Science.gov

Sample records for structural plasticity controlled

  1. Structural Plasticity Controlled by Calcium Based Correlation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Diesmann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Hebbian learning in cortical networks during development and adulthood relies on the presence of a mechanism to detect correlation between the presynaptic and the postsynaptic spiking activity. Recently, the calcium concentration in spines was experimentally shown to be a correlation sensitive signal with the necessary properties: it is confined to the spine volume, it depends on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials, and it is independent of the spine's location along the dendrite. NMDA receptors are a candidate mediator for the correlation dependent calcium signal. Here, we present a quantitative model of correlation detection in synapses based on the calcium influx through NMDA receptors under realistic conditions of irregular pre- and postsynaptic spiking activity with pairwise correlation. Our analytical framework captures the interaction of the learning rule and the correlation dynamics of the neurons. We find that a simple thresholding mechanism can act as a sensitive and reliable correlation detector at physiological firing rates. Furthermore, the mechanism is sensitive to correlation among afferent synapses by cooperation and competition. In our model this mechanism controls synapse formation and elimination. We explain how synapse elimination leads to firing rate homeostasis and show that the connectivity structure is shaped by the correlations between neighboring inputs. PMID:19129936

  2. Nogo-A controls structural plasticity at dendritic spines by rapidly modulating actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Yves; Fricke, Steffen; Kramer, Stella; Iobbi, Cristina; Wierenga, Corette J; Schwab, Martin E; Korte, Martin; Zagrebelsky, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Nogo-A and its receptors have been shown to control synaptic plasticity, including negatively regulating long-term potentiation (LTP) in the cortex and hippocampus at a fast time scale and restraining experience-dependent turnover of dendritic spines over days. However, the molecular mechanisms and the precise time course mediating these actions of Nogo-A are largely unexplored. Here we show that Nogo-A signaling in the adult nervous system rapidly modulates the spine actin cytoskeleton within minutes to control structural plasticity at dendritic spines of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Indeed, acute Nogo-A loss-of-function transiently increases F-actin stability and results in an increase in dendritic spine density and length. In addition, Nogo-A acutely restricts AMPAR insertion and mEPSC amplitude at hippocampal synaptic sites. These data indicate a crucial function of Nogo-A in modulating the very tight balance between plasticity and stability of the neuronal circuitry underlying learning processes and the ability to store long-term information in the mature CNS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26748478

  3. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Aaron D.; Omar, Mitchell H.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults. PMID:25368556

  4. Structural Plasticity and Hippocampal Function

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the mammalian brain that shows an impressive capacity for structural reorganization. Preexisting neural circuits undergo modifications in dendritic complexity and synapse number, and entirely novel neural connections are formed through the process of neurogenesis. These types of structural change were once thought to be restricted to development. However, it is now generally accepted that the hippocampus remains structurally plastic throughout life. This article reviews structural plasticity in the hippocampus over the lifespan, including how it is investigated experimentally. The modulation of structural plasticity by various experiential factors as well as the possible role it may have in hippocampal functions such as learning and memory, anxiety, and stress regulation are also considered. Although significant progress has been made in many of these areas, we highlight some of the outstanding issues that remain. PMID:19575621

  5. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  6. Plastic folding of buckling structures.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme; Coupeau, Christophe; Grilhé, Jean

    2007-07-27

    Atomic force microscopy observations of the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates have evidenced the buckling of the films and the formation of blister patterns undergoing plastic folding. The classical elastic buckling and plastic deformation of the films are analyzed in the framework of the Föppl-Von Kármán theory of thin plates introducing the notion of low-angle tilt boundaries and dislocation distributions to describe this folding effect. It is demonstrated that, in agreement with elementary plasticity of bent crystals, the presence of such tilt-boundaries results in the formation of buckling patterns of lower energy than "classical" elastic blisters. PMID:17678376

  7. Biochemical computation for spine structural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    The structural plasticity of dendritic spines is considered to be essential for various forms of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The process is mediated by a complex signaling network consisting of numerous species of molecules. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the biochemical signaling is regulated in a complicated manner due to geometrical restrictions from the unique morphology of the dendritic branches and spines. Recent advances in optical techniques have enabled the exploration of the spatiotemporal aspects of the signal regulations in spines and dendrites and have provided many insights into the principle of the biochemical computation that underlies spine structural plasticity. PMID:26139370

  8. Plastics as structural materials for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, G M

    1937-01-01

    The purpose here is to consider the mechanical characteristics of reinforced phenol-formaldehyde resin as related to its use as structural material for aircraft. Data and graphs that have appeared in the literature are reproduced to illustrate the comparative behavior of plastics and materials commonly used in aircraft construction. Materials are characterized as to density, static strength, modulus of elasticity, resistance to long-time loading, strength under repeated impact, energy absorption, corrosion resistance, and ease of fabrication.

  9. Differential patterns of functional and structural plasticity within and between inferior frontal gyri support training-induced improvements in inhibitory control proficiency.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Camille F; Mouthon, Michael; Draganski, Bogdan; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Spierer, Lucas

    2015-07-01

    Ample evidence indicates that inhibitory control (IC), a key executive component referring to the ability to suppress cognitive or motor processes, relies on a right-lateralized fronto-basal brain network. However, whether and how IC can be improved with training and the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms remains largely unresolved. We used functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to measure the effects of 2 weeks of training with a Go/NoGo task specifically designed to improve frontal top-down IC mechanisms. The training-induced behavioral improvements were accompanied by a decrease in neural activity to inhibition trials within the right pars opercularis and triangularis, and in the left pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyri. Analyses of changes in brain anatomy induced by the IC training revealed increases in grey matter volume in the right pars orbitalis and modulations of white matter microstructure in the right pars triangularis. The task-specificity of the effects of training was confirmed by an absence of change in neural activity to a control working memory task. Our combined anatomical and functional findings indicate that differential patterns of functional and structural plasticity between and within inferior frontal gyri enhanced the speed of top-down inhibition processes and in turn IC proficiency. The results suggest that training-based interventions might help overcoming the anatomic and functional deficits of inferior frontal gyri manifesting in inhibition-related clinical conditions. More generally, we demonstrate how multimodal neuroimaging investigations of training-induced neuroplasticity enable revealing novel anatomo-functional dissociations within frontal executive brain networks. PMID:25801718

  10. Ultrasonic monitoring and control in plastic manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Russell K.

    In the search for a simple, robust and noninvasive measurement, the use of sound is explored to monitor polymer processing. A new pulsed ultrasonic measurement is developed based on the absorption of ultrasonic energy (AUE) from the plastic. The signal proves to be computationally efficient, robust and simple to use. The sensitivity of the signal is demonstrated in an injection molding process. The AUE signal led to the investigation of continuous sound waves. Different configurations are surveyed. One such configuration is formed by placing a piezoelectric element normal to the cavity face. In this arrangement, standing waves within the mold develop. When tuned to the appropriate frequency; the waves constructively interfere, producing a mechanical resonance within the mold. This configuration is termed Ultrasonic Resonance Monitoring (URM). Plastic presence at the mold face is shown to change the URM signal. Definitions and terms are proposed to explain the concepts and components necessary to realize a URM system. The design of a URM transducer used to monitor the plastic state within the cavity of an injection molding process is presented. An experiment is conducted to study the effects of the plastic on the transducer. Changes in the injection molding parameters are shown to modify the URM profile. In an effort to explain and understand the URM signal, a continuous wave acoustic model is used to identify influential physical parameters. An experiment is conducted to measure the acoustic properties of the plastic during molding. Throughout the molding process, pulsed ultrasonic waveforms are collected while simultaneously measuring the impedance of the URM transducer. The acoustic 3 properties are extracted from the waveforms and used in the model to simulate the response of the URM transducer. Two examples are presented to show how the signal may be used to monitor and control the injection molding process. The first example predicts part weight using features

  11. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". PMID:26721596

  12. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  13. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  14. Hierarchical structure and physicochemical properties of plasticized chitosan.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingkai; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Carreau, Pierre J

    2014-04-14

    Plasticized chitosan with hierarchical structure, including multiple length scale structural units, was prepared by a "melt"-based method, that is, thermomechanical mixing, as opposed to the usual casting-evaporation procedure. Chitosan was successfully plasticized by thermomechanical mixing in the presence of concentrated lactic acid and glycerol using a batch mixer. Different plasticization formulations were compared in this study, in which concentrated lactic acid was used as protonation agent as well as plasticizer. The microstructure of thermomechanically plasticized chitosan was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. With increasing amount of additional plasticizers (glycerol or water), the crystallinity of the plasticized chitosan decreased from 63.7% for the original chitosan powder to almost zero for the sample plasticized with additional water. Salt linkage between lactic acid molecules and amino side chains of chitosan was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy: the lactic acid molecules expanded the space between the chitosan molecules of the crystalline phase. In the presence of other plasticizers (glycerol and water), various levels of structural units including an amorphous phase, nanofibrils, nanofibril clusters, and microfibers were produced under mechanical shear and thermal energy and identified for the first time. The thermal and thermomechanical properties of the plasticized chitosan were measured by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetric, and DMA. These properties were correlated with the different levels of microstructure, including multiple structural units. PMID:24564751

  15. The molecular interfacial structure and plasticizer migration behavior of "green" plasticized poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Li, Yaoxin; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2015-02-14

    Tributyl acetyl citrate (TBAC), a widely-used "green" plasticizer, has been extensively applied in products for daily use. In this paper, a variety of analytical tools including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), contact angle goniometry (CA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied together to investigate the molecular structures of TBAC plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and the migration behavior of TBAC from PVC-TBAC mixtures into water. We comprehensively examine the effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatments on the surface structures of PVC-TBAC thin films containing various bulk percentages of plasticizers and the leaching behavior of TBAC into water. It was found that TBAC is a relatively stable PVC plasticizer compared to traditional non-covalent plasticizers but is also surface active. Oxygen plasma treatment increased the hydrophilicity of TBAC-PVC surfaces, but did not enhance TBAC leaching. However, argon plasma treatment greatly enhanced the leaching of TBAC molecules from PVC plastics to water. Based on our observations, we believe that oxygen plasma treatment could be applied to TBAC plasticized PVC products to enhance surface hydrophilicity for improving the biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of PVC products. The structural information obtained in this study will ultimately facilitate a molecular level understanding of plasticized polymers, aiding in the design of PVC materials with improved properties. PMID:25579625

  16. Hebbian Wiring Plasticity Generates Efficient Network Structures for Robust Inference with Synaptic Weight Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Naoki; Fukai, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    In the adult mammalian cortex, a small fraction of spines are created and eliminated every day, and the resultant synaptic connection structure is highly nonrandom, even in local circuits. However, it remains unknown whether a particular synaptic connection structure is functionally advantageous in local circuits, and why creation and elimination of synaptic connections is necessary in addition to rich synaptic weight plasticity. To answer these questions, we studied an inference task model through theoretical and numerical analyses. We demonstrate that a robustly beneficial network structure naturally emerges by combining Hebbian-type synaptic weight plasticity and wiring plasticity. Especially in a sparsely connected network, wiring plasticity achieves reliable computation by enabling efficient information transmission. Furthermore, the proposed rule reproduces experimental observed correlation between spine dynamics and task performance. PMID:27303271

  17. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for mesoscale fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Robin R.; Schumann, Daniel L.

    1999-06-01

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors form the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  18. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  19. Structural features of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Scudino, S. Shakur Shahabi, H.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U.; Kaban, I.; Escher, B.; Eckert, J.; Vaughan, G. B. M.

    2015-01-19

    Spatially resolved strain maps of a plastically deformed bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been created by using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that plastic deformation creates a spatially heterogeneous atomic arrangement, consisting of strong compressive and tensile strain fields. In addition, significant shear strain is introduced in the samples. The analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the strain tensor indicates that considerable structural anisotropy occurs in both the magnitude and direction of the strain. These features are in contrast to the behavior observed in elastically deformed BMGs and represent a distinctive structural sign of plastic deformation in metallic glasses.

  20. A computer program for cyclic plasticity and structural fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computerized tool for the analysis of time independent cyclic plasticity structural response, life to crack initiation prediction, and crack growth rate prediction for metallic materials is described. Three analytical items are combined: the finite element method with its associated numerical techniques for idealization of the structural component, cyclic plasticity models for idealization of the material behavior, and damage accumulation criteria for the fatigue failure.

  1. Experience-dependent Structural Plasticity in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neuronal circuits. Synaptic plasticity can occur through changes in synaptic strength, as well as through the addition/removal of synapses. Two-photon microscopy, in combination with fluorescence labeling, offers a powerful tool to peek into the living brain and follow structural reorganization at individual synapses. Time-lapse imaging depicts a dynamic picture, in which experience-dependent plasticity of synaptic structures varies between different cortical regions and layers, as well as between neuronal subtypes. Recent studies have demonstrated that the formation and elimination of synaptic structures happens rapidly in a subpopulation of cortical neurons during various sensorimotor learning experiences, and that stabilized synaptic structures are associated with long-lasting memories for the task. Thus, circuit plasticity, mediated by structural remodeling, provides an underlying mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:21397343

  2. Perioperative Glycemic Control in Plastic Surgery: Review and Discussion of an Institutional Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dortch, John D; Eck, Dustin L; Ladlie, Beth; TerKonda, Sarvam P

    2016-07-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is a well-known risk factor for surgical morbidity such as wound healing, infection, and prolonged hospitalization. This association has been reported for a number of surgical subspecialties, including plastic surgery. Specialty-specific guidelines have become increasingly available in the literature. Currently, glucose management guidelines for plastic surgery are lacking. Recognizing that multiple approaches exist for perioperative glucose, protocol-based models provide the necessary structure and guidance for approaching glycemic control. In this article, we review the influence of diabetes on outcomes in plastic surgery patients and propose a practical approach to perioperative blood glucose management based on current Endocrine Society and Mayo Clinic institutional guidelines. PMID:27301370

  3. Structural and Functional Plasticity in the Maternal Brain Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana

    2016-09-01

    Parenting recruits a distributed network of brain structures (and neuromodulators) that coordinates caregiving responses attuned to the young's affect, needs, and developmental stage. Many of these structures and connections undergo significant structural and functional plasticity, mediated by the interplay between maternal hormones and social experience while the reciprocal relationship between the mother and her infant forms and develops. These alterations account for the remarkable behavioral plasticity of mothers. This review will examine the molecular and neurobiological modulation and plasticity through which parenting develops and adjusts in new mothers, primarily discussing recent findings in nonhuman animals. A better understanding of how parenting impacts the brain at the molecular, cellular, systems/network, and behavioral levels is likely to significantly contribute to novel strategies for treating postpartum neuropsychiatric disorders in new mothers, and critical for both the mother's physiological and mental health and the development and well-being of her young. PMID:27589496

  4. Structural Plasticity, Effectual Connectivity, and Memory in Cortex.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Andreas; Sommer, Friedrich T

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory is commonly attributed to the modification of synaptic strengths in neuronal networks. More recent experiments have also revealed a major role of structural plasticity including elimination and regeneration of synapses, growth and retraction of dendritic spines, and remodeling of axons and dendrites. Here we work out the idea that one likely function of structural plasticity is to increase "effectual connectivity" in order to improve the capacity of sparsely connected networks to store Hebbian cell assemblies that are supposed to represent memories. For this we define effectual connectivity as the fraction of synaptically linked neuron pairs within a cell assembly representing a memory. We show by theory and numerical simulation the close links between effectual connectivity and both information storage capacity of neural networks and effective connectivity as commonly employed in functional brain imaging and connectome analysis. Then, by applying our model to a recently proposed memory model, we can give improved estimates on the number of cell assemblies that can be stored in a cortical macrocolumn assuming realistic connectivity. Finally, we derive a simplified model of structural plasticity to enable large scale simulation of memory phenomena, and apply our model to link ongoing adult structural plasticity to recent behavioral data on the spacing effect of learning. PMID:27378861

  5. Structural Plasticity, Effectual Connectivity, and Memory in Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Andreas; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory is commonly attributed to the modification of synaptic strengths in neuronal networks. More recent experiments have also revealed a major role of structural plasticity including elimination and regeneration of synapses, growth and retraction of dendritic spines, and remodeling of axons and dendrites. Here we work out the idea that one likely function of structural plasticity is to increase “effectual connectivity” in order to improve the capacity of sparsely connected networks to store Hebbian cell assemblies that are supposed to represent memories. For this we define effectual connectivity as the fraction of synaptically linked neuron pairs within a cell assembly representing a memory. We show by theory and numerical simulation the close links between effectual connectivity and both information storage capacity of neural networks and effective connectivity as commonly employed in functional brain imaging and connectome analysis. Then, by applying our model to a recently proposed memory model, we can give improved estimates on the number of cell assemblies that can be stored in a cortical macrocolumn assuming realistic connectivity. Finally, we derive a simplified model of structural plasticity to enable large scale simulation of memory phenomena, and apply our model to link ongoing adult structural plasticity to recent behavioral data on the spacing effect of learning. PMID:27378861

  6. Plastic deformation enabled energy dissipation in a bionanowire structured armor.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoze; Yue, Yonghai; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-05-14

    It has been challenging to simultaneously achieve high strength and toughness in engineered materials because of the trade-off relation between the two distinct properties. Nature, however, has elegantly solved this problem. Seashells, commonly referred to as nature's armors, exhibit an unusual resilience against predatory attacks. In this letter, we report an unexpected phenomenon in a bionanowire structured armor-conch shell where the shell's basic building blocks, i.e., the third-order lamellae, exhibit an exceptional plasticity with a maximum strain of 0.7% upon mechanical loading. We attribute such a plastic deformation behavior to the lamella's unique nanoparticle-biopolymer architecture, in which the biopolymer mediates the rotation of aragonite nanoparticles in response to external attacks. We also found that electron beam irradiation facilitates the lamella's plasticity. These findings advance our understanding of seashell's energy dissipating strategy and provide new design guidelines for developing high performance bioinspired materials and sensors. PMID:24745628

  7. Unravelling the structural plasticity of stretched DNA under torsional constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Graeme A.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Regions of the genome are often held under torsional constraint. Nevertheless, the influence of such constraint on DNA-protein interactions during genome metabolism is still poorly understood. Here using a combined optical tweezers and fluorescence microscope, we quantify and explain how torsional constraint influences the structural stability of DNA under applied tension. We provide direct evidence that concomitant basepair melting and helical unwinding can occur in torsionally constrained DNA at forces >~50 pN. This striking result indicates that local changes in linking number can be absorbed by the rest of the DNA duplex. We also present compelling new evidence that an overwound DNA structure (likely P-DNA) is created (alongside underwound structures) at forces >~110 pN. These findings substantiate previous theoretical predictions and highlight a remarkable structural plasticity of torsionally constrained DNA. Such plasticity may be required in vivo to absorb local changes in linking number in DNA held under torsional constraint.

  8. Balance and stability of synaptic structures during synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Scheuss, Volker

    2014-04-16

    Subsynaptic structures such as bouton, active zone, postsynaptic density (PSD) and dendritic spine, are highly correlated in their dimensions and also correlate with synapse strength. Why this is so and how such correlations are maintained during synaptic plasticity remains poorly understood. We induced spine enlargement by two-photon glutamate uncaging and examined the relationship between spine, PSD, and bouton size by two-photon time-lapse imaging and electron microscopy. In enlarged spines the PSD-associated protein Homer1c increased rapidly, whereas the PSD protein PSD-95 increased with a delay and only in cases of persistent spine enlargement. In the case of nonpersistent spine enlargement, the PSD proteins remained unchanged or returned to their original level. The ultrastructure at persistently enlarged spines displayed matching dimensions of spine, PSD, and bouton, indicating their correlated enlargement. This supports a model in which balancing of synaptic structures is a hallmark for the stabilization of structural modifications during synaptic plasticity. PMID:24742464

  9. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  10. Paradoxical Signaling Regulates Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-02-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3-5 min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium-influx due to NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks and their role is to control both the activation and inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion including CaMKII, RhoA, and Cdc42 and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics.

  11. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  12. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  13. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  14. Thermal analyses for quality control of plastics, ceramics, and explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.R.; Garrod, M.J.; Whitaker, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal analyses are performed for production quality control (q.c.) and for surveillance at Mound on plastic, ceramic, explosive and pyrotechnic materials. For the weapons surveillance program, weapon components are disassembled after varying times in the field; thermal and other analyses are then performed on the component materials. The types of thermal analyses done include: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG), thermomechanical analysis (TMA), and high temperature TG/DTA. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Crack monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Bao, Tengfei; Chen, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used in structural health monitoring. Traditional silica fibers are easy to break in field applications due to their brittleness. Thus, silica fibers are proposed to be replaced by plastic optical fibers (POFs) in crack monitoring in this study. Moreover, considering the uncertainty of crack propagation direction in composite materials, the influence of the angles between fibers and cracks on the monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers is studied. A POF sensing device was designed and the relationship between light intensity loss and crack width under different fiber/crack angles was first measured through the device. Then, three-point bend tests were conducted on concrete beams. POFs were glued to the bottom surfaces of the beams and light intensity loss with crack width was measured. Experimental results showed that light intensity loss in plastic optical fibers increased with crack width increase. Therefore, application of plastic optical fibers in crack monitoring is feasible. Moreover, the results also showed that the sensitivity of the POF crack sensor decreased with the increase of angles between fibers and cracks.

  16. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  17. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  18. Technology and future prospects for lightweight plastic vehicle structures

    SciTech Connect

    Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.M.; Bonsignore, P.V.

