/MnO2 composite solution directly for a period of time to coat the active material on a current collector. It is found that the microwave reaction time has a significant effect on the microstructure of graphene/MnO2 composites, and consequently, the electrochemical properties of the supercapacitors based on graphene/MnO2 composites are strongly microstructure dependent. An appropriately longer microwave reaction time, namely, 15 min, facilitates a very dense and homogeneous microstructure of the graphene/MnO2 composites, and thus, excellent electrochemical performance is achieved in the supercapacitor device, including a high specific capacitance of 296 F/g and a high capacitance retention of 93% after 3,000 times of charging/discharging cycles. PACS 81.05.ue; 78.67.Sc; 88.80.fh PMID:25258609

  14. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from Γ4 to Γ2 via Γ24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100 K, while it can be switched back to Γ4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between Γ4 and Γ2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd3+ ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices.

  15. Up, Down, and All Around: Scale-Dependent Spatial Variation in Rocky-Shore Communities of Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Nelson; Díaz, María J.; Holtheuer, Jorge; Garrido, Ignacio; Huovinen, Pirjo; Gómez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variation of biodiversity along environmental gradients and multiple spatial scales is relevant for theoretical and management purposes. Hereby, we analysed the spatial variability in diversity and structure of intertidal and subtidal macrobenthic Antarctic communities along vertical environmental stress gradients and across multiple horizontal spatial scales. Since biotic interactions and local topographic features are likely major factors for coastal assemblages, we tested the hypothesis that fine-scale processes influence the effects of the vertical environmental stress gradients on the macrobenthic diversity and structure. We used nested sampling designs in the intertidal and subtidal habitats, including horizontal spatial scales ranging from few centimetres to 1000s of metres along the rocky shore of Fildes Peninsula, King George Island. In both intertidal and subtidal habitats, univariate and multivariate analyses showed a marked vertical zonation in taxon richness and community structure. These patterns depended on the horizontal spatial scale of observation, as all analyses showed a significant interaction between height (or depth) and the finer spatial scale analysed. Variance and pseudo-variance components supported our prediction for taxon richness, community structure, and the abundance of dominant species such as the filamentous green alga Urospora penicilliformis (intertidal), the herbivore Nacella concinna (intertidal), the large kelp-like Himantothallus grandifolius (subtidal), and the red crustose red alga Lithothamnion spp. (subtidal). We suggest that in coastal ecosystems strongly governed by physical factors, fine-scale processes (e.g. biotic interactions and refugia availability) are still relevant for the structuring and maintenance of the local communities. The spatial patterns found in this study serve as a necessary benchmark to understand the dynamics and adaptation of natural assemblages in response to observed and predicted environmental changes in Antarctica. PMID:24956114

  16. Spatial Dependence of Physical Attributes and Mechanical Properties of Ultisol in a Sugarcane Field.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Uilka Elisa; Rolim, Mário Monteiro; de Oliveira, Veronildo Souza; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Regis; Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Magalhães, Adriana Guedes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of conventional tillage and application of the monoculture of sugar cane on soil health. Variables like density, moisture, texture, consistency limits, and preconsolidation stress were taken as indicators of soil quality. The measurements were made at a 120 × 120 m field cropped with sugar cane under conventional tillage. The objective of this work was to characterize the soil and to study the spatial dependence of the physical and mechanical attributes. Then, undisturbed soil samples were collected to measure bulk density, moisture content and preconsolidation stress and disturbed soil samples for classification of soil texture, and consistency limits. The soil texture indicated that soil can be characterized as sandy clay soil and a sandy clay loam soil, and the consistency limits indicated that the soil presents an inorganic low plasticity clay. The preconsolidation tests tillage in soil moisture content around 19% should be avoided or should be chosen a management of soil with lighter vehicles in this moisture content, to avoid risk of compaction. Using geostatistical techniques mapping was possible to identify areas of greatest conservation soil and greater disturbance of the ground. PMID:26167528

  17. Late-time Hohlraum Simulations: Spatial Dependence of X-Rays from NIF Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, David; Koniges, Alice; Marinak, Marty

    2001-10-01

    The simulation of the late-time (t > 50 ns) behavior of hohlraums requires a proper treatment of the hohlraum expansion. While the outer walls of the hohlraum are expanding, the laser entrance hole (LEH) can be filled to an extent such that x-rays can no longer easily escape. Closure of the LEH to incoming laser light has been studied by a number of authors, but closure of the LEH to escaping x-rays has received little attention. We present 1 and 2D LASNEX results as well as 2 and 3D HYDRA results for NIF hohlraums. The spatial dependence of the x-rays from NIF targets is important because the x-ray fluence is sufficient to ablate and shock spall diagnostic components. The resulting debris and shrapnel can have a large impact on the lifetimes of the NIF debris shields.1 1) D. C. Eder, M. T. Tobin, O. S. Jones, D. G. Braun, M. J. Shaw, R. E. Tokheim, T. Cooper, and B. Lew, "Methodology for Shrapnel and Debris Impact and an Assessment for an Experiment Planned for NIF", UCRL-ID-140691, NIF 0058102 (2001). * This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by UC under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  18. The phenology of space: Spatial aspects of bison density dependence in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taper, M.L.; Meagher, M.; Jerde, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Yellowstone bison represent the only bison population in the United States that survived in the wild the near-extermination of the late 1800's. This paper capitalizes on a unique opportunity provided by the record of the bison population of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). This population has been intensely monitored for almost four decades. The analysis of long-term spatio-temporal data from 1970-1997 supports the following conclusions. 1) Even though the Yellowstone bison herd exhibits an extended period of what appears to be linear growth, this pattern can be explained with classical density dependent dynamics if one realizes that perhaps the primary response of the herd to increased density is range expansion. 2) Several spatial aspects of social behavior in the YNP bison may be behavioral adaptations by the bison to environmental changes. These behavioral strategies may buffer, temporarily at least, bison population dynamics from the immediate repercussions of possible environmental stress and habitat deterioration. 3) Bison ecological carrying capacity for YNP is on the order of 2800 to 3200 animals. 4) There do appear to be indications of changes in the bison dynamics that are associated with increasing use of sections of the interior road system in winter. 5) The possibility of habitat degradation is indicated.

  19. Spatial Dependence of Physical Attributes and Mechanical Properties of Ultisol in a Sugarcane Field

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Uilka Elisa; Monteiro Rolim, Mário; Souza de Oliveira, Veronildo; Maria Regis Pedrosa, Elvira; Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Guedes Magalhães, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of conventional tillage and application of the monoculture of sugar cane on soil health. Variables like density, moisture, texture, consistency limits, and preconsolidation stress were taken as indicators of soil quality. The measurements were made at a 120 × 120 m field cropped with sugar cane under conventional tillage. The objective of this work was to characterize the soil and to study the spatial dependence of the physical and mechanical attributes. Then, undisturbed soil samples were collected to measure bulk density, moisture content and preconsolidation stress and disturbed soil samples for classification of soil texture, and consistency limits. The soil texture indicated that soil can be characterized as sandy clay soil and a sandy clay loam soil, and the consistency limits indicated that the soil presents an inorganic low plasticity clay. The preconsolidation tests tillage in soil moisture content around 19% should be avoided or should be chosen a management of soil with lighter vehicles in this moisture content, to avoid risk of compaction. Using geostatistical techniques mapping was possible to identify areas of greatest conservation soil and greater disturbance of the ground. PMID:26167528

  20. Strong motion characteristics of the M w 6.6 Lushan earthquake, Sichuan, China — an insight into the spatial difference of a typical thrust fault earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinjun; Zhang, Wenbo; Xie, Lili; Zhang, Qi; Jiang, Zhijun

    2015-06-01

    Near-field strong ground motions are useful for engineering seismology studies and seismic design, but dense observation networks of damaging earthquakes are still rare. In this study, based on the strong-motion data from the M w 6.6 Lushan earthquake, the ground motion parameters in different spatial regions are systematically analyzed, and the contributions from different effects, like the hanging-wall effect, directivity effect, and attenuation effect are separated to the extent possible. Different engineering parameters from the observed ground motions are compared with the local design response spectra and a new attenuation relation of Western China. General results indicate that the high frequency ground motion, like the peak ground acceleration, on two sides of the fault plane is sensitive to the hanging-wall effect, whereas the low frequency ground motion, like the long period spectral acceleration, in the rupture propagation direction is affected by the directivity effect. Moreover, although the M w 6.6 Lushan earthquake is not a large magnitude event, the spatial difference of ground motion is still obvious; thus, for a thrust faulting earthquake, in addition to the hanging effect, the directivity effect should also be considered.

  1. Consequences on lower-mantle plume dynamics with the post-perovskite phase change and strongly depth dependent thermodynamic and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Nicola; Yuen, David; Cadek, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    We have carried out numerical simulations of 2-D mantle convection specifically with the deep phase change from perovskite (pv) to post-perovskite (ppv). Using the extended Boussinesq approximation for a fluid with both temperature and pressure dependent viscosity, we have performed an extensive sensitivity analysis of the post-perovskite phase parameters and investigated their effects on the convective planform, heat transport and mean temperature profiles. Since the rheology of ppv is expected to be relatively weak with respect to pv (Ohta et al., 2008; Hunt et al., 2009) and to have a large thermal conductivity (Hofmeister, 2007), we assume that the transition from pv to this ppv phase is accompanied by both a reduction in viscosity by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude and by an increase in thermal conductivity by a factor of 2. Furthermore, we investigate the combined effects of decreasing pressure-dependent thermal expansivity, by considering the most recent findings by Katsura et al. (2009), and steeply increasing thermal conductivity (Hofmeister, 2008, Tang and Dong, 2010). As long as the thermal expansivity and conductivity are constant, ppv exerts a small but measurable effect on mantle convection: it destabilizes the D" layer and causes focusing of the heat-flux peaks and an increase of the average mantle temperature and also of the temporal and spatial frequency of upwellings. When depth dependent thermal expansivity and the latest thermal conductivity models are introduced, the effects of ppv are dramatic. On the one hand, without ppv, we obtain a very sluggish convective regime characterized by a relatively cool mantle dominated by large downwellings that tend to stagnate beneath the transition zone. With ppv, on the other hand, we observe an extremely significant increase of the average mantle temperature due to the formation of large sized and vigorous upwellings that in some cases tend to cluster, thus forming superplumes. If a very large thermal conductivity at the core-mantle boundary is assumed (k ~ 20 W/Km) we obtain a quasi-steady state regime characterized by large and very stable plumes with long lifetimes. The combination of strongly depth dependent expansivity and conductivity is a viable mechanism for the formation of long-wavelength, long-lived structures in the deep mantle (Torsvik et al., 2008;Dziewonski et al., 2010).

  2. Spatial and body-size dependent response of marine pelagic communities to projected global climate change.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Stelly; Aumont, Olivier; Bopp, Laurent; Arsouze, Thomas; Gehlen, Marion; Maury, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, oxygen, and food availability directly affect marine life. Climate models project a global warming of the ocean's surface (~+3 °C), a de-oxygenation of the ocean's interior (~-3%) and a decrease in total marine net primary production (~-8%) under the 'business as usual' climate change scenario (RCP8.5). We estimated the effects of these changes on biological communities using a coupled biogeochemical (PISCES)--ecosystems (APECOSM) model forced by the physical outputs of the last generation of the IPSL-CM Earth System Model. The APECOSM model is a size-structured bio-energetic model that simulates the 3D dynamical distributions of three interactive pelagic communities (epipelagic, mesopelagic, and migratory) under the effects of multiple environmental factors. The PISCES-APECOSM model ran from 1850 to 2100 under historical forcing followed by RCP8.5. Our RCP8.5 simulation highlights significant changes in the spatial distribution, biomass, and maximum body-size of the simulated pelagic communities. Biomass and maximum body-size increase at high latitude over the course of the century, reflecting the capacity of marine organisms to respond to new suitable environment. At low- and midlatitude, biomass and maximum body-size strongly decrease. In those regions, large organisms cannot maintain their high metabolic needs because of limited and declining food availability. This resource reduction enhances the competition and modifies the biomass distribution among and within the three communities: the proportion of small organisms increases in the three communities and the migrant community that initially comprised a higher proportion of small organisms is favored. The greater resilience of small body-size organisms resides in their capacity to fulfill their metabolic needs under reduced energy supply and is further favored by the release of predation pressure due to the decline of large organisms. These results suggest that small body-size organisms might be more resilient to climate change than large ones. PMID:25044507

  3. Spatial structure arising from neighbour-dependent bias in collective cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Parvathi; James, Alex; Law, Richard; Simpson, Matthew J.; Plank, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of collective cell movement often neglect the effects of spatial structure, such as clustering, on the population dynamics. Typically, they assume that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density (the mean-field assumption) which means that cell–cell interactions occurring over short spatial ranges are not accounted for. However, in vitro cell culture studies have shown that spatial correlations can play an important role in determining collective behaviour. Here, we take a combined experimental and modelling approach to explore how individual-level interactions give rise to spatial structure in a moving cell population. Using imaging data from in vitro experiments, we quantify the extent of spatial structure in a population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To understand how this spatial structure arises, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) and simulate cell movement in two spatial dimensions. Our model allows an individual’s direction of movement to be affected by interactions with other cells in its neighbourhood, providing insights into how directional bias generates spatial structure. We consider how this behaviour scales up to the population level by using the IBM to derive a continuum description in terms of the dynamics of spatial moments. In particular, we account for spatial correlations between cells by considering dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells). Our numerical results suggest that the moment dynamics description can provide a good approximation to averaged simulation results from the underlying IBM. Using our in vitro data, we estimate parameters for the model and show that it can generate similar spatial structure to that observed in a 3T3 fibroblast cell population. PMID:26893970

  4. Spatial Dependence and Heterogeneity in Bayesian Factor Analysis: A Cross-National Investigation of Schwartz Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakhovych, Stanislav; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Wedel, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayesian spatial factor analysis model. We extend previous work on confirmatory factor analysis by including geographically distributed latent variables and accounting for heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. The simulation study shows excellent recovery of the model parameters and demonstrates the consequences…

  5. Using IBMs to Investigate Spatially-dependent Processes in Landscape Genetics Theory

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of landscape and conservation genetics theory has been derived using non-spatialmathematical models. Here, we use a mechanistic, spatially-explicit, eco-evolutionary IBM to examine the utility of this theoretical framework in landscapes with spatial structure. Our analysis...

  6. Spatial Dependence and Heterogeneity in Bayesian Factor Analysis: A Cross-National Investigation of Schwartz Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakhovych, Stanislav; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Wedel, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayesian spatial factor analysis model. We extend previous work on confirmatory factor analysis by including geographically distributed latent variables and accounting for heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. The simulation study shows excellent recovery of the model parameters and demonstrates the consequences…

  7. Determination of the spatial TDR-sensor characteristics in strong dispersive subsoil using 3D-FEM frequency domain simulations in combination with microwave dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Trinks, Eberhard; Kupfer, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    The spatial sensor characteristics of a 6 cm TDR flat band cable sensor section was simulated with finite element modelling (high frequency structure simulator—HFSS) under certain conditions: (i) in direct contact with the surrounding material (air, water of different salinities, different synthetic and natural soils (sand-silt-clay mixtures)), (ii) with consideration of a defined gap of different size filled with air or water and (iii) the cable sensor pressed at a borehole-wall. The complex dielectric permittivity ?sstarf(?, ?i) or complex electrical conductivity ?sstarf(?, ?i) = i??sstarf(?, ?i) of the investigated saturated and unsaturated soils was examined in the frequency range 50 MHz-20 GHz at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with a HP8720D-network analyser. Three soil-specific relaxation processes are assumed to act in the investigated frequency-temperature-pressure range: one primary ?-process (main water relaxation) and two secondary (?', ?)-processes due to clay-water-ion interactions (bound water relaxation and the Maxwell-Wagner effect). The dielectric relaxation behaviour of every process is described with the use of a simple fractional relaxation model. 3D finite element simulation is performed with a ?/3 based adaptive mesh refinement at a solution frequency of 1 MHz, 10 MHz, 0.1 GHz, 1 GHz and 12.5 GHz. The electromagnetic field distribution, S-parameter and step responses were examined. The simulation adequately reproduces the spatial and temporal electrical and magnetic field distribution. High-lossy soils cause, as a function of increasing gravimetric water content and bulk density, an increase in TDR signal rise time as well as a strong absorption of multiple reflections. An air or water gap works as a quasi-waveguide, i.e. the influence of the surrounding medium is strongly reduced. Appropriate TDR-travel-time distortions can be quantified.

  8. SPATIAL AGGREGATION IN A FOREST FLOOR INSECT DEPENDS ON SEASONAL CONGREGATION AND SCATTERING EFFECTS OF PREDATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial aggregations arising from gregarious behavior are common in nature and have important implications for population dynamics, community stability, and conservation. However, the translation of aggregation behaviors into emergent properties of populations and communities de...

  9. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task’s demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal emotional experiences. It also illustrates flexible use of the spatial frequencies contained in scenes depending on their emotional valence and on task demands. PMID:26757433

  10. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task's demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal emotional experiences. It also illustrates flexible use of the spatial frequencies contained in scenes depending on their emotional valence and on task demands. PMID:26757433

  11. Categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition depends on different spatial frequencies.

    PubMed

    Saneyoshi, Ayako; Michimata, Chikashi

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that processing categorical spatial relations requires high spatial frequency (HSF) information, while coordinate spatial relations require low spatial frequency (LSF) information. The aim of the present study was to determine whether spatial frequency influences categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition. Participants performed two object-matching tasks for novel, non-nameable objects consisting of "geons" (c.f. Brain Cogn 71:181-186, 2009). For each original stimulus, categorical and coordinate transformations were applied to create comparison stimuli. These stimuli were high-pass/low-cut-filtered or low-pass/high-cut-filtered by a filter with a 2D Gaussian envelope. The categorical task consisted of the original and categorical-transformed objects. The coordinate task consisted of the original and coordinate-transformed objects. The non-filtered object image was presented on a CRT monitor, followed by a comparison object (non-filtered, high-pass-filtered, and low-pass-filtered stimuli). The results showed that the removal of HSF information from the object image produced longer reaction times (RTs) in the categorical task, while removal of LSF information produced longer RTs in the coordinate task. These results support spatial frequency processing theory, specifically Kosslyn's hypothesis and the double filtering frequency model. PMID:25236965

  12. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beeker, Willem P.; Lee, Chris J.; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Gross, Petra; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum and that the frequency of the sidebands depends on the intensity of the control laser light field. We show that analyzing the sideband frequency upon scanning the beams across the sample allows one to spatially resolve emitter positions where a spatial resolution of 65 nm, which is well below the diffraction limit, can be obtained.

  13. Alignment- and orientation-dependent strong-field ionization of molecules: Field-induced orbital distortion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewanowski, Maciej Dominik; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-05-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) is a starting point for many strong-field phenomena, e.g., high-order harmonic generation, as well as a source of fundamental information about the ionized target. Therefore, investigation of SFI of atoms and molecules has been the aim for research since the first strong laser pulses became available. We present a recently developed method, adiabatic strong-field approximation, to study ionization yields as a function of alignment angle for CO2, CO, and OCS molecules. We show that orbital distortion plays an important role in explaining the position and relative strength of maxima in the yields for both polar and nonpolar molecules, even for targets with low polarizabilities at low laser intensities. In particular, we report that for ionization of CO2 the maximum in ionization yield shifts towards the experimentally-measured maximum with respect to the strong-field approximation. For ionization of the CO molecule, not only does the theory predict the preferred direction of ionization correctly, but also the ratio between yields for the two molecular orientations where the electric field points either towards the C or towards the O end. Finally, we find that ionization of OCS is more probable for the laser pointing from the O end towards the S end. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the ERC-StG (Project No. 277767-TDMET), and the VKR center of excellence, QUS- COPE.

  14. Species richness effects on ecosystem multifunctionality depend on evenness, composition and spatial pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maestre, F.T.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.; Bowker, M.A.; Ochoa-Hueso, R.

    2012-01-01

    1. Recent studies have suggested that the simultaneous maintenance of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) is positively supported by species richness. However, little is known regarding the relative importance of other community attributes (e.g. spatial pattern, species evenness) as drivers of multifunctionality. 2. We conducted two microcosm experiments using model biological soil crust communities dominated by lichens to: (i) evaluate the joint effects and relative importance of changes in species composition, spatial pattern (clumped and random distribution of lichens), evenness (maximal and low evenness) and richness (from two to eight species) on soil functions related to nutrient cycling (β-glucosidase, urease and acid phosphatase enzymes, in situ N availability, total N, organic C, and N fixation), and (ii) assess how these community attributes affect multifunctionality. 3. Species richness, composition and spatial pattern affected multiple ecosystem functions (e.g. organic C, total N, N availability, β-glucosidase activity), albeit the magnitude and direction of their effects varied with the particular function, experiment and soil depth considered. Changes in species composition had effects on organic C, total N and the activity of β-glucosidase. Significant species richness × evenness and spatial pattern × evenness interactions were found when analysing functions such as organic C, total N and the activity of phosphatase. 4. The probability of sustaining multiple ecosystem functions increased with species richness, but this effect was largely modulated by attributes such as species evenness, composition and spatial pattern. Overall, we found that model communities with high species richness, random spatial pattern and low evenness increased multifunctionality. 5. Synthesis. Our results illustrate how different community attributes have a diverse impact on ecosystem functions related to nutrient cycling, and provide new experimental evidence illustrating the importance of the spatial pattern of organisms on ecosystem functioning. They also indicate that species richness is not the only biotic driver of multifunctionality, and that particular combinations of community attributes may be required to maximize it.

  15. Spatial and temporal dependence of the convective electric field in Saturn’s inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M.; Krimigis, S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2014-02-01

    The recently established presence of a convective electric field in Saturn’s inner and middle magnetosphere, with an average pointing approximately towards midnight and an intensity less than 1 mV/m, is one of the most puzzling findings by the Cassini spacecraft. In order to better characterize the properties of this electric field, we augmented the original analysis method used to identify it (Andriopoulou et al., 2012) and applied it to an extended energetic electron microsignature dataset, constructed from observations at the vicinity of four saturnian moons. We study the average characteristics of the convective pattern and additionally its temporal and spatial variations. In our updated dataset we include data from the recent Cassini orbits and also microsignatures from the two moons, Rhea and Enceladus, allowing us to further extend this analysis to cover a greater time period as well as larger radial distances within the saturnian magnetosphere. When data from the larger radial range and more recent orbits are included, we find that the originally inferred electric field pattern persists, and in fact penetrates at least as far in as the orbit of Enceladus, a region of particular interest due to the plasma loading that takes place there. We perform our electric field calculations by setting the orientation of the electric field as a free, time-dependent parameter, removing the pointing constraints from previous works. Analytical but also numerical techniques have been employed, that help us overcome possible errors that could have been introduced from simplified assumptions used previously. We find that the average electric field pointing is not directed exactly at midnight, as we initially assumed, but is found to be stably displaced by approximately 12-32° from midnight, towards dawn. The fact, however, that the field’s pointing is much more variable in short time scales, in addition to our observations that it penetrates inside the orbit of Enceladus (?4 Rs), may suggest that the convective pattern is dominating all the way down to the main rings (2.2 Rs), when data from the Saturn Orbit Insertion are factored in. We also report changes of the electric field strength and pointing over the course of time, possibly related to seasonal effects, with the largest changes occurring during a period that envelopes the saturnian equinox. Finally, the average electric field strength seems to be sensitive to radial distance, exhibiting a drop as we move further out in the magnetosphere, confirming earlier results. This drop-off, however, appears to be more intense in the earlier years of the mission. Between 2010 and 2012 the electric field is quasi-uniform, at least between the L-shells of Tethys and Dione. These new findings provide constraints in the possible electric field sources that might be causing such a convection pattern that has not been observed before in other planetary magnetospheres. The very well defined values of the field’s average properties may suggest a periodic variation of the convective pattern, which can average out very effectively the much larger changes in both pointing and intensity over short time scales, although this period cannot be defined. The slight evidence of changes in the properties across the equinox (seasonal control), may also hint that the source of the electric field resides in the planet’s atmosphere/ionosphere system.

  16. POST-TRAINING PROGESTERONE DOSE-DEPENDENTLY ENHANCES OBJECT, BUT NOT SPATIAL, MEMORY CONSOLIDATION

    PubMed Central

    Harburger, Lauren L.; Pechenino, Angela S.; Saadi, Altaf; Frick, Karyn M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if progesterone modulates object and spatial memory consolidation in young ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Object memory was tested in an object recognition task using 24- and 48-hr delays. Spatial memory was tested in a 2-day version of the Morris water maze in which retention was tested 24 or 48 hrs after training. Immediately after training in each task, mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg water-soluble progesterone. Mice were then tested 24 or 48 hrs later in the absence of circulating progesterone. Post-training injections of 10 and 20 mg/kg progesterone enhanced object recognition, but not memory in the spatial water maze. These findings suggest that object memory consolidation in young female mice is more sensitive to the modulatory effects of progesterone than spatial memory consolidation, at least using the tasks, doses, and delays tested. As such, these findings may have important implications for the design of progesterone therapies intended to reduce age-related memory decline. PMID:18687366

  17. Dependence of the signal-noise characteristics of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator on the power supply regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, V. V.; Dvulichanskaia, N. N.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. B.; Sal'Nikov, E. N.

    1991-03-01

    For spatial light modulators based on the structure metal-dielectric-semiconductor-liquid crystal, the signal and noise characteristics are investigated as a function of the amplitude and frequency of the power supply voltage and input light intensity. The dependence of the diffraction efficiency of the light modulators on the power supply regime and input light intensity is described mathematically. Power supply regimes that are optimal from the standpoint of the signal-to-noise ratio are identified.

  18. Spatially dependent parameter estimation and nonlinear data assimilation by autosynchronization of a system of partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Sean; Bollt, Erik M

    2013-09-01

    Given multiple images that describe chaotic reaction-diffusion dynamics, parameters of a partial differential equation (PDE) model are estimated using autosynchronization, where parameters are controlled by synchronization of the model to the observed data. A two-component system of predator-prey reaction-diffusion PDEs is used with spatially dependent parameters to benchmark the methods described. Applications to modeling the ecological habitat of marine plankton blooms by nonlinear data assimilation through remote sensing are discussed. PMID:24089937

  19. Assessments of habitat preferences and quality depend on spatial scale and metrics of fitness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chalfoun, A.D.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    1. Identifying the habitat features that influence habitat selection and enhance fitness is critical for effective management. Ecological theory predicts that habitat choices should be adaptive, such that fitness is enhanced in preferred habitats. However, studies often report mismatches between habitat preferences and fitness consequences across a wide variety of taxa based on a single spatial scale and/or a single fitness component. 2. We examined whether habitat preferences of a declining shrub steppe songbird, the Brewer's sparrow Spizella breweri, were adaptive when multiple reproductive fitness components and spatial scales (landscape, territory and nest patch) were considered. 3. We found that birds settled earlier and in higher densities, together suggesting preference, in landscapes with greater shrub cover and height. Yet nest success was not higher in these landscapes; nest success was primarily determined by nest predation rates. Thus landscape preferences did not match nest predation risk. Instead, nestling mass and the number of nesting attempts per pair increased in preferred landscapes, raising the possibility that landscapes were chosen on the basis of food availability rather than safe nest sites. 4. At smaller spatial scales (territory and nest patch), birds preferred different habitat features (i.e. density of potential nest shrubs) that reduced nest predation risk and allowed greater season-long reproductive success. 5. Synthesis and applications. Habitat preferences reflect the integration of multiple environmental factors across multiple spatial scales, and individuals may have more than one option for optimizing fitness via habitat selection strategies. Assessments of habitat quality for management prescriptions should ideally include analysis of diverse fitness consequences across multiple ecologically relevant spatial scales. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  20. Time-dependent second-order Born calculations for model atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balzer, K.; Bauch, S.; Bonitz, M.

    2010-09-15

    Using the finite-element discrete variable representation of the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) we extend previous work [K. Balzer et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 022510 (2010)] to nonequilibrium situations and compute--from the two-time Schwinger-Keldysh-Kadanoff-Baym equations--the response of the helium atom and the heteronuclear molecule lithium hydride to laser fields in the uv and xuv regimes. In particular, by comparing the one-electron density and the dipole moment to time-dependent Hartree-Fock results on one hand and the full solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation on the other hand, we demonstrate that the time-dependent second Born approximation carries valuable information about electron-electron correlation effects. Also, we outline an efficient distributed memory concept which enables a parallel and well-scalable algorithm for computing the NEGF in the two-time domain.

  1. Model-dependent spatial skill in pseudoproxy experiments testing climate field reconstruction methods for the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Jason E.; Coats, Sloan; Ault, Toby R.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial skill of four climate field reconstruction (CFR) methods is investigated using pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) based on five last millennium and historical simulations from the Coupled and Paleo Model Intercomparison Projects Phases 5 and 3 (CMIP5/PMIP3) data archives. These simulations are used for the first time in a PPE context, the frameworks of which are constructed to test a recently assembled multiproxy network and multiple CFR techniques. The experiments confirm earlier findings demonstrating consistent methodological performance across the employed methods and spatially dependent reconstruction errors in all of the derived CFRs. Spectral biases in the reconstructed fields demonstrate that CFR methods can alone alter the ratio of spectral power at all locations in the field, independent of whether there are any spectral biases inherent in the underlying pseudoproxy series. The patterns of spectral biases are model dependent and indicate the potential for regions in the derived CFRs to be biased by changes in either low or high-frequency spectral power. CFR methods are also shown to alter the pattern of mean differences in the tropical Pacific during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, with some model experiments indicating that CFR methodologies enhance the statistical likelihood of achieving larger mean differences between independent 300-year periods in the region. All of the characteristics of CFR performance are model dependent, indicating that CFR methods must be evaluated across multiple models and that conclusions from PPEs should be carefully connected to the spatial statistics of real-world climatic fields.

  2. Model-dependent spatial skill in pseudoproxy experiments testing climate field reconstruction methods for the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Jason E.; Coats, Sloan; Ault, Toby R.

    2015-06-01

    The spatial skill of four climate field reconstruction (CFR) methods is investigated using pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) based on five last millennium and historical simulations from the Coupled and Paleo Model Intercomparison Projects Phases 5 and 3 (CMIP5/PMIP3) data archives. These simulations are used for the first time in a PPE context, the frameworks of which are constructed to test a recently assembled multiproxy network and multiple CFR techniques. The experiments confirm earlier findings demonstrating consistent methodological performance across the employed methods and spatially dependent reconstruction errors in all of the derived CFRs. Spectral biases in the reconstructed fields demonstrate that CFR methods can alone alter the ratio of spectral power at all locations in the field, independent of whether there are any spectral biases inherent in the underlying pseudoproxy series. The patterns of spectral biases are model dependent and indicate the potential for regions in the derived CFRs to be biased by changes in either low or high-frequency spectral power. CFR methods are also shown to alter the pattern of mean differences in the tropical Pacific during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age, with some model experiments indicating that CFR methodologies enhance the statistical likelihood of achieving larger mean differences between independent 300-year periods in the region. All of the characteristics of CFR performance are model dependent, indicating that CFR methods must be evaluated across multiple models and that conclusions from PPEs should be carefully connected to the spatial statistics of real-world climatic fields.

  3. Spatial climate-dependent growth response of boreal mixedwood forest in western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xinyu; Huang, Jian-Guo; Stadt, Kenneth J.; Comeau, Philip G.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-04-01

    The western Canadian mixedwood boreal forests were projected to be significantly affected by regional drought. However, drought degrees were spatially different across elevations, longitudes and latitudes, which might cause different tree growth responses to climate change in different sub-regions within western Canada. In this way, regional classification of western Canadian boreal forests and understanding spatial tree growth responses to climate might be necessary for future forest management and monitoring. In this paper, tree-ring chronologies of two dominant tree species, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss), were obtained from mixed forest stands distributed across western Canada to study spatial tree growth response to climate based on three regional classification schemes (a phytogeographic sub-region classification, a natural sub-region classification and non-classification). Phytogeographic sub-region classification was estimated based on tree ring samples we collected in this study, while natural sub-region classification was previously developed based on analysis of regional differences in vegetation, soil, site and climate conditions. Results showed that air temperature did not significantly increase, while drought stress became more severe between 1985 to 2010. Relationships between trembling aspen growth and temperature differed between north and south parts of the study area, resulting from spatial difference in water supply. Trembling aspen growth was influenced by temperature or moisture variables of the previous years. White spruce growth was influenced primarily by moisture variables (current or previous year), and response coefficients between white spruce and drought conditions (represented by drought code) were negative in all phytogeographic sub-regions, suggesting that white spruce was more sensitive to drought stress under climate change. As a late-successional dominant species, increasingly drought stress on white spruce might cause significant alteration in forest composition of western Canadian boreal forest.

  4. Sequence-Dependent Promoter Escape Efficiency Is Strongly Influenced by Bias for the Pretranslocated State during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Skancke, Jørgen; Bar, Nadav; Kuiper, Martin; Hsu, Lilian M

    2015-07-21

    Abortive transcription initiation can be rate-limiting for promoter escape and therefore represents a barrier to productive gene expression. The mechanism for abortive initiation is unknown, but the amount of abortive transcript is known to vary with the composition of the initial transcribed sequence (ITS). Here, we used a thermodynamic model of translocation combined with experimental validation to investigate the relationship between ITS and promoter escape on a set of phage T5 N25 promoters. We found a strong, negative correlation between RNAP's propensity to occupy the pretranslocated state during initial transcription and the efficiency of promoter escape (r = -0.67; p < 10(-6)). This correlation was almost entirely caused by free energy changes due to variation in the RNA 3' dinucleotide sequence at each step, implying that this sequence element controls the disposition of initial transcribing complexes. We tested our model experimentally by constructing a set of novel N25-ITS promoter variants; quantitative transcription analysis again showed a strong correlation (r = -0.81; p < 10(-6)). Our results support a model in which sequence-directed bias for the pretranslocated state during scrunching results in increased backtracking, which limits the efficiency of promoter escape. This provides an answer to the long-standing issue of how sequence composition of the ITS affects promoter escape efficiency. PMID:26083830

  5. Spatial light modulator using polymer-dispersed liquid crystal: Dependence of resolution on reading light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kuniharu; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Kodama, Kenichi; Kishi, Kiyoshi

    1994-03-01

    A spatial light modulator consisting of a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) film, a dielectric mirror, and a Bi12SiO20 photoconductor is useful for projection-type displays, optical image processing, and optical computing. However, a portion of the reading light scattered by the PDLC film passes through the dielectric mirror and illuminates the photoconductor, thus causing deterioration of display-image quality. This article reports on the results of a detailed study on the influence of reading light on the resolution and amplification factor, which is the ratio of reading light intensity to the maximum intensity of writing light. Angular distributions of light scattered by a PDLC cell were measured and the results were used to calculate the intensity of scattered light absorbed by the photoconductor. We then analyzed the optical input/output characteristics of the spatial light modulator with regard to the optical feedback effect caused by the reading light in order to discover the parameter for evaluating image quality. The relation between amplification and resolution is derived from this parameter. We have also considered a light absorption layer for preventing the deterioration of image quality and obtained the relation between the amplification factor and the transmittance of the light absorption layer for high definition images of high brightness. Finally, these theoretical results were confirmed by an experiment using a spatial light modulator with no dielectric mirror.

  6. Hyper-Spectral Image Analysis With Partially Latent Regression and Spatial Markov Dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleforge, Antoine; Forbes, Florence; Ba, Sileye; Horaud, Radu

    2015-09-01

    Hyper-spectral data can be analyzed to recover physical properties at large planetary scales. This involves resolving inverse problems which can be addressed within machine learning, with the advantage that, once a relationship between physical parameters and spectra has been established in a data-driven fashion, the learned relationship can be used to estimate physical parameters for new hyper-spectral observations. Within this framework, we propose a spatially-constrained and partially-latent regression method which maps high-dimensional inputs (hyper-spectral images) onto low-dimensional responses (physical parameters such as the local chemical composition of the soil). The proposed regression model comprises two key features. Firstly, it combines a Gaussian mixture of locally-linear mappings (GLLiM) with a partially-latent response model. While the former makes high-dimensional regression tractable, the latter enables to deal with physical parameters that cannot be observed or, more generally, with data contaminated by experimental artifacts that cannot be explained with noise models. Secondly, spatial constraints are introduced in the model through a Markov random field (MRF) prior which provides a spatial structure to the Gaussian-mixture hidden variables. Experiments conducted on a database composed of remotely sensed observations collected from the Mars planet by the Mars Express orbiter demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  7. Time-dependent second-order Born calculations for model atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, K.; Bauch, S.; Bonitz, M.

