Science.gov

Sample records for structural materials research

  1. Recent global trends in structural materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hideyuki; Ohmura, Takahito; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    Structural materials support the basis of global society, such as infrastructure and transportation facilities, and are therefore essential for everyday life. The optimization of such materials allows people to overcome environmental, energy and resource depletion issues on a global scale. The creation and manufacture of structural materials make a large contribution to economies around the world every year. The use of strong, resistant materials can also have profound social effects, providing a better quality of life at both local and national levels. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused significant structural damage in the Tohoku and Kanto regions of Japan. On a global scale, accidents caused by the ageing and failure of structural materials occur on a daily basis. Therefore, the provision and inspection of structural reliability, safety of nuclear power facilities and construction of a secure and safe society hold primary importance for researchers and engineers across the world. Clearly, structural materials need to evolve further to address both existing problems and prepare for new challenges that may be faced in the future. With this in mind, the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) organized the 'NIMS Conference 2012' to host an extensive discussion on a variety of global issues related to the future development of structural materials. Ranging from reconstruction following natural disasters, verification of structural reliability, energy-saving materials to fundamental problems accompanying the development of materials for high safety standards, the conference covered many key issues in the materials industry today. All the above topics are reflected in this focus issue of STAM, which introduces recent global trends in structural materials research with contributions from world-leading researchers in this field. This issue covers the development of novel alloys, current methodologies in the characterization of structural

  2. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  3. Structural biological materials: Overview of current research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.-Y.; Lin, A. Y.-M.; Stokes, A. G.; Seki, Y.; Bodde, S. G.; McKittrick, J.; Meyers, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Through specific biological examples this article illustrates the complex designs that have evolved in nature to address strength, toughness, and weight optimization. Current research is reviewed, and the structure of some shells, bones, antlers, crab exoskeletons, and avian feathers and beaks is described using the principles of materials science and engineering by correlating the structure with mechanical properties. In addition, the mechanisms of deformation and failure are discussed.

  4. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  5. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  6. Research in Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and Materials (SDM) Conference was held on April 2 to 4, 1990 in Long Beach, California. This publication is a compilation of presentations of the work-in-progress sessions and does not contain papers from the regular sessions since those papers are published by AIAA in the conference proceedings.

  7. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  8. Research in structures, structural dynamics and materials, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William F. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Topics addressed include: composite plates; buckling predictions; missile launch tube modeling; structural/control systems design; optimization of nonlinear R/C frames; error analysis for semi-analytic displacement; crack acoustic emission; and structural dynamics.

  9. Progress in materials and structures at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Lauver, R. W.; Halford, G. R.; Davies, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The development of power and propulsion system technology is discussed. Specific emphasis is placed on the following: high temperature materials; composite materials; advanced design and life prediction; and nondestructive evaluation. Future areas of research are also discussed.

  10. Research and Technology Advisory Committee on Materials and Structures: Report of meeting, February 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on Materials and Structures is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) basic materials research: (2) fracture control: (3) aerospace vehicle dynamics and control: and (4) tramp elements in fuels and alloys.

  11. Structural materials research for lighter-than-air systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, V. L., Jr.; Mchatton, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Inflatable systems have widespread applications in military, government, and industrial sectors. Improvements in inflatable materials have followed each salient advancement in textiles. The new organic fiber, Kevlar, is a recent and most significant advancement that justified reexamination of old and new inflatable materials' applications. A fertile frontier exists in integrating Kevlar with various other material combinations, in optimization of geometric features, and in selection of thermomechanical characteristics' compatibility with the environment. Expectations regarding Kevlar have been justified by the performance of two experimental materials. Styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymers appear promising as a constituent adhesive for low temperature applications. Biaxial testing for both strength and material elastic properties is a technology area needing greater awareness and technology growth along with improved facilities. Because of dramatic materials' advancements, inflatable systems appear to be moving toward an increased position in tomorrow's aerospace industry.

  12. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, Samuel L.

    1988-01-01

    Information on materials and structures for use in space is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on the Materials and Structures Division of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. The Division's space research and development budget is given. Further information is given on space materials and structures, space environmental effects, radiation effects, high temperature materials research, metal matrix composites, SiC fiber reinforced titanium alloys, structural dynamics, and control of flexible structures.

  13. Materials and Structures Research for Gas Turbine Applications Within the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current materials and structures research geared toward propulsion applications for NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project one of four projects within the Fundamental Aeronautics Program of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project has selected challenging goals which anticipate an increasing emphasis on aviation s impact upon the global issue of environmental responsibility. These goals are greatly reduced noise, reduced emissions and reduced fuel consumption and address 25 to 30 years of technology development. Successful implementation of these demanding goals will require development of new materials and structural approaches within gas turbine propulsion technology. The Materials and Structures discipline, within the SFW project, comprise cross-cutting technologies ranging from basic investigations to component validation in laboratory environments. Material advances are teamed with innovative designs in a multidisciplinary approach with the resulting technology advances directed to promote the goals of reduced noise and emissions along with improved performance.

  14. Overview of DOE-NE Structural Materials Research, Materials Challenges and Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2012-06-12

    This presentation summarized materials conditions for application of nanomaterials to reactor components. Material performance is essential to reactor performance, economics, and safety. A modern reactor design utilizes many different materials and material systems to achieve safe and reliable performance. Material performance in these harsh environments is very complex and many different forms of degradation may occur (often together in synergistic fashions). New materials science techniques may also help understand degradation modes and develop new manufacturing and fabrication techniques.

  15. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 2. [airframe structures and materials, systems integration, economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advances in airframe structure and materials technology for supersonic cruise aircraft are reported with emphasis on titanium and composite structures. The operation of the Concorde is examined as a baseline for projections into the future. A market survey of U.S. passenger attitudes and preferences, the impact of advanced air transport technology and the integration of systems for the advanced SST and for a smaller research/business jet vehicle are also discussed.

  16. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  17. A Place for Materials Science: University of Pennsylvania's Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Brittany

    2013-03-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) opened its doors in 1965. Constructed to house cutting-edge research on Materials Science, the LRSM building was designed to foster interdisciplinary research among physicists, chemists and metallurgical engineers. Each of the five floors of the new building included a central facility, including a high magnetic field center, an analytical chemistry research center and an electron microscopy center. While primarily funded by the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Projects Agency, the LRSM also was also partly sponsored by industry. The LRSM received funding from Philadelphia Electric Company, General Electric Company, and IBM, among others. In this paper, I will study how the building was designed to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, while also becoming a place of intersection among academic, private, and governmental interests. This project is a collaboration with Hyungsub Choi.

  18. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  19. Structures research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Saba, Elias; Mcginley, Williams; Shen, Ji-Yao

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of the structures group is to provide quality aerospace research with the Center for Aerospace Research - A NASA Center for Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. The group includes dedicated faculty and students who have a proven record in the area of structures, in particular space structures. The participating faculty developed accurate mathematical models and effective computational algorithms to characterize the flexibility parameters of joint dominated beam-truss structures. Both experimental and theoretical modelling has been applied to the dynamic mode shapes and mode frequencies for a large truss system. During the past few months, the above procedures has been applied to the hypersonic transport plane model. The plane structure has been modeled as a lumped mass system by Doctor Abu-Saba while Doctor Shen applied the transfer matrix method with a piecewise continuous Timoshenko tapered beam model. Results from both procedures compare favorably with those obtained using the finite element method. These two methods are more compact and require less computer time than the finite element method. The group intends to perform experiments on structural systems including the hypersonic plane model to verify the results from the theoretical models.

  20. Aeroelastic Tailoring of the NASA Common Research Model via Novel Material and Structural Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Moore, James B.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of tow steered composite laminates, functionally graded metals (FGM), thickness distributions, and curvilinear rib/spar/stringer topologies for aeroelastic tailoring. Parameterized models of the Common Research Model (CRM) wing box have been developed for passive aeroelastic tailoring trade studies. Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Compared to a baseline structure, the lowest aggregate static wing stresses could be obtained with tow steered skins (47% improvement), and many of these designs could reduce weight as well (up to 14%). For these structures, the trade-off between flutter speed and weight is generally strong, although one case showed both a 100% flutter improvement and a 3.5% weight reduction. Material grading showed no benefit in the skins, but moderate flutter speed improvements (with no weight or stress increase) could be obtained by grading the spars (4.8%) or ribs (3.2%), where the best flutter results were obtained by grading both thickness and material. For the topology work, large weight reductions were obtained by removing an inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straightrotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. These results will guide the development of a future design optimization scheme established to exploit and combine the individual attributes of these technologies.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  2. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  3. Materials research at CMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  4. Materials research at CMAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-18

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  5. Materials Research Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofan, Andrew J.

    1986-01-01

    Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites, ceramics, coatings, processing techniques, etc., which are now also in use by U.S. industry. This brochure highlights selected past accomplishments of our materials research and technology staff. It also provides many examples of the facilities available with which we can conduct materials research. The nation is now beginning to consider integrating technology for high-performance supersonic/hypersonic aircraft, nuclear space power systems, a space station, and new research areas such as materials processing in space. As we proceed, I am confident that our materials research staff will continue to provide important contributions which will help our nation maintain a strong technology position in these areas of growing world competition. Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites

  6. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  7. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  8. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  9. Research In Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Report reviews current research in thermoelectric materials with view towards development of materials of greater energy-conversion efficiency. Emphasis on effort to understand and manipulate microstructure to increase thermoelectric figure of merit, Z. Thermoelectric properties of three broad categories of materials discussed. First category includes alloys of group IV elements like silicon and germanium. Second category is rare-earth chalcogenides. Third category includes narrow-band semiconductors, especially boron carbides.

  10. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  11. Computational Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature thermoplastic polyimide polymers are incorporated in engineering structures in the form of matrix materials in advanced fiber composites and adhesives in bonded joints. Developing analytical tools to predict long term performance and screen for final materials selection for polymers is the impetus for intensive studies at NASA and major industry based airframe developers. These fiber-reinforced polymeric composites (FRPCs) combine high strength with lightweight. In addition, they offer corrosion and fatigue resistance, a reduction in parts count, and new possibilities for control through aeroelastic tailoring and "smart" structures containing fully-integrated sensors and actuators. However, large-scale acceptance and use of polymer composites has historically been extremely slow. Reasons for this include a lack of familiarity of designers with the materials; the need for new tooling and new inspection and repair infrastructures; and high raw materials and fabrication costs.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  13. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  14. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  15. Interdisciplinary research and development on the effects of the nature and properties of ceramic materials in the design of advanced structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An educational development and supportive research program on ceramic materials established to advance design methodology, improve materials, and develop engineers knowledgable in design with and use of high performance ceramic materials is described. Emphasis is on the structures and related materials problems in a ceramic turbine engine, but applications in coal gasification, solar conversion, and magnetohydrodynamic technologies are considered. Progress of various research projects in the areas of new materials, processing, characterization, and nondestructive testing is reported. Fracture toughness determination, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements, and grain boundary effects in beta-alumina are among the topics covered.

  16. Materials and innovations for large blade structures : research opportunities in wind energy technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2009-05-01

    The significant growth in wind turbine installations in the past few years has fueled new scenarios that envision even larger expansion of U.S. wind electricity generation from the current 1.5% to 20% by 2030. Such goals are achievable and would reduce carbon dioxide emissions and energy dependency on foreign sources. In conjunction with such growth are the enhanced opportunities for manufacturers, developers, and researchers to participate in this renewable energy sector. Ongoing research activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories will continue to contribute to these opportunities. This paper focuses on describing the current research efforts at Sandia's wind energy department, which are primarily aimed at developing large rotors that are lighter, more reliable and produce more energy.

  17. Structural aspects of metal-organic framework-based energy materials research at Diamond

    PubMed Central

    Allan, David R.; Blake, Alexander J.; Schröder, Martin; Tang, Chiu C.; Yang, Sihai

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale central facilities such as Diamond Light Source fulfil an increasingly pivotal role in many large-scale scientific research programmes. We illustrate these developments by reference to energy-centred projects at the University of Nottingham, the progress of which depends crucially on access to these facilities. Continuing access to beamtime has now become a major priority for those who direct such programmes. PMID:25624515

  18. Cryogenic structural materials for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-02-22

    This paper reviews research in the United States and Japan on structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets are used for magnetic fusion energy devices and for accelerators that are used in particle-physics research. The cryogenic structural materials that we review are used for magnet cases and support structures. We expect increased materials requirements in the future.

  19. Advanced desiccant materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Thomas, T. M.

    1986-05-01

    The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

  20. Research on the exploitation of advanced composite materials to lightly loaded structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The objective was to create a sailplane which could fly in weaker thermals than present day sailplanes (by being lighter) and to fly in stronger thermals than present sailplanes (by carrying more water ballast). The research was to tackle the interaction of advanced composites and the aerodynamic performance, the interaction of fabrication procedures and the advanced composites, and the interaction of advanced composites and the design process. Many pieces of the overall system were investigated but none were carried to the resolution required for engineering application. Nonetheless, interesting and useful results were obtained and are here reported.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  4. Materials Science Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Microgravity materials processing experiments provide an opportunity to perform scientific research in an environment which allows one to observe various phenomena without the masking effects of gravity-driven convective flows, buoyancy, or contaminating influences of walled containers. Even for the most experienced scientists, it is still difficult to predict beforehand, whether or not microgravity experimentation can be successfully performed in space and achieve solutions to problems which are not attainable in 1 g. Consequently, experimentation in ground based facilities which are capable of simulating, in somewhat lesser time frames and to a lesser degree of microgravity, provides a unique low-cost approach to determine the feasibility of continuing research in a particular experiment. The utilization of these facilities in developing the full requirements for a space experiment does present a very cost-effective approach to microgravity experimentation. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides an excellent test bed for containerless processing experiments such as described here. These facilities have demonstrated for a number of years the capability to develop insight into space experiments involving containerless processing, rapid solidification, and wetting phenomena through the use of lower-cost ground facilities. Once sufficient data has been obtained, then a space-based experiment can be better defined.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  6. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  7. Materials and structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Halford, G. R.; Levine, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Materials and structures performance limitations, particularly for the hot section of the engine in which these limitations limit the life of components, are considered. Failure modes for components such as blades, vanes, and combustors and how they are affected by the environment for such components are discussed. Methods used to improve the materials used for such components are: (1) application of directional structures to turbine components for high strength at high temperatures; (2) improved coatings to increase oxidation and corrosion resistance; (3) increase strength and stiffness with reduced weight by applying higher specific properties of composite materials; and (4) cost effective processing such as near net shape powder methods applied to disks. Life prediction techniques developed to predict component life accurately in advance of service and progress in improving the intermediate and cold section components of turbine engines are covered.

  8. Electronics materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The electronic materials and is aimed at the establishment of quantitative relationships underlying crystal growth parameters, materials properties, electronic characteristics and device applications. The overall program evolves about the following main thrust areas: (1) crystal growth novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials; (2) investigation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro and microscale; (3) surface properties and surface interactions with the bulk and ambients; (4) electronic properties controlling device applications and device performance.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  10. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Encapsulation materials for solar cells were investigated. The different phases consisted of: (1) identification and development of low cost module encapsulation materials; (2) materials reliability examination; and (3) process sensitivity and process development. It is found that outdoor photothermal aging devices (OPT) are the best accelerated aging methods, simulate worst case field conditions, evaluate formulation and module performance and have a possibility for life assessment. Outdoor metallic copper exposure should be avoided, self priming formulations have good storage stability, stabilizers enhance performance, and soil resistance treatment is still effective.

  11. Materials research at Stanford University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Information briefly describing the total research activity related to the science of materials is reported. Emphasis is placed on physical and mechanical properties of composite materials, energy transportation, superconductors, microwave electronics, and solid state electrochemistry.

  12. Materials science research in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H.

    1992-01-01

    There are several important attributes of an extended duration microgravity environment that offer a new dimension in the control of the microstructure, processing, and properties of materials. First, when gravitational effects are minimized, buoyancy driven convection flows are also minimized. The flows due to density differences, brought about either by composition or temperature gradients will then be reduced or eliminated to permit a more precise control of the temperature and the composition of a melt which is critical in achieving high quality crystal growth of electronic materials or alloy structures. Secondly, body force effects such as sedimentation, hydrostatic pressure, and deformation are similarly reduced. These effects may interfere with attempts to produce uniformly dispersed or aligned second phases during melt solidification. Thirdly, operating in a microgravity environment will facilitate the containerless processing of melts to eliminate the limitations of containment for reactive melts. The noncontacting forces such as those developed from electromagnet, electrostatic, or acoustic fields can be used to position samples. With this mode of operation, contamination can be minimized to enable the study of reactive melts and to eliminate extraneous crystal nucleation so that novel crystalline structures and new glass compositions may be produced. In order to take advantage of the microgravity environment for materials research, it has become clear that reliable processing models based on a sound ground based experimental experience and an established thermophysical property data base are essential.

  13. Concrete Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilby, C.B.

    1991-12-31

    Concrete Materials and Structures provides one of the most comprehensive treatments on the topic of concrete engineering. The author covers a gamut of concrete subjects ranging from concrete mix design, basic reinforced concrete theory, prestressed concrete, shell roofs, and two-way slabs-including a through presentation of Hillerborg`s strip method. Prior to Wilby`s book, the scope of these topics would require at least four separate books to cover. With this new book he has succeeded, quite remarkably, in condensing a fairly complete knowledge of concrete engineering into one single easy-to-carry volume.

  14. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    The successful use of outdoor mounting racks as an accelerated aging technique (these devices are called optal reactors); a beginning list of candidate pottant materials for thin-film encapsulation, which process at temperatures well below 100 C; and description of a preliminary flame retardant formulation for ethylene vinyl acetate which could function to increase module flammability ratings are presented.

  15. Computational Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Gates, Thomas S. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Computational Materials aims to model and predict thermodynamic, mechanical, and transport properties of polymer matrix composites. This workshop, the second coordinated by NASA Langley, reports progress in measurements and modeling at a number of length scales: atomic, molecular, nano, and continuum. Assembled here are presentations on quantum calculations for force field development, molecular mechanics of interfaces, molecular weight effects on mechanical properties, molecular dynamics applied to poling of polymers for electrets, Monte Carlo simulation of aromatic thermoplastics, thermal pressure coefficients of liquids, ultrasonic elastic constants, group additivity predictions, bulk constitutive models, and viscoplasticity characterization.

  16. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  17. Radiation effects on structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-06-28

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support.

  18. Advanced Materials for Exploration Task Research Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M. B. (Compiler); Murphy, K. L.; Schneider, T.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Materials for Exploration (AME) Activity in Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC s) Exploration Science and Technology Directorate coordinated activities from 2001 to 2006 to support in-space propulsion technologies for future missions. Working together, materials scientists and mission planners identified materials shortfalls that are limiting the performance of long-term missions. The goal of the AME project was to deliver improved materials in targeted areas to meet technology development milestones of NASA s exploration-dedicated activities. Materials research tasks were targeted in five areas: (1) Thermal management materials, (2) propulsion materials, (3) materials characterization, (4) vehicle health monitoring materials, and (5) structural materials. Selected tasks were scheduled for completion such that these new materials could be incorporated into customer development plans.

  19. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  20. Smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  1. Materials Research in Microgravity 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, R. (Editor); Bojarevis, V. (Editor); Downey, J.; Henein, H. (Editor); Matson, D.; Seidel, A. (Editor); Voss, D. (Editor); SanSoucie, M. (Compiler)

    2012-01-01

    Reducing gravitational effects such as thermal and solutal buoyancy enables investigation of a large range of different phenomena in materials science. The Symposium on Materials Research in Microgravity involved 6 sessions composed of 39 presentations and 14 posters with contributions from more than 14 countries. The sessions concentrated on four different categories of topics related to ongoing reduced-gravity research. Highlights from this symposium will be featured in the September 2012 issue of JOM. The TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division, Process Technology and Modeling Committee and Solidification Committee sponsored the symposium.

  2. West Virginia US Department of Energy experimental program to stimulate competitive research. Section 2: Human resource development; Section 3: Carbon-based structural materials research cluster; Section 3: Data parallel algorithms for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    This report consists of three separate but related reports. They are (1) Human Resource Development, (2) Carbon-based Structural Materials Research Cluster, and (3) Data Parallel Algorithms for Scientific Computing. To meet the objectives of the Human Resource Development plan, the plan includes K--12 enrichment activities, undergraduate research opportunities for students at the state`s two Historically Black Colleges and Universities, graduate research through cluster assistantships and through a traineeship program targeted specifically to minorities, women and the disabled, and faculty development through participation in research clusters. One research cluster is the chemistry and physics of carbon-based materials. The objective of this cluster is to develop a self-sustaining group of researchers in carbon-based materials research within the institutions of higher education in the state of West Virginia. The projects will involve analysis of cokes, graphites and other carbons in order to understand the properties that provide desirable structural characteristics including resistance to oxidation, levels of anisotropy and structural characteristics of the carbons themselves. In the proposed cluster on parallel algorithms, research by four WVU faculty and three state liberal arts college faculty are: (1) modeling of self-organized critical systems by cellular automata; (2) multiprefix algorithms and fat-free embeddings; (3) offline and online partitioning of data computation; and (4) manipulating and rendering three dimensional objects. This cluster furthers the state Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research plan by building on existing strengths at WVU in parallel algorithms.

  3. Chemistry and materials science research report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-31

    The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

  4. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  5. Structural materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term performance of structural materials in the space environment is a key research activity within NASA. The primary concerns for materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are atomic oxygen erosion and space debris impact. Atomic oxygen studies have included both laboratory exposures in atomic oxygen facilities and flight exposures using the Shuttle. Characterization of atomic oxygen interaction with materials has included surface recession rates, residual mechanical properties, optical property measurements, and surface analyses to establish chemical changes. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is scheduled to be retrieved in 1989 and is expected to provide a wealth of data on atomic oxygen erosion in space. Hypervelocity impact studies have been conducted to establish damage mechanisms and changes in mechanical properties. Samples from LDEF will be analyzed to determine the severity of space debris impact on coatings, films, and composites. Spacecraft placed in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) will be subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation which for long term exposures will exceed the damage threshold of many polymeric materials. Radiation interaction with polymers can result in chain scission and/or cross-linking. The formation of low molecular weight products in the epoxy plasticize the matrix at elevated temperatures and embrittle the matrix at low temperatures. This affects both the matrix-dominated mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of the composite. Embrittlement of the matrix at low temperatures results in enhanced matrix microcracking during thermal cycling. Matrix microcracking changes the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite laminates and produces permanent length changes. Residual stress calculations were performed to estimate the conditions necessary for microcrack development in unirradiated and irradiated composites. The effects of UV and electron exposure on the optical properties of transparent

  6. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.2. Joining of advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nowok, J.W.; Hurley, J.P.

    1995-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered an attractive material for structural applications in fossil energy systems because of its corrosion and wear resistance, high thermoconductivity, and high temperature strength. These same properties make it difficult to sinter or join SiC. Conventional sintering techniques require applying pressure and heating to temperatures near 2000{degree}C, or the use of binders with lower melting temperatures, or pressureless sintering with the aid of carbon and boron to near full density about 2100{degree}C. The sintering temperature can be reduced to 1850{degree}--2000{degree}C if SiC is sintered with the addition of small quantities of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {plus} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, reaction sintering has been used by mixing Si and C with SiC powder and heating the mixture to 1400{degree}C to cause the Si and C to react and form SiC, which bonds the aggregate together. Work proposed for this year was to center on determining gas compositions that could be used to increase the sinterability of oxide binders and on using the binder and gas combinations to join bars of SiC, alumina, and mullite (3Al{sub 2}O{center_dot}2SiO{sub 2}). During the course of the year the focus was shifted to SiC joining alone, because it was felt that alumina and mullite are too prone to thermal shock for use in structural applications in fossil energy systems. Because of a thermal expansion mismatch between alumina and SiC, only SiC and mullite were investigated as joining aides for SiC. Therefore, the objectives of this work evolved into examining the sintering phenomena of SiC and mullite-derived binders at and below 1500{degree}C in various atmospheres and determining which conditions are suitable to form strong joints in monolithic SiC structures to be used at temperatures of 1000{degree}--1400{degree}C.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  8. Research Ethics. Cases and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penslar, Robin Levin, Ed.

    This book is a comprehensive resource of illustrative cases for classroom discussion of research ethics in the natural sciences, the behavioral sciences, and the humanities. The materials selected for inclusion are intended to speak to people in all disciplines, though the cases are drawn from biology, psychology, and history. They cover such…

  9. Structures and materials technology for hypersonic aerospacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr.; Murrow, Harold N.; Card, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    Major considerations in structural design of a transatmospheric aerospacecraft are discussed. The general direction of progress in structures and materials technology is indicated, and technical areas in structures and materials where further research and development is necessary are indicated. Various structural concepts under study and materials which appear to be most applicable are discussed. Structural design criteria are discussed with particular attention to the factor-of-safety approach and the probabilistic approach. Structural certification requirements for the aerospacecraft are discussed. The kinds of analyses and tests which would be required to certify the structural integrity, safety, and durability of the aerospacecraft are discussed, and the type of test facility needed to perform structural certification tests is identified.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  12. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  13. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  14. Industry-Government-University Cooperative Research Program for the Development of Structural Materials from Sulfate-Rich FGD Scrubber Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    V. M. Malhotra; Y. P. Chugh

    2003-08-31

    The main aim of our project was to develop technology, which converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sulfate-rich scrubber sludge into value-added decorative materials. Specifically, we were to establish technology for fabricating cost effective but marketable materials, like countertops and decorative tiles from the sludge. In addition, we were to explore the feasibility of forming siding material from the sludge. At the end of the project, we were to establish the potential of our products by generating 64 countertop pieces and 64 tiles of various colors. In pursuit of our above-mentioned goals, we conducted Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the binders and co-processed binders to identify their curing behavior. Using our 6-inch x 6-inch and 4-inch x 4-inch high pressure and high temperature hardened stainless steel dies, we developed procedures to fabricate countertop and decorative tile materials. The composites, fabricated from sulfate-rich scrubber sludge, were subjected to mechanical tests using a three-point bending machine and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). We compared our material's mechanical performance against commercially obtained countertops. We successfully established the procedures for the development of countertop and tile composites from scrubber sludge by mounting our materials on commercial boards. We fabricated more than 64 pieces of countertop material in at least 11 different colors having different patterns. In addition, more than 100 tiles in six different colors were fabricated. We also developed procedures by which the fabrication waste, up to 30-weight %, could be recycled in the manufacturing of our countertops and decorative tiles. Our experimental results indicated that our countertops had mechanical strength, which was comparable to high-end commercial countertop materials and contained substantially larger inorganic content than the commercial products. Our moisture

  15. Research progress on polyoxometalate-based transition-metal-rare-earth heterometallic derived materials: synthetic strategies, structural overview and functional applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Li, Yan-Zhou; Chen, Li-Juan; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2016-03-15

    With the rapid development of science and technology and the trend of multidisciplinary pervasion, POM-based TM-RE heterometallic chemistry (POM = polyoxometalate, TM = transition-metal, RE = rare-earth) has become one of the most rapidly growing and challengeable areas of inorganic chemistry due to the impressive structural diversities, various chemical compositions and potential applications of these materials in magnetism, optics, electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and materials science. Over the past several years, continuous interest and persisting efforts have been dedicated to the preparation and exploration of POM-based TM-RE heterometallic derived materials (PTRHDMs), which have led to more than two hundred PTRHDMs. In this review, we summarize the structural types of reported PTRHDMs together with synthetic strategies, structural motifs and relevant functional applications. The exciting array of this emerging research theme presages continuous growth and great vitality. In the last section, some prospects of this branch are also presented and possible guidance for future work is outlined. PMID:26894638

  16. Materials sciences research. [research facilities, research projects, and technical reports of materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving materials research conducted by various international test facilities are reported. Much of the materials research is classified in the following areas: (1) acousto-optic, acousto-electric, and ultrasonic research, (2) research for elucidating transport phenomena in well characterized oxides, (3) research in semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices, (4) the study of interfaces and interfacial phenomena, and (5) materials research relevant to natural resources. Descriptions of the individual research programs are listed alphabetically by the name of the author and show all personnel involved, resulting publications, and associated meeting speeches.

  17. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  18. Fire retardancy with structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Impregnating wood with chemicals to reduce or prevent combustion is discussed. Basic types of materials for fireproofing purposes and methods of applications are described. It is concluded that effective fireproofing materials have been developed and their application to wooden structures represents acceptable safety management procedures.

  19. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  20. LOW CYCLE FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN ARMY STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) of laminate composite structures used in Army applications is assessed to identify the key physical phenomena occurring during LCF processes and to determine their main characteristics. Special attention is given to the LCF conditions inherent in Army stru...

  1. Smart materials and structures: what are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, W. B., Jr.; Sirkis, J. S.; Gardiner, P. T.

    1996-06-01

    There has been considerable discussion in the technical community on a number of questions concerned with smart materials and structures, such as what they are, whether smart materials can be considered a subset of smart structures, whether a smart structure and an intelligent structure are the same thing, etc. This discussion is both fueled and confused by the technical community due to the truly multidisciplinary nature of this new field. Smart materials and structures research involves so many technically diverse fields that it is quite common for one field to completely misunderstand the terminology and start of the art in other fields. In order to ascertain whether a consensus is emerging on a number of questions, the technical community was surveyed in a variety of ways including via the internet and by direct contact. The purpose of this survey was to better define the smart materials and structures field, its current status and its potential benefits. Results of the survey are presented and discussed. Finally, a formal definition of the field of smart materials and structures is proposed.

  2. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  3. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 2: Aeropropulsion Structures Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Aeropropulsion systems present unique problems to the structural engineer. The extremes in operating temperatures, rotational effects, and behaviors of advanced material systems combine into complexities that require advances in many scientific disciplines involved in structural analysis and design procedures. This session provides an overview of the complexities of aeropropulsion structures and the theoretical, computational, and experimental research conducted to achieve the needed advances.

  4. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  5. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  6. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  7. Adaptive structures: some materials and structural issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Donald; Lloyd, Peter A.; Hopgood, P.; Mahon, Steve W.; Bowles, A. R.

    2000-08-01

    The concept of using embedded or surface-bonded solid-state actuators to effect shape change in carbon fibre composite laminates continues to have technical merit and appeal. Conventional laminate design methods tend to lead to stiff structures, whilst it is easiest to impose a change of shape on a compliant structure. This presents a possible conflict of design and suggests that the useful performance of solid- state actuators will always be limited by the stiffness of the host laminate. One possible solution is to increase the in-plane work capacity of the actuators either by using improved materials such as phase change perovskites like PLZT or improved eletroding techniques such as inter-digitated electrodes (IDEs). In this study, the performance of several different actuator/laminate systems have been modelled to determine a baseline capability in pure bending. Four cases have been considered for different panel thicknesses and lay-up sequences. The materials performance and IDE design issues have also been addressed. Modelling indicates that even with conventional actuator materials, structural displacements can be produced which could provide useful shape change in applications such as missile roll control.