    1997-08-01

    The state of the technology and the materials and processing issues of using plastics in vehicle body applications (structural and semistructural) were assessed. Plastics are significantly lighter in weight, more easily fabricated into complex shapes, and more corrosion resistance than sheet steel, high-strength steel, or aluminum. However, at their current stage of development, plastics are deficient in one or more necessary properties: heat resistance and dimensional stability, stiffness and tensile strength, toughness, and impact resistance. To upgrade their physical properties for automotive chassis/body applications, plastics need to be compounds with suitable reinforcing fibers. As a short-term approach, the material of choice is a composite structure made with low-cost glass-fiber reinforcement, such as that made in the resin-transfer-molding (RTM) process and used in the body of the Dodge Viper. However, RTM technology based on thermosets requires a processing cycle time that is too long for large production runs. Adaptation of RTM to the formation of thermoplastic composite bodies could have a significant advantage over thermoset technology. Cyclic oligomers, which are precursors to thermoplastic matrix polymers, show promise for this application. Farther on the horizon are advanced composites compounds with the much more expensive (but stronger and stiffer) carbon-fiber reinforcement. However, significant price reductions of precursor materials and advances in processing and fabrication would be needed. Other materials holding promise are liquid crystal polymers (LCP) and LCP blends with other polymers (molecular composites). However, the cost of monomers and the subsequent polymerization technology also remains a considerable drawback to the widespread and increasing acceptance of LCPs.

  19. Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Hoit, Jeannette; Kent, Raymond; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Shrivastav, Rahul; Strand, Edythe; Yorkston, Kathryn; Sapienza, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders. Method A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms involved in neural plasticity and discusses possible similarities and differences for application to speech motor control disorders. The possible involvement of neural plasticity in changes in speech production in normalcy, development, aging, and neurological diseases and disorders was considered. This report focuses on the appropriate use of functional and structural neuroimaging and the design of feasibility studies aimed at understanding how brain mechanisms are altered by environmental manipulations such as training and stimulation and how these changes might enhance the future development of rehabilitative methods for persons with speech motor control disorders. Conclusions Increased collaboration with neuroscientists working in clinical research centers addressing human communication disorders might foster research in this area. It is hoped that this paper will encourage future research on speech motor control disorders to address the principles of neural plasticity and their application for rehabilitation. PMID:18230849

  20. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  1. Features of the plastic deformation of steels with lamellar perlite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, A. A.; Tushinskii, L. I.; Bataev, V. A.; Zuev, L. B.

    1996-07-01

    The evolution of the perlite structure in the course of plastic deformation of U8 and St70 steels has been studied. With increasing degree of cold working, the dislocation density increases near the interphase boundary in the ferrite interstices of perlite, which forms a dislocational “fringe”, which in turn forms a pseudocellular structure. Under thermal deformation conditions, a subgrain structure arises in the ferrite interstices of lamellar perlite. The most dangerous localized flow channels in which plasticity is exhausted for the first time and cracks appear, are the deformation bands. The narrower the deformation bands and the larger the value of the relative displacement of the subcolumn blocks adjacent to them, the more dangerous they are with regard to failure. The features revealed in the development of deformation and failure provides a basis for controlling steel treatment regimes in order to produce perlite with the optimum structural parameters.

  2. Unravelling the structural plasticity of stretched DNA under torsional constraint.

    PubMed

    King, Graeme A; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2016-01-01

    Regions of the genome are often held under torsional constraint. Nevertheless, the influence of such constraint on DNA-protein interactions during genome metabolism is still poorly understood. Here using a combined optical tweezers and fluorescence microscope, we quantify and explain how torsional constraint influences the structural stability of DNA under applied tension. We provide direct evidence that concomitant basepair melting and helical unwinding can occur in torsionally constrained DNA at forces >∼50 pN. This striking result indicates that local changes in linking number can be absorbed by the rest of the DNA duplex. We also present compelling new evidence that an overwound DNA structure (likely P-DNA) is created (alongside underwound structures) at forces >∼110 pN. These findings substantiate previous theoretical predictions and highlight a remarkable structural plasticity of torsionally constrained DNA. Such plasticity may be required in vivo to absorb local changes in linking number in DNA held under torsional constraint. PMID:27263853

  3. Unravelling the structural plasticity of stretched DNA under torsional constraint

    PubMed Central

    King, Graeme A.; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Regions of the genome are often held under torsional constraint. Nevertheless, the influence of such constraint on DNA–protein interactions during genome metabolism is still poorly understood. Here using a combined optical tweezers and fluorescence microscope, we quantify and explain how torsional constraint influences the structural stability of DNA under applied tension. We provide direct evidence that concomitant basepair melting and helical unwinding can occur in torsionally constrained DNA at forces >∼50 pN. This striking result indicates that local changes in linking number can be absorbed by the rest of the DNA duplex. We also present compelling new evidence that an overwound DNA structure (likely P-DNA) is created (alongside underwound structures) at forces >∼110 pN. These findings substantiate previous theoretical predictions and highlight a remarkable structural plasticity of torsionally constrained DNA. Such plasticity may be required in vivo to absorb local changes in linking number in DNA held under torsional constraint. PMID:27263853

  4. Plastic optical fibre sensor for quality control in food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo, C.; Bilro, L.; Ferreira, R.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Leitão, C.; Nogueira, R.; Pinto, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The present work addresses the need for new devices felt in the context of quality control, especially in the food industry. Due to the spectral dependence of the attenuation coefficient, a novel dual-parameter sensor for colour and refractive index was developed and tested. The sensor employs plastic optical fibres to measure the transmitted optical power in three measurement cells each with a different incident wavelength. The performance of the sensor was tested using several dyes at different concentrations and aqueous solutions of glycerine and ethanol. Results show that this technique allows the monitoring of refractive index and colour without cross-sensitivity.

  5. An Improved Plasticity-Based Distortion Analysis Method for Large Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Athreya, Badrinarayan P.

    2013-05-01

    The plasticity-based distortion prediction method was improved to address the computationally intensive nature of welding simulations. Plastic strains, which are typically first computed using either two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) thermo-elastic-plastic analysis (EPA) on finite element models of simple weld geometry, are mapped to the full structure finite element model to predict distortion by conducting a linear elastic analysis. To optimize welding sequence to control distortion, a new theory was developed to consider the effect of weld interactions on plastic strains. This improved method was validated with experimental work on a Tee joint and tested on two large-scale welded structures—a light fabrication and a heavy fabrication—by comparing against full-blown distortion predictions using thermo-EPA. 3D solid and shell models were used for the heavy and light fabrications, respectively, to compute plastic strains due to each weld. Quantitative comparisons between this method and thermo-EPA indicate that this method can predict distortions fairly accurately—even for different welding sequences—and is roughly 1-2 orders of magnitude faster. It was concluded from these findings that, with further technical development, this method can be an ideal solver for optimizing welding sequences.

  6. Formation and subdivision of deformation structures during plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Bo; Poulsen, Henning F; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Shastri, Sarvjit D; Sørensen, Henning O; Gundlach, Carsten; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2006-05-12

    During plastic deformation of metals and alloys, dislocations arrange in ordered patterns. How and when these self-organization processes take place have remained elusive, because in situ observations have not been feasible. We present an x-ray diffraction method that provided data on the dynamics of individual, deeply embedded dislocation structures. During tensile deformation of pure copper, dislocation-free regions were identified. They showed an unexpected intermittent dynamics, for example, appearing and disappearing with proceeding deformation and even displaying transient splitting behavior. Insight into these processes is relevant for an understanding of the strength and work-hardening of deformed materials. PMID:16690859

  7. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  8. Highly Specific Structural Plasticity of Inhibitory Circuits in the Adult Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry L.; Nedivi, Elly

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons are known to play a vital role in defining the window for critical period plasticity during development, and it is increasingly apparent that they continue to exert powerful control over experience-dependent cortical plasticity in adulthood. Recent in vivo imaging studies demonstrate that long-term plasticity of inhibitory circuits is manifested at an anatomical level. Changes in sensory experience drive structural remodeling in inhibitory interneurons in a cell-type and circuit-specific manner. Inhibitory synapse formation and elimination can occur with a great deal of spatial and temporal precision and are locally coordinated with excitatory synaptic changes on the same neuron.We suggest that the specificity of inhibitory synapse dynamics may serve to differentially modulate activity across the dendritic arbor, to selectively tune parts of a local circuit, or potentially discriminate between activities in distinct local circuits. We further review evidence suggesting that inhibitory circuit structural changes instruct excitatory/inhibitory balance while enabling functional reorganization to occur through Hebbian forms of plasticity. PMID:23474602

  9. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. PMID:25589230

  10. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Spierer, Lucas; Chavan, Camille F.; Manuel, Aurelie L.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may follow either from the development of automatic forms of inhibition or from the strengthening of top-down, controlled inhibition. Automatic inhibition develops in conditions of consistent and repeated associations between inhibition-triggering stimuli and stopping goals. Once established, the stop signals directly elicit inhibition, thereby bypassing slow, top-down executive control and accelerating stopping processes. In contrast, training regimens involving varying stimulus-response associations or frequent inhibition failures prevent the development of automatic inhibition and thus strengthen top-down inhibitory processes rather than bottom-up ones. We discuss these findings in terms of developing optimal inhibitory control training regimens for rehabilitation purposes. PMID:23914169

  11. Biomechanical control of vocal plasticity in an echolocating bat.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    Many animal species adjust the spectral composition of their acoustic signals to variable environments. However, the physiological foundation of such spectral plasticity is often unclear. The source-filter theory of sound production, initially established for human speech, applies to vocalizations in birds and mammals. According to this theory, adjusting the spectral structure of vocalizations could be achieved by modifying either the laryngeal/syringeal source signal or the vocal tract, which filters the source signal. Here, we show that in pale spear-nosed bats, spectral plasticity induced by moderate level background noise is dominated by the vocal tract rather than the laryngeal source signal. Specifically, we found that with increasing background noise levels, bats consistently decreased the spectral centroid of their echolocation calls up to 3.2 kHz, together with other spectral parameters. In contrast, noise-induced changes in fundamental frequency were small (maximally 0.1 kHz) and were inconsistent across individuals. Changes in spectral centroid did not correlate with changes in fundamental frequency, whereas they correlated negatively with changes in call amplitude. Furthermore, while bats consistently increased call amplitude with increasing noise levels (the Lombard effect), increases in call amplitude typically did not lead to increases in fundamental frequency. In summary, our results suggest that at least to a certain degree echolocating bats are capable of adjusting call amplitude, fundamental frequency and spectral parameters independently. PMID:26823102

  12. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-02-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  13. SPARC Controls Melanoma Cell Plasticity through Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Edgardo; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Rivas Baquero, Elvia; Lutzky, Viviana P.; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell transition to a more aggressive mesenchymal-like phenotype is a hallmark of cancer progression that involves different steps and requires tightly regulated cell plasticity. SPARC (Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine) is a matricellular protein that promotes this transition in various malignant cell types, including melanoma cells. We found that suppression of SPARC expression in human melanoma cells compromised cell migration, adhesion, cytoskeleton structure, and cell size. These changes involved the Akt/mTOR pathway. Re-expression of SPARC or protein addition restored all the cell features. Suppression of SPARC expression was associated with increased Rac1-GTP levels and its membrane localization. Expression of the dominant negative mutant of Rac1 counteracted almost all the changes observed in SPARC-deficient cells. Overall, these data suggest that most of the SPARC-mediated effects occurred mainly through the blockade of Rac1 activity. PMID:26248315

  14. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  15. Implementation of elastic-plastic structural analysis into NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, A.; Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    Elastic-plastic analytic capabilities were incorporated into the NASTRAN program. The present implementation includes a general rigid format and additional bulk data cards as well as to two new modules. The modules are specialized to include only perfect plasticity of the CTRMEN and CROD elements but can easily be expanded to include other plasticity theories and elements. The practical problem of an elastic-plastic analysis of a ship's bracket connection is demonstrated and compared to an equivalent analysis using Grumman's PLANS program. The present work demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating general elastic-plastic capabilities into NASTRAN.

  16. Membrane-derived phospholipids control synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  17. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  18. Structural Plasticity in Human Heterochromatin Protein 1β

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Francesca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Xiang, Shengqi; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-01-01

    As essential components of the molecular machine assembling heterochromatin in eukaryotes, HP1 (Heterochromatin Protein 1) proteins are key regulators of genome function. While several high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1, chromo and chromoshadow domains, in their free form or in complex with recognition-motif peptides are available, less is known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy in combination with small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering to characterize the dynamic and structural properties of full-length human HP1β (hHP1β) in solution. We show that the hinge region is highly flexible and enables a largely unrestricted spatial search by the two globular domains for their binding partners. In addition, the binding pockets within the chromo and chromoshadow domains experience internal dynamics that can be useful for the versatile recognition of different binding partners. In particular, we provide evidence for the presence of a distinct structural propensity in free hHP1β that prepares a binding-competent interface for the formation of the intermolecular β-sheet with methylated histone H3. The structural plasticity of hHP1β supports its ability to bind and connect a wide variety of binding partners in epigenetic processes. PMID:23585859

  19. Control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements for future space missions indicate that many of these spacecraft will be large, flexible, and in some applications, require precision geometries. A technology program that addresses the issues associated with the structure/control interactions for these classes of spacecraft is discussed. The goal of the NASA control of flexible structures technology program is to generate a technology data base that will provide the designer with options and approaches to achieve spacecraft performance such as maintaining geometry and/or suppressing undesired spacecraft dynamics. This technology program will define the appropriate combination of analysis, ground testing, and flight testing required to validate the structural/controls analysis and design tools. This work was motivated by a recognition that large minimum weight space structures will be required for many future missions. The tools necessary to support such design included: (1) improved structural analysis; (2) modern control theory; (3) advanced modeling techniques; (4) system identification; and (5) the integration of structures and controls.

  20. Network Structures Arising from Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Baktash

    Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), a widespread synaptic modification mechanism, is sensitive to correlations between presynaptic spike trains, and organizes neural circuits in functionally useful ways. In this dissertation, I study the structures arising from STDP in a population of synapses with an emphasis on the interplay between synaptic stability and Hebbian competition, explained in Chapter 1. Starting from the simplest description of STDP which relates synaptic modification to the intervals between pairs of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, I show in Chapter 2 that stability and Hebbian competition are incompatible in this class of "pair-based" STDP models, either when hard bounds or soft bounds are imposed to the synapses. In chapter 3, I propose an alternative biophysically inspired method for imposing bounds to synapses, i.e. introducing a small temporal shift in the STDP window. Shifted STDP overcomes the incompatibility of synaptic stability and competition and can implement both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian forms of competitive plasticity. In light of experiments the explored a variety of spike patterns, STDP models have been augmented to account for interactions between multiple pre- and postsynaptic action potentials. In chapter 4, I study the stability/competition interplay in three different proposed multi-spike models of STDP. I show that the "triplet model" leads to a partially steady-state distribution of synaptic weights and induces Hebbian competition. The "suppression model" develops a stable distribution of weights when the average weight is high and shows predominantly anti-Hebbian competition. The "NMDAR-based" model can lead to either stable or partially stable synaptic weight distribution and exhibits both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian competition, depending on the parameters. I conclude that multi-spike STDP models can produce radically different effects at the population level depending on how they implement multi-spike interactions

  1. Plastic covering on airfoil structure provides smooth uninterrupted surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Heffernam, J. T.; Lee, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    Primed surface is covered with adhesive. Sheet of plastic film is stretched over adhesive and mechanical holder is used to apply tension to ends of sheet to make it conform to surface of airfoil. After adhesive cures, plastic can be trimmed with sharp cutting tool.

  2. Structural control interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Winder, S. W.; Worley, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The basic guidance and control concepts that lead to structural control interaction and structural dynamic loads are identified. Space vehicle ascent flight load sources and the load relieving mechanism are discussed, along with the the characteristics and special problems of both present and future space vehicles including launch vehicles, orbiting vehicles, and the Space Shuttle flyback vehicle. The special dynamics and control analyses and test problems apparent at this time are summarized.

  3. Synaptic competition in structural plasticity and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Ramiro-Cortés, Yazmín; Hobbiss, Anna F.; Israely, Inbal

    2014-01-01

    Connections between neurons can undergo long-lasting changes in synaptic strength correlating with changes in structure. These events require the synthesis of new proteins, the availability of which can lead to cooperative and competitive interactions between synapses for the expression of plasticity. These processes can occur over limited spatial distances and temporal periods, defining dendritic regions over which activity may be integrated and could lead to the physical rewiring of synapses into functional groups. Such clustering of inputs may increase the computational power of neurons by allowing information to be combined in a greater than additive manner. The availability of new proteins may be a key modulatory step towards activity-dependent, long-term growth or elimination of spines necessary for remodelling of connections. Thus, the aberrant growth or shrinkage of dendritic spines could occur if protein levels are misregulated. Indeed, such perturbations can be seen in several mental retardation disorders, wherein either too much or too little protein translation exists, matching an observed increase or decrease in spine density, respectively. Cellular events which alter protein availability could relieve a constraint on synaptic competition and disturb synaptic clustering mechanisms. These changes may be detrimental to modifications in neural circuitry following activity. PMID:24298158

  4. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  5. Controls for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  6. Recent progress in safety evaluation studies on plasticizers and plastics and their controlled use in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Y

    1976-01-01

    Recent experimental studies in Japan on the evaluation of potential health hazards from phthalate esters used in manufacturing poly (vinyl chloride) as well as several plastics for medical devices and for food containers and packages were introduced. Development of pulmonary granuloma formation after intravenous injection of diethylhexyl phthalate was assumed to be dependent on the particle size of the phthalate in vehicle used. Dietary administration of large amount of diethylhexyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate produced renal cysts in mothers and in descendants in reproduction studies in mice. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of the phthalates and several plastics and resins were also examined by in vivo and in vitro studies. Hematological parameters examined in rabbits after repeated intravenous injection of diethylhexyl phthalate and after implantation of plastics in aorta for 3--6 months did not show any significant change. A slow decrease of radioactivity was observed in adipose tissue of rats following oral administration of 14C-labeled diethylhexyl phthalate. tthe administrative action on phthalates by the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare is briefly reviewed. PMID:1026406

  7. Dendritic structural plasticity in the basolateral amygdala after fear conditioning and its extinction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Stephen C.; Leite-Morris, Kimberly A.; Guy, Marsha D.; Goldberg, Lisa R.; Young, Angela J.; Kaplan, Gary B.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that morphology and arborization of dendritic spines change as a result of fear conditioning in cortical and subcortical brain regions. This study uniquely aims to delineate these structural changes in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) after both fear conditioning and fear extinction. C57BL/6 mice acquired robust conditioned fear responses (70–80% cued freezing behavior) after six pairings with a tone cue associated with footshock in comparison to unshocked controls. During fear acquisition, freezing behavior was significantly affected by both shock exposure and trial number. For fear extinction, mice were exposed to the conditioned stimulus tone in the absence of shock administration and behavioral responses significantly varied by shock treatment. In the retention tests over 3 weeks, the percentage time spent freezing varied with the factor of extinction training. In all treatment groups, alterations in dendritic plasticity were analyzed using Golgi–Cox staining of dendrites in the BLA. Spine density differed between the fear conditioned group and both the fear extinction and control groups on third order dendrites. Spine density was significantly increased in the fear conditioned group compared to the fear extinction group and controls. Similarly in Sholl analyses, fear conditioning significantly increased BLA spine numbers and dendritic intersections while subsequent extinction training reversed these effects. In summary, fear extinction produced enduring behavioral plasticity that is associated with a reversal of alterations in BLA dendritic plasticity produced by fear conditioning. These neuroplasticity findings can inform our understanding of structural mechanisms underlying stress-related pathology can inform treatment research into these disorders. PMID:23570859

  8. Voluntary Exercise Induces Astrocytic Structural Plasticity in the Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Shinjo, Takeaki; Terada, Yuki; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Changes in astrocyte morphology are primarily attributed to the fine processes where intimate connections with neurons form the tripartite synapse and participate in neurotransmission. Recent evidence has shown that neurotransmission induces dynamic synaptic remodeling, suggesting that astrocytic fine processes may adapt their morphologies to the activity in their environment. To illustrate such a neuron-glia relationship in morphological detail, we employed a double transgenic Olig2CreER/WT; ROSA26-GAP43-EGFP mice, in which Olig2-lineage cells can be visualized and traced with membrane-targeted GFP. Although Olig2-lineage cells in the adult brain usually become mature oligodendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells with NG2-proteoglycan expression, we found a population of Olig2-lineage astrocytes with bushy morphology in several brain regions. The globus pallidus (GP) preferentially contains Olig2-lineage astrocytes. Since the GP exerts pivotal motor functions in the indirect pathway of the basal ganglionic circuit, we subjected the double transgenic mice to voluntary wheel running to activate the GP and examined morphological changes of Olig2-lineage astrocytes at both the light and electron microscopic levels. The double transgenic mice were divided into three groups: control group mice were kept in a cage with a locked running wheel for 3 weeks, Runner group were allowed free access to a running wheel for 3 weeks, and the Runner-Rest group took a sedentary 3-week rest after a 3-week running period. GFP immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that astrocytic fine processes elaborated complex arborization in the Runner mice, and reverted to simple morphology comparable to that of the Control group in the Runner-Rest group. Our results indicated that the fine processes of the Olig2-lineage astrocytes underwent plastic changes that correlated with overall running activities, suggesting that they actively participate in motor

  9. Voluntary Exercise Induces Astrocytic Structural Plasticity in the Globus Pallidus.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Shinjo, Takeaki; Terada, Yuki; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Changes in astrocyte morphology are primarily attributed to the fine processes where intimate connections with neurons form the tripartite synapse and participate in neurotransmission. Recent evidence has shown that neurotransmission induces dynamic synaptic remodeling, suggesting that astrocytic fine processes may adapt their morphologies to the activity in their environment. To illustrate such a neuron-glia relationship in morphological detail, we employed a double transgenic Olig2(CreER/WT); ROSA26-GAP43-EGFP mice, in which Olig2-lineage cells can be visualized and traced with membrane-targeted GFP. Although Olig2-lineage cells in the adult brain usually become mature oligodendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells with NG2-proteoglycan expression, we found a population of Olig2-lineage astrocytes with bushy morphology in several brain regions. The globus pallidus (GP) preferentially contains Olig2-lineage astrocytes. Since the GP exerts pivotal motor functions in the indirect pathway of the basal ganglionic circuit, we subjected the double transgenic mice to voluntary wheel running to activate the GP and examined morphological changes of Olig2-lineage astrocytes at both the light and electron microscopic levels. The double transgenic mice were divided into three groups: control group mice were kept in a cage with a locked running wheel for 3 weeks, Runner group were allowed free access to a running wheel for 3 weeks, and the Runner-Rest group took a sedentary 3-week rest after a 3-week running period. GFP immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that astrocytic fine processes elaborated complex arborization in the Runner mice, and reverted to simple morphology comparable to that of the Control group in the Runner-Rest group. Our results indicated that the fine processes of the Olig2-lineage astrocytes underwent plastic changes that correlated with overall running activities, suggesting that they actively participate in motor