    2010-09-01

    Using the finite-element discrete variable representation of the nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) we extend previous work [K. Balzer , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.022510 81, 022510 (2010)] to nonequilibrium situations and compute—from the two-time Schwinger-Keldysh-Kadanoff-Baym equations—the response of the helium atom and the heteronuclear molecule lithium hydride to laser fields in the uv and xuv regimes. In particular, by comparing the one-electron density and the dipole moment to time-dependent Hartree-Fock results on one hand and the full solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation on the other hand, we demonstrate that the time-dependent second Born approximation carries valuable information about electron-electron correlation effects. Also, we outline an efficient distributed memory concept which enables a parallel and well-scalable algorithm for computing the NEGF in the two-time domain.

  8. Debris spatial density dependence on control volume resolution in the geosynchronous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Martin, C. E.; Smith, D. A. J.

    The debris environment of the Earth can be characterised using spatial density within the cells, or bins, of a spherical control volume, which has dimensions of geocentric radius (altitude), declination and right ascension. The characterisation of the debris environment in this way allows model predictions and measurement data from the USSTRATCOM catalogue, radar and returned surfaces to be compared. In addition, the volume-centred approach enables semi-deterministic models to compute debris fluxes relative to given target spacecraft orbits, provided the volume cells are of sufficiently high resolution. In this way semi-deterministic models employ the spatial density representation of the debris environment to predict future collision events and the future environment. The determination of debris spatial density for discrete sectors of near-Earth space is an integral part of the semi-deterministic models, IDES (Integrated Debris Evolution Suite), LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model) and DAMAGE (Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture for the Geosynchronous Environment). Comparative model studies for the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) utilise an agreed baseline incorporating the sizes of control volume cells but the sensitivity to the choice of these sizes has not been previously explored due to the computational expense involved. The results of two such sensitivity studies performed using DAMAGE are presented in this paper. DAMAGE characterized the current debris environment by simulating the debris source (launch and fragmentations only) and sink processes for objects larger than 10 cm from the beginning of the space age to May 2001. The simulated environment in the altitude range 35,000 km to 36,800 km was found to be generally consistent with the equivalent historical evolution performed using IDES and the two-line element (TLE) catalogue. Results from the sensitivity studies suggest that computed spatial densities are stable for altitude bin sizes of 25 km or less and for declination bin sizes of 2.5 degrees or less but only outside the declination range [+1, -1] degrees (i.e. close to the Geostationary ring). Within this declination range, spatial density estimates varied by a factor of ten.

  9. Apolipoprotein E-low density lipoprotein receptor interaction affects spatial memory retention and brain ApoE levels in an isoform-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lance A; Olsen, Reid H J; Merkens, Louise S; DeBarber, Andrea; Steiner, Robert D; Sullivan, Patrick M; Maeda, Nobuyo; Raber, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) exists in three isoforms: apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4. APOE ?4 is a major genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE mediates cholesterol metabolism by binding various receptors. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has a high affinity for apoE, and is the only member of its receptor family to demonstrate an apoE isoform specific binding affinity (E4>E3>E2). Evidence suggests that a functional interaction between apoE and LDLR influences the risk of CVD and AD. We hypothesize that the differential cognitive effects of the apoE isoforms are a direct result of their varying interactions with LDLR. To test this hypothesis, we have employed transgenic mice that express human apoE2, apoE3, or apoE4, and either human LDLR (hLDLR) or no LDLR (LDLR(-/-)). Our results show that plasma and brain apoE levels, cortical cholesterol, and spatial memory are all regulated by isoform-dependent interactions between apoE and LDLR. Conversely, both anxiety-like behavior and cued associative memory are strongly influenced by APOE genotype, but these processes appear to occur via an LDLR-independent mechanism. Both the lack of LDLR and the interaction between E4 and the LDLR were associated with significant impairments in the retention of long term spatial memory. Finally, levels of hippocampal apoE correlate with long term spatial memory retention in mice with human LDLR. In summary, we demonstrate that the apoE-LDLR interaction affects regional brain apoE levels, brain cholesterol, and cognitive function in an apoE isoform-dependent manner. PMID:24412220

  10. Variant 22: Spatially-Dependent: Transient Processes in MOX Fueled Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    This work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, and to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: (1) Central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover. (2) Overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve. (3) The boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop. These accidents have been applied to: (1) Uranium reference core that is the so-called Advanced VVER-1000 core with Zirconium fuel pins claddings and guide tubes. A number of assemblies contained 18 boron BPRs while first year operating. (2) MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel. At a solving it was supposed that MOX-fuel thermophysical characteristics are identical to uranium fuel ones. The calculations were carried out with the help of the program NOSTRA/1/, simulating VVER dynamics that is briefly described in Chapter 1. Chapter 3 contains the description of reference Uranium and MOX cores that are used in calculations. The neutronics calculations of MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel are named ''Variant 2 1''. Chapters 4-6 contain the calculational results of three above mentioned benchmark accidents that compose in a whole the ''Variant 22''.

  11. Spatial dependence of polycrystalline FTO's conductance analyzed by conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, Alexandre Pessoa; da Costa, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine-doped Tin oxide (FTO) is a highly transparent, electrically conductive polycrystalline material frequently used as an electrode in organic solar cells and optical-electronic devices [1-2]. In this work a spatial analysis of the conductive behavior of FTO was carried out by Conductive-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM). Rare highly oriented grains sample give us an opportunity to analyze the top portion of polycrystalline FTO and compare with the border one. It is shown that the current flow essentially takes place through the polycrystalline edge at grain boundaries.

  12. Production of plant growth modulating volatiles is widespread among rhizosphere bacteria and strongly depends on culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Blom, D; Fabbri, C; Connor, E C; Schiestl, F P; Klauser, D R; Boller, T; Eberl, L; Weisskopf, L

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that bacterial volatiles play an important role in bacterial-plant interactions. However, few reports of bacterial species that produce plant growth modulating volatiles have been published, raising the question whether this is just an anecdotal phenomenon. To address this question, we performed a large screen of strains originating from the soil for volatile-mediated effects on Arabidopsis thaliana. All of the 42 strains tested showed significant volatile-mediated plant growth modulation, with effects ranging from plant death to a sixfold increase in plant biomass. The effects of bacterial volatiles were highly dependent on the cultivation medium and the inoculum quantity. GC-MS analysis of the tested strains revealed over 130 bacterial volatile compounds. Indole, 1-hexanol and pentadecane were selected for further studies because they appeared to promote plant growth. None of these compounds triggered a typical defence response, using production of ethylene and of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as read-outs. However, when plants were challenged with the flg-22 epitope of bacterial flagellin, a prototypical elicitor of defence responses, additional exposure to the volatiles reduced the flg-22-induced production of ethylene and ROS in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that bacterial volatiles may act as effectors to inhibit the plant's defence response. PMID:21933319

  13. Alignment- and orientation-dependent strong-field ionization of molecules: Field-induced orbital distortion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, Maciej Dominik; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-04-01

    The adiabatic strong-field approximation is used to study ionization yields as a function of the angle between the polarization of the external field and molecular axis for CO2, CO, and OCS molecules. We find that orbital distortion plays an important role in explaining positions and relative strengths of extrema in the yields for both polar and nonpolar molecules, even for molecules with low polarizabilities and at low laser intensities. In particular, we show that for CO2 the maximum in the ionization yield shifts towards the experimentally measured maximum when accounting for orbital distortion. For the CO molecule, not only is the preferred direction of ionization correctly predicted by the theory, but also the ratio between yields for orientations with the electric field pointing towards C and O ends, respectively. For OCS we find that ionization is more probable when the laser field points from the O end towards the S end than when the field points in the opposite direction.

  14. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  15. Age-dependent effects of neonatal methamphetamine exposure on spatial learning

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Williams, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal rats exposed to (+)-methamphetamine (MA) display spatial learning and reference memory deficits in the Morris water maze. In separate experiments the emergence and permanence of these effects were determined. Twenty litters were used in each experiment, and two male/female pairs/litter received saline or MA (5 mg/kg four times a day) on postnatal days (P) 11–20. In experiment 1, one MA and one saline pair from each litter began testing on either P30 or P40, whereas in experiment 2, testing began on P180 or P360. Animals received trials in a straight swimming channel and then in the Morris maze (acquisition, reversal, and reduced platform phases). In both experiments, MA-treated groups showed impaired learning in the platform trials and impaired reference memory in the probe trials, which were largely independent of age. The P30 and P40 MA impairments were seen on acquisition and reduced platform trials but not on reversal. In the probe trials, MA effects were seen during all phases. The P180 and P360 MA-induced deficits were seen in all phases of the platform trials. In probe trials, deficits were only seen during the reversal and reduced platform phases. The results demonstrate that neonatal MA treatment induces spatial learning and reference memory deficits that emerge early and persist until at least 1 year of age, suggesting permanence. PMID:17762523

  16. Spatial variation of corn canopy temperature as dependent upon soil texture and crop rooting characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    A soil plant atmosphere model for corn (Zea mays L.) together with the scaling theory for soil hydraulic heterogeneity are used to study the sensitivity of spatial variation of canopy temperature to field averaged soil texture and crop rooting characteristics. The soil plant atmosphere model explicitly solves a continuity equation for water flux resulting from root water uptake, changes in plant water storage and transpirational flux. Dynamical equations for root zone soil water potential and the plant water storage models the progressive drying of soil, and day time dehydration and night time hydration of the crop. The statistic of scaling parameter which describes the spatial variation of soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential is assumed to be independent of soil texture class. The field averaged soil hydraulic characteristics are chosen to be representative of loamy sand and clay loam soils. Two rooting characteristics are chosen, one shallow and the other deep rooted. The simulation shows that the range of canopy temperatures in the clayey soil is less than 1K, but for the sandy soil the range is about 2.5 and 5.0 K, respectively, for the shallow and deep rooted crops.

  17. A System of Repressor Gradients Spatially Organizes the Boundaries of “Morphogen-dependent” Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongtao; Xu, Zhe; Mei, Constance; Yu, Danyang; Small, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary The homeodomain (HD) protein Bicoid (Bcd) is thought to function as a gradient morphogen that positions boundaries of target genes via threshold-dependent activation mechanisms. Here we analyze 66 Bcd-dependent regulatory elements, and show that their boundaries are positioned primarily by repressive gradients that antagonize Bcd-mediated activation. A major repressor is the pair-rule protein Runt, which is expressed in an opposing gradient, and is necessary and sufficient for limiting Bcd-dependent activation. Evidence is presented that Runt functions with the maternal repressor Capicua and the gap protein Kruppel as the principal components of a repression system that correctly orders boundaries throughout the anterior half of the embryo. These results put conceptual limits on the Bcd morphogen hypothesis, and demonstrate how the Bcd gradient functions within the gene network that patterns the embryo. PMID:22541432

  18. Spatial heterogeneity in the effects of climate and density-dependence on dispersal in a house sparrow metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    Pärn, Henrik; Ringsby, Thor Harald; Jensen, Henrik; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal plays a key role in the response of populations to climate change and habitat fragmentation. Here, we use data from a long-term metapopulation study of a non-migratory bird, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), to examine the influence of increasing spring temperature and density-dependence on natal dispersal rates and how these relationships depend on spatial variation in habitat quality. The effects of spring temperature and population size on dispersal rate depended on the habitat quality. Dispersal rate increased with temperature and population size on poor-quality islands without farms, where house sparrows were more exposed to temporal fluctuations in weather conditions and food availability. By contrast, dispersal rate was independent of spring temperature and population size on high-quality islands with farms, where house sparrows had access to food and shelter all the year around. This illustrates large spatial heterogeneity within the metapopulation in how population density and environmental fluctuations affect the dispersal process. PMID:21613299

  19. Quantitative determination of valproic acid in postmortem blood samples--evidence of strong matrix dependency and instability.

    PubMed

    Kiencke, Verena; Andresen-Streichert, Hilke; Müller, Alexander; Iwersen-Bergmann, Stefanie

    2013-11-01

    Most of the daily work of forensic toxicologists deals with fatal cases resulting from overdoses of licit and illicit drugs. However, another reason for fatalities in patients suffering from epilepsy can be undetectable or subtherapeutic levels of antiepileptic drugs. Some studies have shown a correlation between "sudden unexpected death in epilepsy" (SUDEP) and the ineffective treatment of epilepsy. Low levels of antiepileptic drugs may be a risk factor for SUDEP. The death of a psychiatric patient also suffering from epilepsy inspired the investigation. Subsequent to the death of the patient, the doctor was accused of providing inadequate therapy for epilepsy. The patient was to be treated with valproic acid. We developed and validated a simple method of determining valproic acid levels by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for serum, but a transfer of the method from serum to postmortem whole blood failed. The method had to be modified and revalidated for postmortem whole blood specimens. A stability study of valproic acid in postmortem blood was conducted, showing a decline of valproic acid levels by 85 % after storage at room temperature for 28 days. During the storage time, the blood samples showed changes in consistency. Depending on the stage of decomposition, it is necessary to perform a determination by standard addition with an equilibration time of 4 h before extraction to achieve reliable results. For a proper interpretation of quantitative results, it is necessary to keep the postmortem decline of valproic acid concentrations in mind. PMID:23536197

  20. Model-Dependent Spatial Skill in Pseudoproxy Experiments Testing Climate Field Reconstruction Methods for the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Jason; Coats, Sloan; Ault, Toby

    2015-04-01

    The spatial skill of four climate field reconstruction (CFR) methods is investigated using pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) based on five Last Millennium (LM) and historical simulations from the Coupled and Paleo Model Intercomparison Projects Phases 5 and 3 (CMIP5/PMIP3) data archives. These simulations are used for the first time in a PPE context, the pseudoproxy frameworks of which are constructed to test a recently assembled multiproxy network and multiple CFR techniques. The experiments confirm earlier findings demonstrating consistent methodological performance across all of the employed methods and spatially dependent reconstruction errors in the derived CFRs. Spectral biases in the reconstructed fields demonstrate that reconstruction methods can alone alter the ratio of spectral power at all locations in the field, independent of whether there are spectral biases inherent in the underlying proxy series. The patterns of spectral biases are model dependent and indicate the potential for regions in the derived CFRs to be biased by changes in either low or high-frequency spectral power. CFR methods are also shown to alter the pattern of mean differences in the tropical Pacific during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA), with some model experiments indicating that CFR methodologies enhance the statistical likelihood of achieving a larger mean difference between the MCA and LIA in the region. All of the characteristics of reconstruction performance are model dependent, indicating that CFR methods must be evaluated across multiple models and that conclusions from PPEs should be carefully connected to the spatial statistics of real-world climatic fields.

  1. Technical Note: Measuring contrast- and noise-dependent spatial resolution of an iterative reconstruction method in CT using ensemble averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lifeng Vrieze, Thomas J.; Leng, Shuai; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The spatial resolution of iterative reconstruction (IR) in computed tomography (CT) is contrast- and noise-dependent because of the nonlinear regularization. Due to the severe noise contamination, it is challenging to perform precise spatial-resolution measurements at very low-contrast levels. The purpose of this study was to measure the spatial resolution of a commercially available IR method using ensemble-averaged images acquired from repeated scans. Methods: A low-contrast phantom containing three rods (7, 14, and 21 HU below background) was scanned on a 128-slice CT scanner at three dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 16, 8, and 4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using two filtered-backprojection (FBP) kernels (B40 and B20) and a commercial IR method (sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction, SAFIRE, Siemens Healthcare) with two strength settings (I40-3 and I40-5). The same scan was repeated 100 times at each dose level. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated based on the edge profile measured on the ensemble-averaged images. Results: The spatial resolution of the two FBP kernels, B40 and B20, remained relatively constant across contrast and dose levels. However, the spatial resolution of the two IR kernels degraded relative to FBP as contrast or dose level decreased. For a given dose level at 16 mGy, the MTF{sub 50%} value normalized to the B40 kernel decreased from 98.4% at 21 HU to 88.5% at 7 HU for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 82.1% for I40-5. At 21 HU, the relative MTF{sub 50%} value decreased from 98.4% at 16 mGy to 90.7% at 4 mGy for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 85.6% for I40-5. Conclusions: A simple technique using ensemble averaging from repeated CT scans can be used to measure the spatial resolution of IR techniques in CT at very low contrast levels. The evaluated IR method degraded the spatial resolution at low contrast and high noise levels.

  2. Bound state of solution of Dirac-Coulomb problem with spatially dependent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol?ar, Eser; Dhahir, Hayder; Mutaf, Haydar

    2014-04-01

    The bound state solution of Coulomb Potential in the Dirac equation is calculated for a position dependent mass function M(r) within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). The eigenfunctions are derived in terms of hypergeometric function and function generator equations of AIM.

  3. Bound state of solution of Dirac-Coulomb problem with spatially dependent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol?ar, Eser; Dhahir, Hayder M.; Mutaf, Haydar

    2014-04-01

    The bound state solution of Coulomb Potential in the Dirac equation is calculated for a position dependent mass function M( r) within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). The eigenfunctions are derived in terms of hypergeometric function and function generator equations of AIM.

  4. Determination of Earths transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities from observations over the twentieth century: Strong dependence on assumed forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz S. E.

    2012-05-04

    Relations among observed changes in global mean surface temperature, ocean heat content, ocean heating rate, and calculated radiative forcing, all as a function of time over the twentieth century, that are based on a two-compartment energy balance model, are used to determine key properties of Earth's climate system. The increase in heat content of the world ocean, obtained as the average of several recent compilations, is found to be linearly related to the increase in global temperature over the period 1965-2009; the slope, augmented to account for additional heat sinks, which is an effective heat capacity of the climate system, is 21.8 {+-} 2.1 W year m{sup -2} K{sup -1} (one sigma), equivalent to the heat capacity of 170 m of seawater (for the entire planet) or 240 m for the world ocean. The rate of planetary heat uptake, determined from the time derivative of ocean heat content, is found to be proportional to the increase in global temperature relative to the beginning of the twentieth century with proportionality coefficient 1.05 {+-} 0.06 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}. Transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities were evaluated for six published data sets of forcing mainly by incremental greenhouse gases and aerosols over the twentieth century as calculated by radiation transfer models; these forcings ranged from 1.1 to 2.1 W m{sup -2}, spanning much of the range encompassed by the 2007 assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). For five of the six forcing data sets, a rather robust linear proportionality obtains between the observed increase in global temperature and the forcing, allowing transient sensitivity to be determined as the slope. Equilibrium sensitivities determined by two methods that account for the rate of planetary heat uptake range from 0.31 {+-} 0.02 to 1.32 {+-} 0.31 K (W m{sup -2}){sup -1} (CO{sub 2} doubling temperature 1.16 {+-} 0.09-4.9 {+-} 1.2 K), more than spanning the IPCC estimated 'likely' uncertainty range, and strongly anticorrelated with the forcing used to determine the sensitivities. Transient sensitivities, relevant to climate change on the multidecadal time scale, are considerably lower, 0.23 {+-} 0.01 to 0.51 {+-} 0.04 K (W m{sup -2}){sup -1}. The time constant characterizing the response of the upper ocean compartment of the climate system to perturbations is estimated as about 5 years, in broad agreement with other recent estimates, and much shorter than the time constant for thermal equilibration of the deep ocean, about 500 years.

  5. Strong dependence of CO2 emissions from anthropogenic land cover change on initial land cover and soil carbon parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, Daniel S.; Brovkin, Victor; Liski, Jari; Raddatz, Thomas; Thum, Tea; Todd-Brown, Kathe E. O.

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of sources and sinks of carbon from land use and land cover changes (LULCC) is uncertain. We investigated how the parametrization of LULCC and of organic matter decomposition, as well as initial land cover, affects the historical and future carbon fluxes in an Earth System Model (ESM). Using the land component of the Max Planck Institute ESM, we found that the historical (1750-2010) LULCC flux varied up to 25% depending on the fraction of biomass which enters the atmosphere directly due to burning or is used in short-lived products. The uncertainty in the decadal LULCC fluxes of the recent past due to the parametrization of decomposition and direct emissions was 0.6 Pg C yr-1, which is 3 times larger than the uncertainty previously attributed to model and method in general. Preindustrial natural land cover had a larger effect on decadal LULCC fluxes than the aforementioned parameter sensitivity (1.0 Pg C yr-1). Regional differences between reconstructed and dynamically computed land covers, in particular, at low latitudes, led to differences in historical LULCC emissions of 84-114 Pg C, globally. This effect is larger than the effects of forest regrowth, shifting cultivation, or climate feedbacks and comparable to the effect of differences among studies in the terminology of LULCC. In general, we find that the practice of calibrating the net land carbon balance to provide realistic boundary conditions for the climate component of an ESM hampers the applicability of the land component outside its primary field of application.

  6. Spatial hearing in Cope’s gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M.; Johns, Anastasia R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope’s gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of tympanum vibrations were 1–4 dB greater than sound pressure differences adjacent to the two tympana, while interaural differences in the phase of tympanum vibration were similar to or smaller than those in sound phase. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibration were highly dependent on sound frequency, and directionality in amplitude varied slightly with signal level. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tone- and call-evoked responses did not differ between sexes. Lung inflation strongly affected tympanum directionality over a narrow frequency range that, in females, included call frequencies. This study provides a foundation for further work on the biomechanics and neural mechanisms of spatial hearing in H. chrysoscelis, and lends valuable perspective to behavioral studies on the use of spatial information by this species and other frogs. PMID:24504183

  7. On strong anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, P.; Mazzino, A.; Muratore-Ginanneschi, P.; Vulpiani, A.

    1999-10-01

    Superdiffusive behavior, i.e., < x2( t)>? t2 ?, with ?>1/2, is in general not completely characterized by a unique exponent. We study some systems exhibiting strong anomalous diffusion, i.e., ? tq?( q) where ?(2)>1/2 and q?( q) is not a linear function of q. This feature is different from the weak superdiffusive regime, i.e., ?( q)=const>1/2, occurring in random shear flows. Strong anomalous diffusion can be generated by nontrivial chaotic dynamics, e.g., Lagrangian motion in 2D time-dependent incompressible velocity fields, 2D symplectic maps and 1D intermittent maps. Typically the function q?( q) is piecewise linear. This is due to two mechanisms: a weak anomalous diffusion for the typical events and a ballistic transport for the rare excursions. In order to have strong anomalous diffusion one needs a violation of the hypothesis of the central limit theorem, this happens only in a very narrow region of the control parameters space. In the presence of strong anomalous diffusion one does not have a unique exponent and therefore one has the failure of the usual scaling P( x, t)= t- ?F( x/ t?) of the probability density. This implies that the effective equation at large scale and long time for P( x, t), obeys neither the usual Fick equation nor other linear equations involving temporal and/or spatial fractional derivatives.

  8. Inactivation of the nucleus reuniens/rhomboid causes a delay-dependent impairment of spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Layfield, Dylan M; Patel, Monica; Hallock, Henry; Griffin, Amy L

    2015-11-01

    Inactivation of the rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus or disconnection of the hippocampus from the mPFC produces deficits in spatial working memory tasks. Previous studies have shown that delay length determines the extent to which mPFC and hippocampus functionally interact, with both structures being necessary for tasks with longer delays and either structure being sufficient for tasks with shorter delays. In addition, inactivation of the nucleus reuniens (Re)/rhomboid nucleus (Rh) of the thalamus, which has bidirectional connections with the mPFC and hippocampus, also produces deficits in these tasks. However, it is unknown how delay duration relates to the function of Re/Rh. If Re/Rh are critical in modulating mPFC-hippocampus interactions, inactivation of the RE/Rh should produce a delay-dependent impairment in spatial working memory performance. To investigate this question, groups of rats were trained on one of three different spatial working memory tasks: continuous alternation (CA), delayed alternation with a five-second delay (DA5), or with a thirty-second delay (DA30). The Re/Rh were inactivated with muscimol infusions prior to testing. The results demonstrate that inactivation of RE/Rh produces a deficit only on the two DA tasks, supporting the notion that the Re/Rh is a critical orchestrator of mPFC-HC interactions. PMID:26391450

  9. Scale-dependent approaches to modeling spatial epidemiology of chronic wasting disease.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conner, Mary M.; Gross, John E.; Cross, Paul C.; Michael R, Ebinger; Gillies, Robert; Samuel, Michael D.; Miller, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    For each scale, we presented a focal approach that would be useful for understanding the spatial pattern and epidemiology of CWD, as well as being a useful tool for CWD management. The focal approaches include risk analysis and micromaps for the regional scale, cluster analysis for the landscape scale, and individual based modeling for the fine scale of within population. For each of these methods, we used simulated data and walked through the method step by step to fully illustrate the “how to”, with specifics about what is input and output, as well as what questions the method addresses. We also provided a summary table to, at a glance, describe the scale, questions that can be addressed, and general data required for each method described in this e-book. We hope that this review will be helpful to biologists and managers by increasing the utility of their surveillance data, and ultimately be useful for increasing our understanding of CWD and allowing wildlife biologists and managers to move beyond retroactive fire-fighting to proactive preventative action.

  10. Task-dependent calibration of auditory spatial perception through environmental visual observation.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Alessia; Brayda, Luca; Gori, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Visual information is paramount to space perception. Vision influences auditory space estimation. Many studies show that simultaneous visual and auditory cues improve precision of the final multisensory estimate. However, the amount or the temporal extent of visual information, that is sufficient to influence auditory perception, is still unknown. It is therefore interesting to know if vision can improve auditory precision through a short-term environmental observation preceding the audio task and whether this influence is task-specific or environment-specific or both. To test these issues we investigate possible improvements of acoustic precision with sighted blindfolded participants in two audio tasks [minimum audible angle (MAA) and space bisection] and two acoustically different environments (normal room and anechoic room). With respect to a baseline of auditory precision, we found an improvement of precision in the space bisection task but not in the MAA after the observation of a normal room. No improvement was found when performing the same task in an anechoic chamber. In addition, no difference was found between a condition of short environment observation and a condition of full vision during the whole experimental session. Our results suggest that even short-term environmental observation can calibrate auditory spatial performance. They also suggest that echoes can be the cue that underpins visual calibration. Echoes may mediate the transfer of information from the visual to the auditory system. PMID:26082692

  11. Task-dependent calibration of auditory spatial perception through environmental visual observation

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Alessia; Brayda, Luca; Gori, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Visual information is paramount to space perception. Vision influences auditory space estimation. Many studies show that simultaneous visual and auditory cues improve precision of the final multisensory estimate. However, the amount or the temporal extent of visual information, that is sufficient to influence auditory perception, is still unknown. It is therefore interesting to know if vision can improve auditory precision through a short-term environmental observation preceding the audio task and whether this influence is task-specific or environment-specific or both. To test these issues we investigate possible improvements of acoustic precision with sighted blindfolded participants in two audio tasks [minimum audible angle (MAA) and space bisection] and two acoustically different environments (normal room and anechoic room). With respect to a baseline of auditory precision, we found an improvement of precision in the space bisection task but not in the MAA after the observation of a normal room. No improvement was found when performing the same task in an anechoic chamber. In addition, no difference was found between a condition of short environment observation and a condition of full vision during the whole experimental session. Our results suggest that even short-term environmental observation can calibrate auditory spatial performance. They also suggest that echoes can be the cue that underpins visual calibration. Echoes may mediate the transfer of information from the visual to the auditory system. PMID:26082692

  12. Near or far? It depends on my impression: Moral information and spatial behavior in virtual interactions.

    PubMed

    Iachini, Tina; Pagliaro, Stefano; Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2015-10-01

    Near body distance is a key component of action and social interaction. Recent research has shown that peripersonal space (reachability-distance for acting with objects) and interpersonal space (comfort-distance for interacting with people) share common mechanisms and reflect the social valence of stimuli. The social psychological literature has demonstrated that information about morality is crucial because it affects impression formation and the intention to approach-avoid others. Here we explore whether peripersonal/interpersonal spaces are modulated by moral information. Thirty-six participants interacted with male/female virtual confederates described by moral/immoral/neutral sentences. The modulation of body space was measured by reachability-distance and comfort-distance while participants stood still or walked toward virtual confederates. Results showed that distance expanded with immorally described confederates and contracted with morally described confederates. This pattern was present in both spaces, although it was stronger in comfort-distance. Consistent with an embodied cognition approach, the findings suggest that high-level socio-cognitive processes are linked to sensorimotor-spatial processes. PMID:26386781

  13. Does a hospital's quality depend on the quality of other hospitals? A spatial econometrics approach

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Hugh; Santos, Rita; Siciliani, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether a hospital's quality is affected by the quality provided by other hospitals in the same market. We first sketch a theoretical model with regulated prices and derive conditions on demand and cost functions which determine whether a hospital will increase its quality if its rivals increase their quality. We then apply spatial econometric methods to a sample of English hospitals in 2009–10 and a set of 16 quality measures including mortality rates, readmission, revision and redo rates, and three patient reported indicators, to examine the relationship between the quality of hospitals. We find that a hospital's quality is positively associated with the quality of its rivals for seven out of the sixteen quality measures. There are no statistically significant negative associations. In those cases where there is a significant positive association, an increase in rivals' quality by 10% increases a hospital's quality by 1.7% to 2.9%. The finding suggests that for some quality measures a policy which improves the quality in one hospital will have positive spillover effects on the quality in other hospitals. PMID:25843994

  14. How within field abundance and spatial distribution patterns of earthworms and macropores depend on soil tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaik, Loes; Palm, Juliane; Schröder, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms play a key role in soil systems. They are ecosystem engineers affecting soil structure as well as the transport and availability of water and solutes through their burrowing behaviour. There are three different ecological earthworm types with different burrowing behaviour that can result in varying local infiltration patterns: from rapid deep vertical infiltration to a stronger diffuse distribution of water and solutes in the upper soil layers. The small scale variation in earthworm abundance is often very high and within fields earthworm population processes might result in an aggregated pattern. The question arises how the local distribution of earthworms affects spatial distributions of macroporosity and how both are influenced by soil tillage. Therefore we performed a total number of 430 earthworm samplings on four differently tilled agricultural fields in the Weiherbach catchment (South East Germany). Additionally, at a limited amount of 32 locations on two of the fields we performed sprinkling experiments with brilliant blue and excavated the soil to count macropores at different soil depths (10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm) to compare macropore distributions to the earthworm distributions.

  15. Time-dependent analysis of spatially resolved fluctuations observed by microwave scattering on TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadoul, M.; Waidmann, G.; Vandenplas, P. E.

    1998-03-01

    A 2 mm microwave scattering system was used on TEXTOR to observe density microfluctuations with good space and time resolution. In ohmic heating conditions, a turbulent sawtooth precursor was discovered and studied in detail near the q = 1 surface, the large fluctuation spike occurring at the sawtooth crash was precisely located in the mixing region, and it was shown that a turbulence pulse propagates together with the outgoing heat pulse. In sawteeth-free neutral beam injection heating discharges, evidence of a toroidal Doppler effect was collected suggesting short parallel wavelength fluctuations near the magnetic axis. In sawtoothing neutral beam injection discharges, a strong transition of the MHz fluctuation levels during the sawtooth development appears as new evidence of the link between confinement and fluctuations.

  16. Early life inflammatory pain induces long-lasting deficits in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Yoko O; Victoria, Nicole C; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Murphy, Anne Z; Parent, Marise B

    2015-02-01

    The present experiment tested the hypothesis that neonatal injury disrupts adult hippocampal functioning and that normal aging or chronic stress during adulthood, which are known to have a negative impact on hippocampal function, exacerbate these effects. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraplantar injection of the inflammatory agent carrageenan (1%) on the day of birth and their memory was tested in the hippocampal-dependent spatial water maze in adulthood and again in middle age. We found that neonatal injury impaired hippocampal-dependent memory in adulthood, that the effects of injury on memory were more pronounced in middle-aged male rats, and that chronic stress accelerated the onset of these memory deficits. Neonatal injury also decreased glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the dorsal CA1 area of middle-aged rats, a brain region critical for spatial memory. Morphine administration at the time of injury completely reversed injury-induced memory deficits, but neonatal morphine treatments in the absence of injury produced significant memory impairments in adulthood. Collectively, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that neonatal injury produces long-lasting disruption in adult hippocampal functioning. PMID:25451312

  17. Strain-Dependent Variations in Spatial Learning and in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus Of Freely Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Schwegler, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal synaptic plasticity is believed to comprise the cellular basis for spatial learning. Strain-dependent differences in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region have been reported. However, it is not known whether these differences extend to other synapses within the trisynaptic circuit, although there is evidence for morphological variations within that path. We investigated whether Wistar and Hooded Lister (HL) rat strains express differences in synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus in vivo. We also explored whether they exhibit differences in the ability to engage in spatial learning in an eight-arm radial maze. Basal synaptic transmission was stable over a 24-h period in both rat strains, and the input–output relationship of both strains was not significantly different. Paired-pulse analysis revealed significantly less paired-pulse facilitation in the HL strain when pulses were given 40–100?ms apart. Low frequency stimulation at 1?Hz evoked long-term depression (>24?h) in Wistar and short-term depression (<2?h) in HL rats; 200?Hz stimulation induced long-term potentiation (>24?h) in Wistar, and a transient, significantly smaller potentiation (<1?h) in HL rats, suggesting that HL rats have higher thresholds for expression of persistent synaptic plasticity. Training for 10 days in an eight-arm radial maze revealed that HL rats master the working memory task faster than Wistar rats, although both strains show an equivalent performance by the end of the trial period. HL rats also perform more efficiently in a double working and reference memory task. On the other hand, Wistar rats show better reference memory performance on the final (8–10) days of training. Wistar rats were less active and more anxious than HL rats. These data suggest that strain-dependent variations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity occur in different hippocampal synapses. A clear correlation with differences in spatial learning is not evident however. PMID:21436876

  18. Spatially resolved observation of crystal-face-dependent catalysis by single turnover counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Sels, Bert F.; Uji-I, Hiroshi; de Schryver, Frans C.; Jacobs, Pierre A.; de Vos, Dirk E.; Hofkens, Johan

    2006-02-01

    Catalytic processes on surfaces have long been studied by probing model reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces under high vacuum conditions. Yet the vast majority of industrial heterogeneous catalysis occurs at ambient or elevated pressures using complex materials with crystal faces, edges and defects differing in their catalytic activity. Clearly, if new or improved catalysts are to be rationally designed, we require quantitative correlations between surface features and catalytic activity-ideally obtained under realistic reaction conditions. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy have allowed in situ characterization of catalyst surfaces with atomic resolution, but are limited by the need for low-pressure conditions and conductive surfaces, respectively. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy can identify vibrations of adsorbed reactants and products in both gaseous and condensed phases, but so far lacks sensitivity down to the single molecule level. Here we adapt real-time monitoring of the chemical transformation of individual organic molecules by fluorescence microscopy to monitor reactions catalysed by crystals of a layered double hydroxide immersed in reagent solution. By using a wide field microscope, we are able to map the spatial distribution of catalytic activity over the entire crystal by counting single turnover events. We find that ester hydrolysis proceeds on the lateral {1010} crystal faces, while transesterification occurs on the entire outer crystal surface. Because the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure and in a condensed phase, it can be applied to the growing number of liquid-phase industrial organic transformations to localize catalytic activity on and in inorganic solids. An exciting opportunity is the use of probe molecules with different size and functionality, which should provide insight into shape-selective or structure-sensitive catalysis and thus help with the rational design of new or more productive heterogeneous catalysts.

  19. Spatially resolved observation of crystal-face-dependent catalysis by single turnover counting.

    PubMed

    Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Sels, Bert F; Uji-I, Hiroshi; De Schryver, Frans C; Jacobs, Pierre A; De Vos, Dirk E; Hofkens, Johan

    2006-02-01

    Catalytic processes on surfaces have long been studied by probing model reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces under high vacuum conditions. Yet the vast majority of industrial heterogeneous catalysis occurs at ambient or elevated pressures using complex materials with crystal faces, edges and defects differing in their catalytic activity. Clearly, if new or improved catalysts are to be rationally designed, we require quantitative correlations between surface features and catalytic activity--ideally obtained under realistic reaction conditions. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy have allowed in situ characterization of catalyst surfaces with atomic resolution, but are limited by the need for low-pressure conditions and conductive surfaces, respectively. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy can identify vibrations of adsorbed reactants and products in both gaseous and condensed phases, but so far lacks sensitivity down to the single molecule level. Here we adapt real-time monitoring of the chemical transformation of individual organic molecules by fluorescence microscopy to monitor reactions catalysed by crystals of a layered double hydroxide immersed in reagent solution. By using a wide field microscope, we are able to map the spatial distribution of catalytic activity over the entire crystal by counting single turnover events. We find that ester hydrolysis proceeds on the lateral {1010} crystal faces, while transesterification occurs on the entire outer crystal surface. Because the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure and in a condensed phase, it can be applied to the growing number of liquid-phase industrial organic transformations to localize catalytic activity on and in inorganic solids. An exciting opportunity is the use of probe molecules with different size and functionality, which should provide insight into shape-selective or structure-sensitive catalysis and thus help with the rational design of new or more productive heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:16452976

  20. Numerical Volumetric Analysis of Spatially Dependent Transmissivity and Storativity in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, K.; Osiensky, J.

