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Sample records for strongyloides stercoralis infections

  1. Pulmonary Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Canan; Gayaf, Mine; Ozsoz, Ayse; Sahin, Birsen; Aksel, Nimet; Karasu, Isil; Aydogdu, Zekiye; Turgay, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    The 17-year-old male patient presented with fever, weakness, dyspnea and weight loss. His chest radiography demonstrated diffuse reticulonodular density, and high-resolution lung tomography indicated diffuse micronodules and prevalent ground-glass pattern. The findings were consistent with miliary involvement. The patient underwent examinations for rheumatology, immunology, cytology and infectious conditions. His immune system was normal and had no comorbidities or any history of immunosuppressive treatment. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were noted upon direct inspection of the feces. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved with albendazole 400 mg/day. This case is being presented since miliary involvement in the lungs caused by S. stercoralis infection in an individual with intact immune system is rare and difficult to diagnosis. PMID:26029521

  2. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  3. Frequency of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ribeiro, Camila Toffoli; Mendes, Daniel de Melo; Oliveira, Tatiana Cunha; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2002-01-01

    Several studies have shown that chronic alcoholics have increased susceptibility to infections due to higher exposure to infectious agents as well as breakdown in their immune defenses. As Strongyloides stercoralis infection is usually more relevant in immunocompromised patients, the aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of S. stercoralis infection in alcoholics. Thus, coproparasitological examination was carried out in 145 subjects, from which 45 were chronic alcoholics (mean age of 45.7 +/- 11.0 years), 10 were nonalcoholic cirrhotic patients (mean age of 50.2 +/- 13.1 years), and 90 were asymptomatic nonalcoholic subjects (mean age of 46.7 +/- 10.1 years), which served as controls. From the alcoholics, 9 had hepatic cirrhosis, 9 had chronic pancreatitis and 27 had neither cirrhosis nor pancreatitis. For the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis, the Baermann-Moraes and Lutz methods were used in three fecal samples from each subject. Samples were collected at alternated days, and three slides of each sample were analyzed for each method, thus totalizing 2,610 slides examined. The frequency of strongloidiasis in the total alcoholic group (33.3%) and in the subgroups of alcoholics, i.e., patients with hepatic cirrhosis (44.4%), with chronic pancreatitis (33.3%), and those with no cirrhosis or pancreatitis (29.6%) was statistically higher than that found in the control group (5.5%). None of the individuals with nonalcoholic hepatic cirrhosis had S. stercoralis infection. Our results showed that the chronic alcoholism itself is an important factor that predisposes to strongyloidiasis. PMID:11992161

  4. Ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; White, A Clinton; Terashima, Angelica; Samalvides, Frine; Pérez-Molina, José A; Plana, Maria N

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis is a gut infection with Strongyloides stercoralis which is common world wide. Chronic infection usually causes a skin rash, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, and respiratory problems, and it can be fatal in people with immune deficiency. It may be treated with ivermectin or albendazole or thiabendazole. Objectives To assess the effects of ivermectin versus benzimidazoles (albendazole and thiabendazole) for treating chronic strongyloides infection. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (24 August 2015); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2015); EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015); LILACS (August 2015); and reference lists of articles. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) using 'strongyloid*' as a search term, reference lists, and conference abstracts. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials of ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for treating chronic strongyloides infection. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias in the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and fixed- or random-effects models. We pooled adverse event data if the trials were sufficiently similar in their adverse event definitions. Main results We included seven trials, enrolling 1147 participants, conducted between 1994 and 2011 in different locations (Africa, Southeast Asia, America and Europe). In trials comparing ivermectin with albendazole, parasitological cure was higher with ivermectin (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.08; 478 participants, four trials, moderate quality evidence). There were no statistically significant differences in adverse events (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.09; 518 participants, four trials, low quality evidence). In trials comparing ivermectin with thiabendazole

  5. Efficacy of agar-plate culture in detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, T; Iwanaga, M; Kinjo, F; Saito, A; Asato, R; Ikeshiro, T

    1990-06-01

    Agar-plate culture of feces using a modified petri dish proved to be highly efficient in the detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection. Furrows left by S. stercoralis on the agar plate were distinguished readily in size from those left by Necator americanus. PMID:2352073

  6. Strongyloides stercoralis infection and re-infection in a cohort of children in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Khieu, Virak; Hattendorf, Jan; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Information on Strongyloides stercoralis re-infection after ivermectin treatment is scarce in S. stercoralis endemic countries. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined S. stercoralis infection and re-infection rates among schoolchildren, two years after ivermectin treatment (2×100 μg/kg PO, 24 h apart). The study was conducted among 484 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province from 2009 to 2011, using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method on two stool samples per child. Complete data were available for 302 participants. We observed infections in 24.2% and 22.5% of the children at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. At baseline, 73 children were treated for S. stercoralis infection. At follow-up, one-third of those treated for S. stercoralis infection had been reinfected, while 19.6% of the 229 healthy children (at baseline) had been newly infected with S. stercoralis. Possession of shoes and defecation in toilet were negatively associated with S. stercoralis infection at follow-up. Infection and re-infection rates of S. stercoralis among schoolchildren are considerably high. However, 68.5% of infected children remained free of infection for at least two years. A large-scale cohort study is required to understand age-specific infection and re-infection dynamics in endemic countries. PMID:24970767

  7. Serological and molecular detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli community in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Hadip, Faizah; Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela

    2013-08-01

    Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection particularly in asymptomatic individuals is often hampered due to the lack of standard diagnostic tools. In this study, the use of serological and molecular approaches were investigated for the detection of S. stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli (indigenous) community following a preliminary detection by microscopic examination of faecal samples. Out of 54 individuals studied, 17/54 (31.5%) were detected to be positive for S. stercoralis infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), compared to 0/54 (0%) by faecal examination. Further confirmation performed by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from faecal samples of these 17 individuals yielded 3/17 (17.6%) positives for S. stercoralis DNA amplification. No amplification was seen with the other 37 faecal samples, which were negative by microscopy and ELISA. As the high ELISA positive results were suspected to be false-positives, ELISA is not recommended for use as a detection tool but may be beneficial for evaluating the effectiveness of anti-Strongyloides drugs. The present finding indicated that PCR should be considered as an alternative diagnostic tool for the detection of S. stercoralis infection. PMID:23666229

  8. Systemic Cytokine Profiles in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection and Alterations following Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukti; Jagannathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2016-02-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth organism that infects ~50 to 100 million people worldwide. Despite its widespread prevalence, very little is known about the immune response that characterizes human S. stercoralis infection. To study the systemic cytokine profile characteristic of Strongyloides infection, we measured the circulating levels of a large panel of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in asymptomatic, infected individuals (n = 32) and compared them to those in uninfected, controls (n = 24). Infected individuals exhibited significantly lower circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-1β [IL-1β]) and significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and transforming growth factor β [TGF-β]). Moreover, treatment of Strongyloides infection resulted in a significant reversal of the cytokine profile, with increased levels of proinflammatory (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-23, and IL-1β) and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and TGF-β) cytokines following treatment. Thus, S. stercoralis infection is characterized by alterations in the levels of systemic cytokines, reflecting major alterations in the underlying immune response to this chronic helminth infection. PMID:26597982

  9. Association between Strongyloides stercoralis infection and cortisol secretion in alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mônica L S; Inês, Elizabete de J; Souza, Alex Bruno da S; Dias, Victória Maria dos S; Guimarães, Cléa M; Menezes, Edimacia R; Barbosa, Larissa G; Alves, Maria Del Carmen M; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina A; Soares, Neci M

    2016-02-01

    A higher prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infections has been reported in alcoholic patients compared to nonalcoholic patients living in the same area. Excessive alcohol consumption increases the levels of endogenous corticosteroids that subsequently enhance the fecundity of S. stercoralis parthenogenetic females. These corticosteroids also enhance the transformation of rhabditiform larvae into infective filariform larvae by mimicking the effect of the ecdysteroid hormones produced by the parasite, thus leading to autoinfection. In addition, alterations in the intestinal barrier and host immune response contribute to the development of hyperinfection and severe strongyloidiasis in alcoholic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of S. stercoralis infections in alcoholic patients and to determine the association between S. stercoralis infection and endogenous cortisol levels. The frequency of infection was evaluated in 332 alcoholic and 92 nonalcoholic patients. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by agar plate culture, the modified Baermann-Moraes method and spontaneous sedimentation. The immunological diagnosis was performed using an ELISA with anti-S. stercoralis IgG. The cortisol levels were measured in serum samples by ELISA. The frequency of S. stercoralis infection in alcoholic patients was 23.5% (78/332), while in nonalcoholic patients, it was 5.4% (5/92) (p<0.05). The cortisol levels were higher in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic patients (p<0.05). However, among the alcoholic patients, the cortisol levels did not differ between S. stercoralis-infected and uninfected patients (p>0.05). As demonstrated in this work, 81.3% (26/32) of patients with a high parasite load, considered as more than 11 larvae per gram of feces, presented serum cortisol levels above the normal reference value (24 mg/dL). High endogenous cortisol levels in alcoholic patients were not associated to susceptibility to S. stercoralis infection

  10. Occurrence of and risk factors for Strongyloides stercoralis infection in South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Schär, Fabian; Giardina, Federica; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Vounatsou, Penelope; Marti, Hanspeter; Odermatt, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The soil-transmitted nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis is one of the most-neglected of all neglected tropical diseases. It is globally distributed, favouring the humid, wet climates of the tropics and subtropics. Inadequate sanitary conditions promote the spread of S. stercoralis infection. In South-East Asia, many countries provide the ideal ecological and economic setting for high S. stercoralis infection rates. Yet, in most of these countries, little is known about the actual prevalence and distribution of S. stercoralis. One reason for this lack of knowledge pertains to the time- and resource-intensive diagnostic methods used to detect S. stercoralis infection. The Koga Agar culture method and the Baermann method are considered to be the best coprological diagnostic methods for field settings today. Both detect the parasite with high sensitivity. This sensitivity can be increased further by examining stool samples for several consecutive days, thereby increasing the chances of detecting low-intensity chronic infections. Diagnostic challenges, however, lead to the omission of S. stercoralis in studies of soil-transmitted helminths and few studies focus on S. stercoralis, specifically. These factors lead to an underreporting of the nematode's prevalence, not only in South-East Asia but worldwide. We have reviewed the scientific literature of the last 25 years and estimated country-wide prevalence rates for South-East Asia. We aim to summarise what is known today about the prevalence of S. stercoralis in South-East Asia, as well as to ascertain the risk factors and diagnostic methods most commonly applied. PMID:25795619

  11. Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Causing Obstructive Jaundice and Refractory Pancreatitis: A Lesson Learned from a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Itoi, Takao; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Mukai, Shuntaro; Koyama, Yohei; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Itaru; Hino, Akina; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old Japanese woman came to our institution because of leg edema and abdominal distention. She had developed acute pancreatitis 5 times in the past 3 years. Dilation of the bile duct and main pancreatic duct without obstruction was observed on computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The presence of Strongyloides stercoralis was highly suspected from the biopsy sample from the duodenal papilla. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of small subunit rDNA from paraffin-embedded specimens identified the worm as S. stercoralis. All of the symptoms were considered to be associated with S. stercoralis infection. Therefore, the patient was treated with oral administration of ivermectin. Subsequently, symptoms and laboratory data improved. There has been no recurrence of the symptoms to date. PMID:27477420

  12. Recurrence of strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient with Hansen's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Joelma Nascimento; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Soares, Neci Matos

    2014-03-01

    In patients with immunosuppressive disorders, S. stercoralis infection may develop into a hyperinfection syndrome which, on rare occasions, may be a life-threatening condition. Therapy of S. stercoralis infection with thiabendazole has been limited, due to its numerous side effects, and has been replaced by albendazole and ivermectin. The present case report describes a case of Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome (SHS) in a patient with Hansen's disease and lack of response to first-line anthelmintic treatment. A 38 year-old man was diagnosed as having borderline lepromatous leprosy. He developed Erythema Nodosum Leprosum and was treated with thalidomide and prednisone. In May 2010 he was diagnosed with S. stercoralis infection and was treated with albendazole. One year later, the stool examination showed continued presence of S. stercoralis larvae. He was treated with ivermectin (6 mg) in a double dose (given 1 month apart) which resulted in larvae excretion clearance. The absence of infection was confirmed three times during a 1 year followup period by stool examination and non-detection of anti-S. stercoralis IgG levels. PMID:24974444

  13. Ivermectin Treatment and Sanitation Effectively Reduce Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Risk in Rural Communities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schindler, Christian; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability to replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and its worldwide prevalence has recently been estimated to be at least half that of hookworm. Information on the epidemiology of S. stercoralis remains scarce and modalities for its large-scale control are yet to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based two-year cohort study was conducted among the general population in a rural province in North Cambodia. At each survey, participants infected with S. stercoralis were treated with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW). Diagnosis was performed using a combination of the Baermann method and Koga agar plate culture on two stool samples. The cohort included participants from eight villages who were either positive or negative for S. stercoralis at baseline. Mixed logistic regression models were employed to assess risk factors for S. stercoralis infection at baseline and re-infection at follow-up. A total of 3,096 participants were examined at baseline, revealing a S. stercoralis prevalence of 33.1%. Of these participants, 1,269 were followed-up over two years. Re-infection and infection rates among positive and negative participants at baseline were 14.4% and 9.6% at the first and 11.0% and 11.5% at the second follow-up, respectively. At follow-up, all age groups were at similar risk of acquiring an infection, while infection risk significantly decreased with increasing village sanitation coverage. Conclusions/Significance Chemotherapy-based control of S. stercoralis is feasible and highly beneficial, particularly in combination with improved sanitation. The impact of community-based ivermectin treatment on S. stercoralis was high, with over 85% of villagers remaining negative one year after treatment. The integration of S. stercoralis into existing STH control programs should be considered

  14. [Thiabendazole for the control of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a hyperendemic area in Peru].

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis; Terashima, Angélica; Samalvides, Frine; Alvarez, Héctor; Lindo, Felipe; Tello, Raúl; Canales, Marco; Demarini, Julio; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infection is a disease caused by an intestinal parasite. This helminth is highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical areas. The preferred treatment is ivermectin, and thiabendazole as a second option available in certain Peruvian institutions. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of thiabendazole (25 mg/kg/day) administered twice a day (after meals) for three days in individuals with S. stercoralis chronic infection. The study was conducted at Hospital de La Merced, Province of Chanchamayo, Peru (endemic area), during a 90 day period. The study included 32 individuals (22 female and 10 male, average age +/- SD = 9.31 +/- 8.11 years) with a diagnosed S. stercoralis infection. Follow up tests were eosinophil count, hematocrit, agar plate feces culture, and Baermann technique modified by Lumbreras. Healing rate was 90.6%. The average eosinophil count in healed patients significantly decreased (1168 to 665 eosinophils/cc, p=0.006) as compared to the treatment failure group, which showed a slight increase (618 to 897 eosinophils/cc, p=0.125). Hematocrit increased in both groups (2% and 3%, respectively). Adverse effects were headache, dizziness, and epigastralgia in 6.2% of individuals. It was concluded that the studied scheme showed a high effectiveness rate and was well tolerated. Therefore this scheme may be taken into account for control programs of this parasite in hyperendemic areas. PMID:16333389

  15. [Aseptic purulent meningitis in two patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis].

    PubMed

    Foucan, L; Genevier, I; Lamaury, I; Strobel, M

    1997-01-01

    Occurrence of anguilluliasis always progresses to hyperinfestation or disseminated anguilluliasis with severe clinical manifestations in carriers of HTLV-1. This prognosis is further illustrated by two new cases of non-septic purulent meningitis observed in two male patients from Guadalope. Ages were 61 and 64 years. In both cases examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated pleiocytosis with more than 3000 cells (mostly polynuclear neutrophils) per mm3, protein content greater than 3 g/l, and low sugar level. No soluble germs or antigens were found in the CSF. In both patients Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were detected in stools but not in CSF. Meningitis responded to antibiotic treatment but follow-up tests showed the persistence of larvae in stools despite treatment using thiabendazole. While similar cases of meningitis have been reported in carriers of HTLV-1, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis appears to be a predisposing factor. This association may warrant preventive anti-parasitic treatment in patients infected by HTLV-1. PMID:9513154

  16. Strongyloides stercoralis, Eosinophilia, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Predictive Value of Eosinophilia in the Diagnosis of S stercoralis Infection in an Endemic Community.

    PubMed

    Hays, Russell; Thompson, Fintan; Esterman, Adrian; McDermott, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background.  This study examines the predictive value of eosinophilia for Strongyloides stercoralis infection, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing, in an endemic community. In remote communities, eosinophilia is frequently used as a proxy test for the presence of helminth infections. Past studies of eosinophilia and Strongyloides infection have been conducted in specific groups such as immigrants and refugees, or in subpopulations of nonendemic communities, rather than in endemic communities. Methods.  We conducted a cross-sectional study of the relationship between eosinophilia and Strongyloides ELISA serology, as part of a study into the relationship between S stercoralis infection and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in an Indigenous community in northern Australia. Results.  Two hundred thirty-nine adults had their eosinophil count and S stercoralis ELISA serology measured in 2012 and 2013, along with other biometric and metabolic data. Eosinophilia was found to have a relatively poor sensitivity (60.9%), specificity (71.1%), positive predictive value (54.6%), and negative predictive value (76.1%) for S stercoralis ELISA positivity in this group. However, there was a more constant relationship between eosinophilia and S Stercoralis ELISA positivity in patients with T2DM (negative predictive value 87.5%). Conclusion.  This study suggests that the presence or absence of eosinophilia is not an adequate proxy test for S stercoralis infection in a community where the infection is prevalent, and that the association between eosinophilia and S stercoralis ELISA positivity is more constant in patients with T2DM. PMID:26989753

  17. Strongyloides stercoralis, Eosinophilia, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Predictive Value of Eosinophilia in the Diagnosis of S stercoralis Infection in an Endemic Community

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Russell; Thompson, Fintan; Esterman, Adrian; McDermott, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study examines the predictive value of eosinophilia for Strongyloides stercoralis infection, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing, in an endemic community. In remote communities, eosinophilia is frequently used as a proxy test for the presence of helminth infections. Past studies of eosinophilia and Strongyloides infection have been conducted in specific groups such as immigrants and refugees, or in subpopulations of nonendemic communities, rather than in endemic communities. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study of the relationship between eosinophilia and Strongyloides ELISA serology, as part of a study into the relationship between S stercoralis infection and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in an Indigenous community in northern Australia. Results. Two hundred thirty-nine adults had their eosinophil count and S stercoralis ELISA serology measured in 2012 and 2013, along with other biometric and metabolic data. Eosinophilia was found to have a relatively poor sensitivity (60.9%), specificity (71.1%), positive predictive value (54.6%), and negative predictive value (76.1%) for S stercoralis ELISA positivity in this group. However, there was a more constant relationship between eosinophilia and S Stercoralis ELISA positivity in patients with T2DM (negative predictive value 87.5%). Conclusion. This study suggests that the presence or absence of eosinophilia is not an adequate proxy test for S stercoralis infection in a community where the infection is prevalent, and that the association between eosinophilia and S stercoralis ELISA positivity is more constant in patients with T2DM. PMID:26989753

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis: Global Distribution and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Fabian; Trostdorf, Ulf; Giardina, Federica; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Vounatsou, Penelope; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The soil-transmitted threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, is one of the most neglected among the so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). We reviewed studies of the last 20 years on S. stercoralis's global prevalence in general populations and risk groups. Methods/Principal Findings A literature search was performed in PubMed for articles published between January 1989 and October 2011. Articles presenting information on infection prevalence were included. A Bayesian meta-analysis was carried out to obtain country-specific prevalence estimates and to compare disease odds ratios in different risk groups taking into account the sensitivities of the diagnostic methods applied. A total of 354 studies from 78 countries were included for the prevalence calculations, 194 (62.4%) were community-based studies, 121 (34.2%) were hospital-based studies and 39 (11.0%) were studies on refugees and immigrants. World maps with country data are provided. In numerous African, Asian and South-American resource-poor countries, information on S. stercoralis is lacking. The meta-analysis showed an association between HIV-infection/alcoholism and S. stercoralis infection (OR: 2.17 BCI: 1.18–4.01; OR: 6.69; BCI: 1.47–33.8), respectively. Conclusions Our findings show high infection prevalence rates in the general population in selected countries and geographical regions. S. stercoralis infection is prominent in several risk groups. Adequate information on the prevalence is still lacking from many countries. However, current information underscore that S. stercoralis must not be neglected. Further assessments in socio-economic and ecological settings are needed and integration into global helminth control is warranted. PMID:23875033

  19. Strongyloides stercoralis-infected dogs as a model for human disseminated strongyloidiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Aikens, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The route of migration of Strongyloides stercoralis third-stage infective larvae was explored in primary and autogenous infections in the dog. Larvae was radiolabeled by one of two means: (1) by culture of the free-living L3 stage in a nutrient medium, deficient in methionine, supplemented with ({sup 75}Se)Selenomethionine, and (2) by feeding of ({sup 75}Se)Selenomethionine-labeled bacteria to microbiverous L1 and L2 stages. Third-stage labeled larvae were then injected into 10-day-old pups either subcutaneously, to study primary migration, or into the distal ileum, to study autogenous migration. At intervals after infection pups were killed and whole body compressed organ autoradiography done on individual tissues to determine organ-specific larval transit sites. Autoradiographic recoveries were analyzed in the context of a series of mathematical models designed to test migratory route hypotheses. Postulated routes of migration for primary infections included (1) the Null Hypothesis or Scramble Route in which larvae migrate to the intestines by any available route, (2) the Classical Pulmonary Route in which larvae migrate sequentially from skin, to blood, to lungs, to the trachea, esophagus and intestines, and (3) the Head Migration Route in which larvae move from caudal to cranial sites within the skin and muscle before entering the intestines. Postulated routes for autoinfective migration reiterated 1 and 2 above. Least squares comparisons, of calculated models to observed autoradiographic distributions, led us to conclude that there was no reason to reject the simplest assumption that larvae move by any available route to the definitive site in both forms of migration. Sampling through tracheostomy sites in 14 pups for larval migrants confirmed this conclusion.

  20. Strongyloides stercoralis in the Immunocompromised Population

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Paul B.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2004-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode of humans that infects tens of millions of people worldwide. S. stercoralis is unique among intestinal nematodes in its ability to complete its life cycle within the host through an asexual autoinfective cycle, allowing the infection to persist in the host indefinitely. Under some conditions associated with immunocompromise, this autoinfective cycle can become amplified into a potentially fatal hyperinfection syndrome, characterized by increased numbers of infective filariform larvae in stool and sputum and clinical manifestations of the increased parasite burden and migration, such as gastrointestinal bleeding and respiratory distress. S. stercoralis hyperinfection is often accompanied by sepsis or meningitis with enteric organisms. Glucocorticoid treatment and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection are the two conditions most specifically associated with triggering hyperinfection, but cases have been reported in association with hematologic malignancy, malnutrition, and AIDS. Anthelmintic agents such as ivermectin have been used successfully in treating the hyperinfection syndrome as well as for primary and secondary prevention of hyperinfection in patients whose exposure history and underlying condition put them at increased risk. PMID:14726461

  1. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction in Stool Detects Transmission of Strongyloides stercoralis from an Infected Donor to Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Junyent, Joan; Paredes-Zapata, David; de las Parras, Esperanza Rodríguez; González-Costello, José; Ruiz-Arranz, Ángel; Cañizares, Rosario; Saugar, José María; Muñoz, José

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients can acquire Strongyloides stercoralis from an infected donor. The diagnosis of S. stercoralis in immunocompromised individuals may be challenging due to a lower sensitivity of available parasitological and serological methods, compared with immunocompetent individuals. Recently, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in stool has been developed for S. stercoralis diagnosis. We report two cases of S. stercoralis infection transmitted by a donor to two solid organ transplant recipients, who were diagnosed with RT-PCR in stool. This test could play an important role inS. stercoralis diagnosis in immunosuppressed patients, facilitating rapid treatment initiation and reducing the risk of severe strongyloidiasis. Adherence to current recommendations of screening among donors and recipients from endemic areas is also urgently needed. PMID:26880781

  2. Epidemiology of Strongyloides stercoralis on Mekong islands in southern Laos.

    PubMed

    Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Sayasone, Somphou; Bouakhasith, Dalouny; Taisayavong, Keoka; Akkavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a neglected helminth infection potentially that can lead to systemic infection in immunocompromised individuals. In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR, Laos), information on S. stercoralis infection is scarce. We assessed S. stercoralis infection and associated risk factors and symptoms on the Mekong islands in Southern Laos. Baermann and Kato-Katz techniques were performed on two stool samples from each individual to detect S. stercoralis larvae and concomitant helminth infections. Among 729 individuals, 41.0% were infected with S. stercoralis. Men were at higher risk than women (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.45-2.67). Urticaria and body itching was associated with S. stercoralis infection (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.42-4.05). Infection with Opisthorchis viverrini (72.2%), Schistosoma mekongi (12.8%), and hookworm (56.1%) were very common. Few infections with Trichuris trichiura (3.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.3%) and Taenia spp. (0.3%) were detected. The majority of helminth infections were of light intensity, with prevalences of 80.4%, 92.9%, 64.5%, 100% and 100%, for O. viverrini, hookworm, S. mekongi, T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides, respectively. Nevertheless, heavy infection intensities were observed for O. viverrini (1.0%), S. mekongi (14.0%) and hookworm (2.9%). S. stercoralis is highly endemic on the islands of Khong district, Champasack province, Southern Laos. The national helminth control programme should take action to control this helminth infection. PMID:25291044

  3. Accuracy of Five Serologic Tests for the Follow up of Strongyloides stercoralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buonfrate, Dora; Sequi, Marco; Mejia, Rojelio; Cimino, Ruben O.; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.; Albonico, Marco; Degani, Monica; Tais, Stefano; Angheben, Andrea; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Muñoz, José; Nutman, Thomas B.; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional faecal-based methods have poor sensitivity for the detection of S. stercoralis, therefore are inadequate for post-treatment evaluation of infected patients who should be carefully monitored to exclude the persistence of the infection. In a previous study, we demonstrated high accuracy of five serology tests for the screening and diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of the same five tests for the follow up of patients infected with S. stercoralis. Methods Retrospective study on anonymized, cryo-preserved samples available at the Centre for Tropical Diseases (Negrar, Verona, Italy). Samples were collected before and from 3 to 12 months after treatment. The samples were tested with two commercially-available ELISA tests (IVD, Bordier), two techniques based on a recombinant antigen (NIE-ELISA and NIE-LIPS) and one in-house IFAT. The results of each test were evaluated both in relation to the results of fecal examination and to those of a composite reference standard (classifying as positive a sample with positive stools and/or at least three positive serology tests). The associations between the independent variables age and time and the dependent variable value of serological test (for all five tests), were analyzed by linear mixed-effects regression model. Results A high proportion of samples demonstrated for each test a seroreversion or a relevant decline (optical density/relative light units halved or decrease of at least two titers for IFAT) at follow up, results confirmed by the linear mixed effects model that showed a trend to seroreversion over time for all tests. In particular, IVD-ELISA (almost 90% samples demonstrated relevant decline) and IFAT (almost 87%) had the best performance. Considering only samples with a complete negativization, NIE-ELISA showed the best performance (72.5% seroreversion). Conclusions Serology is useful for the follow up of patients infected with S. stercoralis and

  4. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Eosinophilia and Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    PubMed Central

    Nesheli, Hassan Mahmoodi; Moghaddam, Tahereh Galini; Zahedpasha, Yadollah; Norouzi, Ali-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Bone pain is an important symptom that can be severe. Eosinophilia without any other abnormal laboratory findings is rare in ALL. Strongyloides stercoralis in ALL causes disseminated fatal disease. Case Presentation This 9-year-old girl presented with bone pain in lumbar region. Bone pain was the only symptom. The patient didn't have organomegaly. The BM samples were studied by flow cytometry, which showed pre-B cell ALL. Larva of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in fecal examination. Plain chest x ray showed bilateral para-cardiac infiltration. Strongyloidiasis was treated before starting chemotherapy. After two days treatment with Mebendazol the patient developed cough, dyspnea, respiratory distress and fever. The treatment changed to Ivermectin for 2 days. Chemotherapy started five days after diagnosis of leukemia. Conclusion The patient complained merely of bone pain in lumbar region without any other signs and symptoms. Peripheral blood smear showed eosinophilia without any other abnormality. Stool examination showed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. We suggest that all patients diagnosed as ALL in tropical and subtropical regions should be evaluated for parasitic infection especially with Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:23056848

  5. Relationship among Strongyloides stercoralis Infection, Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection, and Cancer: A 24-Year Cohort Inpatient Study in Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Teruhisa; Hirata, Tetsuo; Parrott, Gretchen; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Kinjo, Takeshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hokama, Akira; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in the population. In addition, this study investigated the relationship between S. stercoralis infection or HTLV-1 infection and a patient's risk of developing related cancers. This is a retrospective cohort study of 5,209 patients. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 5.2% among all patients. The prevalence among men (6.3%) was significantly higher than among women (3.6%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among this population was 13.6% and the prevalence among women (15.5%) was significantly higher than that of men (12.3%, P < 0.001). HTLV-1 seroprevalence was higher in patients with liver cancer (P = 0.003, odds ratio [OR]: 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 2.95) and in those with lymphoma other than adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (P = 0.005, adjusted OR: 2.76, 95% CI: 1.36, 5.62) if compared with patients without any neoplasm. The prevalence of both S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 in the Okinawan population has been steadily decreasing over the past 24 years. HTLV-1 infection significantly increases the odds of developing liver cancer and lymphomas other than ATLL. PMID:26621566