  10. The influence of plasticizers on the release of theophylline from microporous-controlled tablets.

    PubMed

    Lin, W J; Lee, H K; Wang, D M

    2004-10-19

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of plasticizer on the release of theophylline from microporous-controlled tablets. Three plasticizers, acetyltributyl citrate (ATBC), castor oil, and triacetin, were included in this study. These plasticizers reduced the crystallinity of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-blended films, and the most prominent change of enthalpy of fusion was the film plasticized by triacetin. This might be due to triacetin penetrating into both PCL and PEG domains. However, the lipophilic property of castor oil only allowed it to alter the crystallization of hydrophobic PCL domain. The Young's modulus and the tensile strength of films showed a decreased tendency while increasing the amount of plasticizer. The change of elongation of plasticized blended films was irregular and was dependent of the type of plasticizer. The size of micropores formed in the presence of plasticizer was larger than those micropores formed in its absence. The fatty plasticizer, castor oil, altered the thermal and mechanical performance and pore size of films via soluble in PCL domain, which resulted in the release of theophylline from castor oil plasticized-coated tablets, which in turn enhanced and closed to a constant release pattern. PMID:15451599

  11. Early depolarizing GABA controls critical period plasticity in the rat visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Deidda, Gabriele; Allegra, Manuela; Cerri, Chiara; Naskar, Shovan; Bony, Guillaume; Zunino, Giulia; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Cancedda, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hyperpolarizing and inhibitory GABA regulates “critical periods” for plasticity in sensory cortices. Here, we examine the role of early, depolarizing GABA in controlling plasticity mechanisms. We report that brief interference with depolarizing GABA during early development prolonged critical period plasticity in visual cortical circuits, without affecting overall development of the visual system. The effects on plasticity were accompanied by dampened inhibitory neurotransmission, down-regulation of BDNF expression, and reduced density of extracellular matrix-perineuronal nets. Early interference with depolarizing GABA decreased perinatal BDNF signaling, and pharmacological increase of BDNF signaling during GABA interference rescued the effects on plasticity and its regulators later in life. We conclude that depolarizing GABA exerts a long-lasting, selective modulation of plasticity of cortical circuits by a strong crosstalk with BDNF. PMID:25485756

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Structurally-Graded Materials Using Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Models and Continuum Crystal Plasticity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology that combines the predictive capability of discrete dislocation plasticity and the computational efficiency of continuum crystal plasticity is developed. Single crystal configurations of different grain sizes modeled with periodic boundary conditions are analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity (DD) to obtain grain size-dependent stress-strain predictions. These relationships are mapped into crystal plasticity parameters to develop a multiscale DD/CP model for continuum level simulations. A polycrystal model of a structurally-graded microstructure is developed, analyzed and used as a benchmark for comparison between the multiscale DD/CP model and the DD predictions. The multiscale DD/CP model follows the DD predictions closely up to an initial peak stress and then follows a strain hardening path that is parallel but somewhat offset from the DD predictions. The difference is believed to be from a combination of the strain rate in the DD simulation and the inability of the DD/CP model to represent non-monotonic material response.

  13. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Schumann, D L

    1998-12-29

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors from the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  14. Brain functional plasticity associated with the emergence of expertise in extreme language control.

    PubMed

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Moser-Mercer, Barbara; Golestani, Narly

    2015-07-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to longitudinally examine brain plasticity arising from long-term, intensive simultaneous interpretation training. Simultaneous interpretation is a bilingual task with heavy executive control demands. We compared brain responses observed during simultaneous interpretation with those observed during simultaneous speech repetition (shadowing) in a group of trainee simultaneous interpreters, at the beginning and at the end of their professional training program. Age, sex and language-proficiency matched controls were scanned at similar intervals. Using multivariate pattern classification, we found distributed patterns of changes in functional responses from the first to second scan that distinguished the interpreters from the controls. We also found reduced recruitment of the right caudate nucleus during simultaneous interpretation as a result of training. Such practice-related change is consistent with decreased demands on multilingual language control as the task becomes more automatized with practice. These results demonstrate the impact of simultaneous interpretation training on the brain functional response in a cerebral structure that is not specifically linguistic, but that is known to be involved in learning, in motor control, and in a variety of domain-general executive functions. Along with results of recent studies showing functional and structural adaptations in the caudate nuclei of experts in a broad range of domains, our results underline the importance of this structure as a central node in expertise-related networks. PMID:25869858

  15. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  16. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  17. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  18. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y M; Zeng, J F; Wang, S; Sun, B A; Wang, Q; Lu, J; Gravier, S; Bladin, J J; Wang, W H; Pan, M X; Liu, C T; Yang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3-0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  19. Reliability and Plasticity of Response Inhibition and Interference Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wostmann, Nicola M.; Aichert, Desiree S.; Costa, Anna; Rubia, Katya; Moller, Hans-Jurgen; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the internal reliability, temporal stability and plasticity of commonly used measures of inhibition-related functions. Stop-signal, go/no-go, antisaccade, Simon, Eriksen flanker, Stroop and Continuous Performance tasks were administered twice to 23 healthy participants over a period of approximately 11 weeks in order to…

  20. Structural-chemical modeling of transition of coals to the plastic state

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; S.G. Gagarin

    2007-02-15

    The structural-chemical simulation of the formation of plastic state during the thermal treatment (pyrolysis, coking) of coals is based on allowance for intermolecular interactions in the organic matter. The feasibility of transition of coals to the plastic state is determined by the ratio between the onset plastic state (softening) and runaway degradation temperatures, values that depend on the petrographic composition and the degree of metamorphism of coals and the distribution of structural and chemical characteristics of organic matter. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Deformation behavior, strength, and plasticity of titanium with a submicrocrystalline structure formed under warm rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Kashin, O. A.; Bakach, G. P.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Girsova, N. V.; Pochivalova, G. P.

    2012-02-01

    The temperature-deformation regimes of warm rolling through profiled rolls providing production of submicrocrystalline titanium are determined. For the obtained submicrocrystalline titanium, the annealing conditions under which internal stresses decrease and plasticity increases while maintaining high-strength submicrocrystalline structure are found. The data on the microstructure, deformation behavior, elastic-plastic properties, and the type of fracture of rods with submicrocrystalline structure are reported.

  2. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  3. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  4. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  5. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal. PMID:26581625

  6. Control-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Joseph K.; Ianculescu, George D.; Kenney, Charles S.; Laub, Alan J.; Ly, Jason H. Q.; Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an alternative optimal control to perform the pointing and tracking functions of the Space Station solar dynamic power module is investigated. A very large state model of 6 rigid body modes and 272 flexible modes is used in conjunction with classical linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) optimal control to produce a full-order controller that satisfies the requirements. The results are compared with a classically designed PID controller that was implemented for a much smaller (6 rigid body, 40 flexible modes) model. The conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of retained elastic modes from the full-order model, suggesting that for a complex, large space structure, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic module, application of conventional control system design methods may not be adequate. The use of LQG control is recommended, and method for solving the large matrix. Riccati equation that arises from the optimal formulation is provided.

  7. Oscillation of structure characteristics in polycrystalline nickel during plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorovienko, N.A.; Gernov, S.A.; Sirenko, A.F. . Dept. of Solid State Physics); Hamana, D. . Research Unit of Materiale Physic)

    1993-07-01

    The variation of X-ray diffraction characteristics (breadth at half maximum intensity, integrated intensity, dislocation density and residual stresses), as a function of plastic deformation rate, which occurs by uniaxial tensile test, has been studied. At room temperature the observed oscillation of studied characteristics in deformed polycrystalline nickel is due to the deformation mechanism change. The latter can be a translational displacement due to dislocations or a rotational displacement due to disclination.

  8. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  9. A new hyperspectral imaging based device for quality control in plastic recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, G.; D'Agostini, M.; Dall'Ava, A.; Serranti, S.; Turioni, F.

    2013-05-01

    The quality control of contamination level in the recycled plastics stream has been identified as an important key factor for increasing the value of the recycled material by both plastic recycling and compounder industries. Existing quality control methods for the detection of both plastics and non-plastics contaminants in the plastic waste streams at different stages of the industrial process (e.g. feed, intermediate and final products) are currently based on the manual collection from the stream of a sample and on the subsequent off-line laboratory analyses. The results of such analyses are usually available after some hours, or sometimes even some days, after the material has been processed. The laboratory analyses are time-consuming and expensive (both in terms of equipment cost and their maintenance and of labour cost).Therefore, a fast on-line assessment to monitor the plastic waste feed streams and to characterize the composition of the different plastic products, is fundamental to increase the value of secondary plastics. The paper is finalized to describe and evaluate the development of an HSI-based device and of the related software architectures and processing algorithms for quality assessment of plastics in recycling plants, with particular reference to polyolefins (PO). NIR-HSI sensing devices coupled with multivariate data analysis methods was demonstrated as an objective, rapid and non-destructive technique that can be used for on-line quality and process control in the recycling process of POs. In particular, the adoption of the previous mentioned HD&SW integrated architectures can provide a solution to one of the major problems of the recycling industry, which is the lack of an accurate quality certification of materials obtained by recycling processes. These results could therefore assist in developing strategies to certify the composition of recycled PO products.

  10. Crystal-plastic deformation and recrystallization of peridotite controlled by the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Agnes K.; Trepmann, Claudia A.

    2012-03-01

    Deformed peridotites from the Balmuccia complex, Northern Italy, have been investigated by light and electron microscopy (SEM/EBSD, TEM). The peridotites show a heterogeneous and partly recrystallized microfabric associated with cataclastic shear zones. Intracrystalline deformation microstructures (undulatory extinction, crinkly deformation lamellae, deformation bands, kink bands) and recrystallized grains along intragranular zones in large original grains record a sequence with an initial stage of inhomogeneous glide-controlled deformation in the low-temperature plasticity regime associated with brittle deformation and a subsequent stage of recovery and recrystallization. The microstructural evidence of deformation of olivine in the low-temperature field indicates high stresses on the order of several hundred MPa and accordingly high strain rates. Subsequent recovery and recrystallization requires decreasing stresses and strain rates, as there is no evidence for a complex thermal history with increasing temperatures. A locally occurring foam structure in aggregates of recrystallized olivine indicates grain growth at very low differential stresses at a late stage. Such a stress history with transiently high and then decaying stresses is characteristic for coseismic deformation and postseismic creep just below the base of the seismogenic zone. The associated occurrence of pseudotachylytes and microstructures generated by crystal-plastic mechanisms is explained by semi-brittle behavior at transient high stresses and strain rates during coseismic loading at depths, where during postseismic relaxation and in interseismic periods the rocks are behaving by crystal-plastic flow. The consideration of high-stress deformation and subsequent recrystallization processes at decaying stresses in peridotites is especially relevant for earthquake-driven deformation in the mantle.

  11. Network structure controls noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2004-03-01

    Biochemical reactions often involve low copy number of reactant molecules. Bio-networks, however, control the intrinsic noise arising from the fluctuations of low copy number of reactant molecules quite efficiently to perform their job in a robust manner. Network structures may be very crucial in the effective modulation of fluctuation effects. We investigate the interplay between the network structure and the noise behavior in signal transduction networks using Stochastic simulations. Some of the recurrent modules in biological networks seem to be vital in noise control. We correlate the effect of those modules to the function of the global topology of the network. This may explain why certain class of modules are so ubiquitous in Bio-networks.

  12. The Innate Immune Receptor PGRP-LC Controls Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nathan; Braiser, Daniel J; Dickman, Dion K; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-12-16

    It is now appreciated that the brain is immunologically active. Highly conserved innate immune signaling responds to pathogen invasion and injury and promotes structural refinement of neural circuitry. However, it remains generally unknown whether innate immune signaling has a function during the day-to-day regulation of neural function in the absence of pathogens and irrespective of cellular damage or developmental change. Here we show that an innate immune receptor, a member of the peptidoglycan pattern recognition receptor family (PGRP-LC), is required for the induction and sustained expression of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. This receptor functions presynaptically, controlling the homeostatic modulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles following inhibition of postsynaptic glutamate receptor function. Thus, PGRP-LC is a candidate receptor for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling, a novel activity for innate immune signaling and the first known function of a PGRP-type receptor in the nervous system of any organism. PMID:26687223

  13. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina; Giannì, Costanza; Pantano, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  14. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  15. Geometry changes in the elastic-plastic analysis of steel spatial skeletal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondok, Hosain Mohamed H.

    The principal objective is to furnish a tool for aunified formulation and numerical analysis of all the history-independent classes of response of elastic perfectly plastic space skeletal structures. We aim at determination of load domains corresponding to elastic, shakedown and collapse behavior for structures in initial and deformed configurations. Numerical program SDLAS for post-yield and inadaptation (non-shakedown) analysis of elastic-plastic space skeletal structures was prepared. It accounts for biaxial bending, torsion and axial forces contributing to yielding of beam elements. The program permits to determine a safe domain for either proportional or variable repeated loads. The proposed method accounts for nonlinear geometrical effects. In the post-yield analysis the conditions for plastic now are considered at subsequent deformed configurations. For the inadaptation analysis the similar procedure is applied. Automatic generation of all possible plastic deformation modes allows to select the most dangerous mechanisms and to determine a critical plastic deformation path. Finally, the post-yield or inadaptation curve is obtained showing the dependence of load (load domain) multiplier on the plastic deformation. These problems are formulated as a sequence of linear programming tasks and are solved by a step by step procedure. The proposed method allows to determine the limit multiplier and the shakedown (adaptation) multiplier accounting for geometric effects.

  16. A Theory of Rate Coding Control by Intrinsic Plasticity Effects

    PubMed Central

    Naudé, J.; Paz, J. T.; Berry, H.; Delord, B.

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic plasticity (IP) is a ubiquitous activity-dependent process regulating neuronal excitability and a cellular correlate of behavioral learning and neuronal homeostasis. Because IP is induced rapidly and maintained long-term, it likely represents a major determinant of adaptive collective neuronal dynamics. However, assessing the exact impact of IP has remained elusive. Indeed, it is extremely difficult disentangling the complex non-linear interaction between IP effects, by which conductance changes alter neuronal activity, and IP rules, whereby activity modifies conductance via signaling pathways. Moreover, the two major IP effects on firing rate, threshold and gain modulation, remain unknown in their very mechanisms. Here, using extensive simulations and sensitivity analysis of Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that threshold and gain modulation are accounted for by maximal conductance plasticity of conductance that situate in two separate domains of the parameter space corresponding to sub- and supra-threshold conductance (i.e. activating below or above the spike onset threshold potential). Analyzing equivalent integrate-and-fire models, we provide formal expressions of sensitivities relating to conductance parameters, unraveling unprecedented mechanisms governing IP effects. Our results generalize to the IP of other conductance parameters and allow strong inference for calcium-gated conductance, yielding a general picture that accounts for a large repertoire of experimental observations. The expressions we provide can be combined with IP rules in rate or spiking models, offering a general framework to systematically assess the computational consequences of IP of pharmacologically identified conductance with both fine grain description and mathematical tractability. We provide an example of such IP loop model addressing the important issue of the homeostatic regulation of spontaneous discharge. Because we do not formulate any assumptions on modification rules

  17. A theory of rate coding control by intrinsic plasticity effects.

    PubMed

    Naudé, J; Paz, J T; Berry, H; Delord, B

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic plasticity (IP) is a ubiquitous activity-dependent process regulating neuronal excitability and a cellular correlate of behavioral learning and neuronal homeostasis. Because IP is induced rapidly and maintained long-term, it likely represents a major determinant of adaptive collective neuronal dynamics. However, assessing the exact impact of IP has remained elusive. Indeed, it is extremely difficult disentangling the complex non-linear interaction between IP effects, by which conductance changes alter neuronal activity, and IP rules, whereby activity modifies conductance via signaling pathways. Moreover, the two major IP effects on firing rate, threshold and gain modulation, remain unknown in their very mechanisms. Here, using extensive simulations and sensitivity analysis of Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that threshold and gain modulation are accounted for by maximal conductance plasticity of conductance that situate in two separate domains of the parameter space corresponding to sub- and supra-threshold conductance (i.e. activating below or above the spike onset threshold potential). Analyzing equivalent integrate-and-fire models, we provide formal expressions of sensitivities relating to conductance parameters, unraveling unprecedented mechanisms governing IP effects. Our results generalize to the IP of other conductance parameters and allow strong inference for calcium-gated conductance, yielding a general picture that accounts for a large repertoire of experimental observations. The expressions we provide can be combined with IP rules in rate or spiking models, offering a general framework to systematically assess the computational consequences of IP of pharmacologically identified conductance with both fine grain description and mathematical tractability. We provide an example of such IP loop model addressing the important issue of the homeostatic regulation of spontaneous discharge. Because we do not formulate any assumptions on modification rules

  18. Crystallographically controlled crystal-plastic deformation of zircon in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Plastically-deformed zircons from various types of strained natural metamorphic rocks have been investigated in-situ by electron backscatter diffraction analysis (EBSD), allowing crystallographic orientation mapping at high spatial resolution. Plastic deformation often forms under the control of grain-internal heterogeneities. At the crystal structure scale deformation is controlled by the physical anisotropy of the lattice. Three most common slip systems in zircon are [100]{010}, [010]{001} and [001]{010} (Leroux et. al., 1999; Reddy et. al., 2007). They are genetically connected with the main zircon crystallographic directions: [001] (c-axis), [100] and [010] (a and b axes). Atomic models show weak planes normal to these directions that preferably evolve to glide planes in the deforming crystal. The visualization of seismic (elastic) properties of zircon with the MATLAB toolbox MTEX shows a similar pattern. The slowest S-wave velocities are observed in directions parallel to [100], [010] and [001] crystallographic directions. The highest Young's modulus values lie in the same directions. In natural zircon grains, the common slip systems are preferably activated when zircon is hosted by rheologically comparatively weaker phases or a fine-grained matrix. In these cases zircon behaves as a rigid clast. During progressive deformation high deviatoric stresses together with high strain rates concentrate at crystal tips, as shown by numerical modeling. Softer host phases allow more degrees of freedom for zircon to be deformed according to its crystallographic and internal properties. These conclusions are supported by the misorientation axes density distribution maps, derived with MTEX. Deformed zircon hosted by a relatively soft phase (mostly biotite) develops a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), which has not been documented for zircon before. At the same time deformation of zircon hosted by a rheologically stronger matrix causes the activation of less

  19. Plasticity of Hippocampal Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance: Missing the Synaptic Control in the Epileptic Brain.

    PubMed

    Bonansco, Christian; Fuenzalida, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity generated by experience to modify the neural function and, thereby, adapt our behaviour. Long-term plasticity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission occurs in a concerted manner, finely adjusting the excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) balance. Imbalances of E/I function are related to several neurological diseases including epilepsy. Several evidences have demonstrated that astrocytes are able to control the synaptic plasticity, with astrocytes being active partners in synaptic physiology and E/I balance. Here, we revise molecular evidences showing the epileptic stage as an abnormal form of long-term brain plasticity and propose the possible participation of astrocytes to the abnormal increase of glutamatergic and decrease of GABAergic neurotransmission in epileptic networks. PMID:27006834

  20. Plasticity of Hippocampal Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance: Missing the Synaptic Control in the Epileptic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonansco, Christian; Fuenzalida, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity generated by experience to modify the neural function and, thereby, adapt our behaviour. Long-term plasticity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission occurs in a concerted manner, finely adjusting the excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) balance. Imbalances of E/I function are related to several neurological diseases including epilepsy. Several evidences have demonstrated that astrocytes are able to control the synaptic plasticity, with astrocytes being active partners in synaptic physiology and E/I balance. Here, we revise molecular evidences showing the epileptic stage as an abnormal form of long-term brain plasticity and propose the possible participation of astrocytes to the abnormal increase of glutamatergic and decrease of GABAergic neurotransmission in epileptic networks. PMID:27006834

  1. Nematode, Fungi, and Weed Control using Telone C35 and Colored Plastic Mulches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide fumigation controls weeds, fungi, and nematodes. An alternative treatment system was investigated that used various colored plastic mulches with Telone C35 (65% 1,3- dichloropropene plus 35% chloropicrin). These mulches controlled weeds by a thickness that prevented nutsedge penetrati...

  2. The Formation of Multi-synaptic Connections by the Interaction of Synaptic and Structural Plasticity and Their Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Cortical connectivity emerges from the permanent interaction between neuronal activity and synaptic as well as structural plasticity. An important experimentally observed feature of this connectivity is the distribution of the number of synapses from one neuron to another, which has been measured in several cortical layers. All of these distributions are bimodal with one peak at zero and a second one at a small number (3–8) of synapses. In this study, using a probabilistic model of structural plasticity, which depends on the synaptic weights, we explore how these distributions can emerge and which functional consequences they have. We find that bimodal distributions arise generically from the interaction of structural plasticity with synaptic plasticity rules that fulfill the following biological realistic constraints: First, the synaptic weights have to grow with the postsynaptic activity. Second, this growth curve and/or the input-output relation of the postsynaptic neuron have to change sub-linearly (negative curvature). As most neurons show such input-output-relations, these constraints can be fulfilled by many biological reasonable systems. Given such a system, we show that the different activities, which can explain the layer-specific distributions, correspond to experimentally observed activities. Considering these activities as working point of the system and varying the pre- or postsynaptic stimulation reveals a hysteresis in the number of synapses. As a consequence of this, the connectivity between two neurons can be controlled by activity but is also safeguarded against overly fast changes. These results indicate that the complex dynamics between activity and plasticity will, already between a pair of neurons, induce a variety of possible stable synaptic distributions, which could support memory mechanisms. PMID:25590330

  3. A unified approach to the analysis and design of elasto-plastic structures with mechanical contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin P.; Olhoff, Niels; Taylor, John E.

