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Sample records for structured reminiscence therapy

  1. Snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy and 10-minutes activation in long term care residents with dementia (WISDE): study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background People with dementia are often inapproachable due to symptoms of their illness. Therefore nurses should establish relationships with dementia patients via their remaining resources and facilitate communication. In order to achieve this, different targeted non-pharmacological interventions are recommended and practiced. However there is no sufficient evidence about the efficacy of most of these interventions. A number of publications highlight the urgent need for methodological sound studies so that more robust conclusions may be drawn. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial with 20 nursing homes in Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) as the units of randomization. Nursing homes will be randomly allocated into 4 study groups consisting of 5 clusters and 90 residents: snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy, 10-minutes activation or unstructured verbal communication (control group). The purpose is to determine whether the interventions are effective to reduce apathy in long-term care residents with dementia (N = 360) as the main outcome measure. Assessments will be done at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after beginning of the interventions. Discussion This trial will particularly contribute to the evidence on efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions in dementia care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00653731 PMID:20113526

  2. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy and usual care for depression in young adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a common affliction for young adults, and is associated with a range of adverse outcomes. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy is a brief, structured intervention that has been shown to be highly effective for reducing depressive symptoms, yet to date has not been evaluated in young adult populations. Given its basis in theory-guided reminiscence-based therapy, and incorporation of effective therapeutic techniques drawn from cognitive therapy and problem-solving frameworks, it is hypothesized to be effective in treating depression in this age group. Methods and design This article presents the design of a randomized controlled trial implemented in a community-based youth mental health service to compare cognitive-reminiscence therapy with usual care for the treatment of depressive symptoms in young adults. Participants in the cognitive-reminiscence group will receive six sessions of weekly, individual psychotherapy, whilst participants in the usual-care group will receive support from the youth mental health service according to usual procedures. A between-within repeated-measures design will be used to evaluate changes in self-reported outcome measures of depressive symptoms, psychological wellbeing and anxiety across baseline, three weeks into the intervention, post-intervention, one month post-intervention and three months post-intervention. Interviews will also be conducted with participants from the cognitive-reminiscence group to collect information about their experience receiving the intervention, and the process underlying any changes that occur. Discussion This study will determine whether a therapeutic approach to depression that has been shown to be effective in older adult populations is also effective for young adults. The expected outcome of this study is the validation of a brief, evidence-based, manualized treatment for young adults with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN

  3. A systematic review of the use of technology for reminiscence therapy.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-10-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery of such therapies, including reminiscence therapy (RT), which is a non-pharmacological intervention involving the prompting of past memories, often with artifacts such as old photographs or music for therapeutic benefits such as the facilitation of social interactions or the increase of self-esteem. This paper systematically examines the scientific literature on the use of ICT for facilitating RT to assess the current state of the evidence and identify future trends. We searched the PubMed (1966-2013), ACM (1954-2013), and PsycINFO (1908-2013) repositories using the keywords dementia and reminiscence. Three hundred eighty-six articles were retrieved, 44 of which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Findings of the systematic review include that there are benefits to using ICT for RT interventions. Some of these benefits are access to rich and engaging multimedia reminiscence materials, opportunities for people with dementia to participate in social interactions and take ownership of conversations, and a reduction of barriers due to motor deficits during interactions with media. Future studies should explore the types and content of media beneficial to individuals at different stages of dementia. PMID:25274711

  4. A Systematic Review of the Use of Technology for Reminiscence Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2016-01-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery of such therapies, including reminiscence therapy (RT), which is a non-pharmacological intervention involving the prompting of past memories, often with artifacts such as old photographs or music for therapeutic benefits such as the facilitation of social interactions or the increase of self-esteem. This paper systematically examines the scientific literature on the use of ICT for facilitating RT to assess the current state of the evidence and identify future trends. We searched the PubMed (1966–2013), ACM (1954–2013), and PsycINFO (1908–2013) repositories using the keywords dementia and reminiscence. Three hundred eighty-six articles were retrieved, 44 of which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Findings of the systematic review include that there are benefits to using ICT for RT interventions. Some of these benefits are access to rich and engaging multimedia reminiscence materials, opportunities for people with dementia to participate in social interactions and take ownership of conversations, and a reduction of barriers due to motor deficits during interactions with media. Future studies should explore the types and content of media beneficial to individuals at different stages of dementia. PMID:25274711

  5. Uniting veterans across distance through a telephone-based Reminiscence Group Therapy intervention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew; Guyker, Wendy; Persky, Irena

    2012-05-01

    This report describes the implementation of a six-session telephone-based Reminiscence Group Therapy (RGT) intervention for veterans enrolled in a Home Based Primary Care Program (HBPC). HBPC psychologists face challenges not routinely encountered in the traditional office setting, and the intervention demonstrated the feasibility of conducting semistructured group treatment by telephone. Postgroup feedback indicated that the veterans found meaning in shared experiences and connection with themselves and others. The RGT intervention allowed for efficiency in service delivery while also providing an opportunity for veterans to socialize and gain a sense of meaningfulness and identity through facilitated recall of past experiences. PMID:22662736

  6. Structuring Reminiscence Group Interventions for Older Adults Using a Framework of Mattering to Promote Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukow, Herman R., II.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined if the wellness of older adult residents of a continuing care retirement community was enhanced through the promotion of a sense of mattering to others. A ten-session reminiscence therapy protocol (REM) was developed as a treatment baseline for this study and four tenets of mattering promotion were developed as an additive to…

  7. Auto Therapy: Using Automobiles as Vehicles for Reminiscence With Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Keith A; Weber, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscence can be beneficial for older adults and contribute to well-being and ego integrity. In this exploratory pilot study, researchers assessed the feasibility and tolerability of a novel reminiscence intervention using automobiles as the focal point. Nineteen older adults (N = 19) were asked to reminisce using photographs of automobiles from across their lifespan. The RE-AIM framework was used to assess the intervention in terms of reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. The intervention was well-received, quickly established rapport, and effectively fostered reminiscence. Social workers may find this intervention useful in helping older adults to explore their lives. PMID:25734237

  8. The Effects of Intermittent Reminiscence Therapy on Nursing Home Residents' Depression Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Patricia

    Depression is regarded as the most prevalent mental health disorder in the elderly. Reminiscence, a normative and universal process which can facilitate the resolution, integration, and reorganization of past conflicts can have positive or negative effects on depression. One environment where the elderly are particularly at risk for the negative…

  9. A Systematic Review of the Use of Technology for Reminiscence Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    As the segment of the population 65 years of age or older continues to grow, the number of individuals with dementia increases proportionally, highlighting the need to design therapies that meet the social and emotional needs of people with dementia. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are potential venues for supporting the delivery…

  10. Behavioural sensitisation during dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease is reminiscent of the addicted brain.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, F; Pellegrini, A; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L; Paparelli, A; Fornai, F

    2009-01-01

    The intermittent oral intake of the dopamine (DA) precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the classic therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this way, the drug precursor can be metabolised into the active neurotransmitter DA. Although this occurs throughout the brain, the therapeutic relief is believed to be due to restoring extracellular DA levels within the dorsal striatum (more in the putamen than the caudate nucleus) which lacks endogenous DA as a consequence of the disease process. However, differing from physiological DA transmission, this therapeutic pattern leads to abnormal peaks of non-synaptic DA, which are supposed to trigger behavioural sensitisation expressed as abnormal involuntary movements. A similar pattern of abnormal DA stimulation occurs during methamphetamine (METH) intake. In the present review we will provide evidence showing the similarities between METH- and L-DOPA-induced DA stimulation with an intact and denervated striatum respectively. This comparison will encompass various features; the timing, the areas and the amount of extracellular DA levels which reveal surprising homologies. Such an overlapping between L-DOPA in PD and METH will be further analysed to critically assess the commonalities concerning the following points: abnormal receptor stimulation, recruitment of altered transduction pathways, abnormal gene expression, alterations in the phenotype of striatal neurons, and the establishment of behavioural sensitisation which appear as distinct phenomena (i.e. abnormal involuntary movements in PD and drug addiction in METH abuse); nonetheless, this may also lead to common behavioural alterations (METH-like addictive behaviours in PD patients during the course of DA replacement therapy in subsets of PD patients). PMID:19754404

  11. Reminiscence in dementia: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura; Murphy, Kathy; Cooney, Adeline; Casey, Dympna; O'Shea, Eamon; Devane, Declan; Jordan, Fionnuala; Hunter, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of reminiscence in dementia and highlights its uses as a therapeutic intervention used on individuals with dementia. No single definition of reminiscence exists in healthcare literature; however, definitions offered have similar components. The term life review is commonly used when discussing reminiscence; however, both terms are quite different in their goals, theory base and content. This concept analysis identified reminiscence as a process which occurs in stages, involving the recalling of early life events and interaction between individuals. The antecedents of reminiscence are age, life transitions, attention span, ability to recall, ability to vocalise and stressful situations. Reminiscence can lead to positive mental health, enhanced self esteem and improved communication skills. It also facilitates preparation for death, increases interaction between people, prepares for the future and evaluates a past life. Reminiscence therapy is used extensively in dementia care and evidence shows when used effectively it helps individuals retain a sense of self worth, identity and individuality. PMID:24599812

  12. Reminiscing, Reflecting, Reacting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Mary K.; Fitzgerald, Laurine E.