    2005-12-01

    Aquifer transmissivity (T) and storativity (S) values control the rate and areal extent of propagation of the cone of depression from a pumped well. It has been documented recently that transmissivity and storativity, reflect the geometric and arithmetic means, respectively, of the area contacted by the cone of depression. However, these findings do not reflect a volumetric evaluation of the cone of depression within the heterogenities. Analysis of spatial, volumetric variations within the cone of depression expressed at the potentiometric surface, offers a more general solution to evaluate the meaning of T and S values. Log-normal and normal distributions of hydraulic conductivity as block heterogeneities were established within model domains for simulated aquifer tests. By analyzing the volumetric evolution of the cone of depression observed in the potentiometric surface, we are able to illustrate the averaging of transmissivity as a function of time, and distance from the pumping well for the entire affected aquifer. Volumetric analysis of simulated aquifer tests show an exponential decrease in the arithmetic, harmonic, and geometric weighted mean transmissivity within the evolving cone of depression through time, approaching steady, basin-wide averages. Transmissivity estimates derived for single observation wells by conventional testing methods (i.e., Theis, 1935; Cooper and Jacob, 1946) are found to increase with increasing radial distance from the pumping well. However, when the same observation well drawdown data are plotted together with, and constrained by, the drawdown curve for the pumping well, a family of drawdown curves is derived that yields transmissivity values that are consistent with the volumetric, weighted, mean transmissivity values calculated for the entire cone of depression for specific periods of time (i.e., areal extent).

  1. Spatial dependence of alveolar angiogenesis in post-pneumonectomy lung growth.

    PubMed

    Konerding, Moritz A; Gibney, Barry C; Houdek, Jan P; Chamoto, Kenji; Ackermann, Maximilian; Lee, Grace S; Lin, Miao; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J

    2012-03-01

    Growth of the remaining lung after pneumonectomy has been observed in many mammalian species; nonetheless, the pattern and morphology of alveolar angiogenesis during compensatory growth is unknown. Here, we investigated alveolar angiogenesis in a murine model of post-pneumonectomy lung growth. As expected, the volume and weight of the remaining lung returned to near-baseline levels within 21 days of pneumonectomy. The percentage increase in lobar weight was greatest in the cardiac lobe (P < 0.001). Cell cycle flow cytometry demonstrated a peak of lung cell proliferation (12.02 ± 1.48%) 6 days after pneumonectomy. Spatial autocorrelation analysis of the cardiac lobe demonstrated clustering of similar vascular densities (positive autocorrelation) that consistently mapped to subpleural regions of the cardiac lobe. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated increased cell density and enhanced expression of angiogenesis-related factors VEGFA, and GLUT1 in these subpleural regions. Corrosion casting and scanning electron microscopy 3-6 days after pneumonectomy demonstrated subpleural vessels with angiogenic sprouts. The monopodial sprouts appeared to be randomly oriented along the vessel axis with interbranch distances of 11.4 ± 4.8 ?m in the regions of active angiogenesis. Also present within the regions of increased vascular density were frequent "holes" or "pillars" consistent with active intussusceptive angiogenesis. The mean pillar diameter was 4.2 ± 3.8 ?m, and the pillars were observed in all regions of active angiogenesis. These findings indicate that the process of alveolar construction involves discrete regions of regenerative growth, particularly in the subpleural regions of the cardiac lobe, characterized by both sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. PMID:21969134

  2. Nonlinear frequency-dependent effects in the dc magnetization of uniaxial magnetic nanoparticles in superimposed strong alternating current and direct current fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Nijun; Byrne, Declan; Coffey, William T.; Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Titov, Serguey V.

    2014-11-01

    The dc component of the magnetization of noninteracting fine magnetic particles possessing simple uniaxial anisotropy and subjected to strong ac and dc bias magnetic fields is calculated via the magnetic Langevin equation. In the presence of an ac driving field, the dc component of the magnetization of uniaxial particles alters drastically leading to new nonlinear effects; in particular, it becomes frequency-dependent. In axial symmetry, where the strong ac field is parallel to the easy axis of a particle, two distinct dispersion regions in the dc magnetization at low and mid-frequencies emerge, corresponding to longitudinal overbarrier and intrawell relaxation modes. Such frequency-dependent behavior allows one to estimate the magnetization reversal time via the half-width of the low-frequency dispersion band. Otherwise, by applying the strong ac field at an angle to the easy axis of a particle so breaking the axial symmetry, a third high-frequency nonlinear resonant dispersion in the dc component of the magnetization appears accompanied by parametric resonance behavior due to excitation of transverse modes with frequencies close to the precession frequency.

  3. Effects of surround articulation on lightness depend on the spatial arrangement of the articulated region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemach, Iris K.; Rudd, Michael E.

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effect of surround articulation on the perceived lightness of a target disk. Surround articulation was manipulated by varying either the number of wedges in a surround consisting of wedges of alternating luminance or the number of checks in a surround consisting of a radial checkerboard pattern. In most conditions, increased articulation caused incremental targets to appear lighter and decremental targets to appear darker. But increasing the surround articulation in a way that did not increase the number of target-coaligned edges in the display did not affect the target lightness. We propose that the effects of surround articulation depend on the relationship between the orientations and contrast polarities of the target edges and those of edges present within the surround.

  4. Somatosensory cortex functional connectivity abnormalities in autism show opposite trends, depending on direction and spatial scale.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sheraz; Michmizos, Konstantinos; Tommerdahl, Mark; Ganesan, Santosh; Kitzbichler, Manfred G; Zetino, Manuel; Garel, Keri-Lee A; Herbert, Martha R; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Kenet, Tal

    2015-05-01

    Functional connectivity is abnormal in autism, but the nature of these abnormalities remains elusive. Different studies, mostly using functional magnetic resonance imaging, have found increased, decreased, or even mixed pattern functional connectivity abnormalities in autism, but no unifying framework has emerged to date. We measured functional connectivity in individuals with autism and in controls using magnetoencephalography, which allowed us to resolve both the directionality (feedforward versus feedback) and spatial scale (local or long-range) of functional connectivity. Specifically, we measured the cortical response and functional connectivity during a passive 25-Hz vibrotactile stimulation in the somatosensory cortex of 20 typically developing individuals and 15 individuals with autism, all males and right-handed, aged 8-18, and the mu-rhythm during resting state in a subset of these participants (12 per group, same age range). Two major significant group differences emerged in the response to the vibrotactile stimulus. First, the 50-Hz phase locking component of the cortical response, generated locally in the primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortex, was reduced in the autism group (P < 0.003, corrected). Second, feedforward functional connectivity between S1 and S2 was increased in the autism group (P < 0.004, corrected). During resting state, there was no group difference in the mu-? rhythm. In contrast, the mu-? rhythm, which has been associated with feedback connectivity, was significantly reduced in the autism group (P < 0.04, corrected). Furthermore, the strength of the mu-? was correlated to the relative strength of 50 Hz component of the response to the vibrotactile stimulus (r = 0.78, P < 0.00005), indicating a shared aetiology for these seemingly unrelated abnormalities. These magnetoencephalography-derived measures were correlated with two different behavioural sensory processing scores (P < 0.01 and P < 0.02 for the autism group, P < 0.01 and P < 0.0001 for the typical group), with autism severity (P < 0.03), and with diagnosis (89% accuracy). A biophysically realistic computational model using data driven feedforward and feedback parameters replicated the magnetoencephalography data faithfully. The direct observation of both abnormally increased and abnormally decreased functional connectivity in autism occurring simultaneously in different functional connectivity streams, offers a potential unifying framework for the unexplained discrepancies in current findings. Given that cortical feedback, whether local or long-range, is intrinsically non-linear, while cortical feedforward is generally linear relative to the stimulus, the present results suggest decreased non-linearity alongside an increased veridical component of the cortical response in autism. PMID:25765326

  5. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of nanoparticles inside lysosomes using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Influence of key parameters and dipolar interactions, and evidence for strong spatial variation of heating power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, R. P.; Carrey, J.; Respaud, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the influence of dipolar interactions in magnetic hyperthermia experiments is of crucial importance for fine optimization of nanoparticle (NP) heating power. In this study we use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate hysteresis loops that correctly account for both time and temperature. This algorithm is shown to correctly reproduce the high-frequency hysteresis loop of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic NPs without any ad hoc or artificial parameters. The algorithm is easily parallelizable with a good speed-up behavior, which considerably decreases the calculation time on several processors and enables the study of assemblies of several thousands of NPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic NPs dispersed inside spherical lysosomes is studied as a function of several key parameters: volume concentration, applied magnetic field, lysosome size, NP diameter, and anisotropy. The influence of these parameters is illustrated and comprehensively explained. In summary, magnetic interactions increase the coercive field, saturation field, and hysteresis area of major loops. However, for small amplitude magnetic fields such as those used in magnetic hyperthermia, the heating power as a function of concentration can increase, decrease, or display a bell shape, depending on the relationship between the applied magnetic field and the coercive/saturation fields of the NPs. The hysteresis area is found to be well correlated with the parallel or antiparallel nature of the dipolar field acting on each particle. The heating power of a given NP is strongly influenced by a local concentration involving approximately 20 neighbors. Because this local concentration strongly decreases upon approaching the surface, the heating power increases or decreases in the vicinity of the lysosome membrane. The amplitude of variation reaches more than one order of magnitude in certain conditions. This transition occurs on a thickness corresponding to approximately 1.3 times the mean distance between two neighbors. The amplitude and sign of this variation is explained. Finally, implications of these various findings are discussed in the framework of magnetic hyperthermia optimization. It is concluded that feedback on two specific points from biology experiments is required for further advancement of the optimization of magnetic NPs for magnetic hyperthermia. The present simulations will be an advantageous tool to optimize magnetic NPs heating power and interpret experimental results.

  6. Configuration-interaction-based time-dependent orbital approach for ab initio treatment of electronic dynamics in a strong optical laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, Nina; Santra, Robin; Gordon, Ariel

    2006-10-15

    The time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) method - an ab initio electronic-structure technique with predictive character - is reformulated in terms of an effective one-electron theory with coupled channels. In this form, the TDCIS equations of motion may be evaluated using standard wave-packet propagation techniques in real space. The time-dependent orbital formulation of TDCIS has computational and conceptual advantages for studying strong-field phenomena in many-electron systems. A simplified version of this theory, referred to as the determinantal single-active-electron (d-SAE) method, is derived. TDCIS and d-SAE are tested by their application to a one-dimensional two-electron model in a strong laser field. The numerically exact time-dependent dipole moment of the interacting system is found to be very well reproduced with TDCIS. The d-SAE method is less accurate, but still provides superior performance in comparison to the standard single-active-electron approach.

  7. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-Lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies. PMID:25666161

  8. THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DEPENDENCE OF CORONAL HEATING BY ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Cranmer, S. R.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2013-08-20

    The solar atmosphere may be heated by Alfven waves that propagate up from the convection zone and dissipate their energy in the chromosphere and corona. To further test this theory, we consider wave heating in an active region observed on 2012 March 7. A potential field model of the region is constructed, and 22 field lines representing observed coronal loops are traced through the model. Using a three-dimensional (3D) reduced magnetohydrodynamics code, we simulate the dynamics of Alfven waves in and near the observed loops. The results for different loops are combined into a single formula describing the average heating rate Q as a function of position within the observed active region. We suggest this expression may be approximately valid also for other active regions, and therefore may be used to construct 3D, time-dependent models of the coronal plasma. Such models are needed to understand the role of thermal non-equilibrium in the structuring and dynamics of the Sun's corona.

  9. Involvement of NADPH-Dependent and cAMP-PKA Sensitive H+ Channels in the Chorda Tympani Nerve Responses to Strong Acids

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, John A.; T. Phan, Tam-Hao; Heck, Gerard L.; Ren, ZuoJun; Coleman, Jamison; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Melone, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to strong (HCl) and weak (CO2 and acetic acid) acidic stimuli are dependent upon NADPH oxidase–linked and cAMP-sensitive proton conductances in taste cell membranes, CT responses were monitored in rats, wild-type (WT) mice, and gp91phox knockout (KO) mice in the absence and presence of blockers (Zn2+ and diethyl pyrocarbonate [DEPC]) or activators (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP; 8-CPT-cAMP) of proton channels and activators of the NADPH oxidase enzyme (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA], H2O2, and nitrazepam). Zn2+ and DEPC inhibited and 8-CPT-cAMP, PMA, H2O2, and nitrazepam enhanced the tonic CT responses to HCl without altering responses to CO2 and acetic acid. In KO mice, the tonic HCl CT response was reduced by 64% relative to WT mice. The residual CT response was insensitive to H2O2 but was blocked by Zn2+. Its magnitude was further enhanced by 8-CPT-cAMP treatment, and the enhancement was blocked by 8-CPT-adenosine-3?-5?-cyclic monophospho-rothioate, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Under voltage-clamp conditions, before cAMP treatment, rat tonic HCl CT responses demonstrated voltage-dependence only at ±90 mV, suggesting the presence of H+ channels with voltage-dependent conductances. After cAMP treatment, the tonic HCl CT response had a quasi-linear dependence on voltage, suggesting that the cAMP-dependent part of the HCl CT response has a quasi-linear voltage dependence between +60 and ?60 mV, only becoming sigmoidal when approaching +90 and ?90 mV. The results suggest that CT responses to HCl involve 2 proton entry pathways, an NADPH oxidase–dependent proton channel, and a cAMP-PKA sensitive proton channel. PMID:21339339

  10. Strong dependence of the interlayer coupling on the hole mobility in antiferromagnetic La2-x Srx Cu O4 (x<0.02)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hücker, M.; Klauss, H.-H.; Büchner, B.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the magnetic coupling between the CuO2 planes in the antiferromagnetic (AF) phase of Sr- and Zn-doped La2CuO4 by analyzing the spin-flip transition in the magnetization curves. We find that the interlayer coupling plays a key role in the suppression of the AF phase, and that only mobile holes cause a strong frustration of the interlayer coupling. Depending on the hole mobility, samples with identical Néel temperature can have a very different interlayer coupling.

  11. Strong localization induced anomalous temperature dependence exciton emission above 300 K from SnO{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, S. S. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, F. D.; Liu, Q. W.; Xu, S. C.; Luo, Y. Y.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2015-05-07

    SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) are potential materials for deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting devices. In this study, we report the temperature and excitation power-dependent exciton luminescence from SnO{sub 2} QDs. The exciton emission exhibits anomalous blue shift, accompanied with band width reduction with increasing temperature and excitation power above 300 K. The anomalous temperature dependences of the peak energy and band width are well interpreted by the strongly localized carrier thermal hopping process and Gaussian shape of band tails states, respectively. The localized wells and band tails at conduction minimum are considered to be induced by the surface oxygen defects and local potential fluctuation in SnO{sub 2} QDs.

  12. Spatial dependence and mitigation of radiation damage by a line-focus mini-beam.

    SciTech Connect

    Finfrock, Y.; Stern, E.; Yacoby, Y.; Alkire, R.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Stein, A.; Isakovic, A. F.; Kas, J.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Washington; Hebrew Univ.; BNL

    2010-12-01

    Recently, strategies to reduce primary radiation damage have been proposed which depend on focusing X-rays to dimensions smaller than the penetration depth of excited photoelectrons. For a line focus as used here the penetration depth is the maximum distance from the irradiated region along the X-ray polarization direction that the photoelectrons penetrate. Reported here are measurements of the penetration depth and distribution of photoelectron damage excited by 18.6 keV photons in a lysozyme crystal. The experimental results showed that the penetration depth of {approx}17.35 keV photoelectrons is 1.5 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m, which is well below previous theoretical estimates of 2.8 {micro}m. Such a small penetration depth raises challenging technical issues in mitigating damage by line-focus mini-beams. The optimum requirements to reduce damage in large crystals by a factor of 2.0-2.5 are Gaussian line-focus mini-beams with a root-mean-square width of 0.2 {micro}m and a distance between lines of 2.0 {micro}m. The use of higher energy X-rays (>26 keV) would help to alleviate some of these requirements by more than doubling the penetration depth. It was found that the X-ray dose has a significant contribution from the crystal's solvent, which initially contained 9.0%(w/v) NaCl. The 15.8 keV photoelectrons of the Cl atoms and their accompanying 2.8 keV local dose from the decay of the resulting excited atoms more than doubles the dose deposited in the X-ray-irradiated region because of the much greater cross-section and higher energy of the excited atom, degrading the mitigation of radiation damage from 2.5 to 2.0. Eliminating heavier atoms from the solvent and data collection far from heavy-atom absorption edges will significantly improve the mitigation of damage by line-focus mini-beams.

  13. Spatial Dependence and Mitigation of Radiation Damage by a Line Focus Mini Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Finfrock, Y.Z.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Stern, E.A.; Yacoby, Y.; Alkire, R.W.; Stein, A.; Isakovic, A.F.; Kas, J. J.; Joachimiak, A.

    2010-09-14

    Recently, strategies to reduce primary radiation damage have been proposed which depend on focusing X-rays to dimensions smaller than the penetration depth of excited photoelectrons. For a line focus as used here the penetration depth is the maximum distance from the irradiated region along the X-ray polarization direction that the photoelectrons penetrate. Reported here are measurements of the penetration depth and distribution of photoelectron damage excited by 18.6 keV photons in a lysozyme crystal. The experimental results showed that the penetration depth of {approx}17.35 keV photoelectrons is 1.5 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m, which is well below previous theoretical estimates of 2.8 {micro}m. Such a small penetration depth raises challenging technical issues in mitigating damage by line-focus mini-beams. The optimum requirements to reduce damage in large crystals by a factor of 2.0-2.5 are Gaussian line-focus mini-beams with a root-mean-square width of 0.2 {micro}m and a distance between lines of 2.0 {micro}m. The use of higher energy X-rays (>26 keV) would help to alleviate some of these requirements by more than doubling the penetration depth. It was found that the X-ray dose has a significant contribution from the crystal's solvent, which initially contained 9.0%(w/v) NaCl. The 15.8 keV photoelectrons of the Cl atoms and their accompanying 2.8 keV local dose from the decay of the resulting excited atoms more than doubles the dose deposited in the X-ray-irradiated region because of the much greater cross-section and higher energy of the excited atom, degrading the mitigation of radiation damage from 2.5 to 2.0. Eliminating heavier atoms from the solvent and data collection far from heavy-atom absorption edges will significantly improve the mitigation of damage by line-focus mini-beams.

  14. Developmental plasticity of spatial hearing following asymmetric hearing loss: context-dependent cue integration and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Keating, Peter; King, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Under normal hearing conditions, comparisons of the sounds reaching each ear are critical for accurate sound localization. Asymmetric hearing loss should therefore degrade spatial hearing and has become an important experimental tool for probing the plasticity of the auditory system, both during development and adulthood. In clinical populations, hearing loss affecting one ear more than the other is commonly associated with otitis media with effusion, a disorder experienced by approximately 80% of children before the age of two. Asymmetric hearing may also arise in other clinical situations, such as after unilateral cochlear implantation. Here, we consider the role played by spatial cue integration in sound localization under normal acoustical conditions. We then review evidence for adaptive changes in spatial hearing following a developmental hearing loss in one ear, and show that adaptation may be achieved either by learning a new relationship between the altered cues and directions in space or by changing the way different cues are integrated in the brain. We next consider developmental plasticity as a source of vulnerability, describing maladaptive effects of asymmetric hearing loss that persist even when normal hearing is provided. We also examine the extent to which the consequences of asymmetric hearing loss depend upon its timing and duration. Although much of the experimental literature has focused on the effects of a stable unilateral hearing loss, some of the most common hearing impairments experienced by children tend to fluctuate over time. We therefore propose that there is a need to bridge this gap by investigating the effects of recurring hearing loss during development, and outline recent steps in this direction. We conclude by arguing that this work points toward a more nuanced view of developmental plasticity, in which plasticity may be selectively expressed in response to specific sensory contexts, and consider the clinical implications of this. PMID:24409125

  15. Dependence of chromatic responses in V1 on visual field eccentricity and spatial frequency: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Dany V; Auer, Tibor; Frahm, Jens; Strasburger, Hans; Lee, Barry B

    2016-03-01

    Psychophysical sensitivity to red-green chromatic modulation decreases with visual eccentricity, compared to sensitivity to luminance modulation, even after appropriate stimulus scaling. This is likely to occur at a central, rather than a retinal, site. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to stimuli designed to separately stimulate different afferent channels' [red-green, luminance, and short-wavelength (S)-cone] circular gratings were recorded as a function of visual eccentricity (±10  deg) and spatial frequency (SF) in human primary visual cortex (V1) and further visual areas (V2v, V3v). In V1, the SF tuning of BOLD fMRI responses became coarser with eccentricity. For red-green and luminance gratings, similar SF tuning curves were found at all eccentricities. The pattern for S-cone modulation differed, with SF tuning changing more slowly with eccentricity than for the other two modalities. This may be due to the different retinal distribution with eccentricity of this receptor type. A similar pattern held in V2v and V3v. This would suggest that transformation or spatial filtering of the chromatic (red-green) signal occurs beyond these areas. PMID:26974942

  16. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Rahani, Ehasan Kabiri; Shenoy, Vivek B; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were further correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. These studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses. PMID:25335689

  17. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Rahani, Ehasan Kabiri; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-01-01

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were further correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. These studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses. PMID:25335689

  18. Spatial emission distribution of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes depending on the pattern structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwanjae; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Jin Hong; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Leem, Jae-Young

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We study carrier lifetimes of InGaN/GaN LEDs fabricated on different PSS. • Spatial EL distribution was investigated depending on the pattern structure. • The carrier lifetime of the LEDs was compared with the spatial EL distribution. - Abstract: We investigated the emission characteristics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on lens-shaped (LS) patterned-sapphire substrates (PSS) by using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and confocal-scanning-electroluminescence microscopy (CSEM). The carrier lifetimes evaluated from the TRPL spectra for the LEDs on the LS-PSS (LS-LEDs) at 10 K were relatively shorter than those of the LEDs on a conventional planar substrate (C-LED). However, the carrier lifetimes for the LS-LEDs were relatively long compared to that of the C-LED at room temperature. In the CSEM images of the LS-LEDs, the emission beam around the center region of the LS pattern was relatively weaker than that of the edge region. In addition, the beam profile for the LS-LEDs showed different shapes according to the pattern structures. The emission beam around the boundary region of the LS pattern showed periodic fluctuation with the peak-to-peak distance of 814 nm.

  19. Spatially-resolved mapping of history-dependent coupled electrochemical and electronical behaviors of electroresistive NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Issei; Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Amit; Tselev, Alexander; Rahani, Ehasan Kabiri; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-10-01

    Bias-induced oxygen ion dynamics underpins a broad spectrum of electroresistive and memristive phenomena in oxide materials. Although widely studied by device-level and local voltage-current spectroscopies, the relationship between electroresistive phenomena, local electrochemical behaviors, and microstructures remains elusive. Here, the interplay between history-dependent electronic transport and electrochemical phenomena in a NiO single crystalline thin film with a number of well-defined defect types is explored on the nanometer scale using an atomic force microscopy-based technique. A variety of electrochemically-active regions were observed and spatially resolved relationship between the electronic and electrochemical phenomena was revealed. The regions with pronounced electroresistive activity were further correlated with defects identified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using fully coupled mechanical-electrochemical modeling, we illustrate that the spatial distribution of strain plays an important role in electrochemical and electroresistive phenomena. These studies illustrate an approach for simultaneous mapping of the electronic and ionic transport on a single defective structure level such as dislocations or interfaces, and pave the way for creating libraries of defect-specific electrochemical responses.

  20. Experimental observation of the elusive double-peak structure in R-dependent strong-field ionization rate of H2+

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Han; He, Feng; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R.T.; Litvinyuk, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    When a diatomic molecule is ionized by an intense laser field, the ionization rate depends very strongly on the inter-nuclear separation. That dependence exhibits a pronounced maximum at the inter-nuclear separation known as the “critical distance”. This phenomenon was first demonstrated theoretically in H2+ and became known as “charge-resonance enhanced ionization” (CREI, in reference to a proposed physical mechanism) or simply “enhanced ionization”(EI). All theoretical models of this phenomenon predict a double-peak structure in the R-dependent ionization rate of H2+. However, such double-peak structure has never been observed experimentally. It was even suggested that it is impossible to observe due to fast motion of the nuclear wavepackets. Here we report a few-cycle pump-probe experiment which clearly resolves that elusive double-peak structure. In the experiment, an expanding H2+ ion produced by an intense pump pulse is probed by a much weaker probe pulse. The predicted double-peak structure is clearly seen in delay-dependent kinetic energy spectra of protons when pump and probe pulses are polarized parallel to each other. No structure is seen when the probe is polarized perpendicular to the pump. PMID:26314372

  1. Experimental observation of the elusive double-peak structure in R-dependent strong-field ionization rate of H2(+).

    PubMed

    Xu, Han; He, Feng; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    When a diatomic molecule is ionized by an intense laser field, the ionization rate depends very strongly on the inter-nuclear separation. That dependence exhibits a pronounced maximum at the inter-nuclear separation known as the "critical distance". This phenomenon was first demonstrated theoretically in H2(+) and became known as "charge-resonance enhanced ionization" (CREI, in reference to a proposed physical mechanism) or simply "enhanced ionization"(EI). All theoretical models of this phenomenon predict a double-peak structure in the R-dependent ionization rate of H2(+). However, such double-peak structure has never been observed experimentally. It was even suggested that it is impossible to observe due to fast motion of the nuclear wavepackets. Here we report a few-cycle pump-probe experiment which clearly resolves that elusive double-peak structure. In the experiment, an expanding H2(+) ion produced by an intense pump pulse is probed by a much weaker probe pulse. The predicted double-peak structure is clearly seen in delay-dependent kinetic energy spectra of protons when pump and probe pulses are polarized parallel to each other. No structure is seen when the probe is polarized perpendicular to the pump. PMID:26314372

  2. Spatial dependence of the local diffusion coefficient measured upstream of the November 12, 1978 interplanetary traveling shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of wuprathermal particles accelerated by quasi-parallel interplanetary traveling shocks have been generally explained in terms of a first order Fermi mechanism. Such models require diffusive scattering of particles upstream of the shock. This scattering is characterized by a local diffusion coefficient, kappa, which is determined by the local power density of waves in the upstream region. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient of suprathermal upstream protons on distance from the November 12, 1978 interplanetary traveling shock using a different approach is studied. Unlike previous studies this method, which is based on measurements of particle streaming and intensity gradients, does not rely on predictions. The local spatial variations of Kappa upstream of the November 12, 1978 shock have been chosen for study because the characteristics of this quasi-parallel shock have been extensively studied, and also because of its favorable geometry (i.e. B field nearly radial).

  3. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of two-dimensional orthorhombic SnS flakes with strong angle/temperature-dependent Raman responses.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Li, Xuan-Ze; Huang, Xing; Mao, Nannan; Zhu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Hua; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2016-01-21

    Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm(-1)) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization is parallel to the armchair direction of the 2D SnS flakes, which strongly suggests that the Ag (190.7 cm(-1)) mode can be used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the 2D SnS. In addition, temperature-dependent Raman characterization confirmed that the 2D SnS flakes have a higher sensitivity to temperature than graphene, MoS2 and black phosphorus. These results are useful for the future studies of the optical and thermal properties of 2D orthorhombic SnS. PMID:26698370

  4. Expression of Na+-dependent citrate transport in a strongly metastatic human prostate cancer PC-3M cell line: regulation by voltage-gated Na+ channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Mycielska, Maria E; Palmer, Christopher P; Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa BA

    2005-01-01

    Prostate is a unique organ which synthesizes and releases large amounts of citrate. It has been shown that in metastatic prostate cancer, the amount of citrate in prostatic fluid is significantly reduced, approaching the level normally found in blood. In our previous study, we characterized electrophysiologically the mechanism of citrate transport in a normal prostatic epithelial (PNT2-C2) cell line. It was concluded that the cells expressed a novel transporter carrying 1 citrate3? together with 4 K+, primarily out of cells. In the present study, we aimed similarly to characterize the mechanism(s) of citrate transport in a strongly metastatic human prostate cancer (PC-3M) cell line and to compare this with the previous data. Citrate transport in PC-3M cells was found to be both Na+ and K+ dependent. Intracellular application of citrate produced an outward current that was primarily K+ dependent whilst extracellular citrate elicited an inward current that was mainly Na+ dependent. The electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics of the citrate outward current were similar to the K+-dependent citrate transporter found in the PNT2-C2 cells. On the other hand, the inward citrate current had a markedly different reversal potential, ionic characteristics, inhibitor profile and pH sensitivity. Preincubation of the PC-3M cells (24 or 48 h) with the voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) significantly reduced the Na+ sensitivity of the citrate current, up-regulated VGSC mRNA expression but did not change the partial permeability of the membrane to Na+. It was concluded (a) that PC-3M cells express a K+-dependent transporter (carrying citrate outward), similar to that found in normal prostate epithelial cells, as well as (b) a Na+-dependent transporter (carrying citrate inward). The molecular nature of the latter was investigated by RT-PCR; the three known Na+-dependent citrate/dicarboxylate transporters could not be detected. VGSC activity, which itself has been associated with metastatic prostate cancer, had a differential effect on the two citrate transporters, down-regulating the expression of the Na+-dependent component whilst enhancing the K+-dependent citrate transporter. PMID:15611019

  5. Alteration of ocean crust provides a strong temperature dependent feedback on the geological carbon cycle and is a primary driver of the Sr-isotopic composition of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, Laurence A.; Dosso, Stan E.

    2015-04-01

    On geological timescales there is a temperature dependent feedback that means that increased degassing of CO2 into the atmosphere leads to increased CO2 drawdown into rocks stabilizing Earth's climate. It is widely considered that this thermostat largely comes from continental chemical weathering. An alternative, or additional, feedback comes from dissolution of seafloor basalt in low-temperature (tens of °C), off-axis, hydrothermal systems. Carbonate minerals precipitated in these systems provide strong evidence that increased bottom water temperature (traced by their O-isotopic compositions) leads to increased basalt dissolution (traced by their Sr-isotopic compositions). Inversion of a simple probabilistic model of fluid-rock interaction allows us to determine the apparent activation energy of rock dissolution in these systems. The high value we find (92 ± 7 kJmol-1) indicates a strong temperature dependence of rock dissolution. Because deep-ocean temperature is sensitive to global climate, and the fluid temperature in the upper oceanic crust is strongly influenced by bottom water temperature, increased global temperature must lead to increased basalt dissolution. In turn, through the generation of alkalinity by rock dissolution, this leads to a negative feedback on planetary warming; i.e. off-axis, hydrothermal systems play an important role in the planetary thermostat. Changes in the extent of rock dissolution, due to changes in bottom water temperature, also lead to changes in the flux of unradiogenic Sr into the ocean. The decreased flux of unradiogenic Sr into the ocean due to the cooling of ocean bottom water over the last 35 Myr is sufficient to explain most of the increase in seawater 87Sr/86Sr over this time.

  6. Systemic lipopolysaccharide administration impairs retrieval of context-object discrimination, but not spatial, memory: Evidence for selective disruption of specific hippocampus-dependent memory functions during acute neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Czerniawski, Jennifer; Miyashita, Teiko; Lewandowski, Gail; Guzowski, John F

    2015-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in impairments in neuronal function and cognition that arise with aging, trauma, and/or disease. Therefore, understanding the underlying basis of the effect of immune system activation on neural function could lead to therapies for treating cognitive decline. Although neuroinflammation is widely thought to preferentially impair hippocampus-dependent memory, data on the effects of cytokines on cognition are mixed. One possible explanation for these inconsistent results is that cytokines may disrupt specific neural processes underlying some forms of memory but not others. In an earlier study, we tested the effect of systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on retrieval of hippocampus-dependent context memory and neural circuit function in CA3 and CA1 (Czerniawski and Guzowski, 2014). Paralleling impairment in context discrimination memory, we observed changes in neural circuit function consistent with disrupted pattern separation function. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation selectively disrupts memory retrieval in tasks requiring hippocampal pattern separation processes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats given LPS systemically prior to testing exhibited intact performance in tasks that do not require hippocampal pattern separation processes: novel object recognition and spatial memory in the water maze. By contrast, memory retrieval in a task thought to require hippocampal pattern separation, context-object discrimination, was strongly impaired in LPS-treated rats in the absence of any gross effects on exploratory activity or motivation. These data show that LPS administration does not impair memory retrieval in all hippocampus-dependent tasks, and support the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation impairs context discrimination memory via disruption of pattern separation processes in hippocampus. PMID:25451612

  7. Systemic lipopolysaccharide administration impairs retrieval of context-object discrimination, but not spatial, memory: Evidence for selective disruption of specific hippocampus-dependent memory functions during acute neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Czerniawski, Jennifer; Miyashita, Teiko; Lewandowski, Gail; Guzowski, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in impairments in neuronal function and cognition that arise with aging, trauma, and/or disease. Therefore, understanding the underlying basis of the effect of immune system activation on neural function could lead to therapies for treating cognitive decline. Although neuroinflammation is widely thought to preferentially impair hippocampus-dependent memory, data on the effects of cytokines on cognition are mixed. One possible explanation for these inconsistent results is that cytokines may disrupt specific neural processes underlying some forms of memory but not others. In an earlier study, we tested the effect of systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on retrieval of hippocampus-dependent context memory and neural circuit function in CA3 and CA1 (Czerniawski and Guzowski, 2014). Paralleling impairment in context discrimination memory, we observed changes in neural circuit function consistent with disrupted pattern separation function. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation selectively disrupts memory retrieval in tasks requiring hippocampal pattern separation processes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats given LPS systemically prior to testing exhibited intact performance in tasks that do not require hippocampal pattern separation processes: novel object recognition and spatial memory in the water maze. By contrast, memory retrieval in a task thought to require hippocampal pattern separation, context-object discrimination, was strongly impaired in LPS-treated rats in the absence of any gross effects on exploratory activity or motivation. These data show that LPS administration does not impair memory retrieval in all hippocampus-dependent tasks, and support the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation impairs context discrimination memory via disruption of pattern separation processes in hippocampus. PMID:25451612

  8. Thickness Dependence of Magnetic Relaxation and E-J Characteristics in Superconducting (Gd-Y)-Ba-Cu-O Films with Strong Vortex Pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Polat, Ozgur; Sinclair IV, John W; Zuev, Yuri L; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K; Cook, Sylvester W; Kumar, Dhananjay; Chen, Y; Selvamanickam, V.

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of the critical current density Jc on temperature, magnetic field, and film thickness has been investigated in (Gd-Y)BaCu-oxide materials of 0.7, 1.4, and 2.8 m thickness. Generally, the Jc decreases with film thickness at investigated temperatures and magnetic fields. The nature and strength of the pinning centers for vortices have been identified through angular and temperature measurements, respectively. These films do not exhibit c-axis correlated vortex pinning, but do have correlated defects oriented near the ab-planes. For all film thicknesses studied, strong pinning dominates at most temperatures. The vortex dynamics were investigated through magnetic relaxation studies in the temperature range of 5 77 K in 1 T and 3 T applied magnetic fields, H || surface-normal. The creep rate S is thickness dependent at high temperatures, implying that the pinning energy is also thickness dependent. Maley analyses of the relaxation data show an inverse power law variation for the effective pinning energy Ueff ~ (J0/J) . Finally, the electric field-current density (E-J) characteristics were determined over a wide range of dissipation by combining experimental results from transport, swept field magnetometry (VSM), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. We develop a self-consistent model of the combined experimental results, leading to an estimation of the critical current density Jc0(T) in the absence of flux creep.

  9. Common microscopic origin of superconductivity and unusual temperature dependence of the dc electrical conductivity in strongly correlated organic donor--acceptor salts

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, M.C. )

    1991-12-15

    Material properties of low-dimensional organic donor--acceptor (DA) metals are comparatively discussed. It is shown that the low-temperature superconductivity in organic solids and the nonconventional temperature dependence of the dc electrical conductivity {sigma} have the same microscopic precursor, softening of lattice modes caused by a divergence of the generalized susceptibility on effectively flat Fermi surfaces (FS) ({ital T} dependence of {sigma}), as well as the resulting enhancement of the electron--phonon coupling (superconductivity). Prerequisite for this behavior are sizeable electronic charge fluctuations {l angle}({Delta}{ital n}{sup 2}{sub {ital i}}){r angle} in the strongly correlated organic DA salts at any temperature. Nonvanishing fluctuations, which are maintained also in the limit of almost perfect interatomic correlations, are possible as a result of nonintegral effective electron densities {ital {bar n}}{sub {ital i}}{ne}1.0. The electronic charge fluctuations at {ital T}=0 K and finite temperature are studied by an analytic many-body model. The {ital T} dependence of the fluctuations is discussed as a function of the accessible electron density {ital {bar n}}{sub {ital i}}.