    1990-01-01

    With structural design in mind, a new unified variational model has been developed which represents the mechanics of deformation elasto-plasticity with unilateral contact conditions. For a design problem formulated as maximization of the load carrying capacity of a structure under certain constraints, the unified model allows for a simultaneous analysis and design synthesis for a whole range of mechanical behavior.

  4. Dense-body aggregates as plastic structures supporting tension in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Herrera, Ana M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    The wall of hollow organs of vertebrates is a unique structure able to generate active tension and maintain a nearly constant passive stiffness over a large volume range. These properties are predominantly attributable to the smooth muscle cells that line the organ wall. Although smooth muscle is known to possess plasticity (i.e., the ability to adapt to large changes in cell length through structural remodeling of contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton), the detailed structural basis for the plasticity is largely unknown. Dense bodies, one of the most prominent structures in smooth muscle cells, have been regarded as the anchoring sites for actin filaments, similar to the Z-disks in striated muscle. Here, we show that the dense bodies and intermediate filaments formed cable-like structures inside airway smooth muscle cells and were able to adjust the cable length according to cell length and tension. Stretching the muscle cell bundle in the relaxed state caused the cables to straighten, indicating that these intracellular structures were connected to the extracellular matrix and could support passive tension. These plastic structures may be responsible for the ability of smooth muscle to maintain a nearly constant tensile stiffness over a large length range. The finding suggests that the structural plasticity of hollow organs may originate from the dense-body cables within the smooth muscle cells. PMID:20709732

  5. Learning structure of sensory inputs with synaptic plasticity leads to interference

    PubMed Central

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptation in cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensory inputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data. In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed for three empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks. It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by the presentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network. To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticity be extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the case in experimental neuroscience. PMID:26300769

  6. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  7. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  8. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  9. Neural circuit remodeling and structural plasticity in the cortex during chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Damage in the periphery or spinal cord induces maladaptive plastic changes along the somatosensory nervous system from the periphery to the cortex, often leading to chronic pain. Although the role of neural circuit remodeling and structural synaptic plasticity in the 'pain matrix' cortices in chronic pain has been thought as a secondary epiphenomenon to altered nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord, progress in whole brain imaging studies on human patients and animal models has suggested a possibility that plastic changes in cortical neural circuits may actively contribute to chronic pain symptoms. Furthermore, recent development in two-photon microscopy and fluorescence labeling techniques have enabled us to longitudinally trace the structural and functional changes in local circuits, single neurons and even individual synapses in the brain of living animals. These technical advances has started to reveal that cortical structural remodeling following tissue or nerve damage could rapidly occur within days, which are temporally correlated with functional plasticity of cortical circuits as well as the development and maintenance of chronic pain behavior, thereby modifying the previous concept that it takes much longer periods (e.g. months or years). In this review, we discuss the relation of neural circuit plasticity in the 'pain matrix' cortices, such as the anterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, with chronic pain. We also introduce how to apply long-term in vivo two-photon imaging approaches for the study of pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic pain. PMID:26807017

  10. Structural interaction with control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  11. Translational Control in Synaptic Plasticity and Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Buffington, Shelly A.; Huang, Wei; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent changes in the strength of synaptic connections are fundamental to the formation and maintenance of memory. The mechanisms underlying persistent changes in synaptic strength in the hippocampus, specifically long-term potentiation and depression, depend on new protein synthesis. Such changes are thought to be orchestrated by engaging the signaling pathways that regulate mRNA translation in neurons. In this review, we discuss the key regulatory pathways that govern translational control in response to synaptic activity and the mRNA populations that are specifically targeted by these pathways. The critical contribution of regulatory control over new protein synthesis to proper cognitive function is underscored by human disorders associated with either silencing or mutation of genes encoding proteins that directly regulate translation. In light of these clinical implications, we also consider the therapeutic potential of targeting dysregulated translational control to treat cognitive disorders of synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25032491

  12. Factors influencing efficacy of plastic shelters for control of bacterial blight of lilac

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastic shelters are thought to manage bacterial blight by protecting plants from rain and/or frost. In February to April 2008 and 2009, we studied the contribution of frost protection to efficacy of this cultural control practice. Lilacs in 1-gallon pots were exposed to four treatments: 1) plants...

  13. Use of Fabric and Plastic Barriers to Control Weeds in Blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in blackberries (Rubus spp.) is a serious problem for organic producers and those who wish to reduce their reliance on herbicides. Three landscape fabrics (Dewitt, Texel, and a white polyester weave) and one industrial grade white on black plastic were used in conjuction with newly pla...

  14. Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Hoit, Jeannette; Kent, Raymond; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Shrivastav, Rahul; Strand, Edythe; Yorkston, Kathryn; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders. Method: A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms involved in neural…

  15. Role of Synaptic Structural Plasticity in Impairments of Spatial Learning and Memory Induced by Developmental Lead Exposure in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaojie; Hu, Xiaoxia; Gu, Huaiyu; Chen, Yilin; Wei, Qing; Hu, Qiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is found to impair cognitive function. Synaptic structural plasticity is considered to be the physiological basis of synaptic functional plasticity and has been recently found to play important roles in learning and memory. To study the effect of Pb on spatial learning and memory at different developmental stages, and its relationship with alterations of synaptic structural plasticity, postnatal rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control; Pre-weaning Pb (Parents were exposed to 2 mM PbCl2 3 weeks before mating until weaning of pups); Post-weaning Pb (Weaned pups were exposed to 2 mM PbCl2 for 9 weeks). The spatial learning and memory of rats was measured by Morris water maze (MWM) on PND 85–90. Rat pups in Pre-weaning Pb and Post-weaning Pb groups performed significantly worse than those in Control group (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the performance of MWM between the two Pb-exposure groups. Before MWM (PND 84), the number of neurons and synapses significantly decreased in Pre-weaning Pb group, but not in Post-weaning Pb group. After MWM (PND 91), the number of synapses in Pre-weaning Pb group increased significantly, but it was still less than that of Control group (p<0.05); the number of synapses in Post-weaning Pb group was also less than that of Control group (p<0.05), although the number of synapses has no differences between Post-weaning Pb and Control groups before MWM. In both Pre-weaning Pb and Post-weaning Pb groups, synaptic structural parameters such as thickness of postsynaptic density (PSD), length of synaptic active zone and synaptic curvature increased significantly while width of synaptic cleft decreased significantly compared to Control group (p<0.05). Our data demonstrated that both early and late developmental Pb exposure impaired spatial learning and memory as well as synaptic structural plasticity in Wistar rats. PMID:25536363

  16. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  17. Learning to Perceive Structure from Motion and Neural Plasticity in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Nam-Gyoon; Park, Jong-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects the visual sensory pathways, producing a variety of visual deficits, including the capacity to perceive structure-from-motion (SFM). Because the sensory areas of the adult brain are known to retain a large degree of plasticity, the present study was conducted to explore whether…

  18. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Allyson P; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Bunge, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination. PMID:22936899

  19. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Allyson P.; Whitaker, Kirstie J.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination. PMID:22936899

  20. 76 FR 175 - Continental Structural Plastics Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... of Continental Structural Plastics, North Baltimore, Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal Register on January 26, 2009 (74 FR 4463). At the request of the UAW, Local 1889, the Department reviewed... Employment and Training Administration Continental Structural Plastics Including On-Site Leased Workers...

  1. Impact of pressure on plastic yield in amorphous solids with open structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantisi, B.; Kermouche, G.; Barthel, E.; Tanguy, A.

    2016-03-01

    Plasticity in amorphous silica is unusual: The yield stress decreases with hydrostatic pressure, in contrast to the Mohr-Coulomb response commonly found in more compact materials such as bulk metallic glasses. To better understand this response, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of plastic response in a model glass with open structure. The simulations reproduce the anomalous dependence of yield stress with pressure and also correctly predict that the plastic response turns to normal once the material has been fully compacted. We also show that the overall shape of the yield surface is consistent with a quadratic behavior predicted assuming local buckling of the structure, a point of view that fits well into the present understanding of the deformation mechanisms of amorphous silica. The results also confirm that free volume is an adequate internal variable for a continuum scale description of the plastic response of amorphous silica. Finally, we also investigate the long-range correlations between rearrangement events. We find that strong intermittency is observed when the structure remains open, while compaction results in more homogeneous rearrangements. These findings are in agreement with recent results on the effect of compression on the middle range order in silicate glasses and also suggest that the well-known volume recovery of densified silica at relatively low temperatures is in fact a form of aging.

  2. Relationship between structural brainstem and brain plasticity and lower-limb training in spinal cord injury: a longitudinal pilot study.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Michael; Grabher, Patrick; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Curt, Armin; Bolliger, Marc; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Kollias, Spyros; Eng, Kynan; Freund, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitative training has shown to improve significantly motor outcomes and functional walking capacity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). However, whether performance improvements during rehabilitation relate to brain plasticity or whether it is based on functional adaptation of movement strategies remain uncertain. This study assessed training improvement-induced structural brain plasticity in chronic iSCI patients using longitudinal MRI. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to analyze longitudinal brain volume changes associated with intensive virtual reality (VR)-augmented lower limb training in nine traumatic iSCI patients. The MRI data was acquired before and after a 4-week training period (16-20 training sessions). Before training, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT) assessed baseline morphometric differences in nine iSCI patients compared to 14 healthy controls. The intense VR-augmented training of limb control improved significantly balance, walking speed, ambulation, and muscle strength in patients. Retention of clinical improvements was confirmed by the 3-4 months follow-up. In patients relative to controls, VBM revealed reductions of white matter volume within the brainstem and cerebellum and VBCT showed cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex. Over time, TBM revealed significant improvement-induced volume increases in the left middle temporal and occipital gyrus, left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus, both hippocampi, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and brainstem in iSCI patients. This study demonstrates structural plasticity at the cortical and brainstem level as a consequence of VR-augmented training in iSCI patients. These structural changes may serve as neuroimaging biomarkers of VR-augmented lower limb neurorehabilitation in addition to performance measures to detect improvements in rehabilitative training. PMID:25999842

  3. Relationship between structural brainstem and brain plasticity and lower-limb training in spinal cord injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Michael; Grabher, Patrick; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Curt, Armin; Bolliger, Marc; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Kollias, Spyros; Eng, Kynan; Freund, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitative training has shown to improve significantly motor outcomes and functional walking capacity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). However, whether performance improvements during rehabilitation relate to brain plasticity or whether it is based on functional adaptation of movement strategies remain uncertain. This study assessed training improvement-induced structural brain plasticity in chronic iSCI patients using longitudinal MRI. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to analyze longitudinal brain volume changes associated with intensive virtual reality (VR)-augmented lower limb training in nine traumatic iSCI patients. The MRI data was acquired before and after a 4-week training period (16–20 training sessions). Before training, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT) assessed baseline morphometric differences in nine iSCI patients compared to 14 healthy controls. The intense VR-augmented training of limb control improved significantly balance, walking speed, ambulation, and muscle strength in patients. Retention of clinical improvements was confirmed by the 3–4 months follow-up. In patients relative to controls, VBM revealed reductions of white matter volume within the brainstem and cerebellum and VBCT showed cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex. Over time, TBM revealed significant improvement-induced volume increases in the left middle temporal and occipital gyrus, left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus, both hippocampi, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and brainstem in iSCI patients. This study demonstrates structural plasticity at the cortical and brainstem level as a consequence of VR-augmented training in iSCI patients. These structural changes may serve as neuroimaging biomarkers of VR-augmented lower limb neurorehabilitation in addition to performance measures to detect improvements in rehabilitative training. PMID:25999842

  4. μ-COMPUTED Tomography for Micro-Structure Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (cfrp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoessel, R.; Guenther, T.; Dierig, T.; Schladitz, K.; Godehardt, M.; Kessling, P.-M.; Fuchs, T.

    2011-06-01

    Non-destructive testing is of major importance for quality assurance of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aerospace industry. It is of interest to obtain information of the 3D inner micro-structure of CFRP. A promising option is the usage of μ-CT inspection. State-of-the art software tools are used to characterize the 3D inner micro-structure and to gather knowledge about porosity, cracks, and fiber orientation.

  5. The effect of carbon plastic truss structures of solar arrays on dynamical characteristics of their drive mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatikhin, V. Ye.; Semenov, L. P.; Artemenko, Yu. H.; Ihnatovych, S. R.

    We consider the effect of carbon plastic truss structures on dynamical characteristics of drive mechanism of space vehicle solar arrays. An analysis is made for frequencies of own oscillations of the truss structures of solar arrays and for dynamical characteristics of their drive mechanism for the case of structures from the carbon and plastic as well as from the aluminium alloy AMh-6. We substantiate the advantages of the manufacturing of truss structures of frameworks from the carbon and plastic by the winding method in respect of deriving a higher rigidity of a structure.

  6. Total heat transport data for plastic honeycomb-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Platzer, W.J. )

    1992-11-01

    The total heat transport within honeycomb-type structures consists mainly of radiation and conduction heat transport, as convection is usually suppressed. For surface emissivities larger than 0.7, independent mode analysis may be used, and a splitting of the measured total heat transport into parts is possible. Only a few parameters used in simple modeling equations are needed to describe the heat transport in this approximation. They have been obtained by fitting the functions to experimental results and are presented in tabular form for 11 different materials. The thickness and temperature dependence is included in the results. The presented data may be used as input parameters either for simple calculations in an independent mode analysis (IMA) or for a dependent mode analysis (DMA). Thus even selective flat-plate honeycomb collectors may be modeled reliably.

  7. Structure and Plasticity of Endophilin and Sorting Nexin 9

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Hooda, Reshma Noordin; Goh, Shih Lin; Sondermann, Holger

    2009-06-17

    Endophilin and Sorting Nexin 9 (Snx9) play key roles in endocytosis by membrane curvature sensing and remodeling via their Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domains. BAR and the related F-BAR domains form dimeric, crescent-shaped units that occur N- or C-terminally to other lipid-binding, adaptor, or catalytic modules. In crystal structures, the PX-BAR unit of Snx9 (Snx9{sup PX-BAR}) adopts an overall compact, moderately curved conformation. SAXS-based solution studies revealed an alternative, more curved state of Snx9{sup PX-BAR} in which the PX domains are flexibly connected to the BAR domains, providing a model for how Snx9 exhibits lipid-dependent curvature preferences. In contrast, Endophilin appears to be rigid in solution, and the SH3 domains are located at the distal tips of a BAR domain dimer with fixed curvature. We also observed tip-to-tip interactions between the BAR domains in a trigonal crystal form of Snx9PX-BAR reminiscent of functionally important interactions described for F-BAR domains.

  8. Plasticity and interfacial dislocation structures in Ti-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Parrini, L.; Heinrich, H.; Kostorz, G.

    1997-12-31

    The alloy Ti-48.6Al-1.9Cr-1.9Nb-1B with an equiaxed {gamma} microstructure, obtained by heat treatment at 1,200 C for 4 h, and with a lamellar microstructure, obtained by heat treatment at 1,380 C for 1 h, is characterized by compression tests and transmission electron microscopy. A lower activity of superdislocations and a more frequent pinning of ordinary dislocations are detected in the lamellar Ti-Al specimens in comparison with the non-lamellar ones during deformation at room temperature. The activity of superdislocations and the pinning of ordinary dislocations are responsible for the differences in yield stress and brittleness between lamellar and non-lamellar Ti-Al. A very high density of ordinary interfacial dislocations is found in the lamellar structure. These influence the activity of superdislocations and the pinning of ordinary dislocations. At high temperature a change in the deformation mechanism occurs. Above the brittle-to-ductile transition, the material is remarkably softer and the mechanical properties are insensitive to the presence of the lamellar interfaces.

  9. Multiple transient memories in sheared suspensions: Robustness, structure, and routes to plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, Nathan C.; Paulsen, Joseph D.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    2013-09-01

    Multiple transient memories, originally discovered in charge-density-wave conductors, are a remarkable and initially counterintuitive example of how a system can store information about its driving. In this class of memories, a system can learn multiple driving inputs, nearly all of which are eventually forgotten despite their continual input. If sufficient noise is present, the system regains plasticity so that it can continue to learn new memories indefinitely. Recently, Keim and Nagel [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.010603 107, 010603 (2011)] showed how multiple transient memories could be generalized to a generic driven disordered system with noise, giving as an example simulations of a simple model of a sheared non-Brownian suspension. Here, we further explore simulation models of suspensions under cyclic shear, focusing on three main themes: robustness, structure, and overdriving. We show that multiple transient memories are a robust feature independent of many details of the model. The steady-state spatial distribution of the particles is sensitive to the driving algorithm; nonetheless, the memory formation is independent of such a change in particle correlations. Finally, we demonstrate that overdriving provides another means for controlling memory formation and retention.

  10. Integrated control-structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  11. Cofilin1 Controls Transcolumnar Plasticity in Dendritic Spines in Adult Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Okubo-Suzuki, Reiko; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Ogata, Koshin; Yaguchi, Masae; Matsuyama, Makoto; Inokuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    During sensory deprivation, the barrel cortex undergoes expansion of a functional column representing spared inputs (spared column), into the neighboring deprived columns (representing deprived inputs) which are in turn shrunk. As a result, the neurons in a deprived column simultaneously increase and decrease their responses to spared and deprived inputs, respectively. Previous studies revealed that dendritic spines are remodeled during this barrel map plasticity. Because cofilin1, a predominant regulator of actin filament turnover, governs both the expansion and shrinkage of the dendritic spine structure in vitro, it hypothetically regulates both responses in barrel map plasticity. However, this hypothesis remains untested. Using lentiviral vectors, we knocked down cofilin1 locally within layer 2/3 neurons in a deprived column. Cofilin1-knocked-down neurons were optogenetically labeled using channelrhodopsin-2, and electrophysiological recordings were targeted to these knocked-down neurons. We showed that cofilin1 knockdown impaired response increases to spared inputs but preserved response decreases to deprived inputs, indicating that cofilin1 dependency is dissociated in these two types of barrel map plasticity. To explore the structural basis of this dissociation, we then analyzed spine densities on deprived column dendritic branches, which were supposed to receive dense horizontal transcolumnar projections from the spared column. We found that spine number increased in a cofilin1-dependent manner selectively in the distal part of the supragranular layer, where most of the transcolumnar projections existed. Our findings suggest that cofilin1-mediated actin dynamics regulate functional map plasticity in an input-specific manner through the dendritic spine remodeling that occurs in the horizontal transcolumnar circuits. These new mechanistic insights into transcolumnar plasticity in adult rats may have a general significance for understanding reorganization of

  12. Molecular description of the formation and structure of plasticized globular protein films.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Subirade, Muriel; Pézolet, Michel

    2005-01-01

    To optimize the properties of plasticized globular proteins films, a clear comprehension of the structure and molecular events occurring during film formation is required. In this work, the structural organization of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) films plasticized with diethyelene glycol are investigated for the first time during the entire film formation process by attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy. The films are made by a common two-step procedure consisting of a first heat treatment (80 degrees C/30 min) followed by the casting of the film-forming solution for dehydration. Heating at 80 degrees C leads to the self-aggregation of the proteins with a conversion of regular secondary structures into antiparallel beta-sheets. The kinetics of the conformational conversion shows that approximately 10% of the amino acids are involved in beta-sheets after the first step. Dehydration induces a further aggregation, with approximately 46% of the amino acids involved in beta-sheets in the final film. Water evaporation results in the association of the aggregates formed during the heating step. The presence of the plasticizer during water removal is essential as it allows specific conformational rearrangements into extended beta-sheets and ordering of the polypeptide chains. This work underlines that the assembly of building blocks is common in beta-lg networks and it emphasizes the widespread occurrence of beta-structures in synthetic and natural protein networks. PMID:16283748

  13. Ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 controls hippocampal plasticity and learning by regulating synaptic γ-actin levels

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Joerg; Végh, Marlene J.; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Loos, Maarten; Labonté, Dorthe; Li, Ka Wan; Van Nierop, Pim; Van Diepen, Michiel T.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Kneussel, Matthias; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Smit, August B.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Although two actin isoforms, β- and γ-actin, are expressed in dendritic spines, the specific contribution of γ-actin in the expression of synaptic plasticity is unknown. We show that synaptic γ-actin levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3. TRIM3 protein and Actg1 transcript are colocalized in messenger ribonucleoprotein granules responsible for the dendritic targeting of messenger RNAs. TRIM3 polyubiquitylates γ-actin, most likely cotranslationally at synaptic sites. Trim3−/− mice consequently have increased levels of γ-actin at hippocampal synapses, resulting in higher spine densities, increased long-term potentiation, and enhanced short-term contextual fear memory consolidation. Interestingly, hippocampal deletion of Actg1 caused an increase in long-term fear memory. Collectively, our findings suggest that temporal control of γ-actin levels by TRIM3 is required to regulate the timing of hippocampal plasticity. We propose a model in which TRIM3 regulates synaptic γ-actin turnover and actin filament stability and thus forms a transient inhibitory constraint on the expression of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:26527743

  14. Adaptive Control For Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Ih, Che-Hang Charles; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1988-01-01

    Paper discusses ways to cope with measurement noise in adaptive control system for large, flexible structure in outer space. System generates control signals for torque and thrust actuators to turn all or parts of structure to desired orientations while suppressing torsional and other vibrations. Main result of paper is general theory for introduction of filters to suppress measurement noise while preserving stability.