  6. Relationship Among Strongyloides stercoralis Infection, Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection, and Cancer: A 24-Year Cohort Inpatient Study in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Teruhisa; Hirata, Tetsuo; Parrott, Gretchen; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Kinjo, Takeshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hokama, Akira; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in the population. In addition, this study investigated the relationship between S. stercoralis infection or HTLV-1 infection and a patient's risk of developing related cancers. This is a retrospective cohort study of 5,209 patients. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 5.2% among all patients. The prevalence among men (6.3%) was significantly higher than among women (3.6%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among this population was 13.6% and the prevalence among women (15.5%) was significantly higher than that of men (12.3%, P < 0.001). HTLV-1 seroprevalence was higher in patients with liver cancer (P = 0.003, odds ratio [OR]: 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 2.95) and in those with lymphoma other than adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (P = 0.005, adjusted OR: 2.76, 95% CI: 1.36, 5.62) if compared with patients without any neoplasm. The prevalence of both S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 in the Okinawan population has been steadily decreasing over the past 24 years. HTLV-1 infection significantly increases the odds of developing liver cancer and lymphomas other than ATLL. PMID:26621566

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of Kato-Katz, FLOTAC, Baermann, and PCR methods for the detection of light-intensity hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis infections in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Stefanie; Salim, Nahya; Schindler, Tobias; Karagiannis Voules, Dimitrios A; Rothen, Julian; Lweno, Omar; Mohammed, Alisa S; Singo, Raymond; Benninghoff, Myrna; Nsojo, Anthony A; Genton, Blaise; Daubenberger, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tools are crucial for an accurate assessment of helminth infections in low-endemicity areas. We examined stool samples from Tanzanian individuals and compared the diagnostic accuracy of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the FLOTAC technique and the Kato-Katz method for hookworm and the Baermann method for Strongyloides stercoralis detection. Only FLOTAC had a higher sensitivity than the Kato-Katz method for hookworm diagnosis; the sensitivities of PCR and the Kato-Katz method were equal. PCR had a very low sensitivity for S. stercoralis detection. The cycle threshold values of the PCR were negatively correlated with the logarithm of hookworm egg and S. stercoralis larvae counts. The median larvae count was significantly lower in PCR false negatives than true positives. All methods failed to detect very low-intensity infections. New diagnostic approaches are needed for monitoring of progressing helminth control programs, confirmation of elimination, or surveillance of disease recrudescence. PMID:24445211

  8. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease. PMID:26542223

  9. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection associated with impaired intestinal motility disorder

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Cláudia Frangioia; Cos, Lynda Dorene; Ussami, Edson Yassushi; Otoch, José Pinhata; Felipe-Silva, Aloisio

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Strongyloides stercoralis is a highly prevalent helminthiasis, which is mostly distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although a substantial number of cases are asymptomatic or paucisymtomatic, severe and life-threatening forms of this infection still occur and not infrequently is lately diagnosed. Gram-negative bacteria septicemia, which frequently accompanies the severe helminthiasis, contributes to the high mortality rate. Severe infection is invariably triggered by any imbalance in the host's immunity, favoring the auto-infective cycle, which increases the intraluminal parasite burden enormously. Clinical presentation of severe cases is varied, and diagnosis requires a high suspicion index. Acute abdomen has been reported in association with S. stercoralis infection, but intestinal necrosis is rarely found during the surgical approach. The authors report the case of a man who sought the emergency unit with recent onset abdominal pain. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with obstructive acute abdomen. Scattered adhesions and a necrotic ileal segment with a tiny perforation represented the surgical findings. The patient outcome was unfavorable and respiratory distress required an open lung biopsy. Both surgical specimens showed S. stercoralis infection. Unfortunately the patient underwent multiple organ failure and septicemia, and subsequently died. The authors call attention to the finding of intestinal necrosis and impaired intestinal motility disorder as possibilities for the diagnosis and risk factor, respectively, for a severe infection of S. stercoralis. PMID:26484331

  10. Late onset of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in a retired Belgian miner.

    PubMed

    Pypen, Y; Oris, E; Meeuwissen, J; Vander Laenen, M; Van Gompel, F; Coppens, G

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in an immunocompromised patient treated for a lung carcinoma. Despite his Belgian origin, he was infected with S. stercoralis due to his former work as a miner. Although mostly prevalent in (sub)tropical areas, there are temperate regions where this nematode can occur. PMID:26790558

  11. [Rare Case of Strongyloides stercoralis with Vitamin B12 Deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kadılar, Özlem; Bozkurt, Berna; Karakeçe, Engin; Kaya, Tezcan; Çiftçi, İhsan Hakkı; Tamer, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Strongyloidiyasis is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, and mostly soil transmitted nematode disease that is seen as sporadic cases in Turkey. As may be asymptomatic in healthy individuals, it may even cause death in immunosuppressive people. We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient, 29 years old young male was admitted to our institution with diarrhea who has got vitamin B12 deficiency and eosinophilia. The case represents an extremely rare and in our knowledge, it is the first case in Sakarya. PMID:26470934

  12. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association. PMID:26704620

  13. Regulation of Life Cycle Checkpoints and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis by Dafachronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, Adeiye A.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Wang, Zhu; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Lok, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The complex life cycle of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis leads to either developmental arrest of infectious third-stage larvae (iL3) or growth to reproductive adults. In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, analogous determination between dauer arrest and reproductive growth is governed by dafachronic acids (DAs), a class of steroid hormones that are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. Biosynthesis of DAs requires the cytochrome P450 (CYP) DAF-9. We tested the hypothesis that DAs also regulate S. stercoralis development via DAF-12 signaling at three points. First, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA stimulated 100% of post-parasitic first-stage larvae (L1s) to develop to free-living adults instead of iL3 at 37°C, while 69.4±12.0% (SD) of post-parasitic L1s developed to iL3 in controls. Second, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA prevented post-free-living iL3 arrest and stimulated 85.2±16.9% of larvae to develop to free-living rhabditiform third- and fourth-stages, compared to 0% in the control. This induction required 24–48 hours of Δ7-DA exposure. Third, we found that the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole prevented iL3 feeding in host-like conditions, with only 5.6±2.9% of iL3 feeding in 40 μM ketoconazole, compared to 98.8±0.4% in the positive control. This inhibition was partially rescued by Δ7-DA, with 71.2±16.4% of iL3 feeding in 400 nM Δ7-DA and 35 μM ketoconazole, providing the first evidence of endogenous DA production in S. stercoralis. We then characterized the 26 CYP-encoding genes in S. stercoralis and identified a homolog with sequence and developmental regulation similar to DAF-9. Overall, these data demonstrate that DAF-12 signaling regulates S. stercoralis development, showing that in the post-parasitic generation, loss of DAF-12 signaling favors iL3 arrest, while increased DAF-12 signaling favors reproductive development; that in the post-free-living generation, absence of DAF-12 signaling is crucial for iL3 arrest

  14. Regulation of Life Cycle Checkpoints and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis by Dafachronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Albarqi, Mennatallah M Y; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Pilgrim, Adeiye A; Nolan, Thomas J; Wang, Zhu; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J; Lok, James B

    2016-01-01

    The complex life cycle of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis leads to either developmental arrest of infectious third-stage larvae (iL3) or growth to reproductive adults. In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, analogous determination between dauer arrest and reproductive growth is governed by dafachronic acids (DAs), a class of steroid hormones that are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. Biosynthesis of DAs requires the cytochrome P450 (CYP) DAF-9. We tested the hypothesis that DAs also regulate S. stercoralis development via DAF-12 signaling at three points. First, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA stimulated 100% of post-parasitic first-stage larvae (L1s) to develop to free-living adults instead of iL3 at 37°C, while 69.4±12.0% (SD) of post-parasitic L1s developed to iL3 in controls. Second, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA prevented post-free-living iL3 arrest and stimulated 85.2±16.9% of larvae to develop to free-living rhabditiform third- and fourth-stages, compared to 0% in the control. This induction required 24-48 hours of Δ7-DA exposure. Third, we found that the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole prevented iL3 feeding in host-like conditions, with only 5.6±2.9% of iL3 feeding in 40 μM ketoconazole, compared to 98.8±0.4% in the positive control. This inhibition was partially rescued by Δ7-DA, with 71.2±16.4% of iL3 feeding in 400 nM Δ7-DA and 35 μM ketoconazole, providing the first evidence of endogenous DA production in S. stercoralis. We then characterized the 26 CYP-encoding genes in S. stercoralis and identified a homolog with sequence and developmental regulation similar to DAF-9. Overall, these data demonstrate that DAF-12 signaling regulates S. stercoralis development, showing that in the post-parasitic generation, loss of DAF-12 signaling favors iL3 arrest, while increased DAF-12 signaling favors reproductive development; that in the post-free-living generation, absence of DAF-12 signaling is crucial for iL3 arrest

  15. Radiolabeling of infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis by feeding ( sup 75 Se)selenomethionine-labeled Escherichia coli to first- and second-stage larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Aikens, L.M.; Schad, G.A. )

    1989-10-01

    A technique is described for radiolabeling Strongyloides stercoralis larvae with ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. Cultures of an auxotrophic methionine-dependent stain of Escherichia coli were grown in a medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% nutrient broth, amino acids, and ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. When the {sup 75}Se-labeled bacterial populations were in the stationary phase of growth, cultures were harvested and the bacteria dispersed on agar plates to serve as food for S. stercoralis larvae. Use of nondividing bacteria is important for successful labeling because the isotope is not diluted by cell division and death of larvae attributable to overgrowth by bacteria is prevented. First-stage S. stercoralis larvae were recovered from feces of infected dogs and reared in humid air at 30 C on agar plates seeded with bacteria. After 7 days, infective third-stage larvae were harvested. The mean specific activity of 6 different batches of larvae ranged from 75 to 330 counts per min/larva with 91.8 +/- 9.5% of the population labeled sufficiently to produce an autoradiographic focus during a practicable, 6-wk period of exposure. Labeled infective larvae penetrated the skin of 10-day-old puppies and migrated to the small intestine, where the developed to adulthood.

  16. Strongyloides stercoralis: Amphidial neuron pair ASJ triggers significant resumption of development by infective larvae under host-mimicking in vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Francis T.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Boston, Ray; Lok, James B.; Schad, Gerhard A.

    2011-01-01

    Resumption of development by infective larvae (L3i) of parasitic nematodes upon entering a host is a critical first step in establishing a parasitic relationship with a definitive host. It is also considered equivalent to exit from the dauer stage by the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Initiation of feeding, an early event in this process, is induced in vitro in L3i of Strongyloides stercoralis, a parasite of humans, other primates and dogs, by culturing the larvae in DMEM with 10% canine serum and 5 mM glutathione at 37 °C with 5% CO2. Based on the developmental neurobiology of C. elegans, resumption of development by S. stercoralis L3i should be mediated, in part at least, by neurons homologous to the ASJ pair of C. elegans. To test this hypothesis, the ASJ neurons in S. stercoralis first-stage larvae (L1) were ablated with a laser microbeam. This resulted in a statistically significant (33%) reduction in the number of L3i that resumed feeding in culture. In a second expanded investigation, the thermosensitive ALD neurons, along with the ASJ neurons, were ablated, but there was no further decrease in the initiation of feeding by these worms compared to those in which only the ASJ pair was ablated. PMID:17067579

  17. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in an urban US AIDS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Linda; Krishnan, Sonya; Ramanathan, Roshan; Mejia, Rojelio; Roby, Gregg; Sheikh, Virginia; Mcauliffe, Isabel; Nutman, Thomas; Sereti, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We examined the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection in a cohort of AIDS patients from a US urban centre. We monitored our cohort for possible cases of dissemination or immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Methods One hundred and three HIV-infected participants were prospectively sampled from a cohort observational study of ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients with CD4 ⩽100 T cells/μl. Clinical symptoms, corticosteroid therapy, eosinophilia, CD4 count, and plasma HIV-RNA were reviewed. Sera were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CrAg-ELISA) to crude Ss extract or to an Ss-specific recombinant protein (NIE) and by luciferase immunoprecipitation system assay (LIPS) for Ss-specific antibodies. Results Twenty-five per cent of study participants were Strongyloides seropositive by CrAg-ELISA and 62% had emigrated from Strongyloides-endemic areas. The remaining 38% of the seropositives were US born and tested negative by NIE and LIPS. CrAg-ELISA-positive participants had a median CD4 count of 22 T cells/μl and a median HIV-RNA of 4.87 log10 copies/ml. They presented with diarrhea (27%), abdominal pain (23%), and skin manifestations (35%) that did not differ from seronegative patients. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was common among seropositive patients (prevalence of 62% compared to 29% in seronegatives, P = 0.004). Seropositive patients were treated with ivermectin. There were no cases of hyperinfection syndrome. Discussion Strongyloidiasis may be prevalent in AIDS patients in the USA who emigrated from Ss-endemic countries, but serology can be inconclusive, suggesting that empiric ivermectin therapy is a reasonable approach in AIDS patients originating from Strongyloides endemic areas. PMID:23265425

  18. [Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient complaining of chronic diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Culha, Gülnaz; Savaş, Lütfü; Onlen, Yusuf

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a case of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a 38-year-old patient with complaints of chronic diarrhea and stomach ache is presented. His history showed that the patient who has been a mechanic for 25 years is a farmer as well. S. stercoralis larvae were found during the parasitological examination of the patient's stool samples taken 3 times. The patient was given Albendazol (400 mg a day) for fifteen days. After the patient started to take Albendazol, there was a reduction in the number of parasites in the stool examined on the fifth day. In the stool examinations made on the tenth day, fifteenth day and after the treatment ended, no parasites were seen. When the treatment was completed, all the complaints of the patient disappeared. It was found that no investigation of parasitic infection had been made previously and he had been given different treatments. For this reason, it is important to investigate the possibility of parasitic infection in patients with chronic diarrhea. PMID:17309031

  19. Parasitological and immunological diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Machado, Eleuza R; Teixeira, Eliane M; Gonçalves-Pires, Maria Do Rosario F; Loureiro, Zaira M; Araújo, Rogério A; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer through parasitological and immunological tests. A total of 77 patients were evaluated, 33 with gastrointestinal cancer and 44 controls with other types of cancers. All the patients were undergoing chemotherapy and 14 (18.2%) were receiving concomitant radiotherapy. For a parasitological diagnosis, we applied the Baermann and Lutz methods. The immunological diagnosis involved the indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect IgG antibodies using Strongyloides ratti antigens. The frequency of positive S. stercoralis in gastrointestinal cancer diagnosed by parasitological methods was 3 cases (9.1%), by serology it was 8 cases (24.2%). In the control group 1 case (2.3%) of S. stercoralis was diagnosed by parasitological methods and 2 cases (4.5%) by immunological tests (p<0.05). Patients with gastrointestinal cancer had a 6.7-fold greater chance of testing positive for S. stercoralis infection. Our data highlight the importance of parasitological and immunological diagnosis for S. stercoralis in patients with gastrointestinal cancer living in endemic areas of strongyloidiasis, since they have a higher risk of becoming infected with S. stercoralis than patients with other types of cancer. PMID:17852953

  20. Strongyloides stercoralis induced bilateral blood stained pleural effusion in patient with recurrent Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Win, T T; Sitiasma, H; Zeehaida, M

    2011-04-01

    Infections and malignancies are common causes of pleural effusion. Among infectious causes, hyperinfection syndrome of Strongyloides stercoralis may occur in immunosuppressive patient. A 62-year-old man, known case of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was presented with recurrent NHL stage IV and had undergone salvage chemotherapy. Patient subsequently developed pneumonia with bilateral pleural effusion and ascites. We reported rhabditiform larvae of S. stercoralis in pleural fluid of both lungs without infiltration by lymphoma cells. Stool for microscopic examination also revealed rhabditiform larvae of S. stercoralis. This patient was a known case of NHL receiving chemotherapy resulting in immunosuppression state. Although S. stercoralis infection is not very common compared to other parasitic infections, it is common in immunosuppressive patients and may present with hyperinfection. Therefore, awareness of this parasite should be kept in mind in immunosuppressive patients. PMID:21602770

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae excretion patterns before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Schär, F; Hattendorf, J; Khieu, V; Muth, S; Char, M C; Marti, H P; Odermatt, P

    2014-06-01

    The variability of larval excretion impedes the parasitological diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis in infected individuals. We assessed the number of larvae excreted per gram (LPG) stool in 219 samples from 38 infected individuals over 7 consecutive days before and in 470 samples from 44 persons for 21 consecutive days after ivermectin treatment (200 μg kg-1 BW). The diagnostic sensitivity of a single stool sample was about 75% for individuals with low-intensity infections (⩽1 LPG) and increased to 95% for those with high-intensity infections (⩾10 LPG). Doubling the number of samples examined per person increased sensitivity to more than 95%, even for low-intensity infections. There was no indication of a cyclic excretion of larvae. After treatment, all individuals stopped excreting larvae within 3 days. Larvae were not detected during any of the following 18 days (total 388 Baermann and 388 Koga Agar tests). Two stool samples, collected on consecutive days, are recommended in settings where low or heterogeneous infection intensities are likely. In this way, taking into account the possible biological variability in excretion, the efficacy of ivermectin treatment can be assessed as soon as 4 days after treatment. PMID:24534076

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Takeo Province, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis, the most neglected helminth, affects an estimated 30-100 million people worldwide. Information on S. stercoralis infection is scarce in tropical and sub-tropical resource poor countries, including Cambodia. We determined S. stercoralis infection prevalence and risk factors for infection in the general population in Southern Cambodia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and April 2011 among 2,861 participants living in 60 villages of Takeo province, using Koga-agar plate culture, the Baermann technique and the Kato-Katz technique on a single stool sample. Results Eight intestinal helminth species were diagnosed. Hookworm (31.4%) and S. stercoralis (21.0%) occurred most frequently. Prevalence of S. stercoralis infection increased with age. In all age groups a higher prevalence was found among males than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4 – 2.0; P < 0.001). Participants who had a latrine at home were significantly less frequently infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not (OR: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4 – 0.8; P = 0.003). Muscle pain (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0 – 1.6; P = 0.028) and urticaria (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1 – 1.8; P = 0.001) were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. Conclusions S. stercoralis is highly prevalent among the general Cambodian population and should no longer be neglected. Access to adequate diagnosis and treatment is urgently needed. PMID:24886763

  3. Adult female of Strongyloides stercoralis in respiratory secretions

    PubMed Central

    Bava, Bava Amadeo Javier; Cecilia, Domínguez; Alcides, Troncoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective To communicate the presence of adult females, rabditoid larvae and eggs of Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) in the respiratory secretions obtained by tracheal aspirate from a HIV-negative patient who was suffering from polymyositis, and treated with corticoids and amethopterin and assisted by pneumonia. Methods The respiratory secretions submitted to the Parasitology Laboratory of the Muñiz Hospital were made more concentrated by centrifugation (1 500 r/min for 15 seconds). Wet mount microscopy was performed with the pellet. Results It revealed adult females, rabditoid larvae and eggs of S. stercoralis. Further parasitological studies performed after the start of the treatment with ivermectin on fresh fecal samples, gastric lavages and tracheal aspirates showed scanty mobile filariform and rabditoid larvae of the same parasite. Conclusions The presence of adult female S. stercoralis which has never been observed before in the clinical samples submitted to our Laboratory for investigation can be considered as an indirect marker of the severe immunosupression of the patient. PMID:23620857

  4. Strongyloides stercoralis: a model for translational research on parasitic nematode biology.

    PubMed

    Lok, James B

    2007-01-01

    Because of their free-living life cycle alternatives, Strongyloides and related nematode parasites may represent the best models for translating C. elegans science to the study of nematode parasitism. S. stercoralis, a significant pathogen of humans, can be maintained in laboratory dogs and gerbils. Biosafety precautions necessary for work with S. stercoralis, though unfamiliar to many C. elegans researchers, are straightforward and easily accomplished. Although specialized methods are necessary for large-scale culture of the free-living stages of S. stercoralis, small-scale cultures for experimental purposes may be undertaken using minor modifications of standard C. elegans methods. Similarly, the morphological similarities between C. elegans and the free-living stages of S. stercoralis allow investigational methods such as laser cell ablation and DNA transformation by gonadal microinjection to be easily adapted from C. elegans to S. stercoralis. Comparative studies employing these methods have yielded new insights into the neuronal control of the infective process in parasites and its similarity to regulation of dauer development in C. elegans. Furthermore, we have developed a practical method for transient transformation of S. stercoralis with vector constructs having various tissue- and cell-specific expression patterns and have assembled these into a modular vector kit for distribution to the community. PMID:18050500

  5. Diagnosis, Treatment and Risk Factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Schoolchildren in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Sayasone, Somphou; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, an estimated 30 to 100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil-transmitted helminth. Information on the parasite is scarce in most settings. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined infection rates and risk factors; compared two diagnostic methods (Koga agar plate [KAP] culture and Baermann technique) for detecting S. stercoralis infections, using a multiple stool examination approach; and assessed efficacy of ivermectin treatment. Methods/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional study in 458 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province, using three diagnostic procedures (Kato-Katz, KAP culture and Baermann technique) on three stool samples. Infected children were treated with ivermectin (100 µg/kg/day for two days) and re-examined three weeks after treatment. Hookworm, S. stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and small trematode eggs were most prevalent, with 24.4% of children being infected with S. stercoralis. The sensitivity of KAP culture and Baermann technique was 88.4% and 75.0%, respectively and their negative predictive values were 96.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The cumulative prevalence of S. stercoralis increased from 18.6% to 24.4%, after analyzing three stool samples, which was close to the modeled ‘true’ prevalence of 24.8%. Children who reported defecating in latrines were significantly less infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not use latrines (p<0.001). Itchy skin and diarrhea were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. The cure rate of ivermectin was 98.3%. Conclusions/Significance S. stercoralis infection is highly prevalent among semi-rural Cambodian schoolchildren. The sensitivity of KAP culture is higher than that of the Baermann technique. In the absence of a “gold standard”, analysis of multiple stool samples by different diagnostic methods is required to achieve a satisfactory level of sensitivity. Almost three-quarters of

  6. Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, Kate; Kearns, Therese; Rampton, Melanie; Llewellyn, Stacey; King, Mallory; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart J; Andrews, Ross; Nutman, Thomas; McCarthy, James

    2014-10-01

    An approach to improve the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is the use of serologic assays utilising the NIE antigen from S. stercoralis, with good diagnostic sensitivity and excellent specificity reported. Detection of antibody eluted from dried blood spots (DBS) has shown utility in large-scale seroepidemiological studies for a range of conditions and is appealing for use with children where sample collection is difficult. We adapted an existing NIE-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the testing of strongyloides antibody response on DBS, and evaluated it in a population screening and mass drug administration programme (MDA) for strongyloidiasis conducted in an Australian indigenous community. Study participants were treated with 200 μg/kg ivermectin (>15 kg) or 3× 400 mg albendazole (<15kg). The sensitivity of the NIE DBS-ELISA was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to be 85.7%. A total of 214 DBS were collected from 184 participants across two screening and MDA encounters. A total of 27 of 164 participants (16.5%) tested positive for S. stercoralis NIE-DBS prior to MDA treatment, and 6 of 50 participants (12.0%) tested positive after treatment. These prevalence values are similar to those documented by standard serology in the same community. For 30 participants where a DBS was collected at both MDA 1 and 2, a significant decline in ELISA values was evident post treatment (0.12-0.02, p=0.0012). These results are in agreement with previous studies documenting the high seroprevalence of S. stercoralis in remote Australian Indigenous communities, and suggest that collection of dried blood spots may be a useful approach for field diagnosis of S. stercoralis seroprevalence. PMID:25051188

  7. Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE

    PubMed Central

    Mounsey, Kate; Kearns, Therese; Rampton, Melanie; Llewellyn, Stacey; King, Mallory; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart J.; Andrews, Ross; Nutman, Thomas; McCarthy, James

    2015-01-01

    An approach to improve the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is the use of serologic assays utilising the NIE antigen from S. stercoralis, with good diagnostic sensitivity and excellent specificity reported. Detection of antibody eluted from dried blood spots (DBS) has shown utility in large-scale seroepidemiological studies for a range of conditions and is appealing for use with children where sample collection is difficult. We adapted an existing NIE-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the testing of strongyloides antibody response on DBS, and evaluated it in a population screening and mass drug administration programme (MDA) for strongyloidiasis conducted in an Australian indigenous community. Study participants were treated with 200 μg/kg ivermectin (>15 kg) or 3× 400 mg albendazole (<15 kg). The sensitivity of the NIE DBS-ELISA was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to be 85.7%. A total of 214 DBS were collected from 184 participants across two screening and MDA encounters. A total of 27 of 164 participants (16.5%) tested positive for S. stercoralis NIE-DBS prior to MDA treatment, and 6 of 50 participants (12.0%) tested positive after treatment. These prevalence values are similar to those documented by standard serology in the same community. For 30 participants where a DBS was collected at both MDA 1 and 2, a significant decline in ELISA values was evident post treatment (0.12–0.02, p = 0.0012). These results are in agreement with previous studies documenting the high seroprevalence of S. stercoralis in remote Australian Indigenous communities, and suggest that collection of dried blood spots may be a useful approach for field diagnosis of S. stercoralis seroprevalence. PMID:25051188

  8. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Strongyloides stercoralis Treatment Failure in Australian Aboriginals

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Russell; Esterman, Adrian; McDermott, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of ivermectin in the treatment of serologically diagnosed cases of Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) infection in an Aboriginal community and to describe factors that may influence the outcome of treatment. Methods Longitudinal study of a group of 92 individuals with serologically diagnosed S. stercoralis treated with ivermectin and followed up over a period of approximately 6 months. Main outcomes were serological titers pre and post treatment, diabetic status, and duration of follow up. Findings Treatment success was achieved in 62% to 79% of cases dependent on the methods employed for the diagnosis of infection and assessment of treatment outcome. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) was found to be significantly associated with treatment failure in this group for two of the three methods employed. Interpretation Ivermectin has been confirmed as an effective treatment for S stercoralis infection in this setting. T2DM appears to be an independent risk factor for treatment failure in this population, and plausible mechanisms to explain this observation are presented. PMID:26295162

  9. [Strongyloides stercoralis (Bavay, 1876) Stiles et Hassall, 1902 (Nematoa). Part IV. Life cyclec].