  10. Scale Dependence of Statistics of Spatially Averaged Rain Rate Seen in TOGA COARE Comparison with Predictions from a Stochastic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Bell, T. L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they in general depend on the space and time scales over which rain data are averaged. As a part of an earlier effort to determine the sampling error of satellite rain averages, a space-time model of rainfall statistics was developed to describe the statistics of gridded rain observed in GATE. The model allows one to compute the second moment statistics of space- and time-averaged rain rate which can be fitted to satellite or rain gauge data to determine the four model parameters appearing in the precipitation spectrum - an overall strength parameter, a characteristic length separating the long and short wavelength regimes and a characteristic relaxation time for decay of the autocorrelation of the instantaneous local rain rate and a certain 'fractal' power law exponent. For area-averaged instantaneous rain rate, this exponent governs the power law dependence of these statistics on the averaging length scale $L$ predicted by the model in the limit of small $L$. In particular, the variance of rain rate averaged over an $L \\times L$ area exhibits a power law singularity as $L \\rightarrow 0$. In the present work the model is used to investigate how the statistics of area-averaged rain rate over the tropical Western Pacific measured with ship borne radar during TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment) and gridded on a 2 km grid depends on the size of the spatial averaging scale. Good agreement is found between the data and predictions from the model over a wide range of averaging length scales.

  11. SPATIALLY RESOLVED GALAXY STAR FORMATION AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE. II. EFFECT OF THE MORPHOLOGY-DENSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Welikala, Niraj; Connolly, Andrew J.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Scranton, Ryan E-mail: ajc@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-20

    In this second of a series of papers on spatially resolved star formation, we investigate the impact of the density-morphology relation of galaxies on the spatial variation of star formation (SF) and its dependence on environment. We find that while a density-morphology relation is present for the sample, it cannot solely explain the observed suppression of SF in galaxies in high-density environments. We also find that early-type and late-type galaxies exhibit distinct radial star formation rate (SFR) distributions, with early types having an SFR distribution that extends further relative to the galaxy scale length, compared to late types at all densities. We find that a suppression of SF in the highest density environments is found in the highest star-forming galaxies for both galaxy types. This suppression occurs in the innermost regions in late types (r {<=} 0.125 Petrosian radii), and further out in radius in early types (0.125 Petrosian radii < r {<=} 0.25 Petrosian radii). When the full sample is considered no clear suppression of SF is detected, indicating that the environmental trends are driven only by the highest SF galaxies. We demonstrate that the density-morphology relation alone cannot account for the suppression of SF in the highest density environments. This points to an environmentally governed evolutionary mechanism that affects the SF in the innermost regions in both early- and late-type galaxies. We suggest that this is a natural consequence of the 'downsizing' of SF in galaxies.

  12. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of two-dimensional orthorhombic SnS flakes with strong angle/temperature-dependent Raman responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Li, Xuan-Ze; Huang, Xing; Mao, Nannan; Zhu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Hua; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm-1) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization is parallel to the armchair direction of the 2D SnS flakes, which strongly suggests that the Ag (190.7 cm-1) mode can be used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the 2D SnS. In addition, temperature-dependent Raman characterization confirmed that the 2D SnS flakes have a higher sensitivity to temperature than graphene, MoS2 and black phosphorus. These results are useful for the future studies of the optical and thermal properties of 2D orthorhombic SnS.Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm-1) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization is parallel to the armchair direction of the 2D SnS flakes, which strongly suggests that the Ag (190.7 cm-1) mode can be used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the 2D SnS. In addition, temperature-dependent Raman characterization confirmed that the 2D SnS flakes have a higher sensitivity to temperature than graphene, MoS2 and black phosphorus. These results are useful for the future studies of the optical and thermal properties of 2D orthorhombic SnS. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optical images, statistics of the lateral size, AFM images and height profiles of the 2D SnS flakes grown at different conditions, polar plots of the measured and fitted peak intensities of the Ag and B3g modes for other 2D SnS flakes, and polar plots of the calculated peak intensities of the Ag and B3g modes. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07675g

  13. Verification test problems for the calculation of probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

    2006-06-01

    Four verification test problems are presented for checking the conceptual development and computational implementation of calculations to determine the probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS) in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak links (WLs) and strong links (SLs). The problems are designed to test results obtained with the following definitions of loss of assured safety: (1) Failure of all SLs before failure of any WL, (2) Failure of any SL before failure of any WL, (3) Failure of all SLs before failure of all WLs, and (4) Failure of any SL before failure of all WLs. The test problems are based on assuming the same failure properties for all links, which results in problems that have the desirable properties of fully exercising the numerical integration procedures required in the evaluation of PLOAS and also possessing simple algebraic representations for PLOAS that can be used for verification of the analysis.

  14. Stable and efficient momentum-space solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one-dimensional atoms in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N.I. Räsänen, E.

    2014-12-15

    One-dimensional model systems have a particular role in strong-field physics when gaining physical insight by computing data over a large range of parameters, or when performing numerous time propagations within, e.g., optimal control theory. Here we derive a scheme that removes a singularity in the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in momentum space for a particle in the commonly used soft-core Coulomb potential. By using this scheme we develop two numerical approaches to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in momentum space. The first approach employs the expansion of the momentum-space wave function over the eigenstates of the field-free Hamiltonian, and it is shown to be more efficient for laser parameters usual in strong field physics. The second approach employs the Crank–Nicolson scheme or the method of lines for time-propagation. The both methods are readily applicable for large-scale numerical simulations in one-dimensional model systems.

  15. Strong spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman spin splitting in angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Rik Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Movva, Hema C. P.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-06-02

    We have studied angle dependent magnetoresistance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film with field up to 9?T over 2–20?K temperatures. The perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory alone in a system with strong spin-orbit coupling, from which we have estimated the mean free path, the phase coherence length, and the spin-orbit relaxation time. We have obtained the out-of-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be small and the in-plane spin-orbit relaxation time to be comparable to the momentum relaxation time. The estimation of these charge and spin transport parameters are useful for spintronics applications. For parallel field magnetoresistance, we have confirmed the presence of Zeeman effect which is otherwise suppressed in perpendicular field magnetoresistance due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The parallel field data have been explained using both the contributions from the Maekawa-Fukuyama localization theory for non-interacting electrons and Lee-Ramakrishnan theory of electron-electron interactions. The estimated Zeeman g-factor and the strength of Coulomb screening parameter agree well with the theory. Finally, the anisotropy in magnetoresistance with respect to angle has been described by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. This anisotropy can be used in anisotropic magnetic sensor applications.

  16. Statistical analyses of spatial and time dependence of lightning whistlers observed by VLF/WBA onboard AKEBONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oike, Y.; Kasahara, Y.; Goto, Y.

    2013-12-01

    AKEBONO (EXOS-D) has been continuously operated for more than 24 years since 1989 to observe particles and plasma waves in the auroral region and the plasmasphere. It covers altitude region from 300 km to about 10,000 km with an inclination of 75 degree. Therefore, analyses of the data obtained by AKEBONO enable us to study how the magnetosphere varies depending on the local time, season and solar activity. The WBA (Wide Band Analyzer) is one of subsystems of the VLF instruments onboard AKEBONO. It measures one component of electric or magnetic analogue waveform at frequency band of 50 Hz - 15 kHz. Lightning whistler is one of typical waves frequently observed by the WBA. It is generated by lightning discharge and propagates along the geomagnetic field lines from northern to southern hemisphere and vice-versa. Their dispersions depend on their path length and electron density profile along their propagation path. We have been developed an automatic detection system of lightning whistlers from the spectrogram of the WBA receiver. In the present study, we statistically analyzed the data received at Uchinoura Space Center from 1989 to 2005, and got spatial and time distribution of lightning whistlers by the system. First, we found that lightning whistlers were mainly observed only inside the plasmasphere with L-value below 4. Next, we studied MLT (Magnetic Local Time) and seasonal dependences of occurrence frequency of the lightning whistlers. It is noted that the coverage of MLT and season of the AKEBONO orbit changes simultaneously, but we could successfully identified the MLT and seasonal dependences separately analyzing the long term observation data. Consequently lightning whistlers were mainly observed in the night-side (from 16 to 4 in MLT), while their occurrence frequency becomes quite small in the dayside (from 7 to 15 in MLT). Presumably this is caused by the condition of the ionosphere. In the dayside, it is difficult for whistler-mode wave to propagate into the plasmasphere but it can easily propagate in the night-side. About the seasonal dependence, we found two peaks of occurrence frequency of lightning whistlers. One is from December to January and another is from June to July. The source of lightning whistler is lightning discharge, whose occurrence frequency is known to become maximum in summer. Thus we can find two peaks of occurrence frequency which correspond to the lightning whistlers propagating from summer hemisphere to winter hemisphere. As a future work, we will study solar activity dependence of lightning whistlers. By normalizing the bias caused by MLT and seasonal dependences of lightning whistler based on the results derived in the present study, it is expected to clarify the solar activity dependence independent of the MLT and seasonal variation. It is also interesting to estimate the electron density profile using trends of whistler dispersion. The propagation time of whistler mode wave can be theoretically calculated using ray tracing technique under assumption of electron density profile model. By comparing the observed trends of dispersion along the AKEBONO trajectories with those theoretically derived, we can determine an appropriate electron density profile, and we can know the time variation of the electron density profile in the plasmasphere statistically.

  17. The Min Oscillator Uses MinD-Dependent Conformational Changes in MinE to Spatially Regulate Cytokinesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyung-Tase; Wu, Wei; Battaile, Kevin P.; Lovell, Scott; Holyoak, Todd; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2011-09-16

    In E. coli, MinD recruits MinE to the membrane, leading to a coupled oscillation required for spatial regulation of the cytokinetic Z ring. How these proteins interact, however, is not clear because the MinD-binding regions of MinE are sequestered within a six-stranded {beta} sheet and masked by N-terminal helices. minE mutations that restore interaction between some MinD and MinE mutants were isolated. These mutations alter the MinE structure leading to release of the MinD-binding regions and the N-terminal helices that bind the membrane. Crystallization of MinD-MinE complexes revealed a four-stranded {beta} sheet MinE dimer with the released {beta} strands (MinD-binding regions) converted to {alpha} helices bound to MinD dimers. These results identify the MinD-dependent conformational changes in MinE that convert it from a latent to an active form and lead to a model of how MinE persists at the MinD-membrane surface.

  18. The combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms and external factors enables Listeria monocytogenes to express a strong starvation survival response during multiple-nutrient starvation.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lungu B; Saldivar JC; Story R; Ricke SC; Johnson MG

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the starvation survival response (SSR) of a wild-type Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic DeltasigB mutant strain during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions over 28 days. This study examined the effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis, the proton motive force, substrate level phosphorylation, and oxidative phosphorylation on the SSR of L. monocytogenes 10403S and a DeltasigB mutant during multiple-nutrient starvation. The effects of starvation buffer changes on viability were also examined. During multiple-nutrient starvation, both strains expressed a strong SSR, suggesting that L. monocytogenes possesses SigB-independent mechanism(s) for survival during multiple-nutrient starvation. Neither strain was able to express an SSR following starvation buffer changes, indicating that the nutrients/factors present in the starvation buffer could be a source of energy for cell maintenance and survival. Neither the wild-type nor the DeltasigB mutant strain was able to elicit an SSR when exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol within the first 4 h of starvation. However, both strains expressed an SSR when exposed to chloramphenicol after 6 h or more of starvation, suggesting that the majority of proteins required to elicit an effective SSR in L. monocytogenes are likely produced somewhere between 4 and 6 h of starvation. The varying SSRs of both strains to the different metabolic inhibitors under aerobic or anaerobic conditions suggested that (1) energy derived from the proton motive force is important for an effective SSR, (2) L. monocytogenes utilizes an anaerobic electron transport during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions, and (3) the glycolytic pathway is an important energy source during multiple-nutrient starvation when oxygen is available, and less important under anaerobic conditions. Collectively, the data suggest that the combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms of cells and external nutrients/factors enables L. monocytogenes to express a strong SSR.

  19. The combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms and external factors enables Listeria monocytogenes to express a strong starvation survival response during multiple-nutrient starvation.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Bwalya; Saldivar, Joshua C; Story, Robert; Ricke, Steven C; Johnson, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the starvation survival response (SSR) of a wild-type Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic DeltasigB mutant strain during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions over 28 days. This study examined the effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis, the proton motive force, substrate level phosphorylation, and oxidative phosphorylation on the SSR of L. monocytogenes 10403S and a DeltasigB mutant during multiple-nutrient starvation. The effects of starvation buffer changes on viability were also examined. During multiple-nutrient starvation, both strains expressed a strong SSR, suggesting that L. monocytogenes possesses SigB-independent mechanism(s) for survival during multiple-nutrient starvation. Neither strain was able to express an SSR following starvation buffer changes, indicating that the nutrients/factors present in the starvation buffer could be a source of energy for cell maintenance and survival. Neither the wild-type nor the DeltasigB mutant strain was able to elicit an SSR when exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol within the first 4 h of starvation. However, both strains expressed an SSR when exposed to chloramphenicol after 6 h or more of starvation, suggesting that the majority of proteins required to elicit an effective SSR in L. monocytogenes are likely produced somewhere between 4 and 6 h of starvation. The varying SSRs of both strains to the different metabolic inhibitors under aerobic or anaerobic conditions suggested that (1) energy derived from the proton motive force is important for an effective SSR, (2) L. monocytogenes utilizes an anaerobic electron transport during multiple-nutrient starvation conditions, and (3) the glycolytic pathway is an important energy source during multiple-nutrient starvation when oxygen is available, and less important under anaerobic conditions. Collectively, the data suggest that the combination of energy-dependent internal adaptation mechanisms of cells and external nutrients/factors enables L. monocytogenes to express a strong SSR. PMID:20001327

  20. Low levels of realized seed and pollen gene flow and strong spatial genetic structure in a small, isolated and fragmented population of the tropical tree Copaifera langsdorffii Desf.

    PubMed

    Sebbenn, A M; Carvalho, A C M; Freitas, M L M; Moraes, S M B; Gaino, A P S C; da Silva, J M; Jolivet, C; Moraes, M L T

    2011-01-01

    Over the past century, the Brazilian Atlantic forest has been reduced to small, isolated fragments of forest. Reproductive isolation theories predict a loss of genetic diversity and increases in inbreeding and spatial genetic structure (SGS) in such populations. We analysed eight microsatellite loci to investigate the pollen and seed dispersal patterns, genetic diversity, inbreeding and SGS of the tropical tree Copaifera langsdorffii in a small (4.8?ha), isolated population. All 112 adult trees and 128 seedlings found in the stand were sampled, mapped and genotyped. Seedlings had significantly lower levels of genetic diversity (A=16.5±0.45, mean±95% s.e.; H(e)=0.838±0.006) than did adult trees (A=23.2±0.81; H(e)=0.893±0.030). Parentage analysis did not indicate any seed immigration (m(seeds)=0) and the pollen immigration rate was very low (m(pollen)=0.047). The average distance of realized pollen dispersal within the stand was 94?m, with 81% of the pollen travelling <150?m. A significant negative correlation was found between the frequency and distance of pollen dispersal (r=-0.79, P<0.01), indicating that short-distance pollinations were more frequent. A significant SGS for both adults (?50?m) and seedlings (?20?m) was also found, indicating that most of the seeds were dispersed over short distances. The results suggested that the spatial isolation of populations by habitat fragmentation can restrict seed and pollen gene flow, increase SGS and affect the genetic diversity of future generations. PMID:20372183

  1. Effect of strong phonon-phonon coupling on the temperature dependent structural stability and frequency shift of 2D hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Panigrahi, B K

    2016-01-20

    The temperature dependent structural stability, frequency shift and linewidth of 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are studied using a combination of lattice dynamics (LD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The in-plane lattice parameter shows a negative thermal expansion in the whole computed temperature range (0-2000 K). When the in-plane lattice parameter falls below the equilibrium value, the quasi-harmonic bending (ZA) mode frequency becomes imaginary along the ?-M direction in the Brillouin zone, leading to a structural instability of the 2D sheet. The ZA mode is seen to be stabilized in the dispersion obtained from MD simulations, due to the automatic incorporation of higher order phonon scattering processes in MD, which are absent in a quasi-harmonic dispersion. The mode resolved phonon spectra computed with a quasi-harmonic method predict a blueshift of the longitudinal and transverse (LO/TO) optic mode frequencies with an increase in temperature. On the other hand, both canonical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles predict a redshift with an increase in temperature, which is more prominent in the NVT ensemble. The strong phonon-phonon coupling dominates over the thermal contraction effect and leads to a redshift in LO/TO mode frequency in the NPT ensemble simulations. The out-of-plane (ZO) optic mode quasi-harmonic frequencies are redshifted due to a membrane effect. The phonon-phonon coupling effects in the NVT and NPT ensemble simulations lead to a further reduction in the ZO mode frequencies. The linewidth of the LO/TO and ZO mode frequencies increases in a monotonic fashion. The temperature dependence of acoustic modes is also analyzed. The quasi-harmonic calculations predict a redshift of ZA mode, and at the same time the TA (transverse acoustic) and LA (longitudinal acoustic) mode frequencies are blueshifted. The strong phonon-phonon coupling in MD simulations causes a redshift of the LA and TA mode frequencies, while the ZA mode frequencies are blueshifted with an increase in temperature. PMID:26705543

  2. Spatial variability of nitrous oxide and methane emissions from an MBT landfill in operation: Strong N{sub 2}O hotspots at the working face

    SciTech Connect

    Harborth, Peter; Fuß, Roland; Münnich, Kai; Flessa, Heinz; Fricke, Klaus

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► First measurements of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emissions from an MBT landfill. ► High N{sub 2}O emissions from recently deposited material. ► N{sub 2}O emissions associated with aeration and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate. ► Strong negative correlation between CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O production activity. - Abstract: Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is an effective technique, which removes organic carbon from municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to deposition. Thereby, methane (CH{sub 4}) production in the landfill is strongly mitigated. However, direct measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from full-scale MBT landfills have not been conducted so far. Thus, CH{sub 4} and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from a German MBT landfill in operation as well as their concentrations in the landfill gas (LFG) were measured. High N{sub 2}O emissions of 20–200 g CO{sub 2} eq. m{sup −2} h{sup −1} magnitude (up to 428 mg N m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed within 20 m of the working face. CH{sub 4} emissions were highest at the landfill zone located at a distance of 30–40 m from the working face, where they reached about 10 g CO{sub 2} eq. m{sup −2} h{sup −1}. The MBT material in this area has been deposited several weeks earlier. Maximum LFG concentration for N{sub 2}O was 24.000 ppmv in material below the emission hotspot. At a depth of 50 cm from the landfill surface a strong negative correlation between N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} concentrations was observed. From this and from the distribution pattern of extractable ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate it has been concluded that strong N{sub 2}O production is associated with nitrification activity and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate, which is initiated by oxygen input during waste deposition. Therefore, CH{sub 4} mitigation measures, which often employ aeration, could result in a net increase of GHG emissions due to increased N{sub 2}O emissions, especially at MBT landfills.

  3. Excision Efficiency Is Not Strongly Coupled to Transgenic Rate: Cell Type-Dependent Transposition Efficiency of Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac DNA Transposons

    PubMed Central

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sándor, Sára; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) DNA transposons represent an emerging new gene delivery technology, potentially suitable for human gene therapy applications. Previous studies pointed to important differences between these transposon systems, depending on the cell types examined and the methodologies applied. However, efficiencies cannot always be compared because of differences in applications. In addition, “overproduction inhibition,” a phenomenon believed to be a characteristic of DNA transposons, can remarkably reduce the overall transgenic rate, emphasizing the importance of transposase dose applied. Therefore, because of lack of comprehensive analysis, researchers are forced to optimize the technology for their own “in-house” platforms. In this study, we investigated the transposition of several SB (SB11, SB32, SB100X) and PB (mPB and hyPB) variants in various cell types at three levels: comparing the excision efficiency of the reaction by real-time PCR, testing the overall transgenic rate by detecting cells with stable integrations, and determining the average copy number when using different transposon systems and conditions. We concluded that high excision activity is not always followed by a higher transgenic rate, as exemplified by the hyperactive transposases, indicating that the excision and the integration steps of transposition are not strongly coupled as previously thought. In general, all levels of transposition show remarkable differences depending on the transposase used and cell lines examined, being the least efficient in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In spite of the comparably low activity in those special cell types, the hyperactive SB100X and hyPB systems could be used in hESCs with similar transgenic efficiency and with reasonably low (2–3) transgene copy numbers, indicating their potential applicability for gene therapy purposes in the future. PMID:25045962

  4. Fine-scale genetic analysis of Daphnia host populations infected by two virulent parasites - strong fluctuations in clonal structure at small temporal and spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Petrusek, Adam; Seda, Jaromir; Wolinska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Numerous theoretical studies suggest that parasites impose a strong selection pressure on their host, driving genetic changes within host populations. Yet evidence of this process in the wild is scarce. In the present study we surveyed, using high resolution microsatellite markers, the genetic structure of cyclically parthenogenetic Daphnia hosts within two different Daphnia communities belonging to the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex. One community, consisting of a single host species, was infected with the protozoan parasite Caullerya mesnili. The second community consisted of two parental Daphnia spp. and their hybrids, and was infected with the yeast parasite Metschnikowia. Significant differences in the clonal composition between random and infected sub-samples of Daphnia were detected on several occasions within both communities, indicating that host genotypes differ in resistance to both parasites. In addition, one parental species in the multi-taxon community was consistently under-infected, compared with the other taxa. Overall, our field data confirm that infection patterns are strongly affected by host genetic composition in various Daphnia-microparasite systems. Thus, parasite-driven selection operates in natural Daphnia populations and microparasites influence the clonal structure of host populations. PMID:22154851

  5. Chemically Designed Molecular Interfaces in Cross-Linked Poly(ethylene glycol)/Silica Nanocomposites Reveal Strong Size-Dependent Trends in Gas Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Norman; Urban, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposite membranes can exhibit gas separation performance that surpasses conventional polymeric membranes. While promising, the optimization of nanocomposite membranes requires a fundamental understanding of the transport mechanism and interfacial effects between the inorganic and polymer phase that is currently limited to empirical relationships. Synthesized nanocomposites often consist of poorly distributed and polydisperse inorganic nanomaterials. It is known that polymer dynamics can change drastically upon introduction of an inorganic phase, which can dramatically alter molecular transport behavior. Here, we systematically explore the role of nanoparticle sizes from 12 to 130 nm on polymer dynamics and permeability in a series of cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol)/silica nanocomposite membranes. The nanocomposites are well-dispersed and display excellent homogeneity throughout. Size-dependent broadening of the Tg indicates strong attractive interactions especially at high surface area loadings, which lead to deviations in permeability not captured by Maxwell's model. Chemical modifications of silica at this interface can yield significantly different polymer dynamics than previously observed with enhanced transport and mechanical properties.

  6. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenesis in cereal aleurone is strongly cultivar-dependent and gibberellin action involves SLENDER1 but not GAMYB.

    PubMed

    Eastmond, Peter J; Jones, Russell L

    2005-11-01

    Storage oil is a major constituent in the cereal aleurone layer. The aim of this study was to investigate how gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) regulate conversion of oil to sugar in barley aleurone. The activity of the glyoxylate cycle enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL) was surveyed in eight barley cultivars. Surprisingly, some cultivars do not require GA for the induction of ICL (e.g. Himalaya), whereas some do (e.g. Golden Promise). Furthermore, in Golden Promise, GA also stimulates triacylglycerol breakdown and enhances the net flux of carbon from acetate to sugar. In contrast, ABA strongly represses ICL activity and the flux of carbon from oil to sugar in both Golden Promise and Himalaya. Biolistics using a promoter reporter showed that GA and ABA regulate ICL at the level of transcription. Studies using barley and rice mutants and pharmacological agents show that GA-dependent induction of ICL activity is mediated by SLENDER1 and requires cGMP, but does not involve the transcription factor GAMYB. Gibberellin and ABA therefore act antagonistically to regulate gluconeogenesis in the aleurone layer as well as controlling the production and secretion of hydrolases into the starchy endosperm. We suggest that the variation between different barley cultivars might be a result of selective breeding to alter seed dormancy. PMID:16236157

  7. Low-frequency oscillations measured in the periphery with near-infrared spectroscopy are strongly correlated with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia Maria; Licata, Stephanie C.; deB. Frederick, Blaise

    2012-10-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) in the range of 0.01-0.15 Hz are commonly observed in functional imaging studies, such as blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Some of these LFOs are nonneuronal and are closely related to autonomic physiological processes. In the current study, we conducted a concurrent resting-state fMRI and NIRS experiment with healthy volunteers. LFO data was collected simultaneously at peripheral sites (middle fingertip and big toes) by NIRS, and centrally in the brain by BOLD fMRI. The cross-correlations of the LFOs collected from the finger, toes, and brain were calculated. Our data show that the LFOs measured in the periphery (NIRS signals) and in the brain (BOLD fMRI) were strongly correlated with varying time delays. This demonstrates that some portion of the LFOs actually reflect systemic physiological circulatory effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NIRS is effective for measuring the peripheral LFOs, and that these LFOs and the temporal shifts between them are consistent in healthy participants and may serve as useful biomarkers for detecting and monitoring circulatory dysfunction.

  8. Effect of delayed link failure on probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. D.; Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig

    2007-05-01

    Weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) systems constitute important parts of the overall operational design of high consequence systems, with the SL system designed to permit operation of the system only under intended conditions and the WL system designed to prevent the unintended operation of the system under accident conditions. Degradation of the system under accident conditions into a state in which the WLs have not deactivated the system and the SLs have failed in the sense that they are in a configuration that could permit operation of the system is referred to as loss of assured safety. The probability of such degradation conditional on a specific set of accident conditions is referred to as probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS). Previous work has developed computational procedures for the calculation of PLOAS under fire conditions for a system involving multiple WLs and SLs and with the assumption that a link fails instantly when it reaches its failure temperature. Extensions of these procedures are obtained for systems in which there is a temperature-dependent delay between the time at which a link reaches its failure temperature and the time at which that link actually fails.

  9. Exploring spatial patterns in general practice expenditure.

    PubMed

    Bech, Mickael; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2009-07-01

    The determinants for per capita general practitioner (GP) public expenditure across Danish municipalities are analysed using data from the period 1997-2004. Heterogeneity and dependency across years are controlled for. Spatial spillover effects across municipalities are investigated in order to disclose the spatial dynamics of public GP expenditure. The results reveal substantial heterogeneity and dependency across time, as well as the presence of a significant spatial spillover effect. The effects of determinants are seriously over-estimated if such features are ignored. The spatial coefficient is strongly significant and suggests that there is an indirect effect on expenditure of non-observable variables that are geographically concentrated. PMID:18781346

  10. Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, F.; Vogelsang, V.

    2009-09-29

    We will give here an overview of our theory of the strong interactions, Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and its properties. We will also briefly review the history of the study of the strong interactions, and the discoveries that ultimately led to the formulation of QCD. The strong force is one of the four known fundamental forces in nature, the others being the electromagnetic, the weak and the gravitational force. The strong force, usually referred to by scientists as the 'strong interaction', is relevant at the subatomic level, where it is responsible for the binding of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. To do this, it must overcome the electric repulsion between the protons in an atomic nucleus and be the most powerful force over distances of a few fm (1fm=1 femtometer=1 fermi=10{sup -15}m), the typical size of a nucleus. This property gave the strong force its name.

  11. Quantitative PCR Reveals Strong Spatial and Temporal Variation of the Wasting Disease Pathogen, Labyrinthula zosterae in Northern European Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Beds

    PubMed Central

    Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Tams, Verena; Ploog, Jana; Schubert, Philipp R.; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass beds are the foundation species of functionally important coastal ecosystems worldwide. The world’s largest losses of the widespread seagrass Zostera marina (eelgrass) have been reported as a consequence of wasting disease, an infection with the endophytic protist Labyrinthula zosterae. During one of the most extended epidemics in the marine realm, ?90% of East and Western Atlantic eelgrass beds died-off between 1932 and 1934. Today, small outbreaks continue to be reported, but the current extent of L. zosterae in European meadows is completely unknown. In this study we quantify the abundance and prevalence of the wasting disease pathogen among 19 Z. marina populations in northern European coastal waters, using quantitative PCR (QPCR) with primers targeting a species specific portion of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS1) of L. zosterae. Spatially, we found marked variation among sites with abundances varying between 0 and 126 cells mg?1 Z. marina dry weight (mean: 5.7 L. zosterae cells mg?1 Z. marina dry weight ±1.9 SE) and prevalences ranged from 0–88.9%. Temporarily, abundances varied between 0 and 271 cells mg?1 Z. marina dry weight (mean: 8.5±2.6 SE), while prevalences ranged from zero in winter and early spring to 96% in summer. Field concentrations accessed via bulk DNA extraction and subsequent QPCR correlated well with prevalence data estimated via isolation and cultivation from live plant tissue. L. zosterae was not only detectable in black lesions, a sign of Labyrinthula-induced necrosis, but also occurred in green, apparently healthy tissue. We conclude that L. zosterae infection is common (84% infected populations) in (northern) European eelgrass populations with highest abundances during the summer months. In the light of global climate change and increasing rate of marine diseases our data provide a baseline for further studies on the causes of pathogenic outbreaks of L. zosterae. PMID:23658711

  12. CLASSSTRONG: Classical simulations of strong field processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Like in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA was proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems interact with strong and short laser pulses and temporal synthesized fields are routinely generated in attosecond laboratories around the world. Temporal and spatial synthesized fields have received special attention nowadays because they would allow to exceed considerably the conventional harmonic and electron energy frontiers. Classical simulations are an invaluable tool to explore exhaustively the parameters domain at a cheap computational cost, before massive quantum mechanical calculations, absolutely indispensable for the detailed analysis, are performed.

  13. SU-E-T-354: Peak Temperature Ratio of TLD Glow Curves to Investigate the Spatial Dependence of LET in a Clinical Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C; Pankuch, M; Ramirez, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use the ratio of the two high temperature peaks (HTR) in TLD 700 glow curves to investigate spatial dependence of the linear energy transfer (LET) in proton beams. Studies show that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends upon the physical dose as well as its spatial distribution. Although proton therapy uses a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, studies suggest that the RBE increases in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) due to the increased LET. Methods: Glow curve studies in TLD 700 show that the 280 C temperature peak is more sensitive to LET radiation than the 210 C temperature peak. Therefore, the areas under the individual temperature peaks for TLDs irradiated in a proton beam normalized to the peak ratio for 6 MV photons are used to determine the HTR to obtain information on its LET. TLD 700 chips with dimensions 0.31×0.31×0.038 cc are irradiated with 90 MeV protons at varying depths in a specially designed blue wax phantom to investigate LET spatial dependence. Results: Five TLDs were placed at five different depths of the percent depth dose curve (PDD) of range 16.2 cm: center of the SOPB and approximately at the 99% distal edge, 90%, 75% and 25% of the PDD, respectively. HTR was 1.3 at the center of the SOBP and varied from 2.2 to 3.9 which can be related to an LET variation from 0.5 to 18 KeV/? via calibration with radiation beams of varying LET. Conclusion: HTR data show a spatially invariant LET slightly greater than the 6 MV radiations in the SOBP, but a rapidly increasing LET at the end of the proton range. These results indicate a spatial variation in RBE with potential treatment consequences when selecting treatment margins to minimize the uncertainties in proton RBE.

  14. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C; Germanier, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the acquisition.

  15. DEFINITION OF MULTIVARIATE GEOCHEMICAL ASSOCIATIONS WITH POLYMETALLIC MINERAL OCCURRENCES USING A SPATIALLY DEPENDENT CLUSTERING TECHNIQUE AND RASTERIZED STREAM SEDIMENT DATA - AN ALASKAN EXAMPLE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Susan K.; Trautwein, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The application of an unsupervised, spatially dependent clustering technique (AMOEBA) to interpolated raster arrays of stream sediment data has been found to provide useful multivariate geochemical associations for modeling regional polymetallic resource potential. The technique is based on three assumptions regarding the compositional and spatial relationships of stream sediment data and their regional significance. These assumptions are: (1) compositionally separable classes exist and can be statistically distinguished; (2) the classification of multivariate data should minimize the pair probability of misclustering to establish useful compositional associations; and (3) a compositionally defined class represented by three or more contiguous cells within an array is a more important descriptor of a terrane than a class represented by spatial outliers.

  16. Neuroprotective mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides against hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chun-Sing; Tipoe, George Lim; So, Kwok-Fai; Fung, Man-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which induces hippocampal injuries mediated by oxidative stress. This study aims to examine the neuroprotective mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) against CIH-induced spatial memory deficits. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxic treatment resembling a severe OSA condition for a week. The animals were orally fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) daily 2 hours prior to hypoxia or in air for the control. The effect of LBP on the spatial memory and levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, apoptosis and neurogenesis in the hippocampus was examined. There was a significant deficit in the spatial memory and an elevated level of malondialdehyde with a decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx-1) in the hypoxic group when compared with the normoxic control. In addition, redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B) canonical pathway was activated with a translocation of NF?B members (p65, p50) and increased expression levels of NF?B-dependent inflammatory cytokines and mediator (TNF?, IL-1?, COX-2); also, a significantly elevated level of ER stress (GRP78/Bip, PERK, CHOP) and autophagic flux in the hypoxic group, leading to neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal subfields (DG, CA1, CA3). Remarkably, LBP administration normalized the elevated level of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, ER stress, autophagic flux and apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Moreover, LBP significantly mitigated both the caspase-dependent intrinsic (Bax, Bcl2, cytochrome C, cleaved caspase-3) and extrinsic (FADD, cleaved caspase-8, Bid) signaling apoptotic cascades. Furthermore, LBP administration prevented the spatial memory deficit and enhanced the hippocampal neurogenesis induced by hypoxia. Our results suggest that LBP is neuroprotective against CIH-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits by promoting hippocampal neurogenesis and negatively modulating the apoptotic signaling cascades activated by oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25714473

  17. Neuroprotective Mechanism of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides against Hippocampal-Dependent Spatial Memory Deficits in a Rat Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun-Sing; Tipoe, George Lim; So, Kwok-Fai; Fung, Man-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which induces hippocampal injuries mediated by oxidative stress. This study aims to examine the neuroprotective mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) against CIH-induced spatial memory deficits. Adult Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxic treatment resembling a severe OSA condition for a week. The animals were orally fed with LBP solution (1mg/kg) daily 2 hours prior to hypoxia or in air for the control. The effect of LBP on the spatial memory and levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, apoptosis and neurogenesis in the hippocampus was examined. There was a significant deficit in the spatial memory and an elevated level of malondialdehyde with a decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx-1) in the hypoxic group when compared with the normoxic control. In addition, redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B) canonical pathway was activated with a translocation of NF?B members (p65, p50) and increased expression levels of NF?B-dependent inflammatory cytokines and mediator (TNF?, IL-1?, COX-2); also, a significantly elevated level of ER stress (GRP78/Bip, PERK, CHOP) and autophagic flux in the hypoxic group, leading to neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal subfields (DG, CA1, CA3). Remarkably, LBP administration normalized the elevated level of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, ER stress, autophagic flux and apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Moreover, LBP significantly mitigated both the caspase-dependent intrinsic (Bax, Bcl2, cytochrome C, cleaved caspase-3) and extrinsic (FADD, cleaved caspase-8, Bid) signaling apoptotic cascades. Furthermore, LBP administration prevented the spatial memory deficit and enhanced the hippocampal neurogenesis induced by hypoxia. Our results suggest that LBP is neuroprotective against CIH-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits by promoting hippocampal neurogenesis and negatively modulating the apoptotic signaling cascades activated by oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25714473

  18. Asymmetrical Brain Activity Induced by Voluntary Spatial Attention Depends on the Visual Hemifield: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasawa, Masamitsu; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the visual hemifield to which spatial attention was oriented on the activities of the posterior parietal and occipital visual cortices was examined using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in order to investigate the neural substrates of voluntary visuospatial attention. Our brain imaging data support the theory put forth in a…

  19. Asymmetrical Brain Activity Induced by Voluntary Spatial Attention Depends on the Visual Hemifield: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasawa, Masamitsu; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the visual hemifield to which spatial attention was oriented on the activities of the posterior parietal and occipital visual cortices was examined using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in order to investigate the neural substrates of voluntary visuospatial attention. Our brain imaging data support the theory put forth in a…

  20. Behavioral assessment of emotional and motivational appraisal during visual processing of emotional scenes depending on spatial frequencies.