  15. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.; Petersen, Carl C.H.; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. PMID:26468190

  16. Control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  17. A structurally plastic ribonucleoprotein complex mediates post-transcriptional gene regulation in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jason D; Booth, David S; Frankel, Alan D

    2016-07-01

    HIV replication requires the nuclear export of essential, intron-containing viral RNAs. To facilitate export, HIV encodes the viral accessory protein Rev which binds unspliced and partially spliced viral RNAs and creates a ribonucleoprotein complex that recruits the cellular Chromosome maintenance factor 1 export machinery. Exporting RNAs in this manner bypasses the necessity for complete splicing as a prerequisite for mRNA export, and allows intron-containing RNAs to reach the cytoplasm intact for translation and virus packaging. Recent structural studies have revealed that this entire complex exhibits remarkable plasticity at many levels of organization, including RNA folding, protein-RNA recognition, multimer formation, and host factor recruitment. In this review, we explore each aspect of plasticity from structural, functional, and possible therapeutic viewpoints. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:470-486. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1342 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26929078

  18. Control of Dendritic Spine Morphological and Functional Plasticity by Small GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Srivastava, Deepak P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural plasticity of excitatory synapses is a vital component of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and behaviour. Abnormal development or regulation of excitatory synapses has also been strongly implicated in many neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. In the mammalian forebrain, the majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines, specialized dendritic protrusions that are enriched in actin. Research over recent years has begun to unravel the complexities involved in the regulation of dendritic spine structure. The small GTPase family of proteins have emerged as key regulators of structural plasticity, linking extracellular signals with the modulation of dendritic spines, which potentially underlies their ability to influence cognition. Here we review a number of studies that examine how small GTPases are activated and regulated in neurons and furthermore how they can impact actin dynamics, and thus dendritic spine morphology. Elucidating this signalling process is critical for furthering our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which information is encoded in neural circuits but may also provide insight into novel targets for the development of effective therapies to treat cognitive dysfunction seen in a range of neurological disorders. PMID:26989514

  19. Semantic modeling of the structural and process entities during plastic deformation of crystals and rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, Hassan; Davarpanah, Armita

    2016-04-01

    We are semantically modeling the structural and dynamic process components of the plastic deformation of minerals and rocks in the Plastic Deformation Ontology (PDO). Applying the Ontology of Physics in Biology, the PDO classifies the spatial entities that participate in the diverse processes of plastic deformation into the Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity and Nonphysical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity classes. The Material_Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity class includes things such as microstructures, lattice defects, atoms, liquid, and grain boundaries, and the Immaterial_Physical_Plastic_Deformation_Entity class includes vacancies in crystals and voids along mineral grain boundaries. The objects under the many subclasses of these classes (e.g., crystal, lattice defect, layering) have spatial parts that are related to each other through taxonomic (e.g., Line_Defect isA Lattice_Defect), structural (mereological, e.g., Twin_Plane partOf Twin), spatial-topological (e.g., Vacancy adjacentTo Atom, Fluid locatedAlong Grain_Boundary), and domain specific (e.g., displaces, Fluid crystallizes Dissolved_Ion, Void existsAlong Grain_Boundary) relationships. The dynamic aspect of the plastic deformation is modeled under the dynamical Process_Entity class that subsumes classes such as Recrystallization and Pressure_Solution that define the flow of energy amongst the physical entities. The values of the dynamical state properties of the physical entities (e.g., Chemical_Potential, Temperature, Particle_Velocity) change while they take part in the deformational processes such as Diffusion and Dislocation_Glide. The process entities have temporal parts (phases) that are related to each other through temporal relations such as precedes, isSubprocessOf, and overlaps. The properties of the physical entities, defined under the Physical_Property class, change as they participate in the plastic deformational processes. The properties are categorized into dynamical, constitutive

  20. Atomistic simulation of structure and dynamics of the plastic crystal diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Jin, L.; de Leeuw, S. W.; Pringle, J. M.; Forsyth, M.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the interrelations between structures, transport mechanisms, and phase transitions of an organic ionic plastic crystal material, diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate ([P1,2,2,4][PF6]), in both solid and liquid phases. Examination of the temperature dependence of supercell parameters and radial distribution functions provides evidence of plastic phase transitions. Nonlinear increments of cell size within the temperature range 123-413 K are consistent with the plastic phase transitions identified from experimental analysis. The time- and temperature-dependent microstructure and dynamics have been intensively studied through analysis of trajectory files. The rotational motion and diffusion of the matrix ions are quantitatively analysed via rotational correlation functions and mean square displacements. We present new information on the evolution of molecular motions in different phases, and compare and contrast our findings with previously reported hypotheses based on nuclear magnetic resonance results. This work provides valuable information at an atomistic level to explain the experimental observations, which helps further understanding of the molecular motions underlying the plastic phase transitions.

  1. Alcohol Elicits Functional and Structural Plasticity Selectively in Dopamine D1 Receptor-Expressing Neurons of the Dorsomedial Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yifeng; Wang, Xuehua; Roltsch Hellard, Emily; Ma, Tengfei; Gil, Hannah; Ben Hamida, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is thought to be a maladaptive form of learning and memory caused by drug-evoked aberrant synaptic plasticity. We previously showed that alcohol facilitates synaptic plasticity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), a brain region that drives goal-directed behaviors. The majority of DMS cells are medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) or D2 receptors (D2Rs), which drive “Go” or “No-Go” behaviors, respectively. Here, we report that alcohol induces cell type-specific synaptic and structural plasticity in the DMS. Using mice that express a fluorescence marker to visualize D1R or D2R MSNs, we show that repeated cycles of systemic administration of alcohol or alcohol consumption induces a long-lasting increase in AMPAR activity specifically in DMS D1R but not in D2R MSNs. Importantly, we report that alcohol consumption increases the complexity of dendritic branching and the density of mature mushroom-shaped spines selectively in DMS D1R MSNs. Finally, we found that blockade of D1R but not D2R activity in the DMS attenuates alcohol consumption. Together, these data suggest that alcohol intake produces profound functional and structural plasticity events in a subpopulation of neurons in the DMS that control reinforcement-related learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alcohol addiction is considered maladaptive learning and memory processes. Here we unraveled a long-lasting cellular mechanism that may contribute to the memory of alcohol-seeking behaviors. Specifically, we found that alcohol consumption produces a long-lasting enhancement of channel activity and persistent alterations of neuronal morphology in a part of the brain (DMS) that controls alcohol-drinking behaviors. Furthermore, we show that these alterations occur only in a subpopulation of neurons that positively control reward and reinforcement of drugs of abuse. Finally, we report that blocking the activity of this neuronal population reduces alcohol intake. As such

  2. Effect of small perturbations on the evolution of polycrystalline structure during plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu. A.; Kistanov, A. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    The method of molecular dynamics has been used to study the influence of initial perturbations on the evolution of grain boundaries during the shear plastic deformation of a two-dimensional polycrystalline material with nanoscale grains. It has been shown that short-term thermalization-induced small perturbations result in noticeable differences in grain boundaries configurations at the deformation of 0.05 and the polycrystal completely loses its initial grain boundary structure at the deformation of 0.4.

  3. Effect of preliminary severe plastic deformation on structure and durability of nickel subjected to oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2015-05-01

    Structural transformations in nickel (99.99%) under severe plastic deformation during dry sliding friction and subsequent oxidation in air at temperatures of 400-800°C (1 h of holding) have been studied. The micro-hardness, wear intensity, and coefficient of friction of the strained and oxidized nickel have been measured. It has been shown that plastic deformation leads to the formation of γ crystals with nanocrystalline structures in the surface layer with thicknesses of ˜10 μm; the size of the γ crystal is 10-60 nm and the micro-hardness is about 4 GPa. Oxidation at 500 and 550°C leads to the formation of the two-phase nanocrystalline structure in the strained layer, which consists of the fcc matrix phase and of NiO oxide particles, the volume fraction of which is dozens of percents, and the crystal size is 5-30 nm. The formation of this structure is caused by the accelerated saturation of the strained nickel layer by oxygen atoms, the chemical interaction between nickel and oxygen atoms, and the primary recrystallization in the γ solid solution. The formation of the two-phase nanocrystalline structure, which leads to a considerable increase in hardness, does not have a positive effect on the durability of the nickel surface. Apparently, this is explained by the high brittleness of the analyzed structure. The highest durability is characteristic of a two-phase structure that consists of the γ solid solution supersaturated by oxygen and coarse (up to 200 nm) grains of NiO oxide. This structure forms in the nickel due to the deformation and subsequent oxidation at 800°C. Severe plastic deformation and oxidation have no considerable effect on the coefficient of friction ( f = 0.6-0.7).

  4. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  5. Structural defects in natural plastically deformed diamonds: Evidence from EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, R. M.; Titkov, S. V.; Speransky, A. V.

    2009-06-01

    Structural defects formed as a result of plastic deformation in natural diamond crystals have been studied by EPR spectroscopy. The spectra of brown, pink-brown, black-brown, pink-purple, and gray plastically deformed diamonds of type Ia from deposits in Yakutia and the Urals were recorded. The results of EPR spectroscopy allowed us to identify various deformation centers in the structure of natural diamonds and to show that nitrogen centers were transformed under epigenetic mechanical loading. Abundant A centers, consisting of two isomorphic nitrogen atoms located in neighboring structural sites, were destroyed as a result of this process to form a series of N1, N4, W7, M2, and M3 nitrogen centers. Such centers are characterized by an anisotropic spatial distribution and a positive charge, related to the mechanism of their formation. In addition, N2 centers (probably, deformation-produced dislocations decorated by nitrogen) were formed in all plastically deformed diamonds and W10 and W35 centers (the models have not been finally ascertained) were formed in some of them. It has been established that diamonds with various types of deformation-induced color contain characteristic associations of these deformation centers. The diversity of associations of deformation centers indicates appreciable variations in conditions of disintegration of deep-seated rocks, transfer of diamonds to the Earth’s surface, and formation of kimberlitic deposits. Depending on the conditions of mechanical loading, the diamond crystals were plastically deformed by either dislocation gliding or mechanical twinning. Characteristic features of plastic deformation by dislocation gliding are the substantial prevalence of the N2 centers over other deformation centers and the occurrence of the high-spin W10 and W35 centers. The attributes of less frequent plastic deformation by mechanical twinning are unusual localization of the M2 centers and, in some cases, the N1 centers in microtwinned

  6. Beneficial effects of benzodiazepine diazepam on chronic stress-induced impairment of hippocampal structural plasticity and depression-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunan; Wang, Zhongli; Dai, Jianguo; Chen, Lin; Huang, Yufang; Zhan, Zhen

    2012-03-17

    Whether benzodiazepines (BZDs) have beneficial effects on the progress of chronic stress-induced impairment of hippocampal structural plasticity and major depression is uncertain. The present study designed four preclinical experiments to determine the effects of BZDs using chronic unpredictable stress model. In Experiment 1, several time course studies on behavior and hippocampus response to stress were conducted using the forced swim and tail suspension tests (FST and TST) as well as hippocampal structural plasticity markers. Chronic stress induced depression-like behavior in the FST and TST as well as decreased hippocampal structural plasticity that returned to normal within 3 wk. In Experiment 2, mice received p.o. administration of three diazepam dosages prior to each variate stress session for 4 wk. This treatment significantly antagonized the elevation of stress-induced corticosterone levels. Only low- (0.5mg/kg) and medium-dose (1mg/kg) diazepam blocked the detrimental effects of chronic stress. In Experiment 3, after 7 wk of stress sessions, daily p.o. diazepam administration during 1 wk recovery phase dose-dependently accelerated the recovery of stressed mice. In Experiment 4, 1 wk diazepam administration to control mice enhanced significantly hippocampal structural plasticity and induced an antidepressant-like behavioral effect, whereas 4 wk diazepam administration produced opposite effects. Hence, diazepam can slow the progress of chronic stress-induced detrimental consequences by normalizing glucocorticoid hormones. Considering the adverse effect of long-term diazepam administration on hippocampal plasticity, the preventive effects of diazepam may depend on the proper dose. Short-term diazepam treatment enhances hippocampal structural plasticity and is beneficial to recovery following chronic stress. PMID:22198054

  7. Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Solonick, W.

    1996-11-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  8. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  9. Control Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Control Structures Interaction (CSI) technology for control of space structures is being developed cooperatively by JPL, LaRC and MSFC for NASA OAST/RM. The mid-'90s goal of JPL's CSI program is to demonstrate with analysis, ground and flight tests, the super quiet structures needed for large diffraction-limited instruments such as optical stellar interferometers and large advanced successors to the Hubble Space Telescope. Microprecision CSI technology is intended as a new "building block" for use by the designers of large optical systems. The thrust of the microprecision CSI technology effort is to achieve nanometer-levels of space structure stability/accuracy with designs which employ otherwise conventional spacecraft technologies. JPL design experiences have indicated the following CSI technology development areas are especially applicable to large optical system projects: (1) Active structural members; (2) Control/structures design methods; (3) Microdynamic effects characterization; and (4) Ground and flight test validation of CSI methods.

  10. Layer-specific cholinergic control of human and mouse cortical synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Matthijs B; Obermayer, Joshua; Kortleven, Christian A; Wilbers, René; Wester, Jordi; Baayen, Johannes C; De Kock, Christiaan P J; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2016-01-01

    Individual cortical layers have distinct roles in information processing. All layers receive cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain (BF), which is crucial for cognition. Acetylcholinergic receptors are differentially distributed across cortical layers, and recent evidence suggests that different populations of BF cholinergic neurons may target specific prefrontal cortical (PFC) layers, raising the question of whether cholinergic control of the PFC is layer dependent. Here we address this issue and reveal dendritic mechanisms by which endogenous cholinergic modulation of synaptic plasticity is opposite in superficial and deep layers of both mouse and human neocortex. Our results show that in different cortical layers, spike timing-dependent plasticity is oppositely regulated by the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) either located on dendrites of principal neurons or on GABAergic interneurons. Thus, layer-specific nAChR expression allows functional layer-specific control of cortical processing and plasticity by the BF cholinergic system, which is evolutionarily conserved from mice to humans. PMID:27604129

  11. Dynamic neural networking as a basis for plasticity in the control of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Kember, G; Armour, J A; Zamir, M

    2013-01-21

    A model is proposed in which the relationship between individual neurons within a neural network is dynamically changing to the effect of providing a measure of "plasticity" in the control of heart rate. The neural network on which the model is based consists of three populations of neurons residing in the central nervous system, the intrathoracic extracardiac nervous system, and the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. This hierarchy of neural centers is used to challenge the classical view that the control of heart rate, a key clinical index, resides entirely in central neuronal command (spinal cord, medulla oblongata, and higher centers). Our results indicate that dynamic networking allows for the possibility of an interplay among the three populations of neurons to the effect of altering the order of control of heart rate among them. This interplay among the three levels of control allows for different neural pathways for the control of heart rate to emerge under different blood flow demands or disease conditions and, as such, it has significant clinical implications because current understanding and treatment of heart rate anomalies are based largely on a single level of control and on neurons acting in unison as a single entity rather than individually within a (plastically) interconnected network. PMID:23041448

  12. Neuroendocrine control of seasonal plasticity in the auditory and vocal systems of fish

    PubMed Central

    Forlano, Paul M.; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Rohmann, Kevin N.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal changes in reproductive-related vocal behavior are widespread among fishes. This review highlights recent studies of the vocal plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, a neuroethological model system used for the past two decades to explore neural and endocrine mechanisms of vocal-acoustic social behaviors shared with tetrapods. Integrative approaches combining behavior, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, neuroanatomy, and gene expression methodologies have taken advantage of simple, stereotyped and easily quantifiable behaviors controlled by discrete neural networks in this model system to enable discoveries such as the first demonstration of adaptive seasonal plasticity in the auditory periphery of a vertebrate as well as rapid steroid and neuropeptide effects on vocal physiology and behavior. This simple model system has now revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying seasonal and steroid-driven auditory and vocal plasticity in the vertebrate brain. PMID:25168757

  13. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket.

    PubMed

    Niño, Carlos A; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent; Dargemont, Catherine

    2016-01-18

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  14. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Carlos A.; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  15. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  16. ACTIVITY-DEPENDENT STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY AFTER AVERSIVE EXPERIENCES IN AMYGDALA AND AUDITORY CORTEX PYRAMIDAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc− neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc− neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  17. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis-to-test correlation for structures subjected to dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.C.; Minicucci, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    A test program was undertaken to demonstrate the ability of elastic-plastic finite element methods to predict dynamic inelastic response for simple structural members. Cantilever and fixed-beam specimens were tested to levels that produced plastic straining in the range of 2.0% and to 3.0% and permanent sets. Acceleration, strain, and displacement data were recorded for use in analytical correlation. Correlation analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. Results of the correlation show that current elastic-plastic analysis techniques accurately capture dynamic inelastic response (displacement, acceleration) due to rapidly applied dynamic loading. Peak elastic and inelastic surface strains are accurately predicted. To accurately capture inelastic straining near connections, a solid model, including fillet welds, is necessary. The hardening models currently available in the ABAQUS code (isotropic, kinematic) do not accurately capture inelastic strain reversals caused by specimen rebound. Analyses performed consistently underpredicted the peak strain level of the first inelastic reversal and the rebound deflection and overpredicted the permanent set of structures experiencing inelastic rebound. Based on these findings, an improved hardening model is being implemented in the ABAQUS code by the developers. The intent of this model upgrade is to improve the ability of the program to capture inelastic strain reversals and to predict permanent sets.

  18. On the solution of elastic-plastic static and dynamic postbuckling collapse of general structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1983-01-01

    Many investigations have considered structural collapse from strictly the transient point of view. While such an approach is ideally correct, certain difficulties have to be overcome in its implementation. The present investigation is concerned with the development of self-adaptive algorithms which make it possible to conduct the analysis of both static elastic and elastic-plastic postbuckling, as well as static loading to the onset of buckling followed by subsequent dynamic postbuckling. The approach employed to solve the static portion of loading is to extend the constrained Incremental Newton-Raphson (INR) algorithm by incorporating elastic-plastic constitutive characterizations. Large deformation moderate strain theory is adopted to establish the overall strategy. Attention is given to governing field equations, aspects of algorithmic development, and numerical experiments conducted to illustrate the efficiency and stability of the developed schemes.

  19. Robust control for uncertain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Joel; Athans, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on robust control for uncertain structures are presented. Topics covered include: robust linear quadratic regulator (RLQR) formulas; mismatched LQR design; RLQR design; interpretations of RLQR design; disturbance rejection; and performance comparisons: RLQR vs. mismatched LQR.

  20. Length of Acupuncture Training and Structural Plastic Brain Changes in Professional Acupuncturists

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Minghao; Zhao, Ling; Yuan, Kai; Zeng, Fang; Sun, Jinbo; Liu, Jixin; Yu, Dahua; von Deneen, Karen M.; Liang, Fanrong; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background The research on brain plasticity has fascinated researchers for decades. Use/training serves as an instrumental factor to influence brain neuroplasticity. Parallel to acquisition of behavioral expertise, extensive use/training is concomitant with substantial changes of cortical structure. Acupuncturists, serving as a model par excellence to study tactile-motor and emotional regulation plasticity, receive intensive training in national medical schools following standardized training protocol. Moreover, their behavioral expertise is corroborated during long-term clinical practice. Although our previous study reported functional plastic brain changes in the acupuncturists, whether or not structural plastic changes occurred in acupuncturists is yet elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Cohorts of acupuncturists (N = 22) and non-acupuncturists (N = 22) were recruited. Behavioral tests were delivered to assess the acupuncturists’ behavioral expertise. The results confirmed acupuncturists’ tactile-motor skills and emotion regulation proficiency compared to non-acupuncturists. Using the voxel-based morphometry technique, we revealed larger grey matter volumes in acupuncturists in the hand representation of the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI), the right lobule V/VI and the bilateral ventral anterior cingulate cortex/ventral medial prefrontal cortex. Grey matter volumes of the SI and Lobule V/VI positively correlated with the duration of acupuncture practice. Conclusions To our best knowledge, this study provides first evidence for the anatomical alterations in acupuncturists, which would possibly be the neural correlates underlying acupuncturists’ exceptional skills. On one hand, we suggest our findings may have ramifications for tactile-motor rehabilitation. On the other hand, our results in emotion regulation domain may serve as a target for our future studies, from which we can understand how modulations of aversive emotions

  1. Structural scheme optimization design for the stationary platen of a precision plastic injection molding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bin; Zhang, Shuyou; Tan, Jianrong

    2014-07-01

    The current development of precision plastic injection molding machines mainly focuses on how to save material and improve precision, but the two aims contradict each other. For a clamp unit, clamping precision improving depends on the design quality of the stationary platen. Compared with the parametric design of stationary platen, structural scheme design could obtain the optimization model with double objectives and multi-constraints. In this paper, a SE-160 precision plastic injection molding machine with 1600 kN clamping force is selected as the subject in the case study. During the motion of mold closing and opening, the stationary platen of SE-160 is subjected to a cyclic loading, which would cause the fatigue rupture of the tie bars in periodically long term operations. In order to reduce the deflection of the stationary platen, the FEA method is introduced to optimize the structure of the stationary platen. Firstly, an optimal topology model is established by variable density method. Then, structural topology optimizations of the stationary platen are done with the removable material from 50%, 60% to 70%. Secondly, the other two recommended optimization schemes are given and compared with the original structure. The result of performances comparison shows that the scheme II of the platen is the best one. By choosing the best alternative, the volume and the local maximal stress of the platen could be decreased, corresponding to cost-saving material and better mechanical properties. This paper proposes a structural optimization design scheme, which can save the material as well as improve the clamping precision of the precision plastic injection molding machine.

  2. Microtransfer printing of metal ink patterns onto plastic substrates utilizing an adhesion-controlled polymeric donor layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Min-Kyu; Bae, Jeong Min; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for transfer-printed electrode patterns onto flexible/plastic substrates, specifically intended for metal ink that requires a high sintering temperature. Typically, metal-ink-based electrodes cannot be picked up for microtransfer printing because the adhesion between the electrodes and the donor substrate greatly increases after the sintering process due to the binding materials. We introduced a polymeric donor layer between the printed electrodes and the donor substrate and effectively reduced the adhesion between the Ag pattern and the polymeric donor layer by controlling the interfacial contact area. After completing a wet-etching process for the polymeric donor layer, we obtained Ag patterns supported on the fine polymeric anchor structures; the Ag patterns could be picked up onto the stamp surface even after the sintering process by utilizing the viscoelastic properties of the elastomeric stamp with a pick-up velocity control. The proposed method enables highly conductive metal-ink-based electrode patterns to be applied on thermally weak plastic substrates via an all-solution process. Metal electrodes transferred onto a film showed superior electrical and mechanical stability under the bending stress test required for use in printed flexible electronics.