  8. Smart materials, structures, and mathematical issues; U. S. Army Research Office Workshop, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Sept. 15, 16, 1988, Selected Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Papers are presented on such topics as optical fiber sensors and signal processing for smart materials and structure applications; dynamic control concepts using shape memory alloy reinforced plates; piezoceramic devices and PVDF films as sensors and actuators for intelligent structures; and variable-geometry trusses. Consideration is also given to applications of smart materials in the area of vibration control, smart ceramics, tribopolymerization, ansd computational results for phase transitions in shape memory alloys.

  9. Strategic Research Directions In Microgravity Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.; Wargo, Michael J.; Marzwell, Neville L.; Sanders, Gerald; Schlagheck, Ron; Semmes, Ed; Bassler, Julie; Cook, Beth

    2004-01-01

    The Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) is moving aggressively to align programs, projects, and products with the vision for space exploration. Research in advanced materials is a critical element in meeting exploration goals. Research in low gravity materials science in OBPR is being focused on top priority needs in support of exploration: 1) Space Radiation Shielding; 2) In Situ Resource Utilization; 3) In Situ Fabrication and Repair; 4) Materials Science for Spacecraft and Propulsion Systems; 5) Materials Science for Advanced Life Support Systems. Roles and responsibilities in low gravity materials research for exploration between OBPR and the Office of Exploration Systems are evolving.

  10. CSM parallel structural methods research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel structural methods, research team activities, advanced architecture computers for parallel computational structural mechanics (CSM) research, the FLEX/32 multicomputer, a parallel structural analyses testbed, blade-stiffened aluminum panel with a circular cutout and the dynamic characteristics of a 60 meter, 54-bay, 3-longeron deployable truss beam are among the topics discussed.

  11. Structures and Materials Competency Vision and Purpose at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Vision: The revolutionary materials and structures technologies developed at NASA Langley Research Center meet the needs of the Aerospace Community and benefit the quality of life on Earth Purpose: Develop and deliver useable research and technology results to meet Agency program objectives and to enable the Agency to develop future aerospace materials and structures

  12. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  13. Method of binding structural material

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2007-12-25

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  14. Structural adhesives for missile external protection material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, F. L.; Garzolini, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Two basic rubber materials are examined as possible external substrate protection materials (EPM) for missiles. The analysis provided a data base for selection of the optimum adhesives which are compatible with the substrate, loads applied and predicted bondline temperatures. Under the test conditions, EA934/NA was found to be the optimum adhesive to bond VAMAC 2273 and/or NBR/EPDM 9969A to aluminum substrate. The optimum adhesive for composite structures was EA956. Both of these adhesives are two-part epoxy systems with a pot life of approximately two hours. Further research is suggested on field repair criteria, nuclear hardness and survivability effects on bondline, and ageing effects.

  15. The rheology of structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    2000-10-01

    In this work, the rheological properties of structured materials are studied via both theoretical (continuum mechanics and molecular theory) and experimental approaches. Through continuum mechanics, a structural model, involving shear-induced structural breakdown and buildup, is extended to model biofluids. In particular, we study the cases of steady shear flow, hysteresis, yield stress, small amplitude oscillatory flow as well as non-linear viscoelasticity. Model predictions are successfully compared with experimental data on complex materials such as blood and a penicillin suspension. Next, modifications are introduced into the network model. A new formulation involving non-affine motion is proposed and its applications are presented. The major improvement is that a finite elongational viscosity is predicted for finite elongational rate, contrary to infinite elongational viscosities existing at some elongational rates predicted by most previous network models. Comparisons with experimental data on shear viscosity, primary normal stress coefficient and elongational viscosity are given, in terms of the same set of model parameters. Model predictions for the stress growth are also shown. The model is successfully tested with data on a polyisobutylene solution (S1), on a polystyrene solution and on a poly-alpha-methylstyrene solution. A further extension of the network model is related to the prediction of the stress jump phenomenon which is defined as the instantaneous gain or loss of stress on startup or cessation of a deformation. It is not predicted by most existing models. In this work, the internal viscosity idea used in the dumbbell model is incorporated into the transient network model. Via appropriate approximations, a closed form constitutive equation, which predicts a stress jump, is obtained. Successful comparisons with the available stress jump measurements are given. In addition, the model yields good quantitative predictions of the standard steady

  16. Research on new energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.

    1996-07-01

    Fluorine and oxygen rich energetic crystals and polymers will provide a new approach to increasing composite propellant and explosive energy density and energy release rates. This class of energetic materials will be used to demonstrate that advances in computational chemistry and solid state physics can be used to begin to understand detonation and combustion processes. It is anticipated that fluorinated as well as the oxygenated combustion and detonation products will accelerate the rates of metal particle consumption in composite propellants and explosives. Enhanced and tailorable energy release rates and critical diameters of metallized composite explosives will provide new technological opportunities for both military and civilian applications. Environmentally friendly energetic materials are of great current interest to reduce life cycle waste and pollution as well as life cycle cost. Thermoplastic elastomers, which have reversible crosslinking mechanisms, are one of the required keys to the gate and pathway to achieving substantial waste and pollution reduction goals. The goal in this paper is to review progress in two emerging topics in energetic materials science. These emerging two areas are fluorine and oxygen rich energetic crystals and polymers and environmentally friendly energetic material classes. 33 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  18. Probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.; Fossum, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element program is used to perform probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure. The program used in this study is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), under development at Southwest Research Institute. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the radial stress of a thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure is computed and compared with the analytical solution. In addition, sensitivity factors showing the relative importance of the input random variables are calculated. Significant plasticity is present in this problem and has a pronounced effect on the probabilistic results. The random input variables are the material yield stress and internal pressure with Weibull and normal distributions, respectively. The results verify the ability of NESSUS to compute the CDF and sensitivity factors of a materially nonlinear structure. In addition, the ability of the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) procedure to assess the probabilistic behavior of structures which exhibit a highly nonlinear response is shown. Thus, the AMV procedure can be applied with confidence to other structures which exhibit nonlinear behavior.

  19. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  20. Research Update: ARTI Materials Compatibility and Lubricant Research (MCLR) program

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-10-01

    Since September 1991, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (ARTI) has been conducting materials compatibility and lubricants research on chlorfluorocarbons (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) refrigerant alternatives. During the first two years of this program, ARTI has subcontracted and managed sixteen research projects totaling over $4 million. This research has included materials compatibility tests, refrigerant-lubricant interaction studies, measurement of thermophysical properties, and development of accelerated test methods. This paper summarizes results to date and discusses plans for future research for the Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program.

  1. 2010 Membranes: Materials & Processes Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Lin

    2010-07-30

    The GRC series on Membranes: Materials and Processes have gained significant international recognition, attracting leading experts on membranes and other related areas from around the world. It is now known for being an interdisciplinary and synergistic meeting. The next summer's edition will keep with the past tradition and include new, exciting aspects of material science, chemistry, chemical engineering, computer simulation with participants from academia, industry and national laboratories. This edition will focus on cutting edge topics of membranes for addressing several grand challenges facing our society, in particular, energy, water, health and more generally sustainability. During the technical program, we want to discuss new membrane structure and characterization techniques, the role of advanced membranes and membrane-based processes in sustainability/environment (including carbon dioxide capture), membranes in water processes, and membranes for biological and life support applications. As usual, the informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the oral presentations and posters, and ample opportunity to meet many outstanding colleagues make this an excellent conference for established scientists as well as for students. A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) on the weekend prior to the GRC meeting will provide young researchers an opportunity to present their work and network with outstanding experts. It will also be a right warm-up for the conference participants to join and enjoy the main conference.

  2. Materials Properties Research at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presson, Joan B.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    MSFC is currently planning, organizing and directing test coupon fabrication and subsequent CTE testing for two mirror materials of specific interest to the AMSD and NGST programs, Beryllium 0-30H (Be 0-30H) and Ultra Low Expansion glass (ULE). The ULE test coupons are being fabricated at MSFC from AMSD core residuals provided by Kodak, The Be 0-30H test coupons are being fabricated at Brush Wellman using residuals from the SBMD. Both sets of test coupons will be sent to a test vendor selected through the NASA competitive proposal process with the test results being provided by written report to MSFC by the end of the fiscal year. The test results will become model input data for the AMSD analysts, both MSFC and contractor, providing an enhancement to the historical CTE data currently available.

  3. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  4. DOE Automotive Composite Materials Research: Present and Future Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, C.D.

    1999-08-10

    One method of increasing automotive energy efficiency is through mass reduction of structural components by the incorporation of composite materials. Significant use of glass reinforced polymers as structural components could yield a 20--30% reduction in vehicle weight while the use of carbon fiber reinforced materials could yield a 40--60% reduction in mass. Specific areas of research for lightweighting automotive components are listed, along with research needs for each of these categories: (1) low mass metals; (2) polymer composites; and (3) ceramic materials.

  5. Solar thermal materials research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B. P.

    1981-01-01

    Objectives of the Materials Research and Development effort are examined. The behavior and interaction of different materials used in solar thermal technologies are studied so as to create a sound technical base for future system and component designs. Materials are developed to extend the application potential of systems by either making materials more reliable in difficult operating environments or by offering lower cost alternatives to presently used materials. Solar thermal systems designed for electric power, industrial process heat from low to high temperature, and fuels and chemicals applications are discussed.

  6. Interdisciplinary research concerning the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving the development of ceramic materials are discussed. The following areas of research are reported: (1) refractory structural ceramics, (2) solid electrolyte ceramics, and (3) ceramic processing. The laboratory equipment used and the procedures followed for various development and evaluation techniques are described.

  7. Fatigue and fracture research in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue, fracture, and impact behavior of composite materials are investigated. Bolted and bonded joints are included. The solutions developed are generic in scope and are useful for a wide variety of structural applications. The analytical tools developed are used to demonstrate the damage tolerance, impact resistance, and useful fatigue life of structural composite components. Standard tests for screening improvements in materials and constituents are developed.

  8. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  9. Granular Materials Research at NASA-Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Daidzic, Nihad; Green, Robert D.; Nakagawa, Masami; Nayagam, Vedha; Rame, Enrique; Wilkinson, Allen

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of granular materials research at NASA-Glenn. The topics include: 1) Impulse dispersion of a tapered granular chain; 2) High Speed Digital Images of Tapered Chain Dynamics; 3) Impulse Dispersion; 4) Three Dimensional Granular Bed Experimental Setup; 5) Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Fluid Flow in Porous Media; and 6) Net Charge on Granular Materials (NCharG).

  10. Preparation of actinide-metal research materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Culpepper, C.A.; Campbell, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    The preparation of actinide-metal research materials is one of many functions of the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Research samples of uranium, plutonium, americium, and curium, typically from milligram quantities up to approx. 100 g, are prepared as pure metals or alloys to customer specifications. Larger quantities, up to many kilograms, of the lower activity actinides, such as /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th, are also fabricated into custom research forms. Physical forms of these metals include rolled foils or sheets, castings (ingot, rod, or special shapes), and evaporated or sputtered films. The actinide-metal processing capabilities of the IRML are continuing to be improved and applied to a wide variety of custom material preparations to meet the needs of the world-wide research community.

  11. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  12. Structural disorder in molecular framework materials.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Andrew B; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2013-06-21

    It is increasingly apparent that many important classes of molecular framework material exhibit a variety of interesting and useful types of structural disorder. This tutorial review summarises a number of recent efforts to understand better both the complex microscopic nature of this disorder and also how it might be implicated in useful functionalities of these materials. We draw on a number of topical examples including topologically-disordered zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs), the phenomena of temperature-, pressure- and desorption-induced amorphisation, partial interpenetration, ferroelectric transition-metal formates, negative thermal expansion in cyanide frameworks, and the mechanics and processing of layered frameworks. We outline the various uses of pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, dielectric spectroscopy, peak-shape analysis of powder diffraction data and single-crystal diffuse scattering measurements as means of characterising disorder in these systems, and we suggest a number of opportunities for future research in the field. PMID:23471316

  13. Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, Pascal

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides deal with: the goals for advanced fission reactor systems; the requirements for structural materials; a focus on two important types of materials: ODS and CMC; a focus on materials under irradiation (multiscale modelling, experimental simulation, 'smart' experiments in materials testing reactors); some concluding remarks.

  14. Materials Research With Neutrons at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, R. L.; Glinka, C. J.; Krueger, S.; Lindstrom, R. A.; Lynn, J. W.; Prask, H. J.; Prince, E.; Rush, J. J.; Rowe, J. M.; Satija, S. K.; Toby, B. H.; Tsai, A.; Udovic, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory works with industry, standards bodies, universities, and other government laboratories to improve the nation’s measurements and standards infrastructure for materials. An increasingly important component of this effort is carried out at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), at present the most productive center of its kind in the United States. This article gives a brief historical account of the growth and activities of the Center with examples of its work in major materials research areas and describes the key role the Center can expect to play in future developments. PMID:27500021

  15. NASA. Lewis Research Center materials research and technology: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Division at the Lewis Research Center has a long record of contributions to both materials and process technology as well as to the understanding of key high-temperature phenomena. This paper overviews the division staff, facilities, past history, recent progress, and future interests.

  16. Integrated Thermal Structures and Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The accomplishments of the project this viewgraph presentation summarizes (integrated thermal structures and materials) include the following: (1) Langley Research Center prepared five resins with Tgs as high as 625 F, less than 1% volatiles, moderate toughness, and low melt viscosity and sent to Boeing or Lockheed Martin; (2) Glenn Research Center prepared four resins with Tgs as high as 700 F, less than 10% volatiles, and low melt viscosity and sent to Boeing; (3) Boeing successfully fabricated 2'x2'x36 ply composites by resin infusion of stitched preforms from all NASA supplied resins; and (4) Lockheed Martin successfully fabricated 13"x14"x16 ply composites by resin transfer molding from all NASA supplied resins.

  17. Research update: Materials compatibility and lubricant research (MCLR) program

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.

    1994-04-01

    Since September 1991, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (ARTI) has been conducting materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC and HCFC refrigerant alternatives. This work has been supported by a grant from the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technology, with co-funding from the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (ARI). During the first two and one-half years of this program, ARTI has subcontracted and managed twenty-one research projects totaling over $5.2 million. This research has included materials compatibility tests, refrigerant-lubricant interaction studies, measurement of thermophysical properties, and development of accelerated test methods. This paper summarizes results to date and discusses plans for future research for the Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program.

  18. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  19. Material Selection for Cryogenic Support Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Erik; Kellaris, Nicholas; Daal, Miguel; Sadoulet, Bernard; Golwala, Sunil; Hollister, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Design specifications for the support structures of low temperature instrumentation often call for low thermal conductivity between temperature stages, high stiffness, and specific load bearing capabilities. While overall geometric design plays an important role in both overall stiffness and heat conduction between stages, material selection can affect a structure's properties significantly. In this contribution, we suggest and compare several alternative materials to the current standard materials for building cryogenic support structures.

  20. Materials research institute annual report FY98

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H

    1999-11-02

    The Materials Research Institute (MRI) is the newest of the University/LLNL Institutes and began operating in March 1997. The MRI is one of five Institutes reporting to the LLNL University Relations Program (URP), all of which have as their primary goal to facilitate university interactions at LLNL. This report covers the period from the opening of the MRI through the end of FY98 (September 30, 1998). The purpose of this report is to emphasize both the science that has been accomplished, as well as the LLNL and university people who were involved. The MRI is concentrating on projects, which highlight and utilize the Laboratory's unique facilities and expertise. Our goal is to enable the best university research to enhance Laboratory programs in the area of cutting-edge materials science. The MRI is focusing on three primary areas of materials research: Biomaterials (organic/inorganic interfaces, biomemetic processes, materials with improved biological response, DNA materials science); Electro/Optical Materials (laser materials and nonlinear optical materials, semiconductor devices, nanostructured materials); and Metals/Organics (equation of state of metals, synthesis of unique materials, high explosives/polymers). In particular we are supporting projects that will enable the MRI to begin to make a distinctive name for itself within the scientific community and will develop techniques applicable to LLNL's core mission. This report is organized along the lines of these three topic areas. A fundamental goal of the MRI is to nucleate discussion and interaction between Lab and university researchers, and among Lab researchers from different LLNL Directorates. This is accomplished through our weekly seminar series, special seminar series such as Biomaterials and Applications of High Pressure Science, conferences and workshops, our extensive visitors program and MRI lunches. We are especially pleased to have housed five graduate students who are performing their thesis

  1. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  2. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  3. Materials and structures/ACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Light weight composites made from graphite fibers, glass, or man made materials held in an epoxy matrix, and their application to airframe design are reviewed. The Aircraft Energy Efficiency program is discussed. Characteristics of composites, acceptable risks, building parts and confidence, and aeroelastic tailoring are considered.

  4. Managing Training Materials with Structured Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streit, Les D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes characteristics of structured text design; benefits of its use in training; benefits for developers of training materials and steps in preparing training materials. A case study illustrating how the structured text design process solved the sales training needs of the Mercedes-Benz Truck Company is presented. (MBR)

  5. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  6. HSCT materials and structures: An MDC perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Jay O.

    1992-01-01

    The key High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) features which control the materials selection are discussed. Materials are selected based on weight and production economics. The top-down and bottoms-up approaches to material selection are compared for the Mach 2.4 study baseline aircraft. The key materials and structures related tasks which remain to be accomplished prior to proceeding with the building of the HSCT aircraft are examined.

  7. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

    1999-01-28

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  8. Mapping the Structure of Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.; Hernan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Image-processing microdensitometer/Fourier analyzer yields statistics of subcomponent distribution. Nondestructive method for studying structure heterogeneous materials uses energy-dispersive X-ray analysis in scanning electron microscope. Scanning microdensitometer/Fourier analyzer (SMFA) is applied to SEM images to obtain statistics about sample structure. Method originally developed for studying effect on combustion of fine structure of composite solid propellants.

  9. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This scale model depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Here the transparent furnace is extracted for servicing. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, 0101830, and TBD).

  10. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This scale model depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, and TBD). This composite is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  11. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This computer-generated image depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, 0101830, and TBD).

  12. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This computer-generated image depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101830, and TBD).

  13. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This scale model depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, 0101830, and TBD). This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  14. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This scale model depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, 0101830, and TBD).

  15. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This computer-generated image depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. A larger image is available without labels (No. 0101755).

  16. Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This computer-generated image depicts the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1) being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) for placement in the Destiny laboratory module aboard the International Space Station. The rack is part of the plarned Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and is expected to include two furnace module inserts, a Quench Module Insert (being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center) to study directional solidification in rapidly cooled alloys and a Diffusion Module Insert (being developed by the European Space Agency) to study crystal growth, and a transparent furnace (being developed by NASA's Space Product Development program). Multi-user equipment in the rack is being developed under the auspices of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) and ESA. Key elements are labeled in other images (0101754, 0101829, 0101830).

  17. Material and Virtual Workspaces in Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickman, Chad; Haas, Christina; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2009-03-01

    A growing body of research has examined the potential for computer-based tools to improve the quality and scope of physics education. Yet, few studies have investigated how experienced scientists deploy those tools in the conduct and communication of their work. Based on a study of text production in liquid crystal physics, I will discuss how specific applications, like LabVIEW, mediate the practice of experimental research. Findings suggest that experimentation involves a complex negotiation of material and virtual constraints and that, as a result, a concept of scientific literacy must account for the processes through which scientists visualize, display, and characterize their objects of study symbolically and textually. This approach, in examining the relationship between the material and virtual in a modern scientific workplace, ultimately offers insight into education that prepares students to undertake and communicate research in dynamic, multimedia laboratory environments.

  18. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton; Grugel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The NASA microgravity materials program is dedicated to conducting microgravity experiments and related modeling efforts that will help us understand the processes associated with the formation of materials. This knowledge will help improve ground based industrial production of such materials. The currently funded investigations include research on the distribution of dopants and formation of defects in semiconductors, transitions between columnar and dendritic grain morphology, coarsening of phase boundaries, competition between thermally and kinetically favored phases, and the formation of glassy vs. crystalline material. NASA microgravity materials science investigators are selected for funding either through a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement or by participation in a team proposing to a foreign agency research announcement. In the latter case, a US investigator participating in a successful proposal to a foreign agency can then apply to NASA for funding of an unsolicited proposal. The program relies on cooperation with other aerospace partners from around the world. The ISS facilities used for these investigations are provided primarily by partnering with foreign agencies and in most cases the US investigators are working as a part of a larger team studying a specific area of materials science. The following facilities are to be utilized for the initial investigations. The ESA provided Low Gradient Facility and the Solidification and Quench Inserts to the Materials Research Rack/Materials Science Laboratory are to be used primarily for creating bulk samples that are directionally solidified or quenched from a high temperature melt. The CNES provided DECLIC facility is used to observe morphological development in transparent materials. The ESA provided Electro-Magnetic Levitator (EML) is designed to levitate, melt and then cool samples in order to study nucleation behavior. The facility provides conditions in which nucleation of the solid is

  19. Space structures concepts and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowitzky, A. M.; Supan, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    An extension is preseted of the evaluation of graphite/aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) for space structures application. A tubular DWG graphite/aluminum truss assembly was fabricated having the structural integrity and thermal stability needed for space application. DWG is a proprietary thin ply continuous graphite reinforced aluminum composite. The truss end fittings were constructed using the discontinuous ceramic particulate reinforced MMC DWAl 20 (trademark). Thermal stability was incorporated in the truss by utilizing high stiffness, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) P100 graphite fibers in a 6061 aluminum matrix, crossplied to provide minimized CTE in the assembled truss. Tube CTE was designed to be slightly negative to offset the effects of the end fitting and sleeve, CTE values of which are approx. 1/2 that of aluminum. In the design of the truss configuration, the CTE contribution of each component was evaluated to establish the component dimension and layup configuration required to provide a net zero CTE in the subassemblies which would then translate to a zero CTE for the entire truss bay produced.

  20. Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains presentations and abstracts from the Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures jointly sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center, Virginia Tech, and the Institute for Mechanics and Materials at the University of California, San Diego, and held at NASA Langley on November 15-16, 1993. Workshop attendees represented NASA, other government research labs, the aircraft/rotorcraft industry, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state-of-technology in scaling effects in composite materials and to provide guidelines for future research.

  1. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Supplement: Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the progress achieved over the past 6 to 12 months on four graduate student projects conducted within the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program. These studies were aimed specifically at light metallic alloy issues relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport. Research on Hydrogen-Enhanced Fracture of High-Strength Titanium Alloy Sheet refined successfully the high resolution R-curve method necessary to characterize initiation and growth fracture toughnesses. For solution treated and aged Low Cost Beta without hydrogen precharging, fracture is by ductile transgranular processes at 25 C, but standardized initiation toughnesses are somewhat low and crack extension is resolved at still lower K-levels. This fracture resistance is degraded substantially, by between 700 and 1000 wppm of dissolved hydrogen, and a fracture mode change is affected. The surface oxide on P-titanium alloys hinders hydrogen uptake and complicates the electrochemical introduction of low hydrogen concentrations that are critical to applications of these alloys. Ti-15-3 sheet was obtained for study during the next reporting period. Research on Mechanisms of deformation and Fracture in High-Strength Titanium Alloys is examining the microstructure and fatigue resistance of very thin sheet. Aging experiments on 0. 14 mm thick (0.0055 inch) foil show microstructural agility that may be used to enhance fatigue performance. Fatigue testing of Ti-15-3 sheet has begun. The effects of various thermo-mechanical processing regimens on mechanical properties will be examined and deformation modes identified. Research on the Effect of Texture and Precipitates on Mechanical Property Anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X and Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that models predict a minor influence of stress-induced alignment of Phi, caused by the application of a tensile stress during aging, on the yield stress anisotropy of both modified AA2519 and a model Al-Cu binary alloy. This project

  2. Microgravity Materials Research and Code U ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Sibille, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    The NASA microgravity research program, simply put, has the goal of doing science (which is essentially finding out something previously unknown about nature) utilizing the unique long-term microgravity environment in Earth orbit. Since 1997 Code U has in addition funded scientific basic research that enables safe and economical capabilities to enable humans to live, work and do science beyond Earth orbit. This research has been integrated with the larger NASA missions (Code M and S). These new exploration research focus areas include Radiation Shielding Materials, Macromolecular Research on Bone and Muscle Loss, In Space Fabrication and Repair, and Low Gravity ISRU. The latter two focus on enabling materials processing in space for use in space. The goal of this program is to provide scientific and technical research resulting in proof-of-concept experiments feeding into the larger NASA program to provide humans in space with an energy rich, resource rich, self sustaining infrastructure at the earliest possible time and with minimum risk, launch mass and program cost. President Bush's Exploration Vision (1/14/04) gives a new urgency for the development of ISRU concepts into the exploration architecture. This will require an accelerated One NASA approach utilizing NASA's partners in academia, and industry.

  3. Space Research Results Purify Semiconductor Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    While President Obama's news that NASA would encourage private companies to develop vehicles to take NASA into space may have come as a surprise to some, NASA has always encouraged private companies to invest in space. More than two decades ago, NASA established Commercial Space Centers across the United States to encourage industry to use space as a place to conduct research and to apply NASA technology to Earth applications. Although the centers are no longer funded by NASA, the advances enabled by that previous funding are still impacting us all today. For example, the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center (SVEC) at the University of Houston, one of the 17 Commercial Space Centers, had a mission to create advanced thin film semiconductor materials and devices through the use of vacuum growth technologies both on Earth and in space. Making thin film materials in a vacuum (low-pressure environment) is advantageous over making them in normal atmospheric pressures, because contamination floating in the air is lessened in a vacuum. To grow semiconductor crystals, researchers at SVEC utilized epitaxy the process of depositing a thin layer of material on top of another thin layer of material. On Earth, this process took place in a vacuum chamber in a clean room lab. For space, the researchers developed something called the Wake Shield Facility (WSF), a 12-foot-diameter disk-shaped platform designed to grow thin film materials using the low-pressure environment in the wake of the space shuttle. Behind an orbiting space shuttle, the vacuum levels are thousands of times better than in the best vacuum chambers on Earth. Throughout the 1990s, the WSF flew on three space shuttle missions as a series of proof-of-concept missions. These experiments are a lasting testament to the success of the shuttle program and resulted in the development of the first thin film materials made in the vacuum of space, helping to pave the way for better thin film development on Earth.

  4. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  5. Materials research and applications at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1987-01-01

    The facilities and instruments of the Lewis Research Center specialized for materials research are discussed. The main objectives of the Center are to provide R & D relevant to main propulsion plants and auxiliary power systems for aeronautics, space, and energy conversion applications. The Center is concerned with microstructure-property relations and their effect on processing; intermetallic compounds and high temperature metal matrix composites; ceramics with improved reliability for use in heat engines; polymer matrix composites for aerospace applcations; understanding the high temperature corrosive attack in the hostile environments of aircraft, rockets, and other heat engines; high temperature lubrication and wear; and microgravity materials research. The various types of schemes and techniques, provided by the Center, for analyzing data are described.

  6. NASA Materials Research for Extreme Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, R. J.; Wright, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum briefly covers various innovations in materials science and development throughout the course of the American Space program. It details each innovation s discovery and development, explains its significance, and describes the applications of this material either in the time period discovered or today. Topics of research include silazane polymers, solvent-resistant elastomeric polymers (polyurethanes and polyisocyanurates), siloxanes, the Space Shuttle thermal protection system, phenolic-impregnated carbon ablator, and carbon nanotubes. Significance of these developments includes the Space Shuttle, Apollo programs, and the Constellation program.

  7. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    SciTech Connect

    Schweiger, F.A.

    1987-02-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  8. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiger, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  9. Material issues for lunar/Martian structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Donald W.; Sadeh, Willy Z.; Cheng, Boyle C.

    1991-01-01

    Development of structures in the lunar/Martian environment depends upon the use of the most appropriate materials. Advanced composite materials are apparently the best candidates for use in structures on planetary surfaces and in space in view of their unique properties, tailorability and light weight. The physical and mechanical properties of advanced composite materials as related to their use in lunar/Martian structures are reviewed. Polymer matrix composites are recommended as the best materials in the first exploration stages of a lunar/Martian base. Increased use of ceramic and metal matrix composites is expected in the more advanced exploration stages. The pressing need for the development of tailored radiation shielding composite materials is discussed.

  10. European Fusion Materials Research Program - Recent Results and Future Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Diegele, E.; Andreani, R.; Laesser, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2005-05-15

    The paper reviews the objectives and the status of the current EU long-term materials program. It highlights recent results, discusses some of the key issues and major existing problems to be resolved and presents an outlook on the R and D planned for the next few years. The main objectives of the Materials Development program are the development and qualification of reduced activation structural materials for the Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in ITER and of low activation structural materials resistant to high fluence neutron irradiation for in-vessel components such as breeding blanket, divertor and first wall in DEMO. The EU strategy assumes: (i) ITER operation starting in 2015 with DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules to be installed from day one of operation, (ii) IFMIF operation in 2017 and (iii) DEMO final design activities in 2022 to 2025. The EU candidate structural material EUROFER for TBMs has to be fully code qualified for licensing well before 2015. In parallel, research on materials for operation at higher temperatures is conducted following a logical sequence, by supplementing EUROFER with the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels and, thereafter, with fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (SiC{sub f}/SiC). Complementary, tungsten alloys are developed as structural material for high temperature applications such as gas-cooled divertors.