    PubMed

    Fradcourt, B; Peyrin, C; Baciu, M; Campagne, A

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies performed on visual processing of emotional stimuli have revealed preference for a specific type of visual spatial frequencies (high spatial frequency, HSF; low spatial frequency, LSF) according to task demands. The majority of studies used a face and focused on the appraisal of the emotional state of others. The present behavioral study investigates the relative role of spatial frequencies on processing emotional natural scenes during two explicit cognitive appraisal tasks, one emotional, based on the self-emotional experience and one motivational, based on the tendency to action. Our results suggest that HSF information was the most relevant to rapidly identify the self-emotional experience (unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral) while LSF was required to rapidly identify the tendency to action (avoidance, approach, and no action). The tendency to action based on LSF analysis showed a priority for unpleasant stimuli whereas the identification of emotional experience based on HSF analysis showed a priority for pleasant stimuli. The present study confirms the interest of considering both emotional and motivational characteristics of visual stimuli. PMID:23954668

  1. Strongly-driven laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L; Afeyan, B; Campbell, E M; Decker, C D; Kruer, W L; Moody, J; Orzechowski, T; Powers, L; Wilks, S C

    1998-06-25

    An improved understanding of strongly-driven laser plasma coupling is important for optimal use of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for both inertial fusion and for a variety of advanced applications. Such applications range from high energy x- ray sources and high temperature hohlraums to fast ignition and laser radiography. We discuss a novel model for the scaling of strongly-driven stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering. This model postulates an intensity dependent correlation length associated with spatial incoherence due to filamentation and stimulated forward scattering. We first motivate the model and then relate it to a variety of experiments. Particular attention is paid to high temperature hohlraum experiments, which exhibited low to modest stimulated Brillouin scattering even though this instability was strongly driven. We also briefly discuss the strongly nonlinear interaction physics for efficient generation of high energy electrons either _ by irradiating a large plasma with near quarter-critical density or by irradiating overdense targets with ultra intense laser

  2. The effects of spatial structure, frequency dependence and resistance evolution on the dynamics of toxin-mediated microbial invasions

    PubMed Central

    Libberton, Ben; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that interference competition between bacteria shapes the distribution of the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in the lower nasal airway of humans, either by preventing colonization or by driving displacement. This competition within the nasal microbial community would add to known host factors that affect colonization. We tested the role of toxin-mediated interference competition in both structured and unstructured environments, by culturing S. aureus with toxin-producing or nonproducing Staphylococcus epidermidis nasal isolates. Toxin-producing S. epidermidis invaded S. aureus populations more successfully than nonproducers, and invasion was promoted by spatial structure. Complete displacement of S. aureus was prevented by the evolution of toxin resistance. Conversely, toxin-producing S. epidermidis restricted S. aureus invasion. Invasion of toxin-producing S. epidermidis populations by S. aureus resulted from the evolution of toxin resistance, which was favoured by high initial frequency and low spatial structure. Enhanced toxin production also evolved in some invading populations of S. epidermidis. Toxin production therefore promoted invasion by, and constrained invasion into, populations of producers. Spatial structure enhanced both of these invasion effects. Our findings suggest that manipulation of the nasal microbial community could be used to limit colonization by S. aureus, which might limit transmission and infection rates. PMID:26240609

  3. The effects of spatial structure, frequency dependence and resistance evolution on the dynamics of toxin-mediated microbial invasions.

    PubMed

    Libberton, Ben; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that interference competition between bacteria shapes the distribution of the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in the lower nasal airway of humans, either by preventing colonization or by driving displacement. This competition within the nasal microbial community would add to known host factors that affect colonization. We tested the role of toxin-mediated interference competition in both structured and unstructured environments, by culturing S. aureus with toxin-producing or nonproducing Staphylococcus epidermidis nasal isolates. Toxin-producing S. epidermidis invaded S. aureus populations more successfully than nonproducers, and invasion was promoted by spatial structure. Complete displacement of S. aureus was prevented by the evolution of toxin resistance. Conversely, toxin-producing S. epidermidis restricted S. aureus invasion. Invasion of toxin-producing S. epidermidis populations by S. aureus resulted from the evolution of toxin resistance, which was favoured by high initial frequency and low spatial structure. Enhanced toxin production also evolved in some invading populations of S. epidermidis. Toxin production therefore promoted invasion by, and constrained invasion into, populations of producers. Spatial structure enhanced both of these invasion effects. Our findings suggest that manipulation of the nasal microbial community could be used to limit colonization by S. aureus, which might limit transmission and infection rates. PMID:26240609

  4. An Efficient Sampling Technique for Observing Topographically-Dependent Spatial Variability in Catchment-Scale Soil Moisture Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbylo, K. L.; Niemann, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Catchment-scale variability in soil moisture plays an important role in many hydrologic applications. The magnitude of spatial variability in soil moisture patterns affects the catchment-scale evapotranspiration rate, while the spatial structure of soil moisture patterns affects runoff production. In many cases, spatial variations in soil moisture are associated with variations in topographic attributes such as drainage area, slope, and curvature. In the past, large soil moisture datasets have been collected on uniform grids at experimental catchments to characterize the spatial and temporal variability, but this approach is very time-consuming and expensive with most grids containing hundreds of locations monitored over several dates. Although many studies have focused on efficient strategies to observe the catchment-average soil moisture, few have advanced improved strategies to characterize the spatial variability. In this study, we propose a new stratified sampling technique that aims to reduce the number of observations that are required to observe the main variations in soil moisture. The method is applied to soil moisture patterns with topographically-induced variability, but it can be generalized to consider patterns with other sources of variation. In the method, topographic attributes that potentially introduce variability are preselected, and the observed range of values for each attribute is divided into sub-ranges or stratifications. Because multiple topographic attributes are considered, any given location in the catchment will fall into a joint stratification that corresponds to a particular combination of individual stratifications. The sampling locations are then randomly selected from the locations in each joint stratification. The method thus assures that all combinations of low and high terrain attribute values that exist in the catchment are represented in the dataset. The number of sampling locations can be controlled by changing the number of stratifications for each variable or the number of locations sampled in each joint stratification. The locations selected from the stratified sampling method can also be supplemented with random locations. The method is applied to three different catchments: Tarrawarra, Satellite Station, and Cache la Poudre. The observations are used to calibrate a conceptual model known as the Equilibrium Moisture from Topography (EMT) model and an empirical model based on empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The efficiency of the sampling method is evaluated by the models' ability to reproduce the soil moisture values at unobserved locations. The stratified method is also compared to a random sampling method. The results show that both the random and stratified sampling methods can characterize the soil moisture variation with many fewer locations than have been collected previously. In addition, the stratified sampling method exhibits much better performance than random sampling when relatively few observations are collected.

  5. Dose reduction in CT with correlated-polarity noise reduction: context-dependent spatial resolution and noise properties demonstrating two-fold dose reduction with minimal artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, James T.; Wells, Jered R.; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    Correlated-polarity noise reduction (CPNR) is a novel noise reduction technique that uses a statistical approach to reducing noise while maintaining excellent spatial resolution and a traditional noise appearance. It was demonstrated in application to CT imaging for the first time at SPIE 2013 and showed qualitatively excellent image quality at half of normal CT dose. In this current work, we measure quantitatively the spatial resolution and noise properties of CPNR in CT imaging. To measure the spatial resolution, we developed a metrology approach that is suitable for nonlinear algorithms such as CPNR. We introduce the formalism of Signal Modification Factor, SMF(u,v), which is the ratio in frequency space of the CPNR-processed image divided by the noise-free image, averaged over an ensemble of ROIs in a given anatomical context. SMF is a nonlinear analog to the MTF. We used XCAT computer-generated anthropomorphic phantom images followed by projection space processing with CPNR. The SMF revealed virtually no effect from CPNR on spatial resolution of the images (<7% degradation at all frequencies). Corresponding contextdependent NPS measurements generated with CPNR at half-dose were about equal to the NPS of full-dose images without CPNR. This result demonstrates for the first time the quantitative determination of a two-fold reduction in dose with CPNR with less than 7% reduction in spatial resolution. We conclude that CPNR shows strong promise as a method for reduction of noise (and hence, dose) in CT. CPNR may also be used in combination with iterative reconstruction techniques for yet further dose reduction, pending further investigation.

  6. Repeated neonatal propofol administration induces sex-dependent long-term impairments on spatial and recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Yang, Sung Min; Choi, Chang Soon; Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-05-01

    Propofol is an anesthetic agent that gained wide use because of its fast induction of anesthesia and rapid recovery post-anesthesia. However, previous studies have reported immediate neurodegeneration and long-term impairment in spatial learning and memory from repeated neonatal propofol administration in animals. Yet, none of those studies has explored the sex-specific long-term physical changes and behavioral alterations such as social (sociability and social preference), emotional (anxiety), and other cognitive functions (spatial working, recognition, and avoidance memory) after neonatal propofol treatment. Seven-day-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats underwent repeated daily intraperitoneal injections of propofol or normal saline for 7 days. Starting fourth week of age and onwards, rats were subjected to behavior tests including open-field, elevated-plus-maze, Y-maze, 3-chamber social interaction, novel-object-recognition, passive-avoidance, and rotarod. Rats were sacrificed at 9 weeks and hippocampal protein expressions were analyzed by Western blot. Results revealed long-term body weight gain alterations in the growing rats and sex-specific impairments in spatial (female) and recognition (male) learning and memory paradigms. A markedly decreased expression of hippocampal NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit in female- and increased expression of AMPA GluR1 subunit protein expression in male rats were also found. Other aspects of behaviors such as locomotor activity and coordination, anxiety, sociability, social preference and avoidance learning and memory were not generally affected. These results suggest that neonatal repeated propofol administration disrupts normal growth and some aspects of neurodevelopment in rats in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25995824

  7. Repeated Neonatal Propofol Administration Induces Sex-Dependent Long-Term Impairments on Spatial and Recognition Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Choi, Chang Soon; Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an anesthetic agent that gained wide use because of its fast induction of anesthesia and rapid recovery post-anesthesia. However, previous studies have reported immediate neurodegeneration and long-term impairment in spatial learning and memory from repeated neonatal propofol administration in animals. Yet, none of those studies has explored the sex-specific long-term physical changes and behavioral alterations such as social (sociability and social preference), emotional (anxiety), and other cognitive functions (spatial working, recognition, and avoidance memory) after neonatal propofol treatment. Seven-day-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats underwent repeated daily intraperitoneal injections of propofol or normal saline for 7 days. Starting fourth week of age and onwards, rats were subjected to behavior tests including open-field, elevated-plus-maze, Y-maze, 3-chamber social interaction, novel-object-recognition, passive-avoidance, and rotarod. Rats were sacrificed at 9 weeks and hippocampal protein expressions were analyzed by Western blot. Results revealed long-term body weight gain alterations in the growing rats and sex-specific impairments in spatial (female) and recognition (male) learning and memory paradigms. A markedly decreased expression of hippocampal NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit in female- and increased expression of AMPA GluR1 subunit protein expression in male rats were also found. Other aspects of behaviors such as locomotor activity and coordination, anxiety, sociability, social preference and avoidance learning and memory were not generally affected. These results suggest that neonatal repeated propofol administration disrupts normal growth and some aspects of neurodevelopment in rats in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25995824

  8. An Analysis of the Truncated Bid- and ROS-dependent Spatial Propagation of Mitochondrial Permeabilization Waves during Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Selma F; Würstle, Maximilian L; Delgado, M Eugenia; Rehm, Markus

    2016-02-26

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that is essential for the efficient elimination of surplus, damaged, and transformed cells during metazoan embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Situated at the interface of apoptosis initiation and execution, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents one of the most fundamental processes during apoptosis signal transduction. It was shown that MOMP can spatiotemporally propagate through cells, in particular in response to extrinsic apoptosis induction. Based on apparently contradictory experimental evidence, two distinct molecular mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the propagation of MOMP signals, namely a reaction-diffusion mechanism governed by anisotropies in the production of the MOMP-inducer truncated Bid (tBid), or a process that drives the spatial propagation of MOMP by sequential bursts of reactive oxygen species. We therefore generated mathematical models for both scenarios and performed in silico simulations of spatiotemporal MOMP signaling to identify which one of the two mechanisms is capable of qualitatively and quantitatively reproducing the existing data. We found that the explanatory power of each model was limited in that only a subset of experimental findings could be replicated. However, the integration of both models into a combined mathematical description of spatiotemporal tBid and reactive oxygen species signaling accurately reproduced all available experimental data and furthermore, provided robustness to spatial MOMP propagation when mitochondria are spatially separated. Our study therefore provides a theoretical framework that is sufficient to describe and mechanistically explain the spatiotemporal propagation of one of the most fundamental processes during apoptotic cell death. PMID:26699404

  9. Spatial dependence of polycrystalline FTO’s conductance analyzed by conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM)

    SciTech Connect

    Peixoto, Alexandre Pessoa; Costa, J. C. da

    2014-05-15

    Fluorine-doped Tin oxide (FTO) is a highly transparent, electrically conductive polycrystalline material frequently used as an electrode in organic solar cells and optical-electronic devices [1–2]. In this work a spatial analysis of the conductive behavior of FTO was carried out by Conductive-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM). Rare highly oriented grains sample give us an opportunity to analyze the top portion of polycrystalline FTO and compare with the border one. It is shown that the current flow essentially takes place through the polycrystalline edge at grain boundaries.

  10. Time-dependent Effects of Transcription- and Translation-halting Drugs on the Spatial Distributions of the E. coli Chromosome and Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live E. coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes vs free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane (“transertion”) exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids. PMID:25250841

  11. CoFe alloy as middle layer for strong spin dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R. S.; Yang, See-Hun; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Rice, Philip M.; Canali, Carlo M.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling effect in CoFe/MgO/CoFe/MgO/CoFeB (CoFe) double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The dI/dV spectra reveal clear resonant peaks for the parallel magnetization configurations, which can be matched to quantum well resonances obtained from calculation. The differential TMR exhibits an oscillatory behavior with a sign change due to the formation of the spin-dependent QW states in the middle CoFe layer. Also, we observe pronounced TMR enhancement at resonant voltages at room temperature, suggesting that it is very promising to achieve high TMR using the spin-dependent QW resonant tunneling effect.

  12. Spatial-dependent Propagation of Cosmic Rays Results in the Spectrum of Proton, Ratios of P/P, and B/C, and Anisotropy of Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi-Qing; Tian, Zhen; Jin, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Recent precise measurements of cosmic ray spectra revealed an anomalous hardening at ∼200 GV, observed by the ATIC, CREAM, PAMELA, and AMS02 experiments. Particularly, the latest observation of the \\bar{p}/p ratio by AMS02 demonstrated a flat distribution, which further validated the spectral anomalies of secondary particles. All those new phenomena indicated that the conventional propagation model of cosmic rays meets a challenge. In this work, the spatial-dependent diffusion coefficient D(r,z,p) is employed by tracing the source distribution under the physical picture of the two-halo model in the DRAGON package. Under such a scenario, the model calculation will result in two-component spectra for primary nuclei. Due to the smaller rigidity dependence of D(r,z,p) in the galactic disk, the ratios secondary-to-primary will inevitably be flatter and the expected anisotropy of cosmic rays will be much more attenuated than in the conventional model. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons, the flat ratios of \\bar{p}/p and B/C, and consistent anisotropy from ∼100 GeV to ∼100 TeV by only adopting one set of spatial-dependent diffusion coefficients D(r,z,p) in a galactic disk.

  13. Spatial scale-dependent habitat heterogeneity influences submarine canyon macrofaunal abundance and diversity off the Main and Northwest Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Fabio C.; Vetter, Eric W.; Smith, Craig R.; Rowden, Ashley A.; McGranaghan, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The mapping of biodiversity on continental margins on landscape scales is highly relevant to marine spatial planning and conservation. Submarine canyons are widespread topographic features on continental and island margins that enhance benthic biomass across a range of oceanic provinces and productivity regimes. However, it remains unclear whether canyons enhance faunal biodiversity on landscape scales relevant to marine protected area (MPA) design. Furthermore, it is not known which physical attributes and heterogeneity metrics can provide good surrogates for large-scale mapping of canyon benthic biodiversity. To test mechanistic hypotheses evaluating the role of different canyon-landscape attributes in enhancing benthic biodiversity at different spatial scales we conducted 34 submersible dives in six submarine canyons and nearby slopes in the Hawaiian archipelago, sampling infaunal macrobenthos in a depth-stratified sampling design. We employed multivariate multiple regression models to evaluate sediment and topographic heterogeneity, canyon transverse profiles, and overall water mass variability as potential drivers of macrobenthic community structure and species richness. We find that variables related to habitat heterogeneity at medium (0.13 km2) and large (15-33 km2) spatial scales such as slope, backscatter reflectivity and canyon transverse profiles are often good predictors of macrobenthic biodiversity, explaining 16-30% of the variance. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux and distance from shore are also important variables, implicating food supply as a major predictor of canyon biodiversity. Canyons off the high Main Hawaiian Islands (Oahu and Moloka'i) are significantly affected by organic enrichment, showing enhanced infaunal macrobenthos abundance, whereas this effect is imperceptible around the low Northwest Hawaiian Islands (Nihoa and Maro Reef). Variable canyon alpha-diversity and high rates of species turnover (beta-diversity), particularly for polychaetes, suggest that canyons play important roles in maintaining high levels of regional biodiversity in the extremely oligotrophic system of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. This information is of key importance to the process of MPA design, suggesting that canyon habitats be explicitly included in marine spatial planning. The low-islands of Nihoa and Maro Reef in the NWHI showed a lack of sustained input of terrestrial and macrolagae detritus, likely having an influence on the observed low macrofaunal abundances (see further discussion of ‘canyon effects’ in Section 4.3), and showing the fundamental role of coastal landscape characteristics in determining the amount and nature of allochthonous organic matter entering the system. Total and highly-mobile invertebrate megafauna abundances were two to three times higher in the submarine canyons and slopes of the MHI contrasted with the NWHI (Vetter et al., 2010), also demonstrating the role of this larger contribution of terrestrial and coastal organic enrichment in the MHI contrasted with the NWHI.

  14. Laminar and Orientation-Dependent Characteristics of Spatial Nonlinearities: Implications for the Computational Architecture of Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mechler, Ferenc; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Schmid, Anita M.; Purpura, Keith P.

    2009-01-01

    A full understanding of the computations performed in primary visual cortex is an important yet elusive goal. Receptive field models consisting of cascades of linear filters and static nonlinearities may be adequate to account for responses to simple stimuli such as gratings and random checkerboards, but their predictions of responses to complex stimuli such as natural scenes are only approximately correct. It is unclear whether these discrepancies are limited to quantitative inaccuracies that reflect well-recognized mechanisms such as response normalization, gain controls, and cross-orientation suppression or, alternatively, imply additional qualitative features of the underlying computations. To address this question, we examined responses of V1 and V2 neurons in the monkey and area 17 neurons in the cat to two-dimensional Hermite functions (TDHs). TDHs are intermediate in complexity between traditional analytic stimuli and natural scenes and have mathematical properties that facilitate their use to test candidate models. By exploiting these properties, along with the laminar organization of V1, we identify qualitative aspects of neural computations beyond those anticipated from the above-cited model framework. Specifically, we find that V1 neurons receive signals from orientation-selective mechanisms that are highly nonlinear: they are sensitive to phase correlations, not just spatial frequency content. That is, the behavior of V1 neurons departs from that of linear–nonlinear cascades with standard modulatory mechanisms in a qualitative manner: even relatively simple stimuli evoke responses that imply complex spatial nonlinearities. The presence of these findings in the input layers suggests that these nonlinearities act in a feedback fashion. PMID:19812295

  15. Extremely strong temperature-dependent Davydow-splitting effects in the polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond: Pyrazole and quinolin-2(1H)-one crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachu?a, Barbara; Flakus, Henryk T.; Tyl, Aleksandra; Polasz, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Polarized IR spectra were recorded in the spectral range of the ?N-H and ?N-D proton stretching vibration bands for the isotopically neat and isotopically diluted crystals of pyrazole (Pzl) and quinolin-2(1H)-one (2HQ). The spectra measured in the temperature range of 77-293 K have shown that temperature extremely strongly influenced the magnitude of the Davydow-splitting effects in the crystalline spectra. Two different competing vibrational Davydow-coupling mechanisms involving hydrogen bonds, i.e., the ‘tail-to-head' and the ‘side-to-side', were responsible for the generation of the temperature effects in the polarized spectra.

  16. Prey-predator dynamics in rotifers: density-dependent consequences of spatial heterogeneity due to surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Vadstein, Olav; Olsen, Lasse M; Andersen, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Classical models of prey-predator interactions assume that per capita prey consumption is dependent on prey density alone and that prey consumption (functional response) and consumer proliferation (numerical response) operate on the same timescales and without time lags. Several modifications have been proposed for resolving this timescale discrepancy, including variants where the functional response depends on both prey and predator densities. A microcosm system with the rotifer Brachionus 'Nevada' feeding on the prasinophyte Tetraselmis sp. showed significant (P < 0.0005) increases in steady-state biomasses of both prey and predators with increasing carrying capacity (represented by total phosphorus of the growth medium), which is inconsistent with predictions based on the traditional prey-only-dependent functional response. We provide data indicating that surfaces where the predator can attach provide a high-quality habitat for rotifers, which can result in a predator-dependent functional response. We also show that partitioning between the attached and free-swimming habitats was fast compared to the timescale of the numerical response. When attached to surfaces, rotifers maximized net energy gain by avoiding the high cost of swimming and by increased food capture due to reduced viscous drag. A mathematical model with prey-dependent functional response and wall-attached and free-swimming fractions of the population describes our data adequately. We discuss the implications of this finding for extrapolating microcosm experiments to systems with other surface-to-volume ratios, and to what extent our findings may apply to other popular model organisms for prey-predator interaction. PMID:22928408

  17. Mass-radius relation of strongly magnetized white dwarfs: dependence on field geometry, GR effects and electrostatic corrections to the EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-03-01

    Recent literature has seen an ongoing discussion on the limiting mass of strongly magnetized white dwarfs, since such objects may prove to be a source of overluminous Type-Ia supernovae. In an earlier paper, we have presented the mass-radius relation of white dwarfs with a strong poloidal magnetic field in Newtonian gravity. The inclusion of effects such as general relativistic gravity and many-body corrections to the equation of state can alter the mass-radius relation and the maximum mass. In this work we estimate the extent to which these effects may modify the earlier results. We find that the general relativistic effects tend to reduce the maximum mass by about 2 per cent and many-body corrections by another additional ˜2 per cent, for an assumed carbon composition. We also explore field geometries that are purely toroidal or a mixture of poloidal and toroidal and find that the limiting mass of such equilibrium configurations can be substantially higher than in the case of a purely poloidal field.

  18. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission. PMID:26818710

  19. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission.

  20. Strong composition-dependent variation of MCs + calibration factors in TiO x and GeO x ( x ≤ 2) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Le, Yongkang; Su, Weifeng

    2006-07-01

    The emission of MCs + secondary ions (M designates the analyte species) from TiO x (0.2 ≤ x ≤ 2) and GeO x (0.001 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) films under Cs + bombardment was examined. The relative calibration factors of OCs +/TiCs + and OCs +/GeCs + were determined and were found to depend pronouncedly on the O/Ti and O/Ge atomic concentration ratios. Specifically, with increasing oxygen content OCs + ions form much more efficiently (as compared to TiCs + or GeCs + ions), an enhancement amounting to more than a factor of 10 for the highest oxygen concentrations. Concurrently, the formation of TiOCs + or GeOCs + ions increases drastically. For both oxide systems, an empirical relation for the oxygen-concentration dependence of the relative calibration factors could be established.

  1. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission. PMID:26818710

  2. Conflict of spatial development and water supply under climate change in case of water dependent ecosystem of Ljubljana Moor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bračič Železnik, Branka; Souvent, Petra; Čenčur Curk, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Water resources are vulnerable to climate change and to many other socio-economic drivers of change. A key aspect of vulnerability is that it is spatially variable, reflecting variations of physical and socio-economic conditions. Given the real representation of vulnerability and a set of climate change adaptation options there is need to develop a common transnational strategy for vulnerability reduction. The latter is the goal of SEE CC-WARE project. Among others, ecosystem services, land use change, improving water use efficiency and economic incentives for water management have large potentials to decrease water resources vulnerability. Especially, forests, wetlands and grasslands are important ecosystems, which together with their management emerged as an important means for a sustainable future drinking water supply. The Ljubljana Moor is one of the biggest and most important complexes of wet meadows in Slovenia, which have, due to land use high biodiversity. The Ljubljana Moor extends from the southern part of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, where in the last two centuries extensive irrigation and river regulation projects were implemented to develop agricultural land. Biodiversity of the area is high due to large zones of wet meadows, some flood forest patches, bog areas, and open water courses habitats. The Ljubljana Moor is therefore protected as Natura 2000 site. The Ljubljana Moor is changing very fast and impacts are especially intense in the present years, mostly due to spreading of urbanization and monocultures. In this area the water well field Brest has been designed as important future drinking water source for Ljubljana, pumping mainly water from confined aquifer. The pressure from urbanisation and agriculture and high subsidence that are noticed in the central and eastern part of the aquifer, those two phenomena pose high risk to stable drinking water supply and wetland habitats that are protected as NATURA 2000. Water protection areas with limitation of land use were delineated for protection of drinking water from Brest pumping station. A part of Ljubljana Moor area is also protected as Landscape Park. These legal acts are in conflict with existing agricultural practices, spatial development plans and further urbanisation processes (including new and larger roads, flood areas disconnections and destruction). No attention has been given yet to integrated water management and there is no consideration of long term hydrological and hydrogeological processes.

  3. Spatial structure of a collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Dongxia; Rong, Shiguang; Xu, Ying

    2013-11-15

    The spatial structure of a collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in an optical lattice is studied. A spatially dependent current with an explicit analytic expression is found in the case with a spatially dependent BEC phase. The oscillating amplitude of the current can be adjusted by a Feshbach resonance, and the intensity of the current depends heavily on the initial and boundary conditions. Increasing the oscillating amplitude of the current can force the system to pass from a single-periodic spatial structure into a very complex state. But in the case with a constant phase, the spatially dependent current disappears and the Melnikov chaotic criterion is obtained via a perturbative analysis in the presence of a weak optical lattice potential. Numerical simulations show that a strong optical lattice potential can lead BEC atoms to a state with a chaotic spatial distribution via a quasiperiodic route.

  4. Time of flight dependent linearity in diffuse imaging: how effective is it to evaluate the spatial resolution by measuring the edge response function?

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Rascón, E; Bruce, N C; Rodríguez-Rosales, A A; Garduño-Mejía, J

    2016-03-01

    We describe the behavior of linearity in diffuse imaging by evaluating the differences between time-resolved images produced by photons arriving at the detector at different times. Two approaches are considered: Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results. The images of two complete opaque bars embedded in a transparent or in a turbid medium with a slab geometry are analyzed; the optical properties of the turbid medium sample are close to those of breast tissue. A simple linearity test was designed involving a direct comparison between the intensity profile produced by two bars scanned at the same time and the intensity profile obtained by adding two profiles of each bar scanned one at a time. It is shown that the linearity improves substantially when short time of flight photons are used in the imaging process, but even then the nonlinear behavior prevails. As the edge response function (ERF) has been used widely for testing the spatial resolution in imaging systems, the main implication of a time dependent linearity is the weakness of the linearity assumption when evaluating the spatial resolution through the ERF in diffuse imaging systems, and the need to evaluate the spatial resolution by other methods. PMID:26974619

  5. Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Hoge, Rick D.; Dale, Anders M.; Franceschini, Maria A.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Akin to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive method for measuring localized changes in hemoglobin levels within the brain. When combined with fMRI methods, multimodality approaches could offer an integrated perspective on the biophysics, anatomy, and physiology underlying each of the imaging modalities. Vital to the correct interpretation of such studies, control experiments to test the consistency of both modalities must be performed. Here, we compare DOI with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling fMRI-based methods in order to explore the spatial agreement of the response amplitudes recorded by these two methods. Rather than creating optical images by regularized, tomographic reconstructions, we project the fMRI image into optical measurement space using the optical forward problem. We report statistically better spatial correlation between the fMRI-BOLD response and the optically measured deoxyhemoglobin (R=0.71, p=1 × 10−7) than between the BOLD and oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin measures (R=0.38, p=0.04|0.37, p=0.05, respectively). Similarly, we find that the correlation between the ASL measured blood flow and optically measured total and oxyhemoglobin is stronger (R=0.73, p=5 × 10−6 and R=0.71, p=9 × 10−6, respectively) than the flow to deoxyhemoglobin spatial correlation (R=0.26, p=0.10). PMID:17212541

  6. Using Multivariate Geostatistics to Assess Patterns of Spatial Dependence of Apparent Soil Electrical Conductivity and Selected Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Dafonte, Jorge Dafonte; Valcárcel Armesto, Montserrat; Silva, Ênio Farias França e

    2014-01-01

    The apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) was continuously recorded in three successive dates using electromagnetic induction in horizontal (ECa-H) and vertical (ECa-V) dipole modes at a 6 ha plot located in Northwestern Spain. One of the ECa data sets was used to devise an optimized sampling scheme consisting of 40 points. Soil was sampled at the 0.0–0.3 m depth, in these 40 points, and analyzed for sand, silt, and clay content; gravimetric water content; and electrical conductivity of saturated soil paste. Coefficients of correlation between ECa and gravimetric soil water content (0.685 for ECa-V and 0.649 for ECa-H) were higher than those between ECa and clay content (ranging from 0.197 to 0.495, when different ECa recording dates were taken into account). Ordinary and universal kriging have been used to assess the patterns of spatial variability of the ECa data sets recorded at successive dates and the analyzed soil properties. Ordinary and universal cokriging methods have improved the estimation of gravimetric soil water content using the data of ECa as secondary variable with respect to the use of ordinary kriging. PMID:25614893

  7. Using multivariate geostatistics to assess patterns of spatial dependence of apparent soil electrical conductivity and selected soil properties.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Dafonte, Jorge Dafonte; Valcárcel Armesto, Montserrat; França e Silva, Ênio Farias

    2014-01-01

    The apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) was continuously recorded in three successive dates using electromagnetic induction in horizontal (ECa-H) and vertical (ECa-V) dipole modes at a 6 ha plot located in Northwestern Spain. One of the ECa data sets was used to devise an optimized sampling scheme consisting of 40 points. Soil was sampled at the 0.0-0.3 m depth, in these 40 points, and analyzed for sand, silt, and clay content; gravimetric water content; and electrical conductivity of saturated soil paste. Coefficients of correlation between ECa and gravimetric soil water content (0.685 for ECa-V and 0.649 for ECa-H) were higher than those between ECa and clay content (ranging from 0.197 to 0.495, when different ECa recording dates were taken into account). Ordinary and universal kriging have been used to assess the patterns of spatial variability of the ECa data sets recorded at successive dates and the analyzed soil properties. Ordinary and universal cokriging methods have improved the estimation of gravimetric soil water content using the data of ECa as secondary variable with respect to the use of ordinary kriging. PMID:25614893

  8. Spatial dependent diffusion of cosmic rays and the excess of primary electrons derived from high precision measurements by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Jin; Yi-Qing, Guo; Hong-Bo, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electron and positron spectra (?? = ?e? ??e+) as being dominated by primary electrons. The resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of the standard model of CR propagation. In this work, we generalize the analytic one-dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three-dimensional realistic calculation by implementing spatial variant diffusion coefficients in the DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over-predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100 GeV. To understand this issue, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary. Supported by Natural Sciences Foundation of China (11135010)

  9. Silencing Nicotiana attenuata Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases, CDPK4 and CDPK5, Strongly Up-Regulates Wound- and Herbivory-Induced Jasmonic Acid Accumulations1[W

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Da-Hai; Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T.; Wu, Jianqiang

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) plays a pivotal role in plant-insect interactions. Herbivore attack usually elicits dramatic increases in JA concentrations, which in turn activate the accumulation of metabolites that function as defenses against herbivores. Although almost all enzymes involved in the biosynthesis pathway of JA have been identified and characterized, the mechanism by which plants regulate JA biosynthesis remains unclear. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are plant-specific proteins that sense changes in [Ca2+] to activate downstream responses. We created transgenic Nicotiana attenuata plants, in which two CDPKs, NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5, were simultaneously silenced (IRcdpk4/5 plants). IRcdpk4/5 plants were stunted and aborted most of their flower primordia. Importantly, after wounding or simulated herbivory, IRcdpk4/5 plants accumulated exceptionally high JA levels. When NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 were silenced individually, neither stunted growth nor high JA levels were observed, suggesting that NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 have redundant roles. Attack from Manduca sexta larvae on IRcdpk4/5 plants induced high levels of defense metabolites that slowed M. sexta growth. We found that NaCDPK4 and NaCDPK5 affect plant resistance against insects in a JA- and JA-signaling-dependent manner. Furthermore, IRcdpk4/5 plants showed overactivation of salicylic-acid-induced protein kinase, a mitogen-activated protein kinase involved in various stress responses, and genetic analysis indicated that the increased salicylic-acid-induced protein kinase activity in IRcdpk4/5 plants was a consequence of the exceptionally high JA levels and was dependent on CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1. This work reveals the critical roles of CDPKs in modulating JA homeostasis and highlights the complex duet between JA and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. PMID:22715110

  10. Solute-dependent activation of cell motility in strongly hypertonic solutions in Dictyostelium discoideum, human melanoma HTB-140 cells and walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Korohoda, Włodzimierz; Kucia, Magdalena; Wybieralska, Ewa; Wianecka-Skoczeń, Magdalena; Waligórska, Agnieszka; Drukała, Justyna; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2011-09-01

    Published data concerning the effects of hypertonicity on cell motility have often been controversial. The interpretation of results often rests on the premise that cell responses result from cell dehydration, i.e. osmotic effects. The results of induced hypertonicity on cell movement of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae and human melanoma HTB-140 cells reported here show that: i) hypertonic solutions of identical osmolarity will either inhibit or stimulate cell movement depending on specific solutes (Na(+) or K(+), sorbitol or saccharose); ii) inhibition of cell motility by hypertonic solutions containing Na(+) ions or carbohydrates can be reversed by the addition of calcium ions; iii) various cell types react differently to the same solutions, and iv) cells can adapt to hypertonic solutions. Various hypertonic solutions are now broadly used in medicine and to study modulation of gene expression. The observations reported suggest the need to examine whether the other responses of cells to hypertonicity can also be based on the solute-dependent cell responses besides cell dehydration due to the osmotic effects. PMID:21614489

  11. Ligand-dependent TrkA activity in brain differentially affects spatial learning and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Aboulkassim, Tahar; Tong, Xin-Kang; Tse, Yiu Chung; Wong, Tak-Pan; Woo, Sang B; Neet, Kenneth E; Brahimi, Fouad; Hamel, Edith; Saragovi, H Uri

    2011-09-01

    In the central nervous system, the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA is expressed primarily in cholinergic neurons that are implicated in spatial learning and memory, whereas the NGF receptor p75(NTR) is expressed in many neuronal populations and glia. We asked whether selective TrkA activation may have a different impact on learning, short-term memory, and long-term memory. We also asked whether TrkA activation might affect cognition differently in wild-type mice versus mice with cognitive deficits due to transgenic overexpression of mutant amyloid-precursor protein (APP mice). Mice were treated with wild-type NGF (a ligand of TrkA and p75(NTR)) or with selective pharmacological agonists of TrkA that do not bind to p75(NTR). In APP mice, the selective TrkA agonists significantly improved learning and short-term memory. These improvements are associated with a reduction of soluble A? levels in the cortex and AKT activation in the cortex and hippocampus. However, this improved phenotype did not translate into improved long-term memory. In normal wild-type mice, none of the treatments affected learning or short-term memory, but a TrkA-selective agonist caused persistent deficits in long-term memory. The deficit in wild-type mice was associated temporally, in the hippocampus, with increased AKT activity, increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor, increased neurotrophin receptor homolog-2 (p75-related protein), and long-term depression. Together, these data indicate that selective TrkA activation affects cognition but does so differently in impaired APP mice versus normal wild-type mice. Understanding mechanisms that govern learning and memory is important for better treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:21616921

  12. Dopamine depletion, stimulation or blockade in the rat disrupts spatial navigation and locomotion dependent upon beacon or distal cues.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Dunnett, S B

    1985-01-01

    Rats depleted of dopamine by intraventricular or nigrostriatal bundle 6-hydroxydopamine injection were compared with normal rats on acquisition and retention of place and cue navigation in the Morris swimming pool test and on a battery of sensorimotor tests. Rats with extensive bilateral dopamine depletions were able to swim vigorously, but were unable to acquire either the place or cue task. Rats with unilateral lesions, although impaired in the rate of acquisition were eventually able to learn both tasks to close to normal levels. Animals pretrained on the tasks prior to the lesions displayed retention deficits that were related to the extent of dopamine depletion: after extensive depletions, performance on both tasks deteriorated until successful navigation was abolished, whereas incomplete depletions impaired but did not abolish performance on either task. In separate groups of pretrained animals, both dopamine antagonists (haloperidol, alpha-flupenthixol) and agonists (apomorphine, metamphetamine) blocked performance on both place and cue tasks, although there were individual differences in sensitivity of the rats. Performance on the place task was more sensitive to disruption than the cue task both by the lesions and by haloperidol, alpha-flupenthixol or apormorphine but not by metamphetamine. On the sensorimotor tests dopamine-depleted rats were impaired at visual but not contact placing, they oriented weakly to snout touches and surfaces but not to distal stimuli, and they were akinetic on a number of tests of motor function but when wet they displayed as many grooming movements and groomed as long as did normal rats. The results suggest that dopamine depletion may impair spatial navigation by a disruption of their ability to use distal cues for guidance. PMID:3911980

  13. Speech cues contribute to audiovisual spatial integration.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher W; Miller, Lee M

    2011-01-01

    Speech is the most important form of human communication but ambient sounds and competing talkers often degrade its acoustics. Fortunately the brain can use visual information, especially its highly precise spatial information, to improve speech comprehension in noisy environments. Previous studies have demonstrated that audiovisual integration depends strongly on spatiotemporal factors. However, some integrative phenomena such as McGurk interference persist even with gross spatial disparities, suggesting that spatial alignment is not necessary for robust integration of audiovisual place-of-articulation cues. It is therefore unclear how speech-cues interact with audiovisual spatial integration mechanisms. Here, we combine two well established psychophysical phenomena, the McGurk effect and the ventriloquist's illusion, to explore this dependency. Our results demonstrate that conflicting spatial cues may not interfere with audiovisual integration of speech, but conflicting speech-cues can impede integration in space. This suggests a direct but asymmetrical influence between ventral 'what' and dorsal 'where' pathways. PMID:21909378

  14. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. PMID:26208642

  15. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K.; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. PMID:26208642

  16. The evolution of earthquake-nucleating slip instabilities under spatially variable steady-state rate dependence of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S.; Viesca, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Following laboratory rock friction experiments, fault strength under sub-seismic slip speeds is thought to depend on a slip rate- and state-dependent friction. Laboratory-measured temperature dependence of the frictional properties and their implied variation with depth form the basis for current models of the seismic cycle. However, scant attention has been paid to the role such heterogeneity has on determining the location and manner in which an earthquake nucleating slip instability develops. Recent work demonstrates that a slip instability on a fault with rate-and-state friction (in which state evolution follows the aging law) occurs as the attraction of a dynamical system towards a fixed point (Viesca, this meeting). Based on this development, we find that the location of that fixed point may be determined if a heterogeneous distribution of the relative rate-weakening parameter a/b is known. (Rate-weakening occurs for 01). That this arises can be deduced considering that (i) the problem that determines the fixed points is equivalent to finding the equilibrium solution for a linearly slip-weakening crack, and (ii) heterogeneities in the parameter a/b have analogy in the equivalent problem to heterogeneities in the background stress. Physically, instability develops where rate-weakening is strongest. We examined the influence such a heterogeneity has on the fixed point attractor (and hence on the instability development) by considering the scenario of a rate-weakening patch embedded within a rate-strengthening region with in-plane or anti-plane slip conditions. Specifically, we solve for fixed points under a rate-weakening heterogeneity within |x|1) outside. Additionally, a linear stability analysis reveals the effect of heterogeneity on the stability of the fixed points of the dynamical system. The heterogeneity parameters (a/b)m and H enter as bifurcation parameters indicating a transition in the classification of the fixed point from asymptotically stable to unstable at critical values of (a/b)m and H. The results are further verified by full numerical simulation of the system of slip acceleration and state evolution under this heterogeneity.