  3. Spike train auto-structure impacts post-synaptic firing and timing-based plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Bertram; Castellano, Marta; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Cortical neurons are typically driven by several thousand synapses. The precise spatiotemporal pattern formed by these inputs can modulate the response of a post-synaptic cell. In this work, we explore how the temporal structure of pre-synaptic inhibitory and excitatory inputs impact the post-synaptic firing of a conductance-based integrate and fire neuron. Both the excitatory and inhibitory input was modeled by renewal gamma processes with varying shape factors for modeling regular and temporally random Poisson activity. We demonstrate that the temporal structure of mutually independent inputs affects the post-synaptic firing, while the strength of the effect depends on the firing rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. In a second step, we explore the effect of temporal structure of mutually independent inputs on a simple version of Hebbian learning, i.e., hard bound spike-timing-dependent plasticity. We explore both the equilibrium weight distribution and the speed of the transient weight dynamics for different mutually independent gamma processes. We find that both the equilibrium distribution of the synaptic weights and the speed of synaptic changes are modulated by the temporal structure of the input. Finally, we highlight that the sensitivity of both the post-synaptic firing as well as the spike-timing-dependent plasticity on the auto-structure of the input of a neuron could be used to modulate the learning rate of synaptic modification. PMID:22203800

  4. Spike Train Auto-Structure Impacts Post-Synaptic Firing and Timing-Based Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Bertram; Castellano, Marta; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Cortical neurons are typically driven by several thousand synapses. The precise spatiotemporal pattern formed by these inputs can modulate the response of a post-synaptic cell. In this work, we explore how the temporal structure of pre-synaptic inhibitory and excitatory inputs impact the post-synaptic firing of a conductance-based integrate and fire neuron. Both the excitatory and inhibitory input was modeled by renewal gamma processes with varying shape factors for modeling regular and temporally random Poisson activity. We demonstrate that the temporal structure of mutually independent inputs affects the post-synaptic firing, while the strength of the effect depends on the firing rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. In a second step, we explore the effect of temporal structure of mutually independent inputs on a simple version of Hebbian learning, i.e., hard bound spike-timing-dependent plasticity. We explore both the equilibrium weight distribution and the speed of the transient weight dynamics for different mutually independent gamma processes. We find that both the equilibrium distribution of the synaptic weights and the speed of synaptic changes are modulated by the temporal structure of the input. Finally, we highlight that the sensitivity of both the post-synaptic firing as well as the spike-timing-dependent plasticity on the auto-structure of the input of a neuron could be used to modulate the learning rate of synaptic modification. PMID:22203800

  5. Heterosynaptic structural plasticity on local dendritic segments of hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Won Chan; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Zito, Karen

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Competition between synapses contributes to activity-dependent refinement of the nervous system during development. Does local competition between neighboring synapses drive circuit remodeling during experience-dependent plasticity in the cerebral cortex? Here, we examined the role of activity-mediated competitive interactions in regulating dendritic spine structure and function on hippocampal CA1 neurons. We found that high-frequency glutamatergic stimulation at individual spines, which leads to input-specific synaptic potentiation, induces shrinkage and weakening of nearby unstimulated synapses. This heterosynaptic plasticity requires potentiation of multiple neighboring spines, suggesting that a local threshold of neural activity exists beyond which inactive synapses are punished. Notably, inhibition of calcineurin, IP3Rs, or group I mGluRs blocked heterosynaptic shrinkage without blocking structural potentiation, and inhibition of CaMKII blocked structural potentiation without blocking heterosynaptic shrinkage. Our results support a model in which activity-induced shrinkage signal, and not competition for limited structural resources, drives heterosynaptic structural and functional depression during neural circuit refinement. PMID:25558061

  6. Event Structure and Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Jason F.; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Lorsbach, Thomas C.; Armendarez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by…

  7. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C; Kuil, Laura E; Lucassen, Paul J; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harm; Joels, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity. PMID:26600250

  8. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C.; Kuil, Laura E.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity. PMID:26600250

  9. Influence of structural heterogeneity on the structural coarsening during annealing of polycrystalline Ni subjected to dynamic plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. W.; Luo, Z. P.; Hansen, N.; Lu, K.

    2015-08-01

    The structural heterogeneity of a polycrystalline Ni subjected to dynamic plastic deformation to a strain of 2.3 was characterized, and its influence on the structural coarsening behaviour during post annealing was investigated. Structural heterogeneity on the large scale manifests itself by formation of two types of layers: low misoriented regions (LMRs) and highly misoriented regions (HMRs). On the small scale, the heterogeneity was characterized by different distributions of boundaries and textures in each layer. LMRs contain only low angle boundaries and one dominating crystallographic orientation. In contrast HMRs contain both low and high angle boundaries (>15°) and the texture is mixed with <011> close to the compression axis. During annealing, LMRs coarsen uniformly and recrystallization nucleation is difficult to form. In HMRs, the structural evolution is heterogeneous and recrystallization nuclei are readily formed. The importance of structural heterogeneity during structural design for high performance nanostructure was highlighted.

  10. Flexible particle array structures by controlling polymer graft architecture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihoon; Dong, Hongchen; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2010-09-15

    Surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is used to synthesize particle brushes with controlled fraction of extended and relaxed conformations of surface-grafted chains. In the semidilute brush limit, the grafting of polymeric ligands is shown to facilitate the formation of ordered yet plastic-compliant particle array structures in which chain entanglements give rise to fracture through a polymer-like crazing process that dramatically increases the toughness and flexibility of the particle assembly. PMID:20726581

  11. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-01-01

    How can we strengthen the science–policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science–policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides. PMID:19528061

  12. Annual reversible plasticity of feeding structures: cyclical changes of jaw allometry in a sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Thomas A.; Hernández, José Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of organisms show morphologically plastic responses to environmental stressors but in general these changes are not reversible. Though less common, reversible morphological structures are shown by a range of species in response to changes in predators, competitors or food. Theoretical analysis indicates that reversible plasticity increases fitness if organisms are long-lived relative to the frequency of changes in the stressor and morphological changes are rapid. Many sea urchin species show differences in the sizes of jaws (demi-pyramids) of the feeding apparatus, Aristotle's lantern, relative to overall body size, and these differences have been correlated with available food. The question addressed here is whether reversible changes of relative jaw size occur in the field as available food changes with season. Monthly samples of the North American Pacific coast sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus were collected from Gregory Point on the Oregon (USA) coast and showed an annual cycle of relative jaw size together with a linear trend from 2007 to 2009. Strongylocentrotus purpuratus is a long-lived species and under field conditions individuals experience multiple episodes of changes in food resources both seasonally and from year to year. Their rapid and reversible jaw plasticity fits well with theoretical expectations. PMID:24500161

  13. Low-grade inflammation disrupts structural plasticity in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Szabó, C; Kelemen, O; Kéri, S

    2014-09-01

    Increased low-grade inflammation is thought to be associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by decreased neuronal plasticity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between structural changes in the human brain during cognitive training and the intensity of low-grade peripheral inflammation in healthy individuals (n=56). A two-month training (30 min/day) with a platformer video game resulted in a significantly increased volume of the right hippocampal formation. The number of stressful life events experienced during the past year was associated with less pronounced enlargement of the hippocampus. However, the main predictor of hippocampal volume expansion was the relative peripheral expression of Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB), a transcription factor playing a central role in the effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein levels were not related to hippocampal plasticity when NF-κB was taken into consideration. These results suggest that more intensive peripheral inflammation is associated with weaker neuronal plasticity during cognitive training. PMID:24929068

  14. Structuring policy problems for plastics, the environment and human health: reflections from the UK.

    PubMed

    Shaxson, Louise

    2009-07-27

    How can we strengthen the science-policy interface for plastics, the environment and human health? In a complex policy area with multiple stakeholders, it is important to clarify the nature of the particular plastics-related issue before trying to understand how to reconcile the supply and demand for evidence in policy. This article proposes a simple problem typology to assess the fundamental characteristics of a policy issue and thus identify appropriate processes for science-policy interactions. This is illustrated with two case studies from one UK Government Department, showing how policy and science meet over the environmental problems of plastics waste in the marine environment and on land. A problem-structuring methodology helps us understand why some policy issues can be addressed through relatively linear flows of science from experts to policymakers but why others demand a more reflexive approach to brokering the knowledge between science and policy. Suggestions are given at the end of the article for practical actions that can be taken on both sides. PMID:19528061

  15. The Structurally Plastic CH2 Domain Is Linked to Distinct Functions of Fimbrins/Plastins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihui; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Youjun; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-08-19

    Fimbrins/plastins have been implicated in the generation of distinct actin structures, which are linked to different cellular processes. Historically, fimbrins/plastins were mainly considered as generating tight actin bundles. Here, we demonstrate that different members of the fimbrin/plastin family have diverged biochemically during evolution to generate either tight actin bundles or loose networks with distinct biochemical and biophysical properties. Using the phylogenetically and functionally distinct Arabidopsis fimbrins FIM4 and FIM5 we found that FIM4 generates both actin bundles and cross-linked actin filaments, whereas FIM5 only generates actin bundles. The distinct functions of FIM4 and FIM5 are clearly observed at single-filament resolution. Domain swapping experiments showed that cooperation between the conformationally plastic calponin-homology domain 2 (CH2) and the N-terminal headpiece determines the function of the full-length protein. Our study suggests that the structural plasticity of fimbrins/plastins has biologically meaningful consequences, and provides novel insights into the structure-function relationship of fimbrins/plastins as well as shedding light on how cells generate distinct actin structures. PMID:27261463

  16. Unravelling how βCaMKII controls the direction of plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Thiago M.; Schilstra, Maria J.; Steuber, Volker; Roque, Antonio C.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term plasticity at parallel fibre (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses is thought to mediate cerebellar motor learning. It is known that calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is essential for plasticity in the cerebellum. Recently, Van Woerden et al. demonstrated that the β isoform of CaMKII regulates the bidirectional inversion of PF-PC plasticity. Because the cellular events that underlie these experimental findings are still poorly understood, our work aims at unravelling how β CaMKII controls the direction of plasticity at PF-PC synapses. We developed a bidirectional plasticity model that replicates the experimental observations by Van Woerden et al. Simulation results obtained from this model indicate the mechanisms that underlie the bidirectional inversion of cerebellar plasticity. As suggested by Van Woerden et al., the filamentous actin binding enables β CaMKII to regulate the bidirectional plasticity at PF-PC synapses. Our model suggests that the reversal of long-term plasticity in PCs is based on a combination of mechanisms that occur at different calcium concentrations.

  17. Molecular surface structural changes of plasticized PVC materials after plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2013-03-26

    In this research, a variety of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to investigate the surface and bulk structures of phthalate plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) at the molecular level. Two types of phthalate molecules with different chain lengths, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mixed with PVC in various weight ratios were examined to verify their different surface and bulk behaviors. The effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatment on PVC/DBP and PVC/DEP hybrid films were investigated on both the surface and bulk of films using SFG and CARS to evaluate the different plasticizer migration processes. Without plasma treatment, SFG results indicated that more plasticizers segregate to the surface at higher plasticizer bulk concentrations. SFG studies also demonstrated the presence of phthalates on the surface even at very low bulk concentration (5 wt %). Additionally, the results gathered from SFG, CARS, and XPS experiments suggested that the PVC/DEP system was unstable, and DEP molecules could leach out from the PVC under low vacuum after several minutes. In contrast, the PVC/DBP system was more stable; the migration process of DBP out of PVC could be effectively suppressed after oxygen plasma treatment. XPS results indicated the increase of C═O/C-O groups and decrease of C-Cl functionalities on the polymer surface after oxygen plasma treatment. The XPS results also suggested that exposure to argon plasma induced chemical bond breaking and formation of cross-linking or unsaturated groups with chain scission on the surface. Finally, our results indicate the potential risk of using DEP molecules in PVC since DEP can easily leach out from the polymeric bulk. PMID:23445444

  18. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity in spiking neuron networks for robot navigation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Danieli, Fabio; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Patane, Luca

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a biologically-inspired network of spiking neurons is used for robot navigation control. The implemented scheme is able to process information coming from the robot contact sensors in order to avoid obstacles and on the basis of these actions to learn how to respond to stimuli coming from range finder sensors. The implemented network is therefore able of reinforcement learning through a mechanism based on operant conditioning. This learning takes place according to a plasticity law in the synapses, based on spike timing. Simulation results discussed in the paper show the suitability of the approach and interesting adaptive properties of the network.

  19. Predicting Performance and Plasticity in the Development of Respiratory Structures and Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Montooth, Kristi L.; Helm, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    The scaling laws governing metabolism suggest that we can predict metabolic rates across taxonomic scales that span large differences in mass. Yet, scaling relationships can vary with development, body region, and environment. Within species, there is variation in metabolic rate that is independent of mass and which may be explained by genetic variation, the environment or their interaction (i.e., metabolic plasticity). Additionally, some structures, such as the insect tracheal respiratory system, change throughout development and in response to the environment to match the changing functional requirements of the organism. We discuss how study of the development of respiratory function meets multiple challenges set forth by the NSF Grand Challenges Workshop. Development of the structure and function of respiratory and metabolic systems (1) is inherently stable and yet can respond dynamically to change, (2) is plastic and exhibits sensitivity to environments, and (3) can be examined across multiple scales in time and space. Predicting respiratory performance and plasticity requires quantitative models that integrate information across scales of function from the expression of metabolic genes and mitochondrial biogenesis to the building of respiratory structures. We present insect models where data are available on the development of the tracheal respiratory system and of metabolic physiology and suggest what is needed to develop predictive models. Incorporating quantitative genetic data will enable mapping of genetic and genetic-by-environment variation onto phenotypes, which is necessary to understand the evolution of respiratory and metabolic systems and their ability to enable respiratory homeostasis as organisms walk the tightrope between stability and change. PMID:24812329

  20. RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Diego; Bastide, Amandine; Radford, Helois; Verity, Nicholas; Molloy, Colin; Martin, Maria Guerra; Moreno, Julie A.; Steinert, Joern R; Smith, Tim; Dinsdale, David; Willis, Anne E.; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity1. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases2, 3, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. While much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders2,3, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity4, 5. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM36. The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5×FAD (Alzheimer-type) mice7, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. Further, RBM3 over-expression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia prior to the loss of the RBM3 response, or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5×FAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support

  1. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-02-18

    Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realization that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and importance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncovers the key role this identity has in controlling organ size, reproductive plasticity and response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms that control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognized. PMID:26887495

  2. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realisation that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles1,2. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and significance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncover its key roles in controlling organ size, its reproductive plasticity and its response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms, which control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognised. PMID:26887495

  3. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements adaptable gain control in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Jesús A.; Luque, Niceto R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Adaptable gain regulation is at the core of the forward controller operation performed by the cerebro-cerebellar loops and it allows the intensity of motor acts to be finely tuned in a predictive manner. In order to learn and store information about body-object dynamics and to generate an internal model of movement, the cerebellum is thought to employ long-term synaptic plasticity. LTD at the PF-PC synapse has classically been assumed to subserve this function (Marr, 1969). However, this plasticity alone cannot account for the broad dynamic ranges and time scales of cerebellar adaptation. We therefore tested the role of plasticity distributed over multiple synaptic sites (Hansel et al., 2001; Gao et al., 2012) by generating an analog cerebellar model embedded into a control loop connected to a robotic simulator. The robot used a three-joint arm and performed repetitive fast manipulations with different masses along an 8-shape trajectory. In accordance with biological evidence, the cerebellum model was endowed with both LTD and LTP at the PF-PC, MF-DCN and PC-DCN synapses. This resulted in a network scheme whose effectiveness was extended considerably compared to one including just PF-PC synaptic plasticity. Indeed, the system including distributed plasticity reliably self-adapted to manipulate different masses and to learn the arm-object dynamics over a time course that included fast learning and consolidation, along the lines of what has been observed in behavioral tests. In particular, PF-PC plasticity operated as a time correlator between the actual input state and the system error, while MF-DCN and PC-DCN plasticity played a key role in generating the gain controller. This model suggests that distributed synaptic plasticity allows generation of the complex learning properties of the cerebellum. The incorporation of further plasticity mechanisms and of spiking signal processing will allow this concept to be extended in a more realistic computational scenario

  4. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements adaptable gain control in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Jesús A; Luque, Niceto R; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Adaptable gain regulation is at the core of the forward controller operation performed by the cerebro-cerebellar loops and it allows the intensity of motor acts to be finely tuned in a predictive manner. In order to learn and store information about body-object dynamics and to generate an internal model of movement, the cerebellum is thought to employ long-term synaptic plasticity. LTD at the PF-PC synapse has classically been assumed to subserve this function (Marr, 1969). However, this plasticity alone cannot account for the broad dynamic ranges and time scales of cerebellar adaptation. We therefore tested the role of plasticity distributed over multiple synaptic sites (Hansel et al., 2001; Gao et al., 2012) by generating an analog cerebellar model embedded into a control loop connected to a robotic simulator. The robot used a three-joint arm and performed repetitive fast manipulations with different masses along an 8-shape trajectory. In accordance with biological evidence, the cerebellum model was endowed with both LTD and LTP at the PF-PC, MF-DCN and PC-DCN synapses. This resulted in a network scheme whose effectiveness was extended considerably compared to one including just PF-PC synaptic plasticity. Indeed, the system including distributed plasticity reliably self-adapted to manipulate different masses and to learn the arm-object dynamics over a time course that included fast learning and consolidation, along the lines of what has been observed in behavioral tests. In particular, PF-PC plasticity operated as a time correlator between the actual input state and the system error, while MF-DCN and PC-DCN plasticity played a key role in generating the gain controller. This model suggests that distributed synaptic plasticity allows generation of the complex learning properties of the cerebellum. The incorporation of further plasticity mechanisms and of spiking signal processing will allow this concept to be extended in a more realistic computational scenario

  5. Structural Plasticity within the Barrel Cortex during Initial Phases of Whisker-Dependent Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Daniel H.; Fox, Kevin; Svoboda, Karel

    2014-01-01

    We report learning-related structural plasticity in layer 1 branches of pyramidal neurons in the barrel cortex, a known site of sensorimotor integration. In mice learning an active, whisker-dependent object localization task, layer 2/3 neurons showed enhanced spine growth during initial skill acquisition that both preceded and predicted expert performance. Preexisting spines were stabilized and new persistent spines were formed. These findings suggest rapid changes in connectivity between motor centers and sensory cortex guide subsequent sensorimotor learning. PMID:24760867

  6. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Judith R.; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E.; Ruegg, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  7. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Judith R; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E; Ruegg, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  8. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    SciTech Connect

    Habib Ullah, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2013-11-25

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz.

  9. Advanced Grounding Methods in the Presence of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leininger, M.; Thurecht, F.; Pfeiffer, E.; Ruddle, A.

    2012-05-01

    Lightweight satellite structures are usually of sandwich type where the core is formed of a honeycomb-like structure made of aluminium foil. The outer facesheets are made of aluminium and serve as a ground reference plane. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP), however, is a composite material having an electrical conductivity that is about 2000 times lower than the conductivity of aluminium. Since such a material is not suitable to carry electrical current of high value a network of metal sheets (grounding rails) connects all equipment mounted on the satellite structure. This paper describes an evaluation whether the classical grounding rail system can be replaced by a network of round wires while the high-frequency portion of the current is flowing along the CFRP sheet.

  10. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of plasticization and antiplasticization in glassy encapsulation and biostabilization matrices.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Job

    2016-05-01

    The structural and thermodynamic properties of glassy carbohydrate matrices for the encapsulation and biostabilization of sensitive bioactive compounds, such as pharmaceutically active proteins and oxidation-sensitive compounds, are reviewed in the context of the plasticization and antiplasticization of glassy carbohydrates of intermediate and high molecular weight by low molecular weight diluents. Plasticization and antiplasticization may be monitored either by dynamic measures or by structural and thermodynamic features of the glassy matrices. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the decrease in size of the molecular free volume holes with increasing diluent content, as determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), is related to the antiplasticization of glassy carbohydrate matrices, resulting in increased barrier properties of the glassy matrix. As far as could be ascertained from the available data, the regimes as identified by PALS map on those detected by neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy for glassy matrices consisting of trehalose and the diluent glycerol. The review is concluded by a survey of the published results on the stability of bioactive compounds encapsulated in carbohydrate glasses and an overview of outstanding questions. PMID:26748258

  11. Bidirectional Synaptic Structural Plasticity after Chronic Cocaine Administration Occurs through Rap1 Small GTPase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Michael E; Bagot, Rosemary C; Gancarz, Amy M; Walker, Deena M; Sun, HaoSheng; Wang, Zi-Jun; Heller, Elizabeth A; Feng, Jian; Kennedy, Pamela J; Koo, Ja Wook; Cates, Hannah M; Neve, Rachael L; Shen, Li; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic spines are the sites of most excitatory synapses in the CNS, and opposing alterations in the synaptic structure of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a primary brain reward region, are seen at early versus late time points after cocaine administration. Here we investigate the time-dependent molecular and biochemical processes that regulate this bidirectional synaptic structural plasticity of NAc MSNs and associated changes in cocaine reward in response to chronic cocaine exposure. Our findings reveal key roles for the bidirectional synaptic expression of the Rap1b small GTPase and an associated local synaptic protein translation network in this process. The transcriptional mechanisms and pathway-specific inputs to NAc that regulate Rap1b expression are also characterized. Collectively, these findings provide a precise mechanism by which nuclear to synaptic interactions induce "metaplasticity" in NAc MSNs, and we reveal the specific effects of this plasticity on reward behavior in a brain circuit-specific manner. PMID:26844834

  12. Lim kinase, a bi-functional effector in injury-induced structural plasticity of synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The structural plasticity of synaptic terminals contributes to normal nervous system function but also to neural degeneration, in the form of terminal retraction, and regeneration, due to process growth. Synaptic morphological change is mediated through the actin cytoskeleton, which is enriched in axonal and dendritic terminals. Whereas the three RhoGTPases, RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac, function as upstream signaling nodes sensitive to extracellular stimuli, LIMK-cofilin activity serves as a common downstream effector to up-regulate actin turnover, which is necessary for both polymerization and depolymerization. The dual effects of LIMK activity make LIMK a potential target of therapeutic intervention for injury-induced synaptic plasticity, as LIMK inhibition can stabilize actin cytoskeleton and preserve existing structure. This therapeutic benefit of LIMK inhibition has been demonstrated in animal models of injury-induced axon retraction and neuritic sprouting by rod photoreceptors. A better understanding of the regulation of LIMK-cofilin activity and the interaction with the microtubular cytoskeleton may open new ways to promote synaptic regeneration that can benefit neuronal degenerative disease.