  11. Producing and optimizing novel materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Mahdi

    2011-12-01

    A series of detailed experimental and finite element investigations were carried out to study the response of selected objects which are currently utilized for load carrying. These investigations were later applied to optimize the mechanical performance of the studied structures and materials. First, a number of experiments and detailed finite element simulations were carried out to study the response and failure of single lap joints with non-flat interface under uniaxial tension. The adherents were made from fiber reinforced epoxy composite and the custom-made mold allowed the fibers to follow the profile of the bonded joint interface. The experiments showed that the interface shape has significant effect on the mechanical behavior and strength of the bonded joints. Finite element simulations were performed to estimate the distribution of shear and peeling stresses along the bonded joints and the results were linked to the experimental investigations. Additional parametric calculations were also carried out to highlight the role of interface shape on the distribution of stresses, and inherently the overall strength and behavior of the bonded joints. In addition, the role of a central void on the distribution of the stresses in a bonded joint with flat and non-flat sinusoidal interfaces was investigated. The second topic concerns Wood Plastic Composites (WPC) which are widely used in the industry due to its durability, low cost, and anti-moisture properties in comparison with the natural wood. In this research, we have produced flout shaped WPC samples using African black wood powder and Phenolic resin in a hot compression molding set-up. Initial WPC composites were produced by systematically changing the wood volume fraction. Based on these results the optimum temperature, pressure and wood volume fraction for developing WPC in a form of a flute is developed. A series of experimental procedures were performed to improve mechanical properties of WPC samples by

  12. Plastics as structural materials for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, G M

    1937-01-01

    The purpose here is to consider the mechanical characteristics of reinforced phenol-formaldehyde resin as related to its use as structural material for aircraft. Data and graphs that have appeared in the literature are reproduced to illustrate the comparative behavior of plastics and materials commonly used in aircraft construction. Materials are characterized as to density, static strength, modulus of elasticity, resistance to long-time loading, strength under repeated impact, energy absorption, corrosion resistance, and ease of fabrication.

  13. HITEMP Material and Structural Optimization Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of adding viscoelasticity and the Generalized Method of Cells (GMC) for micromechanical viscoelastic behavior into the commercial HyperSizer structural analysis and optimization code was investigated. The viscoelasticity methodology was developed in four steps. First, a simplified algorithm was devised to test the iterative time stepping method for simple one-dimensional multiple ply structures. Second, GMC code was made into a callable subroutine and incorporated into the one-dimensional code to test the accuracy and usability of the code. Third, the viscoelastic time-stepping and iterative scheme was incorporated into HyperSizer for homogeneous, isotropic viscoelastic materials. Finally, the GMC was included in a version of HyperSizer. MS Windows executable files implementing each of these steps is delivered with this report, as well as source code. The findings of this research are that both viscoelasticity and GMC are feasible and valuable additions to HyperSizer and that the door is open for more advanced nonlinear capability, such as viscoplasticity.

  14. Aeroservoelastic and structural dynamics research on smart structures conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas McGowan, Anna-Maria; Wilkie, W. K.; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Pinkerton Florance, Jennifer L.; Weiseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-06-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway a the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental test to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind-tunnel of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory/NASA/Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials.

  15. NASA/USAF research in structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D.; Amos, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Research in the structural dynamics of large space structures is discussed. The problems of structural response are emphasized. Dynamic modeling, structural members, finite element techniques, axial loads, and vibration tests are among the topics discussed.

  16. Nuclear Industry Support Services by the Buffalo Materials Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The Buffalo Materials Research Center (BMRC) is located on the campus of the State University of New York at Buffalo, Principal facilities within BMRC include a 2-MW PULSTAR, low-enrichment reactor, an electron accelerator, and irradiated materials remote testing facilities. The reactor and the materials testing facilities have been utilized extensively in support of the power reactor community since 1961. This paper briefly highlights the nature and scope of this service. The BMRC is operated for the university by Buffalo Materials Research, Inc., a private for-profit company, which is a subsidiary of Materials Engineering Associates, Inc. (MEA), a Maryland-based materials testing company. A primary mission of MEA has been research on the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor structural materials, including those used for pressure vessel and piping systems. The combined resources of MEA and BMRC have played a pivotal role in the assessment of reactor pressure vessel safety both in the United States and abroad and in the development of new radiation-resistant steels.

  17. Materials and structures for stretchable energy storage and conversion devices.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keyu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-06-11

    Stretchable energy storage and conversion devices (ESCDs) are attracting intensive attention due to their promising and potential applications in realistic consumer products, ranging from portable electronics, bio-integrated devices, space satellites, and electric vehicles to buildings with arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Material synthesis and structural design are core in the development of highly stretchable supercapacitors, batteries, and solar cells for practical applications. This review provides a brief summary of research development on the stretchable ESCDs in the past decade, from structural design strategies to novel materials synthesis. The focuses are on the fundamental insights of mechanical characteristics of materials and structures on the performance of the stretchable ESCDs, as well as challenges for their practical applications. Finally, some of the important directions in the areas of material synthesis and structural design facing the stretchable ESCDs are discussed. PMID:24643976

  18. Bone as a structural material: how good is it?

    PubMed

    Taylor, David

    2008-01-01

    As a structural material, bone is not very good; compared to engineering materials such as metal alloys and fibre composites, its mechanical properties are mediocre. In fact, the really amazing thing about bone is that it is able to achieve even these mediocre properties with the ingredients available: hydroxyapatite, collagen and water. Drawing on previous research, and some simple fracture mechanics calculations, we can see how bone optimises the use of these materials in a composite structure which has important features at two different scales: the nanometre scale and the hundred-micron scale. PMID:18431853

  19. Research on high energy density capacitor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Pulsed Plasma thruster is the simplest of all electric propulsion devices. It is a pulsed device which stores energy in capacitors for each pulse. The lifetimes and energy densities of these capacitors are critical parameters to the continued use of these thrusters. This report presents the result of a research effort conducted by JPL into the materials used in capacitors and the modes of failure. The dominant failure mechanism was determined to be material breakdown precipitated by heat build-up within the capacitors. The presence of unwanted gas was identified as the source of the heat. An aging phenomena was discovered in polycarbonate based capacitors. CO build-up was noted to increase with the number of times the capacitor had been discharged. Improved quality control was cited as being essential for the improvement of capacitor lifetimes.

  20. Materials dispersion and biodynamics project research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials Dispersion and Biodynamics Project (MDBP) focuses on dispersion and mixing of various biological materials and the dynamics of cell-to-cell communication and intracellular molecular trafficking in microgravity. Research activities encompass biomedical applications, basic cell biology, biotechnology (products from cells), protein crystal development, ecological life support systems (involving algae and bacteria), drug delivery (microencapsulation), biofilm deposition by living organisms, and hardware development to support living cells on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Project goals are to expand the existing microgravity science database through experiments on sounding rockets, the Shuttle, and COMET program orbiters and to evolve,through current database acquisition and feasibility testing, to more mature and larger-scale commercial operations on SSF. Maximized utilization of SSF for these science applications will mean that service companies will have a role in providing equipment for use by a number of different customers. An example of a potential forerunner of such a service for SSF is the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA) 'mini lab' of Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc. (ITA) in use on the Shuttle for the Commercial MDAITA Experiments (CMIX) Project. The MDA wells provide the capability for a number of investigators to perform mixing and bioprocessing experiments in space. In the area of human adaptation to microgravity, a significant database has been obtained over the past three decades. Some low-g effects are similar to Earth-based disorders (anemia, osteoporosis, neuromuscular diseases, and immune system disorders). As new information targets potential profit-making processes, services and products from microgravity, commercial space ventures are expected to expand accordingly. Cooperative CCDS research in the above mentioned areas is essential for maturing SSF biotechnology and to ensure U.S. leadership in space technology

  1. Novel energy materials through structural search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Goedecker, Stefan; Wolverton, Chris

    Sophisticated structure prediction methods have been developed and become essential tools when designing new materials with desired properties. Their successful applications to many systems at various conditions and the increasing amount of available computational power have strongly contributed to their popularity. The Minima Hopping Method (MHM) is a powerful tool to find low energy structures given only the chemical composition of a system and allows the prediction of structures at any boundary condition. Recently, not only the thermodynamic ground states, but also metastable phases accessible through various synthesis methods have drawn considerable interest for energy applications. We present the discovery of novel energy materials, ranging from low-density silicon allotropes with improved absorption in the visible to thermoelectric materials, by optimizing the MHM to imitate synthesis pathways.

  2. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  3. Structural and magnetic characterization of actinide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, B.; Allen, T.H.; Lawson, A.C.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have successfully used neutron scattering techniques to investigate physicochemical properties of elements, compounds, and alloys of the light actinides. The focus of this work is to extend the fundamental research capability and to address questions of practical importance to stockpile integrity and long-term storage of nuclear material. Specific subject areas are developing neutron diffraction techniques for smaller actinide samples; modeling of inelastic scattering data for actinide metal hydrides; characterizing actinide oxide structures; and investigating aging effects in actinides. These studies utilize neutron scattering supported by equilibrium studies, kinetics, and x-ray diffraction. Major accomplishments include (1) development of encapsulation techniques for small actinide samples and neutron diffraction studies of AmD{sub 2.4} and PuO{sub 2.3}; (2) refinement of lattice dynamics model to elucidate hydrogen-hydrogen and hydrogen-metal interactions in rare-earth and actinide hydrides; (3) kinetic studies with PuO{sub 2} indicating that the recombination reaction is faster than radiolytic decomposition of adsorbed water but a chemical reaction produces H{sub 2}; (4) PVT studies of the reaction between PuO{sub 2} and water demonstrate that PuO{sub 2+x} and H{sub 2} form and that PuO{sub 2} is not the thermodynamically stable form of the oxide in air; and (5) model calculations of helium in growth in aged plutonium predicting bubble formation only at grain boundaries at room temperature. The work performed in this project has application to fundamental properties of actinides, aging, and long-term storage of plutonium.

  4. Deformation and Damage Studies for Advanced Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advancements made in understanding deformation and damage of advanced structural materials have enabled the development of new technologies including the attainment of a nationally significant NASA Level 1 Milestone and the provision of expertise to the Shuttle Return to Flight effort. During this collaborative agreement multiple theoretical and experimental research programs, facilitating safe durable high temperature structures using advanced materials, have been conceived, planned, executed. Over 26 publications, independent assessments of structures and materials in hostile environments, were published within this agreement. This attainment has been recognized by 2002 Space Flight Awareness Team Award, 2004 NASA Group Achievement Award and 2003 and 2004 OAI Service Awards. Accomplishments in the individual research efforts are described as follows.

  5. Microfabrication of hierarchical structures for engineered mechanical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Canudas, Marc

    Materials found in nature present, in some cases, unique properties from their constituents that are of great interest in engineered materials for applications ranging from structural materials for the construction of bridges, canals and buildings to the fabrication of new lightweight composites for airplane and automotive bodies, to protective thin film coatings, amongst other fields. Research in the growing field of biomimetic materials indicates that the micro-architectures present in natural materials are critical to their macroscopic mechanical properties. A better understanding of the effect that structure and hierarchy across scales have on the material properties will enable engineered materials with enhanced properties. At the moment, very few theoretical models predict mechanical properties of simple materials based on their microstructures. Moreover these models are based on observations from complex biological systems. One way to overcome this challenge is through the use of microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate simple materials, more appropriate for the study of hierarchical organizations and microstructured materials. Arrays of structures with controlled geometry and dimension can be designed and fabricated at different length scales, ranging from a few hundred nanometers to centimeters, in order to mimic similar systems found in nature. In this thesis, materials have been fabricated in order to gain fundamental insight into the complex hierarchical materials found in nature and to engineer novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. The materials fabricated here were mechanically characterized and compared to simple mechanics models to describe their behavior with the goal of applying the knowledge acquired to the design and synthesis of future engineered materials with novel properties.

  6. Thermochromic Materials Research for Optical Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Jorgenson, G. V.; Lin, R. J.

    1987-02-01

    Reactive-ion-beam-sputtering (RIBS) is used to deposit doped vanadium dioxide (V1-xMxO2), where M is a dopant that lowers the transition temperature (Tt) from that of stoichiometric V02. The objective is to synthesize a material that will passively switch between a heat-transmitting-and a heat-reflecting-state at specific design temperatures in the human comfort range. The films are deposited at elevated temperature (>700K) onto glass and sapphire substrates for spectrophotometric evaluation above and below Tt. Then by analyzing the deposited films via EDAX, correlations between film composition and passive solar switching performance are made. Also concepts for synthesizing suitable crystallites of such materials are described. These crystallites could act as switchable pigments for throchromic solar paint. The overall long range goals of this research are to develop these materials for: (1) thin film application to building glazings and (2) pigments for opaque wall coatings. The glazings will transmit and the walls will absorb solar energy when the V1-xMxO2 temperature (T) is low (TTt, both glazings and walls will reflect the solar infrared.

  7. Layer like porous materials with hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Roth, Wieslaw J; Gil, Barbara; Makowski, Wacław; Marszalek, Bartosz; Eliášová, Pavla

    2016-06-13

    Many chemical compositions produce layered solids consisting of extended sheets with thickness not greater than a few nanometers. The layers are weakly bonded together in a crystal and can be modified into various nanoarchitectures including porous hierarchical structures. Several classes of 2-dimensional (2D) materials have been extensively studied and developed because of their potential usefulness as catalysts and sorbents. They are discussed in this review with focus on clays, layered transition metal oxides, silicates, layered double hydroxides, metal(iv) phosphates and phosphonates, especially zirconium, and zeolites. Pillaring and delamination are the primary methods for structural modification and pore tailoring. The reported approaches are described and compared for the different classes of materials. The methods of characterization include identification by X-ray diffraction and microscopy, pore size analysis and activity assessment by IR spectroscopy and catalytic testing. The discovery of layered zeolites was a fundamental breakthrough that created unprecedented opportunities because of (i) inherent strong acid sites that make them very active catalytically, (ii) porosity through the layers and (iii) bridging of 2D and 3D structures. Approximately 16 different types of layered zeolite structures and modifications have been identified as distinct forms. It is also expected that many among the over 200 recognized zeolite frameworks can produce layered precursors. Additional advances enabled by 2D zeolites include synthesis of layered materials by design, hierarchical structures obtained by direct synthesis and top-down preparation of layered materials from 3D frameworks. PMID:26489452

  8. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  9. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  10. The use of containerless processing in researching reactive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, Shankar; Nordine, Paul C.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently become possible to perform containerless, high-temperature liquid-phase processing of many nonvolatile materials without resort to orbital microgravity, thereby facilitating the conduct of materials research in conjunction with noncontact diagnostic instruments. The melt-levitation techniques are electromagnetic, aerodynamic, acoustic, aeroacoustic, and electrostatic; nonorbital microgravity conditions are obtainable aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft on parabolic flight paths, as well as in drop tubes and towers. Applications encompass the purification of metals and the creation of nonequilibrium and metastable structures. Process control and property measurements include optical pyrometry and emissivity, laser polarimetry, and drop calorimetry.

  11. Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-09-25

    Lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles (EV), including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electrical vehicles. With the increasing demand on devices of high energy densities (>500 Wh/kg) , new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB also attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performances of these energy storage systems depend not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performances characteristics of batteries often have conflict requirements on the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflict requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate 1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and 2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties, prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  12. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2013-10-01

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg-1), new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  13. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2013-10-25

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg(-1)), new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime. PMID:24067410

  14. Current research in composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the mechanics of composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center is discussed. The advantages and limitations of special purpose and general purpose analysis tools used in research are reviewed. Future directions in computational structural mechanics are described to address analysis short-comings. Research results on the buckling and postbuckling of unstiffened and stiffened composite structures are presented. Recent investigations of the mechanics of failure in compression and shear are reviewed. Preliminary studies of the dynamic response of composite structures due to impacts encountered during crash-landings are presented. Needs for future research are discussed.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  16. Optical fiber sensors for materials and structures characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The final technical report on Optical Fiber Sensors for Materials and Structures Characterization, covering the period August 1990 through August 1991 is presented. Research programs in the following technical areas are described; sapphire optical fiber sensors; vibration analysis using two-mode elliptical core fibers and sensors; extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer development; and coatings for fluorescent-based sensor. Research progress in each of these areas was substantial, as evidenced by the technical publications which are included as appendices.

  17. Structural Modelling of Two Dimensional Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek

    The continuous random network (CRN) model of network glasses is widely accepted as a model for materials such as vitreous silica and amorphous silicon. Although it has been more than eighty years since the proposal of the CRN, there has not been conclusive experimental evidence of the structure of glasses and amorphous materials. This has now changed with the advent of two-dimensional amorphous materials. Now, not only the distribution of rings but the actual atomic ring structure can be imaged in real space, allowing for greater charicterization of these types of networks. This dissertation reports the first work done on the modelling of amorphous graphene and vitreous silica bilayers. Models of amorphous graphene have been created using a Monte Carlo bond-switching method and MD method. Vitreous silica bilayers have been constructed using models of amorphous graphene and the ring statistics of silica bilayers has been studied.

  18. Structural mechanics research at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The contributions of NASA's Langley Research Center in areas of structural mechanics were traced from its NACA origins in 1917 to the present. The developments in structural mechanics technology since 1940 were emphasized. A brief review of some current research topics were discussed as well as anticipated near-term research projects.

  19. Content Structure in Science Instructional Materials and Knowledge Structure in Students' Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Audrey B.; And Others

    The research reported in this paper concerns the design of instructional materials that represent the content structure of a science discipline and the development of methods of probing and representing the knowledge structure in a student's memory. The science discipline selected for the study was geology. Specifically, the conceptual structures…

  20. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  1. Thermochromic Materials Research For Optical Switching Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, G. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1985-12-01

    A dual-ion-beam-sputtering (DIBS) deposition system is used to deposit doped vanadium dioxide (V1-xMx02), where M is a dopant that decreases the transition temperature (Tt) from that of stoichiometric V02. The objective is to synthesize a material that will passively switch between a heat- transmitting-and a heat-reflecting-state at specific design temperatures. The technique is reactive ion beam sputtering of vanadium and a dopant (separate beams) in a well controlled atmosphere of Ar with a partial pressure of O2. The films are deposited at elevated temperature (>700K) onto glass and sapphire substrates for spectrophotometric evaluation above and below Tt. The longer range goals of this research are to develop the material for: (1) thin film application to building glazings and (2) pigments for opaque wall coatings. The glazings will transmit and the walls will absorb solar energy when the V1-xMxO2 temperature (T) is low (TTt, both glazings and walls will reflect the solar infrared.

  2. Indentation Methods in Advanced Materials Research Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pharr, George Mathews; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Hutchings, Ian; Sakai, Mototsugu; Moody, Neville; Sundararajan, G.; Swain, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    Since its commercialization early in the 20th century, indentation testing has played a key role in the development of new materials and understanding their mechanical behavior. Progr3ess in the field has relied on a close marriage between research in the mechanical behavior of materials and contact mechanics. The seminal work of Hertz laid the foundations for bringing these two together, with his contributions still widely utilized today in examining elastic behavior and the physics of fracture. Later, the pioneering work of Tabor, as published in his classic text 'The Hardness of Metals', exapdned this understanding to address the complexities of plasticity. Enormous progress in the field has been achieved in the last decade, made possible both by advances in instrumentation, for example, load and depth-sensing indentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based in situ testing, as well as improved modeling capabilities that use computationally intensive techniques such as finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. The purpose of this special focus issue is to present recent state of the art developments in the field.

  3. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  4. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  5. Aeroservoelastic and Structural Dynamics Research on Smart Structures Conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas; Wilkie, W. Keats; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Florance, Jennifer Pinkerton; Wieseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally-validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental tests to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind- tunnel tests to demonstrate system performance. The key aeroservoelastic applications of this research include: active twist control of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/ Air Force Research Laboratory/ NASA/ Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials. Keywords: aeroelasticity, smart structures, piezoelectric actuators, active fiber composites, rotorcraft, buffet load alleviation, individual blade control, aeroservoelasticity, shape memory alloys, damping augmentation, piezoelectric power consumption

  6. Structural materials: understanding atomic scale microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Miller, Michael K; Blavette, D; Ringer, S. P.; Sudbrack, C; Smith, G.D.W.

    2009-01-01

    With the ability to locate and identify atoms in three dimensions, atom-probe tomography (APT) has revolutionized our understanding of structure-property relationships in materials used for structural applications. The atomic-scale details of clusters, second phases, and microstructural defects that control alloy properties have been investigated, providing an unprecedented level of detail on the origins of aging behavior, strength, creep, fracture toughness, corrosion, and irradiation resistance. Moreover, atomic-scale microscopy combined with atomistic simulation and theoretical modeling of material behavior can guide new alloy design. In this article, selected examples highlight how APT has led to a deeper understanding of materials structures and therefore properties, starting with the phase transformations controlling the aging and strengthening behavior of complex Al-, Fe-, and Ni-based alloys systems. The chemistry of interfaces and structural defects that play a crucial role in high-temperature strengthening, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also discussed, with particular reference to Zr- and Al-alloys and FeAl intermetallics.

  7. Materials and structures for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles are envisioned to require, in addition to carbon-carbon and ceramic-matrix composities for leading edges heated to above 2000 F, such 600 to 1800 F operating temperature materials as advanced Ti alloys, nickel aluminides, and metal-matrix composited; These possess the necessary low density and high strength and stiffness. The primary design drivers are maximum vehicle heating rate, total heat load, flight envelope, propulsion system type, mission life requirements and liquid hydrogen containment systems. Attention is presently given to aspects of these materials and structures requiring more intensive development.

  8. Research progress of microbial corrosion of reinforced concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Li, Dawang; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Dongwei

    2011-04-01

    Microbial corrosion of reinforce concrete structure is a new branch of learning. This branch deals with civil engineering , environment engineering, biology, chemistry, materials science and so on and is a interdisciplinary area. Research progress of the causes, research methods and contents of microbial corrosion of reinforced concrete structure is described. The research in the field is just beginning and concerted effort is needed to go further into the mechanism of reinforce concrete structure and assess the security and natural life of reinforce concrete structure under the special condition and put forward the protective methods.

  9. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  10. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; and (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system.

  11. A review of the compatibility of structural materials with oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, A. F.; Hust, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the problem of ignition and combustion of structural materials, particularly metals, which may come in contact with oxygen during its production, transport, and use. Following a review of the historical development of compatibility problems and research, a detailed account is given of compatibility testing methods aimed at detecting probable ignition sources, such as mechanical impact, electric sparks or flashes, heat, sound waves, abrasion, and surface fractures. A summary is presented of the ignition and combustion research reported in the literature, dwelling particularly on papers concerning oxygen-related accidents and the compatibility of metals with high-pressure oxygen. The relative oxygen compatibility of a number of common materials is discussed, including that of nickel and copper alloys, stainless steels, aluminum alloys, and titanium alloys. Finally, an effort is made to pinpoint research areas which would enhance understanding of the compatibility of bulk materials.

  12. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  13. Development of an Extreme Environment Materials Research Facility at Princeton

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A B; Tully, C G; Austin, R; Calaprice, F; McDonald, K; Ascione, G; Baker, G; Davidson, R; Dudek, L; Grisham, L; Kugel, H; Pagdon, K; Stevenson, T; Woolley, R; Zwicker, A

    2010-11-17

    materials, and the investigation of repair mechanisms. Effects on materials will be analyzed with in situ beam probes and instrumentation as the target is exposed to radiation, thermal fluxes and other stresses. Photon and monochromatic neutron fluxes, produced using a variable-energy (4-45 MeV) electron linac and the highly asymmetric electron-positron collisions technique used in high-energy physics research, can provide non-destructive, deep-penetrating structural analysis of materials while they are undergoing testing. The same beam lines will also be able to generate neutrons from photonuclear interactions using existing Bremsstrahlung and positrons on target quasi-monochromatic gamma rays. Other diagnostics will include infrared cameras, residual gas analyzer (RGA), and thermocouples; additional diagnostic capability will be added.

  14. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas; Wright, Art; Lambert, John; Hayes, Steven; Natesan, Ken; Ott, Larry J.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  15. Structures and Materials Working Group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torczyner, Robert; Hanks, Brantley R.

    1986-01-01

    The appropriateness of the selection of four issues (advanced materials development, analysis/design methods, tests of large flexible structures, and structural concepts) was evaluated. A cross-check of the issues and their relationship to the technology drivers is presented. Although all of the issues addressed numerous drivers, the advanced materials development issue impacts six out of the seven drivers and is considered to be the most crucial. The advanced materials technology development and the advanced design/analysis methods development were determined to be enabling technologies with the testing issues and development of structural concepts considered to be of great importance, although not enabling technologies. In addition, and of more general interest and criticality, the need for a Government/Industry commitment which does not now exist, was established. This commitment would call for the establishment of the required infrastructure to facilitate the development of the capabilities highlighted through the availability of resources and testbed facilities, including a national testbed in space to be in place in ten years.

  16. Response of structural materials to radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1997-12-01

    An evaluation of proton and neutron damage to aluminum, stainless steel, nickel alloys, and various aluminum alloys has been performed. The proton studies were conducted at energies of 200 MeV, 800 MeV, and 23.5 GeV. The proton studies consisted of evaluation and characterization of proton-irradiated window/target materials from accelerators and comparison to nonirradiated archival materials. The materials evaluated for the proton irradiations included 99.9999 wt% aluminum, 1100 aluminum, 5052 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and inconel 718. The neutron damage research centered on 6061 T-6 aluminum which was obtained from a control-rod follower from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). This material had received thermal neutron fluence up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}. The possible effects of thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios are discussed. The increases in tensile strength in the proton-irradiated materials is shown to be the result of atomic displacements. These displacements cause interstitials and vacancies which aggregate into defect clusters which result in radiation hardening of the materials. Production of gas (helium) in the grain boundaries of proton irradiated 99.9999 wt% aluminum is also discussed. The major factor contributing to the mechanical-property changes in the neutron-irradiated 6061 T-6 aluminum is the production of transmutation products formed by interactions of the aluminum with thermal neutrons. The metallurgical and mechanical-property evaluations for the research consisted of electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), tensile testing, and microhardness testing.

  17. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  18. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system. For both composite sensors and actuators we have continued to explore and exploit the remarkable versatility of the flextensional moonie type structure. Finite element (FEA) calculations have given a clear picture of the lower order resonant modes and permitted the evaluation of various end cap metals, cap geometries and load conditions. In actuator studies multilayer structures have been combined with flextensional moonie endcaps to yield high displacement (50 micrometers) compact structures. Electrically controlled shape memory has been demonstrated in lead zirconate stannate titanate compositions, and used for controlling a simple latching relay.

  19. Materials for adaptive structural acoustic control, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.

    1993-04-01

    This report documents work carried out in the Materials Research Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University over the first year of a new ONR sponsored University Research Initiative (URI) entitled Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. For this report the activities have been grouped under the following topic headings: (1) General Summary Papers; (2) Materials Studies; (3) Composite Sensors; (4) Actuator Studies; (5) Integration Issues; (6) Processing Studies; and (7) Thin Film Ferroelectrics. In material studies important advances have been made in the understanding of the evaluation of relaxor behavior in the PLZT's and of the order-disorder behavior in lead scandium tantalate:lead titanate solid solutions and of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in this system. For both composite sensors and actuators, we have continued to explore and exploit the remarkable versatility of the flextensional moonie type structure. Finite element (FEA) calculations have given a clear picture of the lower order resonant modes and permitted the evaluation of various end cap metals, cap geometries, and load conditions. In actuator studies multilayer structures have been combined with flextensional moonie endcaps to yield high displacement (50 micrometers) compact structures. Electrically controlled shape memory has been demonstrated in lead zirconate stannate titanate compositions, and used for controlling a simple latching relay.

  20. Aeroservoelastic and Structural Dynamics Research on Smart Structures Conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas; Wilkie, W. Keats; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Florance, Jennifer Pinkerton; Wieseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Mathew L.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally-validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental tests to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind tunnel tests to demonstrate system performance. The key aeroservoelastic applications of this research include: active twist control of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory/NASA/Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials.

  1. Guidelines for composite materials research related to general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, N. F.; Humphreys, E. A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines for research on composite materials directed toward the improvement of all aspects of their applicability for general aviation aircraft were developed from extensive studies of their performance, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness. Specific areas for research and for manufacturing development were identified and evaluated. Inputs developed from visits to manufacturers were used in part to guide these evaluations, particularly in the area of cost effectiveness. Throughout the emphasis was to direct the research toward the requirements of general aviation aircraft, for which relatively low load intensities are encountered, economy of production is a prime requirement, and yet performance still commands a premium. A number of implications regarding further directions for developments in composites to meet these requirements also emerged from the studies. Chief among these is the need for an integrated (computer program) aerodynamic/structures approach to aircraft design.

  2. New smart materials to address issues of structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplya, Pavel Mikhail

    2004-12-01

    Nuclear weapons and their storage facilities may benefit from in-situ structural health monitoring systems. Appending health-monitoring functionality to conventional materials and structures has been only marginally successful. The purpose of this project was to evaluate feasibility of a new smart material that includes self-sensing health monitoring functions similar to that of a nervous system of a living organism. Reviews of current efforts in the fields of heath-monitoring, nanotechnology, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and wireless sensor networks were conducted. Limitations of the current nanotechnology methods were identified and new approaches were proposed to accelerate the development of self-sensing materials. Wireless networks of MEMS sensors have been researched as possible prototypes of self-sensing materials. Sensor networks were also examined as enabling technologies for dense data collection techniques to be used for validation of numerical methods and material parameter identification. Each grain of the envisioned material contains sensors that are connected in a dendritic manner similar to networks of neurons in a nervous system. Each sensor/neuron can communicate with the neighboring grains. Both the state of the sensor (on/off) and the quality of communication signal (speed/amplitude) should indicate not only a presence of a structural defect but the nature of the defect as well. For example, a failed sensor may represent a through-grain crack, while a lost or degraded communication link may represent an inter-granular crack. A technology to create such material does not exist. While recent progress in the fields of MEMS and nanotechnology allows to envision these new smart materials, it is unrealistic to expect creation of self-sensing materials in the near future. The current state of MEMS, nanotechnology, communication, sensor networks, and data processing technologies indicates that it will take more than ten years for the

  3. Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology Based on NASA's Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The grant NAG-1 -2125, Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology, based on NASA s Materials Research, involves collaborative effort among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC), Norfolk State University (NSU), national research centers, private industry, technical societies, colleges and universities. The collaboration aims to strengthen math, science and technology education by providing outreach related to materials science and technology (MST). The goal of the project is to transfer new developments from LaRC s Center for Excellence for Structures and Materials and other NASA materials research into technical education across the nation to provide educational outreach and strengthen technical education. To achieve this goal we are employing two main strategies: 1) development of the gateway website and 2) using the National Educators Workshop: Update in Engineering Materials, Science and Technology (NEW:Updates). We have also participated in a number of national projects, presented talks at technical meetings and published articles aimed at improving k-12 technical education. Through the three years of this project the NSU team developed the successful MST-Online site and continued to upgrade and update it as our limited resources permitted. Three annual NEW:Updates conducted from 2000 though 2002 overcame the challenges presented first by the September 11,2001 terrorist attacks and the slow U.S. economy and still managed to conduct very effective workshops and expand our outreach efforts. Plans began on NEW:Update 2003 to be hosted by NASA Langley as a part of the celebration of the Centennial of Controlled Flight.