  17. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields in SU(2) NJL-type models: Parameter dependence of the cold dense matter phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Pablo G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2013-11-01

    The phase structure of magnetized cold quark matter is analyzed in the framework of the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models paying special attention to its dependence on the model parameters as different values within the phenomenological allowed range are considered. We first discuss the simpler chiral limit case, and then the more realistic situation of finite current masses. We show that in spite of the difference in the nature of some transitions, both cases are alike and exhibit a rather rich phase structure for a significant range of acceptable parameters. A simplification of the phase structure is obtained as parameters leading to larger values of the dressed quark mass in the vacuum are considered. Finally, we consider the so-called “inverse catalysis effect” showing that in some phases it implies an actual decrease of the order parameter as the magnetic field increases.

  18. Protection from Severe Influenza Virus Infections in Mice Carrying the Mx1 Influenza Virus Resistance Gene Strongly Depends on Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dai-Lun; Hatesuer, Bastian; Bergmann, Silke; Nedelko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determine the severity of influenza. The MX dynamin-like GTPase 1 (Mx1) gene has been shown to confer strong resistance to influenza A virus infections in mice. Most laboratory mouse strains, including C57BL/6J, carry nonsense or deletion mutations in Mx1 and thus a nonfunctional allele, whereas wild-derived mouse strains carry a wild-type Mx1 allele. Congenic C57BL/6J (B6-Mx1r/r) mice expressing a wild-type allele from the A2G mouse strain are highly resistant to influenza A virus infections, to both mono- and polybasic subtypes. Furthermore, in genetic mapping studies, Mx1 was identified as the major locus of resistance to influenza virus infections. Here, we investigated whether the Mx1 protective function is influenced by the genetic background. For this, we generated a congenic mouse strain carrying the A2G wild-type Mx1 resistance allele on a DBA/2J background (D2-Mx1r/r). Most remarkably, congenic D2-Mx1r/r mice expressing a functional Mx1 wild-type allele are still highly susceptible to H1N1 virus. However, pretreatment of D2-Mx1r/r mice with alpha interferon protected them from lethal infections. Our results showed, for the first time, that the presence of an Mx1 wild-type allele from A2G as such does not fully protect mice from lethal influenza A virus infections. These observations are also highly relevant for susceptibility to influenza virus infections in humans. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus represents a major health threat to humans. Seasonal influenza epidemics cause high economic loss, morbidity, and deaths each year. Genetic factors of the host strongly influence susceptibility and resistance to virus infections. The Mx1 (MX dynamin-like GTPase 1) gene has been described as a major resistance gene in mice and humans. Most inbred laboratory mouse strains are deficient in Mx1, but congenic B6-Mx1r/r mice that carry the wild-type Mx1 gene from the A2G mouse strain are highly resistant. Here, we show that, very unexpectedly, congenic D2-Mx1r/r mice carrying the wild-type Mx1 gene from the A2G strain are not fully protected against lethal influenza virus infections. These observations demonstrate that the genetic background is very important for the protective function of the Mx1 resistance gene. Our results are also highly relevant for understanding genetic susceptibility to influenza virus infections in humans. PMID:26202236

  19. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution II: Solvent Coordinate-Dependent Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    The protonation of methylamine base CH3NH2 by carbonic acid H2CO3 within a hydrogen (H)-bonded complex in aqueous solution was studied via Car-Parrinello dynamics in the preceding paper (Daschakraborty, S.; Kiefer, P. M.; Miller, Y.; Motro, Y.; Pines, D.; Pines, E.; Hynes, J. T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.5b12742 ). Here some important further details of the reaction path are presented, with specific emphasis on the water solvent's role. The overall reaction is barrierless and very rapid, on an ∼100 fs time scale, with the proton transfer (PT) event itself being very sudden (<10 fs). This transfer is preceded by the acid-base H-bond's compression, while the water solvent changes little until the actual PT occurrence; this results from the very strong driving force for the reaction, as indicated by the very favorable acid-protonated base ΔpKa difference. Further solvent rearrangement follows immediately the sudden PT's production of an incipient contact ion pair, stabilizing it by establishment of equilibrium solvation. The solvent water's short time scale ∼120 fs response to the incipient ion pair formation is primarily associated with librational modes and H-bond compression of water molecules around the carboxylate anion and the protonated base. This is consistent with this stabilization involving significant increase in H-bonding of hydration shell waters to the negatively charged carboxylate group oxygens' (especially the former H2CO3 donor oxygen) and the nitrogen of the positively charged protonated base's NH3(+). PMID:26876428

  20. Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying the Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Target-Dependent Gene Expression in Drosophila Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ridyard, Marc S.; Lian, Tianshun; Keatings, Kathleen; Allan, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation often requires target-derived signals from the cells they innervate. These signals typically activate neural subtype-specific genes, but the gene regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Highly restricted expression of the FMRFa neuropeptide in Drosophila Tv4 neurons requires target-derived BMP signaling and a transcription factor code that includes Apterous. Using integrase transgenesis of enhancer reporters, we functionally dissected the Tv4-enhancer of FMRFa within its native cellular context. We identified two essential but discrete cis-elements, a BMP-response element (BMP-RE) that binds BMP-activated pMad, and a homeodomain-response element (HD-RE) that binds Apterous. These cis-elements have low activity and must be combined for Tv4-enhancer activity. Such combinatorial activity is often a mechanism for restricting expression to the intersection of cis-element spatiotemporal activities. However, concatemers of the HD-RE and BMP-RE cis-elements were found to independently generate the same spatiotemporal expression as the Tv4-enhancer. Thus, the Tv4-enhancer atypically combines two low-activity cis-elements that confer the same output from distinct inputs. The activation of target-dependent genes is assumed to 'wait' for target contact. We tested this directly, and unexpectedly found that premature BMP activity could not induce early FMRFa expression; also, we show that the BMP-insensitive HD-RE cis-element is activated at the time of target contact. This led us to uncover a role for the nuclear receptor, seven up (svp), as a repressor of FMRFa induction prior to target contact. Svp is normally downregulated immediately prior to target contact, and we found that maintaining Svp expression prevents cis-element activation, whereas reducing svp gene dosage prematurely activates cis-element activity. We conclude that the target-dependent FMRFa gene is repressed prior to target contact, and that target-derived BMP signaling directly activates FMRFa gene expression through an atypical gene regulatory mechanism. PMID:26713626

  1. Analysis of the temporal and spatial dependence of the eddy current fields in a 40-cm bore magnet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, S; Hughes, D G; Liu, Q; Allen, P S

    1992-05-01

    Eddy current fields, generated in an animal-size superconducting NMR magnet by a nominally rectangular pulsed transverse gradient applied in the vertical direction, have been studied by measuring the offset frequency of the proton NMR signal obtained from a small spherical sample. Measurements were made, after various time delays, at nine different locations in the sample space. Analysis of the data shows that the time-dependent fields at all nine locations are quite well accounted for by the superposition of only four independent exponentially decaying components that have time constants in the range from 9 to 400 ms. Two of these were found to be caused by eddy currents generated in the magnet structure. They generate primarily linear gradients, though one of them also produces a B0 shift, indicating a significant asymmetry about the isocenter of the conducting structure in which the eddy current flows. The other two exponentially decaying components, which had very different time constants from the eddy currents and also initial amplitudes of the opposite sign, were generated by the preemphasis unit. This calls into question the procedure used to adjust the preemphasis unit and an alternative method is proposed. PMID:1593948

  2. Transcription-dependent spatial arrangements of CFTR and conserved adjacent loci are not conserved in human and murine nuclei.

    PubMed

    Sadoni, Nicolas; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Englmann, Andreas; Fesser, Stephanie; Koch, Jeannette; Schindelhauer, Dirk; Zink, Daniele

    2008-08-01

    The human genes CFTR, ASZ1/GASZ, and CTTNBP2/CORTBP2 map to adjacent loci on chromosome 7q31 and display characteristic patterns of nuclear positioning, which strictly correlate with the state of activity. To address the evolutionary conservation of gene positioning, we investigated transcriptional activity and nuclear positioning of the highly conserved murine orthologs and of additional murine genes mapping to the region of conserved synteny on mouse chromosome 6. The results showed that all murine loci investigated constitutively localized in the nuclear interior irrespective of their functional state. Silenced loci did not display preferential association with the nuclear periphery or with chromocenters, respectively, and no differential positioning with respect to the chromosome 6 territory could be observed. This positional behavior of the murine loci was in striking contrast to the positioning of the human orthologs, and the results show that the transcription-dependent positioning of CFTR and adjacent loci has not been conserved. The findings reveal that the nuclear organization of conserved chromosomal regions can change rapidly during evolution and is not always as highly conserved as other features of chromosome organization. Furthermore, the results suggest that the way how nuclear positioning contributes to the regulation of conserved loci can be different in different vertebrate species. PMID:18408947

  3. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  4. The Strong In Vivo Anti-Tumor Effect of the UIC2 Monoclonal Antibody Is the Combined Result of Pgp Inhibition and Antibody Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Szalóki, Gábor; Krasznai, Zoárd T.; Tóth, Ágnes; Vízkeleti, Laura; Szöll?si, Attila G.; Trencsényi, György; Lajtos, Imre; Juhász, István; Krasznai, Zoltán; Márián, Teréz; Balázs, Margit; Szabó, Gábor; Goda, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR). The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10–40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA)). The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX) in KB-V1 (Pgp+) cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp-) cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ?10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). PMID:25238617

  5. Endocytotic routes of cobra cardiotoxins depend on spatial distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic domains to target distinct types of sulfated glycoconjugates on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-07-18

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides. PMID:24898246

  6. Channel doping concentration and cell program state dependence on random telegraph noise spatial and statistical distribution in 30 nm NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miyaji, Kousuke

    2015-04-01

    The dependence of spatial and statistical distribution of random telegraph noise (RTN) in a 30 nm NAND flash memory on channel doping concentration NA and cell program state Vth is comprehensively investigated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo device simulation considering random dopant fluctuation (RDF). It is found that single trap RTN amplitude ?Vth is larger at the center of the channel region in the NAND flash memory, which is closer to the jellium (uniform) doping results since NA is relatively low to suppress junction leakage current. In addition, ?Vth peak at the center of the channel decreases in the higher Vth state due to the current concentration at the shallow trench isolation (STI) edges induced by the high vertical electrical field through the fringing capacitance between the channel and control gate. In such cases, ?Vth distribution slope ? cannot be determined by only considering RDF and single trap.

  7. Spatial distribution of infectious stages of the nematode Syngamus trachea within pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) release pens on estates in the South West of England: Potential density dependence?

    PubMed

    Gethings, O J; Sage, R B; Leather, S R

    2015-09-15

    The spatial distribution of the infectious stages of parasites with a direct life cycle is one of the most important factors influencing infectious disease dynamics, and acquisition rates will generally increase as the contact time between parasite and host increases. For animal species that are constrained by feeding opportunities, one might expect disease patterns to be highly skewed within confined systems. The aim of the present study was to identify to what extent, if any, eggs of avian parasites are aggregated within the release pen, and to evaluate what effect, if any, this aggregation had on the distribution of the adult stages within the host species. The abundance of Syngamus trachea eggs were highly aggregated within pens, with high levels of contamination driven by a combination of feeder placement, soil moisture and host-mediated heterogeneities in immuno-competence. The log mean and log variance of egg abundance was highly linear (R(2)=0.97-0.99), with an estimated slope (b) of between 1.79 and 1.97 for individual sites, and 2.11 when sites were combined, which indicated aggregation relative to an estimated Poisson slope of unity. Although the placement of feeders and environmental moisture could be contributing to parasite aggregation, density-dependent processes appear to be ensuring the population does not become too over or under-dispersed, in order to maintain the transmission-virulence equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to explicitly demonstrate the high spatial aggregation of eggs around feeding sites and the first to suggest possible density-dependent regulatory mechanisms stabilising disease dynamics between S. trachea and ring necked Pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). PMID:26220022

  8. Hippocampal-dependent memory in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task: The role of spatial cues and CA1 activity.

    PubMed

    Leão, Anderson H F F; Medeiros, André M; Apolinário, Gênedy K S; Cabral, Alícia; Ribeiro, Alessandra M; Barbosa, Flávio F; Silva, Regina H

    2016-05-01

    The plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT) has been used to investigate interactions between aversive memory and an anxiety-like response in rodents. Suitable performance in this task depends on the activity of the basolateral amygdala, similar to other aversive-based memory tasks. However, the role of spatial cues and hippocampal-dependent learning in the performance of PMDAT remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of proximal and distal cues in the retrieval of this task. Animals tested under misplaced proximal cues had diminished performance, and animals tested under both misplaced proximal cues and absent distal cues could not discriminate the aversive arm. We also assessed the role of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) in this aversive memory task. Temporary bilateral inactivation of dorsal CA1 was conducted with muscimol (0.05μg, 0.1μg, and 0.2μg) prior to the training session. While the acquisition of the task was not altered, muscimol impaired the performance in the test session and reduced the anxiety-like response in the training session. We also performed a spreading analysis of a fluorophore-conjugated muscimol to confirm selective inhibition of CA1. In conclusion, both distal and proximal cues are required to retrieve the task, with the latter being more relevant to spatial orientation. Dorsal CA1 activity is also required for aversive memory formation in this task, and interfered with the anxiety-like response as well. Importantly, both effects were detected by different parameters in the same paradigm, endorsing the previous findings of independent assessment of aversive memory and anxiety-like behavior in the PMDAT. Taken together, these findings suggest that the PMDAT probably requires an integration of multiple systems for memory formation, resembling an episodic-like memory rather than a pure conditioning behavior. Furthermore, the concomitant and independent assessment of emotionality and memory in rodents is relevant to elucidate how these memory systems interact during aversive memory formation. Thus, the PMDAT can be useful for studying hippocampal-dependent memory when it involves emotional content. PMID:26876135

  9. Quantum hydrodynamics and expansion of a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Y.; Zhou, L.; Ma, Y. L.

    2009-11-01

    We generalize the quantum hydrodynamical equations and study the dynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas trapped in an anisotropic harmonic trap. By using this simple theory to simulate the expansion of the Fermi gas observed experimentally by O'Hara et al., Science, 298 (2002) 2179, we find that the density profiles of the system are well described by the Fetter-like form in the dynamical process in all spatial directions. We also discuss the anisotropic dependence on the expansion.

  10. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  11. From repulsion to attraction: species- and spatial context-dependent threat sensitive response of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae to predatory mite cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Ferrari, M. Celeste; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Prey perceiving predation risk commonly change their behavior to avoid predation. However, antipredator strategies are costly. Therefore, according to the threat-sensitive predator avoidance hypothesis, prey should match the intensity of their antipredator behaviors to the degree of threat, which may depend on the predator species and the spatial context. We assessed threat sensitivity of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, to the cues of three predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, Neoseiulus californicus, and Amblyseius andersoni, posing different degrees of risk in two spatial contexts. We first conducted a no-choice test measuring oviposition and activity of T. urticae exposed to chemical traces of predators or traces plus predator eggs. Then, we tested the site preference of T. urticae in choice tests, using artificial cages and leaves. In the no-choice test, T. urticae deposited their first egg later in the presence of cues of P. persimilis than of the other two predators and cue absence, indicating interspecific threat-sensitivity. T. urticae laid also fewer eggs in the presence of cues of P. persimilis and A. andersoni than of N. californicus and cue absence. In the artificial cage test, the spider mites preferred the site with predator traces, whereas in the leaf test, they preferentially resided on leaves without traces. We argue that in a nonplant environment, chemical predator traces do not indicate a risk for T. urticae, and instead, these traces function as indirect habitat cues. The spider mites were attracted to these cues because they associated them with the existence of a nearby host plant.

  12. Linkage of hippocampal proteins to spatial memory formation and strain-dependence in Apodemus sylvaticus, C57BL/6J and PWD/PhJ mice.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sudarshan S; Schlick, Florentine; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2010-02-01

    Strain-dependence of performance in the Morris water maze (MWM) has been reported but information on underlying differences at the protein level as well as linkage of hippocampal proteins to memory is limited. No data are available on differences in hippocampal protein levels between (within-strain) "good" and "bad" performers in the MWM. Hippocampi of wild-caught mouse strain Apodemus sylvaticus (AS), laboratory inbred mouse strain C57BL/6J and wild-derived inbred mouse strain PWD/PhJ, that were tested in the MWM, were taken and postsynaptic density protein 95, neuronal marker protein NeuN, dendritic spine protein drebrin, synapsins 1a and 1b and synaptosomal protein syntaxin of the SNARE complex were determined by immunoblotting. These mouse strains with known different performance in the MWM showed different hippocampal protein patterns and by the use of yoked controls proteins could be identified as linked to memory formation. When mice, classified as good or bad performers by the median of time spent in the target quadrant on day 12 of the MWM, experiments, NeuN was discriminating good from bad performers in AS at the stringent statistical level of P<0.0001, an effect not seen in the corresponding yoked controls. Strain-dependence of performance in the MWM was reflected by different hippocampal protein levels. Most hippocampal proteins given above were linked to memory formation in the MWM. The finding that the neuronal protein NeuN is able to discriminate between good and bad performers in the MWM may be of major interest and may open a new area in the search for protein markers of spatial memory performance. PMID:20036702

  13. Age, sex and spatial dependent variations in heavy metals levels in the Glaucous Gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from the Bjørnøya and Jan Mayen, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Malinga, Michał; Szefer, Piotr; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2010-10-01

    Heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) concentrations were determined in different tissues (muscle, kidney, liver, brain, gonads, heart and feathers) of Glaucous Gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Bjørnøya and Jan Mayen. The age and spatial dependent variations in heavy metals were quantified and interpreted in view of the three chemometric techniques, i.e. non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test, redundancy gradient analysis and detrended correspondence analysis. The Glaucous Gulls from Bjørnøya contained significantly higher (p < 0.05) levels of Cd, Cu and Zn than those inhabited Jan Mayen. Adult birds were characterized by greater (p < 0.01) concentration of muscle, hepatic and renal heavy metals in comparison to chicks. Insignificantly higher slope constant Zn/Cd for the liver than for the kidney may reflect insignificant Cd exposure. Estimate of transfer factor (TF) allows us to assess variations in heavy metal concentrations during the individual development of Glaucous Gulls. It may be stated that there is a distinct increase of bioaccumulation of all the studied metals during subsequent stages of the bird life. PMID:19847662

  14. Spatial Dependence of Heat Flux Transients and Wetting Behavior During Immersion Quenching of Inconel 600 Probe in Brine and Polymer Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, G.; Narayan Prabhu, K.

    2014-08-01

    Cooling curve analysis of Inconel 600 probe during immersion quenching in brine and polymer quench media was carried out. Thermal histories at various axial and radial locations were recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system and were input to an inverse heat-conduction model for estimating the metal/quenchant heat flux transients. A high performance smart camera was used for online video imaging of the immersion quenching process. Solution to two-dimensional inverse heat-conduction problem clearly brings out the spatial dependence of boundary heat flux transients for a Inconel 600 probe with a simple cylindrical geometry. The estimated heat flux transients show large variation on axial as well as radial directions of quench probe surface for brine quenching. Polymer quenching showed less variation in metal/quenchant heat flux transients. Shorter durations of vapor film, higher rewetting temperatures, and faster movement of wetting front on quench probe surface were observed with brine quenching. Measurement of dynamic contact angle showed better spreading and good wettability for polymer medium as compared to brine quenchant. The solid-liquid interfacial tension between polymer medium and Inconel substrate was lower compared with that of solution. Rewetting and boiling processes were nonuniform and faster on quench probe surface during immersion quenching in brine solution. For the polymer quench medium, slow rewetting, uniform boiling and repeated wetting were observed.

  15. Task Dependence, Tissue Specificity, and Spatial Distribution of Widespread Activations in Large Single-Subject Functional MRI Datasets at 7T.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Hoy, Colin W; Handwerker, Daniel A; Roopchansingh, Vinai; Inati, Souheil J; Saad, Ziad S; Cox, Robert W; Bandettini, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    It was recently shown that when large amounts of task-based blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) data are combined to increase contrast- and temporal signal-to-noise ratios, the majority of the brain shows significant hemodynamic responses time-locked with the experimental paradigm. Here, we investigate the biological significance of such widespread activations. First, the relationship between activation extent and task demands was investigated by varying cognitive load across participants. Second, the tissue specificity of responses was probed using the better BOLD signal localization capabilities of a 7T scanner. Finally, the spatial distribution of 3 primary response types--namely positively sustained (pSUS), negatively sustained (nSUS), and transient--was evaluated using a newly defined voxel-wise waveshape index that permits separation of responses based on their temporal signature. About 86% of gray matter (GM) became significantly active when all data entered the analysis for the most complex task. Activation extent scaled with task load and largely followed the GM contour. The most common response type was nSUS BOLD, irrespective of the task. Our results suggest that widespread activations associated with extremely large single-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets can provide valuable information about the functional organization of the brain that goes undetected in smaller sample sizes. PMID:25405938

  16. Numerical study of strong anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, P.; Mazzino, A.; Muratore-Ginanneschi, P.

    2000-05-01

    The superdiffusion behavior, i.e., ? t 2?, with ?>1/2, in general is not completely characterized by a unique exponent. We study some systems exhibiting strong anomalous diffusion, i.e., <| x( t)| q>? tq?( q) where ?(2)>1/2 and q?( q) is not a linear function of q. This feature is different from the weak superdiffusion regime, i.e., ?( q)= const>1/2, as in random shear flows. The strong anomalous diffusion can be generated by nontrivial chaotic dynamics, e.g. Lagrangian motion in 2d time-dependent incompressible velocity fields, 2d symplectic maps and 1d intermittent maps. Typically the function q?( q) is piecewise linear. This corresponds to two mechanisms: a weak anomalous diffusion for the typical events and a ballistic transport for the rare excursions. In order to have strong anomalous diffusion one needs a violation of the hypothesis of the central limit theorem, this happens only in a very narrow region of the control parameters space. In the presence of strong anomalous diffusion one does not have a unique exponent and therefore one has the failure of the usual scaling of the probability distribution, i.e., P( x, t)= t- ?F( x/ t?). This implies that the effective equation at large scale and long time for P( x, t), can obey neither the usual Fick equation nor other linear equations involving temporal and/or spatial fractional derivatives.

  17. Spatially pooled depth-dependent reservoir storage, elevation, and water-quality data for selected reservoirs in Texas, January 1965-January 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.; Asquith, William H.; Brooks, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Texas Tech University, constructed a dataset of selected reservoir storage (daily and instantaneous values), reservoir elevation (daily and instantaneous values), and water-quality data from 59 reservoirs throughout Texas. The period of record for the data is as large as January 1965-January 2010. Data were acquired from existing databases, spreadsheets, delimited text files, and hard-copy reports. The goal was to obtain as much data as possible; therefore, no data acquisition restrictions specifying a particular time window were used. Primary data sources include the USGS National Water Information System, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Surface Water-Quality Management Information System, and the Texas Water Development Board monthly Texas Water Condition Reports. Additional water-quality data for six reservoirs were obtained from USGS Texas Annual Water Data Reports. Data were combined from the multiple sources to create as complete a set of properties and constituents as the disparate databases allowed. By devising a unique per-reservoir short name to represent all sites on a reservoir regardless of their source, all sampling sites at a reservoir were spatially pooled by reservoir and temporally combined by date. Reservoir selection was based on various criteria including the availability of water-quality properties and constituents that might affect the trophic status of the reservoir and could also be important for understanding possible effects of climate change in the future. Other considerations in the selection of reservoirs included the general reservoir-specific period of record, the availability of concurrent reservoir storage or elevation data to match with water-quality data, and the availability of sample depth measurements. Additional separate selection criteria included historic information pertaining to blooms of golden algae. Physical properties and constituents were water temperature, reservoir storage, reservoir elevation, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, unfiltered salinity, unfiltered total nitrogen, filtered total nitrogen, unfiltered nitrate plus nitrite, unfiltered phosphorus, filtered phosphorus, unfiltered carbon, carbon in suspended sediment, total hardness, unfiltered noncarbonate hardness, filtered noncarbonate hardness, unfiltered calcium, filtered calcium, unfiltered magnesium, filtered magnesium, unfiltered sodium, filtered sodium, unfiltered potassium, filtered potassium, filtered chloride, filtered sulfate, unfiltered fluoride, and filtered fluoride. When possible, USGS and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality water-quality properties and constituents were matched using the database parameter codes for individual physical properties and constituents, descriptions of each physical property or constituent, and their reporting units. This report presents a collection of delimited text files of source-aggregated, spatially pooled, depth-dependent, instantaneous water-quality data as well as instantaneous, daily, and monthly storage and elevation reservoir data.

  18. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  19. Diurnal pattern of stomatal conductance in the large-leaved temperate liana Aristolochia macrophylla depends on spatial position within the leaf lamina

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Tatiana; Ebner, Martin; Traiser, Christopher; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The large distance between peripheral leaf regions and the petiole in large leaves is expected to cause stronger negative water potentials at the leaf apex and marginal zones compared with more central or basal leaf regions. Leaf zone-specific differences in water supply and/or gas exchange may therefore be anticipated. In this study, an investigation was made to see whether zonal differences in gas exchange regulation can be detected in large leaves. Methods The diurnal course of stomatal conductance, gs, was monitored at defined lamina zones during two consecutive vegetation periods in the liana Aristolochia macrophylla that has large leaves. Local climate and stem water potential were also monitored to include parameters involved in stomatal response. Additionally, leaf zonal vein densities were measured to assess possible trends in local hydraulic supply. Key Results It was found that the diurnal pattern of gs depends on the position within a leaf in A. macrophylla. The highest values during the early morning were shown by the apical region, with subsequent decline later in the morning and a further gradual decline towards the evening. The diurnal pattern of gs at the marginal regions was similar to that of the leaf tip but showed a time lag of about 1 h. At the leaf base, the diurnal pattern of gs was similar to that of the margins but with lower maximum gs. At the the leaf centre regions, gs tended to show quite constant moderate values during most of the day. Densities of minor veins were lower at the margin and tip compared with the centre and base. Conclusions Gas exchange regulation appears to be zone specific in A. macrophylla leaves. It is suggested that the spatial–diurnal pattern of gs expressed by A. macrophylla leaves represents a strategy to prevent leaf zonal water stress and subsequent vein embolism. PMID:23606681

  20. Spatial decoupling of agricultural production and consumption: quantifying dependences of countries on food imports due to domestic land and water constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, Marianela; Gerten, Dieter; Krause, Michael; Lucht, Wolfgang; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    In our globalizing world, the geographical locations of food production and consumption are becoming increasingly disconnected, which increases reliance on external resources and their trade. We quantified to what extent water and land constraints limit countries’ capacities, at present and by 2050, to produce on their own territory the crop products that they currently import from other countries. Scenarios of increased crop productivity and water use, cropland expansion (excluding areas prioritized for other uses) and population change are accounted for. We found that currently 16% of the world population use the opportunities of international trade to cover their demand for agricultural products. Population change may strongly increase the number of people depending on ex situ land and water resources up to about 5.2 billion (51% of world population) in the SRES A2r scenario. International trade will thus have to intensify if population growth is not accompanied by dietary change towards less resource-intensive products, by cropland expansion, or by productivity improvements, mainly in Africa and the Middle East. Up to 1.3 billion people may be at risk of food insecurity in 2050 in present low-income economies (mainly in Africa), if their economic development does not allow them to afford productivity increases, cropland expansion and/or imports from other countries.

  1. Anomalous decay of photon echo in a quantum dot ensemble in the strong excitation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Suemori, Ryosuke; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu

    2013-12-04

    We investigated the coherent dynamics of exciton ground-state transitions in an 150-layer-stacked strain-compensated InAs quantum dot ensemble using photon echo (PE) technique in the strong excitation regime. The time delay dependence of PE signal intensity shows a drastic change depending on the excitation intensity and the aperture position placed in front of a detector. Our results suggest that the excitation-intensity-dependent spatial distribution of PE signal intensity plays an important role in observing PE signal decay in the strong excitation regime.

  2. The role of habituation in hippocampus-dependent spatial working memory tasks: Evidence from GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, David J; Bannerman, David M

    2012-01-01

    Spatial alternation, win-shift behavior has been claimed to be a test of working memory in rodents that requires active maintenance of relevant, trial-specific information. In this review, we describe work with GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice that show impaired spatial alternation, but normal spatial reference memory. Due to their selective impairment on spatial alternation, GluA1 knockout mice provide a means by which the psychological processes underlying alternation can be examined. We now argue that the spatial alternation deficit in GluA1 knockout mice is due to an inability to show stimulus-specific, short-term habituation to recently experienced stimuli. Short-term habituation involves a temporary reduction in attention paid to recently presented stimuli, and is thus a distinct process from those that are involved in working memory in humans. We have recently demonstrated that GluA1 knockout mice show impaired short-term habituation, but, surprisingly, show enhanced long-term spatial habituation. Thus, GluA1 deletion reveals that there is competition between short-term and long-term processes in memory. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21125585

  3. Meta-ecosystem dynamics and functioning on finite spatial networks.

    PubMed

    Marleau, Justin N; Guichard, Frédéric; Loreau, Michel

    2014-02-22

    The addition of spatial structure to ecological concepts and theories has spurred integration between sub-disciplines within ecology, including community and ecosystem ecology. However, the complexity of spatial models limits their implementation to idealized, regular landscapes. We present a model meta-ecosystem with finite and irregular spatial structure consisting of local nutrient-autotrophs-herbivores ecosystems connected through spatial flows of materials and organisms. We study the effect of spatial flows on stability and ecosystem functions, and provide simple metrics of connectivity that can predict these effects. Our results show that high rates of nutrient and herbivore movement can destabilize local ecosystem dynamics, leading to spatially heterogeneous equilibria or oscillations across the meta-ecosystem, with generally increased meta-ecosystem primary and secondary production. However, the onset and the spatial scale of these emergent dynamics depend heavily on the spatial structure of the meta-ecosystem and on the relative movement rate of the autotrophs. We show how this strong dependence on finite spatial structure eludes commonly used metrics of connectivity, but can be predicted by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the connectivity matrix that describe the spatial structure and scale. Our study indicates the need to consider finite-size ecosystems in meta-ecosystem theory. PMID:24403323

  4. Meta-ecosystem dynamics and functioning on finite spatial networks

    PubMed Central

    Marleau, Justin N.; Guichard, Frédéric; Loreau, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The addition of spatial structure to ecological concepts and theories has spurred integration between sub-disciplines within ecology, including community and ecosystem ecology. However, the complexity of spatial models limits their implementation to idealized, regular landscapes. We present a model meta-ecosystem with finite and irregular spatial structure consisting of local nutrient–autotrophs–herbivores ecosystems connected through spatial flows of materials and organisms. We study the effect of spatial flows on stability and ecosystem functions, and provide simple metrics of connectivity that can predict these effects. Our results show that high rates of nutrient and herbivore movement can destabilize local ecosystem dynamics, leading to spatially heterogeneous equilibria or oscillations across the meta-ecosystem, with generally increased meta-ecosystem primary and secondary production. However, the onset and the spatial scale of these emergent dynamics depend heavily on the spatial structure of the meta-ecosystem and on the relative movement rate of the autotrophs. We show how this strong dependence on finite spatial structure eludes commonly used metrics of connectivity, but can be predicted by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the connectivity matrix that describe the spatial structure and scale. Our study indicates the need to consider finite-size ecosystems in meta-ecosystem theory. PMID:24403323

  5. Spatial Memory Consolidation is Associated with Induction of Several Lysine-Acetyltransferase (Histone Acetyltransferase) Expression Levels and H2B/H4 Acetylation-Dependent Transcriptional Events in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bousiges, Olivier; Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira de; Neidl, Romain; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karine; Panteleeva, Irina; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genetic studies have shown that the CREB-binding protein (CBP) is an essential component of long-term memory formation, through its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. E1A-binding protein p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) have also recently been involved in memory formation. By contrast, only a few studies have reported on acetylation modifications during memory formation, and it remains unclear as to how the system is regulated during this dynamic phase. We investigated acetylation-dependent events and the expression profiles of these HATs during a hippocampus-dependent task taxing spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. We found a specific increase in H2B and H4 acetylation in the rat dorsal hippocampus, while spatial memory was being consolidated. This increase correlated with the degree of specific acetylated histones enrichment on some memory/plasticity-related gene promoters. Overall, a global increase in HAT activity was measured during this memory consolidation phase, together with a global increase of CBP, p300, and PCAF expression. Interestingly, these regulations were altered in a model of hippocampal denervation disrupting spatial memory consolidation, making it impossible for the hippocampus to recruit the CBP pathway (CBP regulation and acetylated-H2B-dependent transcription). CBP has long been thought to be present in limited concentrations in the cells. These results show, for the first time, that CBP, p300, and PCAF are dynamically modulated during the establishment of a spatial memory and are likely to contribute to the induction of a specific epigenetic tagging of the genome for hippocampus-dependent (spatial) memory consolidation. These findings suggest the use of HAT-activating molecules in new therapeutic strategies of pathological aging, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20811339

  6. Spatial memory consolidation is associated with induction of several lysine-acetyltransferase (histone acetyltransferase) expression levels and H2B/H4 acetylation-dependent transcriptional events in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bousiges, Olivier; Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira de; Neidl, Romain; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karine; Panteleeva, Irina; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2010-12-01

    Numerous genetic studies have shown that the CREB-binding protein (CBP) is an essential component of long-term memory formation, through its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. E1A-binding protein p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) have also recently been involved in memory formation. By contrast, only a few studies have reported on acetylation modifications during memory formation, and it remains unclear as to how the system is regulated during this dynamic phase. We investigated acetylation-dependent events and the expression profiles of these HATs during a hippocampus-dependent task taxing spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. We found a specific increase in H2B and H4 acetylation in the rat dorsal hippocampus, while spatial memory was being consolidated. This increase correlated with the degree of specific acetylated histones enrichment on some memory/plasticity-related gene promoters. Overall, a global increase in HAT activity was measured during this memory consolidation phase, together with a global increase of CBP, p300, and PCAF expression. Interestingly, these regulations were altered in a model of hippocampal denervation disrupting spatial memory consolidation, making it impossible for the hippocampus to recruit the CBP pathway (CBP regulation and acetylated-H2B-dependent transcription). CBP has long been thought to be present in limited concentrations in the cells. These results show, for the first time, that CBP, p300, and PCAF are dynamically modulated during the establishment of a spatial memory and are likely to contribute to the induction of a specific epigenetic tagging of the genome for hippocampus-dependent (spatial) memory consolidation. These findings suggest the use of HAT-activating molecules in new therapeutic strategies of pathological aging, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20811339

  7. The spatial resolving power of earth resources satellites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The significance of spatial resolving power on the utility of current and future Earth resources satellites is critically discussed and the relative merits of different approaches in defining and estimating spatial resolution are outlined. It is shown that choice of a particular measure of spatial resolution depends strongly on the particular needs of the user. Several experiments have simulated the capabilities of future satellite systems by degradation of aircraft images. Surprisingly, many of these indicated that improvements in resolution may lead to a reduction in the classification accuracy of land cover types using computer assisted methods. However, where the frequency of boundary pixels is high, the converse relationship is found. Use of imagery dependent upon visual interpretation is likely to benefit more consistently from higher resolutions. Extraction of information from images will depend upon several other factors apart from spatial resolving power: these include characteristics of the terrain being sensed, the image processing methods that are applied as well as certain sensor characteristics.