    1977-01-01

    As a part of a fraternal organization's bicentennial celebration, Mary Forman, a fifty-year member of the group, was requested to develop a program presentation. This article gives parts of her presentation, including both personal reminiscences and the results of a questionnaire she sent to other women students. (Author/BP)

  13. Structural Features Reminiscent of ATP-Driven Protein Translocases Are Essential for the Function of a Type III Secretion-Associated ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junya; Lefebre, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial pathogens and symbionts utilize type III secretion systems to interact with their hosts. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells to modulate a variety of cellular functions. One of the most conserved components of these systems is an ATPase, which plays an essential role in the recognition and unfolding of proteins destined for secretion by the type III pathway. Here we show that structural features reminiscent of other ATP-driven protein translocases are essential for the function of InvC, the ATPase associated with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion system. Mutational and functional analyses showed that a two-helix-finger motif and a conserved loop located at the entrance of and within the predicted pore formed by the hexameric ATPase are essential for InvC function. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the function of this highly conserved component of type III secretion machines. IMPORTANCE Type III secretion machines are essential for the virulence or symbiotic relationships of many bacteria. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into host cells to modulate cellular functions, thus facilitating bacterial colonization and replication. An essential component of these machines is a highly conserved ATPase, which is necessary for the recognition and secretion of proteins destined to be delivered by the type III secretion pathway. Using modeling and structure and function analyses, we have identified structural features of one of these ATPases from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that help to explain important aspects of its function. PMID:26170413

  14. Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

  15. Reminiscence through the Lens of Social Media.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lisa; Briggs, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Reminiscence is used to support and create new social bonds and give meaning to life. Originally perceived as a preoccupation of the aged, we now recognize that reminiscence has value throughout the lifespan. Increasingly, social media can be used to both support and prompt reminiscence, with Facebook's Lookback or Year in Review as recent examples. This work takes prompted reminiscence further, asking what forms and functions of reminiscence are supported by social media. Utilizing the online service MySocialBook, we invited participants to curate content from their personal Facebook account to then be transformed into a printed book. We used that book as a prompt for discussion of the reminiscence function of the curated material, using Westerhof and Bohlmeijer's (2014) reminiscence framework as a starting point. We conclude that this framework is valuable in understanding the role of social media in reminiscence, but note that earlier models, such as Webster's Reminiscence Functions Scale, are also relevant. We contribute to the reminiscence debate by adding a technological lens to the process of life review, whilst concurring with other researchers in this field that a robust conceptual framework is lacking, particularly when considering the forms of reminiscence that are most salient for younger people. PMID:27378971

  16. Reminiscence through the Lens of Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lisa; Briggs, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Reminiscence is used to support and create new social bonds and give meaning to life. Originally perceived as a preoccupation of the aged, we now recognize that reminiscence has value throughout the lifespan. Increasingly, social media can be used to both support and prompt reminiscence, with Facebook’s Lookback or Year in Review as recent examples. This work takes prompted reminiscence further, asking what forms and functions of reminiscence are supported by social media. Utilizing the online service MySocialBook, we invited participants to curate content from their personal Facebook account to then be transformed into a printed book. We used that book as a prompt for discussion of the reminiscence function of the curated material, using Westerhof and Bohlmeijer’s (2014) reminiscence framework as a starting point. We conclude that this framework is valuable in understanding the role of social media in reminiscence, but note that earlier models, such as Webster’s Reminiscence Functions Scale, are also relevant. We contribute to the reminiscence debate by adding a technological lens to the process of life review, whilst concurring with other researchers in this field that a robust conceptual framework is lacking, particularly when considering the forms of reminiscence that are most salient for younger people. PMID:27378971

  17. A Method for Producing Reminiscence Videos by Using Photo Annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Noriaki; Kuwabara, Kazuhiro; Abe, Shinji; Susami, Kenji; Yasuda, Kiyoshi

    Providing good home-based care to people with dementia is becoming an important issue as the size of the elderly population increases. One of the main problems in providing such care is that it must be constantly provided without interruption, and this puts a great burden on caregivers, who are often family members. Networked Interaction Therapy is the name we call our methods designed to relieve the stress of people suffering from dementia as well as that of their family members. This therapy aims to provide a system that interacts with people with dementia by utilizing various engaging stimuli. One such stimulus is a reminiscence video created from old photo albums, which is a promising way to hold a dementia sufferer's attention for a long time. In this paper, we present an authoring tool to assist in the production of a reminiscence video by using photo annotations. We conducted interviews with several video creators on how they used photo annotations such as date, title and subject of photos when they produced the reminiscence videos. According to the creators' comments, we have defined an ontology for representing the creators' knowledge of how to add visual effects to a reminiscence video. Subsequently, we developed an authoring tool that automatically produces a reminiscence video from the annotated photos. Subjective evaluation of the quality of reminiscence videos produced with our tool indicates that they give impressions similar to those produced by creators using conventional video editing software. The effectiveness of presenting such a video to people with dementia is also discussed.

  18. The experience of family carers attending a joint reminiscence group with people with dementia: A thematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Melunsky, Nina; Crellin, Nadia; Dudzinski, Emma; Orrell, Martin; Wenborn, Jennifer; Poland, Fiona; Woods, Bob; Charlesworth, Georgina

    2015-11-01

    Reminiscence therapy has the potential to improve quality of life for people with dementia. In recent years reminiscence groups have extended to include family members, but carers' experience of attending joint sessions is undocumented. This qualitative study explored the experience of 18 family carers attending 'Remembering Yesterday Caring Today' groups. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: experiencing carer support; shared experience; expectations (met and unmet), carer perspectives of the person with dementia's experience; and learning and comparing. Family carers' experiences varied, with some experiencing the intervention as entirely positive whereas others had more mixed feelings. Negative aspects included the lack of respite from their relative, the lack of emphasis on their own needs, and experiencing additional stress and guilt through not being able to implement newly acquired skills. These findings may explain the failure of a recent trial of joint reminiscence groups to replicate previous findings of positive benefit. More targeted research within subgroups of carers is required to justify the continued use of joint reminiscence groups in dementia care. PMID:24381218

  19. The experience of family carers attending a joint reminiscence group with people with dementia: A thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melunsky, Nina; Crellin, Nadia; Dudzinski, Emma; Orrell, Martin; Wenborn, Jennifer; Poland, Fiona; Woods, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscence therapy has the potential to improve quality of life for people with dementia. In recent years reminiscence groups have extended to include family members, but carers’ experience of attending joint sessions is undocumented. This qualitative study explored the experience of 18 family carers attending ‘Remembering Yesterday Caring Today’ groups. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: experiencing carer support; shared experience; expectations (met and unmet), carer perspectives of the person with dementia’s experience; and learning and comparing. Family carers’ experiences varied, with some experiencing the intervention as entirely positive whereas others had more mixed feelings. Negative aspects included the lack of respite from their relative, the lack of emphasis on their own needs, and experiencing additional stress and guilt through not being able to implement newly acquired skills. These findings may explain the failure of a recent trial of joint reminiscence groups to replicate previous findings of positive benefit. More targeted research within subgroups of carers is required to justify the continued use of joint reminiscence groups in dementia care. PMID:24381218

  20. Reminiscence--when the past eases the present.

    PubMed

    Osborn, C L

    1989-10-01

    1. Fostering reminiscence in a group is an appropriate nursing intervention for a variety of nursing diagnoses, or simply to enhance the general quality of life of elderly clients. Reminiscence groups have been used by nurses in a variety of settings with a variety of types of clients, and have been associated with psychological and social benefits. 2. If participation is voluntary and leadership style is nonjudgmental and supportive, a reminiscence group should have a positive impact on elderly participants. 3. Sharing memories in a group situation may not come naturally to elderly clients. By giving thought in advance to the group's purpose, structure and rules, leadership style, and group process, the leader can enhance the group experience for both herself and the elderly participants. PMID:2794379

  1. Correlates of Reminiscence Activity among Elderly Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Steven W.; Barnett, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines several psychological characteristics and life experiences that may be related to reminiscence activity among elderly individuals (n=70). Results provide support for the notion that aspects of reminiscence activity are associated with individual differences in specific psychological and situational variables. (JPS)

  2. Does Pedagogical Documentation Support Maternal Reminiscing Conversations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Bethany; Richmond, Aaron S.; Sanderson, Jordace; Yacovetta, Sara

    2015-01-01

    When parents talk with their children about lessons learned in school, they are participating in reminiscing of an unshared event. This study sought to understand if pedagogical documentation, from the Reggio Approach to early childhood education, would support and enhance the conversation. Mother-child dyads reminisced two separate times about…

  3. Reminiscence and Hypermnesia in Children's Eyewitness Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooy, D.L.; Pipe, M.E.; Murray, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments examined reminiscence and hypermnesia in 5- and 6-year-olds' memory for an event across repeated interviews that occurred either immediately afterward (Experiment 1) or after a 6-month delay (Experiments 2 and 3). Reminiscence (recall of new information) was reliably obtained in all of the experiments, although the numbers of new…

  4. Reminiscence and Vivid Personal Memories across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jeffrey Dean; Gould, Odette

    2007-01-01

    This study examined reminiscence functions and vivid (i.e., landmark) personal memories in nine samples ranging from the teens to the nineties. Participants (n = 198) ranging in age from 18-95 years completed the Reminiscence Functions Scale (Webster, 1997) and described a vivid personal memory which was subsequently rated for frequency of recall,…

  5. Reminiscence and Its Relationship to the Psychological Adjustment of the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Michael; And Others

    Reminiscence has long been considered an integral part of the aging process, whether as a form of cultural transmission or as a method of strengthening the ego structure. To examine the form of reminiscence defined as life review and its relationship to adjustment in the final stages of development, older Canadian adults (N=82) completed a…

  6. The Uses of Reminiscence in Older Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    1993-01-01

    Results of the Uses of Reminiscence Scale completed by 89 60-year olds, 95 80-year olds, and 104 centenarians identified 17 reasons for thinking or talking about the past. Three factors were most important: therapeutic, informative, and enjoyment. (SK)

  7. Collage as a Therapeutic Modality for Reminiscence in Patients with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolhiser Stallings, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Traditional therapy, with its emphasis on verbal communication between therapist and client, may not be appropriate for patients with dementia due to impaired cognitive and verbal abilities. This brief report presents a qualitative study on the use of collage in art therapy to aid in the process of reminiscence in individuals with dementia. Data…

  8. Reminiscence and hypermnesia in children's eyewitness memory.

    PubMed

    La Rooy, David; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Murray, Janice E