    PubMed

    Soroczan, W

    1999-01-01

    The life cycle of parasitic and free-living generation of Strongyloides stercomlis were described. Factors influencing development of parasitic and free-living generations of S. stercoralis were also described. PMID:16883713

  10. Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis: Detection of parasite-derived DNA in urine.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Nilanjan; Caro, Reynaldo; Sofer, Shterna; Scott, Alan; Krolewiecki, Alejandro; Shiff, Clive

    2016-11-01

    Detecting infections of Strongyloides stercoralis is arduous and has low sensitivity. Clinically this is a major problem because chronic infections may disseminate in the host and lead to a life threatening condition. Epidemiologically, S. stercoralis is often missed in surveys as it is difficult to identify by standard stool examination procedures. We present, for the first time, evidence that the infection can be detected in filtered urine samples collected and processed in the field and subsequently assayed for the presence of parasite DNA. Urine specimens (∼40mL) were collected from 125 test and control individuals living in rural and peri-urban regions of Northern Argentina. From the same individuals, fresh stool specimens were processed using three different copropological methods. Urine specimens were filtered in the field through a 12.5cm Whatman No. 3 filter. The filters were dried and packed individually in sealable plastic bags with desiccant and shipped to a laboratory where DNA was recovered from the filter and PCR-amplified with primers specific to a dispersed repetitive sequence. Prevalence of S. stercoralis infection by stool culture and direct examination was 35/125 (28%), In contrast, PCR-based detection of parasite-specific trans-renal DNA in urine indicated that 56/125 (44.8%) carried the parasite. Of the patients that tested positive for urine-based parasite DNA, approximately half also tested positive in their stool specimens. There were 6.4% of cases where parasite larvae were seen in the stool but no DNA was amplified from the urine. As proof of principle, DNA amplification from urine residue reveals significantly more cases of S. stercoralis infection than the current standard stool examination techniques. Additional work is required to establish the relative utility, sensitivity and specificity of urine-based analysis compared to parasitological and nucleic acid detection from stool for clinical and epidemiological detection for S

  11. High Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in Rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Forrer, Armelle; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Duong, Socheat; Vounatsou, Penelope; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. Methods From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. Principal Findings Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6%) were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7%) were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4–2.0; P<0.001). Participants who defecated in latrines were infected significantly less than those who did not (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4–0.8; P = 0.001). Strongyloidiasis cases would be reduced by 39% if all participants defecated in latrines. Incidence of S. stercoralis infections did not show a strong tendency toward spatial clustering in this province. The risk of infection significantly decreased with increasing rainfall and soil organic carbon content, and increased in areas with rice fields. Conclusions/Significance Prevalence of S. stercoralis in rural Cambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the most at

  12. Comparison of three immunoassays for detection of antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil W; Klein, Diane M; Dornink, Sarina M; Jespersen, Deborah J; Kubofcik, Joseph; Nutman, Thomas B; Merrigan, Stephen D; Couturier, Marc Roger; Theel, Elitza S

    2014-05-01

    Due to the limited sensitivities of stool-based microscopy and/or culture techniques for Strongyloides stercoralis, the detection of antibodies to this intestinal nematode is relied upon as a surrogate for determining exposure status or making a diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. Here, we evaluated three immunoassays, including the recently released InBios Strongy Detect IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (InBios International, Inc., Seattle, WA), the SciMedx Strongyloides serology microwell ELISA (SciMedx Corporation, Denville, NJ), and the luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) assay performed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), for their detection of IgG antibodies to S. stercoralis. A total of 101 retrospective serum samples, previously submitted for routine S. stercoralis antibody detection using the SciMedx assay, were also evaluated by the InBios and LIPS assays. The qualitative results from each assay were compared using a Venn diagram analysis, to the consensus result among the three assays, and each ELISA was also evaluated using the LIPS assay as the reference standard. By Venn diagram analysis, 65% (66/101) of the samples demonstrated perfect agreement by all three assays. Also, the numbers of samples considered positive or negative by a single method were similar. Compared to the consensus result, the overall percent agreement of the InBios, SciMedx, and LIPS assays were comparable at 87.1%, 84.2%, and 89.1%, respectively. Finally, the two ELISAs performed analogously but demonstrated only moderate agreement (kappa coefficient for the two assays, 0.53) with the LIPS assay. Collectively, while the two commercially available ELISAs perform equivalently, neither should be used independently of clinical evaluation to diagnose strongyloidiasis. PMID:24648484

  13. Spatial distribution of soil-transmitted helminths, including Strongyloides stercoralis, among children in Zanzibar.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Stefanie; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Simba Khamis, I; Mgeni, Ali F; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David; Marti, Hanspeter; Utzinger, Jürg

    2008-11-01

    A programme periodically distributing anthelminthic drugs to school-aged children for the control of soiltransmitted helminthiasis was launched in Zanzibar in the early 1990s. We investigated the spatial distribution of soiltransmitted helminth infections, including Strongyloides stercoralis, in 336 children from six districts in Unguja, Zanzibar, in 2007. One stool sample per child was examined with the Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate and Baermann methods. The point prevalence of the different helminth infections was compared to the geological characteristics of the study sites. The observed prevalences for Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and S. stercoralis were 35.5%, 12.2%, 11.9% and 2.2%, respectively, with considerable spatial heterogeneity. Whilst T. trichiura and hookworm infections were found in all six districts, no A. lumbricoides infections were recorded in the urban setting and only a low prevalence (2.2%) was observed in the South district. S. stercoralis infections were found in four districts with the highest prevalence (4.0%) in the West district. The prevalence of infection with any soil-transmitted helminth was highest in the North A district (69.6%) and lowest in the urban setting (22.4%). A. lumbricoides, hookworm and, with the exception of the North B district, S. stercoralis infections were observed to be more prevalent in the settings north of Zanzibar Town, which are characterized by alluvial clayey soils, moist forest regions and a higher precipitation. After a decade of large-scale administration of anthelminthic drugs, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections across Unguja is still considerable. Hence, additional measures, such as improving access to adequate sanitation and clean water and continued health education, are warranted to successfully control soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Zanzibar. PMID:19021108

  14. Effect of dilution of stool soluble component on growth and development of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kaewsawat, Supreecha; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion or dilution of stool by water from heavy rainfall may affect Strongyloides stercoralis free-living development producing infective filariform larvae (FL). This study examined effect of water dilution of stool on survival of S. stercoralis free-living development. One g of stool was prepared in water so that its soluble component was diluted sequentially from 1:2 to 1:480. Three dishes were used to compare FL production in three culture conditions: stool suspension, stool sediment deposited in soil, and isolated rhabditiform larvae (RhL) deposited in soil. The fourth dish was for developmental observation of RhL into free-living stages. Numerous FL were generated from undiluted or 1:2 diluted stool and stool sediment placed on soil. However, starting from dilution 1:5, FL production continuously decreased in both stool suspensions and stool sediments placed on soil. RhL isolated from stool dilutions placed on soil gave rise to few FL. Worm mating were seen at 24-30 hours in dilutions 1:20-1:120 only. Highest numbers of FL from indirect free-living cycle were 1/3 of those from control. FL production decreased as stool dilution increased, and reached zero production at 1:160 dilution. Rainfall may disperse or dilute stool so that nutritional supplement for S. stercoralis free-living development is insufficient. PMID:26035061

  15. Effect of dilution of stool soluble component on growth and development of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong Intapan, Pewpan; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chamavit, Pennapa; Kaewsawat, Supreecha; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion or dilution of stool by water from heavy rainfall may affect Strongyloides stercoralis free-living development producing infective filariform larvae (FL). This study examined effect of water dilution of stool on survival of S. stercoralis free-living development. One g of stool was prepared in water so that its soluble component was diluted sequentially from 1:2 to 1:480. Three dishes were used to compare FL production in three culture conditions: stool suspension, stool sediment deposited in soil, and isolated rhabditiform larvae (RhL) deposited in soil. The fourth dish was for developmental observation of RhL into free-living stages. Numerous FL were generated from undiluted or 1:2 diluted stool and stool sediment placed on soil. However, starting from dilution 1:5, FL production continuously decreased in both stool suspensions and stool sediments placed on soil. RhL isolated from stool dilutions placed on soil gave rise to few FL. Worm mating were seen at 24-30 hours in dilutions 1:20-1:120 only. Highest numbers of FL from indirect free-living cycle were 1/3 of those from control. FL production decreased as stool dilution increased, and reached zero production at 1:160 dilution. Rainfall may disperse or dilute stool so that nutritional supplement for S. stercoralis free-living development is insufficient. PMID:26035061

  16. Strongyloides stercoralis: Systematic Review of Barriers to Controlling Strongyloidiasis for Australian Indigenous Communities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Adrian; Smith, Michelle L.; Judd, Jenni A.; Speare, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis infects human hosts mainly through skin contact with contaminated soil. The result is strongyloidiasis, a parasitic disease, with a unique cycle of auto-infection causing a variety of symptoms and signs, with possible fatality from hyper-infection. Australian Indigenous community members, often living in rural and remote settings, are exposed to and infected with S. stercoralis. The aim of this review is to determine barriers to control of strongyloidiasis. The purpose is to contribute to the development of initiatives for prevention, early detection and effective treatment of strongyloidiasis. Methodology/Principle Findings Systematic search reviewing research published 2012 and earlier was conducted. Research articles discussing aspects of strongyloidiasis, context of infection and overall health in Indigenous Australians were reviewed. Based on the PRISMA statement, the systematic search of health databases, Academic Search Premier, Informit, Medline, PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and Academic was conducted. Key search terms included strongyloidiasis, Indigenous, Australia, health, and community. 340 articles were retrieved with 16 original research articles published between 1969 and 2006 meeting criteria. Review found barriers to control defined across three key themes, (1) health status, (2) socioeconomic status, and (3) health care literacy and procedures. Conclusions/Significance This study identifies five points of intervention: (1) develop reporting protocols between health care system and communities; (2) test all Indigenous Australian patients, immunocompromised patients and those exposed to areas with S. stercoralis; (3) health professionals require detailed information on strongyloidiasis and potential for exposure to Indigenous Australian people; (4) to establish testing and treatment initiatives within communities; and (5) to measure and report prevalence rates specific to communities and to act

  17. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in patient with autoimmune hepatitis and purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Rathor, Neha; Khillan, Vikas; Sarin, S K

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiosis is usually an asymptomatic chronic nematodal disease. The term hyperinfection is used to denote autoinfection, a phenomenon in which the number of worms increases enormously. Development or exacerbation of gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms is seen, (A) and the detection of increased numbers of larvae in stool and or sputum is the hallmark. It is known to occur with a change in immune status of the host; this can occur due to immunosuppressants. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is also known to suppress host immunity. Due to the nonspecific presentation, the diagnosis is frequently missed, and the outcome remains poor with 15-87% mortality despite therapy. We report here a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection following immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune hepatitis and concomitant CMV infection with purpura fulminance and frank sepsis, with fatal outcome. PMID:26955218

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in patient with autoimmune hepatitis and purpura fulminans

    PubMed Central

    Rathor, Neha; Khillan, Vikas; Sarin, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiosis is usually an asymptomatic chronic nematodal disease. The term hyperinfection is used to denote autoinfection, a phenomenon in which the number of worms increases enormously. Development or exacerbation of gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms is seen, (A) and the detection of increased numbers of larvae in stool and or sputum is the hallmark. It is known to occur with a change in immune status of the host; this can occur due to immunosuppressants. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is also known to suppress host immunity. Due to the nonspecific presentation, the diagnosis is frequently missed, and the outcome remains poor with 15–87% mortality despite therapy. We report here a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection following immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune hepatitis and concomitant CMV infection with purpura fulminance and frank sepsis, with fatal outcome. PMID:26955218

  19. A Fatal Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome in a Patient With Chronic kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ting-ting; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mei-hong; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is a rare but fatal disease, which occurs commonly in immunocompromised patients. Strongyloidiasis among patients with chronic kidney disease is rarely reported. A 55-year-old Chinese male presented to hospital with diarrhea and abdominal pain. He developed acute respiratory failure and progressed to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage owing to disseminated strongyloidiasis immediately. The bronchoalveolar lavage revealed filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. This patient was diagnosed with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. Although albendazole, mechanical ventilator support, fluid resuscitation, vasopressor support, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hydrocortisone, and broadspectrum antimicrobials were actively used, the patient eventually died. Similar cases in patients with chronic kidney disease in the literature are also reviewed. Through literature review, we recommend that strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in patients with chronic kidney disease who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27175679

  20. Major Basic Protein from Eosinophils and Myeloperoxidase from Neutrophils Are Required for Protective Immunity to Strongyloides stercoralis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Amy E.; Hess, Jessica A.; Santiago, Gilberto A.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Lok, James B.; Lee, James J.; Abraham, David

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophils and neutrophils contribute to larval killing during the primary immune response, and neutrophils are effector cells in the secondary response to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms used by eosinophils and neutrophils to control infections with S. stercoralis. Using mice deficient in the eosinophil granule products major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), it was determined that eosinophils kill the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism in the primary immune response if other effector cells are absent. Infecting PHIL mice, which are eosinophil deficient, with S. stercoralis resulted in development of primary and secondary immune responses that were similar to those of wild-type mice, suggesting that eosinophils are not an absolute requirement for larval killing or development of secondary immunity. Treating PHIL mice with a neutrophil-depleting antibody resulted in a significant impairment in larval killing. Naïve and immunized mice with neutrophils deficient in myeloperoxidase (MPO) infected with S. stercoralis had significantly decreased larval killing. It was concluded that there is redundancy in the primary immune response, with eosinophils killing the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism and neutrophils killing the worms through an MPO-dependent mechanism. Eosinophils are not required for the development or function of secondary immunity, but MPO from neutrophils is required for protective secondary immunity. PMID:21482685

  1. A Public Health Response against Strongyloides stercoralis: Time to Look at Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis in Full

    PubMed Central

    Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.; Lammie, Patrick; Jacobson, Julie; Gabrielli, Albis-Francesco; Levecke, Bruno; Socias, Eugenia; Arias, Luis M.; Sosa, Nicanor; Abraham, David; Cimino, Ruben; Echazú, Adriana; Crudo, Favio; Vercruysse, Jozef; Albonico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infections have a worldwide distribution with a global burden in terms of prevalence and morbidity that is largely ignored. A public health response against soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections should broaden the strategy to include S. stercoralis and overcome the epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges that this parasite poses in comparison to Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms. The relatively poor sensitivity of single stool evaluations, which is further lowered when quantitative techniques aimed at detecting eggs are used, also complicates morbidity evaluations and adequate drug efficacy measurements, since S. stercoralis is eliminated in stools in a larval stage. Specific stool techniques for the detection of larvae of S. stercoralis, like Baermann's and Koga's agar plate, despite superiority over direct techniques are still suboptimal. New serologies using recombinant antigens and molecular-based techniques offer new hopes in those areas. The use of ivermectin rather than benzimidazoles for its treatment and the need to have curative regimens rather than lowering the parasite burden are also unique for S. stercoralis in comparison to the other STH due to its life cycle, which allows reproduction and amplification of the worm burden within the human host. The potential impact on STH of the benzimidazoles/ivermectin combinations, already used for control/elimination of lymphatic filariasis, should be further evaluated in public health settings. While waiting for more effective single-dose drug regimens and new sensitive diagnostics, the evidence and the tools already available warrant the planning of a common platform for STH and S. stercoralis control. PMID:23675541

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A; Lee, Roland R; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2015-10-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  3. A modified agar plate method for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Kasuya, S; Khamboonruang, C; Sukhavat, K; Ieda, M; Takatsuka, N; Kita, K; Ohtomo, H

    1991-10-01

    The agar plate method is a new technique with high detection rates for coprological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. This report details modifications of the technique and establishes a standardized procedure. We recommend that all plates should be carefully observed using a microscope because macroscopic observation can lead to false negative results. It is also advisable to pour formalin solution directly into microscopically positive dishes to collect worms by sedimentation. This procedure enables one to observe worms otherwise hidden. Sealing dishes with adhesive tape prevents larvae from crawling out of the dishes, eliminating any possibility in the reduction of detection rates, and greatly improves the safety conditions for the technician performing the procedure. We consider the agar plate method to be superior to the filter paper method in detecting Strongyloides, and we believe that it will eventually become the technique of choice. PMID:1951861

  4. Efficacy of parasitological methods for the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in faecal specimens.

    PubMed

    Inês, Elizabete de J; Souza, Joelma N; Santos, Renata C; Souza, Eliane S; Santos, Fred L; Silva, Mônica L S; Silva, Moacir P; Teixeira, Márcia C A; Soares, Neci M

    2011-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of stool examination for the detection of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm, a total of 634 stool samples from the routine laboratory service of the Pharmacia Faculty, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, were examined by agar plate culture (APC), Baermann-Moraes and spontaneous sedimentation. The sensitivity of agar plate culture, calculated by combining results of all 3 methods, was 95% for S. stercoralis and 77.6% for hookwoorm. Moreover, APC had superior accuracy than Baermann-Moraes and spontaneous sedimentation for S. stercoralis and hookworm diagnosis, respectively. The S. stercoralis and hookworm positive samples from the laboratory routine, obtained after the previous analysis, along with those initially selected, were used to evaluate the concordance between microscopic examination and both the type of furrows left by larvae and the time for culture positivity using the APC method. Of 115 stool samples positive for S. stercoralis and 92 positive for hookworm, 110 (95.7%) and 89 (96.7%), respectively, had concordant results for furrows and morphological characteristics. The cumulative percentage of positivity increased to 94% by the third day of observation; at this time, only 19.6% of hookworm-positive samples had positive culture plates. Analyses of 74 S. stercoralis-positive stool samples stored at 4°C for 24, 48 and 72h showed the presence of larvae in 48.6%, 28.4% and 23% of samples, respectively when re-examined by the APC. As a definitive diagnosis of strongyloidiasis depends on the microscopic demonstration of parasites, increasing the sensitivity of the detection requires the use of different parasitological methods, including APC. PMID:21896267

  5. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis Antibodies among a Rural Appalachian Population—Kentucky, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Elizabeth S.; Gray, Elizabeth B.; Marshall, Rebekah E.; Davis, Stephanie; Beaudoin, Amanda; Handali, Sukwan; McAuliffe, Isabel; Davis, Cheryl; Woodhall, Dana

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether Strongyloides infection remains endemic in rural Kentucky's Appalachian regions; 7 of 378 (1.9%) participants tested positive for Strongyloides antibodies. We identified no statistically significant association between a positive test and travel to a known endemic country (P = 0.58), indicating that transmission in rural Kentucky might be ongoing. PMID:25157122

  6. Structure and developmental expression of Strongyloides stercoralis fktf-1, a proposed ortholog of daf-16 in Caenorhabditis elegans☆

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Holman C.; Nishi, Manami; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Pakpour, Nazzy; Lok, James B.

    2013-01-01

    A forkhead transcription factor gene, fktf-1, which we propose to be orthologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer-regulatory gene daf-16 has been discovered in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Genomic and cDNA sequences from both species predict alternately spliced a and b message isoforms. In contrast to C. elegans, where two a isoforms, daf-16a1 and daf-16a2, are found, a single fktf-1a isoform is found in S. stercoralis. Five of the 10 introns found in the C. elegans gene are found in the proposed S. stercoralis ortholog. Functional motifs common to DAF-16 and several mammalian forkhead transcription factors are conserved in FKTF-1. These include the forkhead DNA binding domain, four Akt/protein kinase B phosphorylation sites and a C-terminal domain that may associate with factors such as the steroid receptor coactivator and other factors necessary for transcriptional regulation. An N-terminal serine-rich domain found in DAF-16A is greatly expanded in FKTF-1A. This domain is missing in DAF-16B, FKTF-1B and all mammalian orthologs. FKTF-1 shows the closest phylogenetic relationship to DAF-16 among all known mammalian and nematode forkhead transcription factors. Like its proposed Caenorhabditis ortholog, the fktf-1 message is expressed at all stages of the life cycle examined thus far. Discovery of fktf-1 indicates the presence of an insulin-like signalling pathway in S. stercoralis similar to that known to regulate dauer development in C. elegans. This pathway is a likely candidate to control infective larval arrest and reactivation as well as regulation of the switch between parasitic and free-living development in the parasite. PMID:14572516

  7. Comparison between PCR and larvae visualization methods for diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis out of endemic area: A proposed algorithm.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Silvia A; Ruybal, Paula; Solana, María Elisa; López, Carlota; Berini, Carolina A; Alba Soto, Catalina D; Cappa, Stella M González

    2016-05-01

    Underdiagnosis of chronic infection with the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis may lead to severe disease in the immunosuppressed. Thus, we have set-up a specific and highly sensitive molecular diagnosis in stool samples. Here, we compared the accuracy of our polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method with that of conventional diagnostic methods for chronic infection. We also analyzed clinical and epidemiological predictors of infection to propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis useful for the clinician. Molecular and gold standard methods were performed to evaluate a cohort of 237 individuals recruited in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Subjects were assigned according to their immunological status, eosinophilia and/or history of residence in endemic areas. Diagnosis of strongyloidiasis by PCR on the first stool sample was achieved in 71/237 (29.9%) individuals whereas only 35/237(27.4%) were positive by conventional methods, requiring up to four serial stool samples at weekly intervals. Eosinophilia and history of residence in endemic areas have been revealed as independent factors as they increase the likelihood of detecting the parasite according to our study population. Our results underscore the usefulness of robust molecular tools aimed to diagnose chronic S. stercoralis infection. Evidence also highlights the need to survey patients with eosinophilia even when history of an endemic area is absent. PMID:26868702

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rios, Juliana Trazzi; Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Martins, Bruno da Costa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Sakai, Paulo; Retes, Felipe Alves; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic disease that may progress to a disseminated form, called hyperinfection syndrome, in patients with immunosuppression. The hyperinfection syndrome is caused by the wide multiplication and migration of infective larvae, with characteristic gastrointestinal and/or pulmonary involvement. This disease may pose a diagnostic challenge, as it presents with nonspecific findings on endoscopy. PMID:26466210

  9. Epidemiology of Strongyloides stercoralis in northern Italy: results of a multicentre case-control study, February 2013 to July 2014.

    PubMed

    Buonfrate, Dora; Baldissera, Mara; Abrescia, Fabrizio; Bassetti, Matteo; Caramaschi, Giacomo; Giobbia, Mario; Mascarello, Marta; Rodari, Paola; Scattolo, Novella; Napoletano, Giuseppina; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth widely diffused in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Autochthonous cases have been also diagnosed sporadically in areas of temperate climate. We aimed at defining the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis in immigrants and Italians living in three northern Italian Regions. Screening for S. stercoralis infection was done with serology, confirmation tests were a second serological method or stool agar culture. A case-control approach was adopted and patients with a peripheral eosinophil count ≥ 500/mcL were classified as cases. Of 2,701 individuals enrolled here 1,351 were cases and 1,350 controls; 86% were Italians, 48% women. Italians testing positive were in 8% (97/1,137) cases and 1% (13/1,178) controls (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-14.8), while positive immigrants were in 17% (36/214) cases and in 2% (3/172) controls (aOR 9.6; 95% CI: 2.9-32.4). Factors associated with a higher risk of infection for all study participants were eosinophilia (p < 0.001) and immigration (p = 0.001). Overall, strongyloidiasis was nine-times more frequent in individuals with eosinophilia than in those with normal eosinophil count. PMID:27525375

  10. A Fatal Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome in a Patient With Chronic kidney Disease: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mei-Hong; Wang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is a rare but fatal disease, which occurs commonly in immunocompromised patients. Strongyloidiasis among patients with chronic kidney disease is rarely reported.A 55-year-old Chinese male presented to hospital with diarrhea and abdominal pain. He developed acute respiratory failure and progressed to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage owing to disseminated strongyloidiasis immediately. The bronchoalveolar lavage revealed filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis.This patient was diagnosed with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. Although albendazole, mechanical ventilator support, fluid resuscitation, vasopressor support, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hydrocortisone, and broadspectrum antimicrobials were actively used, the patient eventually died.Similar cases in patients with chronic kidney disease in the literature are also reviewed. Through literature review, we recommend that strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in patients with chronic kidney disease who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27175679

  11. Toward Understanding the Functional Role of Ss-riok-1, a RIO Protein Kinase-Encoding Gene of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wang; Lok, James B.; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Gasser, Robin B.; Fang, Fang; Lei, Wei-Qiang; Fang, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Jun-Long; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs) are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5′-UTR, a 17 bp 3′-UTR and a 1,434 bp ORF encoding a protein of 477 amino acids containing a RIOK-1 signature motif. The genomic sequence of the Ss-riok-1 coding region is 1,636 bp in length and has three exons and two introns. The putative promoter region comprises 4,280 bp and contains conserved promoter elements, including four CAAT boxes, 12 GATA boxes, eight E-boxes (CANNTG) and 38 TATA boxes. The Ss-riok-1 gene is transcribed throughout all developmental stages with the highest transcript abundance in the infective third-stage larva (iL3). Recombinant Ss-RIOK-1 is an active kinase, capable of both phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation. Patterns of transcriptional reporter expression in transgenic S. stercoralis larvae indicated that Ss-RIOK-1 is expressed in neurons of the head, body and tail as well as in pharynx and hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance The characterization of the molecular and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the encoding gene provide first clues as to functions of RIOKs in the biological processes of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25101874

  12. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  13. Rapid detection of Opisthorchis viverrini and Strongyloides stercoralis in human fecal samples using a duplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2011-12-01

    Human opisthorchiasis caused by the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is an endemic disease in Southeast Asian countries including the Lao People's Democratic Republic, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand. Infection with the soil-transmitted roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis is an important problem worldwide. In some areas, both parasitic infections are reported as co-infections. A duplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR merged with melting curve analysis was developed for the rapid detection of O. viverrini and S. stercoralis in human fecal samples. Duplex real-time FRET PCR is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid of amplicons generated from two genera of DNA elements: the 162 bp pOV-A6 DNA sequence specific to O. viverrini and the 244 bp 18S rRNA sequence specific to S. stercoralis, and two pairs of specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Both O. viverrini and S. stercoralis can be differentially detected in infected human fecal samples by this process through their different fluorescence channels and melting temperatures. Detection limit of the method was as little as two O. viverrini eggs and four S. stercoralis larvae in 100 mg of fecal sample. The assay could distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of negative fecal samples and fecal samples with other parasite materials, as well as from the DNA of human leukocytes and other control parasites. The technique showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The introduced duplex real-time FRET PCR can reduce labor time and reagent costs and is not prone to carry over contamination. The method is important for simultaneous detection especially in areas where both parasites overlap incidence and is useful as the screening tool in the returning travelers and immigrants to industrialized countries where number of samples in the diagnostic units will become increasing. PMID:21537984

  14. Detrimental effect of water submersion of stools on development of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    PubMed

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Morakote, Nimit; Janwan, Penchom; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is prevalent in Thailand, yet its prevalence in the south is lower than in other parts of the country. This might be due to the long rainy season in the south resulting in stool submersion in water inhibiting worm development. In this study, the effect of water submersion of fecal samples on development of Strongyloides stercoralis was investigated. Ten ml of a 1 ∶ 5 fecal suspension were placed in 15-ml tubes, 35-mm dishes, and 90-mm dishes producing the depths of 80 mm, 11 mm and 2 mm-suspensions, respectively. The worm development was followed at 1/6, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 24, and 36 h, by determining the number of filariform larva (FL) generated from agar-plate cultures (APC). Fecal suspensions kept in tubes and 35-mm dishes showed a decline in FL yield relative to incubation time and reached zero production 14 h after incubation. In contrast, the number of FL generated from the suspension kept in 90-mm dishes remained stable up to 36 h. Cumulatively, all tubes and 35-mm dishes became negative in APC after 14 h while 90-mm dishes remained APC-positive up to 36 h. Adding more water or stool suspension to dishes resulted in a decreased number of FL. Mechanical aeration of the suspensions in tubes restored an almost normal FL yield. It appears that the atmospheric air plays a significant role in growth and development of S. stercoralis in the environment and may be one of factors which contribute to a lower prevalence of human strongyloidiasis in the south of Thailand. PMID:24358173

  15. Optimum methods of inactivation of Strongyloides stercoralis larvae from reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Saqer, Al Salem; Seham, Hendy; Ragaa, Gouda; Yehia, Abd El Wahab; Wafaa, Shalaby

    2007-07-01

    Strongyloidiasis presents a major health hazard when reusing wastewater. Albendazol with a concentration of 4 mg/l, a contact time of 45 min, pH 1.2 and pH 10.2, killed the larva. The larva was also killed with a 0.03% concentration of iodine and a detention time of 30 min or a 0.04% concentration of iodine and a contact time of 10 min. The required detention time to inactivate larva in water was found to be 17 days. The minimum revealed residual chlorine to kill the larvae was 4 mg/l with 120 min of detention time, and a minimum contact time was found to be 80 min with a residual of 23 mg/l. Many methods are available to inactivate the Strongyloides stercoralis, which could be acids, alkaline chemicals, larvicidal chemicals, super chlorination, or just detention time. The best method must be determined according to the prevailing specific environmental site and the feasibility of the selected method(s). PMID:17106779

  16. First molecular identification and report of genetic diversity of Strongyloides stercoralis, a current major soil-transmitted helminth in humans from Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Laymanivong, Sakhone; Hangvanthong, Bouasy; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Vanisaveth, Viengxay; Laxachack, Pinnakhone; Jongthawin, Jurairat; Sanpool, Oranuch; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Phosuk, Issarapong; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a major soil-transmitted helminth (STH) disease that affects people worldwide. We present updated data on prevalence in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) in 2015, arising from a community cross-sectional helminthiasis survey. Fecal samples were collected from 327 individuals across three provinces in Lao PDR (Luang Prabang in the north, Khammouane in the center, and Champasack in the south). Agar plate culture and Kato-Katz methods were used to examine duplicate stool samples from each participant to detect Strongyloides stercoralis and co-infecting helminths. Overall prevalences of S. strercoralis human hookworm, Taenia spp., Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Enterobius vermicularis were 41.0, 28.1, 4.9, 4.0, 1.5, and 0.9 %, respectively. The prevalence of miscellaneous trematodiases (including opisthorchiasis) was 37.9 % and of Schistosoma mekongi infection was 0.3 %. Strongyloidiasis is a current major STH disease in Lao PDR. We also report the molecular-phylogenetic identification of S. stercoralis adult males collected from 40 representative human strongyliodiasis fecal samples. DNA was extracted, amplified, and sequenced from a portion of the mitochondrial cox1 gene and the nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that all specimens sequenced belonged to S. stercoralis (Bavay, 1876) Stiles and Hassall, 1902. The cox1 sequences exhibited great diversity (24 haplotypes) in Lao PDR. This is the first molecular identification and report of genetic diversity of S. stercoralis in humans from Lao PDR. An effective parasite control program is needed to reduce the serious health impacts. PMID:27083185

  17. Discordances Between Serology and Culture for Strongyloides in an Ethiopian Adopted Child With Multiple Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Sulleiro, Elena; Zarzuela, Francesc; Ruiz, Edurne; Clavería, Isabel; Espasa, Mateu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: infectious diseases screening of international adoptees is complex because of the concurrence of different pathogens in a child at same time. We describe an international adopted child born at Ethiopia infected by 5 different pathogens (Hymenolepis nana, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura), 2 of them S. stercoralis and E. histolytica with a capacity to develop severe clinical complications if not detected promptly with appropriate diagnosis tests. Concerns of the patient: according to the screening protocol a stool sample is always processed for culture addressed to find out protozoan and helminthic pathogens but not specifically for S. stercoralis. Only, when eosinophilia is detected 3 serial stool samples are collected to rule out intestinal parasitic infection including S. stercoralis. Interventions: in our case, S. stercoralis would not have been detected if we had followed the protocol because eosinophilia was absent and its specific serology was negative. Fortunately, the initial inclusion of the feces charcoal culture for S. stercoralis allowed us to detect this infection. Outcomes: discordances between direct methods such as culture and indirect as serology or antigen test forces us to be very cautious before ruling out S. stercoralis or E. histolytica infection, respectively. Also, if a child from tropical areas has persistent symptoms (such as diarrhea or fever) that have not been treated we have to rule out other infections that have not been detected yet. Main lessons: The introduction of different sequencing tests and the insistence to find out pathogens such as S. stercoralis or E. histolytica was determinant to be able to cure this symptomatic child and to prevent potential severe clinical forms in case of immunosuppression. PMID:26962825