  4. Low Gravity Materials Science Research for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Semmes, Edmund B.; Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Bassler, Julie A.; Cook, Mary Beth; Wargo, Michael J.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    2004-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, the President of the United States announced a new vision for the United States civil space program. The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has the responsibility to implement this new vision. The President also created a Presidential Commission 'to obtain recommendations concerning implementation of the new vision for space exploration.' The President's Commission recognized that achieving the exploration objectives would require significant technical innovation, research, and development in focal areas defined as 'enabling technologies.' Among the 17 enabling technologies identified for initial focus were advanced structures; advanced power and propulsion; closed-loop life support and habitability; extravehicular activity system; autonomous systems and robotics; scientific data collection and analysis; biomedical risk mitigation; and planetary in situ resource utilization. The Commission also recommended realignment of NASA Headquarters organizations to support the vision for space exploration. NASA has aggressively responded in its planning to support the vision for space exploration and with the current considerations of the findings and recommendations from the Presidential Commission. This presentation will examine the transformation and realignment activities to support the vision for space exploration that are underway in the microgravity materials science program. The heritage of the microgravity materials science program, in the context of residence within the organizational structure of the Office of Biological and Physical Research, and thematic and sub-discipline based research content areas, will be briefly examined as the starting point for the ongoing transformation. Overviews of future research directions will be presented and the status of organizational restructuring at NASA Headquarters, with respect to influences on the microgravity materials science program, will be discussed

  5. James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials Lecture: New Superconductors and other Research in New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Superconductors and other electronic materials can often display subtle relationships between their structural characteristics and their electronic properties. Though the primary interest in these relationships is within the condensed matter physics community, often at their foundation are the concepts of bonding and structure familiar to inorganic and solid state chemists. Thus a hybridized view, combining physics and chemistry, is one way of approaching the discovery and characterization of new materials. In this talk I will describe some of our research in this context and comment on some broader aspects of interdisciplinary research in new materials.

  6. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    SciTech Connect

    Beausang, Cornelius W.

    2015-04-30

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  7. Bioinspired materials: from low to high dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Wang, Zhen; Cai, Chao; Shen, Heng; Liang, Feiyue; Wang, Dong; Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Tang; Guo, Jing; Wang, Yongxin; Liu, Xiaofang; Duan, Chunting; Wang, Hao; Mao, Yunzeng; Jia, Xin; Dong, Haixia; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Jian

    2014-11-01

    The surprising properties of biomaterials are the results of billions of years of evolution. Generally, biomaterials are assembled under mild conditions with very limited supply of constituents available for living organism, and their amazing properties largely result from the sophisticated hierarchical structures. Following the biomimetic principles to prepare manmade materials has drawn great research interests in materials science and engineering. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in fabricating bioinspired materials with the emphasis on mimicking the structure from one to three dimensions. Selected examples are described with a focus on the relationship between the structural characters and the corresponding functions. For one-dimensional materials, spider fibers, polar bear hair, multichannel plant roots and so on have been involved. Natural structure color and color shifting surfaces, and the antifouling, antireflective coatings of biomaterials are chosen as the typical examples of the two-dimensional biomimicking. The outstanding protection performance, and the stimuli responsive and self-healing functions of biomaterials based on the sophisticated hierarchical bulk structures are the emphases of the three-dimensional mimicking. Finally, a summary and outlook are given. PMID:25212698

  8. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Summaries are presented of fiscal year 1989 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. Highlights from the branch's major work areas include aeroelasticity, vibration control, dynamic systems, and computation structural methods. A listing of the fiscal year 1989 branch publications is given.

  9. Research in Structures and Dynamics, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayduk, R. J. (Compiler); Noor, A. K. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A symposium on advanced and trends in structures and dynamics was held to communicate new insights into physical behavior and to identify trends in the solution procedures for structures and dynamics problems. Pertinent areas of concern were (1) multiprocessors, parallel computation, and database management systems, (2) advances in finite element technology, (3) interactive computing and optimization, (4) mechanics of materials, (5) structural stability, (6) dynamic response of structures, and (7) advanced computer applications.

  10. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  11. Light thermal structures and materials for high speed flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, unified viscoplastic constitutive models have evolved to meet this need. These constitutive models provide a means for representing a material's response from the elastic through the plastic range including strain-rate dependent plastic flow, creep, and stress relaxation. Rate-dependent plasticity effects are known to be important at elevated temperatures. The purpose of this paper is to describe computational and experimental research programs underway at the Light Thermal Structures Center focused on the investigation of the response of structures and materials to local heating. In the first part of the paper, finite element thermoviscoplastic analysis is highlighted. In the second part of the paper, the thermal-structures experimental program is outlined.

  12. Materials, Structures and Manufacturing: An Integrated Approach to Develop Expandable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Zander, Martin E.; Sleight, Daid W.; Connell, John; Holloway, Nancy; Palmieri, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Membrane dominated space structures are lightweight and package efficiently for launch; however, they must be expanded (deployed) in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry. These expandable structural systems include solar sails, solar power arrays, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices that are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. In this work, an integrated approach to development of thin-film damage tolerant membranes is explored using advanced manufacturing. Bio-inspired hierarchical structures were printed on films using additive manufacturing to achieve improved tear resistance and to facilitate membrane deployment. High precision, robust expandable structures can be realized using materials that are both space durable and processable using additive manufacturing. Test results show this initial work produced higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass. Future research and development opportunities for expandable structural systems designed using an integrated approach to structural design, manufacturing, and materials selection are discussed.

  13. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1993-06-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year all 232 operational days were fully utilized. Beam line tests coupled with MATRIX members combined to use 284 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and four groups were provided 48 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1992 the MATRIX group published six articles. To date, for 1993 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation nine articles. Recent research milestones include: the first quantitative structural information on the as-quenched and early stages of decomposition of supersaturated Al-Li alloys; the first quantitative diffuse scattering measurements on a complex system (Co substitute for Cu YBCO superconductor); demonstration of capabilities of a new UHV surface diffraction chamber with in-situ characterization and temperature control (30-1300K); feasibility of phasing structure factors in a quasicrystal using multiple Bragg scattering.

  14. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  15. Solubility of Structurally Complicated Materials: II. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ari L.

    2006-12-01

    Bone is a structurally complex material, formed of both organic and inorganic chemicals. The organic compounds constitute mostly collagen and other proteins. The inorganic or bone mineral components constitute predominantly calcium, phosphate, carbonate, and a host of minor ingredients. The mineralized bone is composed of crystals which are closely associated with a protein of which collagen is an acidic polysaccharide material. This association is very close and the protein integrates into the crystalline structure. The mineralization involves the deposition of relatively insoluble crystals on an organic framework. The solubility process takes place when the outermost ions in the crystal lattice breakaway from the surface and become separated from the crystal. This is characteristic for ions dissolving in water or aqueous solutions at the specified temperature. The magnitude of solubility is temperature and pH dependent. Bone is sparingly soluble in most solvents. Enamel is less soluble than bone and fluoroapatite is the least soluble of all apatites in acid buffers. Collagen is less soluble in neutral salt solution than in dilute acid solutions at ambient temperatures. The solubility of collagens in solvents gradually decreases with increasing age of the bone samples.

  16. Foam core materials for structural sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jongshin.

    1991-01-01

    The author first investigates the creep of polymer foam cores. Models for the creep of linear and nonlinear viscoelastic polymer foams are proposed. Experimental results for the creep of a rigid polyurethane foam are compared to the mode; agreement is good. The results indicate that creep can limit the design of building panels with polymer foam cores. Next, he studies the potential of using ceramic foams as a core material in building panels. Ceramic foams have a high stiffness, high creep resistance, low cost, and are incombustible. Ceramic foams, however, have a low fracture toughness and tensile strength. Assuming that the variability of cell wall modulus of rupture follows a Weibull distribution, there is a cell size effect on both the fracture toughness and tensile strength. Both the tensile strength and fracture toughness of ceramic foams can be improved by controlling the cell size. Since cell wall deformation of cellular materials is primarily by bending, the mechanical properties of cellular materials may be improved by making cell walls into sandwich structures. Hollow-sphere composites are made by introducing thin-walled hollow spheres into a matrix.

  17. Suggestions for Structuring a Research Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, James D.; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often experience difficulty as they attempt to prepare journal articles that describe their work. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers in the field of education with a series of suggestions as to how to clearly structure each section of a research manuscript that they intend to submit for publication in a scholarly…

  18. Research into Practice: How Research Appears in Pronunciation Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Research into pronunciation has often disregarded its potential to inform pedagogy. This is due partly to the historical development of pronunciation teaching and research, but its effect is that there is often a mismatch between research and teaching. This paper looks at four areas in which the (mis)match is imperfect but in which a greater…

  19. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, Shawn E.; Lehman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.

    2014-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a highly automated facility developed in a joint venture/partnership between NASA and ESA center dot Allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses onboard the International Space Station (ISS) center dot Multi-user facility for high temperature materials science research center dot Launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module ?Research goals center dot Provide means of studying materials processing in space to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved center dot Benefit materials science research via the microgravity environment of space where the researcher can better isolate the effects of gravity during solidification on the properties of materials center dot Use the knowledge gained from experiments to make reliable predictions about conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials

  20. Materials and neutronic research at the Low Energy Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David V.

    2016-04-01

    In the decade since the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) produced its first neutrons, the facility has made important contributions to the international neutron scattering community. LENS employs a 13MeV proton beam at up to 4kW beam power onto one of two Be targets to produce neutrons for research in fields ranging from radiation effects in electronics to studies of the structure of fluids confined in nanoporous materials. The neutron source design at the heart of LENS facilitates relatively rapid hands-on access to most of its components which provides a foundation for a research program in experimental neutronics and affords numerous opportunities for novel educational experiences. We describe in some detail a number of the unique capabilities of this facility.

  1. Materials processing in space programs tasks. [NASA research tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E.

    1981-01-01

    Active research tasks as of the end of fiscal year 1981 of the materials processing in space program, NASA Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications are summarized to provide an overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university, and government communities. The program, its history, strategy, and overall goal are described the organizational structures and people involved are identified and a list of recent publications is given for each research task. Four categories: Crystal Growth; Solidification of Metals, Alloys, and Composites; Fluids, Transports, and Chemical Processes, and Ultrahigh Vacuum and Containerless Processing Technologies are used to group the tasks. Some tasks are placed in more than one category to insure complete coverage of each category.

  2. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Smart materials and structures are comprised of structural matter that responds to a stimulus. These materials can be controlled or have properties that can be altered in a prescribed manner. Smart materials generate non-traditional forms of transduction. We are all familiar with common forms of transduction, electromechanical motors. Lorenz's forces utilize permanent and variable magnets, controlled by current, to generate magnetically generated forces that oppose each other. Utilizing this simple principal we have advanced the industrial revolution of the 19th Century by the creation of the servo-mechanism. Controlled velocity and position generation systems that have automated manufacturing, our machines and the very environs in which we dwell. Smart materials often rely on a variety of new and different methods of transduction. Piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, electrostrictive, and phase-change materials, such as shape memory alloys, are among the most common smart materials. Other approaches such as polymer actuators that rely on complex three-dimensional chemical-based composites are also emerging. The trinity of engineering research is analysis, simulation and experimentation. To perform analyses we must understand the physical phenomena at hand in order to develop a mathematical model for the problem. These models form the basis of simulation and complex computational modeling of a system. It is from these models that we begin to expand our understanding about what is possible, ultimately developing simulation-based tools that verify new designs and insights. Experimentation offers the opportunity to verify our analyses and simulations in addition to providing the 'proof of the pudding' so to speak. But it is our ability to simulate that guides us and our expectations, predicting the behavior of what we may see in the lab or in a prototype. Experimentation ultimately provides the feedback to our modeling

  3. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  4. A New Direction for the NASA Materials Science Research Using the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 NASA created a fifth Strategic Enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to bring together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to foster interdisciplinary research. The Materials Science Program is one of five Microgravity Research disciplines within this new Enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program will participate within this new enterprise structure in order to facilitate effective use of ISS facilities, target scientific and technology questions and transfer results for Earth benefits. The Materials Science research will use a low gravity environment for flight and ground-based research in crystallization, fundamental processing, properties characterization, and biomaterials in order to obtain fundamental understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. Completion of the International Space Station's (ISS) first major assembly, during the past year, provides new opportunities for on-orbit research and scientific utilization. The Enterprise has recently completed an assessment of the science prioritization from which the future materials science ISS type payloads will be implemented. Science accommodations will support a variety of Materials Science payload hardware both in the US and international partner modules with emphasis on early use of Express Rack and Glovebox facilities. This paper addresses the current scope of the flight and ground investigator program. These investigators will use the various capabilities of the ISS lab facilities to achieve their research objectives. The type of research and classification of materials being studied will be addressed. This includes the recent emphasis being placed on radiation shielding, nanomaterials, propulsion materials, and biomaterials type research. The Materials Science Program will pursue a new, interdisciplinary approach, which contributes, to Human

  5. A New Direction for the NASA Materials Science Research using the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagheck, R.

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 NASA created a fifth Strategic Enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to bring together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to foster interdisciplinary research. The Materials Science Program is one of five Microgravity Research disciplines within this new Enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program will participate within this new enterprise structure in order to facilitate effective use of ISS facilities, target scientific and technology questions and transfer results for Earth benefits. The Materials Science research will use a low gravity environment for flight and ground-based research in crystallization, fundamental processing, properties characterization, and biomaterials in order to obtain fundamental understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. Completion of the International Space Station's (ISS) first major assembly, during the past year, provides new opportunities for on-orbit research and scientific utilization. The Enterprise has recently completed an assessment of the science prioritization from which the future materials science ISS type payloads will be implemented. Science accommodations will support a variety of Materials Science payload hardware both in the US and international partner modules with emphasis on early use of Express Rack and Glovebox facilities. This paper addresses the current scope of the flight and ground investigator program. These investigators will use the various capabilities of the ISS lab facilities to achieve their research objectives. The type of research and classification of materials being studied will be addressed. This includes the recent emphasis being placed on radiation shielding, nanomaterials, propulsion materials, and biomaterials type research. The Materials Science Program will pursue a new, interdisciplinary approach, which contributes, to Human

  6. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.

    1994-12-01

    Objective is to accelerate phaseout of CFC refrigerants. Since its start in 1991, the MCLR program has initiated twenty-five research projects and the ARTI Refrigerant Database. The MCLR program is now entering its final phase. This phase will include over a dozen new research projects which will be completed in the next two years. This presentation highlights accomplishments of the MCLR program and outlines new projects to be conducted in the final phase.

  7. Abrasive wear of advanced structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Young

    Wear of advanced structural materials, namely composites and ceramics, in abrasion has been examined in the present study. A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of reinforcement is estimated by modeling three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, cracking at the matrix/reinforcement interface or in the reinforcement, and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as the relative size, fracture toughness, and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on-drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy-matrix composite material. In addition, the effects of post heat-treatment on the wear behavior of toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC) are investigated by characterizing the role of the microstructures introduced during the post annealing processes. When the annealing temperature is above 1300°C, an aluminum rich secondary phase (nano-precipitate) forms and grows inside the SiC grains. This toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC), annealed at temperatures ranging from 0 to 1600°C, is subjected to two- and three-body abrasions with different sizes of abrasives (3˜70 mum). The test results exhibit that the effect of nano-precipitates on wear resistance of post-annealed ABC-SiC is restricted to the abrasion with fine abrasives (3 mum), since nano-precipitates, in the range from 4 nm at 1300°C to 25 nm at 1600°C, are comparable in dimension

  8. Structural studies on ferroelectric and ferrodistortive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Mingqin

    The structure of the piezoelectric material 0.68PbMg1/3Nb 2/3O3-0.32PbTiO3 have been studied by single crystal, powder x-ray diffraction techniques over the temperature range from 25°C to 200°C. The existence of twinned structures or coexistence of rhombohedral and tetragonal phases has been shown by the peak distortion of Bragg reflections. Superlattice structure was observed for all experimental PMN-PT crystals. Refinement results showed that the 2 x 2 x 2 superlattice resulted from anti-parallel displacement of oxygen in the adjacent conventional perovskite unit cells. No cation displacement in the paraelectric phase and little in the ferroelectric phase were shown by the refinement results. This unique feature associated with the ferroelectric mechanism of the material was explained by comparison with PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3. The crystals were extensively characterized by using powder x-ray diffraction, Laue back-reflection and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. The detailed orientation information such as misorientation of grains, location of grain boundaries and the orientation distribution was obtained from the automatic orientation mapping with the EBSD technique. The uniform orientation was confirmed for crystals with a "cellular-like" structure. A crystal growth model, the two-dimensional layer mechanism, was proposed by orientation analysis. Based on the model, some important comments were made on orientation problems under general growth conditions. The ferrodistortive phase transitions of tertramethylphosphonium tetrabromozincate [P(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 and tertramethylphosphonium tetraiodonzincate [P(CH3)4]2ZnI4 were thoroughly studied by a single crystal x-ray diffraction technique. An order parameter analysis by application of Landau theory showed that the two compounds undergo first-order phase transitions near a tricritical Lifshitz point. Transitions for both compounds appear to be first order, but with the iodo salt the transition is nearly

  9. Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC), centered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, is the foundation for the Agency's solids and surfaces analysis capabilities. ...

  10. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 {minus}0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of {approx}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} -- 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mm{sup 3}/Nm and {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} -- 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/Nm were measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the {lambda} ratio.

  11. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) and zirconia (ZrO[sub 2]) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 [minus]0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of [approx]2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] -- 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] mm[sup 3]/Nm and [approx]7 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] -- 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] mm[sup 3]/Nm were measured for Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the [lambda] ratio.

  12. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  13. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  14. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  15. A New Direction for NASA Materials Science Research Using the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Trach, Brian; Geveden, Rex D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA recently created a fifth Strategic Enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to bring together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to foster interdisciplinary research. The Materials Science Program is one of five Microgravity Research disciplines within this new enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program will participate within this new enterprise structure in order to facilitate effective use of ISS facilities, target scientific and technology questions and transfer scientific and technology results for Earth benefits. The Materials Science research will use a low gravity environment for flight and ground-based research in crystallization, fundamental processing, properties characterization, and biomaterials in order to obtain fundamental understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. Completion of the International Space Station's (ISS) first major assembly, during the past year, provides new opportunities for on-orbit research and scientific utilization. Accommodations will support a variety of Materials Science payload hardware both in the US and international partner modules with emphasis on early use of Express Rack and Glovebox facilities. This paper addresses the current scope of the flight investigator program. These investigators will use the various capabilities of the ISS to achieve their research objectives. The type of research and classification of materials being studied will be addressed. This includes the recent emphasis being placed on nanomaterials and biomaterials type research. Materials Science Program will pursue a new, interdisciplinary approach, which contributes, to Human Space Flight Exploration research. The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and other related American and International experiment modules will serve as the foundation for this research. Discussion will be

  16. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  17. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Hellmann, J.R.; Chawla, K.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-10-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technology`s Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  18. Chemical Structure and Accidental Explosion Risk in the Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Tips that laboratory researchers and beginning graduate students can use to safeguard against explosion hazard with emphasis on clear illustrations of molecular structure are discussed. Those working with hazardous materials must proceed cautiously and may want to consider alternative and synthetic routes.

  19. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  20. Future opportunities for photovoltaic materials and device research

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, S.K. )

    1994-06-30

    The semiconductor material science and associated device technologies have entered into a new era, almost a revolutionary period. The use of sophisticated computation techniques has given theoreticians the predictive power for novel materials architecture; the experimentalists have the ability to grow materials and devices under carefully controlled conditions and manipulate materials on an atomic scale; and the powerful analytical tools have enabled us to gain insight on the surface, interface, and bulk properties of materials and devices with a high degree of precision. These have opened up some opportunities for doing some very exciting materials and device research in the area of semiconductor materials, in general, and photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices, in particular. In this brief review, a global view of semiconductor materials for PV applications will be taken and an attempt will be made to identify future research opportunities.

  1. Program of Research in Structures and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Structures and Dynamics Program was first initiated in 1972 with the following two major objectives: to provide a basic understanding and working knowledge of some key areas pertinent to structures, solid mechanics, and dynamics technology including computer aided design; and to provide a comprehensive educational and research program at the NASA Langley Research Center leading to advanced degrees in the structures and dynamics areas. During the operation of the program the research work was done in support of the activities of both the Structures and Dynamics Division and the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division. During the period of 1972 to 1986 the Program provided support for two full-time faculty members, one part-time faculty member, three postdoctoral fellows, one research engineer, eight programmers, and 28 graduate research assistants. The faculty and staff of the program have published 144 papers and reports, and made 70 presentations at national and international meetings, describing their research findings. In addition, they organized and helped in the organization of 10 workshops and national symposia in the structures and dynamics areas. The graduate research assistants and the students enrolled in the program have written 20 masters theses and 2 doctoral dissertations. The overall progress is summarized.

  2. Strategic Research Directions in Microgravity Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Raymond G.; Semmes, Ed; Cook, Beth; Wargo, Michael J.; Marzwell, Neville

    2003-01-01

    The next challenge of space exploration is the development of the capabilities for long-term missions beyond low earth orbit. NASA s scientific advisory groups and internal mission studies have identified several fundamental issues which require substantial advancements in new technology if these goals are to be accomplished. Crews must be protected from the severe radiation environment beyond the earth s magnetic field. Chemical propulsion must be replaced by systems that require less mass and are more efficient. The overall launch complement must be reduced by developing repair and fabrication techniques which utilize or recycle available materials.

  3. New directions for nanoscale thermoelectric materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.; Chen, G.; Tang, M. Y.; Yang, R. G.; Lee, H.; Wang, D. Z.; Ren, F.; Fleurial, J. P.; Gogna, P.

    2005-01-01

    Many of the recent advances in enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit are linked to nanoscale phenomena with both bulk samples containing nanoscale constituents and nanoscale materials exhibiting enhanced thermoelectric performance in their own right. Prior theoretical and experimental proof of principle studies on isolated quantum well and quantum wire samples have now evolved into studies on bulk samples containing nanostructured constituents. In this review, nanostructural composites are shown to exhibit nanostructures and properties that show promise for thermoelectric applications. A review of some of the results obtained to date are presented.

  4. Aircraft structures research at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E

    1955-01-01

    A review is made of the test techniques that have been developed and used by the NACA for experimental research in aircraft structures at elevated temperatures. Some experimental results are presented. Remarks are included on the problem of model scaling for testing of structures at high temperatures. (author)

  5. Structural Equation Modeling in Rehabilitation Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Fong; Lee, Gloria K.; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kubota, Coleen; Allen, Chase A.

    2007-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) has become increasingly popular in counseling, psychology, and rehabilitation research. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic concepts and applications of SEM in rehabilitation counseling research using the AMOS statistical software program.

  6. Creep and fatigue research efforts on advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    1987-01-01

    Two of the more important materials problems encountered in turbine blades of aircraft engines are creep and fatigue. To withstand these high-temperature phenomena modern engines utilize single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys as the material of choice in critical applications. Recent research activities at Lewis on single-crystal blading material as well as future research initiatives on metal matrix composites related to creep and fatigue are discussed. The goal of these research efforts is improving the understanding of microstructure-property relationships and thereby guide material development.

  7. Creep and fatigue research efforts on advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    1990-01-01

    Two of the more important materials problems encountered in turbine blades of aircraft engines are creep and fatigue. To withstand these high-temperature phenomena, modern engines utilize single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys as the material of choice in critical applications. This paper will present recent research activities at NASA's Lewis Research Center on single-crystal blading material, related to creep and fatique. The goal of these research efforts is to improve the understanding of microstructure-property relationships and thereby guide material development.

  8. Advanced materials research for long-haul aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    The status of research efforts to apply low to intermediate temperature composite materials and advanced high temperature materials to engine components is reviewed. Emerging materials technologies and their potential benefits to aircraft gas turbines were emphasized. The problems were identified, and the general state of the technology for near term use was assessed.

  9. Polymer materials research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Gilwee, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Polymers that provide significant improvements in both efficiency and safety for civilian transport aircraft and military combat aircraft were developed. High strength to weight structures such as carbon fiber composites with long term durability are requirements common to both classes of aircraft. Aircraft safety improvements in fire resistance and crashworthiness of primary and secondary structures are long term objectives for transport aircraft. Void filler ballistic foams, intumescent coatings, and radiation-resistant transparent plastics contribute to vulnerability reduction in combat military aircraft. Low and high velocity impact tolerance, fire resistance, thermal stability, and long term durability of polymers and components are emphasized.

  10. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials: Final Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam

    2002-01-01

    The objectives and goals of this project were to investigate and develop high efficient, lightweight, and cost effective materials for potential photovoltaic applications, such as solar energy conversion or photo detector devices. Specifically, as described in the original project proposal, the target material to be developed was a block copolymer system containing an electron donating (or p-type) conjugated polymer block coupled to an electron withdrawing (or n-type) conjugated polymer block through a non-conjugated bridge unit. Due to several special requirements of the targeted block copolymer systems, such as electron donating and withdrawing substituents, conjugated block structures, processing requirement, stability requirement, size controllability, phase separation and self ordering requirement, etc., many traditional or commonly used block copolymer synthetic schemes are not suitable for this system. Therefore, the investigation and development of applicable and effective synthetic protocols became the most critical and challenging part of this project. During the entire project period, and despite the lack of a proposed synthetic polymer postdoctoral research associate due to severe shortage of qualified personnel in the field, several important accomplishments were achieved in this project and are briefly listed and elaborated. A more detailed research and experimental data is listed in the Appendix.

  11. Structure and local structure of perovskite based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossell Abrodos, Marta Dacil

    Perovskites, with general formula ABX3, where A and B are cations and X is an anion, form a very important class of inorganic crystals whose physical properties are extensively used in many technological applications. The basic, so-called aristotype structure, consists of an infinite array of corner-linked anion octahedra, with the A cations in the spaces between the octahedra and a B cation at the center of each octahedron. Interesting physical properties are often related to the flexibility of the perovskite structure to deform or to form non-stoichiometric compositions. In this thesis, four perovskite-related systems are studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is of prime interest to analyze the influence of the structure and microstructure on the physical properties of these systems. (1) The anion-deficient Sr4Fe6O12+delta (delta < 1) derivatives. These materials are mixed conducting oxides with high oxygen and electronic conductivity. A complete characterization of the structure of these anion-deficient compounds is deduced from electron diffraction and high-resolution TEM. The presence of anion vacancies in the Sr4Fe6O12+delta (delta < 1) structure is suggested to have an influence on the transport properties. (2) The CaRMnSnO6 (R = La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Dy) double perovskites. A random distribution of the Ca and R cations over the A positions and Mn and Sn cations over the B positions is found. Due to a random distribution of the Mn 3+ and Sn4+ cations, a spin glass behavior was found for CaLaMnSnO6. (3) The K3AlF6 elpasolite-type (or ordered double perovskite) structure. This compound is of high technological importance since it is a basic component of the melts for low temperature electrolysis in aluminum smelting. A sequence of phase transitions at different temperatures in K3AlF6 along with the data on unit cell dimensions and space symmetry of three major polymorphs is reported. (4) Ca 2Fe2O5 brownmillerite-type thin films deposited on three different

  12. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  13. Report on aerospace structures and structural materials R and D in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The end-of-tour report summarizes 65 leading European R and D programs encountered by the author during his assignment as Chief, Structures and Structural Materials in the USAF EOARD (European Office of Aerospace Research and Development) from 1985-1990. The report is divided into two sections: (1) Aerospace Structural Materials; and (2) Aerospace Structures and Solid Mechanics. For each of the programs, a summary of the capability is presented, contact information is provided for the principal investigator, other more detailed EOARD Liaison Reports (which can be ordered from EOARD) are referenced if they exist, and if there has been an R and D project funded by the USAF at the European organization, the name and address of the USAF project monitor is provided.

  14. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-12-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  15. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  16. Reversible Hydrogen Storage MaterialsStructure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  17. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The investigation of the performance limiting mechanisms in large grain (greater than 1-2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon was continued by fabricating a set of minicell wafers on a selection of 10 cm x 10 cm wafers. A minicell wafer consists of an array of small (approximately 0.2 sq cm in area) photodiodes which are isolated from one another by a mesa structure. The junction capacitance of each minicell was used to obtain the dopant concentration, and therefore the resistivity, as a function of position across each wafer. The results indicate that there is no significant variation in resistivity with position for any of the polycrystalline wafers, whether Semix or Wacker. However, the resistivity of Semix brick 71-01E did decrease slightly from bottom to top.

  18. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrystalline silicon solar cells are summarized. Very small grain or short minority-carrier diffusion length silicon was used. Hydrogenated solar cells fabricated from this material appear to have effective minority-carrier diffusion lengths that are still not very long, as shown by the open-circuit voltages of passivated cells that are still significantly less than those of single-crystal solar cells. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. However, the open-circuit voltage, which is sensitive to grain boundary recombination, is sometimes 20 to 40 mV less. The goal was to minimize variations in open-circuit voltage and fill-factor caused by defects by passivating these defects using a hydrogenation process. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystaline silicon solar cells.

  19. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1993 and research proposal for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, H.K.

    1993-03-01

    The materials research laboratory program is about 30% of total Materials Science and Engineering effort on the Univ. of Illinois campus. Coordinated efforts are being carried out in areas of structural ceramics, grain boundaries, field responsive polymeric and organic materials, molecular structure of solid-liquid interfaces and its relation to corrosion, and x-ray scattering science.

  20. Research in nonlinear structural and solid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. G., Jr. (Compiler); Noor, A. K. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of building structures and numerical solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and Newton's method are discussed. Other topics include: nonlinear interaction problems; solution procedures for nonlinear problems; crash dynamics and advanced nonlinear applications; material characterization, contact problems, and inelastic response; and formulation aspects and special software for nonlinear analysis.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Interdisciplinary Materials Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Yogesh; Nordlund, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) offer a broad range of interdisciplinary materials research experiences to undergraduate students with diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, applied mathematics, and engineering. The research projects offered cover a broad range of topics including high pressure physics, microelectronic materials, nano-materials, laser materials, bioceramics and biopolymers, cell-biomaterials interactions, planetary materials, and computer simulation of materials. The students welcome the opportunity to work with an interdisciplinary team of basic science, engineering, and biomedical faculty but the challenge is in learning the key vocabulary for interdisciplinary collaborations, experimental tools, and working in an independent capacity. The career development workshops dealing with the graduate school application process and the entrepreneurial business activities were found to be most effective. The interdisciplinary university wide poster session helped student broaden their horizons in research careers. The synergy of the REU program with other concurrently running high school summer programs on UAB campus will also be discussed.