    2005-03-01

    Three experiments examined reminiscence and hypermnesia in 5- and 6-year-olds' memory for an event across repeated interviews that occurred either immediately afterward (Experiment 1) or after a 6-month delay (Experiments 2 and 3). Reminiscence (recall of new information) was reliably obtained in all of the experiments, although the numbers of new items recalled were fewer after a delay than when the interviews occurred immediately afterward. Hypermnesia (increasing total recall over repeated recall attempts) was obtained only in Experiment 1 when interviews occurred immediately and 24 h after the event. PMID:15707861

  9. The Effect of Narrative Reminiscence on Happiness of Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Zahra; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Tagharrobi, Zahra; Akbari, Hossien

    2015-01-01

    Background: Happiness has a considerable impact on elderly quality of life. Reminiscence therapy can be an effective intervention in increasing the positive emotions among elderly. Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on Iranian elderly women’s happiness. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial conducted on 32 elderly women (census sampling) attending the jahandidegan daycare elderly center IN Gorgan city, Iran, in 2013. Happiness scores of 4 phases were measured: before, the third session, the sixth session and one month after the intervention. Three instruments were used in this study including a demographic questionnaire, the mini mental state examination test, and Oxford happiness questionnaire. The intervention group participated in six sessions of narrative group reminiscence that were held in three consecutive weeks, two sessions per week. The control group was also participated in six sessions of group discussions that were held in three consecutive weeks, two sessions per week. Data analysis was performed the chi-square, independent t-test, Paired t-test. Results: From a total of 32 elderly women, 29 cases completed the study. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of demographic characteristics. The mean happiness scores before the intervention between the two groups were not significantly different (P = 0.824). Comparison of the mean happiness scores of the intervention group in the four measurement times revealed a significant difference only after the third and sixth sessions (P = 0.03), and no significant difference was found between the mean happiness scores of the control group in the four measurement times. Conclusions: The elderly participating in the matched group sessions can be effective in increasing positive emotions. PMID:26734470

  10. Asher Brown Durand: "An Old Man's Reminiscences."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Ted

    1988-01-01

    Uses Durand's "An Old Man's Reminiscences" to introduce students in grades 4-6 to the effective use of nostalgia and memories in artwork. Presents lesson objectives, instructional strategies, evaluation criteria, and background information about the artist and the painting. (GEA)

  11. Indian Students and Reminiscences of Alcatraz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Steve

    1994-01-01

    A former graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, at the time of the occupation of Alcatraz Island by American Indians reminisces about the development of a Native American Studies program at Berkeley, a course on Indian liberation given just before the occupation, the role of Indian students in the occupation, and attempts to…

  12. Reminiscence and item recovery in free recall.

    PubMed

    Madigan, S

    1976-05-01

    The item recovery or reminiscence component of recall in RTT procedures was investigated in two free recall experiments. In the first, Erdelyi and Becker's (1974) "hypermnesia" effect was found with pictures as the to-be-remembered material: total amount recalled increased over two successive test trials, and included a large reminiscence effect, with some 27% of previously unrecalled items appearing in the second test. The second experiment, with word lists, showed that the frequency of occurrence of new items was greater following a 12-min separation of two test trials than in two relatively massed tests. This kind of item recovery is relevant to models of output interference and retrieval limitations in free recall, and may be also related to spontaneous recovery effects. PMID:21287027

  13. Combining Individual Psychodynamics with Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melito, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Presents integrative framework for combining central aspects of individual psychodynamics with structural family therapy in meaningful way. Explains how framework derives from developmental perspective. Presents case example to illustrate combined approach and demonstrate its utility. (Author/NB)

  14. Cascading reminiscence bumps in popular music.

    PubMed

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne; Zupnick, Justin Adam

    2013-10-01

    Autobiographical memories are disproportionately recalled for events in late adolescence and early adulthood, a phenomenon called the reminiscence bump. Previous studies on music have found autobiographical memories and life-long preferences for music from this period. In the present study, we probed young adults' personal memories associated with top hits over 5-and-a-half decades, as well as the context of their memories and their recognition of, preference for, quality judgments of, and emotional reactions to that music. All these measures showed the typical increase for music released during the two decades of their lives. Unexpectedly, we found that the same measures peaked for the music of participants' parents' generation. This finding points to the impact of music in childhood and suggests that these results reflect the prevalence of music in the home environment. An earlier peak occurred for 1960s music, which may be explained by its quality or by its transmission through two generations. We refer to this pattern of musical cultural transmission over generations as cascading reminiscence bumps. PMID:24006129

  15. Mother-child reminiscing at risk: Maternal attachment, elaboration, and child autobiographical memory specificity.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Christina G; Valentino, Kristin; Comas, Michelle; Nuttall, Amy K

    2016-03-01

    Mother-child reminiscing, the process by which mothers and their children discuss past events and emotional experiences, has been robustly linked with child outcomes, including autobiographical memory. To advance previous work linking elaborative maternal reminiscing with child autobiographical memory specificity, the ability to generate and retrieve specific memories from one's past, it is essential to make distinctions among aspects of elaboration and to consider how maternal risk factors may influence the reminiscing context. The current study evaluated (a) an interaction between emotional and structural elaboration predicting child autobiographical memory specificity and (b) the potential moderating role of maternal adult attachment. Participants consisted of 95 preschool-aged children and their mothers. The sample was predominantly low income and racially diverse. Dyads completed a reminiscing task that was coded for emotional and structural elaboration. Mothers completed the Experiences in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR-R) to assess attachment-related avoidance and anxiety, and children completed the Autobiographical Memory Test-Preschool Version (AMT-PV) to assess memory specificity. Results indicated that the association between structural reminiscing and child memory specificity was moderated by emotional elements of reminiscing. At high levels of emotional elaboration, mothers with high levels of structural elaboration had children with more specific memory than mothers with low levels of structural elaboration. Moreover, emotional elaboration (a) predicted less specific child memory without high structural support and (b) negatively predicted child specificity at high levels of maternal attachment avoidance and anxiety, a profile associated with fearful avoidance. Future directions and implications are discussed. PMID:26630033

  16. Early Reminiscing in Cultural Contexts: Cultural Models, Maternal Reminiscing Styles, and Children's Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; Kartner, Joscha; Kleis, Astrid; Abels, Monika; Yovsi, Relindis D.; Chaudhary, Nandita; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined conversations of 164 mothers from seven different cultural contexts when reminiscing with their 3-year-old children. We chose samples based on their sociodemographic profiles, which represented three different cultural models: (1) autonomy (urban middle-class families from Western societies), (2) relatedness (rural…

  17. Crafts as memory triggers in reminiscence: a case study of older women with dementia.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Sinikka Hannele; Hirsimäki, Reetta Marja

    2014-10-01

    This case study explored the benefits of crafts as memory triggers in reminiscence sessions with older women in residential care who had severe symptoms of dementia and had enjoyed crafting as a leisure activity during their lifetime. Three structured reminiscence sessions, involving different kinds of handicrafts, craft material, and craft tools, were used to trigger memories and offer multisensory stimuli. Thematization, quantification, and theory-based reasoning were employed for content analysis. Multisensory triggers activated nonverbal and verbal reactions, sustaining attention and prompting interaction and nonverbal communication. The most interesting triggers stimulated recall of forgotten, pleasing craft experiences. PMID:25180472

  18. Mother-Child Reminiscing and Children's Understanding of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe

    2006-01-01

    Children's autobiographical memory is hypothesized to be a function of their understanding of mind (Perner & Ruffman, 1995; Welch-Ross, 1995). In the context of mother-child reminiscing, children may learn about and display their understanding of mind (Nelson, 1999; Welch-Ross, 1997). We studied links among maternal reminiscing style, children's…

  19. A quasi-experimental study of a reminiscence program focused on autobiographical memory in institutionalized older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Teresa Silveira; Afonso, Rosa Marina Lopes Brás Martins; Ribeiro, Óscar Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Working with past memories through reminiscence interventions has been practiced for several decades with successful outcomes on mental health in older adults. Few studies however have focused on autobiographical memory recall in older individuals with cognitive impairment. This study aims to analyze the impact of an individual reminiscence program in a group of older persons with cognitive decline living in nursing homes on the dimensions of cognition, autobiographical memory, mood, behavior and anxiety. A two-group pre-test and post-test design with single blinded assessment was conducted. Forty-one participants were randomized to an experimental group (n=20) and a control group (n=21). The first group attended five weekly individual reminiscence sessions. Changes in the outcome measures were examined for cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment; Autobiographical Memory Test), behavior (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Subscale Non-Cog) and emotional status (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia; Geriatric Depression Scale, and Geriatric Anxiety Inventory). Participants attending reminiscence sessions exhibited better outcomes compared to the control group in cognition, anxiety and depression (p<0.001), and presented a higher number of retrieved autobiographical events, specificity of evoked memories and positive valence of events (p<0.001), and also presented lower latency time for recalling events, and lower negative recalled events (p<0.01). This study supports the potential value of reminiscence therapy in improving the recall of autobiographical memory. Reminiscence therapy can be helpful to maintain or improve cognitive function, decrease anxiety and manage depressive symptoms and altered behavior, but further investigation is needed to clarify long-term effects. PMID:27347792

  20. A computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Zullo, Valeria; Schirone, Simona; Prisco, Raffaella; Denitto, Floriana

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed a simple computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence. In practice, the program was aimed at fostering the patient's verbal engagement on a number of life experiences/topics previously selected for him or her and introduced in the sessions through a friendly female, who appeared on the computer screen. The female asked the patient about the aforementioned experiences/topics, and provided him or her with positive attention, and possibly verbal guidance (i.e., prompts/encouragements). Eight patients were involved in the study, which was carried out according to non-concurrent multiple baseline designs across participants. Seven of them showed clear improvement during the intervention phase (i.e., with the program). Their mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence ranged from close to zero to about 15 during the baseline and from above 50 to above 75 during the intervention. The results were discussed in relation to previous literature on reminiscence therapy, with specific emphasis on the need for (a) replication studies and (b) the development of new versions of the technology-aided program to improve its impact and reach a wider number of patients. PMID:25124700