  18. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is required for protective immunity to larval Strongyloides stercoralis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Leon, Ofra; Nolan, Thomas J; Schad, Gerhard A; Abraham, David

    2007-01-01

    TLR4 is important for immunity to various unicellular organisms and has been implicated in the immune responses to helminth parasites. The immune response against helminths is generally Th2-mediated and studies have shown that TLR4 is required for the development of a Th2 response against allergens and helminth antigens in mice. C3H/HeJ mice, which have a point mutation in the Tlr4 gene, were used in this study to determine the role of TLR4 in protective immunity to the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. It was demonstrated that TLR4 was not required for killing larval S. stercoralis during the innate immune response, but was required for killing the parasites during the adaptive immune response. No differences were seen in the IL-5 and IFN-gamma responses, antibody responses or cell recruitment between wild type and C3H/HeJ mice after immunization. Protective immunity was restored in immunized C3H/HeJ mice by the addition of wild type peritoneal exudate cells in the environment of the larvae. It was therefore concluded that the inability of TLR4-mutant mice to kill larval S. stercoralis during the adaptive immune response is due to a defect in the effector cells recruited to the microenvironment of the larvae. PMID:17196865

  19. Mass Administration of Ivermectin for the Elimination of Onchocerciasis Significantly Reduced and Maintained Low the Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in Esmeraldas, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Mariella; Buonfrate, Dora; Guevara Espinoza, Angel; Prandi, Rosanna; Marquez, Monica; Gobbo, Maria; Montresor, Antonio; Albonico, Marco; Racines Orbe, Marcia; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of ivermectin mass drug administration on strongyloidiasis and other soil transmitted helminthiases. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected in Esmeraldas (Ecuador) during surveys conducted in areas where ivermectin was annually administered to the entire population for the control of onchocerciasis. Data from 5 surveys, conducted between 1990 (before the start of the distribution of ivermectin) and 2013 (six years after the interruption of the intervention) were analyzed. The surveys also comprised areas where ivermectin was not distributed because onchocerciasis was not endemic. Different laboratory techniques were used in the different surveys (direct fecal smear, formol-ether concentration, IFAT and IVD ELISA for Strongyloides stercoralis). Results In the areas where ivermectin was distributed the strongyloidiasis prevalence fell from 6.8% in 1990 to zero in 1996 and 1999. In 2013 prevalence in children was zero with stool examination and 1.3% with serology, in adult 0.7% and 2.7%. In areas not covered by ivermectin distribution the prevalence was 23.5% and 16.1% in 1996 and 1999, respectively. In 2013 the prevalence was 0.6% with fecal exam and 9.3% with serology in children and 2.3% and 17.9% in adults. Regarding other soil transmitted helminthiases: in areas where ivermectin was distributed the prevalence of T. trichiura was significantly reduced, while A. lumbricoides and hookworms were seemingly unaffected. Conclusions Periodic mass distribution of ivermectin had a significant impact on the prevalence of strongyloidiasis, less on trichuriasis and apparently no effect on ascariasis and hookworm infections. PMID:26540412

  20. Maltreatment of Strongyloides infection: Case series and worldwide physicians-in-training survey

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Stauffer, William M.; Hendel-Paterson, Brett R.; Rocha, Jaime Luís Lopes; Seet, Raymond Chee-Seong; Summer, Andrea P.; Nield, Linda S.; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Walker, Patricia F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is an important cause of mortality from intestinal helminth infection in developed countries. The persistence of infection, increasing international travel, lack of familiarity by healthcare providers, and potential for iatrogenic hyperinfection, all make strongyloidiasis an important emerging infection. Design & Methods Two studies were performed. A retrospective chart review of Strongyloides stercoralis cases identified through microbiology laboratory records from 1993–2002 was conducted. Subsequently, 363 resident physicians in 15 training programs worldwide were queried with a case scenario of strongyloidiasis presenting an immigrant with wheezing and eosinophilia. The evaluation focused on resident recognition and diagnostic recommendations. Results In 151 strongyloidiasis cases, stool ova and parasite sensitivity is poor (51%), and eosinophilia (>5% or >400 cells/μL) commonly present (84%). Diagnosis averaged 56 months (Intra-quartile range: 4 to 72 months) after immigration. Presenting complaints were non-specific, although 10% presented with wheezing. Hyperinfection occurred in five patients prescribed corticosteroids with two deaths. Treatment errors occurred more often among providers unfamiliar with immigrant health (Relative Risk of Error: 8.4; 95% CI: 3.4 to 21.0; P<0.001). When presented a hypothetical case scenario, U.S. physicians-in-training had poor recognition (9%) of the need for parasite screening and frequently advocated empiric corticosteroids (23%). International trainees had superior recognition at 56% (P<0.001). Among U.S. trainees, 41% were unable to choose any parasite causing pulmonary symptoms. Conclusions Strongyloidiasis is present in U.S. patients. Diagnostic consideration should occur with appropriate exposure, non-specific symptoms including wheezing, or eosinophilia (>5% relative or >400 eosinophils/μL). U.S. residents’ helminth knowledge is

  1. Diagnosis of the strongyloid nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Marques, P D; Malta, F M; Meisel, D M C L; Corral, M A; Pinho, J R; Costa-Cruz, J M; Chieffi, P P; Gryschek, R C B; Paula, F M

    2016-07-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is an intestinal nematode of rats, frequently used as a model for studying human and animal strongyloidiasis. In the present study, we evaluated parasitological, serological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of experimental S. venezuelensis in rats, Rattus norvegicus. Blood and faecal samples were collected and analysed up to 60 days post infection (pi) with adult worm recovery occurring from 5 to 45 days pi. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), serum levels of IgG antibodies increased up to 28 days pi, thereafter decreasing by day 60 pi. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detected S. venezuelensis DNA in faecal samples of rats from 5 to 21 days pi. The present study therefore represents the first step towards improving the diagnosis of experimental strongyloidiasis. PMID:26169305

  2. Functional consequences of genetic diversity in Strongyloides ratti infections.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, S; Viney, M E

    2003-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes show levels of genetic diversity comparable to other taxa, but the functional consequences of this are not understood. Thus, a large body of theoretical work highlights the potential consequences of parasite genetic diversity for the epidemiology of parasite infections and its possible implications for the evolution of host and parasite populations. However, few relevant empirical data are available from parasites in general and none from parasitic nematodes in particular. Here, we test two hypotheses. First, that different parasitic nematode genotypes vary in life-history traits, such as survivorship and fecundity, which may cause variation in infection dynamics. Second, that different parasitic nematode genotypes interact within the host (either directly or via the host immune system) to increase the mean reproductive output of mixed-genotype infections compared with single-genotype infections. We test these hypotheses in laboratory infections using genetically homogeneous lines of Strongyloides ratti. We find that nematode genotypes do vary in their survivorship and fecundity and, consequently, in their dynamics of infection. However, we find little evidence of interactions between genotypes within hosts under a variety of trickle- and single-infected infection regimes. PMID:12803891

  3. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Flores, Paúl; Ahumada, Víctor; Vázquez-Vázquez, Lorena; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes. PMID:22924046

  4. IgG and IgE Collaboratively Accelerate Expulsion of Strongyloides venezuelensis in a Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Makoto; Sasaki, Yuki; Yasuda, Koubun; Takai, Toshiyuki; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    The host deploys a subset of immune responses to expel helminths, which differs depending on the nature of the helminth. Strongyloides venezuelensis, a counterpart of the human pathogen S. stercoralis, naturally infects rodents and has been used as an experimental model. Here we show that induction of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgE is a prerequisite for rapid expulsion of S. venezuelensis during a primary infection. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase-deficient (AID−/−) mice, which lack the ability to switch IgM to other isotypes, normally developed T-helper 2 (Th2) cells and intestinal mastocytosis after infection with S. venezuelensis. Although AID−/− mice expelled Nippostrongylus brasiliensis normally, they required a much longer period to expel S. venezuelensis than wild-type (WT) mice. Adoptive transfers of immune sera from S. venezuelensis-infected but not N. brasiliensis-infected mice restored the ability of AID−/− mice to promptly expel S. venezuelensis. Immune serum-derived IgG and IgE induced worm expulsion via Fc γ receptor III (FcγRIII) and Fc ε receptor I (FcεRI), respectively, and a mixture of IgG and IgE showed collaborative effects. Whereas FcγRIII−/− mice or FcεRIα−/− mice normally could expel S. venezuelensis, FcγRIII−/− mice, when their IgE was neutralized by anti-IgE, or FcεRIα−/− mice, when their IgG binding to FcγRIII was blocked by anti-FcγRIII, showed a markedly reduced ability to expel S. venezuelensis. These data reveal that IgG and IgE play redundant roles but act in concert to accelerate S. venezuelensis expulsion. Mast cell-deficient mice, even those equipped with immune serum-derived IgG or IgE, failed to expel S. venezuelensis promptly, suggesting that mast cells are cellular targets of IgG and IgE. PMID:23630966

  5. Hypolipemia associated with the wasting condition of rabbits infected with Strongyloides papillosus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Motokawa, M

    2000-02-29

    Rabbits develop a wasting condition in the intestinal stage of Strongyloides papillosus infection. Serum inflammatory cytokine and lipid profiles were investigated in five rabbits infected with S. papillosus and five uninfected pair-fed controls to ascertain whether the disease is inflammatory cytokine-mediated cachexia. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was detected in one infected animal at Day 7 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1 was detected in three infected, and one control, animals at Day 28. IL-6 remained unchanged in both the groups. Infected animals developed hypolipemia, including hypotriglyceridemia in the intestinal stage of infection. Control animals lost body weight in the same manner as the infected animals, but had elevated cholesterols and phospholipids with normal triglyceride concentrations. The results suggested that the wasting condition has no association with cachexia induced by TNF alpha. IL-1 or IL-6, and that hepatic function for lipid synthesis is affected during the intestinal stage of S. papillosus infection. PMID:10681033

  6. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Kalousova, Barbora; McLennan, Matthew R; Modry, David; Profousova-Psenkova, Ilona; Shutt-Phillips, Kathryn A; Todd, Angelique; Huffman, Michael A; Petrzelkova, Klara J

    2016-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis was carried out on Strongyloides spp. larvae obtained from fecal samples of local humans, a wild western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a central chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) inhabiting Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas (DSPA), Central African Republic, and eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) living in degraded forest fragments on farmland in Bulindi, Uganda. From humans, both Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides stercoralis were recorded, though the former was predominant. Only S. fuelleborni was present in the great apes in both areas. Phylogenetic analysis of partial mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (Cox1) and comparison of 18S rDNA hyper variable region IV (HVR-IV) sequences implied that in DSPA S. fuelleborni populations in humans differ from those in the nonhuman great apes. PMID:27180094

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis: a field-based survey of mothers and their preschool children using ELISA, Baermann and Koga plate methods reveals low endemicity in western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J R; Pleasant, J; Oguttu, D; Adriko, M; Galimaka, R; Ruggiana, A; Kazibwe, F; Kabatereine, N B

    2008-09-01

    To ascertain the current status of strongyloidiasis in mothers and their preschool children, a field-based survey was conducted in western Uganda using a combination of diagnostic methods: ELISA, Baermann concentration and Koga agar plate. The prevalence of other soil-transmitted helminthiasis and intestinal schistosomiasis were also determined. In total, 158 mothers and 143 children were examined from five villages within Kabale, Hoima and Masindi districts. In mothers and children, the general prevalence of strongyloidiasis inferred by ELISA was approximately 4% and approximately 2%, respectively. Using the Baermann concentration method, two parasitologically proven cases were encountered in an unrelated mother and child, both of whom were sero-negative for strongyloidiasis. No infections were detected by Koga agar plate method. The general level of awareness of strongyloidiasis was very poor ( < 5%) in comparison to schistosomiasis (51%) and ascariasis (36%). Strongyloidiasis is presently at insufficient levels to justify inclusion within a community treatment programme targeting maternal and child health. Better epidemiological screening is needed, however, especially identifying infections in HIV-positive women of childbearing age. In the rural clinic setting, further use of the Baermann concentration method would appear to be the most immediate and pragmatic option for disease diagnosis. PMID:18416881

  8. Parasitic infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Valar, C; Keitel, E; Dal Prá, R L; Gnatta, D; Santos, A F; Bianco, P D; Sukiennik, T C T; Pegas, K L; Bittar, A E; Oliveira, K T; Garcia, V D

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of symptomatic parasitic infections in adult renal transplant recipients. We retrospectively analyzed a sample of 657 adult renal transplant recipients performed from January 2001 to December 2005 for immunosuppression protocol, clinical manifestations, parasite diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. The prevalence of symptomatic parasitosis infections was 2.4% (16/657). None of the infected patients received cyclosporine in their immunosuppression protocol. Most of the infections were caused by Strongyloids stercoralis (n = 11), followed by Giardia lamblia (n = 3), Toxoplasma gondii (n = 1), and Trypanosoma cruzi: (n = 1). Strongyloides stercoralis was the most frequent agent, causing three cases of hyperinfection including one fatal case. With the new immunosuppressive regimes there must be a suspicion of parasitic infection to avoid the diagnostic delay that can be fatal. Strategies, including empiric treatment for S. stercoralis, must be considered. PMID:17362759

  9. Neuroparasitic infections: nematodes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M D; Zunt, J R

    2005-09-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system--Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.--is reviewed. PMID:16170738

  10. Evaluation of gastrointestinal transit after infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Anjos-Ramos, L; Gama, L A; Mati, V L T; Corá, L A; Fujiwara, R T; Americo, M F

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to correlate the gastrointestinal transit profile in rats, evaluated by a biomagnetic technique, in response to infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Eggs per gram, intestinal number of worms and fecundity, and also gastric emptying time, cecum arrival time, small intestinal transit time and stool weight were determined. Assessments occurred at 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days post infection (dpi) with three infective loads (400, 2000, and 10,000L). Gastric emptying was faster (p=0.0001) and the intestinal transit was significantly slower (p=0.001) during the infection time course. Also, linear mixed-effects models showed significantly changes in small intestinal transit after three parasite load over time. Cecum arrival was not influenced by infection time course or parasite load. As indirect effect, stool weight decreased accompanied a strong oviposition peak at 9dpi in 400L and 2000L. In several motor function instances, neuromuscular dysfunction persists after mucosal inflammation has decreased. Our approach could be very helpful to evaluate gastrointestinal motor abnormalities in vivo after parasite infection. Despite parasitological data progressively decreased after 15 dpi, small intestinal transit worse over time and according to burden. PMID:26739657

  11. [Chronic infections in Latin American immigrants in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Jackson, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Recently arrived immigrants from Latin American countries represent a growing population in Switzerland. This article reviews the evidences on the most frequent chronic infections affecting this population group in Switzerland and presents screening recommendations adapted to primary care practice. Efforts should particularly focus on screening for Trypanosoma cruzi and Strongyloides stercoralis, especially in groups at higher risk of complication or transmission. PMID:27323479

  12. Strongyloides spp.

    PubMed

    Viney, Mark E; Lok, James B

    2007-01-01

    Strongyloides is a genus of parasitic nematodes, which, unusually, has a free-living adult generation. Here we introduce the biology of this genus, especially the fascinating, but complex, life-cycle together with an overview of the taxonomy, morphology, genetics and genomics of this genus. PMID:18050491

  13. Loss of surface coat by Strongyloides ratti infective larvae during skin penetration: evidence using larvae radiolabelled with /sup 67/gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, D.I.; Northern, C.; Warwick, A.; Lovegrove, F.T.

    1984-10-01

    The optimal conditions for labelling infective larvae of Strongyloides ratti with /sup 67/Ga citrate were determined. Radiolabelled larvae were injected s.c. into normal and previously infected rats. The distribution of radioactivity in these animals was compared with that in rats infected subcutaneously with a similar dose of free /sup 67/Ga by using a gamma camera linked to a computer system. Whereas free /sup 67/Ga was distributed throughout the body and excreted via the hepatobiliary system, the bulk of radioactivity in rats injected with radiolabelled larvae remained at the injection sites. Direct microscopical examination of these sites, however, revealed only minimal numbers of worms. When rats were infected percutaneously with radiolabelled larvae, it was found that most radioactivity remained at the surface, despite penetration of worms. When infective larvae were exposed to CO/sub 2/ in vitro and examined carefully by light microscopy, loss of an outer coat was observed. It was concluded that infective larvae lose an outer coat on skin penetration.

  14. Comparison of parasitological, immunological and molecular methods for evaluation of fecal samples of immunosuppressed rats experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Leilane A; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Paula, Fabiana M; Silva, Neide M; Silva, Cláudio V; Costa-Cruz, Julia M; Freitas, Michelle A R

    2015-12-01

    Definitive diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in humans is typically achieved by detection of larvae in fecal samples. However, limitations on sensitivity of parasitological methods emphasize the need for more robust diagnostic methods. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of three methods: eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coproantigen detection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and DNA detection by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The assays were performed at 0 and 5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 days post-infection (dpi) using fecal samples from experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats. In immunocompetent rats, eggs were detected in feces on days 5, 8 and 13 dpi; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points (5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 dpi). In immunosuppressed rats, eggs were detected at 5, 8, 13 and 21; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points. In conclusion, these results suggest that coproantigen detection and PCR may be more sensitive alternatives to traditional methods such as EPG for diagnosis of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection. PMID:26442899

  15. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis in mice due to Mycobacterium bovis co-infection which modulates production of Th2 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Carmo, A M; Vicentini, M A; Dias, A T; Alves, L L; Alves, C C S; Brandi, J S; De Paula, M L; Fernandes, A; Barsante, M M; Souza, M A; Teixeira, H C; Negrão-Corrêa, D; Ferreira, A P

    2009-09-01

    An estimated quarter of the world's population possesses an infection caused by gastrointestinal nematodes, which induce a Th2 type immune response. Concomitant infection of nematodes with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which induces a predominantly Th1 type response, is very frequent in tropical and subtropical regions. This study examined immune responses of BALB/c mice infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and then co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis. The number of worms in the intestine, eggs in feces, cytokine production in lungs and intestine and the expression of CD80, CD86, CTLA-4 and CD28 cell markers on pulmonary cells were analysed. Our results indicate that co-infected mice had an increased parasite burden, which correlates with elevated IFN-gamma and IL-10 cytokine production and decreased IL-4 and IL-13. Moreover, decreased expression of CD80 and increased expression of CTLA-4 were observed in co-infected mice. Our data point out that susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is increased by Mycobacterium bovis co-infection, resulting in higher parasite survival. PMID:19660155

  16. Effect of different stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the parasite burden and immune response to Strongyloides venezuelensis in co-infected mice.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Michelle Carvalho; Araújo, Emília Souza; Moreira, João Marcelo Peixoto; Rodrigues, Vanessa Fernandes; Rodrigues, Jailza Lima; Pereira, Cíntia A de Jesus; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Multiple schistosome and soil-transmitted nematode infections are frequently reported in human populations living in tropical areas of developing countries. In addition to exposure factors, the host immune response plays an important role in helminth control and morbidity in hosts with multiple infections; however, these aspects are difficult to evaluate in human populations. In the current study, female Swiss mice were simultaneously co-infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and Schistosoma mansoni or infected with St. venezuelensis at 2, 4, or 14 weeks after Sc. mansoni infection. The simultaneously infected mice showed a similar parasite burden for St. venezuelensis compared with mono-infected mice. In contrast, there was a significant reduction of St. venezuelensis burden (primarily during the migration of the larvae) in mice that were previously infected with Sc. mansoni at the acute or chronic phase. Independent of the stage of Sc. mansoni infection, the St. venezuelensis co-infection was capable of inducing IL-4 production in the small intestine, increasing the IgE concentration in the serum and increasing eosinophilia in the lungs and intestine. This result suggests that the nematode infection stimulates local type 2 immune responses independently of the schistosomiasis stage. Moreover, previous Sc. mansoni infection stimulated early granulocyte infiltration in the lungs and trematode-specific IgM and IgG1 production that recognized antigens from St. venezuelensis infective larvae; these immune responses would act in the early control of St. venezuelensis larvae. Our data suggest that the effect of multiple helminth infections on host susceptibility and morbidity largely depends on the species of parasite and the immune response. PMID:26350380

  17. The Genomic Basis of Parasitism in the Strongyloides Clade of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Vicky L.; Tsai, Isheng J.; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J.; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J.; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A.; Stanley, Eleanor J.; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M.; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A.; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W.; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R.; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Lok, James B.; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Soil transmitted nematodes, including Strongyloides, cause one of the most prevalent Neglected Tropical Diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides spp., including the human pathogen S. stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families – astacin-like and SCP/TAPS coding gene families – is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle we compare the transcriptome of its parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same genes are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism. PMID:26829753

  18. Intestinal Parasite Infections in Symptomatic Children Attending Hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Nget, Phot; Saroeun, Mao; Kuong, Suy; Chanthou, Seng; Kumar, Varun; Bousfield, Rachel; Nader, Johanna; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. Methods In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. Principal Findings We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. Conclusions/Significance This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation. PMID

  19. Application of real-time PCR for the detection of Strongyloides spp. in clinical samples in a reference center in Spain.

    PubMed

    Saugar, José M; Merino, Francisco J; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Ortega, Sheila; Gárate, Teresa; Rodríguez, Esperanza

    2015-02-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the major intestinal helminthic infections in humans with a worldwide distribution, affecting especially tropical and subtropical regions. This disease can occur without any symptoms or as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Definitive diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection relies mainly on demonstration of larvae in stool, but at present there is no gold standard for this diagnosis. Our main objective was to evaluate a real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Strongyloides spp. and to compare it with routine parasitological methods. DNA from Strongyloides venezuelensis was used to optimize PCR protocols obtaining an analytical sensitivity of 0.1 pg of parasite DNA per sample. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR on fecal samples from 231 patients screened for suspected strongyloidiasis attending two hospitals in Madrid were 93.8% and 86.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found when comparing Ct-values of positive PCR between parasitological positive and negative samples. This study showed that real-time PCR is an effective tool for diagnosing strongyloidiasis and could be applied in association with parasitological methods in epidemiological studies in endemic areas. It would be also important to assess its performance in immunocompromised populations who are at risk of fatal disease. PMID:25447829

  20. Molecular identification of the causative agent of human strongyloidiasis acquired in Tanzania: dispersal and diversity of Strongyloides spp. and their hosts.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Nobusue, Kenichi; Miyagi, Kei; Kooriyama, Takanori; Takenoshita, Yuji; Noda, Shohei; Sato, Akiko; Morimoto, Azusa; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Nishida, Toshisada

    2010-09-01

    In order to identify the causative agent of imported strongyloidiasis found in a Japanese mammalogist, who participated in a field survey in Tanzania, the hyper-variable region IV (HVR-IV) of 18S ribosomal DNA and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) were analyzed and compared with Strongyloides fuelleborni collected from apes and monkeys of Africa and Japan, and S. stercoralis from humans, apes and dogs. The HVR-IV and cox1 of the patient's worms were identical to or only slightly differed from those of worms parasitic in Tanzanian chimpanzees and yellow baboons, demonstrating that the patient acquired the infection during her field survey in Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis with the maximum-likelihood method largely divided isolates of S. fuelleborni into three groups, which corresponded to geographical localities but not to host species. Meanwhile, isolates of S. stercoralis were grouped by the phylogenetic analysis into dog-parasitic and primate-parasitic clades, and not to geographical regions. It is surmised that subspeciation has occurred in S. fuelleborni during the dispersal of primates in Africa and Asia, while worldwide dispersal of S. stercoralis seems to have occurred more recently by migration and the activities of modern humans. PMID:20621633

  1. Life Cycle Stage-resolved Proteomic Analysis of the Excretome/Secretome from Strongyloides ratti—Identification of Stage-specific Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Soblik, Hanns; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Mitreva, Makedonka; Renard, Bernhard Y.; Kirchner, Marc; Geisinger, Frank; Steen, Hanno; Brattig, Norbert W.

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of biomolecules, including proteins, are excreted and secreted from helminths and contribute to the parasite's successful establishment, survival, and reproduction in an adverse habitat. Excretory and secretory proteins (ESP) are active at the interface between parasite and host and comprise potential targets for intervention. The intestinal nematode Strongyloides spp. exhibits an exceptional developmental plasticity in its life cycle characterized by parasitic and free-living generations. We investigated ESP from infective larvae, parasitic females, and free-living stages of the rat parasite Strongyloides ratti, which is genetically very similar to the human pathogen, Strongyloides stercoralis. Proteomic analysis of ESP revealed 586 proteins, with the largest number of stage-specific ESP found in infective larvae (196), followed by parasitic females (79) and free-living stages (35). One hundred and forty proteins were identified in all studied stages, including anti-oxidative enzymes, heat shock proteins, and carbohydrate-binding proteins. The stage-selective ESP of (1) infective larvae included an astacin metalloproteinase, the L3 Nie antigen, and a fatty acid retinoid-binding protein; (2) parasitic females included a prolyl oligopeptidase (prolyl serine carboxypeptidase), small heat shock proteins, and a secreted acidic protein; (3) free-living stages included a lysozyme family member, a carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme, and saponin-like protein. We verified the differential expression of selected genes encoding ESP by qRT-PCR. ELISA analysis revealed the recognition of ESP by antibodies of S. ratti-infected rats. A prolyl oligopeptidase was identified as abundant parasitic female-specific ESP, and the effect of pyrrolidine-based prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors showed concentration- and time-dependent inhibitory effects on female motility. The characterization of stage-related ESP from Strongyloides will help to further understand the interaction of

  2. The genomic basis of parasitism in the Strongyloides clade of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A; Stanley, Eleanor J; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Lok, James B; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Soil-transmitted nematodes, including the Strongyloides genus, cause one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides species, including the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp. KR3021). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families--families encoding astacin-like and SCP/TAPS proteins--is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle, we compare the transcriptomes of the parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same gene families are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism. PMID:26829753

  3. Strongyloides ratti infection induces expansion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells that interfere with immune response and parasite clearance in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Blankenhaus, Birte; Klemm, Ulrike; Eschbach, Marie-Luise; Sparwasser, Tim; Huehn, Jochen; Kühl, Anja A; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Jacobs, Thomas; Breloer, Minka

    2011-04-01

    To escape expulsion by their host's immune system, pathogenic nematodes exploit regulatory pathways that are intrinsic parts of the mammalian immune system, such as regulatory T cells (Tregs). Using depletion of Treg mice, we showed that Foxp3(+) Treg numbers increased rapidly during infection with the nematode Strongyloides ratti. Transient depletion of Tregs during the first days of infection led to dramatically reduced worm burden and larval output, without aggravation of immune pathology. The transient absence of Tregs during primary infection did not interfere with the generation of protective memory. Depletion of Tregs at later time points of infection (i.e., day 4) did not improve resistance, suggesting that Tregs exert their counterregulatory function during the priming of S. ratti-specific immune responses. Improved resistance upon early Treg depletion was accompanied by accelerated and prolonged mast cell activation and increased production of types 1 and 2 cytokines. In contrast, the blockade of the regulatory receptor CTLA-4 specifically increased nematode-specific type 2 cytokine production. Despite this improved immune response, resistance to the infection was only marginally improved. Taken together, we provide evidence that Treg expansion during S. ratti infection suppresses the protective immune response to this pathogenic nematode and, thus, represents a mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:21335490

  4. [Effectiveness of ivermectin in Strongyloides westeri cases in foals].