  2. 7 CFR 3406.17 - Program application materials-research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program application materials-research. 3406.17... RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Research Proposal § 3406.17 Program application...

  3. Probabilistic structural mechanics research for parallel processing computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, Robert H.; Chen, Heh-Chyun; Twisdale, Lawrence A.; Martin, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerospace structures and spacecraft are a complex assemblage of structural components that are subjected to a variety of complex, cyclic, and transient loading conditions. Significant modeling uncertainties are present in these structures, in addition to the inherent randomness of material properties and loads. To properly account for these uncertainties in evaluating and assessing the reliability of these components and structures, probabilistic structural mechanics (PSM) procedures must be used. Much research has focused on basic theory development and the development of approximate analytic solution methods in random vibrations and structural reliability. Practical application of PSM methods was hampered by their computationally intense nature. Solution of PSM problems requires repeated analyses of structures that are often large, and exhibit nonlinear and/or dynamic response behavior. These methods are all inherently parallel and ideally suited to implementation on parallel processing computers. New hardware architectures and innovative control software and solution methodologies are needed to make solution of large scale PSM problems practical.

  4. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  5. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Smart materials and structures are comprised of structural matter that responds to a stimulus. These materials can be controlled or have properties that can be altered in a prescribed manner. Smart materials generate non-traditional forms of transduction. We are all familiar with common forms of transduction, electromechanical motors. Lorenz's forces utilize permanent and variable magnets, controlled by current, to generate magnetically generated forces that oppose each other. Utilizing this simple principal we have advanced the industrial revolution of the 19th Century by the creation of the servo-mechanism. Controlled velocity and position generation systems that have automated manufacturing, our machines and the very environs in which we dwell. Smart materials often rely on a variety of new and different methods of transduction. Piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, electrostrictive, and phase-change materials, such as shape memory alloys, are among the most common smart materials. Other approaches such as polymer actuators that rely on complex three-dimensional chemical-based composites are also emerging. The trinity of engineering research is analysis, simulation and experimentation. To perform analyses we must understand the physical phenomena at hand in order to develop a mathematical model for the problem. These models form the basis of simulation and complex computational modeling of a system. It is from these models that we begin to expand our understanding about what is possible, ultimately developing simulation-based tools that verify new designs and insights. Experimentation offers the opportunity to verify our analyses and simulations in addition to providing the 'proof of the pudding' so to speak. But it is our ability to simulate that guides us and our expectations, predicting the behavior of what we may see in the lab or in a prototype. Experimentation ultimately provides the feedback to our modeling

  6. 2003 research briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2003-08-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems and Materials Modeling and Computational Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  7. 2005 Research Briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  8. 2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  9. 2012 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF GRAPHITIC CARBON MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17-22, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Herbert

    2012-06-22

    This conference will highlight the urgency for research on graphitic carbon materials and gather scientists in physics, chemistry, and engineering to tackle the challenges in this field. The conference will focus on scalable synthesis, characterization, novel physical and electronic properties, structure-properties relationship studies, and new applications of the carbon materials. Contributors

  10. Method for making field-structured memory materials

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a dual-level memory material using field structured materials. The field structured materials are formed from a dispersion of ferromagnetic particles in a polymerizable liquid medium, such as a urethane acrylate-based photopolymer, which are applied as a film to a support and then exposed in selected portions of the film to an applied magnetic or electric field. The field can be applied either uniaxially or biaxially at field strengths up to 150 G or higher to form the field structured materials. After polymerizing the field-structure materials, a magnetic field can be applied to selected portions of the polymerized field-structured material to yield a dual-level memory material on the support, wherein the dual-level memory material supports read-and-write binary data memory and write once, read many memory.

  11. EDITORIAL: Combinatorial and High-Throughput Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    The success of combinatorial and high-throughput methodologies relies greatly on the availability of various characterization tools with new and improved capabilities [1]. Indeed, how useful can a combinatorial library of 250, 400, 25 000 or 2 000 000 compounds be [2-5] if one is unable to characterize its properties of interest fairly quickly? How useful can a set of thousands of spectra or chromatograms be if one is unable to analyse them in a timely manner? For these reasons, the development of new approaches for materials characterization is one of the most active areas in combinatorial materials science. The importance of this aspect of research in the field has been discussed in numerous conferences including the Pittsburgh Conferences, the American Chemical Society Meetings, the American Physical Society Meetings, the Materials Research Society Symposia and various Gordon Research Conferences. Naturally, the development of new measurement instrumentation attracts the attention not only of practitioners of combinatorial materials science but also of those who design new software for data manipulation and mining. Experimental designs of combinatorial libraries are pursued with available and realistic synthetic and characterization capabilities in mind. It is becoming increasingly critical to link the design of new equipment for high-throughput parallel materials synthesis with integrated measurement tools in order to enhance the efficacy of the overall experimental strategy. We have received an overwhelming response to our proposal and call for papers for this Special Issue on Combinatorial Materials Science. The papers in this issue of Measurement Science and Technology are a very timely collection that captures the state of modern combinatorial materials science. They demonstrate the significant advances that are taking place in the field. In some cases, characterization tools are now being operated in the factory mode. At the same time, major challenges

  12. Material research for environmental sustainability in Thailand: current trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranatlumpong, Panadda; Ramangul, Nudjarin; Dulyaprapan, Pongsak; Nivitchanyong, Siriluck; Udomkitdecha, Werasak

    2015-06-01

    This article covers recent developments of material research in Thailand with a focus on environmental sustainability. Data on Thailand’s consumption and economic growth are briefly discussed to present a relevant snapshot of its economy. A selection of research work is classified into three topics, namely, (a) resource utilization, (b) material engineering and manufacturing, and (c) life cycle efficiency. Material technologies have been developed and implemented to reduce the consumption of materials, energy, and other valuable resources, thus reducing the burden we place on our ecological system. At the same time, product life cycle study allows us to understand the extent of the environmental impact we impart to our planet.

  13. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymurski, S. R.; Hawley, M.; Hourahan, G. C.; Godwin, D. S.

    1994-08-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  14. Advanced Propulsion Research Interest in Materials for Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of material science and technology in the area of propulsion energetics. The authors note that conventional propulsion systems are near peak performance and further refinements in manufacturing, engineering design and materials will only provide incremental increases in performance. Energetic propulsion technologies could potential solve the problems of energy storage density and energy-to-thrust conversion efficiency. Topics considered include: the limits of thermal propulsion systems, the need for energetic propulsion research, emerging energetic propulsion technologies, materials research needed for advanced propulsion, and potential research opportunities.

  15. Structural optimization of structured carbon-based energy-storing composite materials used in space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Yu, Zhichao; Tang, Chenlong

    2016-01-01

    The hot work environment of electronic components in the instrument cabin of spacecraft was researched, and a new thermal protection structure, namely graphite carbon foam, which is an impregnated phase-transition material, was adopted to implement the thermal control on the electronic components. We used the optimized parameters obtained from ANSYS to conduct 2D optimization, 3-D modeling and simulation, as well as the strength check. Finally, the optimization results were verified by experiments. The results showed that after optimization, the structured carbon-based energy-storing composite material could reduce the mass and realize the thermal control over electronic components. This phase-transition composite material still possesses excellent temperature control performance after its repeated melting and solidifying. PMID:27387673

  16. A demonstration of simple airfoils: Structural design and materials choices

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Piippo, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    An educational unit is presented for building and evaluating simple wing structures, in order to learn about materials choice and lightweight construction. This unit is appropriate for a high school materials science class or lower-division college courses in structural engineering, materials science, or aeronautical engineering.

  17. Field-structured material media and methods for synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-09-18

    The present application is directed to a new class of composite materials, called field-structured composite (FSC) materials, which comprise a oriented aggregate structure made of magnetic particles suspended in a nonmagnetic medium, and to a new class of processes for their manufacture. FSC materials have much potential for application, including use in chemical, optical, environmental, and mechanical sensors.

  18. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992. Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy.

  19. Experimental research on structural dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Horner, G. C.; Cole, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes an apparatus at the NASA Langley Research Center for conducting research on dynamics and control of structural dynamics systems. The apparatus consists of a 3.66 m (12 ft.) long flexible beam to which are attached four electromagnetic actuators, nine noncontacting sensors to measure deflection of beam at various locations, and four strain gage type load cells one at each actuator attachment point. The important feature of the apparatus is that the actuators can be controlled and deflection and load sensor data can be processed in real time using the research centers CDC Cyber 175 computer system - thereby allowing research to be conducted on structural dynamics systems using advanced control laws. The facility is described in the report along with a detailed discussion of the actuators used.

  20. Condensed matter research at the modernized IBR-2 reactor: from functional materials to nanobiotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.; Kozlenko, D. P.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the main scientific areas of condensed matter research, which are extended with the use of the IBR-2 high-flux research reactor, is presented. It is demonstrated that the spectrometer facility of the upgraded reactor has great potential for studying the structural, magnetic, and dynamical properties of novel functional materials and nanobiosystems, which ensures the leading position of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in neutron research of condensed matter for the long-term prospect.

  1. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  2. Active-solar-energy-system materials research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, S.A.; Hien, L.K.; Silberglitt, R.

    1983-01-01

    THis report describes and prioritizes materials research alternatives to improve active solar heating and cooling system cost-effectiveness. Materials research areas analyzed are (polymer) glazings, heat mirrors, (selective) absorber surfaces, absorber adhesives, absorber substrates, fluids, thermal storage materials, and desiccants. Three classes of solar collectors are considered in the cost-effectiveness analysis: medium-temperature flat-plate collectors (operating temperature, 70/sup 0/C); high-temperature flat-plate collectors (operating temperature, 70 to 120/sup 0/C); and evacuated tubes (operating temperature 70 to 230/sup 0/C). We found the highest priority for medium-temperature flat-plate collectors to be research on polymeric materials to improve performance and durability characteristics. For the high-temperature, flat-plate collectors and evacuated tubes, heat mirror and selective absorber research is the highest priority. Research on storage materials, fluids, and desiccants is of relatively low priority for improving cost-effectiveness in all cases. The highest priority materials research areas identified include: optical properties and degradation of transparent conducting oxide heat mirrors and thickness insensitive selective paints; uv and thermal stabilization of polymeric glazing materials; and systems analysis of integrated polymeric collectors.

  3. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  4. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, K.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Allen, T.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. Here, it is vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility and deformation characteristics be defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objective is to describe the research results in two areas for the above goal: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compressed under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress.

  5. Preliminary exploration of the interfacial structure of nanocrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.Q.; Liu, X.D.; Ding, B.Z.

    1995-12-31

    The present intense interest in exploration on nanostructured materials stems from the studies of interfacial structures of nanocrystalline materials. Up to now, there are two different results of the exploration on interfacial structure of nanocrystalline materials. The first one supposed by Gleiter et al. is a so-called {open_quotes}gas-like{close_quotes} structure. They reported that the interfaces of nanocrystalline materials represent a novel type of solid structure without any long or short range order, corresponding structurally to a {open_quotes}gas-like{close_quotes} solid. This structure can be verified with X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy, positron lifetime spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXFAS). The second result obtained by Siegel et al. with high resolution electron microscopy, raman scattering and small angle X-ray and neutron diffraction is that the interfacial structures of nanocrystalline materials are rather similar to those in conventional coarse-grained polycrystals.

  6. PREFACE: MRS International Materials Research Conference (IMRC-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanguo; Qiu, Yong; Li, Yongxiang

    2009-03-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the MRS International Materials Research Conference (IMRC-2008) held in Chongqing, China, 9-12 June 2008. IMRC-2008 included 9 symposia of A. Eco/Environmental Materials, B. Sustainable Energy Materials, C. Electronic Packaging Materials, D. Electronic Materials, E. Materials and Processes for Flat-panel Displays, F. Functional Ceramics, G. Transportation Materials, H. Magnesium and I. Biomaterials for Medical Applications. Nearly 1200 participants from 33 countries attended the conference, and the conference organizers received more than 700 papers. After the peer review processes, 555 papers were selected to be published in 9 Journals or proceedings, including J. of Materials Research (JMR), Rare Metal Materials and Engineering, J. of Univ. Science and Technology Beijing, Biomedical Materials: Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Chinese Journal of Aeronautics, Materials Science Forum, and Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Among the 555 selected papers, 91 papers are published in this volume, and the topics mainly cover electronic matrials, processes for flat-panel displays and functional ceramics. The editors would like to give special thanks to the graduate students Liwu Jiang, Ming Li and Di He from Beihang University for their hard work compiling and typesetting each paper in this volume. Zhanguo Wang, Yong Qiu and Yongxiang Li Editors

  7. Status of research aimed at predicting structural integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable research has been performed throughout the world on measuring the fracture toughness of metals. The existing capability fills the need encountered when selecting materials, thermal-mechanical treatments, welding procedures, etc., but cannot predict the fracture process of structural components containing cracks. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been collaborating for a number of years on developing capabilities for using fracture toughness results to predict structural integrity. Because of the high cost of fabricating and testing structural components, these studies have been limited to predicting the fracture process in specimens containing surface cracks. This paper summarizes the present status of the experimental studies of using fracture toughness data to predict crack growth initiation in specimens (structural components) containing surface cracks. These results are limited to homogeneous base materials.

  8. Research Directions in Cotton Structure and Quality Research at the USDA, Southern Regional Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton and Structure (CSQ) Research Unit is a core cotton research unit at the Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC). The mission of the CSQ is to develop and improve the methods for assessing quality and structural attributes of cotton fiber through all stages of production and processing. S...

  9. [Research and industrialization of biobased materials in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews the research and commercialization progresses of biobased polymeric materials including polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), polylactides (PLA), poly (butylene succinate) (PBS) and its monomer succinate, and CO2 copolymer poly (propylene carbonate), especially these efforts made in China. PMID:26672370

  10. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  11. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  12. Progress of applied superconductivity research at Materials Research Laboratories, ITRI (Taiwan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R. S.; Wang, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    A status report based on the applied high temperature superconductivity (HTS) research at Materials Research Laboratories (MRL), Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is given. The aim is to develop fabrication technologies for the high-TC materials appropriate to the industrial application requirements. To date, the majorities of works have been undertaken in the areas of new materials, wires/tapes with long length, prototypes of magnets, large-area thin films, SQUID's and microwave applications.

  13. Research and Development in the Educational Materials Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.

    Under the sponsorship of the Carnegie Corporation and the Ford Foundation, a study was instituted to examine research and development in the educational materials industry. Using the open-ended interview method, data was collected from executives of major book publishers and their subsidiaries, and producers of materials other than books.…

  14. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

  15. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  16. A survey of structural material issues for a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagaman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    An NASA enters the definition phase of the space station project, one of the important issues to be considered is structural material selection. The complexity of the space station and its long life requirement are two key factors which must be considered in the material selection process. Both aluminum and graphite/epoxy are considered as potential structural materials. Advantages and disadvantages of these materials with respect to mechanical and thermal considerations, space environment, manufacturing, and cost are discussed.

  17. Materials and structure synergistic with in-space materials utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Shadman, Farhang; Sridhar, K. R.

    The significant advances made recently toward actual hardware realizations of various concepts for the application of in-space materials utilization (ISMU) are demonstrated. The overall plan for taking innovative concepts through technical feasibility, small-scale tests, scale-up, computer modeling, and larger-scale execution is outlined. Two specific fields of endeavor are surveyed: one has direct applications to construction on the moon, while the other has more basic implications, in addition to the practical aspects of lunar colonies. Several fundamental scientific advances made in the characterization of the physical and chemical processes that need to be elucidated for any intelligent application of the ISMU concepts in future space missions are described. A rigorous quantitative technique for the unambiguous evaluation of various components and component technology that form any space (or terrestrial mission) is also described.

  18. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia; Richard, Monique N.; Dehne, Aaron; Phillips, Jonathan; Stamm, Kimber L.; Fanson, Paul T.

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  19. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  20. Impact dynamics research on composite transport structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts being undertaken to investigate the response of composite and aluminum structures under crash loading conditions were reviewed. A Boeing 720 airplane was used in the controlled-impact demonstration test. Energy absorption of composite materials, the tearing of fuselage skin panels, the friction and abrasion behavior of composite skins, and the crushing behavior and dynamic response of composite beams were among the topics addressed.

  1. Studies of noise transmission in advanced composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Mcgary, M. C.; Powell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Noise characteristics of advanced composite material fuselages were discussed from the standpoints of applicable research programs and noise transmission theory. Experimental verification of the theory was also included.

  2. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  3. Materials Development and Research--Making the Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of applied linguistics the activities involved in developing instructional materials and those working in second language research and the more theoretical areas of applied linguistics are often seen to have little connection. This paper is an exploration of some of the kinds of interaction that are possible between research, theory…

  4. First Materials Science Research Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D.; King, R.; Cobb, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) will accommodate dual Experiment Modules (EM's) and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first international Materials Science Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 is an international cooperative research activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center. (ESTEC). This International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) will contain the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) developed by ESA as an Experiment Module. The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts. Module Inserts currently planned are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, Solidification with Quench Furnace, and Diffusion Module Insert. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Department (SPD). It includes capabilities for vapor transport processes and liquid metal sintering. This Experiment Module will be replaced on-orbit with other NASA Materials Science EMs.

  5. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  6. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  7. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  8. Course Modules on Structural Health Monitoring with Smart Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Hui-Ru; Walters, Wilbur L.; Zheng, Wei; Everett, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is an emerging technology that has multiple applications. SHM emerged from the wide field of smart structures, and it also encompasses disciplines such as structural dynamics, materials and structures, nondestructive testing, sensors and actuators, data acquisition, signal processing, and possibly much more. To…

  9. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    The materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  10. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR pregrain the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing several research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results is from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  11. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, D.A.; Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-04-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each researcher.

  12. Radiation and Nuclear Materials Detection Research and Development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Jim E; Wright, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Research and development is underway to improve radiation and nuclear detection capabilities. This research and development in radiation and nuclear detection includes areas such as advanced materials, applied research and engineering for designing and fabricating customized detection equipment, and theoretical modeling and computational support. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a distinctive set of detector materials fabrication and characterization capabilities and recently created a Center for Radiation Detection Materials and Systems. Applied research and engineering efforts have led to the development of improved detectors for specific applications including safeguards, treaty monitoring, and science experiments. All sizes, types, and capabilities of detector systems have been addressed from miniature to man-portable and from neutrons to gamma radiation. Dedicated test beds, in-house and in the field, have been established to analyze, characterize, and improve detection systems.

  13. Heat sink structural design concepts for a hypersonic research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Hypersonic research aircraft design requires careful consideration of thermal stresses. This paper relates some of the problems in a heat sink structural design that can be avoided by appropriate selection of design options including material selection, design concepts, and load paths. Data on several thermal loading conditions are presented on various conventional designs including bulkheads, longerons, fittings, and frames. Results indicate that conventional designs are inadequate and that acceptable designs are possible by incorporating innovative design practices. These include nonintegral pressure compartments, ball-jointed links to distribute applied loads without restraining the thermal expansion, and material selections based on thermal compatibility.

  14. The NASA Materials Science Research Program - It's New Strategic Goals and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.

    2003-01-01

    In 2001, the NASA created a separate science enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to perform strategical and fundamental research bringing together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to solve problems needed for future agency mission goals. The Materials Science Program is one of basic research disciplines within this new Enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program participates to utilize effective use of International Space Station (ISS) experimental facilities, target new scientific and technology questions, and transfer results for Earth benefits. The program has recently pursued new investigative research in areas necessary to expand NASA knowledge base for exploration of the universe, some of which will need access to the microgravity of space. The program has a wide variety of traditional ground and flight based research related types of basic science related to materials crystallization, fundamental processing, and properties characterization in order to obtain basic understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. A summary of the types and sources for this research is presented and those experiments planned for the space. Areas to help expand the science basis for NASA future missions are described. An overview of the program is given including the scope of the current and future NASA Research Announcements with emphasis on new materials science initiatives. A description of the planned flight experiments to be conducted on the International Space Station program along with the planned facility class Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) and Microgravity Glovebox (MSG) type investigations.

  15. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, Shawn; Frazier, Natalie; Lehman, John; Aicher, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009 and currently resides in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has logged more than 1000 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials, including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. The NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA-developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) that accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400C. ESA continues to develop samples with 14 planned for launch and processing in the near future. Additionally NASA has begun developing SCAs to

  16. Life Science Research Facility materials management requirements and concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Programs Office at NASA Ames Research Center has defined hypothetical experiments for a 90-day mission on Space Station to allow analysis of the materials necessary to conduct the experiments and to assess the impact on waste processing of recyclable materials and storage requirements of samples to be returned to earth for analysis as well as of nonrecyclable materials. The materials include the specimens themselves, the food, water, and gases necessary to maintain them, the expendables necessary to conduct the experiments, and the metabolic products of the specimens. This study defines the volumes, flow rates, and states of these materials. Process concepts for materials handling will include a cage cleaner, trash compactor, biological stabilizer, and various recycling devices.

  17. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  18. Physics Education in a Multidisciplinary Materials Research Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, W. D.

    1997-03-01

    The MINT Center, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, is a multidisciplinary research program focusing on materials information storage. It involves 17 faculty, 10 post-doctoral fellows and 25 graduate students from six academic programs including Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Electric al Engineering and Chemical Engineering, whose research is supported by university, federal and industrial funds. The research facilities (15,000 ft^2) which include faculty and student offices are located in one building and are maintained by the university and the Center at no cost to participating faculty. The academic requirements for the students are determined by the individual departments along relatively rigid, traditional grounds although several materials and device courses are offered for students from all departments. Within the Center, participants work in teams assigning responsibilities and sharing results at regularly scheduled meetings. Bi-weekly research seminars for all participants provide excellent opportunities for students to improve their communication skills and to receive critical input from a large, diverse audience. Strong collaboration with industrial partners in the storage industry supported by workshops, research reviews, internships, industrial visitors and participation in industry consortia give students a broader criteria for self-evaluation, higher motivation and excellent career opportunities. Physics students, because of their rigorous basic training, are an important element in a strong materials sciences program, but they often are deficient in the behavior and characterization of real materials. The curriculum for physics students should be broadened to prepare them fully for a rewarding career in this emerging discipline.

  19. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  20. Development Approach for the Accommodation of Materials Science Research for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility comprised of autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's) for research in the microgravity environment afforded by the International Space Station (ISS). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device. Each MSRR is a stand alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multiuser generic processing apparatus. Each MSRR will support a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). MSRF is being developed for the United States Laboratory Module and will provide the apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range Materials Science Discipline goals and objectives.

  1. Thermoelectric Materials With the Skutterudite Structure: New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, J. -P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

    1995-01-01

    New experimental findings on semiconductors with the relatively complex 32 atom unit cell skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values larger than for state-of- the-art thermoelectric materials. An overview of recent results is provided, and current approaches to experimentally achieving high ZT in skutterudite materials are discussed.

  2. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes.

  3. SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program has potentially wide application to the testing and structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. The test program will provide a basis for characterization of the dynamic failure criteria for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant, insulation, inhibitor and liners. This experimental investigation will also endeavor to obtain a consistent complete set of materials test data. This test will be used to improve and revise the presently used theoretical math models for SRM propellant, insulators, inhibitor, liners, and O-ring seals.

  4. Neutronic analysis of alternative structural materials for fusion reactor blankets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul dos

    1988-07-01

    The neutronic performance of the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) blanket was studied when several alternative structural materials were used instead of the INTOR reference structural material, type 316 stainless steel. The alternative structural materials included: ferritic-, vanadium-, titanium-, long range ordered-, manganese austenitic-, and nimonic-alloys. All were treated both with and without a first-wall coating of beryllium or graphite. The tritium breeding ratio, the nuclear heating, and the gas (hydrogen and helium) production rates in the structural materials were calculated for the possible combinations of structural material and first-wall coating. These parameters were compared with those obtained by using SS-316. The nimonic alloy was the only one with worse neutronic performance than the SS-316.

  5. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  6. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  7. Information and computer-aided system for structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrashevitch, Ju. G.; Nizametdinov, Sh. U.; Polkovnikov, A. V.; Rumjantzev, V. P.; Surina, O. N.; Kalinin, G. M.; Sidorenkov, A. V.; Strebkov, Ju. S.

    1992-09-01

    An information and computer-aided system for structural materials data has been developed to provide data for the fusion and fission reactor system design. It is designed for designers, industrial engineers, and material science specialists and provides a friendly interface in an interactive mode. The database for structural materials contains the master files: chemical composition, physical, mechanical, corrosion, technological properties, regulatory and technical documentation. The system is implemented on a PC/AT running the PS/2 operating system.

  8. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Mayfair C.

    2016-05-31

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  9. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M; Kung, Mayfair C

    2013-10-08

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  10. Effects of space environment on structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miglionico, C.; Stein, C.; Roybal, R.; Robertson, R.; Murr, L. E.; Quinones, S.; Rivas, J.; Marquez, B.; Advani, A. H.; Fisher, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary study of materials exposed in space in a low Earth orbit for nearly six years has revealed a wide range of micrometeorite or microparticle impact craters ranging in size from 1 to 1000 micron in diameter, debris particles from adjacent and distant materials systems, reaction products, and other growth features on the specimen surfaces, and related phenomena. The exposed surface features included fine grained and nearly amorphous materials as well as a large array of single crystal particles. A replication type, lift off technique was developed to remove reaction products and debris from the specimen surfaces in order to isolate them from the background substrate without creating microchemical or microstructural artifacts or alterations. This resulted in surface features resting on a carbon support film which was virtually invisible to observation by electron microscopy and nondispersive x ray analysis. Some evidence for blisters on leading edge aluminum alloy surfaces and a high surface region concentration of oxygen determined by Auger electron spectrometry suggests oxygen effects where fluences exceed 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm.

  11. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The Materials and Components Technology Division (MCT) provides a research and development capability for the design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs related to nuclear energy support the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR): life extension and accident analyses for light water reactors (LWRs); fuels development for research and test reactors; fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology; and safe shipment of hazardous materials. MCT Conservation and Renewables programs include major efforts in high-temperature superconductivity, tribology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and thermal sciences. Fossil Energy Programs in MCT include materials development, NDE technology, and Instrumentation design. The division also has a complementary instrumentation effort in support of Arms Control Technology. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the database.

  12. Metrology and Characterization Challenges for Emerging Research Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C. Michael; Herr, Dan; Obeng, Yaw

    2011-11-10

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) Emerging Research Materials (ERM) and Emerging Research Devices (ERD) Technology Workgroups have identified materials and devices that could enable continued increases in the density and performance of future integrated circuit (IC) technologies and the challenges that must be overcome; however, this will require significant advances in metrology and characterization to enable progress. New memory devices and beyond CMOS logic devices operate with new state variables (e.g., spin, redox state, etc.) and metrology and characterization techniques are needed to verify their switching mechanisms and scalability, and enable improvement of operation of these devices. Similarly, new materials and processes are needed to enable these new devices. Additionally, characterization is needed to verify that the materials and their interfaces have been fabricated with required quality and performance.

  13. Metrology and Characterization Challenges for Emerging Research Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, C. Michael; Herr, Dan; Obeng, Yaw

    2011-11-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) Emerging Research Materials (ERM) and Emerging Research Devices (ERD) Technology Workgroups have identified materials and devices that could enable continued increases in the density and performance of future integrated circuit (IC) technologies and the challenges that must be overcome; however, this will require significant advances in metrology and characterization to enable progress. New memory devices and beyond CMOS logic devices operate with new state variables (e.g., spin, redox state, etc.) and metrology and characterization techniques are needed to verify their switching mechanisms and scalability, and enable improvement of operation of these devices. Similarly, new materials and processes are needed to enable these new devices. Additionally, characterization is needed to verify that the materials and their interfaces have been fabricated with required quality and performance.

  14. Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Liu, K; Yang, L H; Pask, J E

    2007-05-03

    A brief comparison of conventional electronics and spintronics is given. The key features of half metallic binary compounds with the zincblende structure are presented, using MnAs as an example. We discuss the interactions responsible for the half metallic properties. Special properties of superlattices and a digital ferromagnetic heterostructure incorporating zincblende half metals are also discussed.

  15. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Natalie C.; Johnson, Jimmie; Aicher, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses onboard the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U. S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has performed virtually flawlessly logging more than 550 hours of operating time. Materials science is an integral part of development of new materials for everyday life here on Earth. The goal of studying materials processing in space is to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility containing two furnace inserts in which Sample Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one material sample, can be processed up to temperatures of 1400C. Once an SCA is installed by a Crew Member, the experiment can be run by automatic command or science conducted via telemetry commands from the ground. Initially, 12 SCAs were processed in the first furnace insert for a team of European and US investigators. The processed samples have been returned to Earth for evaluation and comparison of their properties to samples similarly processed on the ground. A preliminary examination of the samples indicates that the majority of the desired science objectives have been successfully met leading to significant improvements in the understanding of alloy solidification processes. The second furnace insert will be installed in the facility in January 2011 for processing the remaining SCA currently on orbit. Six SCAs are planned for launch summer 2011, and additional batches are

  16. Ground-Based Research within NASA's Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based research in Materials Science for NASA's Microgravity program serves several purposes, and includes approximately four Principal Investigators for every one in the flight program. While exact classification is difficult. the ground program falls roughly into the following categories: (1) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Theoretical Studies; (2) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Bringing to Maturity New Research; (3) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Enabling Characterization; (4) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Thermophysical Property Determination; (5) Radiation Shielding; (6) Preliminary In Situ Resource Utilization; (7) Biomaterials; (8) Nanostructured Materials; (9) Materials Science for Advanced Space Propulsion. It must be noted that while the first four categories are aimed at using long duration low gravity conditions, the other categories pertain more to more recent NASA initiatives in materials science. These new initiatives address NASA's future materials science needs in the realms of crew health and safety, and exploration, and have been included in the most recent NASA Research Announcements (NRA). A description of each of these nine categories will be given together with examples of the kinds of research being undertaken.

  17. Novel Method Used to Inspect Curved and Tubular Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a technique for the ultrasonic characterization of plates has been extended to tubes and to curved structures in general. In this technique, one performs measurements that yield a thickness-independent value of the local through-the-thickness speed of sound in a specimen. From such measurements at numerous locations across the specimen, one can construct a map of velocity as a function of location. The gradients of velocity indicated by such a map indicate local through-the-thickness-averaged microstructural parameters that affect the speed of sound. Such parameters include the pore volume fraction, mass density, fiber volume fraction (in the case of a composite material), and chemical composition. Apparatus was designed to apply the technique to tubular and other curved specimens.