  1. Effects of part-set cuing on reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, Neil; Parker, Andrew; Munley, Gary

    2007-12-01

    Part-set cuing has frequently been found to inhibit the recall of previously learned information; see Nickerson's 1984 work. This study investigated whether negative part-set cuing effects extend to the disruption of reminiscence, the production of new items, on a delayed second recall trial. 64 psychology students from local Further Education colleges volunteered to participate. Following random assignment to conditions participants were presented 20 unrelated words at 2-sec. intervals. After a 30-sec. interference task participants free recalled. After a delay of 5 or 30 min., part icipants recalled a second time either with or without cues. Part-set cuing inhibited the production of new words (reminiscences). Time delay, however, had no effect on reminiscence. PMID:18229555

  2. Beyond reminiscence: using generic video to elicit conversational language.

    PubMed

    Davis, Boyd H; Shenk, Dena

    2015-02-01

    Videos and multimedia are increasingly used to stimulate reminiscence in dementia care. However, they are also valuable in eliciting a wide range of language patterns that are not necessarily keyed to reminiscence about self. Low-technology, home-made generic and personalized videos were tested with 2 samples of persons with dementia, to increase engagement and support the retention of identity. Participants showed a slight, though not significant, preference for looking first at personalized videos and produced a wider range of conversational language topics and phrasal patterns in response to the generic videos. PMID:24851873

  3. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Tariq I; Radich, Jerald P; Deininger, Michael W; Apperley, Jane F; Hughes, Timothy P; Harrison, Christine J; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q

    2016-05-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people's lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  4. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Radich, Jerald P.; Deininger, Michael W.; Apperley, Jane F.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Harrison, Christine J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q.

    2016-01-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people’s lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  5. Personal reminiscences of ophthalmology giants of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Tasman, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper records personal reminiscences of seven 20th century ophthalmologists who each in his own way metaphorically split the atom and, thereby, changed ophthalmology forever. In addition to their major contributions, they each shared some very desirable traits. They were gentlemen who were devoted to their families and their families to them. PMID:23768923

  6. In Search of Meaning: A Reminiscence Program for Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerhof, Gerben J.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst; Valenkamp, Marije W.

    2004-01-01

    A pilot evaluation is reported of a reminiscence program aimed at increasing personal meaning. Fifty-seven older persons completed both a sentence completion questionnaire measuring personal meaning and a depression scale administered before and after the program. In comparison to a group from a representative survey that was matched on life…

  7. Jacob L. Moreno and "Sociometry": A Mid-Century Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgatta, Edgar F.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he first met Jacob L. Moreno, the founder of "Social Psychology Quarterly," through the intervention of Professor Wellman J. Warner, then the chairman of New York University's Department of Sociology. He then reminisces about his experience of working with Moreno on the journal "Sociometry."

  8. Misleading Children's Story Recall: Forgetting and Reminiscence of the Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined misinformation effects in kindergartners' and second graders' long-term recollection. Results of two experiments showed that (1) misinformation effects were related to rate of forgetting but not to age; (2) developmental differences in retention were controlled by forgetting; and (3) reminiscence increased the probability of correct…

  9. Parent-Child Reminiscing Locates the Self in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fivush, Robyn; Nelson, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we extend our social-cultural developmental model of autobiographical memory development (Nelson & Fivush, 2004) to discuss children's developing understanding of self and other as temporally extended in time. Parent-guided reminiscing about past events that includes discussion, comparison, and negotiation of internal states of self…

  10. Reminiscentia: Cherished Objects as Memorabilia in Late-Life Reminiscence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Edmund

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 100 older adults to determine kinds of memorabilia and cherished objects they would identify and how these were related to reminiscence and current mood as measured by Affect-Balance Scale. Found significant positive relationship between memorabilia and mood; total lack of cherished objects was associated with significantly lower mood…

  11. The Subversive Practices of Reminiscence Theatre in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wan-Jung

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1995, the Taiwanese Uhan Shii Theatre Group has created 12 distinctive reminiscence theatre productions and has performed locally in Taiwan as well as globally around the world. The company has developed its own theatrical aesthetics of memory, and their work not only represents the traditions of Taiwanese culture and habitus, but it…

  12. Early Childhood Autism and Structural Therapy: Outcome after 3 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the effect of three years of structural therapy on inpatient cases of early childhood autism (ECA). Treatment resulted in the discharge of 12 patients. Results indicate that high stimulation, physically intrusive, gamelike, novelty filled, and developmentally oriented treatment of structural therapy can produce significant improvement in…

  13. Is there hypermnesia and reminiscence for information intentionally forgotten?

    PubMed

    Goernert, P N; Wolfe, T

    1997-09-01

    Memory performance was examined across consecutive tests in three directed-forgetting experiments. Following word-method or list-method cueing to forget, significant directed forgetting was observed for all tests: Free recall for remember cue words always exceeded free recall for forget cue words. Moreover, following either cueing method, similar magnitudes of hypermnesia (improved free recall across tests) and reminiscence (recovery of words across tests) were observed for both word types. Regardless of cueing method, after an initial free recall test, the level of recovery for both word types did not differ significantly. That is, directed forgetting was not observed for the reminiscence data. Taken together, the pattern of results suggest that cues to forget impair the encoding of information but, after an initial memory test, they do not interrupt the accessing of that information. These findings are consistent with the selective rehearsal account but not the retrieval inhibition account of directed forgetting. PMID:9499755

  14. Gestalt and psychoanalytic therapies: structural analysis and rapprochement.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A C

    1980-10-01

    This paper examines the psychoanalytic concepts of interpretation, resistance, and transference as manifest in gestalt therapy. Although these concepts are de-emphasized, criticized, and disavowed in gestalt theoretical writings, they are actually fundamental to the underlying or "deep" structure of gestalt therapy. Examples of gestalt interventions are described and indications for their use suggested. PMID:7446800

  15. Extroversion and reminiscence following a frustrating paired-associate task.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J E; Koenig, K P

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments were reported relating extroversion to reminiscence following a frustrating paired-associate (PA) task. In the first experiment a group of 30 male and female college students was randomly assigned to one of two tasks in which they learned a PA list of high or low stimulus similarity. All PA lists were mixed lists composed of half solvable and half unsolvable (randomized) stimulus-response items. Recall for solvable items was tested immediately, 15 min, and 30 min after criterion was reached. Results indicated a significant difference between high and low stimulus similarity with superior recall for low similarity. The predicted reminiscence effect for high stimulus similarity recall was present but not significant. Comparison of recall scores for extroverts and introverts indicated a significant difference in recall favoring the introverts. The second experiment made a similar test of recall for two groups of S s that had been established as extreme extroverts or introverts (N = 8 in each group). The superiority of recall for introverts was replicated, and a reminiscence effect was found for the extroverts. Results were discussed in relation to Eysenck's formulation and previous conflicting results. PMID:627881

  16. Connecting with the Well-Elderly through Reminiscence: Analysis of Lived Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Peg; Carey, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Reminiscing is a therapeutic nursing intervention for older adults. Nursing students and elders who participated in reminiscing interviews were excited by this activity. Researchers across disciplines collaborated in this qualitative research project to clarify the meaning and experience of reminiscing for the student and the diverse elder.…

  17. Psychosocial benefits of solitary reminiscence writing: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Elford, H; Wilson, F; McKee, K J; Chung, M C; Bolton, G; Goudie, F

    2005-07-01

    Claims have been made that reminiscence has benefits for older people's psychological well-being, and that writing memories may be a therapeutic process. This paper describes an exploratory study in which five nursing home residents engaged in a process of writing their memories by themselves, in a series of booklets containing memory prompts and photographs, over a period of four weeks. Each completed booklet was typed up by researchers and returned to participants the following week, with a bound copy provided to participants at the end of the study period. Analysis focuses on two sets of data: an in-depth case study of one participant, and a thematic analysis of field notes, researcher reflections, and the written material produced by the other study participants. The case study revealed three main themes: views on the past; sharing the past; and confidence in writing about the past. The field note analysis indicated the presence of four themes: proof and maintenance of skills; psychological or internal processes; social contact; and pleasure in reminiscence. The writing was seen as cathartic and provided a meaningful purpose, an opportunity to exercise writing skills and memory, and a focus for participants to share key stories with others. This exploratory study suggests that there is potential in using solitary writing within a reminiscence framework to improve psychological well-being in older people. However, caution should be exercised when encouraging older people to write their stories. Issues of confidentiality, audience, support, and appropriateness of the activity for the individual need consideration. PMID:16019286

  18. Remembering the forgotten? Reminiscence, hypermnesia and memory for order.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Matthew R; Nairne, James S

    2003-05-01

    Three experiments established that repeated testing affects item and order retention differently: Hypermnesia was found with repeated free recall tests, whereas net performance declined significantly across successive free reconstruction of order tests. Overall order performance declined over tests under a variety of encoding conditions (pictures, words, and relational and item-specific processing) and retrieval conditions (intentional and incidental learning). Although net performance dropped across tests, participants did show reliable order recovery (reminiscence) between tests. The implications of these data for general theories of hypermnesia and order are discussed. PMID:12745831

  19. Training maltreating parents in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing with their preschool-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Kristin; Comas, Michelle; Nuttall, Amy K.; Thomas, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Objective In the current study, the effects of training maltreating parents and their preschool-aged children in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing were examined. Method 44 parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to a training (reminiscing) or wait-list (control) condition. All participating parents had substantiated maltreatment and were involved with the Department of Child Services at the time of enrollment. Children were 3–6 years old (M = 4.88, SD = .99) and living in the custody of the participating parent. Dyads in the reminiscing condition received four, weekly, in-home sessions in elaborative and emotion rich reminiscing. Results At a follow-up assessment, maltreating parents in the reminiscing condition provided more high-elaborative utterances, references to children’s negative emotions, and explanations of children’s emotion during reminiscing than did parents in the control condition. Children in the reminiscing condition had richer memory recall and made more emotion references than did children in the control condition during reminiscing with their mothers, but not with an experimenter. Conclusion The findings suggest that maltreating parents can be taught elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing skills, with benefits for child cognitive and emotional development. The potential clinical utility of a reminiscing-based training for maltreating families with young children is discussed. PMID:23548682