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Hiepe, T

    1986-08-01

    Efficacy of Ivermectin in combating Strongyloides westeri infection of foal. The efficacy of Ivermectin and Mebendazol in combating spontaneous Strongyloides westeri infections in foals has been tested by examining faecal egg output reduction. Ivermectin as a paste formulation was given to sucking foals and pregnant mares in a single dosage of 200 micrograms/kg bodyweight by oral administration. A high efficacy of Ivermectin in combating patent Strongyloides westeri infection could be demonstrated; no side effects have been observed. Mebendazol at a dosage rate of 8 mg/kg did not yield satisfactory results. PMID:3777529

  5. Specific IgG and immune complex responses to parthenogenetic females and eggs of nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis for the diagnosis of immunosuppression in infected rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, A L R; de Araújo, K C L; Carvalho, E F G; Ueta, M T; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, antigens from parthenogenetic females and eggs of Strongyloides venezuelensis, or anti-parthenogenetic-female and anti-egg antigens were used to detect specific IgG and immune complex responses, respectively. Serum samples from experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats were analysed on days 5, 8, 13 and 21 post-infection (dpi). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed using alkaline parasite extract for specific IgG detection, and anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-egg antigens for immune complex detection. The data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by a Bonferroni test. When parthenogenetic female or egg extracts were used as antigens, specific IgGs were not detected in either immunocompetent or immunosuppressed rats. When anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-S. venezuelensis-eggs were used, immune complexes were detected for the duration of the infection in immunosuppressed animals and were only detected between 5 and 13 dpi in immunocompetent animals. The duration of infection was not significantly different between the immunocompetent and immunosuppressed groups when anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-S. venezuelensis-eggs were used. Parthenogenetic female extracts yielded significant differences between antibody and immune complex responses in immunocompetent rats from 5 to 13 dpi, but only on day 5 dpi in immunosuppressed rats. Exposure to S. venezuelensis egg extract yielded significant differences in both antibody and immune complex detection between immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats for the duration of the infection. In conclusion, ELISA using alternative antigens may be a successful strategy for identifying immune complexes in serum samples and diagnosing active strongyloidiasis, particularly under conditions of immunosuppression. PMID:25997825

  6. Strong-LAMP: A LAMP Assay for Strongyloides spp. Detection in Stool and Urine Samples. Towards the Diagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis Starting from a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gandasegui, Javier; Bajo Santos, Cristina; López-Abán, Julio; Saugar, José María; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis, the chief causative agent of human strongyloidiasis, is a nematode globally distributed but mainly endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Chronic infection is often clinically asymptomatic but it can result in severe hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised patients. There is a great diversity of techniques used in diagnosing the disease, but definitive diagnosis is accomplished by parasitological examination of stool samples for morphological identification of parasite. Until now, no molecular method has been tested in urine samples as an alternative to stool samples for diagnosing strongyloidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a new molecular LAMP assay in a well-established Wistar rat experimental infection model using both stool and, for the first time, urine samples. The LAMP assay was also clinically evaluated in patients´ stool samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool and urine samples were obtained daily during a 28-day period from rats infected subcutaneously with different infective third-stage larvae doses of S. venezuelensis. The dynamics of parasite infection was determined by daily counting the number of eggs per gram of feces from day 1 to 28 post-infection. A set of primers for LAMP assay based on a DNA partial sequence in the 18S rRNA gene from S. venezuelensis was designed. The set up LAMP assay (namely, Strong-LAMP) allowed the sensitive detection of S. venezuelensis DNA in both stool and urine samples obtained from each infection group of rats and was also effective in S. stercoralis DNA amplification in patients´ stool samples with previously confirmed strongyloidiasis by parasitological and real-time PCR tests. Conclusions/Significance Our Strong-LAMP assay is an useful molecular tool in research of a strongyloidiasis experimental infection model in both stool and urine samples. After further validation, the Strong-LAMP could also be potentially

  7. Fatal Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pochineni, Vaishnavi; Lal, Darshan; Hasnayen, Shahed; Restrepo, Erfidia

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome Symptoms: Abdominal pain • diarrhea Medication: Cyclophosphamide • Prednisone Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Currently, it is normal to screen for Strongyloides as part of the workup in pre-transplant patients who have eosinophilia. Given the high mortality rates in Strongyloides hyperinfection, this article illustrates the need to screen all patients with eosinophilia who will be started on immunosuppression. Case Report: We present here an interesting case of a 76-year-old man with membranous glomerulopathy who developed a severe Strongyloides hyperinfection that required an ICU stay and ultimately led to his death a few weeks after initiation of cyclophosphamide and steroids. Conclusions: We recommend that a detailed workup to detect or rule out this parasitic infection be conducted prior to the initiation of immunosuppression in any patient with eosinophilia. PMID:26348071

  8. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abah, A E; Arene, F O I

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state. PMID:26600945

  9. Status of Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Primary School Children in Rivers State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abah, A. E.; Arene, F. O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Status of intestinal parasitic infections among primary school children in Rivers State, Nigeria, was investigated between January and December 2011. A total of 3,826 stool samples were collected from school children (1,828 males and 1998 females) in 36 primary schools from 13 local government areas of Rivers State. The samples were analyzed using wet saline/iodine and formol ether concentration methods. Of the 3,826 stool samples examined, 1059 (27.66%) were positive for different intestinal parasites, namely, Ascaris lumbricoides (51.78%), hookworm sp. (25.0%), Trichuris trichiura (15.18%), Strongyloides stercoralis (7.14%), Taenia sp. (0.89%), and Enterobius vermicularis (0.01%). The prevalence of the infection was generally higher in males (57.60%) than females (42.40%). The differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Among these intestinal parasites, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm sp., and Trichuris trichiura were found in all the 13 local government areas studied while Strongyloides stercoralis was found in 12, Taenia sp. in five, and Enterobius vermicularis in only one community in Ahoada Local Government Area. The overall infection rate remains high and would require coordinated deworming of the school children within the state. PMID:26600945

  10. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia PMID:27244955

  11. The biology of Strongyloides spp.

    PubMed

    Viney, Mark E; Lok, James B

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides is a genus of parasitic nematodes that, unusually, has a free-living adult generation. Here we introduce the biology of this genus, especially the fascinating but complex life-cycle, together with an overview of the taxonomy, morphology, genetics, and genomics of this genus. PMID:26183912

  12. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Martínez-Gallo, Mónica; Carrillo, Eugenia; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain). Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood), and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae). Results Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1%) patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5%) patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021). Conclusions We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated

  13. Karyotype and reproduction mode of the rodent parasite Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    PubMed

    Hino, Akina; Tanaka, Teruhisa; Takaishi, Maho; Fujii, Yumiko; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Hasegawa, Koichi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-11-01

    SUMMARY Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode that infects rodents. Although Strongyloides species described to date are known to exhibit parthenogenetic reproduction in the parasitic stage of their life cycle and sexual reproduction in the free-living stage, we did not observe any free-living males in S. venezuelensis in our strain, suggesting that the nematode is likely to depend on parthenogenetic reproduction. We confirmed by cytological analysis that S. venezuelensis produces eggs by parthenogenesis during the parasitic stage of its life cycle. Phylogenetic analysis using nearly the full length of 18S and D3 region of 28S ribosomal RNA gene suggested that S. venezuelensis is distantly related to another rodent parasite, namely Strongyloides ratti, but more closely related to a ruminant parasite, Strongyloides papillosus. Karyotype analysis revealed S. venezuelensis reproduces with mitotic parthenogenesis, and has the same number of chromosomes as S. papillosus (2n = 4), but differs from S. ratti (2n = 6) in this regard. These results, taken together, suggest that S. venezuelensis evolved its parasitism for rodents independently from S. ratti and, therefore, is likely to have a different reproductive strategy. PMID:25089654

  14. Distribution and Risk Factors for Plasmodium and Helminth Co-infections: A Cross-Sectional Survey among Children in Bagamoyo District, Coastal Region of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Nahya; Knopp, Stefanie; Lweno, Omar; Abdul, Ummi; Mohamed, Ali; Schindler, Tobias; Rothen, Julian; Masimba, John; Kwaba, Denis; Mohammed, Alisa S.; Althaus, Fabrice; Abdulla, Salim; Tanner, Marcel; Daubenberger, Claudia; Genton, Blaise

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasmodium and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) are a major public health problem, particularly among children. There are conflicting findings on potential association between these two parasites. This study investigated the Plasmodium and helminth co-infections among children aged 2 months to 9 years living in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania. Methods A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1033 children. Stool, urine and blood samples were examined using a broad set of quality controlled diagnostic methods for common STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichuris trichura), schistosoma species and Wuchereria bancrofti. Blood slides and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) were utilized for Plasmodium diagnosis. Results Out of 992 children analyzed, the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 13% (130/992), helminth 28.5% (283/992); 5% (50/992) had co-infection with Plasmodium and helminth. The prevalence rate of Plasmodium, specific STH and co-infections increased significantly with age (p < 0.001), with older children mostly affected except for S. stercoralis monoinfection and co-infections. Spatial variations of co-infection prevalence were observed between and within villages. There was a trend for STH infections to be associated with Plasmodium infection [OR adjusted for age group 1.4, 95% CI (1.0–2.1)], which was more marked for S. stercoralis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI (1.1–4.3). Age and not schooling were risk factors for Plasmodium and STH co-infection. Conclusion The findings suggest that STH and Plasmodium infections tend to occur in the same children, with increasing prevalence of co-infection with age. This calls for an integrated approach such as using mass chemotherapy with dual effect (e.g., ivermectin) coupled with improved housing, sanitation and hygiene for the control of both parasitic infections. PMID:25837022

  15. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.

    PubMed

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J; Khieu, Virak; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Chhoun, Chamnan; Sok, Daream; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. PMID:24704609

  16. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  17. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed. PMID:19549579

  18. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in five farms in Holambra, São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Hasegawa, H; Forli, A A; Nishimura, N F; Yamanaka, A; Shimabukuro, T; Sato, Y

    1995-01-01

    A parasitological survey was carried out on 222 inhabitants of five farms in Holambra, located 30 km north of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, on October 1992. Approximately 70% of the inhabitants were found to be infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. The positive rates of 6 helminths and 7 protozoan species detected are as follows: 5.4% Ascaris lumbricoides; 8.6% Trichuris trichiura; 19.8% Necator americanus; 10.4% Strongyloides stercoralis; 1.4% Enterobius vermicularis; 0.9% Hymenolepis nana; 3.2% Entamoeba histolytica; 2.7% E. hartmanni; 9.9% E. coli; 14.0% Endolimax nana; 2.3% Iodamoeba butschlii; 10.4% Giardia lamblia; 37.8% Blastocystis hominis. The positive rates of helminth infection were generaly higher in the younger-group under 16 years-old than those in the elder group aged 16 or more, whereas the infection rates of protozoan species were higher in the elder group. The infection rate of Strongyloides was found to be 10.4% by a newly developed sensitive method (an agarplate culture methods). PMID:7569635

  19. Stage-specific excretory/secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti: putative links to host’s intestinal mucosal defense system

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D.; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In search of molecules involved in the interaction of intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed mass spectrometry to identify excretory/secretory proteins (ESP) from Strongyloides ratti. In addition to other peptides, we detected in the ESP of parasitic female stage peptides homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (~19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (~ 18 kDa) with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified and the genomic organization analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by qRT-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. The sequence analysis of both DNA and amino acid sequence showed two genes share a conserved alpha-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17 proteins showed the highest homology to the deduced small heat-shock protein sequence of the human pathogen S. stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to high IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocytes/macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released IL-10 but not TNF-alpha in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting a possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. PMID:21762402

  20. Influence of nutrition on infection and re-infection with soil-transmitted helminths: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between nutrition and soil-transmitted helminthiasis is complex and warrants further investigation. We conducted a systematic review examining the influence of nutrition on infection and re-infection with soil-transmitted helminths (i.e. Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis) in humans. Emphasis was placed on the use of nutritional supplementation, alongside anthelminthic treatment, to prevent re-infection with soil-transmitted helminths. Methods We searched eight electronic databases from inception to 31 July 2013, with no restriction of language or type of publication. For studies that met our inclusion criteria, we extracted information on the soil-transmitted helminth species, nutritional supplementation and anthelminthic treatment. Outcomes were presented in forest plots and a summary of findings (SoF) table. An evidence profile (EP) was generated by rating the evidence quality of the identified studies according to the GRADE system. Results Fifteen studies met our inclusion criteria; eight randomised controlled trials and seven prospective cohort studies. Data on A. lumbricoides were available from all studies, whereas seven and six studies additionally contained data on T. trichiura and hookworm, respectively. None of the studies contained data on S. stercoralis. Positive effects of nutritional supplementation or the host’s natural nutritional status on (re-)infection with soil-transmitted helminths were reported in 14 studies, while negative effects were documented in six studies. In terms of quality, a high, low and very low quality rating was assigned to the evidence from four, six and five studies, respectively. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the current evidence-base is weak, precluding guidelines on nutrition management as a potential supplementary tool to preventive chemotherapy targeting soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Moreover, several epidemiological, immunological and

  1. Coincident Helminth Infection Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Immune Activation in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity) in TB is not known. Methodology We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB) with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB) with or without Ss infection. Principal Findings Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection. Conclusions Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease. PMID:25375117

  2. Strongyloidiasis in the immunocompetent: an overlooked infection.

    PubMed

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj; Karmacharya, Paras

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infestation caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. Most cases are asymptomatic; however, symptomatic patients may present with a wide range of non-specific cutaneous, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal symptoms posing a diagnostic dilemma and delay in diagnosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old female who presented with months of generalized pruritus and abdominal discomfort along with persistent eosinophilia due to strongyloidiasis, which completely resolved with treatment. PMID:27609726

  3. Helminth Infections Coincident with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Inhibit Mono- and Multifunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Responses in a Process Dependent on IL-10

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Tissue invasive helminth infections and tuberculosis (TB) are co-endemic in many parts of the world and can trigger immune responses that might antagonize each other. We have previously shown that helminth infections modulate the Th1 and Th17 responses to mycobacterial-antigens in latent TB. To determine whether helminth infections modulate antigen-specific and non-specific immune responses in active pulmonary TB, we examined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses as well as the systemic (plasma) cytokine levels in individuals with pulmonary TB with or without two distinct helminth infections—Wuchereria bancrofti and Strongyloides stercoralis infection. By analyzing the frequencies of Th1 and Th17 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and their component subsets (including multifunctional cells), we report a significant diminution in the mycobacterial–specific frequencies of mono- and multi–functional CD4+ Th1 and (to a lesser extent) Th17 cells when concomitant filarial or Strongyloides infection occurs. The impairment in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell cytokine responses was antigen-specific as polyclonal activated T cell frequencies were equivalent irrespective of helminth infection status. This diminution in T cell responses was also reflected in diminished circulating levels of Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2)- and Th17 (IL-17A and IL-17F)-associated cytokines. Finally, we demonstrate that for the filarial co-infections at least, this diminished frequency of multifunctional CD4+ T cell responses was partially dependent on IL-10 as IL-10 blockade significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ Th1 cells. Thus, co-existent helminth infection is associated with an IL-10 mediated (for filarial infection) profound inhibition of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses as well as protective systemic cytokine responses in active pulmonary TB. PMID:25211342

  4. Reproduction in Strongyloides (Nematoda): a life between sex and parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Streit, A

    2008-03-01

    Nematodes of the genus Strongyloides parasitize the small intestines of vertebrates. In addition to a parasitic life-cycle, which is generally considered to be parthenogenetic, Strongyloides can also have a facultative, free-living generation involving male and female worms. The purpose of the present article was to review the literature on the modes of reproduction, the routes of development in the two generations of Strongyloides, discuss the controversial opinions in the literature regarding these aspects and point to new opportunities for addressing key questions in relation to the biology of reproduction of members of the genus employing genetic and genomic tools. PMID:18076772

  5. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4+ cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  6. Trichinella spiralis: monoclonal antibody against the muscular larvae for the detection of circulating and fecal antigens in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José-Lino; García-Juarez, Jazmín; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    In this work we search for antigens of Trichinella spiralis in sera and stool of rats experimentally infected. The kinetic of antibodies to excretory and secretory (ES) antigens of muscle larvae (ML) was also determined. Wistar rats were infected with 15 ML per gram of body weight and blood samples were collected weekly for 10 weeks. Antibodies were studied using an indirect ELISA. For detection of circulating antigens and coproantigens, a sandwich ELISA was developed with the use of polyclonal rabbit antibodies obtained against the total extract of ML and an IgM monoclonal antibody (Mab) against ES antigens of ML. No reactivity was observed between Mab and the total worm antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Ascaris suum, Echinococcus granulosus, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia solium, Toxocara canis and Trichuris trichiura. The IgM Mab recognized antigens of 45, 49, and 55 kDa in ES antigens and was unable to bind ES antigens deglycosylated with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid (TFMS) indicating that a glycan structure is present in the epitope recognized by this Mab. The sensitivity of sandwich ELISA was 1 ng/mL. Circulating antigens were detected in all infected rats between 3 and 8 weeks post infection and coproantigens were found during the first two days post infection. Antibodies were detected since the third week post infection through the end of experiment. These results suggested that antigen detection by our sandwich ELISA could be a useful complementary laboratory test for antibody detection. PMID:23026455

  7. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among children from a shanty town in Tucuman, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dib, J R; Fernández-Zenoff, M V; Oquilla, J; Lazarte, S; González, S N

    2015-06-01

    A parasitological survey was conducted in children living in a poor area next to a drainage channel, in Tucumán province, Argentina. Stool specimens from 115 children were collected and samples were analyzed by direct microscopy examination and concentration techniques. The prevalence rate of intestinal parasites infection was high (78.3%) and Blastocystis hominis was the most frequent protozoan parasite found (68.9%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (33.3%), Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Endolimax nana (12.2%), Chilomastix mesnili (5.6%) and Iodamoeba bütschlii (2.2%). Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent intestinal helminth, with an infection frequency of 38.9%, followed by Trichuris trichiura (13.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (13.3%), Hymenolepis nana (7.8%) and Enterobius vermicularis (3.3%). Multiple parasitic infections were also high, affecting 71.1% of infected population. These results indicate that sanitary policies, including health care and sanitary education have been inadequate for the control of intestinal parasitism in this high-risk population. Implementation of sanitation programs is a basic need and a joint collaboration between public servant and health professionals should be a priority. PMID:26691248

  8. Tropical Diseases Screening in Immigrant Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Fernando; Molina, Israel; Sulleiro, Elena; Burgos, Joaquín; Curran, Adrián; den Eynde, Eva Van; Villar del Saz, Sara; Navarro, Jordi; Crespo, Manuel; Ocaña, Inma; Ribera, Esteve; Falcó, Vicenç; Pahissa, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Latent parasitic infections can reactivate because of immunosuppression. We conducted a prospective observational study of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected immigrants who visited the Infectious Diseases Department of the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain, during June 2010–May 2011. Screening of the most prevalent tropical diseases (intestinal parasitosis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis) was performed according to geographic origin. A total of 190 patients were included: 141 (74.2%) from Latin America, 41 (21.6%) from sub-Saharan Africa, and 8 (4.2%) from northern Africa. Overall, 36.8% (70 of 190) of the patients had at least one positive result for any parasitic disease: 5 patients with positive Trypanosoma cruzi serology, 11 patients with positive Schistosoma mansoni serology, 35 patients with positive Strongyloides stercoralis serology, 7 patients with positive Leishmania infantum serology, intestinal parasitosis were detected in 37 patients, malaria was diagnosed in one symptomatic patient. We propose a screening and management strategy of latent parasitic infections in immigrant patients infected with HIV. PMID:23509119

  9. Rapid Re-Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths after Triple-Dose Albendazole Treatment of School-Aged Children in Yunnan, People's Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Peiling; Du, Zun-Wei; Wu, Fang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong; Chen, Ran; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Hattendorf, Jan; Utzinger, Jürg; Steinmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Post-treatment soil-transmitted helminth re-infection patterns were studied as part of a randomized controlled trial among school-aged children from an ethnic minority group in Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. Children with a soil-transmitted helminth infection (N = 194) were randomly assigned to triple-dose albendazole or placebo and their infection status monitored over a 6-month period using the Kato-Katz and Baermann techniques. Baseline prevalence of Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Strongyloides stercoralis were 94.5%, 93.3%, 61.3%, and 3.1%, respectively, with more than half of the participants harboring triple-species infections. For the intervention group (N = 99), the 1-month post-treatment cure rates were 96.7%, 91.5%, and 19.6% for hookworm, A. lumbricoides, and T. trichiura, respectively. Egg reduction rates were above 88% for all three species. Rapid re-infection with A. lumbricoides was observed: the prevalence 4 and 6 months post-treatment was 75.8% and 83.8%, respectively. Re-infection with hookworm and T. trichiura was considerably slower. PMID:23690551

  10. Intestinal parasitic infections in Campalagian district, south Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mangali, A; Sasabone, P; Syafruddin; Abadi, K; Hasegawa, H; Toma, T; Kamimura, K; Miyagi, I

    1993-06-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections were surveyed in the inhabitants of 3 coastal and 2 inland villages of Campalagian District, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, in July 1992. A total of 398 fecal samples were examined by using Kato-Katz thick smear, Harada-Mori culture and agar-plate culture techniques. Protozoan cysts were examined by formalin ether concentration technique on 380 fecal samples. Soil-transmitted helminth infections were highly prevalent with the overall positive rates as follows: Ascaris lumbricoides 25.3%, Trichuris trichiura 59.3%, hookworm 68.3% and Strongyloides stercoralis 2.3%. Eight species of protozoan were detected with the overall prevalence as follows: Entamoeba histolytica 10.9%, E. hartmanni 16.3%, E. coli 31.9%, Endolimax nana 12.5%, Iodamoeba buetschlii 5.4%, Giardia lamblia 4.6%, Chilomastix mesnili 0.8% and Blastocystis hominis 18.0%. In the inland villages, prevalence of hookworm infection was higher than Ascaris and Trichuris infections, while in the coastal villages Trichuris infection was predominant. Egg count revealed that the infection level was light in most of the hookworm and Trichuris carriers. Prevalence of lavatories among houses appeared to be inversely proportional to the prevalence of hookworm infection. Meanwhile, the incomplete structure of the lavatories might result in contamination of environment with Ascaris and Trichuris eggs. Harada-Mori culture was the most efficient method in the detection of hookworm infection compared to other techniques. Both Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale were found in all villages, but the former was the predominant species. An adult pinworm was detected by agar-plate culture of feces. Two types of pinworm males, corresponding to Enterobius vermicularis and E. gregorii, were observed. PMID:8266235

  11. Enteric parasites and HIV infection: occurrence in AIDS patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura, H; Fernandes, O; Viola, J P; Silva, S P; Passos, R H; Lima, D B

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of intestinal parasites, its relation with the transmission mechanism of HIV, and the clinical state of the AIDS patients, were analyzed in 99 Group IV patients (CDC, 1986), treated at "Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto" (HUPE), between 1986 and 1988. The group consisted of 79 (79.8%) patients whose HIV transmission mechanism took place through sexual contact and of 16 (20.2%) who were infected through blood. Feces samples from each patient were examined by four distincts methods (Faust et al., Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Baxby et al.). The most occurring parasites were: Cryptosporidium sp., Entamoeba coli and Endolimax nana (18.2%), Strongyloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia (15.2%), E. histolytica and/or E. hartmanni (13.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (11.1%) and Isospora belli (10.1%). Furthermore, 74.7% of the patients carried at least one species. Intestinal parasites were found in 78.5% of the patients who acquired the HIV through sexual intercourse and in 56.3% of those infected by blood contamination. The difference, was not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05). In the group under study, the increase of the occurrence of parasitic infections does not seem to depend on the acquisition of HIV through sexual contact. It appears that in developing countries, the dependency is more related to the classic mechanisms of parasites transmission and its endemicity. PMID:2487448

  12. Pelodera strongyloides Schneider 1866: A Potential Research Tool

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H. L.; Whittaker, F. H.

    1970-01-01

    Axenic Pelodera strongyloides matured in a completely defined culture medium were homogenized and the homogenate separated into "nuclear," "mitochondrial," and supernatant fractions. Medium, homogenate and fractionates were analyzed using standard biochemical techniques. Ammonia was the only purine catabolite detected in the medium, but the electrolytes and enzymes of the major metabolic pathways in warm-blooded animals were found in the homogenate and fractionates. Nine months of artificial selection of an X-ray-induced mutant P. strongyloides yielded a strain with a 16-fold greater incidence of endotokia matricida (death of the mother due to internal birth of the young). Crossing with recently isolated wild-type individuals (low endotokia) reduced the frequency of endotokia in the succeeding generations to the level observed in the wild populations. The authors conclude P. strongyloides will be a suitable nematode for metabolic and genetic investigations when improved fully-defined media are developed. PMID:19322297

  13. Repurposing drugs for the treatment and control of helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Duthaler, Urs; Speich, Benjamin; Keiser, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Helminth infections are responsible for a considerable public health burden, yet the current drug armamentarium is small. Given the high cost of drug discovery and development, the high failure rates and the long duration to develop novel treatments, drug repurposing circumvents these obstacles by finding new uses for compounds other than those they were initially intended to treat. In the present review, we summarize in vivo and clinical trial findings testing clinical candidates and marketed drugs against schistosomes, food-borne trematodes, soil-transmitted helminths, Strongyloides stercoralis, the major human filariases lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, taeniasis, neurocysticercosis and echinococcosis. While expanding the applications of broad-spectrum or veterinary anthelmintics continues to fuel alternative treatment options, antimalarials, antibiotics, antiprotozoals and anticancer agents appear to be producing fruitful results as well. The trematodes and nematodes continue to be most investigated, while cestodal drug discovery will need to be accelerated. The most clinically advanced drug candidates include the artemisinins and mefloquine against schistosomiasis, tribendimidine against liver flukes, oxantel pamoate against trichuriasis, and doxycycline against filariasis. Preclinical studies indicate a handful of promising future candidates, and are beginning to elucidate the broad-spectrum activity of some currently used anthelmintics. Challenges and opportunities are further discussed. PMID:25516827

  14. Effect of Poor Access to Water and Sanitation As Risk Factors for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Selectiveness by the Infective Route

    PubMed Central

    Echazú, Adriana; Bonanno, Daniela; Juarez, Marisa; Cajal, Silvana P.; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Cimino, Ruben O.; Caro, Nicolas; Vargas, Paola A.; Paredes, Gladys; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are a public health problem in resource-limited settings worldwide. Chronic STH infection impairs optimum learning and productivity, contributing to the perpetuation of the poverty-disease cycle. Regular massive drug administration (MDA) is the cardinal recommendation for its control; along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. The impact of joint WASH interventions on STH infections has been reported; studies on the independent effect of WASH components are needed to contribute with the improvement of current recommendations for the control of STH. The aim of this study is to assess the association of lacking access to water and sanitation with STH infections, taking into account the differences in route of infection among species and the availability of adequate water and sanitation at home. Methods and Findings Cross-sectional study, conducted in Salta province, Argentina. During a deworming program that enrolled 6957 individuals; 771 were randomly selected for stool/serum sampling for parasitological and serological diagnosis of STH. Bivariate stratified analysis was performed to explore significant correlations between risk factors and STH infections grouped by mechanism of entry as skin-penetrators (hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis) vs. orally-ingested (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura). After controlling for potential confounders, unimproved sanitation was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of skin-penetrators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.6–5.9). Unimproved drinking water was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of orally-ingested (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3–3.7). Conclusions Lack of safe water and proper sanitation pose a risk of STH infections that is distinct according to the route of entry to the human host used by each of the STH species. Interventions aimed to improve water and sanitation access should

  15. Entamoeba histolytica and other parasitic infections in south Kanara district, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, K; Babu, M H; Kumar, A; Rao, T S; Shivananda, P G

    1989-09-01

    Single stool specimens collected from 1,020 apparently healthy people of the South Kanara District, were processed for intestinal parasites using three parasitological methods viz. (a) Direct smear in physiological saline and D'Antoni's iodine, (b) Zinc sulfate concentration method and (c) by culture in modified Boek and Drbolhav medium. Of these 781 (76.51 per cent) were found to be infected with parasites. The prevalence of various intestinal parasites was: Ascaris lumbricoides (48.33 per cent), Necator americanus (46.86 per cent), Trichuris trichiura (42.75 per cent), Entamoeba coli (23.24 per cent), Entamoeba histolytica (7.94 per cent), Enterobius vermicularis (2.84 per cent), Giardia intestinalis (2.45 per cent), Iodamoeba buitschlii (1.57 per cent), Entamoeba hartmanni (1.37 per cent), Trichomonas hominis (0.88 per cent), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.68 per cent), Hymenolepis nana (0.49 per cent), Chilomastis mesnili (0.10 per cent) and Endolimax nana (0.10 per cent). High incidence of parasitic infections was recorded in females and age group of 6-14 years. PMID:2559118

  16. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bachur, Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues; Vale, Josias Martins; Coêlho, Ivo Castelo Branco; Queiroz, Telma Régia Bezerra Sales de; Chaves, Cristina de Souza

    2008-04-01

    Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482) and HAART (Group 2; n = 100) eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE) were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis--30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001), Ascaris lumbricoides--15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001), hookworms--3.7% and 2% (p<0.0001), Trichuris trichiura--13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001), Hymenolepis nana--0 and 1% (p = 0.1718), Giardia duodenalis--7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar--3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301), Isospora belli--4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993), Cryptosporidium sp.--8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007), and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001). In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575), as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08), and diarrhea (36% of the patients); lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626); and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41%) than women (19.04%) of Group 1 (p = 0.018), a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites. PMID:18641847

  17. Structural and functional characterization of a novel scFv anti-HSP60 of Strongyloides sp.

    PubMed Central

    Levenhagen, Marcelo Arantes; de Almeida Araújo Santos, Fabiana; Fujimura, Patrícia Tiemi; Caneiro, Ana Paula; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technology that selects specific proteins or peptides to a target. We have used Phage Display to select scFv (single-chain variable fragment) clones from a combinatorial library against total proteins of Strongyloides venezuelensis. After scFv characterization, further analysis demonstrated that this recombinant fragment of antibody was able to bind to an S. venezuelensis antigenic fraction of ~65 kDa, present in the body periphery and digestive system of infective larvae (L3), as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Mass spectrometry results followed by bioinformatics analysis showed that this antigenic fraction was a heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) of Strongyloides sp. The selected scFv was applied in serodiagnosis by immune complexes detection in serum samples from individuals with strongyloidiasis using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showing sensitivity of 97.5% (86.84–99.94), specificity of 98.81 (93.54–99.97), positive likelihood ratio of 81.60 and an area under the curve of 0.9993 (0.9973–1.000). Our study provided a novel monoclonal scFv antibody fragment which specifically bound to HSP60 of Strongyloides sp. and was applied in the development of an innovative serodiagnosis method for the human strongyloidiasis. PMID:25994608

  18. A 6 year Geohelminth infection profile of children at high altitude in Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Wilson, Godwin; Chawla, Kiran; VS, Binu; Shivananda, PG