  18. Quantitative nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to quantify damage tolerance and resistance in composite materials impacted using the drop-weight method. Tests were conducted on laminates of several different carbon-fiber composite systems, such as epoxies, modified epoxies, and amorphous and semicrystalline thermoplastics. Impacted composite specimens were examined using destructive and non-destructive techniques to establish the characteristic damage states. Specifically, optical microscopy, ultrasonic, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to identify impact induced damage mechanisms. Damage propagation during post impact compression was also studied.

  19. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  20. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  1. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  2. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  3. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G.; Hatano, Y.; Hara, M.; Oya, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K.; Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  4. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  5. Structural Framework for Flight: NASA's Role in Development of Advanced Composite Materials for Aircraft and Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Johnston, Norman J.; Pipes, R. Byron; McGuire, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    This serves as a source of collated information on Composite Research over the past four decades at NASA Langley Research Center, and is a key reference for readers wishing to grasp the underlying principles and challenges associated with developing and applying advanced composite materials to new aerospace vehicle concepts. Second, it identifies the major obstacles encountered in developing and applying composites on advanced flight vehicles, as well as lessons learned in overcoming these obstacles. Third, it points out current barriers and challenges to further application of composites on future vehicles. This is extremely valuable for steering research in the future, when new breakthroughs in materials or processing science may eliminate/minimize some of the barriers that have traditionally blocked the expanded application of composite to new structural or revolutionary vehicle concepts. Finally, a review of past work and identification of future challenges will hopefully inspire new research opportunities and development of revolutionary materials and structural concepts to revolutionize future flight vehicles.

  6. Recent development in modeling and analysis of functionally graded materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ankit; Talha, Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    In this article, an extensive review related to the structural response of the functionally graded materials (FGMs) and structures have been presented. These are high technology materials developed by a group scientist in the late 1980's in Japan. The emphasis has been made here, to present the structural characteristics of FGMs plates/shells under thermo-electro-mechanical loadings under various boundary and environmental conditions. This paper also provides an overview of different fabrication procedures and the future research directions which is required to implement these materials in the design and analysis appropriately. The expected outcome of present review can be treated as milestone for future studies in the area of high technology materials and structures, and would be definitely advantageous for the researchers, scientists, and designers working in this field.

  7. Method for fabricating high aspect ratio structures in perovskite material

    DOEpatents

    Karapetrov, Goran T.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Crabtree, George W.; Iavarone, Maria

    2003-10-28

    A method of fabricating high aspect ratio ceramic structures in which a selected portion of perovskite or perovskite-like crystalline material is exposed to a high energy ion beam for a time sufficient to cause the crystalline material contacted by the ion beam to have substantially parallel columnar defects. Then selected portions of the material having substantially parallel columnar defects are etched leaving material with and without substantially parallel columnar defects in a predetermined shape having high aspect ratios of not less than 2 to 1. Etching is accomplished by optical or PMMA lithography. There is also disclosed a structure of a ceramic which is superconducting at a temperature in the range of from about 10.degree. K. to about 90.degree. K. with substantially parallel columnar defects in which the smallest lateral dimension of the structure is less than about 5 microns, and the thickness of the structure is greater than 2 times the smallest lateral dimension of the structure.

  8. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  9. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  10. Science Education Research vs. Physics Education Research: A Structural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to introduce physics education research (PER) to researchers in other fields. Topics include discussion of differences between science education research (SER) and physics education research (PER), physics educators, research design and methodology in physics education research and current research traditions and…

  11. Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. Quarterly progress report ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The objective of the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The management of the Program has been decentralized to DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as technical support contractor. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating subcontractor organizations. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined quarterly progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FYs 1982 to 1986, in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. It is the intent of the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program to sponsor materials research which is generic to a number of fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  12. Controlling terahertz waves with meta-materials and photonic bandgap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Azad, Abul; O' Hara, John F; Moody, Nathan A; Simakov, Evgenya I

    2010-12-07

    We will describe research conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory towards developing components for controlling terahertz waves. We employ meta-materials and, particularly, meta-films, as very compact absorbers for controlling quasioptical beams. We believe that dielectric photonic bandgap structures could replace ordinary metal waveguide devices at THz, since metal structures become extremely lossy in this frequency range.

  13. Functional and Multifunctional Polymers: Materials for Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S.; Pratt, L. M.; Li, J.; Wuagaman, M.; Khan, I. M.

    1996-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the research in smart structures and smart materials is the development of a new generation of products/devices which will perform better than products/devices built from passive materials. There are a few examples of multilayer polymer systems which function as smart structures, e.g. a synthetic muscle which is a multilayer assembly of a poly(ethylene) layer, a gold layer, and a poly(pyrrole) layer immersed in a liquid electrolyte. Oxidation and reductions of the active pyrrole layer causes the assembly to reversibly deflect and mimic biological muscles. The drawback of such a setup is slow response times and the use of a liquid electrolyte. We have developed multifunctional polymers which will eliminate the use of a liquid electrolyte, and also because the functionalities of the polymers are within a few hundred angstroms, an improved response time to changes in the external field should be possible. Such multifunctional polymers may be classified as the futuristic 'smart materials.' These materials are composed of a number of different functionalities which work in a synergistic fashion to function as a device. The device performs on the application of an external field and such multifunctional polymers may be scientifically labeled as 'field responsive polymers.' Our group has undertaken a systematic approach to develop functional and multifunctional polymers capable of functioning as field responsive polymers. Our approach utilizes multicomponent polymer systems (block copolymers and graft copolymers), the strategy involves the preparation of block or graft copolymers where the functionalities are limited to different phases in a microphase separated system. Depending on the weight (or volume) fractions of each of the components, different microstructures are possible. And, because of the intimate contact between the functional components, an increase in the synergism between the functionalities may be observed. In this presentation, three

  14. Structure and Thermal Properties of Porous Geological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Simon; Williamson, David

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of porous geological materials is important for developing models of the explosive loading of rock in mining applications. To this end it is essential to first characterise its complex internal structure. Knowing the structure shows how the properties of the component materials relate to the overall properties of rock. The structure and mineralogy of Gosford sandstone was investigated and this information was used to predict its thermal properties. The thermal properties of the material were measured experimentally and compared against these predictions.

  15. Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop. Volume 2; Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, Frank W., Jr. (Compiler); Gardner, James E. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop was held on September 23-26, 1991, in Newport News, Virginia. The workshop, sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Flight and the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, was held to provide a forum for communication within the space materials and structures technology developer and user communities. Workshop participants were organized into a Vehicle Technology Requirements session and three working panels: Materials and Structures Technologies for Vehicle Systems, Propulsion Systems, and Entry Systems.

  16. Neutron Scattering Studies of Nanomagnetism and Artificially Structured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Bader, S.D.; Borchers, J.A.; Felcher, G.P.; Furdyna, J.K.; Hoffmann, A.; Kortright, J.B.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Schulthess, T.C.; Sinha, S.K.; Toney, M.F.; Weller, D.; Wolf, S.

    2003-02-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials are intensively studied due to their unusual properties and promise for possible applications. The key issues in these materials relate to the connection between their physical properties (transport, magnetism, mechanical, etc.) and their chemical-physical structure. In principle, a detailed knowledge of the chemical and physical structure allows calculation of their physical properties. Theoretical and computational methods are rapidly evolving so that magnetic properties of nanostructured materials might soon be predicted. Success in this endeavor requires detailed quantitative understanding of the magnetic structure and properties.

  17. The Bias of Materiality in Sociocultural Research: Reconceiving Embodiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheville, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Although language practices must obviously be an empirical focus in sociocultural research, this article suggests that emphasis on the human body's material aspect has not revealed how, in particular communicative contexts, its ideational influence surpasses that of language. This article suggests that in the "social" semiotic, the body's function…

  18. Action Research to Support Teachers' Classroom Materials Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Emily; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Language teachers constantly create, adapt and evaluate classroom materials to develop new curricula and meet their learners' needs. It has long been argued (e.g. by Stenhouse, L. [1975]. "An Introduction to Curriculum Research and Development." London: Heinemann) that teachers themselves, as opposed to managers or course book writers,…

  19. Materials for hydrogen storage: current research trends and perspectives.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Annemieke W C; Areán, Carlos Otero

    2008-02-14

    Storage and transport of hydrogen constitutes a key enabling technology for the advent of a hydrogen-based energy transition. Main research trends on hydrogen storage materials, including metal hydrides, porous adsorbents and hydrogen clathrates, are reviewed with a focus on recent developments and an appraisal of the challenges ahead. . PMID:18478688

  20. Materials Research Society Proceedings: Interfaces in Composites, volume 170

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlo G.; Chen, Eric J. H.

    1990-11-01

    Reports on the following topics are presented: (1) micromechanics of interfaces; (2) characterization of interfaces; (3) interface reactions in ceramic and metal systems; (4) interface effects in ceramic and metal matrix composites; and (5) interface effects in polymer matrix composites. A list of the materials research society symposium proceedings is also presented.

  1. Research Update: Computational materials discovery in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan; Andrienko, Denis; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Soft matter embodies a wide range of materials, which all share the common characteristics of weak interaction energies determining their supramolecular structure. This complicates structure-property predictions and hampers the direct application of data-driven approaches to their modeling. We present several aspects in which these methods play a role in designing soft-matter materials: drug design as well as information-driven computer simulations, e.g., histogram reweighting. We also discuss recent examples of rational design of soft-matter materials fostered by physical insight and assisted by data-driven approaches. We foresee the combination of data-driven and physical approaches a promising strategy to move the field forward.

  2. The NASA Materials Science Research Program: It's New Strategic Goals and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Stagg, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    In the past year, the NASA s Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has formulated a long term plan to perform strategical and fundamental research bringing together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to solve problems needed for current and future agency mission goals. Materials Science is one of basic disciplines within the Enterprise s Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program participates to utilize effective use of International Space Station (ISS) and various world class ground laboratory facilities to solve new scientific and technology questions and transfer these results for public and agency benefits. The program has recently targeted new investigative research in strategic areas necessary to expand NASA knowledge base for exploration of the universe and some of these experiments will need access to the microgravity of space. The program is implementing a wide variety of traditional ground and flight based research related types of fundamental science related to materials crystallization, fundamental processing, and properties characterization in order to obtain basic understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. , In addition new initiatives in radiation protection, materials for propulsion and In-space fabrication and repair focus on research helping the agency solve problems needed for future transportation into the solar system. A summary of the types and sources for this research is presented including those experiments planned for a low gravity environment. Areas to help expand the science basis for NASA future missions are described. An overview of the program is given including the scope of the current and future NASA Research Announcements with emphasis on new materials science initiatives. A description of the planned flight experiments to be conducted on the International Space Station program along with the planned

  3. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  4. Community-oriented support and research structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attig, Norbert; Eickermann, Thomas; Gibbon, Paul; Lippert, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Coordinated by the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) Europe is restructuring and strengthening its high-performance computing infrastructure with the aim to create a model HPC ecosystem. At the tip of the pyramid, up to six centres are envisaged that will operate systems of the highest performance class. The HPC Research Infrastructure (HPC-RI) will comprise European, national and regional centres. Science communities are integral partners, strong links will include Grid and Cloud users. The HPC-RI strives at providing scientists all over Europe, on the one hand, with unlimited and independent access to state-of-the-art computer resources in all performance classes and, on the other hand, with a world-class pan-European competence and support network. While the hardware-oriented buildup of the infrastructure is making progress, high-quality user support and software development in the upcoming era of unprecedented parallelism and exascale on the horizon have become the imminent challenges. This has been clearly recognized by the European Commission, who will issue calls for proposals to fund petascale software development in summer 2009. Although traditional support structures are well established in Europe's major supercomputing centres, it is questionable if these structures are able to meet the challenges of the future: in general, support structures are based on cross-disciplinary computer science and mathematics teams; disciplinary computational science support usually is given in an ad-hoc, project-oriented manner. In this paper, we describe our approach to establish a suitable support structure-Simulation Laboratories (SL). SLs are currently being established at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre of the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) and at the Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) of the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT) in Germany. While SLs are community-oriented, i.e. each SL focusses on a specific community, they are structured

  5. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  6. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials. PMID:22097281

  7. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  8. Mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics of complex-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Silva, A. A. P.; Luzzi, Roberto; Casas-Vázquez, J.; Jou, David

    2013-10-01

    Some experimental results in the study of disordered systems, polymeric fluids, solutions of micelles and surfactants, ionic-glass conductors, and others show a hydrodynamic behavior labeled “anomalous” with properties described by some kind of fractional power laws in place of the standard ones. This is a consequence of the fractal-like structure that is present in these systems of which we do not have a detailed description, thus impairing the application of the conventional ensemble formalism of statistical mechanics. In order to obtain a physical picture of the phenomenon for making predictions which may help with technological and industrial decisions, one may resort to different styles (so-called nonconventional) in statistical mechanics. In that way can be introduced a theory for handling such impaired situations, a nonconventional mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics (MHT). We illustrate the question presenting an application in a contracted description of such nonconventional MHT, consisting in the use of the Renyi approach to derive a set of coupled nonstandard evolution equations, one for the density, a nonconventional Maxwell-Cattaneo equation, which in a limiting case goes over a non-Fickian diffusion equation, and other for the velocity in fluids under forced flow. For illustration the theory is applied to the study of the hydrodynamic motion in several soft-matter systems under several conditions such as streaming flow appearing in electrophoretic techniques and flow generated by harmonic forces arising in optical traps. The equivalence with Lévy processes is discussed and comparison with experiment is done.

  9. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  10. Aerospace Structural Materials Handbook Supplement GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor); Nathel, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    GRCop-84 is a high strength-high conductivity copper-based alloy developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for combustion chamber liners of regeneratively cooled rocket engines. It also has promise for other high heat flux applications operating at temperatures up to 700 C (1292 F) and potentially higher. The alloy must be made by powder metallurgy techniques such as gas atomization. Slower cooling rates such as those experienced during casting do not develop a proper microstructure. Once made into powder, the alloy exhibits excellent processability using conventional consolidation and forming techniques, e.g., extrusion and rolling. GRCop-84 is strengthened by a combination of dispersion and precipitation strengthening by fine (50-500 nanometer (2-20 microinch)) Cr2Nb particles and Hall-Petch strengthening from a fine copper grain size. The presence of a high volume fraction of particles prevents grain boundary sliding at high temperatures and contributes to the alloy's overall good high temperature mechanical properties. Maximum thermal conductivity is obtained by using two alloying elements (Cr, Nb) with limited solubility in solid Cu that form a high temperature intermetallic compound with an even lower solid solubility. The resulting matrix of the alloy is nearly pure copper. The limited solubility also minimizes Cr2Nb particle coarsening at elevated temperatures and enhances microstructural and mechanical property stability. Further enhancement of the microstructural stability is obtained by using a high volume fraction (approx. 14 vol.%) of Cr2Nb particles that effectively pin grain growth.

  11. Certification of Discontinuous Composite Material Forms for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Michael Roger

    New, high performance chopped, discontinuous, or short fiber composites (DFCs), DFCs, such as HexMC and Lytex, made by compression molding of randomly oriented pre-impregnated unidirectional tape, can be formed into complex geometry while retaining mechanical properties suitable for structural use. These DFCs provide the performance benefits of Continuous Fiber Composites (CFCs) in form factors that were previously unavailable. These materials demonstrate some notably different properties from continuous fiber composites, especially with respect to damage tolerance and failure behavior. These behaviors are not very well understood, and fundamental research efforts are ongoing to better characterize the material and to ease certification for future uses. Despite this, these new DFCs show such promise that they are already in service in the aerospace industry, for instance in the Boeing 787. Unfortunately, the relative novelty of these parts means that they needed to be certified by “point design”, an excess of physical testing, rather than by a mix of physical testing and finite element analysis, which would be the case for CFCs or metals. In this study, one particular approach to characterizing both linear-elastic and failure behaviors are considered. The Stochastic Laminate Analogy, which represents a novel approach to modeling DFCs, and its combination with a Ply Discount scheme. Owing to limited available computational resources, only preliminary results are available, but those results are quite promising and warrant further investigation.

  12. An Evaluation of Frangible Materials as Veneers on Vented Structural Member Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Kevin Jay

    2015-10-01

    Literature shows there has been extensive research and testing done in the area of wall panels and frangible materials. There is evidence from past research that shows it is possible to vent a structure that has had an accidental internal explosion [1]. The reviewed literature shows that most designs vent the entire wall panel versus a frangible material attached to the wall panel. The frangible material attachment points are important to determine the overall loading of the wall panel structure [2]. The materials used in the reviewed literature were securely attached as well as strong enough to remain intact during the pressure loading to move the entire wall panel. Since the vented wall panel was the weakest part of the overall structure, the other walls of the structure were substantially larger. The structure was usually built from concrete and large amounts of steel with dirt and sand over the top of the structure.The study will be conducted at Sandia National Laboratories located in Albuquerque New Mexico. The skeletal structural design for evaluation is a rectangular frame with a square grid pattern constructed from steel. The skeletal structure has been given to the researcher as a design requirement. The grid pattern will be evaluated strictly on plastic deformation and the loading that is applied from the frangible material. The frangible material tested will either fit into the grid or will be a veneer lightly attached to the structure frame. The frangible material may be required on both sides of the structure to adequately represent the application.

  13. Classic and New Materials Used for Structural Rehabilitation. Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lute, M.

    2016-06-01

    New materials development with different combination of properties were always a challenge in terms of their adequate use in civil engineering. Introduction of carbon fibres as strength material for structures was a beginning of a new approach in structural rehabilitation, and sometimes meant the end of classic rehabilitation solution use. The present paper gives an example of a building rehabilitation that use a melt of both new and old solutions in order to achieve the optimum result for building itself. The problem was even more challenging, because the structure considered is only 22 years old, but having some design faults in terms of seismic behaviour and, in addition, one floor was added to existing structure. The chosen solution was a compromise between the use of old and new materials in places where their qualities were best suitable and their minuses could be compensated by the other material.

  14. Casting materials and their application in research and teaching.

    PubMed

    Haenssgen, Kati; Makanya, Andrew N; Djonov, Valentin

    2014-04-01

    From a biological point of view, casting refers to filling of anatomical and/or pathological spaces with extraneous material that reproduces a three-dimensional replica of the space. Casting may be accompanied by additional procedures such as corrosion, in which the soft tissue is digested out, leaving a clean cast, or the material may be mixed with radiopaque substances to allow x-ray photography or micro computed topography (µCT) scanning. Alternatively, clearing of the surrounding soft tissue increases transparency and allows visualization of the casted cavities. Combination of casting with tissue fixation allows anatomical dissection and didactic surgical procedures on the tissue. Casting materials fall into three categories namely, aqueous substances (India ink, Prussian blue ink), pliable materials (gelatins, latex, and silicone rubber), or hard materials (methyl methacrylates, polyurethanes, polyesters, and epoxy resins). Casting has proved invaluable in both teaching and research and many phenomenal biological processes have been discovered through casting. The choice of a particular material depends inter alia on the targeted use and the intended subsequent investigative procedures, such as dissection, microscopy, or µCT. The casting material needs to be pliable where anatomical and surgical manipulations are intended, and capillary-passable for ultrastructural investigations. PMID:24564951

  15. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded

  16. EDITORIAL: Adaptive and Active Materials: Selected Papers from the ASME 2008 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 08) (Maryland, USA, 28-30 October 2008) Adaptive and Active Materials: Selected Papers from the ASME 2008 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 08) (Maryland, USA, 28-30 October 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    The rapid development of the field of Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures, and Materials Systems led the Aerospace Division ASMS TC to launch the new annual SMASIS conference in 2008. The conference focuses on the multi-disciplinary challenges of developing new multifunctional materials and implementing them in advanced systems. The research spans length scales from nano-structured materials to civil, air, and space structures. The first conference consisted of six symposia, each focusing on a different research area. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures summarizes some of the top research presented at the 2008 SMASIS conference in the materials-focused symposia. These symposia focused on the behavior and mechanics of active materials, on multifunctional materials, and on bio-inspired materials. The behavior and mechanics of active materials is an approach that combines observed material behavior with mechanism-based models that not only give insight into the observed behavior, but guide the development of new materials. This approach has been applied to shape memory metals and polymers, ferroelectrics, ferromagnetics, and recently to multiferroic materials, and has led to considerable improvements in our understanding of multi-field phenomena. Multifunctional materials are the next generation of active materials. These materials include structural, sensing, and actuation components integrated into a material system. A natural extension of multifunctional materials is a new class of bio-inspired materials. Bio-inspired materials range from detailed bio-mimicry of sensing and self healing materials to nano and microstructures that take advantage of features observed in biological systems. The Editors would like to express their sincere thanks to all of the authors for their contributions to this special issue on 'Adaptive and Active Materials' for Smart Materials and Structures. We convey our gratitude to all of the reviewers for their time and

  17. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchini, C.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; Wooldridge, J.; Thompson, P.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Lucas, C. A.; Lepadatu, S.; Bikondoa, O.; Hase, T. P. A.; Lesourd, M.; Dontsov, D.; Cain, M. G.

    2015-10-15

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  18. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials is disclosed. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes. 3 figs.

  19. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Materials (NOHMs) - Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Lynden

    2014-03-01

    Polymer-particle composites are used today in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created in their polymer hosts, which present opportunities and challenges for research, as well as for applications. This talk will focus on a novel class of polymer-particle composite fluids created by densely grafting short organic polymer chains or ionic liquid molecules to inorganic nanostructures. By manipulating the nanoparticle size, polymer molecular weight and surface chemistry, we show that it is possible to create self-suspended suspensions of nanoparticles in which each particle in suspension carries around a discrete share of the suspending medium. The talk will explore consequences of the self-suspended state on fluid structure, rheology, and tethered polymer & particle dynamics in these so-called nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The talk will also discuss particle and tethered polymer dynamics in single-component NOHMs and phase stability, structure, and rheology of NOHMs/polymer blends. This presentation is based on work supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award No. DMR-1006323.

  20. Activation product release from fusion structural materials in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, I.; Montgomery, F.; Trester, P.; Burnette, R.; Johnson, W.; Schultz, K.

    1985-08-01

    The release and transport of activated materials-of-construction in a fusion reactor during an accident scenario involving overheating and ingress of oxidants is an important area of safety research. This investigation quantified material release characteristics which result from surface oxide spallation and vaporization for the steel alloys PCA and HT-9 in impure helium and air environments.

  1. Three-Dimensional Data and the Recording of Material Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, R.; Gilento, P.; Ceccaroni, F.

    2011-09-01

    The "description" of a material structure requires a high degree of objectivity to serve the scientific interests of certain disciplines (archeological documentation, conservation and restoration, safeguarding of cultural assets and heritage). Geometric data and photographic documentation of surfaces are thus the best instruments for efficacious, clear and objective recording of architectural objects and other anthropic manifestations. In particular, the completeness and diachrony of photographic documentation has always proven essential in recording the material structure of historical buildings.The aim of our contribution is to show the results of several projects carried out with the aid of survey methodologies that utilize digital photographic images to generate RGB (ZScan) point clouds of architectural monuments (urban standing buildings, monuments in archaeological areas, etc.) and art objects. These technologies allow us to capture data using digital photogrammetric techniques; although not based on laser scanners, they can nonetheless create dense 3D point clouds, simply by using images that have been obtained via digital camera. The results are comparable to those achieved with laser scanner technology, although the procedures are simpler, faster and cheaper. We intend to try to adapt these technologies to the requirements and needs of scientific research and the conservation of cultural heritage. Furthermore, we will present protocols and procedures for data recording, processing and transfer in the cultural heritage field, especially with regard to historical buildings. Cooperation among experts from different disciplines (archaeology, engineering and photogrammetry) will allow us to develop technologies and proposals for a widely adoptable workflow in the application of such technologies, in order to build an integrated system that can be used throughout the scientific community. Toward this end, open formats and integration will be taken into account

  2. Studies of Matrix/Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials for the High Speed Research (HSR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The research on the curing mechanism of the phenylethynyl terminated imide matrix resins was the primary focus of this research. The ability to process high performance polymers into useful adhesives and high quality composites has been significantly advanced by synthetic techniques in which oligomers terminated with reactive groups cure or crosslink at elevated temperature after the article has been fabricated. The research used a variety of analytical techniques. Many stable products were isolated, and attempts at identification were made. This research was intended to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of these new engineering materials.

  3. First Materials Science Research Facility Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S.; Higgins, D.; Kitchens, L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) is the primary facility for U.S. sponsored materials science research on the International Space Station. MSRR-1 is contained in an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) equipped with the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for the best possible microgravity environment. MSRR-1 will accommodate dual Experiment Modules and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first Experiment Module for the MSRR-1, the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL), is an international cooperative activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC). The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts which provide distinct thermal processing capabilities. Module Inserts currently planned for the MSL are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, and a Solidification with Quench Furnace. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Development (SPD) Group. Transparent furnace assemblies include capabilities for vapor transport processes and annealing of glass fiber preforms. This Experiment Module is replaceable on-orbit. This paper will describe facility capabilities, schedule to flight and research opportunities.

  4. New Ion Beam Materials Laboratory for Materials Modification and Irradiation Effects Research

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Crespillo, Miguel L; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Chen, Chien-Hung; Fontana, Cristiano L; Graham, Dr. Joseph T.; Weber, William J

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion-solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  5. New ion beam materials laboratory for materials modification and irradiation effects research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Crespillo, M. L.; Xue, H.; Jin, K.; Chen, C. H.; Fontana, C. L.; Graham, J. T.; Weber, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion-solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  6. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  7. Silicon carbide alloys: Research reports in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The book draws from work done on other silicon materials, silicon nitrides and sialons, to emphasize the importance of the SiC system. A comprehensive treatment of non-oxide silicon ceramics, this work is of special interest to researchers involved in ceramics, materials science, and high-temperature technology. This book covers the alloys of silicon carbide with aluminum nitride. Crystallography and experimental methods including sample preparation, furnace methods, X-ray and electron diffraction, optical and electron microscopy and chemical analysis are covered.

  8. Crash simulation of hybrid structures considering the stress and strain rate dependent material behavior of thermoplastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Schöngart, M.; Weber, M.; Klein, J.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic materials are more and more used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in the automotive industry. Since these materials do not provide the mechanical properties, which are required to manufacture supporting elements like an auto body or a cross bearer, plastics are combined with metals in so called hybrid structures. Normally, the plastics components are joined to the metal structures using different technologies like welding or screwing. Very often, the hybrid structures are made of flat metal parts, which are stiffened by a reinforcement structure made of thermoplastic materials. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in the crash situation of an automobile. Due to the large stiffness variation of metal and thermoplastic materials, complex states of stress and very high local strain rates occur in the contact zone under impact conditions. Since the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is highly dependent on these types of load, the crash failure of metal plastic hybrid parts is very complex. The problem is that the normally used strain rate dependent elastic/plastic material models are not capable to simulate the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials depended on the state of stress. As part of a research project, a method to simulate the mechanical behavior of hybrid structures under impact conditions is developed at the IKV. For this purpose, a specimen for the measurement of mechanical properties dependet on the state of stress and a method for the strain rate depended characterization of thermoplastic materials were developed. In the second step impact testing is performed. A hybrid structure made from a metal sheet and a reinforcement structure of a Polybutylenterephthalat Polycarbonate blend is tested under impact conditions. The measured stress and strain rate depended material data are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid structure under highly dynamic load with

  9. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  10. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1995-04-01

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in providing enhanced understanding of conventional and advanced materials processing operations. Development and application of mathematical models and computer simulation techniques can provide a quantitative understanding of materials processes and will minimize the need for expensive and time consuming trial- and error-based product development. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, high performance computing and simulation are expected to play a key role in supporting the improvements required in advanced material syntheses and processing by lessening the dependence on expensive prototyping and re-tooling. Many of these numerical models are highly compute-intensive. It is not unusual for an analysis to require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. For example, to accurately simulate the heat transfer in a 1-m{sup 3} block using a simple computational method requires 10`2 arithmetic operations per second of simulated time. For a computer to do the simulation in real time would require a sustained computation rate 1000 times faster than that achievable by current supercomputers. Massively parallel computer systems, which combine several thousand processors able to operate concurrently on a problem are expected to provide orders of magnitude increase in performance. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in materials processing at ORNL. Continued development of computational techniques and algorithms utilizing the massively parallel computers will allow the simulation of conventional and advanced materials processes in sufficient generality.

  11. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). This program includes research and development (R D) in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this program is to support R D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long-term goals of high efficiency (15%--20%), low cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin-film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe modules. This paper focuses on the recent progress and future directions of the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials. 26 refs., 12 figs, 1 tab.

  12. An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material used in honeycomb structure absorbing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daqing; Kang, Feiyu; Zhou, Zhuohui; Cheng, Hongfei; Ding, Heyan

    2015-03-01

    An `H'-shape three-dimensional meta-material structure which loaded on the sidewall of honeycomb structure absorbing material was designed and fabricated in this project. The simulation results demonstrated a super-wide absorption band below -10 dB between 2.3 and 18 GHz, which expanded 7 GHz compared with the absorber without meta-material. The relative impedance curve was analyzed, which showed that the meta-material has little impact on the impedance-matching characteristics of the honeycomb structure absorbing material. We further studied the distribution of both electronic field energy and magnetic field energy. The former one indicated that the low-frequency absorption peaks could easily be moved by adjusting the parameters of the parallel-plate capacitors which generate electric resonance, and the latter one illustrated that the three-dimensional meta-material could generate magnetic resonance between units which would not exist in two-dimensional meta-material. Then we verified the simulation results through experiment which display a similar absorbing curve. The differences between simulation results and experiment results were caused by the addition substrate of the meta-material, which could not be eliminated in this experiment. However, it still implied that we can obtain a meta-material absorber that has a super-wide absorbing band if we can put the meta-material on the sidewall of the honeycomb without attachments.