  20. Pragmatism and structuralism in occupational therapy: the long conversation.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Barb; Wood, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    The history of occupational therapy may be understood as a continual transaction between two cultural discourses: pragmatism and structuralism. Pragmatism is a way of thinking that presupposes humans are agentic by nature and knowledge is tentative and created within particular contexts. Structuralism is a way of thinking that assumes humans are composites of recurring general frameworks and that knowledge is objective and can be generalized to multiple contexts. Early in the field's history, both pragmatist and structuralist assumptions about the human and knowledge produced different readings, or interpretations, of what constituted the appropriate tools, methods, and outcomes for occupational therapy. Consequently, occupational therapy adopted an interesting mix of pragmatist language regarding the human and structuralist approaches to knowledge, resulting in professional identity problems still experienced today. However, recent developments offer an opportunity for occupational therapists to correct old identity problems through critically evaluating incompatible assumptions and carefully reading the prevailing cultural ethos. PMID:11833400

  1. Preparation of reminiscent aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Bonkohara, Kaori; Fuji, Maiko; Nakao, Akito; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    To prepare an aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce by fewest components, the aroma concentrate of good sensory attributes was prepared by polyethylene membrane extraction, which could extract only the volatiles with diethyl ether. GC-MS-Olfactometry was done with the aroma concentrate, and 28 odor-active compounds were detected. Application of aroma extract dilution analysis to the separated fraction revealed high flavor dilution factors with respect to acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-2(or5)-ethyl-5(or2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol), and 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal (methional). A model aroma mixture containing above four odorants showed a good similarity with the aroma of the soy sauce itself. Consequently, the reminiscent aroma mixture of soy sauce was prepared in water. The ratio of acetic acid, HEMF, isoamyl alcohol, and methional was 2500:300:100:1. PMID:26494283

  2. Transient Structured Distance as a Maneuver in Marital Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Bernard L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Experience with 73 cases has shown the value of Transient Structured Distance as a maneuver in marriage therapy. While the TSD is a radical form of intervention with risks of anxiety reactions, homosexual panic, or divorce, it has proved effective with difficult forms of acute or chronic marital disharmony. (Author)

  3. Ecological Structural Family Therapy with Cuban Immigrant Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scopetta, Mercedes A.; And Others

    Research and clinical practice at the Spanish Family Guidance Clinic (Miami, Florida) has suggested that ecological structural family therapy might be a treatment of choice for Cuban immigrants. Such a treatment approach was found to be consistent with the values of this population and was particularly helpful in addressing special problems…

  4. Order Out of Chaos: A Structural Analysis of Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Knox-Harbour, Pamela L.

    Within the literature on group counseling and psychotherapy, the structure of therapeutic group processes is frequently described in terms of stages of the group process. Numerous group stages have been proposed to describe the social interaction and change in social interaction that is characteristic of group therapy. This study examined the…

  5. Telomerase Structure Paves the way for New Cancer Therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Skordalakes, S.

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of a single enzyme, telomerase, is associated with the uncontrollable proliferation of cells observed in as many as 90% of all of human cancers. Since the mid-1990s, when telomerase activity was detected in human tumors, scientists have eyed the enzyme as an ideal target for developing broadly effective anticancer drugs. One of the missing links in the effort to identify such therapies has been the high-resolution structure of the enzyme, a powerful tool used for the identification and development of clinical drugs. A recent structure of the catalytic subunit of teleomerase from the Skordalakes laboratory, a major advancement in the field of telomeres, has opened the door to the development of new, broadly effective cancer drugs, as well as anti-aging therapies. Here we present a brief description of telomerase biology, current efforts to identify telomerase function modulators and the potential importance of the telomerase structure in future drug development.

  6. Structured dyadic behavior therapy processes for ADHD intervention.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David F

    2014-03-01

    Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) present significant problems with behavioral disinhibition that often negatively affect their peer relationships. Although behavior therapies for ADHD have traditionally aimed to help parents and teachers better manage children's ADHD-related behaviors, therapy processes seldom use peer relationships to implement evidence-based behavioral principles. This article introduces Structured Dyadic Behavior Therapy as a milieu for introducing effective behavioral techniques within a socially meaningful context. Establishing collaborative behavioral goals, benchmarking, and redirection strategies are discussed to highlight how in-session dyadic processes can be used to promote more meaningful reinforcement and change for children with ADHD. Implications for improving patient care, access to care, and therapist training are also discussed. PMID:24377401

  7. Scenario-Based Design of a Digital Reminiscing System for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiry, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    Reminiscing--"the act or process of recalling the past (Butler, 1963, p. 66)"--is a core activity for any society. Research shows that the desire and tradition for reminiscing can be traced back to early civilizations where the elders of the community were responsible to know and share the history of their community (Butler, 1995;…

  8. Two Is the Beginning of the End: "Peter Pan" and the Doctrine of Reminiscence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Glenda A.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers J.M. Barrie's satirical treatment of the Platonic doctrine of reminiscence in "Peter Pan," and how Barrie's work both honors and undercuts it. It will first analyze the Platonic notion of the doctrine of reminiscence in Wordsworth's "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood" (1807). It will then…

  9. Reminiscence Activity and Increased Communication Interaction among Cognitively Disabled Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupar, Karen R.; Smith, N. Richmond

    Designed as the first phase of a larger project to explore the relationships between the possible impact of reminiscence on memory deterioration in elderly women confined to nursing home environments, a study demonstrated that reminiscence activity is positively correlated with increases in communication interactions. Women were chosen as the…

  10. Family Reminiscing Style: Parent Gender and Emotional Focus in Relation to Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fivush, Robyn; Marin, Kelly; McWilliams, Kelly; Bohanek, Jennifer G.

    2009-01-01

    Family reminiscing is a critical part of family interaction related to child outcome. In this study, we extended previous research by examining both mothers and fathers, in two-parent racially diverse middle-class families, reminiscing with their 9- to 12-year-old children about both the facts and the emotional aspects of shared positive and…

  11. Including Social Factors in the Analysis of Reminiscence in Elderly Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamme, Simone; Baars, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Contends that developmental, determinist, and contextualist psychologists, although all studying reminiscence in older adults, have not fully acknowledged the role the environment plays in establishing reminiscent behavior in elderly people. Suggests including sociological life course theory in the analyses and interpretation of this behavior.…

  12. Constructing Emotional and Relational Understanding: The Role of Mother-Child Reminiscing about Negatively Valenced Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laible, Deborah; Murphy, Tia Panfile; Augustine, Mairin

    2013-01-01

    Although there is some evidence from cross-sectional studies that reminiscing is an important context in which children construct socioemotional understanding, longitudinal evidence is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine longitudinally the links between the quality of reminiscing at 42 months and children's subsequent socioemotional…

  13. Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing Increases Low-Income Children's Narrative Skills Relative to Dialogic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Leyva, Diana; Sparks, Alison; Grolnick, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This study compared the unique effects of training low-income mothers in dialogic reading versus elaborative reminiscing on children's oral language and emergent literacy. Thirty-three low-income parents of 4-year-old children attending Head Start were randomly assigned to either dialogic reading, elaborative reminiscing, or a…

  14. Profiles of reminiscence among older adults: perceived stress, life attitudes, and personality variables.

    PubMed

    Cappeliez, Philippe; O'Rourke, Norm

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify subgroups of older participants on the basis of unique configurations of variables among functions of reminiscence, personality traits, life attitudes, and perceived stress by means of cluster analysis. Ninety-three older adults (M = 66.7 years of age) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, the Life Attitude Profile-Revised, the Reminiscence Functions Scale, and the Psychological State of Stress Measure. Cluster membership was determined on the basis of intra-personal functions of reminiscence (Boredom Reduction, Death Preparation, Identity, Bitterness Revival). These groups were subsequently compared on personality traits (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience), life attitudes (Existential Vacuum, Goal Seeking), and perceived stress. Three distinct groupings emerged. A greater tendency to ruminate about negative memories and lower extraversion characterized the negative reminiscers. Higher frequency of reminiscence related to issues of identity, life meaning and death, together with a tendency toward openness to experience, typified the meaning seekers. Lower reminiscence frequency for each of the four functions, combined with lower perceived stress and neuroticism, characterized the infrequent reminiscers. These results are interpreted in terms of differential patterns of coping and adaptation. PMID:12243446

  15. The Effects of Mother Training in Emotion-Rich, Elaborative Reminiscing on Children's Shared Recall and Emotion Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bergen, Penny; Salmon, Karen; Dadds, Mark R.; Allen, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of training mothers in high-elaborative, emotional reminiscing on children's autobiographical memory and emotion knowledge. Eighty mothers were randomly allocated to one of two training conditions: in the "reminiscing" condition, mothers were encouraged to reminisce by asking their children (aged 3.5 to 5…

  16. Associations of Mother-Child Reminiscing about Negative Past Events, Coping, and Self-Concept in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodvin, Rebecca; Romdall, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Parent-child reminiscing conversations in early childhood have received theoretical attention as a forum for children's self-concept development, but this has been little addressed in empirical work. This study examines associations between emotion reminiscing and children's self-concepts and, building from the reminiscing and…

  17. Allergic rhinitis: meaningful and less meaningful combination treatments including reminiscences.

    PubMed

    Szelenyi, I

    2014-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) results from a complex allergen-driven mucosal inflammation in the nasal cavity. Current guideline-based therapy for allergic rhinitis include oral and nasal antihistamines, topical and systemic glucocorticoids, decongestants, antimuscarinic agents, mast cell stabilizing drugs, leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and others. In spite of guideline recommendations, most patients are using multiple therapies in an attempt to achieve symptom control. Therefore, more effective therapies for the management of AR are clearly required. Recently, a novel fixed dose combination containing azelastine and fluticasone propionate has successfully been introduced. At present, it represents the only meaningful topical drug combination. Perhaps, it will be followed by others. PMID:24974572