    2008-01-01

    Background Geohelminth infections are a major problem of children from the developing countries. Children with these infections suffer from developmental impairments and other serious illnesses. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of geohelminth infection, infection intensity as well as the change in the intensity in children from Western Nepal over years. Methods This 6-year hospital based prospective study at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara included children (< 15 years) visiting the hospital from Kaski and 7 surrounding districts. Samples were also collected from children in the community from different medical camps. Three stool samples from every child were processed using direct and concentration methods. The Kato-Katz technique was used for measuring the intensity of infection. Results The overall prevalence in hospital - attending children was 9.2% with 7.6% in preschool (0 – 5 y) and 11.0% in school-age (6 – 15 y) children, and in community 17.7% with 14.8% in pre-school and 20.5% in school-age children. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma deodenale and Strongyloides stercoralis were the common geohelminths with a gradual decrease in worm load over the years. School-age children were found to be significantly more prone to geohelminth infection as compared to preschool children, but no statistical difference was detected by gender, district as well as season. Conclusion This heavy infection of geohelminths in children should be corrected by appropriate medication and maintaining strict personal hygiene. Health education, clean water, good sewage management and a congenial environment should be ensured to minimise infection. PMID:18366807

  19. Prevalence of Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and Strongyloides in pre-weaned calves on smallholder dairy farms in Mukurwe-ini district, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Getrude Shepelo; Gitau, George Karuoya; Mulei, Charles Matiku; Vanleeuwen, John; Richards, Shauna; Wichtel, Jeff; Uehlinger, Fabienne; Mainga, Omwando

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal diseases are among the leading causes of calf morbidity and mortality in Kenya and elsewhere. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and Strongyloides in calves on smallholder dairy farms (SDF) in Mukurwe-ini District, Nyeri County, Kenya. These infections have been associated with economic losses by decreased growth rates, decreased productivity, and increased susceptibility to other diseases. Materials and Methods: An observational study was conducted on 109 farms in Mukurwe-ini District, Nyeri County, Kenya, where 220 calf fecal samples (each calf at 4 and 6 weeks of age) from 110 calves (1 set of twins) were collected and analyzed for Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and helminth parasites. Results: Eimeria oocysts, Cryptosporidia oocysts, and Strongyloides eggs were detected in the fecal samples examined, but no Giardia cysts were found. The overall period prevalence of Eimeria, Cryptosporidia, and Strongyloides was 42.7% (47/110), 13.6% (15/110), and 5.4% (6/110), respectively. The prevalence at 4 weeks of age for Eimeria, Cryptosporidia, and Strongyloides was 30.0% (33/110), 8.2% (9/110), and 3.7% (4/109), respectively, while the prevalence at 6 weeks of age was 20.2% (22/109), 6.5% (7/107), and 2.7% (3/110), respectively. There was, however, no significant difference in the prevalence at 4 and 6 weeks (p>0.05). Conclusion: Findings from this study show that Eimeria, Cryptosporidia, and Strongyloides, are prevalent in the study area and indicate the need to adopt optimal management practices to control infections in calves. PMID:27047207

  20. Serological cross-reactivity between Strongyloides venezuelensis and Syphacia muris in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    de Sousa, José Eduardo N; de Carvalho, Edson Fernando G; Levenhagen, Marcelo A; de Faria, Lucas S; Gonçalves-Pires, Maria do R F; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2016-04-01

    One of the problems frequently faced in laboratory facilities is the possibility of the natural parasitic infection of lab animals, which can interfere with biomedical research results. The present study aimed to evaluate cross-reactivity among serum samples from Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) naturally infected with Syphacia muris and experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis. Forty rats were divided into four groups of ten animals each. Parasite load was evaluated by quantifying the adult worms from both helminthes species recovered from the intestines and the S. venezuelensis eggs eliminated in feces. Serological cross-reactivity by parasite-specific IgG detection was tested via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and immunoblotting. The results demonstrated that the quantity of S. venezuelensis eliminated eggs and parthenogenetic females decreased significantly in cases of co-infection with S. muris. ELISA revealed 100% cross-reactivity of serum samples from both species against the opposing antigen. IgG cross-reactivity was confirmed by IFAT using tissue sections of S. venezuelensis larvae and adult S. muris. Immunoblotting showed that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. muris recognized eight antigenic bands from S. venezuelensis saline extract and that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. venezuelensis recognized seven bands from S. muris saline extract. These results demonstrate the serological cross-reactivity between S. muris and S. venezuelensis in infected rats. PMID:26601618

  1. Dermatitis due to larvae of a soil nematode, Pelodera strongyloides.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, B; Beaver, P C; Wilson, E R; Whitley, R J

    1984-07-01

    A 6-month-old infant girl was seen because of failure to thrive and hyperpigmented papulonodules on the lower abdomen and thighs. Results of skin biopsy demonstrated dauer larvae of a soil nematode, Pelodera strongyloides, in the dermis. This is the second documented episode of human dermatitis due to this nematode, which more often invades the skin of dogs, cattle, horses, and sheep. PMID:6542207

  2. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in HIV-Infected Patients, Lao People’s Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    Paboriboune, Phimpha; Phoumindr, Niranh; Borel, Elisabeth; Sourinphoumy, Khamphang; Phaxayaseng, Saykham; Luangkhot, Elodie; Sengphilom, Bouachanh; Vansilalom, Yathmany; Odermatt, Peter; Delaporte, Eric; Etard, Jean- François; Rabodonirina, Meja

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection is an emerging problem in Laos. We conducted the first prospective study on intestinal parasites, including opportunistic protozoa, in newly diagnosed HIV infected patients, with or without diarrhea. The aims were to describe the spectrum of infections, to determine their prevalence and to assess their associations with diarrhea, CD4 cell count, place of residence and living conditions. Methodology One to three stool samples over consecutive days were obtained from 137 patients. The Kato thick smear method, formalin-ethyl concentration and specific stains for coccidia and microsporidia diagnosis were performed on 260 stool samples. Baseline characteristics regarding relevant demographics, place of residence and living conditions, clinical features including diarrhea, were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Principal Findings The 137 patients were young (median age: 36 years) and severely immunocompromised (83.9% at WHO stage 3 or 4, median CD4 cell count: 41/mm3). Diarrhea was present in 43.0% of patients. Parasite infection was found in 78.8% of patients, infection with at least two species in 49.6%. Prevalence rates of protozoan and helminth infections were similar (54.7% and 58.4% respectively). Blastocystis sp. was the most frequent protozoa (26.3%). Cryptosporidium sp., Cytoisospora belli and microsporidia, found at low prevalence rates (6.6%, 4.4%, 2.9%, respectively), were described for the first time in Laos. Cryptosporidium sp. was associated with persistent diarrhea. Strongyloides stercoralis was the most prevalent helminth following Opisthorchis viverrini (20.4% and 47.5% respectively). The most immunocompromised patients, as assessed by a CD4 count ≤ 50 cells/mm3, were more likely to be infected with intestinal parasites. Conclusions/Significance HIV infection was mainly diagnosed at an advanced stage of immunosuppression in Lao patients. Intestinal parasite infections were highly prevalent regardless of their

  3. Determining Soil-transmitted Helminth Infection Status and Physical Fitness of School-aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Peiling; Fürst, Thomas; Müller, Ivan; Kriemler, Susi; Utzinger, Jürg; Steinmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are common. Indeed, more than 1 billion people are affected, mainly in the developing world where poverty prevails and hygiene behavior, water supply, and sanitation are often deficient1,2. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus, are the most prevalent STHs3. The estimated global burden due to hookworm disease, ascariasis, and trichuriasis is 22.1, 10.5, and 6.4 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), respectively4. Furthermore, an estimated 30-100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, the most neglected STH species of global significance which arguably also causes a considerable public health impact5,6. Multiple-species infections (i.e., different STHs harbored in a single individual) are common, and infections have been linked to lowered productivity and thus economic outlook of developing countries1,3. For the diagnosis of common STHs, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the Kato-Katz technique7,8, which is a relatively straightforward method for determining the prevalence and intensity of such infections. It facilitates the detection of parasite eggs that infected subjects pass in their feces. With regard to the diagnosis of S.stercoralis, there is currently no simple and accurate tool available. The Baermann technique is the most widely employed method for its diagnosis. The principle behind the Baermann technique is that active S.stercoralis larvae migrate out of an illuminated fresh fecal sample as the larvae are phototactic9. It requires less sophisticated laboratory materials and is less time consuming than culture and immunological methods5. Morbidities associated with STH infections range from acute but common symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and pruritus, to chronic symptoms, such as anemia, under- and malnutrition, and cognitive impairment10. Since the symptoms are generally

  4. Strongyloides robustus and the northern sympatric populations of northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Dubay, Shelli A; Anderson, Eric M; Taft, Stephen J

    2004-07-01

    Within North America, northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (Glaucomys volans) flying squirrels occupy distinct ranges with limited overlap. Sympatry in northern latitudes coincides with northern hardwood vegetation from Minnesota to New England. Strongyloides robustus is an intestinal parasite that infects both species but appears to be deleterious only to northern flying squirrels. As a result, S. robustus could be a critical determinant of flying squirrel population characteristics in at least some areas of sympatry. However, cold weather could potentially limit the distribution of S. robustus in northern climates. Therefore, we assessed fecal samples from both flying squirrel species to determine the presence of the nematode in Wisconsin. Strongyloides robustus was found in 12 flying squirrel scat samples and infected 52% of southern flying squirrels and 11% of northern flying squirrels. Prevalence of S. robustus infection for northern flying squirrels was substantially lower than previously reported from more southern regions. This is the northernmost documentation of S. robustus in flying squirrels and the first documentation of S. robustus parasitizing flying squirrels in Wisconsin. PMID:15465730

  5. Characterization and cloning of metallo-proteinase in the excretory/secretory products of the infective-stage larva of Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Lun, H M; Mak, C H; Ko, R C

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitor sensitivity assays using azocaesin and FTC-caesin as substrates showed that the excretory/secretory (E/S) products of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis contained serine, metallo-, cysteine and aspartic proteinases. The activity of the metallo-proteinase was zinc ion dependent (within a range of ZnSO(4) concentrations). Gelatin-substrate gel electrophoresis revealed two bands of molecular mass 48 and 58 kDa which were sensitive to the metallo-proteinase inhibitor EDTA. The former peptide was probably a cleavage product of the latter. The authenticity of the 58 kDa metallo-proteinase as an E/S product was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Using PCR and RACE reactions, a complete nucleotide sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene was obtained. It comprised 2,223 bp with an open reading frame encoding 604 amino acid residues. The 3' untranslated region consisted of 352 bp, including a polyadenylation signal AATAA. A consensus catalytic zinc-binding motif was present. The conserved domains suggest that the cloned metallo-proteinase belongs to the astacin family and occurs as a single copy gene with 11 introns and 10 exons. Cluster analysis showed that the sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene of T. spiralis resembles those of Caenorhabdites elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:12743801

  6. Treatment with nitric oxide donors diminishes hyperinfection by Strongyloides venezuelensis in mice treated with dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ruano, Ana Lucía; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; de Melo, Alan Lane; Muro, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The effects of using nitric oxide (NO) donors and inhibitors in experimental strongyloidiasis were showed using, both naïve and dexamethasone immunosuppressed BALB/c mice infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis. Aminoguanidine, an inhibitor of inducible NO synthase and LA419 a NO donor, were administered. Dexamethasone was used to induce immunosuppression. The study in BALB/c mice revealed increases in counts of fecal eggs, larvae in lungs and parasitic females following treatment with aminoguanidine, while mice treated with LA419 had limited egg output with low larval and adult recoveries. Mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone developed hyperinfection with high long lasting fecal egg emission, high numbers of larvae in lungs and high numbers of parasitic females in the intestine even when the infection had already been cleared in non-immunosuppressed infected controls. Mice treated with dexamethasone and aminoguanidine had the highest egg output and the highest larva and parasitic female recovery showing a severe hyperinfection syndrome. In contrast, treatment with dexamenthasone and LA419 resulted in a controlled hyperinfection syndrome and these mice were able to eliminate the parasite. Therefore, NO modulation appears to be a determinant factor in severe strongyloidiasis and further studies should be conducted to confirm in other experimental models. PMID:26342794

  7. The alkylphospholipid edelfosine shows activity against Strongyloides venezuelensis and induces apoptosis-like cell death.

    PubMed

    Legarda-Ceballos, Ana L; Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Ruano, Ana Lucía; Yepes, Edward; Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino; Muro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is widely distributed in the tropical and subtropical areas. Ivermectin is the drug of choice for the treatment. However, the concerns about relying treatment on a single drug make identification of new molecules a priority. Alkylphospholipid analogues, including edelfosine, are a group of synthetic compounds that have shown activity against some parasites. The objective was to assess the in vitro and in vivo activity of edelfosine, miltefosine, perifosine against Strongyloides venezuelensis. Moreover, apoptosis-like mechanism in larvae after treatment was studied. Edelfosine displayed the highest activity and the best selectivity index (LD50=49.6 ± 5.4μM, SI=1.1) compared to miltefosine or perifosine. Third stage larvae after culture with edelfosine were not able to develop an infection in mice. Treatment of mice with edelfosine showed reduction of 47% in parasitic females allocated in the gut. Moreover, DNA fragmentation was observed by TUNEL staining in larvae treated with edelfosine. These results suggest that edelfosine could be an effective drug against strongyloidiasis, probably through induction of apoptosis-like cell death. PMID:27394030

  8. The control of morph development in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, S C; Gemmill, A W; Read, A F; Viney, M E

    2000-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti has a complex life cycle. The progeny of the parasitic females can develop into three distinct morphs, namely directly developing infective third-stage larvae (iL3s), free-living adult males and free-living adult females. We have analysed of the effect of host immune status (an intra-host factor), environmental temperature (an extra-host factor) and their interaction on the proportion of larvae that develop into these three morphs. The results are consistent with the developmental decision of larvae being controlled by at least two discrete developmental switches. One is a sex-determination event that is affected by host immune status and the other is a switch between alternative female morphs that is affected by both host immune status and environmental temperature. These findings clarify the basis of the life cycle of S. ratti and demonstrate how such complex life cycles can result from a combination of simple developmental switches. PMID:11416909

  9. Molecular identification of the strongyloid nematode Oesophagostomum aculeatum in the Asian wild elephant Elephas maximus.

    PubMed

    Phuphisut, O; Maipanich, W; Pubampen, S; Yindee, M; Kosoltanapiwat, N; Nuamtanong, S; Ponlawat, A; Adisakwattana, P

    2016-07-01

    The transmission of zoonoses by wildlife, including elephants, is a growing global concern. In this study, we screened for helminth infections among Asian wild elephants (Elephas maximus) of the Salakpra Wildlife Sanctuary, Kanchanaburi, Thailand. Elephant faecal samples (45) were collected from the sanctuary grounds during January through November 2013 and assayed individually using the tetranucleotide microsatellite technique. Microscopic examination indicated a high prevalence of strongylids (93.0%) and low prevalences of trichurids (2.3%) and ascarids (2.3%). To identify the strongylid species, small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences were amplified from copro-DNA and compared with sequences in GenBank. The generated SSU-rDNA sequences comprised five distinct haplotypes that were closely related to Oesophagostomum aculeatum. A phylogenetic analysis that incorporated related nematodes yielded a tree separated into two main clades, one containing our samples and human and domestic animal hookworms and the other consisting of Strongyloides. The present results indicate that O. aculeatum in local elephants is a potential source of helminthiasis in human and domestic animals in this wild-elephant irrupted area. PMID:26213101

  10. Control of Strongyloides westeri by nematophagous fungi after passage through the gastrointestinal tract of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Juliana Milani; Araújo, Jackson Victor de; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Tavela, Alexandre de Oliveira; Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; Soares, Filippe Elias de Freitas; Carvalho, Giovanni Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Strongyloides westeri is the most prevalent nematode among equines aged up to four months and causes gastrointestinal disorders. The objective of this study was to observe the control of infective S. westeri larvae (L3) by the nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001) and Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34) after passage through the gastrointestinal tract of female donkeys. Twelve dewormed female donkeys that were kept in stables were used. Two treatment groups each comprising four animals received orally 100 g of pellets made of sodium alginate matrix containing a mycelial mass of either D. flagrans (AC001) or M. thaumasium (NF34). The control group consisted of four animals that received pellets without fungus. Feces samples were then collected from the animal groups at different times (after 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours). These feces were placed in Petri dishes containing 2% water-agar medium and 1000 L3 of S. westeri. AC001 and NF34 isolates showed the ability to destroy the L3, after gastrointestinal transit, thus demonstrating their viability and predatory activity. PMID:22832758

  11. Comparison between the effect of Lawsonia inermis and flubendazole on Strongyloides species using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ayman Nabil; Ahmed, Mona Abdel-Fattah; Hetta, Mona Hafez

    2016-06-01

    Strongyloides species is a helminth of worldwide distribution primarily in tropical and subtropical regions. It is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability for autoinfection so; it may lead to severe systemic manifestations especially in immunosuppressed patients. Chemotherapy is currently considered the best therapeutic option for strongyloidiasis but some drugs are expensive and others have side effects as nausea, diarrhea and headache. Strongyloides larva is resistant to most chemical agents so, search for plant extracts may provide other effective but less expensive treatment. Lawsonia inermis Linn, popularly known as Henna, has been proven to have antihelminthic, antibacterial and antifungal properties. The current study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of Lawsonia inermis on Strongyloides spp. In vitro using scanning electron microscopy. Fifty Strongyloides species. larvae and free living females were incubated with different concentrations of Lawsonia (1, 10, 100 mg/ml), for different incubation periods (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) in comparison to the same concentrations of flubendazole at the same different time points. The results showed that Lawsonia inermis in a concentration of 10 mg/ml incubated with Strongyloides spp. female for 24 h affected the parasite cuticular surface in the form of transverse and longitudinal fissures and transverse depression in comparison to no cuticular change with flubendazole (100 mg/ml). This suggests that Lawsonia inermis may be a promising phytotherapeutic agent for strongyloidiasis. PMID:27413314

  12. Failure of Ivermectin per Rectum to Achieve Clinically Meaningful Serum Levels in Two Cases of Strongyloides Hyperinfection

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Isaac I.; Khan, Kamran; Abrams, Howard; Nott, Caroline; Leung, Elizabeth; Fleckenstein, Lawrence; Keystone, Jay S.

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of Strongyloides hyperinfection are presented. Ivermectin was initially administered orally and per rectum pending the availability of subcutaneous (SC) preparations. In neither case did rectal suppositories of ivermectin achieve clinically meaningful serum values. Clinicians should use SC preparations of ivermectin as early as possible in Strongyloides hyperinfection and dissemination. PMID:25918215

  13. Application of a Multiplex Quantitative PCR to Assess Prevalence and Intensity Of Intestinal Parasite Infections in a Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, Stacey; Inpankaew, Tawin; Nery, Susana Vaz; Gray, Darren J.; Verweij, Jaco J.; Clements, Archie C. A.; Gomes, Santina J.; Traub, Rebecca; McCarthy, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate quantitative assessment of infection with soil transmitted helminths and protozoa is key to the interpretation of epidemiologic studies of these parasites, as well as for monitoring large scale treatment efficacy and effectiveness studies. As morbidity and transmission of helminth infections are directly related to both the prevalence and intensity of infection, there is particular need for improved techniques for assessment of infection intensity for both purposes. The current study aimed to evaluate two multiplex PCR assays to determine prevalence and intensity of intestinal parasite infections, and compare them to standard microscopy. Methodology/Principal Findings Faecal samples were collected from a total of 680 people, originating from rural communities in Timor-Leste (467 samples) and Cambodia (213 samples). DNA was extracted from stool samples and subject to two multiplex real-time PCR reactions the first targeting: Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp., Ascaris spp., and Trichuris trichiura; and the second Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia. duodenalis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Samples were also subject to sodium nitrate flotation for identification and quantification of STH eggs, and zinc sulphate centrifugal flotation for detection of protozoan parasites. Higher parasite prevalence was detected by multiplex PCR (hookworms 2.9 times higher, Ascaris 1.2, Giardia 1.6, along with superior polyparasitism detection with this effect magnified as the number of parasites present increased (one: 40.2% vs. 38.1%, two: 30.9% vs. 12.9%, three: 7.6% vs. 0.4%, four: 0.4% vs. 0%). Although, all STH positive samples were low intensity infections by microscopy as defined by WHO guidelines the DNA-load detected by multiplex PCR suggested higher intensity infections. Conclusions/Significance Multiplex PCR, in addition to superior sensitivity, enabled more accurate determination of infection intensity for Ascaris, hookworms and

  14. Pattern of co-infection by enteric pathogenic parasites among HIV sero-positive individuals in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Chowdhary, Abhay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major medical concerns in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) is management of diarrhea that can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA. Owing to the scarcity of recent pattern of intestinal opportunistic infections from this region, the study was designed to determine the opportunistic parasites causing diarrhea in PLHA; and to find out whether there is any significant difference in the enteric parasitic pathogens in patients with different immunological status and in those on highly active anti retro-viral therapy (HAART). Materials and Methods: Analysis of the spectrum of intestinal parasites was carried out with 192 subjects in two groups (142 HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 50 HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea). The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry. Results: Enteric parasites were detected in 35.9% of HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 18% of HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea. Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%); others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%), Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%), Giardia intestinalis (3.1%) and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%). Opportunistic enteric parasites were detected in significantly low numbers in patients with CD4+ T-Lymphocyte counts >500 cells/ml; and in those taking HAART. PMID:26392653

  15. Bacteroides-associated pylephlebitis in a patient with strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Neil R H; Martin, Thomas; Biswas, Jason; Barrett, Jessica; Hickish, Tom; Dasgupta, Dhruba; Newsholme, William

    2015-02-01

    Strongyloidiasis is associated with Gram-negative bacteremia. Septic portal vein thrombosis or pylephlebitis is a rare but serious complication of intra-abdominal infection, and it is often associated with Bacteroides bacteremia. We present the first report of pylephlebitis with Bacteroides bacteremia associated with underlying Strongyloides stercoralis infection and briefly review the management of septic portal vein thrombosis. PMID:25510718

  16. 75 FR 41501 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... novel antigen capable of providing 70-90% protection for mice immunized with the antigen. In addition, sera from immunized mice have also been used to effectively protect na ve mice from infection. The...) induces protective immunity to larval Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. Infect Immun. 2005...

  17. Identification of a Bacteria-Like Ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an Animal Parasitic Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Nagayasu, Eiji; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Taketani, Shigeru; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Yoshida, Ayako; Inagaki, Yuji; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH), which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH) have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of FeCH genes in the

  18. A new rhabditoid nematode species in Asian sciurids, distinct from Strongyloides robustus in North American sciurids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Torii, Harumi; Une, Yumi; Ooi, Hong-Kean

    2007-12-01

    Strongyloides callosciureus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabditoidea), from Asian sciurids, is described based on morphology, morphometry, and the small and large subunit (SSU/LSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences. This new species was collected from Pallas's squirrels (Callosciurus erythraeus) in the central part of mainland Japan (Honshu), which were originally introduced from Taiwan some decades ago, and plantain squirrels (Callosciurus notatus) imported from Malaysia as personal pets. For comparison, Strongyloides robustus Chandler, 1942 was collected from American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) and southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) imported from the United States as personal pets. The parasitic females found in North American and Asian sciurids shared some key morphological features such as the ovary running spirally around the gut, and the shapes of the stoma in the apical view and the tail. However, morphometric features of parasitic females in North American and Asian sciurids differed significantly from each other; the former was larger than the latter, and the relative position of the vulva to the whole body length from the mouth was different. The SSU/LSU rDNA sequences supported the division of sciurid Strongyloides isolates by geographical distribution of the host and morphological features, leading us to propose the erection of new species. PMID:18314696

  19. Secreted adhesion molecules of Strongyloides venezuelensis are produced by oesophageal glands and are components of the wall of tunnels constructed by adult worms in the host intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, H; El-Malky, M; Kumagai, T; Ohta, N

    2003-02-01

    The parasitic female of Strongyloides venezuelensis keeps invading the epithelial layer of the host intestinal mucosa. Upon invasion, it adheres to the surface of the intestinal epithelial cells with adhesion molecules secreted from the mouth. It has been demonstrated that S. venezuelensis are expelled from the intestine because mucosal mast cells inhibit the attachment of adult worms to the mucosal surface. In the present study, we generated specific antibodies against secreted adhesion molecules to investigate their function in vivo, because these molecules have been demonstrated only in vitro in spite of the importance in the infection processes. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific to S. venezuelensis adhesion molecules inhibited the attachment of adult worms to plastic dishes and the binding of adhesion molecules to rat intestinal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical study revealed that adhesion molecules were produced by oesophageal glands and were continuously secreted in vivo to line the wall of the tunnels formed by adult worms in the intestinal mucosa. Our findings indicate that adhesion molecules play essential roles in the infection processes of S. venezuelensis in the host intestine. PMID:12636354

  20. MEMBRANE FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis IN THE IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Paula, Fabiana Martins; Gottardi, Maiara; Meisel, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode of rodents frequently used to obtain heterologous antigens for the immunological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis for human strongyloidiasis immunodiagnosis. Soluble and membrane fractions were obtained in phosphate saline (SS and SM) and Tris-HCl (TS and TM) from filariform larvae of S. venezuelensis. Ninety-two serum samples (n = 92) were obtained from 20 strongyloidiasis patients (Group I), 32 from patients with other parasitic diseases (Group II), and 40 from healthy individuals (Group III), and were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions (SS and TS) showed 90.0% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity, whereas the membrane fractions (SM and TM) showed 95.0% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. The present results suggest the possible use of membrane fractions of S. venezuelensis as an alternative antigen for human strongyloidiasis immunodiagnosis. PMID:25651330

  1. Economic Analysis of the Impact of Overseas and Domestic Treatment and Screening Options for Intestinal Helminth Infection among US-Bound Refugees from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Brian; Coleman, Margaret S.; Weinberg, Michelle; Zhou, Weigong; Rotz, Lisa; Klosovsky, Alexander; Cantey, Paul T.; Fox, LeAnne M.; Cetron, Martin S.; Stauffer, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many U.S.-bound refugees travel from countries where intestinal parasites (hookworm, Trichuris trichuria, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis) are endemic. These infections are rare in the United States and may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, leading to potentially serious consequences. This evaluation examined the costs and benefits of combinations of overseas presumptive treatment of parasitic diseases vs. domestic screening/treating vs. no program. Methods An economic decision tree model terminating in Markov processes was developed to estimate the cost and health impacts of four interventions on an annual cohort of 27,700 U.S.-bound Asian refugees: 1) “No Program,” 2) U.S. “Domestic Screening and Treatment,” 3) “Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin” presumptive treatment, and 4) “Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides”. Markov transition state models were used to estimate long-term effects of parasitic infections. Health outcome measures (four parasites) included outpatient cases, hospitalizations, deaths, life years, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results The “No Program” option is the least expensive ($165,923 per cohort) and least effective option (145 outpatient cases, 4.0 hospitalizations, and 0.67 deaths discounted over a 60-year period for a one-year cohort). The “Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin” option ($418,824) is less expensive than “Domestic Screening and Treatment” ($3,832,572) or “Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides” ($2,182,483). According to the model outcomes, the most effective treatment option is “Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin,” which reduces outpatient cases, deaths and hospitalization by around 80% at an estimated net cost of $458,718 per death averted, or $2,219/$24,036 per QALY/life year gained relative to “No Program”. Discussion Overseas presumptive treatment for U.S.-bound refugees is a cost

  2. [Strongyloidosis. Part VII. Epidemiology and prevention (1)].

    PubMed

    Soroczan, W

    2000-01-01

    The source of invasion of Strongyloides stercoralis and the routes of transmission strongyloidosis were presented. The survival, development and behavior forms parasitic and free-living generation of S. stercoralis in soil and host was also described. PMID:16886338

  3. [Case report: strongyloidiosis with chronic abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Tamer, Gülden Sönmez; Dündar, Devrim

    2008-01-01

    The case was presented here in order to point out that an immunocompetent child might have Strongyloidiosis infection that might be misdiagnosed. A 9 year old male patient who had chronic abdominal pain with a feeling of weakness was treated several times for urinary tract infection. He had never been tested for the presence of parasites. After the patient's complaints occurred again, he presented at our hospital. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were observed in his feces by microscopy. Albendazol (400 mg/day for three days) was prescribed. After 10 days, the feces of the patient was reexamined and no Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were detected. For this reason, it is important to investigate the possibility of intestinal parasitic infections in children with chronic abdominal pain. PMID:18645954

  4. Chronic strongyloidiasis in World War II Far East ex-prisoners of war.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, L L

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-two of 142 (37%) American ex-prisoners of war that worked on the Burma-Thailand Railroad during World War II were found to have previously unrecognized symptomatic Strongyloides stercoralis infections. A characteristic urticarial creeping skin eruption on the abdomen, buttocks and thighs occurred in 92%. Infection was also associated with pruritus ani, abdominal pain, indigestion, heartburn, and diarrhea. Demonstration of larvae in ether-formalin stool concentrates in these chronic low density infections required 5 hours of microscopy per case to detect 90% of positive cases. Therapy with thiabendazole resulted in a clinical cure in 93% and a microscopic cure in 100%; but was associated with frequent side effects. Chronic strongyloidiasis should be considered in veterans of Far East conflicts and in others with intimate soil contact in rural Strongyloides stercoralis-endemic areas who present with recurrent creeping skin eruption, abdominal pain, and eosinophilia. PMID:6696184

  5. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    CORRAL, Marcelo Andreetta; de PAULA, Fabiana Martins; GOTTARDI, Maiara; MEISEL, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; CASTILHO, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; GONÇALVES, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo; GRYSCHEK, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively), Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively), and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively). Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. PMID:26603231

  6. Optimizing culture conditions for free-living stages of the nematode parasite Strongyloides ratti.

    PubMed

    Dulovic, Alex; Puller, Vadim; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    The rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti (S. ratti) has recently emerged as a model system for various aspects of parasite biology and evolution. In addition to parasitic parthenogenetic females, this species can also form facultative free-living generations of sexually reproducing adults. These free-living worms are bacteriovorous and grow very well when cultured in the feces of their host. However, in fecal cultures the worms are rather difficult to find for observation and experimental manipulation. Therefore, it has also been attempted to raise S. ratti on Nematode Growth Media (NGM) plates with Escherichia coli OP50 as food, exactly as described for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Whilst worms did grow on these plates, their longevity and reproductive output compared to fecal cultures were dramatically reduced. In order to improve the culture success we tested other plates occasionally used for C. elegans and, starting from the best performing one, systematically varied the plate composition, the temperature and the food in order to further optimize the conditions. Here we present a plate culturing protocol for free-living stages of S. ratti with strongly improved reproductive success and longevity. PMID:27334397

  7. Strongyloides myopotami (Secernentea: Strongyloididae) from the Intestine of Feral Nutrias (Myocastor coypus) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Seongjun; Lee, Dongmin; Park, Hansol; Oh, Mihyeon; Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Surveys on helminthic fauna of the nutria, Myocastor coypus, have seldom been performed in the Republic of Korea. In the present study, we describe Strongyloides myopotami (Secernentea: Strongyloididae) recovered from the small intestine of feral nutrias. Total 10 adult nutrias were captured in a wetland area in Gimhae-si (City), Gyeongsangnam-do (Province) in April 2013. They were transported to our laboratory, euthanized with ether, and necropsied. About 1,300 nematode specimens were recovered from 10 nutrias, and some of them were morphologically observed by light and scanning electron microscopies. They were 3.7-4.7 (4.0±0.36) mm in length, 0.03-0.04 (0.033) mm in width. The worm dimension and other morphological characters, including prominent lips of the vulva, blunted conical tail, straight type of the ovary, and 8-chambered stoma, were all consistent with S. myopotami. This nematode fauna is reported for the first time in Korea. PMID:25352703

  8. How to become a parasite without sex chromosomes: a hypothesis for the evolution of Strongyloides spp. and related nematodes.