  13. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  14. Structural applications of metal foams considering material and geometrical uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mohammadreza

    Metal foam is a relatively new and potentially revolutionary material that allows for components to be replaced with elements capable of large energy dissipation, or components to be stiffened with elements which will generate significant supplementary energy dissipation when buckling occurs. Metal foams provide a means to explore reconfiguring steel structures to mitigate cross-section buckling in many cases and dramatically increase energy dissipation in all cases. The microstructure of metal foams consists of solid and void phases. These voids have random shape and size. Therefore, randomness ,which is introduced into metal foams during the manufacturing processes, creating more uncertainty in the behavior of metal foams compared to solid steel. Therefore, studying uncertainty in the performance metrics of structures which have metal foams is more crucial than for conventional structures. Therefore, in this study, structural application of metal foams considering material and geometrical uncertainty is presented. This study applies the Sobol' decomposition of a function of many random variables to different problem in structural mechanics. First, the Sobol' decomposition itself is reviewed and extended to cover the case in which the input random variables have Gaussian distribution. Then two examples are given for a polynomial function of 3 random variables and the collapse load of a two story frame. In the structural example, the Sobol' decomposition is used to decompose the variance of the response, the collapse load, into contributions from the individual input variables. This decomposition reveals the relative importance of the individual member yield stresses in determining the collapse load of the frame. In applying the Sobol' decomposition to this structural problem the following issues are addressed: calculation of the components of the Sobol' decomposition by Monte Carlo simulation; the effect of input distribution on the Sobol' decomposition

  15. Electrostatic Levitation: A Tool to Support Materials Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; SanSoucie, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important topic for materials research in microgravity. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container, which permits studies of deeply undercooled melts, and high-temperature, highly reactive materials. Containerless processing provides data for studies of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable state formation, microstructure formation, undercooling, and nucleation. The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) jointly developed an electromagnetic levitator facility (MSL-EML) for containerless materials processing in space. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center provides support for the development of containerless processing studies for the ISS. Apparatus and techniques have been developed to use the ESL to provide data for phase diagram determination, creep resistance, emissivity, specific heat, density/thermal expansion, viscosity, surface tension and triggered nucleation of melts. The capabilities and results from selected ESL-based characterization studies performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented.

  16. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: commentary.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Dong; Wang, Xiumei; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kyung Min; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    We introduce our active experts' communications and reviews (Part II) of 2015 Korea-China Joint Symposium on Biomimetic Medical Materials in Republic of Korea, which reflect their perspectives on current research trends of biomimetic medical materials for tissue regeneration in both Korea and China. The communications covered three topics of biomimetics, i.e., 1) hydrogel for therapeutics and extracellular matrix environments, 2) design of electrical polymers for communications between electrical sources and biological systems and 3) design of biomaterials for nerve tissue engineering. The reviews in the Part II will cover biomimetics of 3D bioprinting materials, surface modifications, nano/micro-technology as well as clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage. PMID:27026826

  17. Editorial - Proceedings on Basic Research on Ionic-Covalent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    The third symposium on Basic Research on Ionic-Covalent Materials for Nuclear Applications, originally initiated at the EMRS in Nice (May 2011), attracted 80 registered participants. During 4 days, 54 oral talks and 22 posters were presented. The overall high quality of the majority of the contributions was appreciated, in particular the great efforts of the invited speakers to convey their expertise in an excellent tutorial way.

  18. Theoretical estimation of surface Debye temperature of nano structured material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Bijan Kumar; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of Debye temperature (TD) exploiting phonon is very important. In this work an attempt has been made to estimate TD for solids in a simple phenomenological approach. The ultimate goal is to estimate TD for nano structured material. The objective of this present work is to extend Debye model for nano-structured material and hence to extract the contribution to surface specific heat and surface Debye temperature. An empirical relation between TD and surface Debye temperature (TDS) is proposed. Lindemann melting criterion is also extended towards nano structure. The overall results obtained are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  19. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project - Structures and Materials Discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Structures & Materials Discipline within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project is focused on developing rotorcraft technologies. The technologies being developed are within the task areas of: 5.1.1 Life Prediction Methods for Engine Structures & Components 5.1.2 Erosion Resistant Coatings for Improved Turbine Blade Life 5.2.1 Crashworthiness 5.2.2 Methods for Prediction of Fatigue Damage & Self Healing 5.3.1 Propulsion High Temperature Materials 5.3.2 Lightweight Structures and Noise Integration The presentation will discuss rotorcraft specific technical challenges and needs as well as details of the work being conducted in the six task areas.

  20. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  1. Advances in Structural Studies of Materials using Scattering Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, Ashfia; Bozin, Emil; Welberry, Dr. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Study of contemporary materials and their remarkable properties is a challenging problem. To understand these complex properties and develop better materials it is essential to understand their structures, as the two are intimately linked. Great advances in materials scattering have been achieved due to the advent of synchrotron and neutron sources along with the availability of high-speed computational algorithms. Materials scientists can now collect data with high resolution, high throughput from very small amount of sample (both single crystal and powder), and analyze vast amount of data to unravel detailed structural description that was not possible before. This article presents some of these great advances in using scattering probes for materials characterization.

  2. Frozen spin targets in ribosomal structure research.

    PubMed

    Stuhrmann, H B

    1991-01-01

    Polarized neutron scattering strongly depends on nuclear spin polarisation, particularly on proton spin polarisation. A single proton in a deuterated environment then is as efficient as 10 electrons in X-ray anomalous diffraction. Neutron scattering from the nuclear spin label is controlled by the polarisation of neutron spins and nuclear spins. Pure deuteron spin labels and proton spin labels are created by NMR saturation. We report on results obtained from the large subunit of E. coli ribosomes which have been obtained at the research reactor of GKSS using the polarized target facility developed by CERN. The nuclear spins were oriented with respect to an external field by dynamic nuclear polarisation. Proton spin polarisations of more than 80% were obtained in ribosomes at temperatures below 0.5 K. At T = 130 mK the relaxation time of the polarized target is one month (frozen spin target). Polarized small-angle neutron scattering of the in situ structure of rRNA and the total ribosomal protein (TP) has been determined from the frozen spin targets of the large ribosomal subunit, which has been deuterated in the TP and rRNA respectively. The results agree with those from neutron scattering in H2O/D2O mixtures obtained at room temperature. This is a necessary prerequisite for the planned determination of the in situ structure of individual ribosomal proteins and especially of that of ribosome bound mRNA and tRNAs. PMID:1720669

  3. Advances in Materials Research: An Internship at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrios, Elizabeth A.; Roberson, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    My time at Kennedy Space Center. was spent immersing myself in research performed in the Materials Science Division of the Engineering Directorate. My Chemical Engineering background provided me the ability to assist in many different projects ranging from tensile testing of composite materials to making tape via an extrusion process. However, I spent the majority of my time on the following three projects: (1) testing three different materials to determine antimicrobial properties; (2) fabricating and analyzing hydrogen sensing tapes that were placed at the launch pad for STS-133 launch; and (3) researching molten regolith electrolysis at KSC to prepare me for my summer internship at MSFC on a closely related topic. This paper aims to explain, in detail, what I have learned about these three main projects. It will explain why this research is happening and what we are currently doing to resolve the issues. This paper will also explain how the hard work and experiences that I have gained as an intern have provided me with the next big step towards my career at NASA.

  4. Ultrasonic waves for fabricating lattice structure in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Itagaki, Kazuhiro; Imanishi, Yoshihiro

    1999-09-01

    Ultrasonic waves are useful for arranging small particles in liquid, since the acoustic pressure exerts a sufficient trapping force on the particles. A composite material with layered structure can be fabricated by solidifying a particle suspension during the process of ultrasonic standing wave excitation. Fabrication of a 2D or 3D lattice structure is also possible by simultaneous excitation of two or three orthogonal ultrasonic standing waves. A polysiloxane resin is appropriate as a host material of such composite materials, since it is easily synthesized from a solution and its yields a small-periodicity structure due to its low sound velocity. Acrylic spheres, glass rods, and metal particles have been successfully arranged in polysiloxane resin forming layers or lattice structures. The spacing of particles was approximately 60 micrometers , which was half of the ultrasonic wavelength used. For heavy particles, a sample cell was continually rotated during the solidification process in order to prevent sedimentation.

  5. Effect of Interface Structure on Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yong X.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown. PMID:20054466

  6. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  7. Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr. (Compiler); Gardner, J. E. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The workshop was held to provide a forum for communication within the space materials and structures technology developer and user communities. Workshop participants were organized into a Vehicle Technology Requirements session and three working panels: Materials and Structures Technologies for Vehicle Systems; Propulsion Systems; and Entry Systems. The goals accomplished were (1) to develop important strategic planning information necessary to transition materials and structures technologies from lab research programs into robust and affordable operational systems; (2) to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas between technology developers and users; and (3) to provide senior NASA management with a review of current space transportation programs, related subjects, and specific technology needs. The workshop thus provided a foundation on which a NASA and industry effort to address space transportation materials and structures technologies can grow.

  8. A Study of Fragmentation in a Ni-Al Structural Energetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydelotte, B.; Braithwaite, C. H.; Thadhani, N. N.; Trexler, M.; Williamson, D. M.

    2011-06-01

    A study of fragmentation behavior of a Ni-Al structural energetic material was undertaken to determine fragment size and distribution as well as study the impact of material microstructure on the fragmentation process. Rings were fabricated from a nearly 100% TMD Ni-Al structural energetic material and subjected to explosive fragmentation experiments. Fragments were recovered for subsequent analysis; PDV velocity data was concurrently collected. Recovered fragments show negligible ductility suggesting that brittle fracture behavior dominates the fragmentation process. Quantitative microscopy and comparisons with existing fragmentation models are presented. This research was funded by ONR/MURI grant No. N00014-07-1-0740 and the SMART scholarship program.

  9. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-07-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  10. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  11. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  12. Preliminary Structural Sizing and Alternative Material Trade Study of CEV Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steve M.; Collier, Craig S.; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary structural sizing and alternate material trade study for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Crew Module (CM). This critical CEV component will house the astronauts during ascent, docking with the International Space Station, reentry, and landing. The alternate material design study considers three materials beyond the standard metallic (aluminum alloy) design that resulted from an earlier NASA Smart Buyer Team analysis. These materials are graphite/epoxy composite laminates, discontinuously reinforced SiC/Al (DRA) composites, and a novel integrated panel material/concept known as WebCore. Using the HyperSizer (Collier Research and Development Corporation) structural sizing software and NASTRAN finite element analysis code, a comparison is made among these materials for the three composite CM concepts considered by the 2006 NASA Engineering and Safety Center Composite Crew Module project.

  13. Structure-property relationships of multiferroic materials: A nano perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feiming

    The integration of sensors, actuators, and control systems is an ongoing process in a wide range of applications covering automotive, medical, military, and consumer electronic markets. Four major families of ceramic and metallic actuators are under development: piezoelectrics, electrostrictors, magnetostrictors, and shape-memory alloys. All of these materials undergo at least two phase transformations with coupled thermodynamic order parameters. These transformations lead to complex domain wall behaviors, which are driven by electric fields (ferroelectrics), magnetic fields (ferromagnetics), or mechanical stress (ferroelastics) as they transform from nonferroic to ferroic states, contributing to the sensing and actuating capabilities. This research focuses on two multiferroic crystals, Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-PbTiO3 and Fe-Ga, which are characterized by the co-existence and coupling of ferroelectric polarization and ferroelastic strain, or ferro-magnetization and ferroelastic strain. These materials break the conventional boundary between piezoelectric and electrostrictors, or magnetostrictors and shape-memory alloys. Upon applying field or in a poled condition, they yield not only a large strain but also a large strain over field ratio, which is desired and much benefits for advanced actuator and sensor applications. In this thesis, particular attention has been given to understand the structure-property relationships of these two types of materials from atomic to the nano/macro scale. X-ray and neutron diffraction were used to obtain the lattice structure and phase transformation characteristics. Piezoresponse and magnetic force microscopy were performed to establish the dependence of domain configurations on composition, thermal history and applied fields. It has been found that polar nano regions (PNRs) make significant contributions to the enhanced electromechanical properties of PMN-x%PT crystals via assisting intermediate phase transformation. With increasing PT

  14. Neuromorphic Computing – From Materials Research to Systems Architecture Roundtable

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Stevens, Rick; Pino, Robinson; Pechan, Michael

    2015-10-29

    Computation in its many forms is the engine that fuels our modern civilization. Modern computation—based on the von Neumann architecture—has allowed, until now, the development of continuous improvements, as predicted by Moore’s law. However, computation using current architectures and materials will inevitably—within the next 10 years—reach a limit because of fundamental scientific reasons. DOE convened a roundtable of experts in neuromorphic computing systems, materials science, and computer science in Washington on October 29-30, 2015 to address the following basic questions: Can brain-like (“neuromorphic”) computing devices based on new material concepts and systems be developed to dramatically outperform conventional CMOS based technology? If so, what are the basic research challenges for materials sicence and computing? The overarching answer that emerged was: The development of novel functional materials and devices incorporated into unique architectures will allow a revolutionary technological leap toward the implementation of a fully “neuromorphic” computer. To address this challenge, the following issues were considered: The main differences between neuromorphic and conventional computing as related to: signaling models, timing/clock, non-volatile memory, architecture, fault tolerance, integrated memory and compute, noise tolerance, analog vs. digital, and in situ learning New neuromorphic architectures needed to: produce lower energy consumption, potential novel nanostructured materials, and enhanced computation Device and materials properties needed to implement functions such as: hysteresis, stability, and fault tolerance Comparisons of different implementations: spin torque, memristors, resistive switching, phase change, and optical schemes for enhanced breakthroughs in performance, cost, fault tolerance, and/or manufacturability.

  15. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    The motivations for the research issues addressed in this thesis are based on the needs of the aerospace structural analysis and the design community. The specific focus is related to the characterization and shock induced chemical reactions of multi-functional structural-energetic materials that are also known as the reactive structural materials and their reaction capabilities. Usually motivation for selection of aerospace structural materials is to realize required strength characteristics and favorable strength to weight ratios. The term strength implies resistance to loads experienced during the service life of the structure, including resistance to fatigue loads, corrosion and other extreme conditions. Thus, basically the structural materials are single function materials that resist loads experienced during the service life of the structure. However, it is desirable to select materials that are capable of offering more than one basic function of strength. Very often, the second function is the capability to provide functions of sensing and actuation. In this thesis, the second function is different. The second function is the energetic characteristics. Thus, the choice of dual functions of the material are the structural characteristics and energetic characteristics. These materials are also known by other names such as the reactive material structures or dual functional structural energetic materials. Specifically the selected reactive materials include mixtures of selected metals and metal oxides that are also known as thermite mixtures, reacting intermetallic combinations and oxidizing materials. There are several techniques that are available to synthesize these structural energetic materials or reactive material structures and new synthesis techniques constitute an open research area. The focus of this thesis, however, is the characterization of chemical reactions of reactive material structures that involve two or more solids (or condensed matter). The

  16. Research on the icephobic properties of fluoropolymer-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuqing; Xia, Qiang; Zhu, Lin; Xue, Jian; Wang, Qingjun; Chen, Qing-min

    2011-03-01

    Fluoropolymer, because of the extremely low surface energy, could be non-stick to water and thus could be a good candidate as anti-icing materials. In this paper, the icephobic properties of a series of fluoropolymer materials including pristine PTFE plates (P-PTFE), sandblasted PTFE plates (SB-PTFE), two PTFE coatings (SNF-1 and SNF-CO1), a fluorinated room-temperature vulcanized silicone rubber coating (F-RTV) and a fluorinated polyurethane coating (F-PU) have been investigated by using SEM, XPS, ice adhesion strength (tensile and shear) tests, and static and dynamic water contact angle analysis. Results show that the fluoropolymer material with a smooth surface can significantly reduce ice adhesion strength but do not show obvious effect in reducing ice accretion at -8 °C. Fluoropolymers with sub-micron surface structures can improve the hydrophobicity at normal temperature. It leads to an efficient reduction in the ice accretion on the surface at -8 °C, due to the superhydrophobicity of the materials. But the hydrophobicity of this surface descends at a low temperature with high humidity. Consequently, once ice layer formed on the surface, the ice adhesion strength enhanced rapidly due to the existence of the sub-micron structures. Ice adhesion strength of fluoropolymers is highly correlated to CA reduction observed when the temperature was changed from 20 °C to -8 °C. This property is associated with the submicron structure on the surface, which allows water condensed in the interspace between the sub-micron protrudes at a low temperature, and leads to a reduced contact angle, as well as a significantly increased ice adhesion strength.

  17. Materials research for passive solar systems: solid-state phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Webb, J.D.; Burrows, R.W.; McFadden, J.D.O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 4/), pentaglycerinve (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 3/), and neopentyl glycol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 2/). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature betweeen 25/sup 0/C and 188/sup 0/C, and have latent heats of transformation between 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier. Nevertheless, a higher cost of the phase-change materials (approx. =$0.70 per pound) is likely to limit their applicability in passive solar systems unless their performance can be significantly improved through further research.

  18. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area

  19. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect

    Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area

  20. Present and Future Automotive Composite Materials Research Efforts at DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Automobiles of the future will be forced to travel fi.uther on a tank of fuel while discharging lower levels of pollutants. Currently, the United States uses in excess of 16.4 million barrels of petroleum per day. Sixty-six percent of that petroleum is used in the transportation of people and goods. Automobiles currently account for just under two-thirds of the nation's gasoline consumptio~ and about one-third of the total United States energy usage. [1] By improving transportation related fiel efficiency, the United States can lessen the impact that emissions have on our environment and provide a cleaner environment for fiture generations. In 1992, The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Transportation Materials completed a comprehensive program plan entitled, The Lightweight MateriaIs (LWko Multi-Year Program Plan, for the development of technologies aimed at reducing vehicle mass [2]. This plan was followed in 1997 by the more comprehensive Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan titled, Energy Eficient Vehicles for a Cleaner Environment [3] which outlines the department's plans for developing more efficient vehicles during the next ~een years. Both plans identi~ potential applications, technology needs, and R&D priorities. The goal of the Lightweight Materials Program is to develop materials and primary processing methods for the fabrication of lighter weight components which can be incorporated into automotive systems. These technologies are intended to reduce vehicle weight, increase fuel efficiency and decrease emissions. The Lightweight Materials program is jointly managed by the Department of Energy(DOE) and the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). Composite materiak program work is coordinated by cooperative research efforts between the DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC).

  1. The role of polymer based composites materials in modern and future aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, Stefania; De Nicola, Felice; Mercurio, Umberto; Quaranta, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    The need to reduce the overall weight of aeronautical and space structures, while at the same time preserving or even improving their performances, make the research and development in the field of innovative structures and advanced composite materials a crucial step for the advancement of aerospace technologies. Several fields of innovation have been explored in the last decades but the most promising solutions for the future of aerospace structures will be found in the "intelligent" use of polymer based composite materials both in the design and in their "nature like" use.

  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  3. NASA Lewis Research Center/University Graduate Research Program on Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  4. Physical cognition: birds learn the structural efficacy of nest material

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Ida E.; Morgan, Kate V.; Bertin, Marion; Meddle, Simone L.; Healy, Susan D.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally assumed that birds’ choice of structurally suitable materials for nest building is genetically predetermined. Here, we tested that assumption by investigating whether experience affected male zebra finches’ (Taeniopygia guttata) choice of nest material. After a short period of building with relatively flexible string, birds preferred to build with stiffer string while those that had experienced a stiffer string were indifferent to string type. After building a complete nest with either string type, however, all birds increased their preference for stiff string. The stiffer string appeared to be the more effective building material as birds required fewer pieces of stiffer than flexible string to build a roofed nest. For birds that raised chicks successfully, there was no association between the material they used to build their nest and the type they subsequently preferred. Birds’ material preference reflected neither the preference of their father nor of their siblings but juvenile experience of either string type increased their preference for stiffer string. Our results represent two important advances: (i) birds choose nest material based on the structural properties of the material; (ii) nest material preference is not entirely genetically predetermined as both the type and amount of experience influences birds’ choices. PMID:24741011

  5. Progress in the research and development of photonic structure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Pham, Van Dai; Cham Tran, Thi; Trang Hoang, Thu; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the results of the research and development of photonic structure devices performed in the Institute of Materials Science in the period from 2010-2015. We have developed a configuration of 1D photonic crystal (PC) microcavities based on porous silicon (PS) layers and applied them to optical sensing devices that can be used for the determination of organic content with a very low concentration in different liquid environments. Various important scientific and technological applications of photonic devices such as the ultralow power operation of microcavity lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emissions and the manipulation of light amplification by combining the surface plasmonic effect and the microcavity are expected. We developed new kinds of photonic structures for optical filters based on guided-mode resonances in coupled slab waveguide gratings, which have great potential for application in fiber-optic communication and optical sensors.

  6. Research requirements to reduce empty weight of helicopters by use of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffstedt, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Utilization of the new, lightweight, high-strength, aerospace structural-composite (filament/matrix) materials, when specifically designed into a new aircraft, promises reductions in structural empty weight of 12 percent at recurring costs competive with metals. A program of basic and applied research and demonstration is identified with the objective of advancing the state of the art to the point where civil helicopters are confidently designed, produced, certified, and marketed by 1985. A structural empty-weight reduction of 12 percent was shown to significantly reduce energy consumption in modern high-performance helicopters.

  7. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  8. Lewis' enhanced laboratory for research into the fatigue and constitutive behavior of high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1985-01-01

    Lewis Research Center's high temperature fatigue laboratory has undergone significant changes resulting in the addition of several new experimental capabilities. New materials testing systems have been installed enabling research to be conducted in multiaxial fatigue and deformation at high temperature, as well as cumulative creep-fatigue damage wherein the relative failure-life levels are widely separated. A key component of the new high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory is a local, distributed computer system whose hardware and software architecture emphasizes a high degree of configurability, which in turn, enables the researcher to tailor a solution to the problem at hand.

  9. Local structure studies of materials using pair distribution function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joseph W.

    A collection of pair distribution function studies on various materials is presented in this dissertation. In each case, local structure information of interest pushes the current limits of what these studies can accomplish. The goal is to provide insight into the individual material behaviors as well as to investigate ways to expand the current limits of PDF analysis. Where possible, I provide a framework for how PDF analysis might be applied to a wider set of material phenomena. Throughout the dissertation, I discuss 0 the capabilities of the PDF method to provide information pertaining to a material's structure and properties, ii) current limitations in the conventional approach to PDF analysis, iii) possible solutions to overcome certain limitations in PDF analysis, and iv) suggestions for future work to expand and improve the capabilities PDF analysis.

  10. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  11. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  12. Deformation mechanisms in negative Poisson's ratio materials - Structural aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Poisson's ratio in materials is governed by the following aspects of the microstructure: the presence of rotational degrees of freedom, non-affine deformation kinematics, or anisotropic structure. Several structural models are examined. The non-affine kinematics are seen to be essential for the production of negative Poisson's ratios for isotropic materials containing central force linkages of positive stiffness. Non-central forces combined with pre-load can also give rise to a negative Poisson's ratio in isotropic materials. A chiral microstructure with non-central force interaction or non-affine deformation can also exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. Toughness and damage resistance in these materials may be affected by the Poisson's ratio itself, as well as by generalized continuum aspects associated with the microstructure.

  13. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 339: Diamond, SiC and nitride wide bandgap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Calvin H.; Gildenblat, Gennady; Nakamura, Shuji; Nemanich, Robert J.

    1994-04-01

    This symposium was directed toward the potential of using diamond, SiC, and nitride wide bandgap semiconductors. The symposium emphasized materials issues related to the semiconducting properties of these wide bandgap materials. Both experimental and theoretical studies were presented. Solid advances were reported in the growth techniques of all three materials groups. Contributions demonstrated the critical importance of surfaces, interfaces, doping, defects, and impurities Reports demonstrated potential device applications ranging from unique electronic devices to blue/UV light emitters/detectors and even novel structures employing a negative electron affinity. The overall theme of the symposium was that materials research into wide bandgap semiconductors will make available exciting new applications, and that we are just beginning to understand the potential of these materials.

  14. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  15. Earth materials research: Report of a Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The report concludes that an enhanced effort of earth materials research is necessary to advance the understanding of the processes that shape the planet. In support of such an effort, there are new classes of experiments, new levels of analytical sensitivity and precision, and new levels of theory that are now applicable in understanding the physical and chemical properties of geological materials. The application of these capabilities involves the need to upgrade and make greater use of existing facilities as well as the development of new techniques. A concomitant need is for a sample program involving their collection, synthesis, distribution, and analysis.

  16. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H. S.

    1990-11-01

    DOE supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin Film Program. This program includes includes R and D in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective is to support R and D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long term goals of high efficiency (15 to 20 percent), low cost ($50/sq cm), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin film CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe(sub 2) and CdTe modules. The recent progress and future directions are studied of the Polycrystalline Thin Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials.

  17. Materials research for PMI at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Chad; Edmondson, Philip; Meyer, Fred; Bannister, Mark; Garrison, Lauren; Unocic, Kinga; Hu, Xunxiang; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve the scientific understanding of how materials' structure influences plasma-materials interactions (PMI) and the material response to plasma effects, we have performed a series of ion- and neutron-irradiation experiments on tungsten (W). Single- and polycrystal tungsten developed second phase Re +Os precipitates due to transmutation from High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron irradiation. The microstructure of these precipitates was investigated with electron and atom probe microscopy, while mechanical testing found a significant degradation in materials properties, such as toughness and strength, which will degrade PMI performance. We have also used a beam-deceleration module on an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source beamline at ORNL to study the effects of W crystallography (specifically surface normal) and the effect of beam incidence angle and beam energy on surface morphology after irradiation. Ongoing plasma-exposure experiments and neutron-irradiation campaigns will be described. Supported by ORNL LDRD program, and Office of Fusion Energy Science, US Department of Energy.

  18. Contributive research in compound semiconductor material and related devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twist, James R.

    1988-05-01

    The objective of this program was to provide the Electronic Device Branch (AFWAL/AADR) with the support needed to perform state of the art electronic device research. In the process of managing and performing on the project, UES has provided a wide variety of scientific and engineering talent who worked in-house for the Avionics Laboratory. These personnel worked on many different types of research programs from gas phase microwave driven lasers, CVD and MOCVD of electronic materials to Electronic Device Technology for new devices. The fields of research included MBE and theoretical research in this novel growth technique. Much of the work was slanted towards the rapidly developing technology of GaAs and the general thrust of the research that these tasks started has remained constant. This work was started because the Avionics Laboratory saw a chance to advance the knowledge and level of the current device technology by working in the compounds semiconductor field. UES is pleased to have had the opportunity to perform on this program and is looking forward to future efforts with the Avionics Laboratory.

  19. Research and education on fiber-based materials for nanofluidics at Clemson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2007-11-01

    Advanced materials and the science and engineering related to their design, process, test and manufacture represents one of the fast growing sectors of the Materials Science and Engineering field. Awareness of existing process, performance, manufacturing or recycle-ability issues and limitations, often dictates the next generation of advances needed to improve existing or create new materials. To compete in this growing science and technology area, trained experts must possess strong academic skills in their discipline as well as advanced communication, networking and cultural teamwork experience. Clemson's School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), is continuing to expand our program to focus on unique capabilities which support local, regional and national needs in advanced materials. Specifically, MSE at Clemson is evolving to highlight intrinsic strengths in research and education areas related to optical materials, advanced fibers and composites (based on inorganic, organic and natural fibers), biomaterials and devices, and architectural and restoration material science (including the conservation and preservation of maritime structures). Additionally, we continue to invest in our expertise in materials design and fabrication, which has historically supported our well known programs in ceramics and textiles. In addition to a brief review of the School's forward-looking challenges to remain competitive among strong southeast regional materials science programs, this presentation will also highlight recent technical advances in fiber-based materials for nanofluidic applications. Specifically we will present recent results on design of fiber-based nanofluidics for sensor applications and we will discuss some physical phenomena associated with liquid transport at nanoscale.

  20. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  1. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  2. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  3. Electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of organic solid-state materials IV. Materials Research Society, symposium proceedings Volume 488

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.R.; Jen, A.K.Y.; Rubner, M.F.; Chiang, L.Y.; Dalton, L.R.

    1998-07-01

    The symposium, Electrical, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of Organic Solid-State Materials IV, was sponsored by the Materials Research Society and held December 1--5, 1997, in Boston, Massachusetts. Early studies of charge transport in conducting polymers have evolved from the elucidation of fundamental structure/function relationships to applications as batteries, simple electrical devices such as diodes, chemical sensors, antistatic coatings, microwave and millimeter wave-absorbing materials, and photochromic devices. A particularly exciting evolution has been the discovery and development of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) which appear to be nearing commercialization in an amazingly short period of time. This application is of particular interest because both electrical and optical properties must be considered, and these have been important parallel themes of the conference. Moreover, nanostructure control is important for OLEDs, and nanoscale architectural engineering has been an increasingly important theme of the conference. Indeed, not only has the study of conjugated (quasidelocalized) electrons in organic solid-state materials resulted in interesting physical properties and device applications, but the desire to exploit these properties has promoted the development of new synthesis and processing methodologies to achieve special nanoscale and microscale structures. One hundred five papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Process research on non-CZ silicon material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    High risk, high payoff research areas associated with he process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-CZ sheet material are investigated. All investigations are being performed using dendritic web silicon, but all processes are directly applicable to other ribbon forms of sheet material. The technical feasibility of forming front and back junctions in non-CZ silicon using liquid dopant techniques was determined. Numerous commercially available liquid phosphorus and boron dopant solutions are investigated. Temperature-time profiles to achieve N(+) and P(+) sheet resistivities of 60 + or - 10 and 40 + or - s10 ohms per square centimeter respectively are established. A study of the optimal method of liquid dopant application is performed. The technical feasibility of forming a liquid applied diffusion mask to replace the more costly chemical vapor deposited SiO2 diffusion mask was also determined.

  5. Electrical research on solar cells and photovoltaic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orehotsky, J.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic study of the properties of various polymer pottant materials and of the electrochemical corrosion mechanisms in solar cell materials is required for advancing the technology of terrestrial photovoltaic modules. The items of specific concern in this sponsored research activity involve: (1) kinetics of plasticizer loss in PVB, (2) kinetics of water absorption and desorption in PVB, (3) kinetics of water absorption and desorption in EVA, (4) the electrical properties at PVB as a function of temperature and humidity, (5) the electrical properties of EVA as a function of temperature and humidity, (6) solar cell corrosion characteristics, (7) water absorption effects in PVB and EVA, and (8) ion implantation and radiation effects in PVB and EVA.

  6. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  7. Fragmentation of structural energetic materials: implications for performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydelotte, B.; Braithwaite, C. H.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation results for structural energetic materials based on intermetallic forming mixtures are reviewed and the implications of the fragment populations are discussed. Cold sprayed Ni+Al and explosively compacted mixtures of Ni+Al+W and Ni+Al+W+Zr powders were fabricated into ring shaped samples and explosively fragmented. Ring velocity was monitored and fragments were soft captured in order to study the fragmentation process. It was determined that the fragments produced by these structural energetic materials are much smaller than those typically produced by ductile metals such as steel or aluminum. This has implications for combustion processes that may occur subsequent to the fragmentation process.