  18. Maternal elaborative reminiscing mediates the effect of child maltreatment on behavioral and physiological functioning.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Kristin; Hibel, Leah C; Cummings, E Mark; Nuttall, Amy K; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggest that the way in which parents discuss everyday emotional experiences with their young children (i.e., elaborative reminiscing) has significant implications for child cognitive and socioemotional functioning, and that maltreating parents have a particularly difficult time in engaging in this type of dialogue. This dyadic interactional exchange, therefore, has the potential to be an important process variable linking child maltreatment to developmental outcomes at multiple levels of analysis. The current investigation evaluated the role of maternal elaborative reminiscing in associations between maltreatment and child cognitive, emotional, and physiological functioning. Participants included 43 maltreated and 49 nonmaltreated children (aged 3-6) and their mothers. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about four past emotional events, and children participated in assessments of receptive language and emotion knowledge. Child salivary cortisol was also collected from children three times a day (waking, midday, and bedtime) on 2 consecutive days to assess daily levels and diurnal decline. Results indicated that maltreating mothers engaged in significantly less elaborative reminiscing than did nonmaltreating mothers. Maternal elaborative reminiscing mediated associations between child maltreatment and child receptive language and child emotion knowledge. In addition, there was support for an indirect pathway between child maltreatment and child cortisol diurnal decline through maternal elaborative reminiscing. Directions for future research are discussed, and potential clinical implications are addressed. PMID:26535941

  19. Attachment-Focused Integrative Reminiscence with Older African-Americans: A Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Charles R.; Kang, Suk-Young; Pillemer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prior integrative reminiscence interventions have had a limited focus on attachment themes. The Attachment-Focused Integrative Reminiscence (AFIR) intervention differs from these in its central emphasis on attachment themes. The wide range of health benefits resulting from integrative reminiscence may be due in part to reminiscing about, mourning, and integrating unresolved attachment experiences. Method Participants were randomized into treatment and wait-list control conditions; completed a pre-test; met for 8 consecutive weekly 2-hour sessions of largely attachment-focused reminiscence; then completed post-tests immediately following the intervention and again 6 months later. Results Results show treatment effects for depression (p = .01 and .05 at 8 weeks and 6 months), perceived stress (p = .01 and .04), and emergency room (ER) visits at 6 months (p = .04), with the intervention group showing lower depression and stress and fewer ER visits. Conclusion Integrative reminiscence interventions are cost-effective, have rapid impact, and carry a certain appeal to older adults. Augmenting such interventions with a focus on attachment experiences may reduce perceived stress, an important health risk factor. Wider application of AFIRs may further reduce health disparities among U.S. older adults. PMID:25812080

  20. Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing Mediates the Effect of Child Maltreatment on Behavioral and Physiological Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Kristin; Hibel, Leah C; Cummings, E. Mark; Nuttall, Amy K.; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggest that the way in which parents discuss everyday emotional experiences with their young children (i.e., elaborative reminiscing) has significant implications for child cognitive and socio-emotional functioning, and that maltreating parents have a particularly difficult time in engaging in this type of dialogue. This dyadic interactional exchange, therefore, has the potential to be an important process variable linking child maltreatment to developmental outcomes at multiple levels of analysis. The current investigation evaluated the role of maternal elaborative reminiscing in associations between maltreatment and child cognitive, emotional, and physiological functioning. Participants included 43 maltreated and 49 nonmaltreated children (aged 3–6) and their mothers. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about four past emotional events, and children participated in assessments of receptive language and emotion knowledge. Child salivary cortisol was also collected from children three times a day (waking, midday, and bedtime) on two consecutive days to assess daily levels and diurnal decline. Results indicated that maltreating mothers engaged in significantly less elaborative reminiscing than nonmaltreating mothers. Maternal elaborative reminiscing mediated associations between child maltreatment and child receptive language and child emotion knowledge. Additionally, there was support for an indirect pathway between child maltreatment and child cortisol diurnal decline through maternal elaborative reminiscing. Directions for future research are discussed and potential clinical implications are addressed. PMID:26535941

  1. Structure of inositol monophosphatase, the putative target of lithium therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bone, R; Springer, J P; Atack, J R

    1992-01-01

    Inositol monophosphatase (EC 3.1.3.25), the putative molecular site of action of lithium therapy for manic-depressive illness, plays a key role in the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway by catalyzing the hydrolysis of inositol monophosphates. To provide a structural basis from which to design better therapeutic agents for manic-depressive illness, the structure of human inositol monophosphatase has been determined to 2.1-A resolution by using x-ray crystallography. The enzyme exists as a dimer of identical subunits, each folded into a five-layered sandwich of three pairs of alpha-helices and two beta-sheets. Sulfate and an inhibitory lanthanide cation (Gd3+) are bound at identical sites on each subunit and establish the positions of the active sites. Each site is located in a large hydrophilic cavern that is at the base of the two central helices where several segments of secondary structure intersect. Comparison of the phosphatase aligned sequences of several diverse genes with the phosphatase structure suggests that the products of these genes and the phosphatase form a structural family with a conserved metal binding site. Images PMID:1332026

  2. Consequences from use of reminiscence - a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. Methods In this randomised study, ten nursing homes were matched into two groups on the basis of location, type and size. In the period August 2006 - August 2007, staff in the Intervention Group were trained and supported in the use of reminiscence, involving individual and group sessions with residents as well as reminiscence boxes, posters and exhibitions. At baseline and again 6 and 12 months after the intervention start, data were collected on residents' cognitive level, agitated behaviour, general functioning and proxy-assessed quality of life, as well as on staff well-being and job satisfaction. Mixed linear modelling was used to analyse differences in outcome between the intervention and control groups. Results Project drop-out rates were 32% for residents and 38% for nursing staff. Most staff in the Intervention Group considered reminiscence a useful tool that improved their communication with residents, and that they would recommend to other nursing homes. There were no significant differences between residents in the Intervention and the Control Group in cognitive level, agitated behaviour or general functioning. Residents in the Intervention Group showed significant higher score at 6 months in quality of life subscale 'Response to surroundings', but there was no significant difference at 12 months. Positive effects of reminiscence were observed for all staff outcome measures, the only exception being SF-12 self-rated physical health. At 6 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, 'Attitude towards individual contact with residents' and SF-12

  3. Family Reminiscing Style: Parent Gender and Emotional Focus in Relation to Child Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Fivush, Robyn; Marin, Kelly; McWilliams, Kelly; Bohanek, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    Family reminiscing is a critical part of family interaction related to child outcome. In this study, we extended previous research by examining both mothers and fathers, in two-parent racially diverse middle-class families, reminiscing with their 9- to 12-year-old children about both the facts and the emotional aspects of shared positive and negative events. Mothers were more elaborative than fathers, and both mothers and fathers elaborated and evaluated more about the facts of positive than negative events, but there were no differences in parental reminiscing about the emotional aspects of these events. Fathers showed a more consistent reminiscing style across event and information type, whereas mothers seem to show a more nuanced style differentiated by topic. Most interesting, maternal elaborations and evaluations about the facts of negative events were related to higher child well-being, whereas paternal elaborations and evaluations about the emotional aspects of both positive and negative events were related to lower child well-being. Implications for the gendered nature of reminiscing are discussed. PMID:26705398

  4. Life scripts for emotionally charged autobiographical memories: A cultural explanation of the reminiscence bump.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shamsul; Hasking, Penelope A

    2010-10-01

    Two studies examined the ability of the life script account to explain the reminiscence bump for emotionally charged autobiographical memories among Malaysian participants. In Study 1 volunteers, aged 50-90 years, participated in a two-phased task. In the first phase, participants estimated the timing of 11 life events (both positive and negative) that may occur in a prototypical life course within their own culture. Two weeks later the participants retrieved the same set of events from their lives and reported how old they were when those events occurred. In the second study 92 undergraduate students produced life scripts for the same 11 events. The findings revealed reminiscence bumps in both life script and retrieval curves for the memories judged happiest, most important, most in love, and most jealous. A reminiscence bump was also noted for success, although this was later in the lifespan than other reminiscence bumps. It was suggested that the life scripts can be used as an alternative account for the reminiscence bump, for highly positive and occasionally for negative autobiographical memories. PMID:20803371

  5. Hippocampal structural and functional changes associated with electroconvulsive therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, C C; Jones, T; Lemke, N T; Gallegos, P; McClintock, S M; Mayer, A R; Bustillo, J; Calhoun, V D

    2014-01-01

    Previous animal models and structural imaging investigations have linked hippocampal neuroplasticity to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) response, but the relationship between changes in hippocampal volume and temporal coherence in the context of ECT response is unknown. We hypothesized that ECT response would increase both hippocampal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity and hippocampal volumes. Patients with major depressive disorder (n=19) were scanned before and after the ECT series. Healthy, demographically matched comparisons (n=20) were scanned at one-time interval. Longitudinal changes in functional connectivity of hippocampal regions and volumes of hippocampal subfields were compared with reductions in ratings of depressive symptoms. Right hippocampal connectivity increased (normalized) after the ECT series and correlated with depressive symptom reduction. Similarly, the volumes of the right hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA2/3), dentate gyrus and subiculum regions increased, but the hippocampal subfields were unchanged relative to the comparison group. Connectivity changes were not evident in the left hippocampus, and volume changes were limited to the left CA2/3 subfields. The laterality of the right hippocampal functional connectivity and volume increases may be related to stimulus delivery method, which was predominately right unilateral in this investigation. The findings suggested that increased hippocampal functional connectivity and volumes may be biomarkers for ECT response. PMID:25405780