    PubMed

    Streit, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Parasitic lifestyles evolved many times independently. Just within the phylum Nematoda animal parasitism must have arisen at least four times. Switching to a parasitic lifestyle is expected to lead to changes in various life history traits including reproductive strategies. Parasitic nematode worms of the genus Strongyloides represent an interesting example to study these processes because they are still capable of forming facultative free-living generations in between parasitic ones. The parasitic generation consists of females only, which reproduce parthenogenetically. The sex in the progeny of the parasitic worms is determined by environmental cues, which control a, presumably ancestral, XX/XO chromosomal sex determining system. In some species the X chromosome is fused with an autosome and one copy of the X-derived sequences is removed by sex-specific chromatin diminution in males. Here I propose a hypothesis for how today's Strongyloides sp. might have evolved from a sexual free-living ancestor through dauer larvae forming free-living and facultative parasitic intermediate stages. PMID:24829037

  9. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  10. Prevalence of Strongyle infections in goat of Maha Koushal region, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alok Kumar; Das, G; Roy, B; Nath, S; Naresh, Ram; Kumar, Sahil

    2016-06-01

    The coproculture study on Strongyle infection of goats was carried out in small holder farmers kept under semi-intensive management system in Balaghat, Narsinghpur and Chhindwara district, Madhya Pradesh, during the period from July 2011 to February 2012. Copro-culture of the samples positive for Strongyle infection revealed Haemonchus sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Oesophagostomum sp., Strongyloides sp., and Bunostomum sp. in a decreasing order in goats. The larvae of Haemonchus sp. (61.63 %) and Strongyloides sp. (7.50 %) were highest in Balaghat, Trichostrongylus (18.13 %) in Narsinghpur, while Oesophagostomum sp. (10.50 %) and Bunostomum sp. (5.75 %) were in Chhindwara district. The finding of this study indicates that, even though subclinical in nature, Strongyle infection are one of the major problems that could hamper health and productivity and there is need for design a programme to minimize and control Strongyle infection in goats in the study area. PMID:27413295

  11. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is known to occur in immunocompetent individuals while hyperinfection and dissemination occurs in selective immunosuppressed hosts particularly those on corticosteroid therapy. We report two cases of hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients and document endoscopic and pathological changes in the involved small bowel. One patient presented with features of dehydration and malnutrition while another developed ileal obstruction and strangulation, requiring bowel resection. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erythematous and thickened duodenal mucosal folds. Histopathological examination of duodenal biopsies revealed S. stercoralis worms, larvae and eggs embedded in mucosa and submucosa. Wet mount stool preparation showed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis in both cases. Patients were managed with anthelmintic therapy (ivermectin/albendazole) and concurrent reduction of immunosuppression. Both patients had uneventful recovery. Complicated strongyloidiasis should be suspected in immunocompromised hosts who present with abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, particularly in endemic areas. PMID:25150235

  12. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2014-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is known to occur in immunocompetent individuals while hyperinfection and dissemination occurs in selective immunosuppressed hosts particularly those on corticosteroid therapy. We report two cases of hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients and document endoscopic and pathological changes in the involved small bowel. One patient presented with features of dehydration and malnutrition while another developed ileal obstruction and strangulation, requiring bowel resection. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erythematous and thickened duodenal mucosal folds. Histopathological examination of duodenal biopsies revealed S. stercoralis worms, larvae and eggs embedded in mucosa and submucosa. Wet mount stool preparation showed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis in both cases. Patients were managed with anthelmintic therapy (ivermectin/albendazole) and concurrent reduction of immunosuppression. Both patients had uneventful recovery. Complicated strongyloidiasis should be suspected in immunocompromised hosts who present with abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, particularly in endemic areas. PMID:25150235

  13. Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strunz, Eric C.; Addiss, David G.; Stocks, Meredith E.; Ogden, Stephanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventive chemotherapy represents a powerful but short-term control strategy for soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Since humans are often re-infected rapidly, long-term solutions require improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively summarize the relationship between WASH access or practices and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations of improved WASH on infection with STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus], and Strongyloides stercoralis). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and LILACS were searched from inception to October 28, 2013 with no language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they provided an estimate for the effect of WASH access or practices on STH infection. We assessed the quality of published studies with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 94 studies met our eligibility criteria; five were randomized controlled trials, whilst most others were cross-sectional studies. We used random-effects meta-analyses and analyzed only adjusted estimates to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding respectively. Use of treated water was associated with lower odds of STH infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.36–0.60). Piped water access was associated with lower odds of A. lumbricoides (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.39–0.41) and T. trichiura infection (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45–0.72), but not any STH infection (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.28–3.11). Access to sanitation was associated with decreased likelihood of infection with any STH (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.57–0.76), T. trichiura (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.74), and A. lumbricoides (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.88), but not with hookworm infection (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61–1.06). Wearing shoes was associated with reduced

  14. Strongyloidiasis: prevalence, risk factors, clinical and laboratory features among diarrhea patients in Ibadan Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Dada-Adegbola, H O; Oluwatoba, O A; Bakare, R A

    2010-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. The infection is usually mild or asymptomatic in normal immunocompetent individuals, but could be very severe or even fatal due to hyper infection in individuals who are immunosuppressed. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors and features of strongyloidiasis among diarrhea patients in Ibadan. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of diarrhea patients from a teaching hospital, three major government hospitals and one mission hospital in Ibadan. Self administered questionnaire, clinical assessment and laboratory investigations were used to confirm health status and presence of S. stercoralis. Diagnosis was made by microscopic examination of stool in saline preparation and formol-ether concentration. One thousand and ninety patients, (562 (51.6%) males and 528 (48.4%) females) consisting 380 (34.9%) children and 710 (65.1%) adults who had diarrhea were studied. The prevalence rate for the parasite among diarrhea patients was 3.0%. While the risk factor for infection remains contact with contaminated soil, malnutrition, steroid therapy, HIV/AIDS, lymphomas, tuberculosis, and chronic renal failure. Others are maleness, institutionalism and alcoholism. Predominant clinical presentations are abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and bloating and weight loss, Strongyloides stercoralis should be considered in diarrhea patients who are either malnourished or immunosuppressed. PMID:21735994

  15. Notes from the Field: Strongyloidiasis at a Long-Term-Care Facility for the Developmentally Disabled - Arizona, 2015.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jefferson M; Hill, Clancey; Briggs, Graham; Gray, Elizabeth; Handali, Sukwan; McAuliffe, Isabel; Montgomery, Susan; Komatsu, Kenneth; Adams, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode endemic in the tropics and subtropics. Infection is usually acquired through skin contact with contaminated soil, or less commonly, from person to person through fecal contamination of the immediate environment. Infections are often asymptomatic, but can result in a pruritic rash, respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough or wheeze), and gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea and vomiting). Immunosuppressed persons can develop strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome, which can be fatal (1). In June 2015, the Pinal County Public Health Services District in Arizona was notified of a suspected strongyloidiasis infection in a resident of a long-term-care facility for developmentally disabled persons. The patient had anemia and chronic eosinophilia. The patient's serum tested positive for S. stercoralis-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and at CDC by a crude antigen ELISA, a quantitative assay for detection of IgG against S. stercoralis. An investigation was conducted to determine the infection source and identify additional cases. PMID:27310213

  16. Considerations for screening live kidney donors for endemic infections: a viewpoint on the UNOS policy.

    PubMed

    Levi, M E; Kumar, D; Green, M; Ison, M G; Kaul, D; Michaels, M G; Morris, M I; Schwartz, B S; Echenique, I A; Blumberg, E A

    2014-05-01

    In February 2013, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network mandated that transplant centers perform screening of living kidney donors prior to transplantation for Strongyloides, Trypanosoma cruzi and West Nile virus (WNV) infection if the donor is from an endemic area. However, specific guidelines for screening were not provided, such as the optimal testing modalities, timing of screening prior to donation and the appropriate selection of donors. In this regard, the American Society of Transplantation Infectious Diseases Community of Practice, together with disease-specific experts, has developed this viewpoint document to provide guidance for the testing of live donors for Strongyloides, T. cruzi and WNV infection, specifically identifying at-risk populations and testing algorithms, including advantages, limitations and interpretation of results. PMID:24636427

  17. The potential role of strongyloides robustus on parasite-mediated competition between two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys).

    PubMed

    Krichbaum, Kristle; Mahan, Carolyn G; Steele, Michael A; Turner, Gregory; Hudson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that populations of the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) are declining in the eastern United States, perhaps due to competition with the southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). Potential causes include parasite-mediated or apparent competition from the shared intestinal nematode, Strongyloides robustus, which has been shown to detrimentally affect the northern flying squirrel but not the southern flying squirrel. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a preliminary study on the parasite community of both flying squirrel species from sites in Pennsylvania where the two species occur sympatrically and where G. sabrinus is now considered endangered at the state level. We compared these parasite communities with those from northern flying squirrels from northern New York where the southern flying squirrel is absent. We found eight species of gastrointestinal parasites (Pterygodermatites peromysci, Lemuricola sciuri, Syphacia thompsoni, Syphacia spp., Capillaria spp., Citellinema bifurcatum, Strogyloides robustus, and an unidentifiable cestode species) in both species of flying squirrels examined for our study. The parasite-mediated competition hypothesis was partially supported. For example, in Pennsylvania, S. robustus was overdispersed in southern flying squirrels, such that a small proportion of the hosts carried a large proportion of the worm population. In addition, we found S. robustus to be present in northern flying squirrels when the species were sympatric, but not where southern flying squirrels were absent in New York. However, there was no association between S. robustus and the body condition of flying squirrels. We detected a potential parasite community interaction, as S. robustus abundance was positively associated with P. peromysci. PMID:20090036

  18. Bacteriophage-Fused Peptides for Serodiagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Nágilla Daliane; Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Santos, Fabiana de Almeida Araújo; Fujimura, Patricia Tiemi; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis, a human intestinal infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis, is frequently underdiagnosed and although its high prevalence is still a neglected parasitic disease because conventional diagnostic tests based on parasitological examination (presence of Strongyloides larvae in stool) are not sufficiently sensitive due to the low parasitic load and to the irregular larval output. There is an urgent need to improve diagnostic assays, especially for immunocompromised patients with high parasitic load as consequence of self-infection cycle, which can disseminate throughout the body, resulting in a potentially fatal hyperinfection syndrome often accompanied by sepsis or meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings We have performed Phage Display technology to select peptides that mimic S. stercoralis antigens, capable of detecting a humoral response in patients with strongyloidiasis. The peptides reactivity was investigated by Phage-ELISA through different panels of serum samples. We have successfully selected five peptides with significant immunoreactivity to circulating IgG from patients' sera with strongyloidiasis. The phage displayed peptides C9 and C10 presented the highest diagnostic potential (AUC>0.87) with excellent sensitivity (>85%) and good specificity (>77.5%), suggesting that some S. stercoralis antigens trigger systemic immune response. Conclusions/Significance These novel antigens are interesting serum biomarkers for routine strongyloidiasis screenings due to the easy production and simple assay using Phage-ELISA. Such markers may also present a promising application for therapeutic monitoring. PMID:24874206

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of Helminth Co-infection in Kenyan HIV-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walson, Judd L.; Stewart, Barclay T.; Sangaré, Laura; Mbogo, Loice W.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Piper, Benjamin K. S.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Deworming HIV-1 infected individuals may delay HIV-1 disease progression. It is important to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1/helminth co-infection in helminth-endemic areas. Methods HIV-1 infected individuals (CD4>250 cells/ul) were screened for helminth infection at ten sites in Kenya. Prevalence and correlates of helminth infection were determined. A subset of individuals with soil-transmitted helminth infection was re-evaluated 12 weeks following albendazole therapy. Results Of 1,541 HIV-1 seropositive individuals screened, 298 (19.3%) had detectable helminth infections. Among individuals with helminth infection, hookworm species were the most prevalent (56.3%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (17.1%), Trichuris trichiura (8.7%), Schistosoma mansoni (7.1%), and Stongyloides stercoralis (1.3%). Infection with multiple species occurred in 9.4% of infections. After CD4 count was controlled for, rural residence (RR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.08–1.81), having no education (RR 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07–2.30), and higher CD4 count (RR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07–1.73) remained independently associated with risk of helminth infection. Twelve weeks following treatment with albendazole, 32% of helminth-infected individuals had detectable helminths on examination. Residence, education, and CD4 count were not associated with persistent helminth infection. Conclusions Among HIV-1 seropositive adults with CD4 counts above 250 cells/mm3 in Kenya, traditional risk factors for helminth infection, including rural residence and lack of education, were associated with co-infection, while lower CD4 counts were not. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130910 PMID:20361031

  20. Intestinal strongyloidiasis and hyperinfection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamudi, Raja S; Chi, David S; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    In spite of recent advances with experiments on animal models, strongyloidiasis, an infection caused by the nematode parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, has still been an elusive disease. Though endemic in some developing countries, strongyloidiasis still poses a threat to the developed world. Due to the peculiar but characteristic features of autoinfection, hyperinfection syndrome involving only pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems, and disseminated infection with involvement of other organs, strongyloidiasis needs special attention by the physician, especially one serving patients in areas endemic for strongyloidiasis. Strongyloidiasis can occur without any symptoms, or as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Th2 cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity and mucosal immunity have been shown to have protective effects against this parasitic infection especially in animal models. Any factors that suppress these mechanisms (such as intercurrent immune suppression or glucocorticoid therapy) could potentially trigger hyperinfection or disseminated infection which could be fatal. Even with the recent advances in laboratory tests, strongyloidiasis is still difficult to diagnose. But once diagnosed, the disease can be treated effectively with antihelminthic drugs like Ivermectin. This review article summarizes a case of strongyloidiasis and various aspects of strongyloidiasis, with emphasis on epidemiology, life cycle of Strongyloides stercoralis, clinical manifestations of the disease, corticosteroids and strongyloidiasis, diagnostic aspects of the disease, various host defense pathways against strongyloidiasis, and available treatment options. PMID:16734908

  1. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. PMID:26314916

  2. Eosinophilia in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam and diagnostic work-up is unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  3. SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) of the intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti is involved in mucosa-associated parasite-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Anandarajah, Emmanuela M; Ditgen, Dana; Hansmann, Jan; Erttmann, Klaus D; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2016-06-01

    The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), found in the excretory/secretory products of Strongyloides ratti, is most strongly expressed in parasitic females. Since SPARC proteins are involved in the modulation of cell-matrix interactions, a role of the secreted S. ratti SPARC (Sr-SPARC) in the manifestation of the parasite in the host's intestine is postulated. The full-length cDNA of Sr-SPARC was identified and the protein was recombinantly expressed. The purified protein was biologically active, able to bind calcium, and to attach to mucosa-associated human cells. Addition of Sr-SPARC to an in vitro mucosal three-dimensional-cell culture model led to a time-dependent release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-22, IL-10 and TSLP. Of importance, exposure with Sr-SPARC fostered wound closure in an intestinal epithelial cell model. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SPARC released from the nematode is a multifunctional protein affecting the mucosal immune system. PMID:27268729

  4. Clinicopathological studies of gastrointestinal tract disorders in sheep with parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarvan; Jakhar, K. K.; Singh, Satyavir; Potliya, Sandeep; Kumar, Kailash; Pal, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was envisaged to elucidate the parasitological aspects of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders of sheep. Materials and Methods: Fecal, blood and serum samples collected from 31 sheep/lambs of Sheep Breeding Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Hisar. Results: Of 25 cases, strongyle eggs (12 cases, 48%) were a major infection, followed by Strongyloides spp. (8 cases, 32%) and Moniezia spp. (5 case, 20%). In one case, massive infection of strongyle particularly Haemonchus contortus and Moniezia spp. was observed. All these animals were found negative for hemoprotozoan parasites in blood smear examination. Hematological studies revealed that significantly decreased values of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV) and total erythrocytic count (TEC). Absolute leukocytic count revealed significant leukocytosis due to neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis and eosinophilia. Serum biochemical profiles of diarrheic sheep/lambs in present study were significant decrease in values of total protein, serum globulin, glucose where as significant increase in the albumin: Globulin ratio, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatise (ALKP) and bilirubin. Conclusions: From the present study, it is reasonable to conclude that major parasitic infection of sheep/lamb observed was strongyle, followed by Strongyloides spp. and Moniezia spp. Hemato-biochemical studies revealed significant leukocytosis and increase in AST, ALT, ALKP and bilirubin. PMID:27046991

  5. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  6. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Barbella, Rosa A.; Case, Cynthia; Arria, Melissa; Ravelo, Marisela; Perez, Henry; Urdaneta, Oscar; Gervasio, Gloria; Rubio, Nestor; Maldonado, Andrea; Aguilera, Ymora; Viloria, Anna; Blanco, Juan J.; Colina, Magdary; Hernández, Elizabeth; Araujo, Elianet; Cabaniel, Gilberto; Benitez, Jesús; Rifakis, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 (P < .01). Discussion. Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered. PMID:17093349

  7. Strongyloidiasis in a young French woman raises concern about possible ongoing autochthonous transmission in Spain.

    PubMed

    Duvignaud, Alexandre; Pistone, Thierry; Malvy, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the most common geohelminth infections in tropical and subtropical areas. Accurate diagnosis remains challenging, leading to an overall underestimation of strongyloidiasis prevalence. The possibility of ongoing autochthonous transmission in some temperate areas and especially in southern Europe is still debated, and data supporting this hypothesis are scarce. The case of a young French woman, who had travelled frequently to Spain and had acquired Strongyloides stercoralis infection as revealed by gastrointestinal symptoms and hypereosinophilia, is reported here. Physicians should keep in mind the risk of being infected in some areas of southern Europe, even if low, in order to avoid the life-threatening manifestations of strongyloidiasis favoured by pathological or therapeutic immunosuppression. PMID:26617257

  8. Intestinal parasites of children and adults in a remote Aboriginal community of the Northern Territory, Australia, 1994–1996

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Kieran; Kearns, Thérèse; Gongdjalk, Glenda; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart; Prociv, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parasitic infections can adversely impact health, nutritional status and educational attainment. This study investigated hookworm and other intestinal parasites in an Aboriginal community in Australia from 1994 to 1996. Methods Seven surveys for intestinal parasites were conducted by a quantitative formol-ether method on faecal samples. Serological testing was conducted for Strongyloides stercoralis and Toxocara canis IgG by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Of the 314 participants, infections were as follows: Trichuris trichiura (86%); hookworm, predominantly Ancylostoma duodenale (36%); Entamoeba spp. (E. histolytica complex [E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moskovski], E. coli and E. hartmanni) (25%); S. stercoralis (19%); Rodentolepis nana (16%); and Giardia duodenalis (10%). Serological diagnosis for 29 individuals showed that 28% were positive for S. stercoralis and 21% for T. canis. There was a decrease in the proportion positive for hookworm over the two-year period but not for the other parasite species. The presence of hookworm, T. trichiura and Entamoeba spp. was significantly greater in 5–14 year olds (n = 87) than in 0–4 year olds (n = 41), while the presence of S. stercoralis, R. nana, G. duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. in 5–14 year olds was significantly greater than 15–69 year olds (n = 91). Discussion Faecal testing indicated a very high prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially in schoolchildren. The decrease in percentage positive for hookworm over the two years was likely due to the albendazole deworming programme, and recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of hookworm is now low. However there was no sustained decrease in percentage positive for the other parasite species. PMID:25960921

  9. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  10. Multiple Simultaneous Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar-Morales, Esteban A; Cardona-Rodríguez, Zaydalee; Bertrán-Pasarell, Jorge; Soto-Malave, Ruth; De León-Borras, Rafeal

    2016-06-01

    Patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk for gastrointestinal infections causing diarrhea, particularly when those infections are parasitic in nature. This propensity is more pronounced in AIDS, where opportunistic parasitic infections may cause severe diarrhea, marked absorptive dysfunction, and significant risk of mortality. There are scant data regarding parasitic infections among HIV patients in the developed world; most studies and research come from povertystricken areas of South Africa, India, Iran, and the South Pacific. Although multiple infections with the same or different parasites have been reported, simultaneous infections are rare. We present the case of a 35-year-old man who developed a co-infection with Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Strongyloides, simultaneously, the diagnosis being made after the judicious evaluation of a stool sample. Given the associated morbidity, prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed to avoid further complications in patients with HIV. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of triple parasitic infection in a patient with HIV. PMID:27232872

  11. Intrinsic Factors Influencing the Infection by Helminth Parasites in Horses under an Oceanic Climate Area (NW Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, I.; Arias, M.; Cortiñas, F. J.; Francisco, R.; Mochales, E.; Dacal, V.; Suárez, J. L.; Uriarte, J.; Morrondo, P.; Sánchez-Andrade, R.; Díez-Baños, P.; Paz-Silva, A.

    2009-01-01

    A coprological survey to determine the influence of some intrinsic factors (breed, age, and sex) on the infection by helminth parasites in equine livestock (n = 418) under an oceanic climate area (NW Spain) was conducted. Faecal samples were individually collected and analyzed by the coprological techniques. The main strongylid genera identified were Trichonema and Cyalocephalus spp (small strongyles) and Strongylus and Triodontophorus (large strongyles). The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode was 89% (95% CI 86, 92) and 1% cestoda (0, 2). The percentage of horses with strongyloid parasites was 89% (86, 92), 11% (8, 14) for Parascaris, and 3% (1, 5) for Oxyuris. The highest prevalence for ascariosis was observed in the youngest horses (<3 years), for oxyurosis in the >10 years animals, and for strongylosis in the 3–10 years ones. Females were significantly more parasitized than males. A negative correlation between the age and the egg-excretion of ascarids and strongyles was recorded. The autochthonous and the English Pure Blood horses were the most parasitized. We concluded that the infections by helminths, especially the strongyloids, are significantly common in the region, so that greater importance should be given to this situation. PMID:20721327

  12. Intrinsic Factors Influencing the Infection by Helminth Parasites in Horses under an Oceanic Climate Area (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Francisco, I; Arias, M; Cortiñas, F J; Francisco, R; Mochales, E; Dacal, V; Suárez, J L; Uriarte, J; Morrondo, P; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Díez-Baños, P; Paz-Silva, A

    2009-01-01

    A coprological survey to determine the influence of some intrinsic factors (breed, age, and sex) on the infection by helminth parasites in equine livestock (n = 418) under an oceanic climate area (NW Spain) was conducted. Faecal samples were individually collected and analyzed by the coprological techniques. The main strongylid genera identified were Trichonema and Cyalocephalus spp (small strongyles) and Strongylus and Triodontophorus (large strongyles). The prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode was 89% (95% CI 86, 92) and 1% cestoda (0, 2). The percentage of horses with strongyloid parasites was 89% (86, 92), 11% (8, 14) for Parascaris, and 3% (1, 5) for Oxyuris. The highest prevalence for ascariosis was observed in the youngest horses (<3 years), for oxyurosis in the >10 years animals, and for strongylosis in the 3-10 years ones. Females were significantly more parasitized than males. A negative correlation between the age and the egg-excretion of ascarids and strongyles was recorded. The autochthonous and the English Pure Blood horses were the most parasitized. We concluded that the infections by helminths, especially the strongyloids, are significantly common in the region, so that greater importance should be given to this situation. PMID:20721327

  13. [Spectrum of species and infection frequency of endoparasites in bitches and their puppies in south Germany].

    PubMed

    Gothe, R; Reichler, I

    1990-02-01

    Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, hookworms, Trichuris vulpis, Strongyloides, Hammondia heydorni, Sarcocystis spp., Isospora canis and Isospora ohioensis and/or Isospora burrowsi of at least 9 species were detected in 100 randomly selected dog families in Southern Germany. Examinations carried out 5 to 9 times at weekly intervals revealed a monoinfection in 37 litters, infection with two parasite species in 28 litters, with three species in 10 litters and with four species in 6 litters. During the investigation period, 29 of the examined litters did not excrete helminth eggs, and, of these, 19 also did not excrete oocysts/sporocysts. In order of decreasing frequency among the dog families, the excretion extent of the litters and their mothers was as follows: Toxocara canis 67% and 45%, Isospora ohioensis/burrowsi 36% and 24%, Sarcocystis spp. 12% and 19%, Isospora canis 16% and 8%, Hammondia heydorni 7% and 6%, hookworms 6% and 7% and Toxascaris leonina 3% and 8%, respectively. Trichuris vulpis and Strongyloides eggs were only detected in 6 and 3 of the bitches, respectively. PMID:2326798

  14. Cutting Edge: the BTLA-HVEM regulatory pathway interferes with protective immunity to intestinal Helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Breloer, Minka; Hartmann, Wiebke; Blankenhaus, Birte; Eschbach, Marie-Luise; Pfeffer, Klaus; Jacobs, Thomas

    2015-02-15

    Helminths exploit intrinsic regulatory pathways of the mammalian immune system to dampen the immune response directed against them. In this article, we show that infection with the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti induced upregulation of the coinhibitory receptor B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) predominantly on CD4(+) T cells but also on a small fraction of innate leukocytes. Deficiency of either BTLA or its ligand herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) resulted in reduced numbers of parasitic adults in the small intestine and reduced larval output throughout infection. Reduced parasite burden in BTLA- and HVEM-deficient mice was accompanied by accelerated degranulation of mucosal mast cells and increased Ag-specific production of the mast cell-activating cytokine IL-9. Our combined results support a model whereby BTLA on CD4(+) T cells and additional innate leukocytes is triggered by HVEM and delivers negative signals into BTLA(+) cells, thereby interfering with the protective immune response to this intestinal parasite. PMID:25595777

  15. Parasitic and Bacterial Infections of Myocastor coypus in a Metropolitan Area of Northwestern Italy.

    PubMed

    Zanzani, Sergio A; Di Cerbo, Annarita; Gazzonis, Alessia L; Epis, Sara; Invernizzi, Anna; Tagliabue, Silvia; Manfredi, Maria T

    2016-01-01

    Coypus (Myocastor coypus) are widespread throughout Europe. In northern Italy, they are abundant in the flatland areas, and their high population densities can cause economic loss and ecosystem damage. We examined 153 coypus for selected parasitic and bacterial infections. We found Strongyloides myopotami (63.4% prevalence), Trichostrongylus duretteae (28.1%), Eimeria coypi (86.3%), and Eimeria seideli (6.8%), but did not find Giardia duodenalis or Cryptosporidium spp. We also isolated Staphylococcus aureus (10.1%), Escherichia coli (4.5%), and Streptococcus spp. (3.4%) from lung samples; no Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples. Coypus had antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii (28.9%) and to four serovars of Leptospira interrogans (44.9%); Australis/Bratislava was the serovar most frequently detected. It is clear that coypu can be infected with pathogens of human and veterinary importance. PMID:26745834

  16. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  17. Kato-Katz and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation test to evaluate helminth prevalence in the setting of a school-based deworming program.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Martha; Morales, Maria Luisa; Konana, Monisha; Hoyer, Paige; Pineda-Reyes, Roberto; White, Arthur Clinton; Garcia, Hector Hugo; Lescano, Andres Guillermo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Cabada, Miguel Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity of the Kato-Katz test is suboptimal for the evaluation of intestinal helminth prevalence. Moreover, during mass deworming, as helminth egg burden decreases, the sensitivity is likely to decrease. The Lumbreras rapid sedimentation (Lumbreras) is a low-cost non-quantitative test, but may provide useful information in low burden areas. We compared the prevalence of intestinal helminth infections assessed by the Kato-Katz and the Lumbreras rapid sedimentation test on 3 stool specimens from each of 1083 children. The sensitivities were compared using the McNemar paired test. Using the combined outcome of the 3 different stool tests as the standard, Kato-Katz had lower sensitivity than Lumbreras rapid sedimentation tests for Ascaris lumbricoides (85.1% vs. 95.1%, p = 0.03), Hymenolepis nana (77.7% vs. 97.9%, p < 0.01), Trichuris trichura (41.7% vs. 100%, p = 0.01), hookworm (0% vs. 100%, p = 0.01), and Strongyloides stercoralis (0% vs. 88%, p < 0.01). Kato-Katz demonstrated significantly lower sensitivity, missing most T. trichiura, hookworm, and S. stercoralis infections. The combination of Kato-Katz and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation tests enables the detection of more intestinal helminths infections in post-deworming low prevalence areas. PMID:27376503

  18. [Strongyloidosis. Part VIII. Parasitological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Soroczan, Wiesław

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness and safety of the methods of detecting Strongyloides stercoralis, by passing larvae from the faeces to water, in duodenal fluid (duodenal intubation, Enterotest), in sputum and other body fluids, have been estimated. The author recommend Baermann technique for detecting S. stercoralis in individual examinations and Dancescu technique in mass field examinations. The detection of S. stercoralis larvae by the two methods ought to be checked by Fülleborn agar Petri dish technique in order to identify parasite to the species level. PMID:16888939

  19. Parasitism in Children Aged Three Years and Under: Relationship between Infection and Growth in Rural Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Maxim; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric M.; McKibben, Elisabeth; Gildengorin, Ginny; Sutherland, Laura J.; King, Charles H.; King, Christopher L.; Malhotra, Indu

    2015-01-01

    Background Parasitic infections, which are among the most common infections worldwide, disproportionately affect children; however, little is known about the impact of parasitic disease on growth in very early childhood. Our objective was to document the prevalence of parasitic infections and examine their association with growth during the first three years of life among children in coastal Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings Children enrolled in a maternal-child cohort were tested for soil transmitted helminths (STHs: Ascaris, Trichuris, hookworm, Strongyloides), protozoa (malaria, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia), filaria, and Schistosoma infection every six months from birth until age three years. Anthropometrics were measured at each visit. We used generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to examine the relationship between parasitic infections experienced in the first three years of life and growth outcomes (weight, length and head circumference). Of 545 children, STHs were the most common infection with 106 infections (19%) by age three years. Malaria followed in period prevalence with 68 infections (12%) by three years of age. Filaria and Schistosoma infection occurred in 26 (4.8%) and 16 (2.9%) children, respectively. Seven percent were infected with multiple parasites by three years of age. Each infection type (when all STHs were combined) was documented by six months of age. Decreases in growth of weight, length and head circumference during the first 36 months of life were associated with hookworm, Ascaris, E. histolytica, malaria and Schistosoma infection. In a subset analysis of 180 children who followed up at every visit through 24 months, infection with any parasite was associated with decelerations in weight, length and head circumference growth velocity. Multiple infections were associated with greater impairment of linear growth. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate an under-recognized burden of parasitism in the first

  20. A pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of four species of soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Basuni, Madihah; Muhi, Jamail; Othman, Nurulhasanah; Verweij, Jaco J; Ahmad, Maimunah; Miswan, Noorizan; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Zainudin, Nurul Shazalina; Noordin, Rahmah

    2011-02-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections remain a major public health burden in low- and middle-income countries. The traditional diagnosis by microscopic examination of fecal samples is insensitive and time-consuming. In this study, a pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was evaluated for the simultaneous detection of Ancylostoma, Necator americanus, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The results were compared with those obtained by conventional parasitological diagnostic methods. Real-time PCR was positive in 48 of 77 samples (62.3%) and microscopic examination was positive in six samples (7.8%) only (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the real-time PCR assay described in this study provides a specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of these four helminth species in epidemiological studies and monitoring of treatment programs. PMID:21292911

  1. [Geohelminths].