  13. Structural load control during construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In the absence of gravitational pull, the major design considerations for large space structures are stiffness for controllability, and transient dynamic loadings (as opposed to the traditional static load associated with earth-based structures). Because of the absence of gravitational loading, space structures can be designed to be significantly lighter than their counterparts on Earth. For example, the Space Shuttle manipulator arm is capable of moving and positioning a 60,000 lb payload, yet weighs less than 1,000 lbs. A recent design for the Space Station which had a total weight of about 500,000 lbs. used a primary loadcarrying keel beam which weighed less than 10,000 lbs. For many large space structures designs it is quite common for the load-carrying structure to have a mass fraction on the order of one or two percent of the total spacecraft mass. This significant weight reduction for large space structures is commonly accompanied by very low natural frequencies. These low frequencies cause an unprecedented level of operational complexity for mission applications which require a high level of positioning and control accuracy. This control problem is currently the subject of considerable research directed towards reducing the flexibility problem. In addition, however, the small mass fraction typically results in structures which are quite unforgiving to inadvertent high loadings. In other words, the structures are 'fragile.' In order to deal with the fragility issue CSC developed a load-limiting concept for space truss structures. This concept is aimed at limiting the levels of load which can occur in a large space structure during the construction process as well as during subsequent operations. Currently, the approach for dealing with large loadings is to make the structure larger. The impact this has on construction is significant. The larger structures are more difficult to package in the launch vehicle, and in fact in some instances the concept must be

  14. Event structure and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jason F; Radvansky, Gabriel A; Lorsbach, Thomas C; Armendarez, Joseph J

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by shifting the spatial location of cues and probes on a computer screen. When location shifts were present, a pattern of AX-CPT performance consistent with enhanced cognitive control was found. To test whether the location shift effects were caused by the presence of event boundaries per se, other aspects of the AX-CPT were manipulated, such as the color of cues and probes and the inclusion of a distractor task during the cue-probe delay. Changes in cognitive control were not found under these conditions, suggesting that the location shift effects were specifically related to the formation of separate event models. Together, these results can be accounted for by the Event Horizon Model and a representation-based theory of cognitive control, and suggest that cognitive control can be influenced by the surrounding environmental structure. PMID:25603168

  15. A biological cosmos of parallel universes: does protein structural plasticity facilitate evolution?

    PubMed

    Meier, Sebastian; Ozbek, Suat

    2007-11-01

    While Darwin pictured organismal evolution as "descent with modification" more than 150 years ago, a detailed reconstruction of the basic evolutionary transitions at the molecular level is only emerging now. In particular, the evolution of today's protein structures and their concurrent functions has remained largely mysterious, as the destruction of these structures by mutation seems far easier than their construction. While the accumulation of genomic and structural data has indicated that proteins are related via common ancestors, naturally occurring protein structures are often considered to be evolutionarily robust, thus leaving open the question of how protein structures can be remodelled while selective pressure forces them to function. New information on the proteome, however, increasingly explains the nature of local and global conformational diversity in protein evolution, which allows the acquisition of novel functions via molecular transition forms containing ancestral and novel structures in dynamic equilibrium. Such structural plasticity may permit the evolution of new protein folds and help account for both the origins of new biological functions and the nature of molecular defects. PMID:17935152

  16. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  17. Structural Plasticity Underpins Promiscuous Binding of the Prosurvival Protein A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smits,C.; Czabotar, P.; Hinds, M.; Day, C.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic pathways are regulated by protein-protein interactions. Interaction of the BH3 domains of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins with the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins is critical. Whereas some BH3 domains bind in a promiscuous manner, others exhibit considerable selectivity and the sequence characteristics that distinguish these activities are unclear. In this study, crystal structures of complexes between the prosurvival protein A1 and the BH3 domains from Puma, Bmf, Bak, and Bid have been solved. The structure of A1 is similar to that of other prosurvival proteins, although features, such as an acidic patch in the binding groove, may allow specific therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. Significant conformational plasticity was observed in the intermolecular interactions and these differences explain some of the variation in affinity. This study, in combination with published data, suggests that interactions between conserved residues demarcate optimal binding.

  18. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Stryker, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state. PMID:25948638

  19. Control of synaptic plasticity and memory via suppression of poly(A)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Yanagiya, Akiko; Gkogkas, Christos G; Fabian, Marc R; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Cao, Ruifeng; Gamache, Karine; Bouthiette, Frederic; Parsyan, Armen; Sorge, Robert E; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2013-04-24

    Control of protein synthesis is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms linking neuronal activity to activation of mRNA translation are not fully understood. Here, we report that the translational repressor poly(A)-binding protein (PABP)-interacting protein 2A (PAIP2A), an inhibitor of PABP, is rapidly proteolyzed by calpains in stimulated neurons and following training for contextual memory. Paip2a knockout mice exhibit a lowered threshold for the induction of sustained long-term potentiation and an enhancement of long-term memory after weak training. Translation of CaMKIIα mRNA is enhanced in Paip2a⁻/⁻ slices upon tetanic stimulation and in the hippocampus of Paip2a⁻/⁻ mice following contextual fear learning. We demonstrate that activity-dependent degradation of PAIP2A relieves translational inhibition of memory-related genes through PABP reactivation and conclude that PAIP2A is a pivotal translational regulator of synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:23622065

  20. Controllability of structural brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function.

  1. Controllability of structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function. PMID:26423222

  2. Combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Milman, M.; Bruno, R.; Scheid, R.; Gibson, S.

    1989-01-01

    An approach for combined control-structure optimization keyed to enhancing early design trade-offs is outlined and illustrated by numerical examples. The approach employs a homotopic strategy and appears to be effective for generating families of designs that can be used in these early trade studies. Analytical results were obtained for classes of structure/control objectives with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) costs. For these, researchers demonstrated that global optima can be computed for small values of the homotopy parameter. Conditions for local optima along the homotopy path were also given. Details of two numerical examples employing the LQR control cost were given showing variations of the optimal design variables along the homotopy path. The results of the second example suggest that introducing a second homotopy parameter relating the two parts of the control index in the LQG/LQR formulation might serve to enlarge the family of Pareto optima, but its effect on modifying the optimal structural shapes may be analogous to the original parameter lambda.

  3. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  4. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  5. Seasonal regulation of structural plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain: focus on the sheep hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Migaud, Martine; Butrille, Lucile; Batailler, Martine

    2015-04-01

    To cope with variations in the environment, most mammalian species exhibit seasonal cycles in physiology and behaviour. Seasonal plasticity during the lifetime contributes to seasonal physiology. Over the years, our ideas regarding adult brain plasticity and, more specifically, hypothalamic plasticity have greatly evolved. Along with the two main neurogenic regions, namely the hippocampal subgranular and lateral ventricle subventricular zones, the hypothalamus, which is the central homeostatic regulator of numerous physiological functions that comprise sexual behaviours, feeding and metabolism, also hosts neurogenic niches. Both endogenous and exogenous factors, including the photoperiod, modulate the hypothalamic neurogenic capacities. The present review describes the effects of season on adult morphological plasticity and neurogenesis in seasonal species, for which the photoperiod is a master environmental cue for the successful programming of seasonal functions. In addition, the potential functional significance of adult neurogenesis in the mediation of the seasonal control of reproduction and feeding is discussed. PMID:25462590

  6. Solvation structure around the Li(+) ion in succinonitrile-lithium salt plastic crystalline electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuneng; Deng, Gang-Hua; Ge, Chuanqi; Tian, Yuhuan; Wu, Guorong; Yang, Xueming; Zheng, Junrong; Yuan, Kaijun

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we discuss the study of solvation dynamics of lithium-succinonitrile (SN) plastic crystalline electrolytes by ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra indicated that the CN stretch of the Li(+) bound and unbound succinonitrile molecules in a same solution have distinct vibrational frequencies (2276 cm(-1)vs. 2253 cm(-1)). The frequency difference allowed us to measure the rotation decay times of solvent molecules bound and unbound to Li(+) ion. The Li(+) coordination number of the Li(+)-SN complex was found to be 2 in the plastic crystal phase (22 °C) and 2.5-3 in the liquid phase (80 °C), which is independent of the concentration (from 0.05 mol kg(-1) to 2 mol kg(-1)). The solvation structures along with DFT calculations of the Li(+)-SN complex have been discussed. In addition, the dissociation percentage of lithium salt was also determined. In 0.5 mol kg(-1) LiBF4-SN solutions at 80 °C, 60% ± 10% of the salt dissociates into Li(+), which is bound by 2 or 3 solvent molecules. In the 0.5 mol kg(-1) LiClO4-SN solutions at 80 °C, the salt dissociation ratio can be up to 90% ± 10%. PMID:27189266

  7. Needle-based fluorescence endomicroscopy via structured illumination with a plastic, achromatic objective

    PubMed Central

    Kyrish, Matthew; Dobbs, Jessica; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In order to diagnose cancer, a sample must be removed, prepared, and examined under a microscope, which is expensive, invasive, and time consuming. Fiber optic fluorescence endomicroscopy, where an image guide is used to obtain high-resolution images of tissue in vivo, has shown promise as an alternative to conventional biopsies. However, the resolution of standard endomicroscopy is limited by the fiber bundle sampling frequency and out-of-focus light. A system is presented which incorporates a plastic, achromatic objective to increase the sampling and which provides optical sectioning via structured illumination to reject background light. An image is relayed from the sample by a fiber bundle with the custom 2.1-mm outer diameter objective lens integrated to the distal tip. The objective is corrected for the excitation and the emission wavelengths of proflavine (452 and 515 nm). It magnifies the object onto the fiber bundle to improve the system’s lateral resolution by increasing the sampling. The plastic lenses were fabricated via single-point diamond turning and assembled using a zero alignment technique. Ex vivo images of normal and neoplastic murine mammary tissues stained with proflavine are captured. The system achieves higher contrast and resolves smaller features than standard fluorescence endomicroscopy. PMID:24002190

  8. Synaptic plasticity in a cerebellum-like structure depends on temporal order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis C.; Han, Victor Z.; Sugawara, Yoshiko; Grant, Kirsty

    1997-05-01

    Cerebellum-like structures in fish appear to act as adaptive sensory processors, in which learned predictions about sensory input are generated and subtracted from actual sensory input, allowing unpredicted inputs to stand out1-3. Pairing sensory input with centrally originating predictive signals, such as corollary discharge signals linked to motor commands, results in neural responses to the predictive signals alone that are Negative images' of the previously paired sensory responses. Adding these 'negative images' to actual sensory inputs minimizes the neural response to predictable sensory features. At the cellular level, sensory input is relayed to the basal region of Purkinje-like cells, whereas predictive signals are relayed by parallel fibres to the apical dendrites of the same cells4. The generation of negative images could be explained by plasticity at parallel fibre synapses5-7. We show here that such plasticity exists in the electrosensory lobe of mormyrid electric fish and that it has the necessary properties for such a model: it is reversible, anti-hebbian (excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are depressed after pairing with a postsynaptic spike) and tightly dependent on the sequence of pre- and postsynaptic events, with depression occurring only if the postsynaptic spike follows EPSP onset within 60 ms.

  9. Aging and demographic plasticity in response to experimental age structures in honeybees (Apis mellifera L)

    PubMed Central

    Linford, Robyn; Gardner, Preston; Coleman, Jennifer; Fine, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Honeybee colonies are highly integrated functional units characterized by a pronounced division of labor. Division of labor among workers is mainly age-based, with younger individuals focusing on in-hive tasks and older workers performing the more hazardous foraging activities. Thus, experimental disruption of the age composition of the worker hive population is expected to have profound consequences for colony function. Adaptive demography theory predicts that the natural hive age composition represents a colony-level adaptation and thus results in optimal hive performance. Alternatively, the hive age composition may be an epiphenomenon, resulting from individual life history optimization. We addressed these predictions by comparing individual worker longevity and brood production in hives that were composed of a single age cohort, two distinct age cohorts, and hives that had a continuous, natural age distribution. Four experimental replicates showed that colonies with a natural age composition did not consistently have a higher life expectancy and/or brood production than the single cohort or double cohort hives. Instead, a complex interplay of age structure, environmental conditions, colony size, brood production, and individual mortality emerged. A general trade-off between worker life expectancy and colony productivity was apparent, and the transition from in-hive tasks to foraging was the most significant predictor of worker lifespan irrespective of the colony age structure. We conclude that the natural age structure of honeybee hives is not a colony-level adaptation. Furthermore, our results show that honeybees exhibit pronounced demographic plasticity in addition to behavioral plasticity to react to demographic disturbances of their societies. PMID:18663386

  10. Structure and plasticity in hot deformed FeAl intermetallic phase base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuc, Dariusz; Niewielski, Grzegorz; Bednarczyk, Iwona

    2009-10-15

    This paper constitutes part of research conducted on the possibility of forming alloys based on intermetallic phases from the Fe-Al system via thermoplastic processing. Insufficient plasticity, which is an inhibitor of further development of these intermetallics as construction materials, makes the range of their applications limited. In the paper, an analysis is conducted of the influence of deformation parameters on the structure of an alloy of Fe-Al with the B2 type structure. Axi-symmetric compression tests were carried out at temperatures ranging from 600 deg. C to 1200 deg. C and at a deformation rate from 0.001 s{sup 1} to 10 s{sup -1}. Structural examination was carried out using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A quantitative evaluation of the structure was made with the use of 'Met-Ilo'. The results obtained will be used for the development of mathematical models determining the influence of deformation parameters on the alloy structure.

  11. Plastic adaptation toward mutations in proteins: structural comparison of thymidylate synthases.

    PubMed

    Perry, K M; Fauman, E B; Finer-Moore, J S; Montfort, W R; Maley, G F; Maley, F; Stroud, R M

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thymidylate synthase (TS) from Escherichia coli was solved from cubic crystals with a = 133 A grown under reducing conditions at pH 7.0, and refined to R = 22% at 2.1 A resolution. The structure is compared with that from Lactobacillus casei solved to R = 21% at 2.3 A resolution. The structures are compared using a difference distance matrix, which identifies a common core of residues that retains the same relationship to one another in both species. After subtraction of the effects of a 50 amino acid insert present in Lactobacillus casei, differences in position of atoms correlate with temperature factors and with distance from the nearest substituted residue. The dependence of structural difference on thermal factor is parameterized and reflects both errors in coordinates that correlate with thermal factor, and the increased width of the energy well in which atoms of high thermal factor lie. The dependence of structural difference on distance from the nearest substitution also depends on thermal factors and shows an exponential dependence with half maximal effect at 3.0 A from the substitution. This represents the plastic accommodation of the protein which is parameterized in terms of thermal B factor and distance from a mutational change. PMID:2128651

  12. Statistics of plastic events in post-yield strain-controlled amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Hentschel, H. George E.; Procaccia, Itamar; Singh, Murari

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous solids yield in strain-controlled protocols at a critical value of the strain. For larger strains the stress and energy display a generic complex serrated signal with elastic segments punctuated by sharp energy and stress plastic drops having a wide range of magnitudes. Here we provide a theory of the scaling properties of such serrated signals taking into account the system-size dependence. We show that the statistics are not homogeneous: they separate sharply to a regime of "small" and "large" drops, each endowed with its own scaling properties. A scaling theory is first derived solely by data analysis, showing a somewhat complex picture. But after considering the physical interpretation one discovers that the scaling behavior and the scaling exponents are in fact very simple and universal.

  13. Acoustic surface waveguides for acoustic emission monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.R.; He, Y.; Superfesky, M. . Constructed Facilities Center)

    1994-09-01

    Acoustic surface waveguides are developed to enhance the transmission of acoustic emission (AE) signals in high attenuating fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) structures. In this paper, the design of the surface waveguide system and the source location technique are described. Experimental results of using a surface waveguide for AE monitoring of a FRP composite pressure pipe are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide system. A metal wire was selected as a waveguide, and pencil breaks and electronic pulses were used as artificial AE signals. The results indicate that the use of the surface waveguide can significantly increase the AE monitoring range. Also, a high transmission efficiency was experimentally determined for the epoxy joints developed to attach the surface waveguide to the FRP pipe. The proposed surface waveguide appears to be a promising technique for AE monitoring on existing FRP pressure vessels and storage tanks.

  14. Exact Integration Of Uniaxial Elasto-Plastic Laws For Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marmo, Francesco; Rosati, Luciano; Sessa, Salvatore

    2008-07-08

    The recently formulated fiber-free approach [1,2] is used for the analytical integration of non-linear elastic and elasto-plastic normal stresses acting on beam cross sections. It is based on the subdivision of the section in suitable subdomains, which are updated during the analysis of the structural model, and the use of analytical formulas which require the constitutive law to be integrated four times as a maximum. In particular we illustrate the application of the fiber-free approach to the well known concrete model by Mander et al. [3] since its expression belongs to the set of countinous functions which do not admit a primitive. Some representative numerical tests highlight the correctness and the computational efficiency of the fiber-free approach with repsect to the traditional fiber approach, to date the only existing method to perform a non-linear sectional analysis.

  15. Rule learning enhances structural plasticity of long-range axons in frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carolyn M; Peckler, Hannah; Tai, Lung-Hao; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Rules encompass cue-action-outcome associations used to guide decisions and strategies in a specific context. Subregions of the frontal cortex including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) are implicated in rule learning, although changes in structural connectivity underlying rule learning are poorly understood. We imaged OFC axonal projections to dmPFC during training in a multiple choice foraging task and used a reinforcement learning model to quantify explore-exploit strategy use and prediction error magnitude. Here we show that rule training, but not experience of reward alone, enhances OFC bouton plasticity. Baseline bouton density and gains during training correlate with rule exploitation, while bouton loss correlates with exploration and scales with the magnitude of experienced prediction errors. We conclude that rule learning sculpts frontal cortex interconnectivity and adjusts a thermostat for the explore-exploit balance. PMID:26949122

  16. Nanocomposites based on plasticized starch and rectorite clay: structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peter R; Wu, Dongliang; Anderson, Debbie P; Ma, Xiaofei

    2012-06-20

    Sodium rectorite clay (REC) was attached to cationic guar gum (CGG) using a cationic-exchange reaction to obtain CGG modified-REC (CREC). It was found that CGG appeared on the surface of REC's layered structure and represented about 30.1% wt. in CREC. REC and CREC were, respectively, used as fillers in a plasticized starch (PS) matrix to prepare PS/REC and PS/CREC composites using the casting process. Rapid Visco Analyser and scanning electron microscopy revealed that an interaction existed between the REC (or CREC) filler and the matrix. Both REC and CREC had obvious reinforcing effects on the matrix. Compared to the neat matrix, REC or CREC improved the thermal stability of the composites. By increasing the filler content from 0 to 10 wt%, water vapor permeability (WVP) values of PS/REC composites obviously decreased, while WVP values of PS/CREC composites decreased slightly. PMID:24750774

  17. Rule learning enhances structural plasticity of long-range axons in frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn M.; Peckler, Hannah; Tai, Lung-Hao; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Rules encompass cue-action-outcome associations used to guide decisions and strategies in a specific context. Subregions of the frontal cortex including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) are implicated in rule learning, although changes in structural connectivity underlying rule learning are poorly understood. We imaged OFC axonal projections to dmPFC during training in a multiple choice foraging task and used a reinforcement learning model to quantify explore–exploit strategy use and prediction error magnitude. Here we show that rule training, but not experience of reward alone, enhances OFC bouton plasticity. Baseline bouton density and gains during training correlate with rule exploitation, while bouton loss correlates with exploration and scales with the magnitude of experienced prediction errors. We conclude that rule learning sculpts frontal cortex interconnectivity and adjusts a thermostat for the explore–exploit balance. PMID:26949122

  18. Plastic deformation of Mo(Si,Al){sub 2} single crystals with C40 structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, M.; Ito, K.; Inui, H.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1997-12-31

    The deformation behavior of single crystals of Mo(Si,Al){sub 2} with the C40 structure has been studied as a function of crystal orientation and Al content in the temperature range from room temperature to 1,500 C in compression. Plastic flow is possible only above 1,100 C for orientations where slip along <11{bar 2}0> on (0001) is operative and no other slip systems are observed over whole temperature range investigated. The critical resolved shear stress for basal slip decreases rapidly with increasing temperature and the Schmid law is valid. Basal slip appears to occur through a synchroshear mechanism, in which a-dislocations (b = 1/3 <11{bar 2}0>) dissociate into two synchro-partial dislocations with the identical Burgers vector (b = 1/6 <11{bar 2}0>) and each synchro-partial further dissociates into two partials on two adjacent planes.