  6. Complementarity as a Function of Stage in Therapy: An Analysis of Minuchin's Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Heather; Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    1987-01-01

    Explored the level of family therapist complementarity in the early, middle and late stages of therapy performing a micro-analysis of Salvador Minuchin with one family in successful therapy. Level of therapist complementarity was signficantly greater in the early and late stages than in the middle stage, and was significantly correlated with…

  7. A Controlled Evaluation of Reminiscence and Current Topics Discussion Groups in a Nursing Home Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattenbury, Christine; Stones, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Compared psychological well-being of elderly nursing home residents who participated in reminiscence and current topics group discussions with control group of residents. Rated participants' happiness/depression, activity, mood, and functional levels before and after intervention. Intervention had significant effect only on happiness/depression…

  8. Reminiscence, Psychological Well-Being, and Ego Integrity in Portuguese Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afonso, Rosa Maria; Bueno, Belen; Loureiro, Manuel Joachim; Pereira, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of a reminiscence program on the psychological well-being and ego integrity of elderly people with depressive symptomatology. Ninety people aged 65 and over participated in a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest evaluations. They were assigned to one of three groups: (a) experimental group…

  9. Mother-child reminiscing and autobiographical memory specificity among preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Kristin; Nuttall, Amy K; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G; Piper, Brianna; Thomas, Taylor E; Fanuele, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM) refers to difficulty in retrieving specific autobiographical memories. The tendency to be overgeneral in autobiographical memory recall is more commonly observed among individuals with emotional disorders compared with those without. Despite significant advances in theory and identification of mechanisms that underlie the etiology of OGM, there has been little integration between normative research on the development of autobiographical memory and research on OGM. Informed by a developmental psychopathology perspective and drawing on normative developmental research on the social construction of autobiographical memory, the current investigation examined whether the elaborative quantity and elaborative quality of maternal reminiscing are predictive of preschool-age children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, this investigation tested whether children's positive self-representations may explain these hypothesized associations. Participants consisted of 95 mother-child dyads. Children's ages ranged between 3.5 and 6 years, and the sample was predominantly low income and of minority race/ethnicity. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about 4 past events, and children participated in assessments of autobiographical memory specificity and self-representations. Results indicated that the elaborative quality, defined by maternal-sensitive guidance and emotional narrative coherence, but not the elaborative quantity, of maternal reminiscing style was significantly associated with children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, there was support for an indirect pathway between maternal reminiscing quality and child memory specificity through children's positive self-representations. Directions for future research are discussed, and potential clinical implications are addressed. PMID:24219316

  10. How to Make Reminiscence Movies: A Project-Based Gerontology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancura, Loriena A.

    2013-01-01

    One key to successful gerontological education lies in teaching students to integrate information from diverse academic disciplines into practical contexts. This article describes a project-based course within which students learn to integrate theories by working with older adult partners to make reminiscence movies based on an important event or…

  11. Psychometric Properties of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale" for the Portuguese Population: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Daniela C.; Guedes, Joana Martins; Fonseca, Antonio M.; Martin, Inacio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of a version in Portuguese of the "Reminiscence Functions Scale." Total sample was composed of 628 participants aged between 18 and 92 years, divided into three groups according to their age (18-24 years, "n" = 249; 26-54 years, "n" = 174; 55 and older, "n" = 205). Results…

  12. In memoriam Yurii Fedorovich Smirnov: Some personal reminiscences on a great physicist

    SciTech Connect

    Kibler, M. R.

    2012-01-15

    Yurii Fedorovich Smirnov (1935-2008) was a famous theoretical physicist. He achieved his career mainly at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Moscow. These notes describe some particular facets of the contributions of the late Professor Smirnov in theoretical physics and mathematical physics. They also relate some personal reminiscences on Yurii Smirnov in connection with some of his numerous works.

  13. Flashbacks: Reminiscences from 40 Years with the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author reminisces about his 40 years with the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre. He begins by recalling his early years with the Centre. He follows it up with his middle years, as well as his later years with the Centre. The author ends his flashback by "bragging" about some of the extraordinary scholars who have…

  14. Profiles of Reminiscence among Older Adults: Perceived Stress, Life Attitudes, and Personality Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappeliez, Philippe; O'Rourke, Norm

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify subgroups of older participants on the basis of unique configurations of variables among functions of reminiscence, personality traits, life attitudes, and perceived stress by means of cluster analysis. Ninety-three older adults (M = 66.7 years of age) completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, the Life…

  15. Arousal and Reminiscence in Learning From Color and Black/White Audio-Visual Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Frank H.; Grant, Alfred D.

    Reminiscence, or an increase in retention scores from a short-to-long-term retention test, has been shown in some previous work to be a significant function of arousal. Previous studies of the effects of color versus black-and-white audiovisual presentations have generally used film or television and have found no facilitating effect of color on…

  16. Socialization of Past Event Talk: Cultural Differences in Maternal Elaborative Reminiscing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tougu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia; Schroder, Lisa; Keller, Heidi; De Geer, Boel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines mother-child reminiscing conversations with respect to variation in use and function of mothers' elaborations, the nature of children's memory elaborations, and the connections between the two, in three Western middle-class cultures where autonomy is valued over relatedness. Mothers participated with their 4-year-old children…

  17. Maternal Reminiscing Style during Early Childhood Predicts the Age of Adolescents' Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Fiona; MacDonald, Shelley; Reese, Elaine; Hayne, Harlene

    2009-01-01

    Individual differences in parental reminiscing style are hypothesized to have long-lasting effects on children's autobiographical memory development, including the age of their earliest memories. This study represents the first prospective test of this hypothesis. Conversations about past events between 17 mother-child dyads were recorded on…

  18. Functions of Memory Sharing and Mother-Child Reminiscing Behaviors: Individual and Cultural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkofsky, Sarah; Wang, Qi; Koh, Jessie Bee Kim

    2009-01-01

    This study examined maternal beliefs about the functions of memory sharing and the relations between these beliefs and mother-child reminiscing behaviors in a cross-cultural context. Sixty-three European American and 47 Chinese mothers completed an open-ended questionnaire concerning their beliefs about the functions of parent-child memory…

  19. Lateral heterogeneity of plant thylakoid protein complexes: early reminiscences

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    The concept that the two photosystems of photosynthesis cooperate in series, immortalized in Hill and Bendall's Z scheme, was still a black box that defined neither the structural nor the molecular organization of the thylakoid membrane network into grana and stroma thylakoids. The differentiation of the continuous thylakoid membrane into stacked grana thylakoids interconnected by single stroma thylakoids is a morphological reflection of the non-random distribution of photosystem II/light-harvesting complex of photosystem II, photosystem I and ATP synthase, which became known as lateral heterogeneity. PMID:23148264

  20. A Review of Critical, Person-Centred and Clinical Approaches to Reminiscence Work for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Puyenbroeck, Joris; Maes, Bea

    2008-01-01

    The present article reviews reminiscence research with regard to people with intellectual disabilities. Although the term "reminiscence" is not often used in intellectual disability research, the concept offers a useful framework for charting the different approaches in literature, thanks to its multidisciplinary character and eclectic theoretical…

  1. The Effect of Reminiscence Group Work on Life Satisfaction, Self-Esteem and Mood of Ageing People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Puyenbroeck, Joris; Maes, Bea

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates the effects of reminiscence group work on the subjective well-being of ageing people with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The content of the successive group work sessions was manipulated as follows: a control-phase with three "current topics" sessions, an experimental phase with six "reminiscence" sessions and…

  2. The Efficacy of Treatment Reminders of Life with Emphasis on Integrative Reminiscence on Self-Esteem and Anxiety in Widowed Old Men

    PubMed Central

    Pishvaei, Malihe; Ataie Moghanloo, Roghayeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Loss of wife besides the phenomenon of aging could cause some psychological disorders and may shorten the duration of this stage of life. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of treatment reminders of life with emphasis on integrative reminiscence on self-esteem and anxiety in widowed old men. Method: This was a clinical trial with pre-test and post-test design with a control group. The study population included All 60 to 80 year old men living in Meshginshahr; among whom, 34 participants were selected using convenience sampling method. They were randomly allocated into two equal groups (experimental and control). The experimental group participated in therapy sessions and the control group did not receive any intervention. The research instruments were Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the General Anxiety Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using multivariable covariance analysis in SSPS-19. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results: MANCOVA results showed that the treatment positively affected the variables of self-esteem and anxiety in old widowed men (p<0.001). Conclusion: The reminders of life therapy with emphasis on integrative reminiscence may enhance self-esteem and reduce anxiety in widowed old men. This treatment gives better results compared to the traditional treatments and it is recommended to be implemented in nursing homes. PMID:26005476

  3. Assessment and Therapeutic Application of the Expressive Therapies Continuum: Implications for Brain Structures and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusebrink, Vija B.

    2010-01-01

    The Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC) provides a theoretical model for art-based assessments and applications of media in art therapy. The three levels of the ETC (Kinesthetic/Sensory, Perceptual/Affective, and Cognitive/Symbolic) appear to reflect different functions and structures in the brain that process visual and affective information.…

  4. A Reminiscence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuder, Frederic

    1980-01-01

    This address by Kuder was presented at the annual Luncheon of the Association for Measurement and Evaluation in Guidance. The author reviews the history of measurement and evaluation and his participation in the field. (Author/CMG)

  5. A Reminiscence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobind Khorana, H.

    1997-12-01

    Leslie Orgel and Francis Crick with Gobind Khorana in Madison, Wisconsin (December 1965). I first met Leslie at the Endicott House (MIT) in February 1964. Leslie was then spending a period of time at MIT and the occasion was a party for him. During our conversation, Leslie talked about starting some experimental work. He seemed to be particularly interested in polyphosphates and the chemical activation of small molecules (building blocks). Shortly after his move to the Salk Institute in the Fall of 1964 I visited him in January 1965. He already had a lab going. I remember meeting Jim Ferris, in particular, and John Sulston sometime later. That particular time was exciting for my research as well. We had the first results on the Genetic Code using the chemical-biochemical approach that my lab had developed. Francis Crick was also at the Salk Institute during the time of my visit. Both Leslie and Francis were very excited by my results and they began to ask a lot of questions and gave me a whole lot of suggestions about further experiments. In fact, my thinking and planning of things that we were doing were so scrutinized and clarified during these discussions that, it seemed to me, my own group had only to turn out all the experiments that were needed. These interactions with Francis and Leslie continued intensively throughout that year and later. In fact, both Leslie and Francis accepted my invitation to Madison in December 1965 for more discussions. Since those early days of the Salk Institute, I have made numerous visits over the years to Leslie and his research group. It has always been very exciting to learn about the many discoveries bearing on chemical evolution that have unfolded from Leslie's research group. In addition, I have always benefitted from the insightful comments that Leslie invariably provided on my own research. I look forward to our continued interactions and friendship in the future. Leslie, A Happy Birthday!