    PubMed

    Prieto-Pérez, Laura; Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Cabello-Úbeda, Alfonso; Petkova-Saiz, Elizabet; Górgolas-Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people in in rural areas and deprived tropical and subtropical regions are infected by soil-transmitted helminths: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and Strongyloides stercoralis. Large migratory flows have made their worldwide distribution easier. Besides being debilitating and producing a significant mortality, they cause high morbidity, leading to physical and intellectual impairment in millions of children who live in poverty. Along with the use of benzimidazoles (albendazole and mebendazole), large-scale international campaigns for treatment and prevention have decreased the number of affected individuals. However, re-infestations and benzimidazole-resistance are frequent, so there needs to be awareness about the importance and consequences of these neglected parasites. PMID:26980233

  2. Intestinal and blood parasites in the North Lore District, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Carney, W P; Masri, S; Stafford, E E; Putrali, J

    1977-06-01

    Over 1,000 stool specimens from residents of the Napu and Besoa Valleys, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia were examined. Schistosoma japonicum was detected in 31% of Napu Valley residents while in only 2% of the Besoa Valley residents. Hookworm infections were the most frequently encountered helminth parasitisms in both valleys. Other helminth parasites encountered were: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Physaloptera sp., Diphyllobothrium sp., echinostome and heterophyid trematodes. Intestinal protozoa endemic to the area were: Entamoeba histolytica, E. coli, E. hartmanni, Iodamoebe bütschlii, Giardia lamblia, Chilomastix mesnili and Trichomonas hominis. Plasmodium falciparum was responsible for malaria parasitaemias in 5% of 1353 specimens examined and Brugia malayi microfilaraemias were detected in 10% of 972 specimens examined. PMID:335530

  3. Finding ancient parasite larvae in a sample from a male living in late 17th century Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, D H; Chai, J Y; Park, E A; Lee, W; Lee, H; Lee, J S; Choi, Y M; Koh, B J; Park, J B; Oh, C S; Bok, G D; Kim, W L; Lee, E; Lee, E J; Seo, M

    2009-06-01

    Parasitological examination of samples from tombs of the Korean Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) could be helpful to researchers in understanding parasitic infection prevalence in pre-industrial Korean society. Whereas most of our previous parasitological studies revealed the presence of ancient parasite eggs in coprolites of Korean mummies, a sample from a man living in late 17th century Korea proved to be relatively unique in possessing what appeared to be several species of parasite larvae. The larvae identified included Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichostrongylus spp., along with eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Paragonimus westermani. Since ancient parasite larvae retain enough morphology to make proper species identification possible, even after long burial times, the examination of parasite larvae within ancient samples will be conducted more carefully in our future work. PMID:19071966

  4. Strongyloidiasis: A case with acute pancreatitis and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Balar, Bhavna; Niazi, Masooma; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted helminth infection, affects millions with varying prevalence worldwide. A large number of affected hosts are asymptomatic. Symptoms pertaining to pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement may be present. Manifestations of involvement beyond lung and intestine can be seen with dissemination of infection and lethal hyperinfection. Immunosuppression secondary to use of steroids or other immunosuppressants and coexistence of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 are the known risk factors for dissemination and hyperinfection. Diagnostic modalities comprise stool examination, serology and molecular testing. Stool tests are inexpensive but are limited by low sensitivity, whereas serologic and molecular tests are more precise but at the expense of higher cost. Treatment with Ivermectin or Albendazole as an alternative is safe and efficacious. We present a rare case of acute pancreatitis secondary to Strongyloides. High index of suspicion in patients specifically from endemic countries of origin and lack of other common etiologies of acute pancreatitis may help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially fatal infection. PMID:25805946

  5. Hookworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... in getting the disease is walking barefoot on ground where there are feces of people who have ...

  6. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection. Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways: Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida ...

  7. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  8. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  9. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  10. Minimal change nephrotic syndrome in a patient with strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mieko; Tamura, Masahito; Kabashima, Narutoshi; Serino, Ryota; Shibata, Tatsuya; Miyamoto, Tetsu; Furuno, Yumi; Nishio, Tetsuo; Ohara, Jiro; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis, a chronic infection caused by the intestinal parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, is prevalent in the Nansei Islands of Japan. Here, we report our findings on a case of strongyloidiasis complicated with steroid-resistant minimal change nephrotic syndrome in a 69-year-old male resident of Fukuoka Prefecture who had lived in Yakushima, one of the Nansei Islands, until age 15. In October 2006, he developed proteinuria and edema, and was diagnosed with minimal change nephrotic syndrome on the basis of the renal biopsy findings. Following treatment with prednisolone, the level of proteinuria decreased to 0.29 g/day by day 35. However, 5 days later (day 40), the patient developed persistent watery diarrhea and vomiting, leading to dehydration and malnutrition. Pneumonia and bacterial meningitis subsequently developed (day 146); filarial (infectious-type) and rhabditiform (noninfectious-type) S. stercoralis larvae were detected for the first time in the patient's sputum, gastric juice, feces, and urine. Although treatment with ivermectin was started immediately and the parasitosis responded to the treatment, the patient died of sepsis. Consequently, although strongyloidiasis is a rare infection except in endemic regions, it is essential to consider the possibility of this disease and begin treatment early for patients who have lived in endemic areas and who complain of unexplained diarrhea during steroid-induced or other immunosuppression. PMID:20224878

  11. IL-10- and TGFβ-mediated Th9 Responses in a Human Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Jagannathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Background Th9 cells are a subset of CD4+ T cells that express the protoypical cytokine, IL-9. Th9 cells are known to effect protective immunity in animal models of intestinal helminth infections. However, the role of Th9 cells in human intestinal helminth infections has never been examined. Methodology To examine the role of Th9 cells in Strongyloidis stercoralis (Ss), a common intestinal helminth infection, we compared the frequency of Th9 expressing IL-9 either singly (mono-functional) or co-expressing IL-4 or IL-10 (dual-functional) in Ss-infected individuals (INF) to frequencies in uninfected (UN) individuals. Principal Findings INF individuals exhibited a significant increase in the spontaneously expressed and/or antigen specific frequencies of both mono- and dual-functional Th9 cells as well as Th2 cells expressing IL-9 compared to UN. The differences in Th9 induction between INF and UN individuals was predominantly antigen-specific as the differences were no longer seen following control antigen or mitogen stimulation. In addition, the increased frequency of Th9 cells in response to parasite antigens was dependent on IL-10 and TGFx since neutralization of either of these cytokines resulted in diminished Th9 frequencies. Finally, following successful treatment of Ss infection, the frequencies of antigen-specific Th9 cells diminished in INF individuals, suggesting a role for the Th9 response in active Ss infection. Moreover, IL-9 levels in whole blood culture supernatants following Ss antigen stimulation were higher in INF compared to UN individuals. Conclusion Thus, Ss infection is characterized by an IL-10- and TGFβ dependent expansion of Th9 cells, an expansion found to reversible by anti-helmintic treatment. PMID:26730582

  12. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a clinico-pathologic study of twenty-six patients from Martinique.

    PubMed

    Plumelle, Y; Pascaline, N; Nguyen, D; Panelatti, G; Jouannelle, A; Jouault, H; Imbert, M

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) were identified between 1983 and 1991 in Martinique (French West Indies). There were 14 men and 12 women, all of mixed racial descent and born in Martinique. Their ages ranged from 23 to 95 years. The main clinical and laboratory features at initial presentation were peripheral lymphadenopathy (22 cases), hepatomegaly (11 cases), splenomegaly (10 cases), cutaneous lesions (12 cases), hypercalcemia (16 cases), refractory infection by Strongyloides stercoralis (12 cases), and pre-existing autoimmune disorders (4 cases). All patients had absolute lymphocytosis with circulating pleomorphic abnormal lymphocytes. The prognosis was poor, with most patients (20 cases) surviving for less than 6 months. Although the overall clinicopathologic features of ATLL in this series are similar to those described in previous reports, we observed three additional points of interest: a high association with Strongyloides infection, an increased incidence of tropical spastic paresis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) among the relatives of the patients (5 cases), and the presence of prior collagen vascular diseases. PMID:8113152

  13. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  14. Prevalence of endoparasitic infections in wild cervids of Army Golf Course, Mathura.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Ashish; Sudan, Vikrant; Singh, Ranbir; Shanker, Daya; Parashar, Rahul

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate, through cross-sectional survey, the distribution, types and prevalence of gastro-intestinal parasites affecting wild cervids of Army Golf Course, Mathura. The copro samples were collected from animals of either sex and of different age groups and examined for copro examination by flotation and sedimentation techniques followed by copro culture and Bearmans technique for the identification of helminth species using standard keys. A total of 46 samples were screened. Single parasite infections (30 %) were more common than two or more infections (12 %). The data on the distribution of the various worm species in the positive animals indicate that Haemonchus spp. eggs (32 %) was more predominant followed by Hookworms (21 %); Strongyloides spp. (13 %) and Oesophagostomum spp. (5 %). Coccidian infections with eimerian species was found in (28 %) while Isospora spp. was found in (8 %) cases. The present study has generated an important data regarding parasitism of these wild animals which is of immense significance from epidemiological point of view. Further, more detailed parasitological studies are needed and future research on wild animal population dynamics should not neglect parasitic infections, which are of great importance for species conservation. PMID:25320482

  15. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each ... infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute ...

  16. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Coronaviruses are common viruses that most people get some time in their life. They are common throughout the world, and they can infect people and animals. Several different coronaviruses can infect people ...

  17. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  18. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  19. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making ...

  20. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are ...

  1. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical risk factors include a long surgical time, instrumentation and re-operations. Infections occur in up to 4% of surgical cases despite the numerous preventative measures that are taken. The likelihood of an infection ...

  2. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  3. Helminthiasis: Hookworm Infection Remains a Public Health Problem in Dera District, South Gondar, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Mengistu, Agmas Dessalegn

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections are significant cause of morbidity and mortality in endemic countries. In Ethiopia, helminthiasis was the third leading cause of outpatient visits. Despite the health extension program was launched to address this problem, there is limited information on the burden of intestinal parasites after implementation of the program in our setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the intestinal helminthic infections among clients attending at Anbesame health center, South Gondar, Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at Anbesame health center from March to June 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 464 study participants selected consecutively. Stool specimen collection, processing through formol-ether concentration technique and microscopic examination for presence of parasites were carried out. Data were entered, cleaned and analyzed using SPSS Version 20. Results Among the total 464 study participants with median (±IQR) age of 25.0 (±21.75) years, 262 (56.5%) were females. Helminthic infection was found in 97 (20.9%) participants. Hookworm (68 [14.7%]) was the predominant parasite followed by S. mansoni (11 [2.4%]), E. vermicularis (9 [1.9%]) and S. stercoralis (5 [1.1%]). Patients with age group ≥15 years (AOR: 5.26; 95% CI: 2.05–13.46; P: 0.001) and walking barefoot (AOR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.08–4.48; P: 0.031) were more vulnerable from the hookworm infections. Conclusions There was a high burden of hookworm infections in our setting. Hence, regular shoes wearing, considering all age groups in the albendazole deworming as mass treatment and environmental hygiene are important interventions to reduce the burden of such neglected tropical disease. PMID:26657490

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Single and Double Doses of Ivermectin versus 7-Day High Dose Albendazole for Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Premasathian, Nalinee; Bhumimuang, Kid; Waywa, Duangdao; Nilganuwong, Surasak; Karuphong, Ekkapun; Anekthananon, Thanomsak; Wanachiwanawin, Darawan; Silpasakorn, Saowaluk

    2011-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis, caused by an intestinal helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, is common throughout the tropics. It remains an important health problem due to autoinfection, which may result in hyperinfection and disseminated infection in immunosuppressed patients, especially patients receiving chemotherapy or corticosteroid treatment. Ivermectin and albendazole are effective against strongyloidiasis. However, the efficacy and the most effective dosing regimen are to be determined. Methods A prospective, randomized, open study was conducted in which a 7-day course of oral albendazole 800 mg daily was compared with a single dose (200 microgram/kilogram body weight), or double doses, given 2 weeks apart, of ivermectin in Thai patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. Patients were followed-up with 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, then 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 1 year after treatment. Combination of direct microscopic examination of fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method, and modified Koga agar plate culture were used to detect strongyloides larvae in two consecutive fecal samples in each follow-up visit. The primary endpoint was clearance of strongyloides larvae from feces after treatment and at one year follow-up. Results Ninety patients were included in the analysis (30, 31 and 29 patients in albendazole, single dose, and double doses ivermectin group, respectively). All except one patient in this study had at least one concomitant disease. Diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythrematosus, nephrotic syndrome, hematologic malignancy, solid tumor and human immunodeficiency virus infection were common concomitant diseases in these patients. The median (range) duration of follow-up were 19 (2–76) weeks in albendazole group, 39 (2–74) weeks in single dose ivermectin group, and 26 (2–74) weeks in double doses ivermectin group. Parasitological cure rate were 63.3%, 96.8% and 93.1% in albendazole, single dose oral ivermectin

  5. TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25677998

  6. Gastrointestinal symbionts of chimpanzees in Cantanhez National Park, Guinea-Bissau with respect to habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Sá, Rui M; Petrášová, Jana; Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Profousová, Ilona; Petrželková, Klára J; Sousa, Cláudia; Cable, Joanne; Bruford, Michael W; Modrý, David

    2013-10-01

    One of the major factors threatening chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) in Guinea-Bissau is habitat fragmentation. Such fragmentation may cause changes in symbiont dynamics resulting in increased susceptibility to infection, changes in host specificity and virulence. We monitored gastrointestinal symbiotic fauna of three chimpanzee subpopulations living within Cantanhez National Park (CNP) in Guinea Bissau in the areas with different levels of anthropogenic fragmentation. Using standard coproscopical methods (merthiolate-iodine formalin concentration and Sheather's flotation) we examined 102 fecal samples and identified at least 13 different symbiotic genera (Troglodytella abrassarti, Troglocorys cava, Blastocystis spp., Entamoeba spp., Iodamoeba butschlii, Giardia intestinalis, Chilomastix mesnili, Bertiella sp., Probstmayria gombensis, unidentified strongylids, Strongyloides stercoralis, Strongyloides fuelleborni, and Trichuris sp.). The symbiotic fauna of the CNP chimpanzees is comparable to that reported for other wild chimpanzee populations, although CNP chimpanzees have a higher prevalence of Trichuris sp. Symbiont richness was higher in chimpanzee subpopulations living in fragmented forests compared to the community inhabiting continuous forest area. We reported significantly higher prevalence of G. intestinalis in chimpanzees from fragmented areas, which could be attributed to increased contact with humans and livestock. PMID:23776090

  7. Gastrointestinal nematode infection in small ruminants in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Asmare, Kassahun; Sheferaw, Desie; Aragaw, Kassaye; Abera, Mesele; Sibhat, Berhanu; Haile, Aynalem; Kiara, Henry; Szonyi, Barbara; Skjerve, Eystein; Wieland, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a major health challenge affecting productive and reproductive performance of sheep and goats in Ethiopia. However, there is no comprehensive summary on the occurrence and distribution of the infection at national level. This systematic review provides pooled prevalence estimates and assesses potential predictors of the nematode infections in small ruminants, i.e. helpful in planning interventions or control strategies. The review used 50 animal level datasets retrieved from 24 manuscripts. The studies used data collected from 9407 sheep and 3478 goats. A meta-analytical approach was employed to analyze Effect size (ES). The reported GI nematodes represented eleven genera affecting sheep and goats including: Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Teladorsagia/Ostertagia, Strongyloides, Bunostomum, Nematodirus, Chabertia, Trichuris, Cooperia, Skrjabinema and Oesophagostomum. The GI nematodes pooled prevalence estimate in the random effect model was 75.8% (95% CI: 69.6, 80.8). The subgroup analysis revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in the prevalence between different regions and type of diagnostic methods used. 'Postmortem technique' and 'eastern part of the country' were associated with higher GI nematode prevalence and accounted for 68.1% of the between studies heterogeneity. In light of the high parasitic prevalence in all agro-ecologies, the need for strategic intervention is recommended. Meanwhile, data need to be generated for some of the regions where dependable survey reports are lacking. PMID:27154584

  8. Norovirus Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Norovirus Infection Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical ...

  9. Imaging infection.

    PubMed

    Ketai, Loren; Jordan, Kirk; Busby, Katrina H

    2015-06-01

    Thoracic imaging is widely used to detect lower respiratory tract infections, identify their complications, and aid in differentiating infectious from noninfectious thoracic disease. Less commonly, the combination of imaging findings and a clinical setting can favor infection with a specific organism. This confluence can occur in cases of bronchiectatic nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in immune-competent hosts, invasive fungal disease among neutropenic patients, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in patients with AIDS, and in cytomegalovirus infections in patients with recent hematopoietic cell transplantation. These specific diagnoses often depend on computed tomography scanning rather than chest radiography alone. PMID:26024600

  10. Smear of duodenal fluid aspirate

    MedlinePlus

    ... check for signs of an infection (such as giardia or strongyloides ). Rarely, this test is also done ... The results may show the presence of giardia protozoa, the intestinal parasite strongyloides, or another infectious organism.

  11. Development of Ss-NIE-1 Recombinant Antigen Based Assays for Immunodiagnosis of Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rascoe, Lisa N.; Price, Courtney; Shin, Sun Hee; McAuliffe, Isabel; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Handali, Sukwan

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a widely distributed parasite that infects 30 to 100 million people worldwide. In the United States strongyloidiasis is recognized as an important infection in immigrants and refugees. Public health and commercial reference laboratories need a simple and reliable method for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis to identify and treat cases and to prevent transmission. The recognized laboratory test of choice for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is detection of disease specific antibodies, most commonly using a crude parasite extract for detection of IgG antibodies. Recently, a luciferase tagged recombinant protein of S. stercoralis, Ss-NIE-1, has been used in a luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) to detect IgG and IgG4 specific antibodies. To promote wider adoption of immunoassays for strongyloidiasis, we used the Ss-NIE-1 recombinant antigen without the luciferase tag and developed ELISA and fluorescent bead (Luminex) assays to detect S. stercoralis specific IgG4. We evaluated the assays using well-characterized sera from persons with or without presumed strongyloidiasis. The sensitivity and specificity of Ss-NIE-1 IgG4 ELISA were 95% and 93%, respectively. For the IgG4 Luminex assay, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 95%, respectively. Specific IgG4 antibody decreased after treatment in a manner that was similar to the decrease of specific IgG measured in the crude IgG ELISA. The sensitivities of the Ss-NIE-1 IgG4 ELISA and Luminex assays were comparable to the crude IgG ELISA but with improved specificities. However, the Ss-NIE-1 based assays are not dependent on native parasite materials and can be performed using widely available laboratory equipment. In conclusion, these newly developed Ss-NIE-1 based immunoassays can be readily adopted by public health and commercial reference laboratories for routine screening and clinical diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection in refugees and immigrants in the United States. PMID

  12. Development of Ss-NIE-1 recombinant antigen based assays for immunodiagnosis of strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Rascoe, Lisa N; Price, Courtney; Shin, Sun Hee; McAuliffe, Isabel; Priest, Jeffrey W; Handali, Sukwan

    2015-04-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a widely distributed parasite that infects 30 to 100 million people worldwide. In the United States strongyloidiasis is recognized as an important infection in immigrants and refugees. Public health and commercial reference laboratories need a simple and reliable method for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis to identify and treat cases and to prevent transmission. The recognized laboratory test of choice for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is detection of disease specific antibodies, most commonly using a crude parasite extract for detection of IgG antibodies. Recently, a luciferase tagged recombinant protein of S. stercoralis, Ss-NIE-1, has been used in a luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) to detect IgG and IgG4 specific antibodies. To promote wider adoption of immunoassays for strongyloidiasis, we used the Ss-NIE-1 recombinant antigen without the luciferase tag and developed ELISA and fluorescent bead (Luminex) assays to detect S. stercoralis specific IgG4. We evaluated the assays using well-characterized sera from persons with or without presumed strongyloidiasis. The sensitivity and specificity of Ss-NIE-1 IgG4 ELISA were 95% and 93%, respectively. For the IgG4 Luminex assay, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 95%, respectively. Specific IgG4 antibody decreased after treatment in a manner that was similar to the decrease of specific IgG measured in the crude IgG ELISA. The sensitivities of the Ss-NIE-1 IgG4 ELISA and Luminex assays were comparable to the crude IgG ELISA but with improved specificities. However, the Ss-NIE-1 based assays are not dependent on native parasite materials and can be performed using widely available laboratory equipment. In conclusion, these newly developed Ss-NIE-1 based immunoassays can be readily adopted by public health and commercial reference laboratories for routine screening and clinical diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection in refugees and immigrants in the United States. PMID

  13. Molecular diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in tropical areas: a comparison of conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction with parasitological methods

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Fabiana Martins; Malta, Fernanda de Mello; Marques, Priscilla Duarte; Sitta, Renata Barnabé; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis from stool samples in tropical areas. Stool samples were collected from individuals and were determined to be positive for Strongyloides stercoralis (group I), negative for S. stercoralis (group II) and positive for other enteroparasite species (group III). DNA specific to S. stercoralis was found in 76.7% of group I samples by cPCR and in 90% of group I samples by qPCR. The results show that molecular methods can be used as alternative tools for detecting S. stercoralis in human stool samples in tropical areas. PMID:25946255

  14. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... similar to tuberculosis: Cough Weight loss Coughing up blood or mucus Weakness or fatigue Fever and chills Night sweats Lack of appetite and weight loss Medicines can treat these infections, but often more than one is needed to cure the infection.

  15. Postpartum Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News ... Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's Health Issues ... Bladder and Kidney Infections Breast Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum ...

  16. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent injury to the bone. You may also be at risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and fever Swelling, warmth, and redness A blood ...

  17. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for a variety of acute and chronic diseases in poultry. These diseases continue to cause economically significant losses in many nations and absorb a large investment of resources in testing and control efforts in others. Infected poul...

  18. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... include fever, headache or body aches. Treatment includes bed rest and lots of liquids to prevent dehydration. There is no specific medicine to treat norovirus infections. Proper hand washing and safe food preparation may help prevent infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  19. Cross-Sectional Study on the Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors in Teda Health Centre, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Abraraw; Kibret, Biniam; Bekalu, Eylachew; Abera, Sendeku; Teklu, Takele; Yalew, Aregawi; Worku, Ligabaw; Tekeste, Zinaye

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection and associated risk factors in Teda Health Centre, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Teda Health Centre from February to April, 2011. Stool samples were collected from 410 study participants and analysed by direct wet mount and formal ether concentration techniques. Furthermore, sociodemographic data were collected by using standardized questionnaire. Result. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in this study was 62.3%. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite (23.2%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (12.4%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (4.6%), Schistosoma mansoni (8.9%), hookworm (6.6%), Hymenolepis nana (1.5%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (0.2%). Absence of toilet and hand washing after toilet was shown to be associated with intestinal parasitic infection (P < 0.05 for both). Furthermore, swimming and less shoe wearing habits showed a significant prevalence of S. mansoni and hookworm infections, respectively. Conclusion. The present study showed high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in the study area. Absence of toilet and hand washing after toilet was found to be associated with intestinal parasitic infection. Therefore, there is a need for integrated control programme to have a lasting impact on transmission of intestinal parasitic infection. PMID:27335860

  20. Development of cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase based Dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anju; Raina, O K; Nagar, Gaurav; Garg, Rajat; Banerjee, P S; Maharana, B R; Kollannur, Justin D

    2012-02-10

    Native cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase (28 kDa) was purified from the excretory secretory products of Fasciola gigantica and was used for sero-diagnosis of F. gigantica infection in buffaloes by Dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA). The test detected F. gigantica field infection in these animals with a sensitivity of ∼ 90%. No specific IgG antibody binding was displayed by sera obtained from 76 buffaloes considered to be Fasciola and other parasite-free by microscopic examination of faeces and necropsy examination of liver, rumen and intestine. Additionally, sera from 156 Fasciola-free buffaloes, yet infected with Gigantocotyle explanatum, Paramphistomum epiclitum, Gastrothylax spp., Strongyloides papillosus and hydatid cyst were all negative, indicating that F. gigantica cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase does not cross-react with these helminth parasites in natural infection of the host. The data indicated that cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase based Dot-ELISA reached ∼ 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity with relation to above parasites in the detection of bubaline fasciolosis. The present Dot-ELISA diagnostic assay is relevant to the field diagnosis of F. gigantica infection in buffaloes. PMID:22055612

  1. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of skin infections (eg, impetigo, pimples, boils). Staphylococcus aureus also causes toxin-related illnesses, including toxic shock syndrome, scalded skin syndrome, and staphylococcal-related food poisoning. In fact, ... Staphylococcus that you should be familiar with include the ...

  2. Hand Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread to others. Necrotizing Fasciitis, or “Flesh-Eating Bacteria” Necrotizing fasciitis is a very rare but severe infection. Streptococcus pyogenes or other “flesh-eating bacteria” enter the body through a cut. Bacteria toxins ...

  3. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two vaccines. One is for infants and young children. The other is for people ...

  4. Whipworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Trichuris trichiura egg References Diemert DJ. Intestinal nematode infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 365. Maguire JH. Intestinal nematodes (roundworms). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, ...

  5. Hantavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathe infected air or come into contact with rodents or their urine or droppings. You cannot catch ... symptoms include coughing and shortness of breath. Controlling rodents in and around your house is the best ...

  6. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? A tube called the eustachian (say: "you-stay-shee-an") tube connects the middle ear with the back of the nose. Normally this ...

  7. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  8. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... nearby What to Do Teach kids not to pop, pick at, or scratch pimples, pus-filled infections, ... Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your ...

  9. Campylobacter infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Giardia infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...