  8. Remaking Memories: Reconsolidation Updates Positively Motivated Spatial Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bethany; Bukoski, Elizabeth; Nadel, Lynn; Fellous, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that reactivation of a memory returns it to a labile state, initiating a restabilization process termed reconsolidation, which allows for updating of the memory. In this study we investigated reactivation-dependent updating using a new positively motivated spatial task in rodents that was designed specifically to model a…

  9. Strong and superplastic nanoglass.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Branicio, P S; Pei, Q X; Liu, Z S; Lee, H P; Tay, T E; Wang, T J

    2015-11-01

    The strength-ductility tradeoff has been a common long-standing dilemma in materials science. For example, superplasticity with a tradeoff in strength has been reported for Cu50Zr50 nanoglass (NG) with grain sizes below 5 nm. Here we report an improvement in strength without sacrificing superplasticity in Cu50Zr50 NG by using a bimodal grain size distribution. Our results reveal that large grains impart high strength, which is in striking contrast to the physical origin of the improvement in strength reported in the traditional nanostructured metals/alloys. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of NG with a bimodal nanostructure depend critically upon the fraction of large grains. By increasing the fraction of the large grains, a transition from superplastic flow to failure by shear banding is clearly observed. We expect that these results will be useful in the development of a novel strong and superplastic NG. PMID:26437684

  10. Strong and superplastic nanoglass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Z. D.; Branicio, P. S.; Pei, Q. X.; Liu, Z. S.; Lee, H. P.; Tay, T. E.; Wang, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    The strength-ductility tradeoff has been a common long-standing dilemma in materials science. For example, superplasticity with a tradeoff in strength has been reported for Cu50Zr50 nanoglass (NG) with grain sizes below 5 nm. Here we report an improvement in strength without sacrificing superplasticity in Cu50Zr50 NG by using a bimodal grain size distribution. Our results reveal that large grains impart high strength, which is in striking contrast to the physical origin of the improvement in strength reported in the traditional nanostructured metals/alloys. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of NG with a bimodal nanostructure depend critically upon the fraction of large grains. By increasing the fraction of the large grains, a transition from superplastic flow to failure by shear banding is clearly observed. We expect that these results will be useful in the development of a novel strong and superplastic NG.

  11. Dissecting the age-related decline on spatial learning and memory tasks in rodent models: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in senescent synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    In humans, heterogeneity in the decline of hippocampal-dependent episodic memory is observed during aging. Rodents have been employed as models of age-related cognitive decline and the spatial water maze has been used to show variability in the emergence and extent of impaired hippocampal-dependent memory. Impairment in the consolidation of intermediate-term memory for rapidly acquired and flexible spatial information emerges early, in middle-age. As aging proceeds, deficits may broaden to include impaired incremental learning of a spatial reference memory. The extent and time course of impairment has been be linked to senescence of calcium (Ca2+) regulation and Ca2+-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms in region CA1. Specifically, aging is associated with altered function of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs), and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) linked to intracellular Ca2+ stores (ICS). In young animals, NMDAR activation induces long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission (NMDAR-LTP), which is thought to mediate the rapid consolidation of intermediate-term memory. Oxidative stress, starting in middle-age, reduces NMDAR function. In addition, VDCCs and ICS can actively inhibit NMDAR-dependent LTP and oxidative stress enhances the role of VDCC and RyR-ICS in regulating synaptic plasticity. Blockade of L-type VDCCs promotes NMDAR-LTP and memory in older animals. Interestingly, pharmacological or genetic manipulations to reduce hippocampal NMDAR function readily impair memory consolidation or rapid learning, generally leaving incremental learning intact. Finally, evidence is mounting to indicate a role for VDCC-dependent synaptic plasticity in associative learning and the consolidation of remote memories. Thus, VDCC-dependent synaptic plasticity and extrahippocampal systems may contribute to incremental learning deficits observed with advanced aging. PMID:22307057

  12. Spatially and Temporally Varying Associations between Temporary Outmigration and Natural Resource Availability in Resource-Dependent Rural Communities in South Africa: A Modeling Framework

    PubMed Central

    Leyk, Stefan; Maclaurin, Galen J.; Hunter, Lori M.; Nawrotzki, Raphael; Twine, Wayne; Collinson, Mark; Erasmus, Barend

    2012-01-01

    Migration-environment models tend to be aspatial within chosen study regions, although associations between temporary outmigration and environmental explanatory variables likely vary across the study space. This research extends current approaches by developing migration models considering spatial non-stationarity and temporal variation – through examination of the migration-environment association at nested geographic scales (i.e. whole-population, village, and subvillage) within a specific study site. Demographic survey data from rural South Africa, combined with indicators of natural resource availability from satellite imagery, are employed in a nested modeling approach that brings out distinct patterns of spatial variation in model associations derived at finer geographic scales. Given recent heightened public and policy concern with the human migratory implications of climate change, we argue that consideration of spatial variability adds important nuance to scientific understanding of the migration-environment association. PMID:23008525

  13. Plasmon-induced spatial electron transfer between single Au nanorods and ALD-coated TiO2: dependence on TiO2 thickness.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Tachikawa, Takashi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-10-01

    We employed single-particle photoluminescence (PL) measurements to investigate the interfacial electron transfer between single Au nanorods (NRs) and TiO2 coated by ALD. Analyzing the energy relaxation path of plasmon-generated hot electrons as well as the PL intensities allowed for the detection and study of the interfacial electron transfer process spatially. PMID:26269424

  14. Chemical Differentation in Strongly Magnetized Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, Valery I.; Weibe, Dmitri S.; Shustov, B. M.; Pavluchenkov, Yaroslav N.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    A detailed chemical model for the starless cores of strongly magnetized molecular clouds was developed. In this model the ambipolar diffusion-driven evolution of the clouds is coupled to the chemistry through ion abundances. The model predictions on the peak values and spatial distributions of the column densities of CO, CCS, N2H+ and HCO+ are compared with those observationally inferred for the well-studied starless core L1544, which is thought to be on the verge of star formation. A reasonable overall fit to the available data on L1544 was found for a model cloud which is magnetically supported for several million years before collapsing dynamically. The model predicts ring-like chemical structures for magnetically supported dense cores. This chemical differentiation is usually characterized by strong depletion of some species (CO, CS, CCS,...) and nearly constant or even enhanced abundances of others (N2H+, NH3, HCO+,...) towards the core center. The structure is caused by the chemical coupling between dust and gas components of the core and by the so-called ``late-time'' chemistry with reactions triggered by depletion. Here we report new results on modeling of chemical composition of starless cores in the different evolutionary stages. These include the model dependences on the magnetic coupling coefficient, desorption energies, and grain-surface chemistry, etc. We have identified several key molecules that seem to be useful for distinguishing between different dynamic and chemical scenarios. The coupled dynamical and chemical model allows us to calculate simultaneously the spatial distribution of a given tracer molecule and the velocity field. The synthetic line profiles for the commonly-used low- and high-density tracers were calculated and used to constrain the chemical models of the prestellar core evolution leading to star formation. See: Li Z.-Y., Shematovich V. I., Wiebe D. S., & Shustov B. M., ApJ, 569, 792 (2002).

  15. Modelling the spread of Wolbachia in spatially heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Penelope A.; Godfray, H. Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    The endosymbiont Wolbachia infects a large number of insect species and is capable of rapid spread when introduced into a novel host population. The bacteria spread by manipulating their hosts' reproduction, and their dynamics are influenced by the demographic structure of the host population and patterns of contact between individuals. Reaction–diffusion models of the spatial spread of Wolbachia provide a simple analytical description of their spatial dynamics but do not account for significant details of host population dynamics. We develop a metapopulation model describing the spatial dynamics of Wolbachia in an age-structured host insect population regulated by juvenile density-dependent competition. The model produces similar dynamics to the reaction–diffusion model in the limiting case where the host's habitat quality is spatially homogeneous and Wolbachia has a small effect on host fitness. When habitat quality varies spatially, Wolbachia spread is usually much slower, and the conditions necessary for local invasion are strongly affected by immigration of insects from surrounding regions. Spread is most difficult when variation in habitat quality is spatially correlated. The results show that spatial variation in the density-dependent competition experienced by juvenile host insects can strongly affect the spread of Wolbachia infections, which is important to the use of Wolbachia to control insect vectors of human disease and other pests. PMID:22675165

  16. Strongly Driven Crystallization Processes in a Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Grummon, D S; Reed, B W; Browning, N D; King, W E; Campbell, G H

    2009-02-09

    The crystallization of amorphous NiTi thin films was studied in situ using pulsed laser heating in a dynamic transmission electron microscope. A single pulse can crystallize small areas of the film within 2 {micro}s. The crystallized volume fraction and morphology depend strongly on the laser energy, the laser spatial profile, and the heat transport in the film. As compared to slower furnace and continuous wave laser annealing, pulsed laser heating produces a dramatically different microstructure. Higher than expected crystallization rates were observed under pulsed irradiation that do not correlate with kinetic data obtained from the slow-heating crystallization experiments.

  17. Influence of spatial attention on conscious and unconscious word priming.

    PubMed

    Ortells, Juan J; Frings, Christian; Plaza-Ayllon, Vanesa

    2012-03-01

    We used a qualitative dissociation procedure to assess semantic priming from spatially attended and unattended masked words. Participants categorized target words that were preceded by parafoveal prime words belonging to either the same (20%) or the opposite (80%) category as the target. Using this paradigm, only non-strategic use of the prime would result in facilitation of the target responses in related trials. Primes were immediately masked or masked with a delay, while spatial attention was allocated to the primes' location or away from the primes' location. Immediate masked, strongly related primes facilitated target responses irrespective of the spatial attention. Delayed masked, related primes led to reversed (strategic) or facilitatory priming depending on whether they were cued or uncued. These findings demonstrate that perceiving a stimulus with or without awareness depends on both stimulus quality and attention orienting and that non-strategic priming can be observed from clear visible but spatially unattended words. PMID:22115727

  18. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 (R??=??Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices.

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Provino, A; Manfrinetti, P; Pecharsky, V K; Gschneidner, K A; Dhar, S K

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R 5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R??=??Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R 5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings. A transition at T C??=??125?K in Tb5Ni2In4 [? 1??=??(0, 0, 0)] leads to a ferro/ferrimagnetic order where the magnetic ordering in one of the three R-sublattices leads to the ordering of another one; the third sublattice stays non-magnetic. New magnetic Bragg peaks appearing below T N??=??20?K can be indexed with the incommensurate magnetic propagation vector ? 2??=??(0, 0.636, ½); at T N??=??20?K a cycloidal spin order, which acts mostly upon the third R-sublattice, occurs. Ho5Ni2In4 establishes first antiferromagnetism [???=??(0, 0, 0)] at T N??=??31?K on two R-sublattices; then the system becomes ferro/ferrimagnetic at T C??=??25?K with the third sublattice ordering as well. Tb11Ni4In9 has three magnetic transitions at T C??=??135?K, T N1??=??35?K and at T N2??=??20?K; they are respectively coupled to the appearance of different propagation vectors [? 1??=??(0, 0, 0), ? 2??=??(0, 0, ½), ? 3??=??(0, 1, ½)], which themselves are operating differently on the five different R-sublattices. Two sublattices remain mostly ferromagnetic down to lowest temperature while the three others are predominantly coupled antiferromagnetically. In Ho11Ni4In9 a purely antiferromagnetic order, described by four different magnetic propagation vectors [? 1??=??(0, 0.62, 0), ? 2??=??(0, 1, 0), ? 3??=??(0, 0, ½), ? 4??=??(0, 1, ½)], succeedingly includes all five different sublattices on cooling through transitions at T N1??=??22?K, T N2??=??12?K, T N3??=??8?K and T N4??=??7?K. The strength of the magnetic interactions of the different sublattices can be linked to structural details for both R 5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds. PMID:26548457

  19. Magnetic structures of R 5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 (R??=??Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R 5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R??=??Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R 5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings. A transition at T C??=??125?K in Tb5Ni2In4 [? 1??=??(0, 0, 0)] leads to a ferro/ferrimagnetic order where the magnetic ordering in one of the three R-sublattices leads to the ordering of another one; the third sublattice stays non-magnetic. New magnetic Bragg peaks appearing below T N??=??20?K can be indexed with the incommensurate magnetic propagation vector ? 2??=??(0, 0.636, ½) at T N??=??20?K a cycloidal spin order, which acts mostly upon the third R-sublattice, occurs. Ho5Ni2In4 establishes first antiferromagnetism [???=??(0, 0, 0)] at T N??=??31?K on two R-sublattices; then the system becomes ferro/ferrimagnetic at T C??=??25?K with the third sublattice ordering as well. Tb11Ni4In9 has three magnetic transitions at T C??=??135?K, T N1??=??35?K and at T N2??=??20?K they are respectively coupled to the appearance of different propagation vectors [? 1??=??(0, 0, 0), ? 2??=??(0, 0, ½), ? 3??=??(0, 1, ½)], which themselves are operating differently on the five different R-sublattices. Two sublattices remain mostly ferromagnetic down to lowest temperature while the three others are predominantly coupled antiferromagnetically. In Ho11Ni4In9 a purely antiferromagnetic order, described by four different magnetic propagation vectors [? 1??=??(0, 0.62, 0), ? 2??=??(0, 1, 0), ? 3??=??(0, 0, ½), ? 4??=??(0, 1, ½)], succeedingly includes all five different sublattices on cooling through transitions at T N1??=??22?K, T N2??=??12?K, T N3??=??8?K and T N4??=??7?K. The strength of the magnetic interactions of the different sublattices can be linked to structural details for both R 5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds.

  20. Maternal Aerobic Exercise during Pregnancy Can Increase Spatial Learning by Affecting Leptin Expression on Offspring's Early and Late Period in Life Depending on Gender

    PubMed Central

    Dayi, Ayfer; Agilkaya, Sinem; Ozbal, Seda; Cetin, Ferihan; Aksu, Ilkay; Gencoglu, Celal; Cingoz, Sultan; Pekcetin, Cetın; Tugyan, Kazim; Kayatekin, Berkant Muammer; Uysal, Nazan

    2012-01-01

    Maternal exercise during pregnancy has been suggested to exert beneficial effects on brain functions of the offspring. Leptin is an adipocytokine which is secreted from adipose tissues and has positive effects on learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. In this study, pregnant rats were moderately exercised and we observed the effects of this aerobic exercise on their prepubertal and adult offsprings' spatial learning, hippocampal neurogenesis, and expression of leptin. All the pups whose mothers exercised during pregnancy learned the platform earlier and spent longer time in the target quadrant. Their thigmotaxis times were shorter than those measured in the control group. It is shown that hippocampal CA1, CA3 neuron numbers increased in both prepubertal and adult pups, in addition that GD neuron numbers increased in adult pups. Leptin receptor expression significantly increased in the prepubertal male, adult male, and adult female pups. In our study, maternal running during pregnancy resulted in significant increase in the expression of leptin receptor but not in prepubertal female pups, enhanced hippocampal cell survival, and improved learning memory capability in prepubertal and adult rat pups, as compared to the control group. In conclusion, maternal exercise during pregnancy may regulate spatial plasticity in the hippocampus of the offspring by increasing the expression of leptin. PMID:23028249

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 Spectroscopic M Dwarf Catalog. III. The Spatial Dependence of Magnetic Activity in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J. Sebastian; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2013-09-01

    We analyze the magnetic activity of 59,318 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. This analysis explores the spatial distribution of M dwarf activity as a function of both vertical distance from the Galactic plane (Z) and planar distance from the Galactic center (R). We confirm the established trends of decreasing magnetic activity (as measured by H? emission) with increasing distance from the mid-plane of the disk and find evidence of a trend in Galactocentric radii. We measure a non-zero radial gradient in the activity fraction in our analysis of stars with spectral types dM3 and dM4. The activity fraction increases with R and can be explained by a decreasing mean stellar age with increasing distance from the Galactic center.

  2. Toll-like receptor ligands sensitize B-cell receptor signalling by reducing actin-dependent spatial confinement of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Spencer A.; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Choi, Kate; Hsu, Brian E.; Wong, Harikesh S.; Abraham, Libin; Graves, Marcia L.; Coombs, Daniel; Roskelley, Calvin D.; Das, Raibatak; Grinstein, Sergio; Gold, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating signals from multiple receptors allows cells to interpret the physiological context in which a signal is received. Here we describe a mechanism for receptor crosstalk in which receptor-induced increases in actin dynamics lower the threshold for signalling by another receptor. We show that the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and CpG DNA, which are conserved microbial molecules, enhance signalling by the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) by activating the actin-severing protein cofilin. Single-particle tracking reveals that increased severing of actin filaments reduces the spatial confinement of the BCR within the plasma membrane and increases BCR mobility. This allows more frequent collisions between BCRs and greater signalling in response to low densities of membrane-bound antigen. These findings implicate actin dynamics as a means of tuning receptor signalling and as a mechanism by which B cells distinguish inert antigens from those that are accompanied by indicators of microbial infection. PMID:25644899

  3. Higgs-induced spectroscopic shifts near strong gravity sources

    SciTech Connect

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-09-15

    We explore the consequences of the mass generation due to the Higgs field in strong gravity astrophysical environments. The vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field is predicted to depend on the curvature of spacetime, potentially giving rise to peculiar spectroscopic shifts, named hereafter 'Higgs shifts'. Higgs shifts could be searched through dedicated multiwavelength and multispecies surveys with high spatial and spectral resolution near strong gravity sources such as Sagittarius A* or broad searches for signals due to primordial black holes. The possible absence of Higgs shifts in these surveys should provide limits to the coupling between the Higgs particle and the curvature of spacetime, a topic of interest for a recently proposed Higgs-driven inflationary model. We discuss some conceptual issues regarding the coexistence between the Higgs mechanism and gravity, especially for their different handling of fundamental and composite particles.

  4. Studies on Strong Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriano, Claudio

    Five studies, four in Quantum field theory and one in fermionic molecular dynamics are presented. In the first study, introduced in chapter one and developed in chapter two of this dissertation, we formulate an extension of QCD sum rules to Compton scattering of the pion at intermediate energy. The chapter is based on the research paper Fixed angle pion Compton scattering and QCD sum rules by Prof. George Sterman and the author, which has been submitted for publication as a regular article. In chapter 3 we discuss the relation between traditional bosonic exchange models of nuclear strong interaction and soliton models, in the particular case of the sine-Gordon model. The chapter is based on the research paper "Scattering in soliton models and bosonic exchange descriptions", by R. R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi, I. Zahed and the author, and is published in Phys. Rev. D 45 (1992), 2542. A preprint of this paper (Preprint 1) has been included as an Appendix to the Chapter. In Chapter 4 we discuss aspects of the propagation of quantized fields in classical backgrounds, using the light-cone expansion of the propagator. The chapter is based on the research papers "Electrodynamics in the presence of an axion", published by the author in Modern Physics Letters A 7 (1992), 1253, and on the paper "Singularity of Green's function and the effective action in massive Yang Mills theories, by Prof. H. Yamagishi and the author. This last paper is published in Physical Review D 41 (1990), 3226 and its reprint appears in the final part of the Chapter (Reprint 1). In chapter 5, entitled "On the time dependent Rayleigh-Ritz equations", we discuss aspects of the variational approach to fermionic molecular dynamics. This investigation by R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi and the author has been published in Nucl. Physics A 522 (1991), 591. A preprint of this research paper has been inserted in the final part of the Chapter (Preprint 2).

  5. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  6. Spatially embedded growing small-world networks

    PubMed Central

    Zitin, Ari; Gorowara, Alexander; Squires, Shane; Herrera, Mark; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Girvan, Michelle; Ott, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Networks in nature are often formed within a spatial domain in a dynamical manner, gaining links and nodes as they develop over time. Motivated by the growth and development of neuronal networks, we propose a class of spatially-based growing network models and investigate the resulting statistical network properties as a function of the dimension and topology of the space in which the networks are embedded. In particular, we consider two models in which nodes are placed one by one in random locations in space, with each such placement followed by configuration relaxation toward uniform node density, and connection of the new node with spatially nearby nodes. We find that such growth processes naturally result in networks with small-world features, including a short characteristic path length and nonzero clustering. We find no qualitative differences in these properties for two different topologies, and we suggest that results for these properties may not depend strongly on the topology of the embedding space. The results do depend strongly on dimension, and higher-dimensional spaces result in shorter path lengths but less clustering. PMID:25395180

  7. Spatially embedded growing small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Zitin, Ari; Gorowara, Alexander; Squires, Shane; Herrera, Mark; Antonsen, Thomas M; Girvan, Michelle; Ott, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Networks in nature are often formed within a spatial domain in a dynamical manner, gaining links and nodes as they develop over time. Motivated by the growth and development of neuronal networks, we propose a class of spatially-based growing network models and investigate the resulting statistical network properties as a function of the dimension and topology of the space in which the networks are embedded. In particular, we consider two models in which nodes are placed one by one in random locations in space, with each such placement followed by configuration relaxation toward uniform node density, and connection of the new node with spatially nearby nodes. We find that such growth processes naturally result in networks with small-world features, including a short characteristic path length and nonzero clustering. We find no qualitative differences in these properties for two different topologies, and we suggest that results for these properties may not depend strongly on the topology of the embedding space. The results do depend strongly on dimension, and higher-dimensional spaces result in shorter path lengths but less clustering. PMID:25395180

  8. Topographic Controls on Spatial Patterns of Soil Texture and Moisture in a Semi-arid Montane Catchment with Aspect-Dependent Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, B. M.; Niemann, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Soil moisture exerts significant control over the partitioning of latent and sensible energy fluxes, the magnitude of both vertical and lateral water fluxes, the physiological and water-use characteristics of vegetation, and nutrient cycling. Considerable progress has been made in determining how soil characteristics, topography, and vegetation influence spatial patterns of soil moisture in humid environments at the catchment, hillslope, and plant scales. However, understanding of the controls on soil moisture patterns beyond the plant scale in semi-arid environments remains more limited. This study examines the relationships between the spatial patterns of near surface soil moisture (upper 5 cm), terrain indices, and soil properties in a small, semi-arid, montane catchment. The 8 ha catchment, located in the Cache La Poudre River Canyon in north-central Colorado, has a total relief of 115 m and an average elevation of 2193 m. It is characterized by steep slopes and shallow, gravelly/sandy soils with scattered granite outcroppings. Depth to bedrock ranges from 0 m to greater than 1 m. Vegetation in the catchment is highly correlated with topographic aspect. In particular, north-facing hillslopes are predominately vegetated by ponderosa pines, while south-facing slopes are mostly vegetated by several shrub species. Soil samples were collected at a 30 m resolution to characterize soil texture and bulk density, and several datasets consisting of more than 300 point measurements of soil moisture were collected using time domain reflectometry (TDR) between Fall 2007 and Summer 2008 at a 15 m resolution. Results from soil textural analysis performed with sieving and the ASTM standard hydrometer method show that soil texture is finer on the north-facing hillslope than on the south-facing hillslope. Cos(aspect) is the best univariate predictor of silts, while slope is the best predictor of coarser fractions up to fine gravel. Bulk density increases with depth but shows no significant relationship with topographic indices. When the catchment average soil moisture is low, the variance of soil moisture increases with the average. When the average is high, the variance remains relatively constant. Little of the variation in soil moisture is explained by topographic indices when the catchment is either very wet or dry; however, when the average soil moisture takes on intermediate values, cos(aspect) is consistently the best predictor among the terrain indices considered.

  9. Phase states of a 2D easy-plane ferromagnet with strong inclined anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, Yu. A. Klevets, F. N.; Gorelikov, G. A.; Meleshko, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the spin states of a 2D film exhibiting easy-axis anisotropy and a strong single-ion inclined anisotropy whose axis forms a certain angle with the normal to the film surface. Such a system may have an angular ferromagnetic phase, a spatially inhomogeneous state, and a quadrupole phase, whose realization depends substantially on the inclined anisotropy and the orientation of the wavevector in the film plane.

  10. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  11. Spatially resolved and orientation dependent Raman mapping of epitaxial lateral overgrowth nonpolar a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Xie, Yong; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Uncoalesced a-plane GaN epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) structures have been synthesized along two mask stripe orientations on a-plane GaN template by MOCVD. The morphology of two ELO GaN structures is performed by Scanning electronic microscopy. The anisotropy of crystalline quality and stress are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. According to the Raman mapping spectra, the variations on the intensity, peak shift and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of GaN E2 (high) peak indicate that the crystalline quality improvement occurs in the window region of the GaN stripes along [0001], which is caused by the dislocations bending towards the sidewalls. Conversely, the wing regions have better quality with less stress as the dislocations propagated upwards when the GaN stripes are along []. Spatial cathodoluminescence mapping results further support the explanation for the different dislocation growth mechanisms in the ELO processes with two different mask stripe orientations.

  12. Spatially resolved and orientation dependent Raman mapping of epitaxial lateral overgrowth nonpolar a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Teng; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Xie, Yong; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Uncoalesced a-plane GaN epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) structures have been synthesized along two mask stripe orientations on a-plane GaN template by MOCVD. The morphology of two ELO GaN structures is performed by Scanning electronic microscopy. The anisotropy of crystalline quality and stress are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. According to the Raman mapping spectra, the variations on the intensity, peak shift and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of GaN E2 (high) peak indicate that the crystalline quality improvement occurs in the window region of the GaN stripes along [0001], which is caused by the dislocations bending towards the sidewalls. Conversely, the wing regions have better quality with less stress as the dislocations propagated upwards when the GaN stripes are along []. Spatial cathodoluminescence mapping results further support the explanation for the different dislocation growth mechanisms in the ELO processes with two different mask stripe orientations. PMID:26821824

  13. Spatially resolved and orientation dependent Raman mapping of epitaxial lateral overgrowth nonpolar a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Teng; Xu, Sheng-rui; Zhang, Jin-cheng; Xie, Yong; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Uncoalesced a-plane GaN epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) structures have been synthesized along two mask stripe orientations on a-plane GaN template by MOCVD. The morphology of two ELO GaN structures is performed by Scanning electronic microscopy. The anisotropy of crystalline quality and stress are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. According to the Raman mapping spectra, the variations on the intensity, peak shift and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of GaN E2 (high) peak indicate that the crystalline quality improvement occurs in the window region of the GaN stripes along [0001], which is caused by the dislocations bending towards the sidewalls. Conversely, the wing regions have better quality with less stress as the dislocations propagated upwards when the GaN stripes are along []. Spatial cathodoluminescence mapping results further support the explanation for the different dislocation growth mechanisms in the ELO processes with two different mask stripe orientations. PMID:26821824

  14. Promoter-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 under Pi shortage and its spatial localization in ectomycorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kevin; Haider, Muhammad Zulqurnain; Delteil, Amandine; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Conéjero, Geneviève; Tatry, Marie-Violaine; Becquer, Adeline; Amenc, Laurie; Sentenac, Hervé; Plassard, Claude; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal exchange of nutrients between fungi and host plants involves a specialization and polarization of the fungal plasma membrane adapted for the uptake from the soil and for secretion of nutrient ions towards root cells. In addition to the current progress in identification of membrane transport systems of both symbiotic partners, data concerning the transcriptional and translational regulation of these proteins are needed to elucidate their role for symbiotic functions. To answer whether the formerly described Pi-dependent expression of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 from Hebeloma cylindrosporum is the result of its promoter activity, we introduced promoter-EGFP fusion constructs in the fungus by Agrotransformation. Indeed, HcPT1.1 expression in pure fungal cultures quantified and visualized by EGFP under control of the HcPT1.1 promoter was dependent on external Pi concentrations, low Pi stimulating the expression. Furthermore, to study expression and localization of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 in symbiotic conditions, presence of transcripts and proteins was analyzed by the in situ hybridization technique as well as by immunostaining of proteins. In ectomycorrhiza, expression of the phosphate transporter was clearly enhanced by Pi-shortage indicating its role in Pi nutrition in the symbiotic association. Transcripts were detected in external hyphae and in the hyphal mantle, proteins in addition also within the Hartig net. Exploiting the transformable fungus H. cylindrosporum, Pi-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 as result from its promoter activity as well as transcript and protein localization in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis are shown. PMID:23850603

  15. First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Gen

    2011-02-15

    First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation is investigated on the basis of the scalar QED on a homogeneous background of a time-dependent electric field, which is a generalization of a recent work by Higuchi and Walker so as to be extended for an accelerated charged particle in a relativistic motion. We obtain a simple approximate formula for the quantum correction in the limit of the relativistic motion when the direction of the particle motion is parallel to that of the electric field.

  16. 2.45 GHz Microwave Radiation Impairs Learning and Spatial Memory via Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress Induced p53-Dependent/Independent Hippocampal Apoptosis: Molecular Basis and Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Saba; Banerjee, Somanshu; Singh, Surya Pal; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2015-12-01

    A close association between microwave (MW) radiation exposure and neurobehavioral disorders has been postulated but the direct effects of MW radiation on central nervous system still remains contradictory. This study was performed to understand the effect of short (15 days) and long-term (30 and 60 days) low-level MW radiation exposure on hippocampus with special reference to spatial learning and memory and its underlying mechanism in Swiss strain male mice, Mus musculus. Twelve-weeks old mice were exposed to 2.45 GHz MW radiation (continuous-wave [CW] with overall average power density of 0.0248 mW/cm(2) and overall average whole body specific absorption rate value of 0.0146 W/Kg) for 2 h/day over a period of 15, 30, and 60 days). Spatial learning and memory was monitored by Morris Water Maze. We have checked the alterations in hippocampal oxidative/nitrosative stress, neuronal morphology, and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax), inactive executioner Caspase- (pro-Caspase-3), and uncleaved Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in the hippocampal subfield neuronal and nonneuronal cells (DG, CA1, CA2, and CA3). We observed that, short-term as well as long-term 2.45 GHz MW radiation exposure increases the oxidative/nitrosative stress leading to enhanced apoptosis in hippocampal subfield neuronal and nonneuronal cells. Present findings also suggest that learning and spatial memory deficit which increases with the increased duration of MW exposure (15 < 30 < 60 days) is correlated with a decrease in hippocampal subfield neuronal arborization and dendritic spines. These findings led us to conclude that exposure to CW MW radiation leads to oxidative/nitrosative stress induced p53-dependent/independent activation of hippocampal neuronal and nonneuronal apoptosis associated with spatial memory loss. PMID:26396154

  17. Magnetic-resonance determination of the spatial dependence of the droplet size distribution in the cream layer of oil-in-water emulsions: Evidence for the effects of depletion flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, P. J.; Ciampi, E.; Keddie, J. L.; Heidenreich, M.; Kimmich, R.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that a combination of pulsed-field-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) restricted diffusion analysis and NMR imaging may be used to measure the spatial dependence of the droplet size distribution in the cream layer of turbid oil-in-water emulsions. 1H-13C cyclic J cross-polarization PGSE is introduced as a technique for this purpose in cases where selective observation of the oil component (or other carbohydrate constituent) is required. With this method, 13C nuclei are chemical shift selectively excited by cross-polarization from coupled 1H partners. An optimum detection sensitivity is ensured by transferring the polarization back to the coupled protons with which the combined imaging and diffusion experiment is then carried out. The spatial dependence of the oil droplet size distribution was measured for a series of emulsions containing various fractions of gum xanthan thickener dissolved in the water. The experimental results are compared with a recent model of the creaming process due to Pinfield, Dickinson, and Povey [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 166, 363 (1994)]. When no gum xanthan is present, the experimental results are in good agreement with the model. However, the model fails to describe the droplet distribution for emulsions with a gum xanthan concentration of the order of 0.1 wt %. The discrepancy is discussed in terms of depletion flocculation and depletion stabilization.

  18. Robustness of spatial micronetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Thomas C.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Bagrow, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  19. Robustness of spatial micronetworks.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Thomas C; Danforth, Christopher M; Bagrow, James P

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure. PMID:25974553

  20. Impaired spatial learning related with decreased expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha and cAMP-response element binding protein in the pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Wei-Ping; Sun-Zhang; Wang, Hai-Xiang; Yan-Lou; Fan, Yue-Hui

    2008-10-31

    Although its effect on cognitive functions has been one of the hot topics in the present neuroscience research, the mechanism of epilepsy related cognitive impairment is not clearly revealed. Intracellular Ca(2+) plays an important role in regulating many cellular functions including learning and memory, this experiment was therefore conducted, in which, we observed the behaviors of chronic epileptic rats kindled by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) through Morris water maze (MWM), examined the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) with flow cytometry, and tested the expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha (CaMKII(alpha)) and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) in hippocampus of those rats using western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results demonstrate impaired ability of spatial learning and memory, increased concentration of [Ca(2+)](i), decreased expression levels of total CaMKII(alpha), phosphorylated CaMKII(alpha) (P-CaMKII(alpha)) and phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) and decreased levels of CaMKII(alpha) mRNA and CREB mRNA of the epileptic rats compared with the normal control rats. Moreover, Nimodipine, an inhibitor of voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs), reduced the Racine's stage, improved the ability of spatial learning and memory, reversed the effect of Ca(2+) influx and expression levels of CaMKII(alpha) and CREB of the epileptic rats. We concluded that Ca(2+) influx, CaMKII(alpha) and CREB expression levels in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats may be related with their impaired spatial learning and memory. PMID:18710651

  1. Spatial cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  2. The organization of high-affinity ammonium uptake in Arabidopsis roots depends on the spatial arrangement and biochemical properties of AMT1-type transporters.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lixing; Loqué, Dominique; Kojima, Soichi; Rauch, Sabine; Ishiyama, Keiki; Inoue, Eri; Takahashi, Hideki; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-08-01

    The AMMONIUM TRANSPORTER (AMT) family comprises six isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe the complete functional organization of root-expressed AMTs for high-affinity ammonium uptake. High-affinity influx of (15)N-labeled ammonium in two transposon-tagged amt1;2 lines was reduced by 18 to 26% compared with wild-type plants. Enrichment of the AMT1;2 protein in the plasma membrane and localization of AMT1;2 promoter activity in the endodermis and root cortex indicated that AMT1;2 mediates the uptake of ammonium entering the root via the apoplasmic transport route. An amt1;1 amt1;2 amt1;3 amt2;1 quadruple mutant (qko) showed severe growth depression under ammonium supply and maintained only 5 to 10% of wild-type high-affinity ammonium uptake capacity. Transcriptional upregulation of AMT1;5 in nitrogen-deficient rhizodermal and root hair cells and the ability of AMT1;5 to transport ammonium in yeast suggested that AMT1;5 accounts for the remaining uptake capacity in qko. Triple and quadruple amt insertion lines revealed in vivo ammonium substrate affinities of 50, 234, 61, and 4.5 muM for AMT1;1, AMT1;2, AMT1;3, and AMT1;5, respectively, but no ammonium influx activity for AMT2;1. These data suggest that two principle means of achieving effective ammonium uptake in Arabidopsis roots are the spatial arrangement of AMT1-type ammonium transporters and the distribution of their transport capacities at different substrate affinities. PMID:17693533

  3. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0-10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm(3) cm(-3) for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  4. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying

    PubMed Central

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R.; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0–10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm3 cm–3 for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  5. Optical spectroscopy of strongly correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Andreas B.