  19. A period of structural plasticity at the axon initial segment in developing visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gutzmann, Annika; Ergül, Nursah; Grossmann, Rebecca; Schultz, Christian; Wahle, Petra; Engelhardt, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Cortical networks are shaped by sensory experience and are most susceptible to modifications during critical periods characterized by enhanced plasticity at the structural and functional level. A system particularly well-studied in this context is the mammalian visual system. Plasticity has been documented for the somatodendritic compartment of neurons in detail. A neuronal microdomain not yet studied in this context is the axon initial segment (AIS) located at the proximal axon segment. It is a specific electrogenic axonal domain and the site of action potential (AP) generation. Recent studies showed that structure and function of the AIS can be dynamically regulated. Here we hypothesize that the AIS shows a dynamic regulation during maturation of the visual cortex. We therefore analyzed AIS length development from embryonic day (E) 12.5 to adulthood in mice. A tri-phasic time course of AIS length remodeling during development was observed. AIS first appeared at E14.5 and increased in length throughout the postnatal period to a peak between postnatal day (P) 10 to P15 (eyes open P13–14). Then, AIS length was reduced significantly around the beginning of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity (CP, P21). Shortest AIS were observed at the peak of the CP (P28), followed by a moderate elongation toward the end of the CP (P35). To test if the dynamic maturation of the AIS is influenced by eye opening (onset of activity), animals were deprived of visual input before and during the CP. Deprivation for 1 week prior to eye opening did not affect AIS length development. However, deprivation from P0 to 28 and P14 to 28 resulted in AIS length distribution similar to the peak at P15. In other words, deprivation from birth prevents the transient shortening of the AIS and maintains an immature AIS length. These results are the first to suggest a dynamic maturation of the AIS in cortical neurons and point to novel mechanisms in the development of neuronal

  20. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  1. Impedance and structural studies on plasticized PCL-LiSO3CF3-SiO2 polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ng, B C; Wong, H Y; You, A H

    2014-07-01

    Plasticized polymer electrolytes in this study are consist of biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) as a host, ethylene carbonate (EC) as a plasticizer, lithium triflate (LiSO3CF3) as salt and nanocomposite silicon dioxide (SiO2) as filler. Solution cast technique is used in the preparation of the plasticized polymer electrolytes. The electrical properties of the plasticized polymer electrolytes with different composition of lithium salt, plasticizer and nano-sized filler are reported in this paper. Conductivity as high as 4.30 x 10(-3) S cm(-1) is obtained in ambient temperature. Ionic conductivity of the plasticized polymer electrolytes are measured using electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The structural and complex formations are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity result can be further verified and supported by XRD and FTIR reading in which the ionic conductivity is directly proportional to the amorphous phase behaviour of the sample. PMID:24758066

  2. Insights into molecular plasticity in protein complexes from Trm9-Trm112 tRNA modifying enzyme crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Létoquart, Juliette; van Tran, Nhan; Caroline, Vonny; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazar, Noureddine; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Liger, Dominique; Graille, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Most of the factors involved in translation (tRNA, rRNA and proteins) are subject to post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, which participate in the fine-tuning and tight control of ribosome and protein synthesis processes. In eukaryotes, Trm112 acts as an obligate activating platform for at least four methyltransferases (MTase) involved in the modification of 18S rRNA (Bud23), tRNA (Trm9 and Trm11) and translation termination factor eRF1 (Mtq2). Trm112 is then at a nexus between ribosome synthesis and function. Here, we present a structure-function analysis of the Trm9-Trm112 complex, which is involved in the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm5U) modification of the tRNA anticodon wobble position and hence promotes translational fidelity. We also compare the known crystal structures of various Trm112-MTase complexes, highlighting the structural plasticity allowing Trm112 to interact through a very similar mode with its MTase partners, although those share less than 20% sequence identity. PMID:26438534

  3. Insights into molecular plasticity in protein complexes from Trm9-Trm112 tRNA modifying enzyme crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; van Tran, Nhan; Caroline, Vonny; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazar, Noureddine; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Liger, Dominique; Graille, Marc

    2015-12-15

    Most of the factors involved in translation (tRNA, rRNA and proteins) are subject to post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, which participate in the fine-tuning and tight control of ribosome and protein synthesis processes. In eukaryotes, Trm112 acts as an obligate activating platform for at least four methyltransferases (MTase) involved in the modification of 18S rRNA (Bud23), tRNA (Trm9 and Trm11) and translation termination factor eRF1 (Mtq2). Trm112 is then at a nexus between ribosome synthesis and function. Here, we present a structure-function analysis of the Trm9-Trm112 complex, which is involved in the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U) modification of the tRNA anticodon wobble position and hence promotes translational fidelity. We also compare the known crystal structures of various Trm112-MTase complexes, highlighting the structural plasticity allowing Trm112 to interact through a very similar mode with its MTase partners, although those share less than 20% sequence identity. PMID:26438534

  4. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  5. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Horstmann, Annette; Busse, Franziska; Lepsien, Jöran; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training twice a week over a period of 3 months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI), reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing. PMID:26190989

  6. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  7. Simple structures test for elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion validation

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, T.F.; Krech, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    A Simple Structures Test Program was performed where several cantilevered beam and fixed-end beam test specimens (fabricated from HY-80 steel) were subjected to a series of analytically predetermined rapidly applied transient dynamic input loads. The primary objective of the test program was to obtain dynamic nonlinear response for simple structures subjected to these load inputs. Data derived from these tests was subsequently used to correlate to analysis predictions to assess the capability to analytically predict elastic-plastic nonlinear material behavior in structures using typical time-dependent (transient) design methods and the ABAQUS finite element analysis code. The installation of a significant amount of instrumentation on these specimens and post-test measurements enabled the monitoring and recording of strain levels, displacements, accelerations, and permanent set. An assessment of modeling parameters such as the element type and mesh refinement was made using these test results. In addition, currently available material models and the incremental time step procedure used in the transient analyses were evaluated. Comparison of test data to analysis results shows that displacements, accelerations, and peak strain can be predicted with a reasonable level of accuracy using detailed solid models of the tested specimens. Permanent set is overpredicted by a factor of approximately two. However, the accuracy of the prediction of permanent set is being enhanced by updating material modeling in the ABAQUS code to account for effects of strain reversal in oscillatory behavior of dynamically loaded specimens.

  8. Evidence for training-induced plasticity in multisensory brain structures: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Multisensory learning and resulting neural brain plasticity have recently become a topic of renewed interest in human cognitive neuroscience. Music notation reading is an ideal stimulus to study multisensory learning, as it allows studying the integration of visual, auditory and sensorimotor information processing. The present study aimed at answering whether multisensory learning alters uni-sensory structures, interconnections of uni-sensory structures or specific multisensory areas. In a short-term piano training procedure musically naive subjects were trained to play tone sequences from visually presented patterns in a music notation-like system [Auditory-Visual-Somatosensory group (AVS)], while another group received audio-visual training only that involved viewing the patterns and attentively listening to the recordings of the AVS training sessions [Auditory-Visual group (AV)]. Training-related changes in cortical networks were assessed by pre- and post-training magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of an auditory, a visual and an integrated audio-visual mismatch negativity (MMN). The two groups (AVS and AV) were differently affected by the training. The results suggest that multisensory training alters the function of multisensory structures, and not the uni-sensory ones along with their interconnections, and thus provide an answer to an important question presented by cognitive models of multisensory training. PMID:22570723

  9. Structural plasticity of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase active site

    PubMed Central

    Turner, James M.; Graziano, James; Spraggon, Glen; Schultz, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, tRNA aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs have been evolved that allow one to genetically encode a large array of unnatural amino acids in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. We have determined the crystal structures of two substrate-bound Methanococcus jannaschii tyrosyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that charge the unnatural amino acids p-bromophenylalanine and 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine (NpAla). A comparison of these structures with the substrate-bound WT synthetase, as well as a mutant synthetase that charges p-acetylphenylalanine, shows that altered specificity is due to both side-chain and backbone rearrangements within the active site that modify hydrogen bonds and packing interactions with substrate, as well as disrupt the α8-helix, which spans the WT active site. The high degree of structural plasticity that is observed in these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is rarely found in other mutant enzymes with altered specificities and provides an explanation for the surprising adaptability of the genetic code to novel amino acids. PMID:16618920

  10. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Luke A.; Durrant, Benjamin P.; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J.; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3′ ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164–N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes—for example by the binding of protein co-factors—may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3′ termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  11. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding to ion channels demonstrates the role of its plasticity in regulation.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Bate, Neil; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Vuister, Geerten W

    2013-11-01

    The Ca²⁺-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) is a well-known regulator of ion-channel activity. Consequently, the Protein Data Bank contains many structures of CaM in complex with different fragments of ion channels that together display a variety of binding modes. In addition to the canonical interaction, in which CaM engages its target with both its domains, many of the ion-channel-CaM complexes demonstrate alternative non-canonical binding modes that depend on the target and experimental conditions. Based on these findings, several mechanisms of ion-channel regulation by CaM have been proposed, all exploiting its plasticity and flexibility in interacting with its targets. In this review, we focus on complexes of CaM with either the voltage-gated calcium channels; the voltage-gated sodium channels or the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, for which both structural and functional data are available. For each channel, the functional relevance of these structural data and possible mechanism of calcium-dependent (in)activation and/or facilitation are discussed in detail. PMID:23609407

  12. Evidence for Training-Induced Plasticity in Multisensory Brain Structures: An MEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Multisensory learning and resulting neural brain plasticity have recently become a topic of renewed interest in human cognitive neuroscience. Music notation reading is an ideal stimulus to study multisensory learning, as it allows studying the integration of visual, auditory and sensorimotor information processing. The present study aimed at answering whether multisensory learning alters uni-sensory structures, interconnections of uni-sensory structures or specific multisensory areas. In a short-term piano training procedure musically naive subjects were trained to play tone sequences from visually presented patterns in a music notation-like system [Auditory-Visual-Somatosensory group (AVS)], while another group received audio-visual training only that involved viewing the patterns and attentively listening to the recordings of the AVS training sessions [Auditory-Visual group (AV)]. Training-related changes in cortical networks were assessed by pre- and post-training magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of an auditory, a visual and an integrated audio-visual mismatch negativity (MMN). The two groups (AVS and AV) were differently affected by the training. The results suggest that multisensory training alters the function of multisensory structures, and not the uni-sensory ones along with their interconnections, and thus provide an answer to an important question presented by cognitive models of multisensory training. PMID:22570723

  13. The changing health care marketplace: current industry trends, new provider organizational structures, and effects on plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M

    1998-09-01

    Current market forces are driving the health care industry in new directions. The managed care industry is currently undergoing a market shakeout, as manifested by consolidation, increased competition, and lower profits. Medicare is fighting to remain solvent by lowering fees paid to providers, driving patients into managed care plans, and cracking down on billing irregularities. For providers, the combined effect of these trends is lower fees, increased risk-sharing, and increased overhead. Plastic surgeons face new demands in this environment. They must increase their efficiency and form new alliances with other providers. These alliances allow plastic surgeons to maintain a steady stream of patients, to manage risk, to negotiate more lucrative contracts with managed care organizations, and to increase efficiency. To achieve these alliances, plastic surgeons must alter the organizational structure of their practices. Several corporate practice models are becoming more prevalent; these include large group practices, physician practice management companies, and integrated delivery systems. Each structure has advantages for plastic surgeons, but each also requires plastic surgeons to trade varying degrees of financial and professional autonomy for market strength. PMID:9727464

  14. Scanning Laser Optical Tomography Resolves Structural Plasticity during Regeneration in an Insect Brain

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, René; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Scheiblich, Hannah; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Meyer, Heiko; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy) allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. Methodology We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies) by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. Conclusions This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations. PMID:22829931

  15. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  16. Learning Discloses Abnormal Structural and Functional Plasticity at Hippocampal Synapses in the APP23 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Roberto, Anna; Berretta, Nicola; Panico, Maria Beatrice; Lista, Simone; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Nistico, Robert

    2010-01-01

    B6-Tg/Thy1APP23Sdz (APP23) mutant mice exhibit neurohistological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease but show intact basal hippocampal neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Here, we examine whether spatial learning differently modifies the structural and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal synapses in APP23 and wild-type mice. While…

  17. Demonstrating the Effects of Processing on the Structure and Physical Properties of Plastic Using Disposable PETE Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra A.; Rhein, Morgan; Krafcik, Matthew J.; Ydstie, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    An educational activity is described in which the structure and physical properties of disposable plastic cups were directly related to the method of processing. The mechanical properties of specimens cut from the walls of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PETE) cups, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the thermoforming direction, were measured in…

  18. Predictive grain yield models based on canopy structure and structural plasticity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structural dimensions, digitally measured on stems and leaves of soybean plants during the first six reproductive growth stages (R1-R6), were used to assess the impact of five management strategies including cropping systems (conventional (C) vs. organic, (O)), tillage (conventional moldboard (C) vs...

  19. Cognitive-affective neural plasticity following active-controlled mindfulness intervention

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Dietz, Martin; Blair, Karina S.; van Beek, Martijn; Rees, Geraint; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Lutz, Antoine; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation is a set of attention-based, regulatory and self-inquiry training regimes. Although the impact of mindfulness meditation training (MT) on self-regulation is well established, the neural mechanisms supporting such plasticity are poorly understood. MT is thought to act on attention through interoceptive salience and attentional control mechanisms, but until now conflicting evidence from behavioral and neural measures has made it difficult to distinguish the role of these mechanisms. To resolve this question we conducted a fully randomized 6-week longitudinal trial of MT, explicitly controlling for cognitive and treatment effects with an active control group. We measured behavioral metacognition and whole-brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals using functional MRI during an affective Stroop task before and after intervention. Although both groups improved significantly on a response-inhibition task, only the MT group showed reduced affective Stroop conflict. Moreover, the MT group displayed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) responses during executive processing, consistent with increased recruitment of top-down mechanisms to resolve conflict. In contrast, we did not observe overall group by time interactions on negative affect-related RTs or BOLD responses. However, only participants with the greatest amount of MT practice showed improvements in response-inhibition and increased recruitment of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and right anterior insula during negative valence processing. Collectively our findings highlight the importance of active control in MT research, and indicate unique neural mechanisms for progressive stages of mindfulness training. PMID:23115195

  20. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  1. Polymerization and Structure of Bio-Based Plastics: A Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, Shrikant N.; Wool, Richard P.

    2001-03-01

    We recently examined several hundred chemical pathways to convert chemically functionalized plant oil triglycerides, monoglycerides and reactive diluents into high performance plastics with a broad range of properties (US Patent No. 6,121,398). The resulting polymers had linear, branched, light- and highly-crosslinked chain architectures and could be used as pressure sensitive adhesives, elastomers and high performance rigid thermoset composite resins. To optimize the molecular design and minimize the number of chemical trials in this system with excess degrees of freedom, we developed a computer simulation of the free radical polymerization process. The triglyceride structure, degree of chemical substitution, mole fractions, fatty acid distribution function, and reaction kinetic parameters were used as initial inputs on a 3d lattice simulation. The evolution of the network fractal structure was computed and used to measure crosslink density, dangling ends, degree of reaction and defects in the lattice. The molecular connectivity was used to determine strength via a vector percolation model of fracture. The simulation permitted the optimal design of new bio-based materials with respect to monomer selection, cure reaction conditions and desired properties. Supported by the National Science Foundation

  2. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  3. Characterization via atomic force microscopy of discrete plasticity in collagen fibrils from mechanically overloaded tendons: Nano-scale structural changes mimic rope failure.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Kreplak, Laurent; Lee, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tendons exposed to tensile overload show a structural alteration at the fibril scale termed discrete plasticity. Serial kinks appear along individual collagen fibrils that are susceptible to enzymatic digestion and are thermally unstable. Using atomic force microscopy we mapped the topography and mechanical properties in dehydrated and hydrated states of 25 control fibrils and 25 fibrils displaying periodic kinks, extracted from overloaded bovine tail tendons. Using the measured modulus of the hydrated fibrils as a probe of molecular density, we observed a non-linear negative correlation between molecular density and kink density of individual fibrils. This is accompanied by an increase in water uptake with kink density and a doubling of the coefficient of variation of the modulus between kinked, and control fibrils. The mechanical property maps of kinked collagen fibrils show radial heterogeneity that can be modeled as a high-density core surrounded by a low-density shell. The core of the fibril contains the kink structures characteristic of discrete plasticity; separated by inter-kink regions, which often retain the D-banding structure. We propose that the shell and kink structures mimic characteristic damage motifs observed in laid rope strands. PMID:26925699

  4. Feasibility and acceptability of insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) for vector control in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) as a malaria control intervention in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Methods ZeroVector® ITPS was installed in 40 homes across four study sites representing a cross section of malaria transmission risk and housing style. Structured questionnaires were completed at the time of ITPS installation (n=40) and at four weeks post installation (n=40) with the household head. Similarly, group interviews with the male and/or female household heads were completed at installation (n=5) and four-week follow-up (n=4). Results ZeroVector® ITPS was successfully installed in a range of homes employing traditional and/or modern building materials in PNG. The ITPS installations remained intact over the course of the four-week trial period and were highly acceptable to both male and female household heads. No dissatisfaction with the ITPS product was reported at four-week follow-up; however, the installation process was time consuming, participants reported a reduction in mosquito net use following ITPS installation and many participants expressed concern about the longevity of ITPS over the longer term. Conclusion ZeroVector® ITPS installation is feasible and highly acceptable in a diverse range of PNG contexts and is likely to be favourably received as a vector control intervention if accessible en masse. A longer-term evaluation is required before firm policy or public health decisions can be made regarding the potential application of ITPS in the national malaria control programme. The positive study findings suggest a longer-term evaluation of this promising malaria control intervention warrants consideration. PMID:23046535

  5. REVERSING CYCLIC ELASTO-PLASTIC DEMANDS ON STRUCTURES DURING STRONG MOTION EARTHQUAKE EXCITATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, V.; Brady, A.G.; Safak, E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the horizontal components from El Centro 1940, Taft 1952, and 4 accelerograms from the San Fernando earthquake of 2/9/71, the time history of the elasto-plastic displacement response was calculated for oscillators having periods within the range of 1 to 6 s and ductility factors within the range of 3 to 6. The Nth largest peak of the elasto-plastic response (N equals 2,4,8,16), when expressed as a percentage of maximum response (that is, N equals 1), is fairly independent of period within our period range. When considering only plastic peaks occurring, sometimes in a one-directional group of peaks, in the reverse direction from the preceding plastic peak, the amplitude of the Nth reversing plastic peak is similar to the Nth elastic peak, regardless of the ductility factor.

  6. Structural plasticity of 4-α-helical bundles exemplified by the puzzle-like molecular assembly of the Rop protein.

    PubMed

    Amprazi, Maria; Kotsifaki, Dina; Providaki, Mary; Kapetaniou, Evangelia G; Fellas, Georgios; Kyriazidis, Ioannis; Pérez, Javier; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2014-07-29

    The dimeric Repressor of Primer (Rop) protein, a widely used model system for the study of coiled-coil 4-α-helical bundles, is characterized by a remarkable structural plasticity. Loop region mutations lead to a wide range of topologies, folding states, and altered physicochemical properties. A protein-folding study of Rop and several loop variants has identified specific residues and sequences that are linked to the observed structural plasticity. Apart from the native state, native-like and molten-globule states have been identified; these states are sensitive to reducing agents due to the formation of nonnative disulfide bridges. Pro residues in the loop are critical for the establishment of new topologies and molten globule states; their effects, however, can be in part compensated by Gly residues. The extreme plasticity in the assembly of 4-α-helical bundles reflects the capacity of the Rop sequence to combine a specific set of hydrophobic residues into strikingly different hydrophobic cores. These cores include highly hydrated ones that are consistent with the formation of interchain, nonnative disulfide bridges and the establishment of molten globules. Potential applications of this structural plasticity are among others in the engineering of bio-inspired materials. PMID:25024213

  7. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  8. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  9. Structural Plasticity of the Protein Plug That Traps Newly Packaged Genomes in Podoviridae Virions.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Olia, Adam S; Brooke, Dewey; Casjens, Sherwood R; Taylor, Derek J; Prevelige, Peter E; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial viruses of the P22-like family encode a specialized tail needle essential for genome stabilization after DNA packaging and implicated in Gram-negative cell envelope penetration. The atomic structure of P22 tail needle (gp26) crystallized at acidic pH reveals a slender fiber containing an N-terminal "trimer of hairpins" tip. Although the length and composition of tail needles vary significantly in Podoviridae, unexpectedly, the amino acid sequence of the N-terminal tip is exceptionally conserved in more than 200 genomes of P22-like phages and prophages. In this paper, we used x-ray crystallography and EM to investigate the neutral pH structure of three tail needles from bacteriophage P22, HK620, and Sf6. In all cases, we found that the N-terminal tip is poorly structured, in stark contrast to the compact trimer of hairpins seen in gp26 crystallized at acidic pH. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, limited proteolysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and gel filtration chromatography revealed that the N-terminal tip is highly dynamic in solution and unlikely to adopt a stable trimeric conformation at physiological pH. This is supported by the cryo-EM reconstruction of P22 mature virion tail, where the density of gp26 N-terminal tip is incompatible with a trimer of hairpins. We propose the tail needle N-terminal tip exists in two conformations: a pre-ejection extended conformation, which seals the portal vertex after genome packaging, and a postejection trimer of hairpins, which forms upon its release from the virion. The conformational plasticity of the tail needle N-terminal tip is built in the amino acid sequence, explaining its extraordinary conservation in nature. PMID:26574546

  10. Interfacial growth of controllable morphology of silver patterns on plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanghui; Qi, Shengli; Wang, Xiaodong; Tian, Guofeng; Sun, Guang; Liu, Wei; Yan, Xiaona; Wu, Dezhen; Wu, Zhanpeng; Zhang, Li

    2012-10-11

    Controllable growth of newly born silver nanoparticles to fractal, cauliflower-like, microscale disks and continuous silver layers with high conductivity and reflectivity on plastic substrates has been developed via solid-liquid interfacial reduction and growing of ion-doped polymeric films. Such approaches involve polyimide (PI) films as substrates, its corresponding silver-ion-doped precursors as solid oxidants, and facile immersion of ion-doped polymeric films in aqueous reducing solution. The solution reducing process belongs to liquid-solid interfacial reduction processes, during which silver ions doped in polymeric matrix transformed to newly born silver nanoparticles which further aggregated and migrated along the liquid-solid interface to form dendrite, cauliflower-like and lamella disk-like architecture and/or severely compact continuous silver nanolayers with highly reflective and conductive properties. Time-dependent morphology evolutions of silver particles were traced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This strategy can also extend to synthesis of many other metals on polymeric films while maintaining outstanding metal-polymer adhesion based on incorporation of various metal ions, and may offer an opportunity to fabricate large scale, high-output, cost-effective processes for metal patterns on flexible polymeric substrates. PMID:23016702