  8. Surviving the space environment - An overview of advanced materials and structures development at the CWRU CCDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, John F.; Zdankiewicz, Edward M.; Schmidt, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    The development of advanced materials and structures for long-term use in space is described with specific reference given to applications to the Space Station Freedom and the lunar base. A flight-testing program is described which incorporates experiments regarding the passive effects of space travel such as material degradation with active materials experiments such as the Materials Exposure Flight Experiment. Also described is a research and development program for materials such as organic coatings and polymeric composites, and a simulation laboratory is described which permits the analysis of materials in the laboratory. The methods of investigation indicate that the NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space facilitates the understanding of material degradation in space.

  9. Recent progress in R&D on tungsten alloys for divertor structural and plasma facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wurster, S.; Baluc, N.; Battabyal, M.; Crosby, T.; Du, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Hasegawa, Akira; Hoffmann, A.; Kimura, A.; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Kurtz, Richard J.; Li, H.; Noh, S.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Rieth, Michael; Setyawan, Wahyu; Walter, M.; You, J. H.; Pippan, R.

    2013-03-13

    Tungsten materials are candidates for plasma facing components for ITER and DEMO because of their superior thermophysical properties. Knowledge and strategies to improve properties of tungsten-based materials are still under development, as they are not a common structural material such as steel. Consequently, several activities have started in Europe, Japan, USA and China. Research is directed towards manufacturing of new materials based on alloying, microstructure stabilizing and composite formation involving improved processing steps. Beside experimental analyses, work also focuses on computational treatment of open questions, supporting the development of better tungsten materials. Assuming the availability of an ideal material that is ready to use, there remain the questions of inherent safety, the joining of tungsten to steel and the influence of radiation damage. These are topics of increasing interest when the material comes to application.

  10. Vacuum isostatic micro molding of diffractive structures into PTFE materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is an ideal material for use in industrial, automotive and consumer electronics. Specifically, PTFE has outstanding physical properties; such as chemical inertness and resistance to chemical corrosion, even when exposed to a strong acid, alkali and oxidants. Its properties provide for superior electrical insulation and thermal stability, which is not affected by wide ranges in temperature and frequency. Its non-absorption of moisture makes it a perfect material for consideration in micro optical, retro-reflector or diffuser type devices used in handheld displays, flat panel displays as well as automotive, industrial and home lighting. This paper presents an overview of a unique fabrication method that incorporates a variety of elements to establish a processing technique that can form micro diffractive, holographic and reflective structures into PTFE materials. By means of modifying an existing known molding process, this new technique incorporates the addition of a vacuum to assist in the reliable molding and densification of the PTFE as well the use of a micro-structured electroformed shim to form small microstructures into the surface of the PTFE material. The combination of the vacuum and the electroformed shim within the molding process noticeably increases the precision, reproducibility and resolution of micro-structures that can be realized. The paper will describe the molding hardware involved, process parameters and the resulting structures formed. Optical function testing and metrology of the micro-structure geometry formed on each sample will be compared to the original design mandrel geometry [1].

  11. Structural health monitoring of materials by high critical temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, M.; Ruosi, A.; Peluso, G.; Pepe, G. P.

    2002-08-01

    Nowadays, tailoring the material properties is essential for advanced product design in engineering systems. The need to provide key information about micro- and macro-structural behaviour of materials, without destructively sectioning the sample, has spurred the development of nondestructive evaluation methodologies. These techniques are required during material production, quality testing of components during manufacturing, and in-service inspection of structural integrity. To ensure the highest possible operational safety along with an economic efficiency, it is necessary to carry out inspections with a high sensitivity and a proven reliability. Due to its unparalleled magnetic field sensitivity over a wide frequency range and large dynamic range, SQUID-based nondestructive evaluation has unique advantages for materials and structures characterization. We will present an overview of eddy-current nondestructive analysis utilizing high Tc SQUIDs with an emphasis on examples relevant to the aeronautical industry. These include the detection of deep-lying defects in multi-layer structures of Al-Ti alloys and damage of extremely lightweight graphite/epoxy composites. Both of these can be successfully treated by this approach where conventional electromagnetic probes often fail. In addition some results based on the volume integral formulation, successfully developed to simulate the response of the system to different type of flaws in Al-alloy planar structures and to solve the inverse electromagnetic problem, will be shown.

  12. Quantitative property-structural relation modeling on polymeric dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke

    Nowadays, polymeric materials have attracted more and more attention in dielectric applications. But searching for a material with desired properties is still largely based on trial and error. To facilitate the development of new polymeric materials, heuristic models built using the Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) techniques can provide reliable "working solutions". In this thesis, the application of QSPR on polymeric materials is studied from two angles: descriptors and algorithms. A novel set of descriptors, called infinite chain descriptors (ICD), are developed to encode the chemical features of pure polymers. ICD is designed to eliminate the uncertainty of polymer conformations and inconsistency of molecular representation of polymers. Models for the dielectric constant, band gap, dielectric loss tangent and glass transition temperatures of organic polymers are built with high prediction accuracy. Two new algorithms, the physics-enlightened learning method (PELM) and multi-mechanism detection, are designed to deal with two typical challenges in material QSPR. PELM is a meta-algorithm that utilizes the classic physical theory as guidance to construct the candidate learning function. It shows better out-of-domain prediction accuracy compared to the classic machine learning algorithm (support vector machine). Multi-mechanism detection is built based on a cluster-weighted mixing model similar to a Gaussian mixture model. The idea is to separate the data into subsets where each subset can be modeled by a much simpler model. The case study on glass transition temperature shows that this method can provide better overall prediction accuracy even though less data is available for each subset model. In addition, the techniques developed in this work are also applied to polymer nanocomposites (PNC). PNC are new materials with outstanding dielectric properties. As a key factor in determining the dispersion state of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix

  13. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  14. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  15. Materials by Design-A Perspective From Atoms to Structures.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J

    2013-02-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes-in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science. PMID:24163499

  16. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  17. Energy absorption in composite materials for crashworthy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Crash energy-absorption processes in composite materials have been studied as part of a research program aimed at the development of energy absorbing subfloor beams for crashworthy military helicopters. Based on extensive tests on glass/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy composites, it is shown that the energy-absorption characteristics and crushing modes of composite beams are similar to those exhibited by tubular specimens of similar material and architecture. The crushing mechanisms have been determined and related to the mechanical properties of the constituent materials and specimen architecture. A simple and accurate method for predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite beams has been developed.

  18. Coatings for high-temperature structural materials: Trends and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This book assesses the state of the art of coatings materials and processes for gas-turbine blades and vanes, determines potential applications of coatings in high-temperature environments, identifies needs for improved coatings in terms of performance enhancements, design considerations, and fabrication processes, assesses durability of advanced coating systems in expected service environments, and discusses the required inspection, repair, and maintenance methods. The promising areas for research and development of materials and processes for improved coating systems and the approaches to increased coating standardization are identified, with an emphasis on materials and processes with the potential for improved performance, quality, reproducibility, or manufacturing cost reduction.

  19. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling of Nano-Structured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for modeling structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with an equivalent-continuum model. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As an important example with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the model has been applied to determine the effective continuum geometry of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the equivalent-continuum model has been developed with an effective thickness. This effective thickness has been shown to be similar to, but slightly smaller than, the interatomic spacing of graphite.

  20. Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Behavior in HSCT Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    Structures in super-sonic aircraft are subjected to conditions of high temperature and cyclic and sustained loading for extended periods of time. The durability of structures fabricated from aluminum and certain titanium alloys in such demanding conditions is of primary concern to the designers and manufacturers of futuristic transport aircraft. Accordingly, the major goal of this project was to evaluate the performance and durability of high temperature aluminum and titanium alloys for use in high speed civil transport (HSCT) structures. Additional goals were to develop time-dependent fracture mechanics methodology and test methods for characterizing and predicting elevated temperature crack growth behavior in creep-brittle materials such as ones being considered for use in HSCT structures and to explore accelerated methods of simulating microstructural degradation during service and measuring degraded properties in these materials.

  1. Cell-based composite materials with programmed structures and functions

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-03-01

    The present invention is directed to the use of silicic acid to transform biological materials, including cellular architecture into inorganic materials to provide biocomposites (nanomaterials) with stabilized structure and function. In the present invention, there has been discovered a means to stabilize the structure and function of biological materials, including cells, biomolecules, peptides, proteins (especially including enzymes), lipids, lipid vesicles, polysaccharides, cytoskeletal filaments, tissue and organs with silicic acid such that these materials may be used as biocomposites. In many instances, these materials retain their original biological activity and may be used in harsh conditions which would otherwise destroy the integrity of the biological material. In certain instances, these biomaterials may be storage stable for long periods of time and reconstituted after storage to return the biological material back to its original form. In addition, by exposing an entire cell to form CSCs, the CSCs may function to provide a unique system to study enzymes or a cascade of enzymes which are otherwise unavailable.

  2. Nanoindentation in Materials Research: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Warren; Pharr, George Mathews

    2010-01-01

    The method we introduced in 1992 for measuring hardness and elastic modulus by nanoindentation testing has been widely adopted and used in the characterization of mechanical behavior at small scales. Since its original development, the method has undergone numerous refinements and changes brought about by improvements to testing equipment and techniques, as well as advances in our understanding of the mechanics of elastic-plastic contact. In this article, we briefly review the history of the method, comment on its capabilities and limitations, and discuss some of the emerging areas in materials research where it has played, or promises to play, an important role.

  3. Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced processing techniques for non-CZ silicon sheet material that might improve the cost effectiveness of photovoltaic module production were investigated. Specifically, the simultaneous diffusion of liquid boron and liquid phosphorus organometallic precursors into n-type dendritic silicon web was examined. The simultaneous junction formation method for solar cells was compared with the sequential junction formation method. The electrical resistivity of the n-n and p-n junctions was discussed. Further research activities for this program along with a program documentation schedule are given.

  4. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center. Report for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The work described, while involving research in the broad field of materials processing, has two common features: the problems are closed related to space precessing of materials and have both practical and fundamental significance. An interesting and important feature of many of the projects is that the interdisciplinary nature of the problem mandates complementary analytical modeling/experimental approaches. An other important aspect of many of the projects is the increasing use of mathematical modeling techniques as one of the research tools. The predictive capability of these models, when tested against measurements, plays a very important role in both the planning of experimental programs and in the rational interpretation of the results. Many of the projects described have a space experiment as their ultimate objective. Mathematical models are proving to be extremely valuable in projecting the findings of ground - based experiments to microgravity conditions.

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  6. Structuring Research Opportunities for All Biology Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Susan E.; Conley, Lisa K.; Horst, Cynthia J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a required research experience program for all biology majors instituted in the biology department of Carroll College. Discusses successes and challenges of coordinating a program that involves 20-40 research projects each year. (Author/NB)

  7. NASA Sponsored Research Involving Crystallization of Biological Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton

    2000-01-01

    An overview of NASA's plans for the performing experiments involving the crystallization of biological materials on the International Space Station (ISS) is presented. In addition, a brief overview of past work is provided as background. Descriptions of flight hardware currently available for use on the ISS are given and projections of future developments are discussed. In addition, experiment selection and funding is described. As of the flight of STS-95, these crystallization projects have proven to be some of the most successful in the history of microgravity research. The NASA Microgravity Research Division alone has flown 185 different proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, and complexes on 43 different missions. 37 of the 185 have resulted, in, diffraction patterns with higher resolution than was obtained in all previous ground based experiments. This occurred despite the fact that an average of only 41 samples per protein were flown. A number of other samples have shown improved signal to noise characteristics, i.e. relative Wilson plots, when compared to the best ground experiments. In addition, a number of experiments investigating the effects of microgravity conditions on the crystallization of biological material have been conducted.

  8. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. PMID:26866276

  9. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feig, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    This report is an addendum to the Revolutionary Opportunities for Materials and Structures Study (ROMS), modifying the original by the addition of two tasks. The primary purpose of these tasks was to conduct additional aircraft/engine sizing and mission analysis to obtain contributory aircraft performance data such as fuel burns and direct operating costs for both the subsonic and supersonic engines.

  10. Structural materials from lunar simulants through thermal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, Kirsten

    1992-01-01

    Thermal liquefaction that allows development of intermediate ceramic composites from a lunar simulant with various admixtures is used to develop structural materials for construction on the moon. Bending and compressive properties of resulting composites are obtained from laboratory tests and evaluated with respect to the use of three different types and fibers.

  11. Research of metallic materials irradiation with high energy pulsed laser impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Seropyan, G. M.; Tkachenko, E. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Polonyankin, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the process of metallic materials treatment by pulsed laser beams with nanosecond duration occurs extremely rapid and intensive heating of their surface. In this case a thin surface layer of material is heated to the boiling point and rapidly evaporates. This leads to arising substantial forces of reactive nature which significantly influence on the shape of the solidified melt and in some cases may cause deformation of the underlying layers. The considered question is relevant in the research of precision treatment of miniature products by laser beams. A metallic powder with microfine material structure was selected as the object of research and was exposed to laser irradiation with nanosecond duration. At the core of reactive forces calculation used the approach similar for laser rocket engines. The paper also presents the model and the results of the forces and the reactive recoil impulse calculation occurring during laser impact to the microfine metallic powder.

  12. In-pile irradiation research at NRI Rez for corrosion and material testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kysela, J.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental test facility enabling exposition of materials to radiation environment is described. The facility enables research on behavior of materials and water chemistry of PWRs and BWRs. High pressure water loop RVS-3 is operated in LVR-15 test research reactor. The loop was designed as a universal facility providing wide experimental possibilities. Loop is designed for 16.7 MPa pressure, 334 C temperature, 10 t/hour water flow rate and 1.10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1} neutron flux. Water chemistry used corresponds the PWRs with boric acid and pH control by potassium/lithium, hydrogen control by gas or ammonia. BWR loop is designed for investigation of structural materials and Water chemistry in conditions of boiling water power reactors.

  13. Structure and mechanics of interfaces in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelat, Francois; Yin, Zhen; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-04-01

    Hard biological materials — for example, seashells, bone or wood — fulfil critical structural functions and display unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, owing to their intricate architectures, which are organized over several length scales. The size, shape and arrangement of the ‘building blocks’ of which these materials are made are essential for defining their properties and their exceptional performance, but there is growing evidence that their deformation and toughness are also largely governed by the interfaces that join these building blocks. These interfaces channel nonlinear deformations and deflect cracks into configurations in which propagation is more difficult. In this Review, we discuss comparatively the composition, structure and mechanics of a set of representative biological interfaces in nacre, bone and wood, and show that these interfaces possess unusual mechanical characteristics, which can encourage the development of advanced bioinspired composites. Finally, we highlight recent examples of synthetic materials inspired from the mechanics and architecture of natural interfaces.

  14. Some Recent Advances of Ultrasonic Diagnostic Methods Applied to Materials and Structures (Including Biological Ones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    This paper gives an overview of some recent advances of ultrasonic methods applied to materials and structures (including biological ones), exploring typical applications of these emerging inspection technologies to civil engineering and medicine. In confirmation of this trend, some results of an experimental research carried out involving both destructive and non-destructive testing methods for the evaluation of structural performance of existing reinforced concrete (RC) structures are discussed in terms of reliability. As a result, Ultrasonic testing can usefully supplement coring thus permitting less expensive and more representative evaluation of the concrete strength throughout the whole structure under examination.

  15. Fabricating Composite-Material Structures Containing SMA Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Lach, Cynthia L.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of designing and fabricating laminated composite-material (matrix/fiber) structures containing embedded shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators has been devised. Structures made by this method have repeatable, predictable properties, and fabrication processes can readily be automated. Such structures, denoted as shape-memory-alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, have been investigated for their potential to satisfy requirements to control the shapes or thermoelastic responses of themselves or of other structures into which they might be incorporated, or to control noise and vibrations. Much of the prior work on SMAHC structures has involved the use SMA wires embedded within matrices or within sleeves through parent structures. The disadvantages of using SMA wires as the embedded actuators include (1) complexity of fabrication procedures because of the relatively large numbers of actuators usually needed; (2) sensitivity to actuator/ matrix interface flaws because voids can be of significant size, relative to wires; (3) relatively high rates of breakage of actuators during curing of matrix materials because of sensitivity to stress concentrations at mechanical restraints; and (4) difficulty of achieving desirable overall volume fractions of SMA wires when trying to optimize the integration of the wires by placing them in selected layers only.

  16. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  17. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242293

  18. Basic materials and structures aspects for hypersonic transport vehicles (HTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheil, E.; Uhse, W.

    A Mach 5 transport design is used to illustrate structural concepts and criteria for materials selections and also key technologies that must be followed in the areas of computational methods, materials and construction methods. Aside from the primary criteria of low weight, low costs, and conceivable risks, a number of additional requirements must be met, including stiffness and strength, corrosion resistance, durability, and a construction adequate for inspection, maintenance and repair. Current aircraft construction requirements are significantly extended for hypersonic vehicles. Additional consideration is given to long-duration temperature resistance of the airframe structure, the integration of large-volume cryogenic fuel tanks, computational tools, structural design, polymer matrix composites, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

  19. Correlation of Local Structure and Electronic Properties of Glass Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Adelstein, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Wide band gap glasses such as silica and its derivatives are typically considered insulators. However, electronic transport in glasses can be important for certain applications, such as when used as the host material for a scintillator radiation detector. Here we explore the relationship between local structure in glass materials and the corresponding electronic properties of carrier transport and charge trapping. We present a novel analysis that decomposes the distribution of localized band tail states in terms of specific local structural features in the glass. Comparison of the structure-related transport properties of different glass compositions is given, using silica and sodium silicate as prototypes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Global Materials Structure Search with Chemically Motivated Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Panosetti, Chiara; Krautgasser, Konstantin; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2015-12-01

    Identification of relevant reaction pathways in ever more complex composite materials and nanostructures poses a central challenge to computational materials discovery. Efficient global structure search, tailored to identify chemically relevant intermediates, could provide the necessary first-principles atomistic insight to enable a rational process design. In this work we modify a common feature of global geometry optimization schemes by employing automatically generated collective curvilinear coordinates. The similarity of these coordinates to molecular vibrations enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures for covalently bound systems. In the application to hydrogenated Si clusters, we concomitantly observe a significantly increased efficiency in identifying low-energy structures and exploit it for an extensive sampling of potential products of silicon-cluster soft landing on Si(001) surfaces. PMID:26444084

  1. Novel cost controlled materials and processing for primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastin, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Textile laminates, developed a number of years ago, have recently been shown to be applicable to primary aircraft structures for both small and large components. Such structures have the potential to reduce acquisition costs but require advanced automated processing to keep costs controlled while verifying product reliability and assuring structural integrity, durability and affordable life-cycle costs. Recently, resin systems and graphite-reinforced woven shapes have been developed that have the potential for improved RTM processes for aircraft structures. Ciba-Geigy, Brochier Division has registered an RTM prepreg reinforcement called 'Injectex' that has shown effectivity for aircraft components. Other novel approaches discussed are thermotropic resins producing components by injection molding and ceramic polymers for long-duration hot structures. The potential of such materials and processing will be reviewed along with initial information/data available to date.

  2. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1994-12-31

    The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

  3. Research on Recent Processing Technologies for Functionally Graded Materials in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, C. C.; Song, S. X.; Zhou, Z. J.; Shen, W. P.; Du, J.; Cong, W. W.

    2008-02-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are attracting more and more attentions of materials scientists, because their composition, structures and properties vary gradually and continuously from one material to another along one or more direction, which satisfy the demands of the advanced materials. The studies on FGMs have been performed for nearly 20 years around the world. In China, the related research also has been carried out for more than 10 years and some notable progress is noted. This paper presents an overview on emerging technologies for FGMs in China, including ultra-high consolidation with graded sintering, spark plasma sintering (SPS), self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), thermal spraying, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, laser cladding and so on. In addition, various applications of these technologies are presented and some new technologies to the next level are also discussed.

  4. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  5. Advanced composite structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Advanced material concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kreisler S. Y.; Landis, Abraham L.; Chow, Andrea W.; Hamlin, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve acceptable performance and long-term durability at elevated temperatures (350 to 600 F) for high-speed transport systems, further improvements of the high-performance matrix materials will be necessary to achieve very long-term (60,000-120,000 service hours) retention of mechanical properties and damage tolerance. This report emphasizes isoimide modification as a complementary technique to semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN's) to achieve greater processibility, better curing dynamics, and possibly enhanced thermo-mechanical properties in composites. A key result is the demonstration of enhanced processibility of isoimide-modified linear and thermo-setting polyimide systems.

  6. Failure modes and materials design for biomechanical layer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan

    Ceramic materials are finding increasing usage in the area of biomechanical replacements---dental crowns, hip and bone implants, etc.---where strength, wear resistance, biocompatibility, chemical durability and even aesthetics are critical issues. Aesthetic ceramic crowns have been widely used in dentistry to replace damaged or missing teeth. However, the failure rates of ceramic crowns, especially all-ceramic crowns, can be 1%˜6% per year, which is not satisfactory to patients. The materials limitations and underlying fracture mechanisms of these prostheses are not well understood. In this thesis, fundamental fracture and damage mechanisms in model dental bilayer and trilayer structures are studied. Principle failure modes are identified from in situ experimentation and confirmed by fracture mechanics analysis. In bilayer structures of ceramic/polycarbonate (representative of ceramic crown/dentin structure), three major damage sources are identified: (i) top-surface cone cracks or (ii) quasiplasticity, dominating in thick ceramic bilayers; (iii) bottom-surface radial cracks, dominating in thin ceramic bilayers. Critical load P for each damage mode are measured in six dental ceramics: Y-TZP zirconia, glass-infiltrated zirconia and alumina (InCeram), glass-ceramic (Empress II), Porcelain (Mark II and Empress) bonded to polymer substrates, as a function of ceramic thickness d in the range of 100 mum to 10 mm. P is found independent of d for mode (i) and (ii), but has a d 2 relations for mode (iii)---bottom surface radial cracking. In trilayer structures of glass/core-ceramic/polycarbonate (representing veneer porcelain/core/dentin structures), three inner fracture origins are identified: radial cracks from the bottom surface in the (i) first and (ii) second layers; and (iii) quasiplasticity in core-ceramic layer. The role of relative veneer/core thickness, d1/d 2 and materials properties is investigated for three core materials with different modulus (114--270GPa

  7. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1991-10-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in user friendly'' aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

  8. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1991-10-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

  9. INFLEX: an inexpensive structure and materials flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogan, Ray E.

    1993-09-01

    The Inexpensive Structure and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX) validates new technologies for space that can reduce cost and improve the performance of future precision structure space programs. These technologies include advanced sensors, structural modeling, actuators, system identification, active control algorithms, health monitoring, passive damping, and advanced composites. The INFLEX payload consists of a 16-foot deployable structure, avionics, control system actuators, and structural sensors. The entire payload structure is hinged with the spacecraft bus and is controlled by an extendible strut. Sensors and proof-mass actuators are distributed on the structure to conduct dynamics and control experiments. Two video cameras (wide and narrow field of view) monitor deployment, assess structural status, and quantitatively monitor structural motion. The data acquisition Remote Units, located on each rib and the central tower, interface to the actuators and sensors mounted nearby. The payload processor is mounted on the thermally controlled bulkhead of the spacecraft bus, and communicates with the Remote Units and the spacecraft to control all experiment hardware.

  10. Composite material technology requirements for large precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, P. M.; Helms, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of dimensionally stable, precision composite structures has been recognized as a high risk technology driver in NASA's continuing large space structures research. Attempts are being made to understand the influences controlling thermal performance in such composites, and specifically in composite sandwich panels. The necessary tools for such composite panels' deployment, the experimental verification of analytical predictions, and the demonstration of technology in small scale hardware, are presently addressed.

  11. High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Olszta, Matthew J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion and cracking represent critical failure mechanisms for structural materials in many applications. Although a crack can often be seen with the unaided eye, higher resolution imaging techniques are required to understand the nature of the crack tips and underlying degradation processes. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) employ a suite of microscopy techniques and site-specific material sampling to analyze corrosion and crack structures, producing images and compositional analyses with near-atomic spatial resolution. The samples are cracked components removed from commercial light-water reactor service or laboratory samples tested in simulated reactor environments.

  12. Implementation Plan for the NASA Center of Excellence for Structures and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the implementation plans of the Center of Excellence (COE) for Structures and Materials. The plan documented herein is the result of an Agencywide planning activity led by the Office of the Center of Excellence for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The COE Leadership Team, with a representative from each NASA Field Center, was established to assist LaRC in fulfilling the responsibilities of the COE. The Leadership Team developed the plan presented in this report.

  13. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  14. Ferromagnetic materials in the zinc-blende structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, B.; Bergqvist, L.; Eriksson, O.

    2003-08-01

    New materials are currently sought for use in spintronics applications. Ferromagnetic materials with half metallic properties are valuable in this respect. Here we present the electronic structure and magnetic properties of binary compounds consisting of 3d transition metals and group V elements, viz., P, Sb, and As in the zinc-blende structure. We demonstrate that compounds of V, Cr, and Mn show half metallic behavior for appropriate lattice constants. By comparing the total energies in the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic structures, we have ascertained that the ferromagnetic phase is stable over the antiferromagnetic one. Of the different compounds studied, the Cr based systems exhibit the strongest interatomic exchange interactions, and are hence predicted to have the highest critical temperatures. Also, we predict that VAs under certain growth conditions should be a semiconducting ferromagnet. Moreover, critical temperatures of selected half metallic compounds have been estimated from mean field theory and Monte Carlo simulations using parameters obtained from a ab initio noncollinear, tight binding linearized muffin-tin orbital method. From a simple model, we calculate the reflectance from an ideal MnAs/InAs interface considering the band structures of MnAs and InAs. Finally, we present results on the relative stabilities of MnAs and CrSb compounds in the NiAs and zinc-blende structures, and suggest a parameter space in substrate lattice spacings for when the zinc-blende structure is expected to be stable.

  15. Fast Detection of Material Deformation through Structural Dissimilarity

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2015-10-29

    Designing materials that are resistant to extreme temperatures and brittleness relies on assessing structural dynamics of samples. Algorithms are critically important to characterize material deformation under stress conditions. Here, we report on our design of coarse-grain parallel algorithms for image quality assessment based on structural information and on crack detection of gigabyte-scale experimental datasets. We show how key steps can be decomposed into distinct processing flows, one based on structural similarity (SSIM) quality measure, and another on spectral content. These algorithms act upon image blocks that fit into memory, and can execute independently. We discuss the scientific relevance of the problem, key developments, and decomposition of complementary tasks into separate executions. We show how to apply SSIM to detect material degradation, and illustrate how this metric can be allied to spectral analysis for structure probing, while using tiled multi-resolution pyramids stored in HDF5 chunked multi-dimensional arrays. Results show that the proposed experimental data representation supports an average compression rate of 10X, and data compression scales linearly with the data size. We also illustrate how to correlate SSIM to crack formation, and how to use our numerical schemes to enable fast detection of deformation from 3D datasets evolving in time.

  16. The MEMIN Research Unit: New results from impact cratering experiments into geological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on performing hypervelocity impact experiments, analyzing experimental impact craters and modeling cratering rocesses in geological materials. The main goal of the MEMIN project is to comprehensively quantify impact processes by conducting stringently controlled experimental impact cratering campaigns on the mesoscale with a multidisciplinary analytical approach. As a unique feature we use two-stage light gas guns capable of producing impact craters in thedecimeter size-range in solid rocks that, in turn, allow detailed spatial analysis of petrophysical, structural, and geochemical changes in target rocks and ejecta.

  17. Computational structural mechanics methods research using an evolving framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Lotts, C. G.; Gillian, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers are being developed in a computational structural mechanics research activity sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center. These new methods are developed in an evolving framework and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the methods development environment is presented, and methods research areas are described. Selected application studies are also summarized.

  18. Interfacial structure in Telluride-based thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, Douglas L.

    2010-06-01

    Chalcogenide compounds based on the rocksalt and tetradymite structures possess good thermoelectric properties and are widely used in a variety of thermoelectric devices. Examples include PbTe and AgSbTe2, which have the rocksalt structure, and Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2Te3, which fall within the broad tetradymite-class of structures. These materials are also of interest for thermoelectric nanocomposites, where the aim is to improve thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by harnessing interfacial scattering processes (e.g., reducing the thermal conductivity by phonon scattering or enhancing the Seebeck coefficient by energy filtering). Understanding the phase stability and microstructural evolution within such materials is key to designing processing approaches for optimal thermoelectric performance and to predicting the long-term nanostructural stability of the materials. In this presentation, we discuss our work investigating relationships between interfacial structure and formation mechanisms in several telluride-based thermoelectric materials. We begin with a discussion of interfacial coherency and its special aspects at interfaces in telluride compounds based on the rocksalt and tetradymite structures. We compare perfectly coherent interfaces, such as the Bi2Te3 (0001) twin, with semi-coherent, misfitting interfaces. We next discuss the formal crystallographic analysis of interfacial defects in these systems and then apply this methodology to high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations of interfaces in the AgSbTe2/Sb2Te3 and PbTe/Sb2Te3 systems, focusing on interfaces vicinal to {l_brace}111{r_brace}/{l_brace}0001{r_brace}. Through this analysis, we identify a defect that can accomplish the rocksalt-to-tetradymite phase transformation through diffusive-glide motion along the interface.

  19. Fullerene-based materials research and development. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P A; Henderson, C C; Rohlfing, C M; Loy, D A; Assink, R A; Gillen, K T; Jacobs, S J; Dugger, M T

    1995-05-01

    The chemistry and physical properties of fullerenes, the third, molecular allotrope of carbon, have been studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Early computational work investigated the stability of fullerene isomers and oxides, which was followed by extensive work on hydrogenated fullerenes. Our work led to the first synthesis of a polymer containing C{sub 60} and the synthesis of the simplest hydrocarbon derivatives of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment ({plus_minus} 0.1 kcal/mol in the relative stability of isomers) has provided insight into the chemical nature of fullerenes and has yielded a sound basis for prediction of the structure of derivatized fullerenes. Such derivatives are the key to the preparation of fullerene-based materials.

  20. Understanding Thermal Behavior in Lens Processing of Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Hofmeister, W.H.; Nelson, D.V.; Robino, C.V.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.E.; Wert, M.J.

    1998-11-05

    In direct laser metal deposition technologies, such as the Laser (LENS) process, it is important to understand and control the Engineered Net Shaping thermal behavior during fabrication. With this control, components can be reliably fabricated with desired structural material properties. This talk will describe the use of contact and imaging techniques to monitor the thermal signature during LENS processing. Recent results show a direct correlation between thermal history and material properties, where the residual stress magnitude decreases as the laser power, and therefore thermal signature, increases. Development of an understanding of solidification behavior, residual stress, and microstructural evolution with respect to thermal behavior will be discussed.