    2001-02-27

    In this thesis, both time-resolved, nonlinear optical spectroscopy and linear spectroscopy are used to investigate the interactions and dynamics of elementary excitations in strongly correlated electron systems. In the first part, we investigate the renormalization of magnetic elementary excitations in the transition metal oxide Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We have created a non-equilibrium population of antiferromagnetic spin waves and characterized its dynamics, using frequency- and time-resolved optical spectroscopy of the exciton-magnon transition. We observed a time-dependent pump-probe line shape, which results from excitation induced renormalization of the spin wave band structure. We present a model that reproduces the basic characteristics of the data, in which we postulate the optical nonlinearity to be dominated by interactions with long-wavelength spin waves, and the dynamics due to spin wave thermalization. Using linear spectroscopy, coherent third-harmonic generation and pump-probe experiments, we measured the optical properties of the charge-transfer (CT) gap exciton in Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, an undoped model compound for high-temperature superconductors. A model is developed which explains the pronounced temperature dependence and newly observed Urbach tail in the linear absorption spectrum by a strong, phonon-mediated coupling between the charge-transfer exciton and ligand field excitations of the Cu atoms. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility within the Cu-O plane of Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} is fully characterized in both amplitude and phase, and symmetry based conclusions are made with respect to the spatial arrangement of the underlying charge distribution. Theoretical considerations ascribe a newly reported resonance in the third-order nonlinear susceptibility at 0.7 eV to a three-photon transition from the ground state to the charge-transfer exciton. An even parity intermediate state of Cudd character, is found to contribute to the transition. Finally, preliminary results of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy confirm that the CT exciton or one of its constituent parts couples strongly to phonons, and we suggest ultrafast thermalization with the lattice as the dominating mechanism underlying the dynamical properties.

  6. Spatial Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudipto

    2016-03-18

    With increasing accessibility to geographic information systems (GIS) software, statisticians and data analysts routinely encounter scientific data sets with geocoded locations. This has generated considerable interest in statistical modeling for location-referenced spatial data. In public health, spatial data routinely arise as aggregates over regions, such as counts or rates over counties, census tracts, or some other administrative delineation. Such data are often referred to as areal data. This review article provides a brief overview of statistical models that account for spatial dependence in areal data. It does so in the context of two applications: disease mapping and spatial survival analysis. Disease maps are used to highlight geographic areas with high and low prevalence, incidence, or mortality rates of a specific disease and the variability of such rates over a spatial domain. They can also be used to detect hot spots or spatial clusters that may arise owing to common environmental, demographic, or cultural effects shared by neighboring regions. Spatial survival analysis refers to the modeling and analysis for geographically referenced time-to-event data, where a subject is followed up to an event (e.g., death or onset of a disease) or is censored, whichever comes first. Spatial survival analysis is used to analyze clustered survival data when the clustering arises from geographical regions or strata. Illustrations are provided in these application domains. PMID:26789381

  7. Strong quantum interference in strongly disordered bosonic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, Sergey; Moor, Andreas; Efetov, Konstantin

    2012-02-01

    We study the model of variable-range hopping of bosons in an array of sites with short-range interactions and a large characteristic coordination number, which describes conduction in a broad class of insulators, such as strongly disordered superconductive films, systems close to the Anderson transition, Josephson networks, etc. Large coordination number leads to strong quantum interference phenomena yet allows for their analytical study. We develop a functional renormalization group scheme that repeatedly eliminates high-energy sites properly renormalizing the tunneling between the low-energy ones. Using this approach we determine the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the hopping conductivity and find a large positive magnetoresistance. With increasing magnetic field the behaviour of the conductivity crossovers from the Mott's law to an activational behaviour with the activation gap proportional to the magnetic field.

  8. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  9. Interaction dynamics of spatially separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, Nadine; Schumacher, Silvia; Nuzzo, Valeria; Arnold, Cord L.; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ripken, Tammo

    2010-11-01

    We present a high-speed photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles generated in two spatially separated regions by femtosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water. Depending on the relative energies of the femtosecond laser pulses and their spatial separation, different kinds of interactions, such as a flattening and deformation of the bubbles, asymmetric water flows, and jet formation were observed. The results presented have a strong impact on understanding and optimizing the cutting effect of modern femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates (>1 MHz).

  10. Spatial and Functional Relationships Among Pol V-Associated loci, Pol IV-Dependent siRNAs, and Cytosine Methylation in the Arabidopsis Epigenome

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, A. T.; Cocklin, Ross; Mayampurath, Anoop; Lister, Ryan; Rowley, M. J.; Gregory, Brian D.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Tang, Haixu; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-08-15

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pols IV and V) mediate RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons and heterochromatic repeats in plants. We identified genomic sites of Pol V occupancy in parallel with siRNA deep sequencing and methylcytosine mapping, comparing wild-type plants with mutants defective for Pol IV, Pol V, or both Pols IV and V. Approximately 60% of Pol V-associated regions encompass regions of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNA complementarity and cytosine methylation, consistent with cytosine methylation being guided by base-pairing of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs with Pol V transcripts. However, 27% of Pol V peaks do not overlap sites of 24-nt siRNA biogenesis or cytosine methylation, indicating that Pol V alone does not specify sites of cytosine methylation. Surprisingly, the number of methylated CHH motifs, a hallmark of RNA-directed de novo methylation, is similar in wild-type plants and Pol IV or Pol V mutants. In the mutants, methylation is lost at 50%-60% of the CHH sites that are methylated in the wild type but is gained at new CHH positions, primarily in pericentromeric regions. These results indicate that Pol IV and Pol V are not required for cytosine methyltransferase activity but shape the epigenome by guiding CHH methylation to specific genomic sites.

  11. Enhanced neoplastic transformation by mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays: indication for a strong dependence on photon energy of the RBE(M) for various end points.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, D; Kelnhofer, K; Bär, K; Frankenberg-Schwager, M

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental assumption implicit in the use of the atomic bomb survivor data to derive risk estimates is that the gamma rays of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are considered to have biological efficiencies equal to those of other low-LET radiations up to 10 keV/microm, including mammography X rays. Microdosimetric and radiobiological data contradict this assumption. It is therefore of scientific and public interest to evaluate the efficiency of mammography X rays (25-30 kVp) to induce cancer. In this study, the efficiency of mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays to induce neoplastic cell transformation was evaluated using cells of a human hybrid cell line (CGL1). For both radiations, a linear-quadratic dose-effect relationship was observed for neoplastic transformation of CGL1 cells; there was a strong linear component for the 29 kVp X rays. The RBE(M) of mammography X rays relative to 200 kVp X rays was determined to be about 4 for doses < or = 0.5 Gy. A comparison of the electron fluences for both X rays provides strong evidence that electrons with energies of < or = 15 keV can induce neoplastic transformation of CGL1 cells. Both the data available in the literature and the results of the present study strongly suggest an increase of RBE(M) for carcinogenesis in animals, neoplastic cell transformation, and clastogenic effects with decreasing photon energy or increasing LET to an RBE(M) approximately 8 for mammography X rays relative to 60Co gamma rays. PMID:11754647

  12. On Strong Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, N.; Turvey, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as “internal”, “model” and “prediction”. PMID:20191086

  13. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  14. Double Dissociations in Visual and Spatial Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Christoph; Zhao, Zengmei

    2004-01-01

    A visual short-term memory task was more strongly disrupted by visual than spatial interference, and a spatial memory task was simultaneously more strongly disrupted by spatial than visual interference. This double dissociation supports a fractionation of visuospatial short-term memory into separate visual and spatial components. In 6 experiments,…

  15. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-01-01

    We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic H2+ show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented. PMID:26798785

  16. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D

    2015-01-01

    We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic [Formula: see text] show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented. PMID:26798785

  17. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    PubMed

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently dipping mudstones. Despite more than 18 years of pump and treat (P&T) remediation, and natural attenuation processes, CVOC concentrations in aqueous samples pumped from these deeper strata remain elevated in isolated intervals. DNAPL was detected in one borehole during coring at a depth of 27 m. In contrast to core samples from the weathered zone, concentrations in core samples from deeper unweathered and unfractured strata are typically below detection. However, high CVOC concentrations were found in isolated samples from fissile black carbon-rich strata and fractured gray laminated strata. Aqueous-phase concentrations were correspondingly high in samples pumped from these strata via short-interval wells or packer-isolated zones in long boreholes. A refined conceptual site model considers that prior to P&T remediation groundwater flow was primarily subhorizontal in the higher-permeability near surface strata, and the bulk of contaminant mass was shallow. CVOCs diffused into these fractured and weathered mudstones. DNAPL and high concentrations of CVOCs migrated slowly down in deeper unweathered strata, primarily along isolated dipping bedding-plane fractures. After P&T began in 1995, using wells open to both shallow and deep strata, downward transport of dissolved CVOCs accelerated. Diffusion of TCE and other CVOCs from deeper fractures penetrated only a few centimeters into the unweathered rock matrix, likely due to sorption of CVOCs on rock organic carbon. Remediation in the deep, unweathered strata may benefit from the relatively limited migration of CVOCs into the rock matrix. Synthesis of rock core sampling from closely spaced boreholes with geophysical logging and hydraulic testing improves understanding of the controls on CVOC delineation and informs remediation design and monitoring. PMID:25461882

  18. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-12-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently dipping mudstones. Despite more than 18 years of pump and treat (P&T) remediation, and natural attenuation processes, CVOC concentrations in aqueous samples pumped from these deeper strata remain elevated in isolated intervals. DNAPL was detected in one borehole during coring at a depth of 27 m. In contrast to core samples from the weathered zone, concentrations in core samples from deeper unweathered and unfractured strata are typically below detection. However, high CVOC concentrations were found in isolated samples from fissile black carbon-rich strata and fractured gray laminated strata. Aqueous-phase concentrations were correspondingly high in samples pumped from these strata via short-interval wells or packer-isolated zones in long boreholes. A refined conceptual site model considers that prior to P&T remediation groundwater flow was primarily subhorizontal in the higher-permeability near surface strata, and the bulk of contaminant mass was shallow. CVOCs diffused into these fractured and weathered mudstones. DNAPL and high concentrations of CVOCs migrated slowly down in deeper unweathered strata, primarily along isolated dipping bedding-plane fractures. After P&T began in 1995, using wells open to both shallow and deep strata, downward transport of dissolved CVOCs accelerated. Diffusion of TCE and other CVOCs from deeper fractures penetrated only a few centimeters into the unweathered rock matrix, likely due to sorption of CVOCs on rock organic carbon. Remediation in the deep, unweathered strata may benefit from the relatively limited migration of CVOCs into the rock matrix. Synthesis of rock core sampling from closely spaced boreholes with geophysical logging and hydraulic testing improves understanding of the controls on CVOC delineation and informs remediation design and monitoring.

  19. Coupled-cluster theory of a gas of strongly-interacting electrons in the dilute limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bodgan; Cardenas, Andres L

    2008-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a dilute gas of strongly-interacting fermions in the framework of the coupled-cluster expansion (CCE). We demonstrate that properties such as universality, opening of a gap in the excitation spectrum and applicability of s-wave approximations appear naturally in the CCE approach. In the zero-density limit, we show that the ground-state energy density depends on only one parameter which in turn may depend at most on the spatial dimensionality of the system.

  20. A strong comeback

    SciTech Connect

    Marier, D.

    1992-03-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders.

  1. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  2. Partners: Forging Strong Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Ellen, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This newsletter issue asserts that sound, effective relationships in which diverse groups of people and organizations work together toward a common goal are the basis of the collaborative efforts in education that can accomplish change. The first article, "Partners: Forging Strong Relationships" (Sarah E. Torian), briefly describes the efforts of…

  3. The spatial scaling of habitat selection by African elephants.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, Henrik J; van Langevelde, Frank; Skidmore, Andrew K; Delsink, Audrey; Slotow, Rob; Henley, Steve; Bucini, Gabriela; de Boer, Willem F; Coughenour, Michael B; Grant, Cornelia C; Heitkönig, Ignas M A; Henley, Michelle; Knox, Nicky M; Kohi, Edward M; Mwakiwa, Emmanuel; Page, Bruce R; Peel, Mike; Pretorius, Yolanda; van Wieren, Sipke E; Prins, Herbert H T

    2011-01-01

    1. Understanding and accurately predicting the spatial patterns of habitat use by organisms is important for ecological research, biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management. However, this understanding is complicated by the effects of spatial scale, because the scale of analysis affects the quantification of species-environment relationships. 2. We therefore assessed the influence of environmental context (i.e. the characteristics of the landscape surrounding a site), varied over a large range of scales (i.e. ambit radii around focal sites), on the analysis and prediction of habitat selection by African elephants in Kruger National Park, South Africa. 3. We focused on the spatial scaling of the elephants' response to their main resources, forage and water, and found that the quantification of habitat selection strongly depended on the scales at which environmental context was considered. Moreover, the inclusion of environmental context at characteristic scales (i.e. those at which habitat selectivity was maximized) increased the predictive capacity of habitat suitability models. 4. The elephants responded to their environment in a scale-dependent and perhaps hierarchical manner, with forage characteristics driving habitat selection at coarse spatial scales, and surface water at fine spatial scales. 5. Furthermore, the elephants exhibited sexual habitat segregation, mainly in relation to vegetation characteristics. Male elephants preferred areas with high tree cover and low herbaceous biomass, whereas this pattern was reversed for female elephants. 6. We show that the spatial distribution of elephants can be better understood and predicted when scale-dependent species-environment relationships are explicitly considered. This demonstrates the importance of considering the influence of spatial scale on the analysis of spatial patterning in ecological phenomena. PMID:21054380

  4. Asymmetric spatial soliton dragging.

    PubMed

    Blair, S; Wagner, K; McLeod, R

    1994-12-01

    A new low-latency, cascadable optical logic gate with gain, high contrast, and three-terminal input-output isolation is introduced. The interaction between two orthogonally polarized spatial solitons brought into coincidence at the boundary of a saturating nonlinear medium and propagating in different directions results in the phase-insensitive spatial dragging of a strong pump soliton by a weaker signal. As a result, the strong pump is transmitted through an aperture when the weak signal is not present, and it is dragged to the side by more than a beam width and blocked in the presence of the weak signal, thus implementing an inverter with gain. A multi-input, logically complete NOR gate also can be implemented in a cascaded system. PMID:19855703

  5. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-10-15

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T{sub c} superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  6. Ocular following in humans: Spatial properties

    PubMed Central

    Quaia, Christian; Sheliga, Boris M.; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Optican, Lance M.

    2012-01-01

    Ocular following responses (OFRs) are tracking eye movements elicited at ultrashort latency by the sudden movement of a textured pattern. Here we report the results of our study of their dependency on the spatial arrangement of the motion stimulus. Unlike previous studies that looked at the effect of stimulus size, we investigated the impact of stimulus location and how two distinct stimuli, presented together, collectively determine the OFR. We used as stimuli vertical gratings that moved in the horizontal direction and that were confined to either one or two 0.58° high strips, spanning the width of the screen. We found that the response to individual strips varied as a function of the location and spatial frequency (SF) of the stimulus. The response decreased as the stimulus eccentricity increased, but this relationship was more accentuated at high than at low spatial frequencies. We also found that when pairs of stimuli were presented, nearby stimuli interacted strongly, so that the response to the pair was barely larger than the response to a single strip in the pair. This suppressive effect faded away as the separation between the strips increased. The variation of the suppressive interaction with strip separation, paired with the dependency on eccentricity of the responses to single strips, caused the peak response for strip pairs to be achieved at a specific separation, which varied as a function of SF. PMID:22523400

  7. Strongly intensive quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  8. Strong coupling of the single excitations in the Q-like bands of phenylene-linked free-base and zinc bacteriochlorin dimers: A time-dependent density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Mashiko, Shinro

    2002-04-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were carried out to predict the Q-like bands of the two structural isomers of the phenylene-linked free-base (FBBC) and zinc (ZnBC) bacteriochlorin dimers. The calculated singlet excitation energies and oscillator strengths for the low-lying excited states of the reference monomers, FBBC and ZnBC, are quite consistent with recent ab initio calculations. The 1,3 and 1,4-phenylene-linked dimers have monomer-like Q bands and new Q' bands comprised of the cross-linked (i.e., charge transfer) excitations from the FBBC (ZnBC) ring to the ZnBC (FBBC) ring, whose excitation energies are slightly and considerably red-shifted by about 0.03 eV and 0.5-0.7 eV compared to the monomers, respectively. The monomer-like Qx bands are of the mixed highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)?lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) excitations in the Qx bands from the different bacteriochlorin rings, whose origin is the coupling of the Qx transition dipole moments through the ?-? interaction between the unreduced pyrroles situated across the phenylene group. This mixing character is still maintained in the monomers separated by the same distance in the dimer, which is quite different from previous TDDFT calculations for the phenylene-linked free-base and zinc porphyrin dimers. The present dimers may show a more efficient Qx excitation energy transfer between the bacteriochlorins via each's through-space overlapped LUMOs than the conventional porphyrin dimers.

  9. Strong Quantum Interference in Strongly Disordered Bosonic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, S. V.; Moor, A.; Efetov, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    We study the variable-range hopping of bosons in an array of sites with short-range interactions and a large characteristic coordination number. The latter leads to strong quantum interference phenomena yet allows for their analytical study. We develop a functional renormalization-group scheme that repeatedly eliminates high-energy sites properly renormalizing the tunneling between the low-energy ones. Using this approach we determine the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the hopping conductivity and find a large positive magnetoresistance. With increasing magnetic field the behavior of the conductivity crossovers from the Mott’s law to an activational behavior with the activation gap proportional to the magnetic field.

  10. Kinetic Characterization of Strongly Coupled Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knapek, C. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.; Samsonov, D.

    2007-01-05

    We propose a simple method to determine the local coupling strength {gamma} experimentally, by linking the individual particle dynamics with the local density and crystal structure of a 2D plasma crystal. By measuring particle trajectories with high spatial and temporal resolution we obtain the first maps of {gamma} and temperature at individual particle resolution. We employ numerical simulations to test this new method, and discuss the implications to characterize strongly coupled systems.

  11. Turning the tables: language and spatial reasoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Peggy; Gleitman, Lila

    2002-04-01

    This paper investigates possible influences of the lexical resources of individual languages on the spatial organization and reasoning styles of their users. That there are such powerful and pervasive influences of language on thought is the thesis of the Whorf-Sapir linguistic relativity hypothesis which, after a lengthy period in intellectual limbo, has recently returned to prominence in the anthropological, linguistic, and psycholinguistic literatures. Our point of departure is an influential group of cross-linguistic studies that appear to show that spatial reasoning is strongly affected by the spatial lexicon in everyday use in a community (e.g. Brown, P., & Levinson, S. C. (1993). Linguistic and nonlinguistic coding of spatial arrays: explorations in Mayan cognition (Working Paper No. 24). Nijmegen: Cognitive Anthropology Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics; Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1995) 33). Specifically, certain groups customarily use an externally referenced spatial-coordinate system to refer to nearby directions and positions ("to the north") whereas English speakers usually employ a viewer-perspective system ("to the left"). Prior findings and interpretations have been to the effect that users of these two types of spatial system solve rotation problems in different ways, reasoning strategies imposed by habitual use of the language-particular lexicons themselves. The present studies reproduce these different problem-solving strategies in speakers of a single language (English) by manipulating landmark cues, suggesting that language itself may not be the key causal factor in choice of spatial perspective. Prior evidence on rotation problem solution from infants (e.g. Acredolo, L.P. (1979). Laboratory versus home: the effect of environment on the 9-month-old infant's choice of spatial reference system. Developmental Psychology, 15 (6), 666-667) and from laboratory animals (e.g. Restle, F. (1975). Discrimination of cues in mazes: a resolution of the place-vs.-response question. Psychological Review, 64, 217-228) suggests a unified interpretation of the findings: creatures approach spatial problems differently depending on the availability and suitability of local landmark cues. The results are discussed in terms of the current debate on the relation of language to thought, with particular emphasis on the question of why different cultural communities favor different perspectives in talking about space. PMID:11934404

  12. Strong nonlocal interaction stabilizes cavity solitons with a varying size plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Oto, Cristian; Tlidi, Mustapha; Escaff, Daniel; Clerc, Marcel; Kockaert, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Cavity solitons are localized light peaks in the transverse section of nonlinear resonators. These structures are usually formed under a coexistence condition between a homogeneous background of radiation and a self- organized patterns resulting from a Turing type of instabilities. In this issue, most of studies have been realized ignoring the nonlocal effects. Non-local effects can play an important role in the formation of cavity solitons in optics, population dynamics and plant ecology. Depending on the choice of the nonlocal interaction function, the nonlocal coupling can be strong or weak. When the nonlocal coupling is strong, the interaction between fronts is controlled by the whole non-local interaction function. Recently it has shown that this type of nonlocal coupling strongly affects the dynamics of fronts connecting two homogeneous steady states and leads to the stabilization of cavity solitons with a varying size plateau. Here, we consider a ring passive cavity filled with a Kerr medium like a liquid crystal or left-handed materials and driven by a coherent injected beam. We show that cavity solitons resulting for strong front interaction are stable in one and two-dimensional setting out of any type of Turing instability. Their spatial profile is characterized by a varying size plateau. Our results can apply to large class of spatially extended systems with strong nonlocal coupling.

  13. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  14. The Strong Anick Conjecture

    PubMed Central

    Drensky, Vesselin; Yu, Jie-Tai

    2006-01-01

    Recently, Umirbaev proved the long-standing Anick conjecture, that is, there exist wild automorphisms of the free associative algebra K?x, y, z? over a field K of characteristic 0. In particular, the well known Anick automorphism is wild. In this work, we obtain a stronger result (the Strong Anick Conjecture that implies the Anick Conjecture). Namely, we prove that there exist wild coordinates of K?x, y, z?. In particular, the two nontrivial coordinates in the Anick automorphism are both wild. We establish a similar result for several large classes of automorphisms of K?x, y, z?. We also discover a large, previously undescribed class of wild automorphisms of K?x, y, z? that is not covered by the results of Umirbaev. PMID:16551745

  15. Strongly-correlated heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Electronic phase behavior in correlated-electron systems is a fundamental problem of condensed matter physics. The change in the phase behavior near surfaces and interfaces, i.e., {\\em electronic reconstruction}, is therefore the fundamental issue of the correlated-electron surface or interface science. In addition to basic science, understanding of such a phase behavior is of crucial importance for potential devices exploiting the novel properties of the correlated systems. In this article, we present a general overview of the field, and then discuss the recent theoretical progress mainly focusing on the correlation effects. We illustrate the general concept of {\\em electronic reconstruction} by studying model heterostructures consisting of strongly-correlated systems. Future directions for research are also discussed.

  16. Strong nucleosomes of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N; Tripathi, Vijay

    2016-02-01

    Yeast genome lacks visibly periodic sequences characteristic of strong nucleosomes (SNs) originally discovered in A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens. Yet, the sequences with good match to the (RRRRRYYYYY)n consensus of the SNs do show preference to centromere regions of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans - property characteristic of SNs of higher eukaryotes. Candida albicans is the first exception detected so far, where their SNs do not have any affinity to the centromeres, nor pericentromeric regions. Three of the four yeast genomes analyzed possess unique repeating centromere-specific SN sequences (C. albicans, again, is an exception). The results firmly indicate that centromeres of plants, animals, and yeasts in general have special chromatin structure, favoring SNs. PMID:25893982

  17. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank-Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  18. One spatial map or many? Spatial coding of connected environments.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Becker, Suzanna

    2014-03-01

    We investigated how humans encode large-scale spatial environments using a virtual taxi game. We hypothesized that if 2 connected neighborhoods are explored jointly, people will form a single integrated spatial representation of the town. However, if the neighborhoods are first learned separately and later observed to be connected, people will form separate spatial representations; this should incur an accuracy cost when inferring directions from one neighborhood to the other. Interestingly, our data instead suggest that people have a very strong tendency to form local representations, regardless of whether the neighborhoods were learned together or separately. Only when all visible distinctions between neighborhoods were removed did people behave as if they formed one integrated spatial representation. These data are broadly consistent with evidence from rodent hippocampal place cell recordings in connected boxes, and with hierarchical models of spatial coding. PMID:24364723

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  20. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  1. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  2. Natural auditory scene statistics shapes human spatial hearing

    PubMed Central

    Parise, Cesare V.; Knorre, Katharina; Ernst, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    Human perception, cognition, and action are laced with seemingly arbitrary mappings. In particular, sound has a strong spatial connotation: Sounds are high and low, melodies rise and fall, and pitch systematically biases perceived sound elevation. The origins of such mappings are unknown. Are they the result of physiological constraints, do they reflect natural environmental statistics, or are they truly arbitrary? We recorded natural sounds from the environment, analyzed the elevation-dependent filtering of the outer ear, and measured frequency-dependent biases in human sound localization. We find that auditory scene statistics reveals a clear mapping between frequency and elevation. Perhaps more interestingly, this natural statistical mapping is tightly mirrored in both ear-filtering properties and in perceived sound location. This suggests that both sound localization behavior and ear anatomy are fine-tuned to the statistics of natural auditory scenes, likely providing the basis for the spatial connotation of human hearing. PMID:24711409

  3. Strongly nonlinear traveling waves in granular dimer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, K. R.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Starosvetsky, Yuli

    2013-08-01

    This study is concerned with the dynamics of spatially periodic travelling waves supported by strongly nonlinear granular dimer chains with no pre-compression. In particular, we demonstrate numerically the formation of special families of travelling waves with spatially periodic waveforms that are realized in semi-infinite dimer chains. These traveling waves depend on a single system parameter defined as the mass ratio of the two granules forming each dimer pair of the chain. The dynamics of these families of traveling waves is systematically studied by considering finite dimer chains (termed the 'reduced systems') subject to periodic boundary conditions. In the present work we demonstrate that these waves may exhibit interesting bifurcations or loss of stability as the system parameter and the energy of the motion vary. In turn, these bifurcations and stability exchanges in infinite dimer chains are correlated to previous studies of pulse attenuation in finite dimer chains through efficient energy radiation from the propagating pulse to the far field, mainly in the form of traveling waves. Based on these results a new formulation of attenuation and propagation zones (stop and pass bands) in semi-infinite granular dimer chains is proposed.

  4. Achieving a Strongly Temperature-Dependent Casimir Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Woolf, David; Capasso, Federico; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-06

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2 nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied.

  5. Achieving a strongly temperature-dependent Casimir effect.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Woolf, David; McCauley, Alexander P; Capasso, Federico; Joannopoulos, John D; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-08-01

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2??nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied. PMID:20867961

  6. Spatial Visualization: What Happens when You Turn It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Oscar; Reys, Robert; Jones, Dusty

    2005-01-01

    Spatial visualization is an important skill that deserves instructional attention. Strong evidence supports the claim that "measures of mathematical ability tend to be strongly correlated with spatial ability" (Anderson 2000). Thus, there is every reason to believe that time spent helping students develop their spatial visualization skills will…

  7. Strong ground-motion prediction from Stochastic-dynamic source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Mai, P.M.; Beroza, G.C.; Boatwright, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of sufficient data in the very near source, predictions of the intensity and variability of ground motions from future large earthquakes depend strongly on our ability to develop realistic models of the earthquake source. In this article we simulate near-fault strong ground motion using dynamic source models. We use a boundary integral method to simulate dynamic rupture of earthquakes by specifying dynamic source parameters (fracture energy and stress drop) as spatial random fields. We choose these quantities such that they are consistent with the statistical properties of slip heterogeneity found in finite-source models of past earthquakes. From these rupture models we compute theoretical strong-motion seismograms up to a frequency of 2 Hz for several realizations of a scenario strike-slip Mw 7.0 earthquake and compare empirical response spectra, spectra obtained from our dynamic models, and spectra determined from corresponding kinematic simulations. We find that spatial and temporal variations in slip, slip rise time, and rupture propagation consistent with dynamic rupture models exert a strong influence on near-source ground motion. Our results lead to a feasible approach to specify the variability in the rupture time distribution in kinematic models through a generalization of Andrews' (1976) result relating rupture speed to apparent fracture energy, stress drop, and crack length to 3D dynamic models. This suggests that a simplified representation of dynamic rupture may be obtained to approximate the effects of dynamic rupture without having to do full dynamic simulations.

  8. Detecting the Amplitude Mode of Strongly Interacting Lattice Bosons by Bragg Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bissbort, Ulf; Hofstetter, Walter; Li Yongqiang

    2011-05-20

    We report the first detection of the Higgs-type amplitude mode using Bragg spectroscopy in a strongly interacting condensate of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. By the comparison of our experimental data with a spatially resolved, time-dependent bosonic Gutzwiller calculation, we obtain good quantitative agreement. This allows for a clear identification of the amplitude mode, showing that it can be detected with full momentum resolution by going beyond the linear response regime. A systematic shift of the sound and amplitude modes' resonance frequencies due to the finite Bragg beam intensity is observed.

  9. Detecting the amplitude mode of strongly interacting lattice bosons by Bragg scattering.

    PubMed

    Bissbort, Ulf; Götze, Sören; Li, Yongqiang; Heinze, Jannes; Krauser, Jasper S; Weinberg, Malte; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus; Hofstetter, Walter

    2011-05-20

    We report the first detection of the Higgs-type amplitude mode using Bragg spectroscopy in a strongly interacting condensate of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. By the comparison of our experimental data with a spatially resolved, time-dependent bosonic Gutzwiller calculation, we obtain good quantitative agreement. This allows for a clear identification of the amplitude mode, showing that it can be detected with full momentum resolution by going beyond the linear response regime. A systematic shift of the sound and amplitude modes' resonance frequencies due to the finite Bragg beam intensity is observed. PMID:21668240

  10. Characterization of spatial distribution of Tetranychus urticae in peppermint in California and implication for improving sampling plan.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Jhalendra P; Wilson, Rob; Godfrey, Larry D

    2016-02-01

    Twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is an important pest of peppermint in California, USA. Spider mite feeding on peppermint leaves causes physiological changes in the plant, which coupling with the favorable environmental condition can lead to increased mite infestations. Significant yield loss can occur in absence of pest monitoring and timely management. Understating the within-field spatial distribution of T. urticae is critical for the development of reliable sampling plan. The study reported here aims to characterize the spatial distribution of mite infestation in four commercial peppermint fields in northern California using spatial techniques, variogram and Spatial Analysis by Distance IndicEs (SADIE). Variogram analysis revealed that there was a strong evidence for spatially dependent (aggregated) mite population in 13 of 17 sampling dates and the physical distance of the aggregation reached maximum to 7 m in peppermint fields. Using SADIE, 11 of 17 sampling dates showed aggregated distribution pattern of mite infestation. Combining results from variogram and SADIE analysis, the spatial aggregation of T. urticae was evident in all four fields for all 17 sampling dates evaluated. Comparing spatial association using SADIE, ca. 62 % of the total sampling pairs showed a positive association of mite spatial distribution patterns between two consecutive sampling dates, which indicates a strong spatial and temporal stability of mite infestation in peppermint fields. These results are discussed in relation to behavior of spider mite distribution within field, and its implications for improving sampling guidelines that are essential for effective pest monitoring and management. PMID:26692381

  11. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed during SCES 2010. As we learned, past dogmas about strongly correlated materials and phenomena must be re-examined with an open and inquisitive mind. Invited speakers and respected leaders in the field were invited to contribute to this special issue and we have insisted that they present new data, ideas, or perspectives, as opposed to simply an overview of their past work. As with the conference, this special issue touches upon recent developments of strongly correlated electron systems in d-electron materials, such as Sr3Ru2O7, graphene, and the new Fe-based superconductors, but it is dominated by topics in f-electron compounds. Contributions reflect the growing appreciation for the influence of disorder and frustration, the need for organizing principles, as well as detailed investigations on particular materials of interest and, of course, new materials. As this special issue could not possibly capture the full breadth and depth that the conference had to offer, it is being published simultaneously with an issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series containing 157 manuscripts in which all poster presenters at SCES 2010 were invited to contribute. Since this special issue grew out of the 2010 SCES conference, we take this opportunity to give thanks. This conference would not have been possible without the hard work of the SCES 2010 Program Committee, International and National Advisory Committees, Local Committee, and conference organizers, the New Mexico Consortium. We thank them as well as those organizations that generously provided financial support: ICAM-I2CAM, Quantum Design, Lakeshore, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Department of Energy National Laboratories at Argonne, Berkeley, Brookhaven, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge. Of course, we especially thank the participants for bringing new ideas and new results, without which SCES 2010 would not have been possible. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Spin-orbit coupling and k-dependent Zeeman splitting in strontium ruthenate Emil J Rozbicki, James F Annett, Jean-René Souquet and Andrew P Mackenzie Thermodynamics of itinerant metamagnetic transitions A M Berridge Magnon-mediated pairing and isotope effect in iron-based superconductors Jiansheng Wu and Philip Phillips Nernst quantum oscillations in bulk semi-metals Zengwei Zhu, Huan Yang, Aritra Banerjee, Liam Malone, Benoît Fauqué and Kamran Behnia Signatures of a quantum Griffiths phase in a d-metal alloy close to its ferromagnetic quantum critical point Almut Schroeder, Sara Ubaid-Kassis and Thomas Vojta Influence of super-ohmic dissipation on a disordered quantum critical point Thomas Vojta, José A Hoyos, Priyanka Mohan and Rajesh Narayanan The van Hemmen-Kondo model for disordered cerium systems S G Magalhaes, F M Zimmer and B Coqblin Chemical pressure, dilution and disorder in the heavy fermion compounds Ce3 - xLaxPd20Si6 (x = 1/3, 2/3) H Winkler, K-A Lorenzer, S Laumann, J Custers, A Prokofiev and S Paschen Magnetism of fine particles of Kondo lattices, obtained by high-energy ball-milling E V Sampathkumaran, K Mukherjee, Kartik K Iyer, Niharika Mohapatra and Sitikantha D Das Heavy fermion scaling: uranium versus cerium and ytterbium compounds J M Lawrence, C H Wang, A D Christianson and E D Bauer Temperature dependence of hybridization gaps in metallic heavy-fermion systems Xiaodong Yang, Peter S Riseborough and Tomasz Durakiewicz Low-energy properties of the Kondo lattice model O Bodensiek, R Žitko, R Peters and T Pruschke Temperature dependence of the zero-bias anomaly in the Anderson-Hubbard model: insights from an ensemble of two-site systems R Wortis and W A Atkinson A charge density wave in the hidden order state of URu2Si2 Jung-Jung Su, Yonatan Dubi, Peter Wölfle and Alexander V Balatsky Field-induced suppression of the heavy-fermion state in YbRh2Si2 Gertrud Zwicknagl Discontinuous Hall coefficient at the quantum critical point in YbRh2Si2 Sven Friedemann, Niels Oeschler, Steffen Wirth, Cornelius Krellner, Christoph Geibel, Frank Steglich, Silke Paschen, Stefan Kirchner and Qimiao Si Roles of critical valence fluctuations in Ce- and Yb-based heavy fermion metals Shinji Watanabe and Kazumasa Miyake Unconventional quantum criticality in the pressure-induced heavy-fermion superconductor CeRhIn5 Tuson Park, V A Sidorov, H Lee, F Ronning, E D Bauer, J L Sarrao and J D Thompson Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state Youichi Yanase and Manfred Sigrist Magnetic transition and spin fluctuations in the unconventional antiferromagnetic compound Yb3Pt4 S Zhao, D E MacLaughlin, O O Bernal, J M Mackie, C Marques, Y Janssen and M C Aronson The non-centrosymmetric heavy fermion ferromagnet Sm2Fe12P7 M Janoschek, R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, I K Lum and M B Maple Magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of the actinide based noncentrosymmetric compounds Th2Fe12P7 and U2Fe12P7 R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, M Janoschek, I K Lum and M B Maple Magnetic order in Pu2M3Si5 (M = Co, Ni) E D Bauer, P H Tobash, J N Mitchell, J A Kennison, F Ronning, B L Scott and J D Thompson