  6. Training Mothers in Elaborative Reminiscing Enhances Children's Autobiographical Memory and Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Newcombe, Rhiannon

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal intervention assessed children's memory at 2-1/2 years (short-term posttest; N = 115) and their memory and narrative at 3-1/2 years (long-term posttest; N = 100) as a function of maternal training in elaborative reminiscing when children were 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 years. At both posttests, trained mothers were more elaborative in their…

  7. Development of Dual-Retrieval Processes in Recall: Learning, Forgetting, and Reminiscence

    PubMed Central

    Brainerd, C. J.; Aydin, C.; Reyna, V. F.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the development of dual-retrieval processes with a low-burden paradigm that is suitable for research with children and neurocognitively impaired populations (e.g., older adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia). Rich quantitative information can be obtained about recollection, reconstruction, and familiarity judgment by defining a Markov model over simple recall tasks like those that are used in clinical neuropsychology batteries. The model measures these processes separately for learning, forgetting, and reminiscence. We implemented this procedure in some developmental experiments, whose aims were (a) to measure age changes in recollective and nonrecollective retrieval during learning, forgetting, and reminiscence and (b) to measure age changes in content dimensions (e.g., taxonomic relatedness) that affect the two forms of retrieval. The model provided excellent fits in all three domains. Concerning (a), recollection, reconstruction, and familiarity judgment all improved during the child-to-adolescent age range in the learning domain, whereas only recollection improved in the forgetting domain, and the processes were age-invariant in the reminiscence domain. Concerning (b), although some elements of the adult pattern of taxonomic relatedness effects were detected by early adolescence, the adult pattern differs qualitatively from corresponding patterns in children and adolescents. PMID:22778491

  8. Reminiscence, forgetting, and hypermnesia using face-name learning: isolating the effects using recall and recognition memory measures.

    PubMed

    Groninger, Lowell D; Murray, Kenneth N

    2004-05-01

    A face-name learning paradigm was used to study phenomena involved in reminiscence, forgetting, and hypermnesia. Individuals introduced themselves on videotape while participants tried to learn their names. The presence of cues during testing increased overall performance but decreased hypermnesia in Experiment 1. Significant recognition memory effects were found for reminiscence and hypermnesia in Experiments 2 and 3. Experiment 3 also showed no interference from activities between testing sessions, but did show facilitating effects from exposure to photographs of target faces and to exposure of target names. The results were interpreted as showing support for reminiscence effects being primarily caused by imagery redintegration and effects consistent with stimulus sampling theories. PMID:15279437

  9. Manualized Therapy for PTSD: Flexing the Structure of Cognitive Processing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Blain, Leah M.; Mott, Juliette M.; Elwood, Lisa; Houle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study tested a modified Cognitive Processing Therapy intervention (MCPT) designed as a more flexible administration of the protocol. Number of sessions was determined by client progress toward a priori defined end-state criteria, “stressor sessions” were inserted when necessary, and therapy was conducted by novice CPT clinicians. Method A randomized, controlled, repeated measures, semi-crossover design was utilized to 1) test the relative efficacy of the MCPT intervention compared to a Symptom-Monitoring Delayed Treatment (SMDT) condition and 2) to assess within-group variation in change with a sample of 100 male and female interpersonal trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results Hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed that MCPT evidenced greater improvement on all primary (PTSD and depression) and secondary (guilt, quality of life, general mental health, social functioning, and health perceptions) outcomes compared with SMDT. After the conclusion of SMDT, participants crossed over to MCPT, resulting in a Combined MCPT sample (n = 69). Of the 50 participants who completed MCPT, 58% reached end-state criteria prior to the 12th session, 8% at session 12, and 34% between sessions 12-18. Maintenance of treatment gains was found at the 3-month follow-up, with only two of the treated sample meeting criteria for PTSD. The use of stressor sessions did not result in poorer treatment outcomes. Conclusions Findings suggest that individuals respond at a variable rate to CPT, with significant benefit from additional therapy when indicated and excellent maintenance of gains. The insertion of stressor sessions did not alter the efficacy of the therapy. PMID:23106761

  10. [Multimodal pain therapy in Germany: structure and quality].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund; Nagel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal Pain Management is a comprehensive treatment of complex chronic pain syndromes. In addition to medical therapy various other specialized therapeutical interventions based on the biopsychosocial model of pain origin and chronic pain development are added.Medical indications are given for patients with chronic pain syndromes, but also if there is an elevated risk of chronic pain in the early stadium of the disease and aiming at delaying the process of chronification. Multimodal pain management has been included in the official catalogue of the recognized medical procedure for day clinic units as well as for inpatients pain management. As there is still a lack of clarity and of consistency about the implementation of multimodal pain management the ad-hoc-Kommission on multimodal interdisciplinary pain management of the German Pain Society has proposed a position paper that has been worked out in a multilevel and interdisciplinary consensus process. Moreover a basic tool for documentation and quality management of pain therapy was developed by the German Pain Society (KEDOQ-Schmerz) as the data basis for nationwide, cross-sectional and independent scientific research in health services in Germany. In future KEDOQ-Schmerz will also used as a method for external quality management in chronic pain therapy in Germany. PMID:26859474

  11. Functions of reminiscence and the psychological well-being of young-old and older adults over time.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Norm; Cappeliez, Philippe; Claxton, Amy

    2011-03-01

    Existing cross-sectional research demonstrates an association between reminiscence functions and well-being in later life. The results of this study replicate and extend previous findings in separate participant samples above and below 70 years of age. Findings suggest a link between reminiscence functions and psychological well-being, and indirectly between reminiscence and well-being 16 months thereafter. Invariance analyses reveal few differences in association between reminiscence and well-being when young-old (n = 196) and older adults (n = 215) are compared. These findings suggest a direct positive association between self-positive reminiscence functions (identity, death preparation, and problem-solving) and a direct negative association between self-negative functions (boredom reduction, bitterness revival, and intimacy maintenance) and psychological well-being (life satisfaction, depressive, and anxiety symptoms). In contrast, prosocial reminiscence functions (conversation, teach/inform others) appear to have an indirect association with well-being (i.e., via self-positive and self-negative functions). These findings are discussed relative to evolving theory and research linking cognition and health. PMID:21140308

  12. John Widdicombe’s contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    John Widdicombe has made substantial contributions to respiratory physiology and to the field of cough particularly. He was one of the first to characterise Aδ-myelinated fibres in the airways that could mediate cough and increased breathing. Later on, he initiated the series of international London Cough Symposia that gathered researchers and clinicians on a two-yearly basis to discuss recent results and concepts regarding cough. John Widdicombe was interested in all aspects of cough from the definition to potential new antitussives. This article will focus on his contributions and on his generous personality through reminiscences from three friends. PMID:23497652

  13. Initial recall, reminiscence, and hypermnesia: comment on Madigan and O'Hara (1992).

    PubMed

    Payne, D G; Wenger, M J

    1994-01-01

    S. Madigan and R. O'Hara (1992) analyzed data from repeated free-recall experiments and concluded that the rate of item recovery across tests was related to the level of recall performance on an initial free-recall test. We report a reanalysis of these data along with Monte Carlo simulations that indicate the measures used by Madigan and O'Hara may have inflated the magnitude of the relation between initial recall and item recovery. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research investigating reminiscence and hypermnesia. PMID:8138787

  14. 'Take me away from all this' ... can reminiscence be therapeutic in an intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Jones, C

    1995-12-01

    'Stuart had been with us in the ICU for 4 weeks; weaning attempts from his artificial ventilation were difficult, leaving him frightened, exhausted and despondent. Depression, hopelessness and apathy were beginning to take a hold on him ... until one day something changed everything. A way had been found to help him escape, temporarily, from his intensive care situation. Three days later Stuart was breathing spontaneously and was being prepared for discharge from the ICU.' In this paper potential benefits of reminiscence sessions with patients in a critical care unit are discussed. Background and context are reviewed, leading to some suggestions for practice. PMID:8574086

  15. Chlorotoxin: Structure, activity, and potential uses in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Paola G; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a disulfide-rich stable peptide from the venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus, which has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of cancer. Its ability to preferentially bind to tumor cells has been harnessed to develop an imaging agent to help visualize tumors during surgical resection. In addition, chlorotoxin has attracted interest as a vehicle to deliver anti-cancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. Given its interesting structural and biological properties, chlorotoxin also has the potential to be used in a variety of other biotechnology and biomedical applications. Here, we review the structure, activity and potential applications of chlorotoxin as a drug design scaffold. PMID:26418522

  16. Structural and Physical Basis for Anti-IgE Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jon D.; Chu, Hsing-Mao; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ma, Che; Wen Chang, Tse; Lim, Carmay

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, used to treat severe allergic asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria, binds to IgE in blood or membrane-bound on B lymphocytes but not to IgE bound to its high (FcεRI) or low (CD23) affinity receptor. Mutagenesis studies indicate overlapping FcεRI and omalizumab-binding sites in the Cε3 domain, but crystallographic studies show FcεRI and CD23-binding sites that are far apart, so how can omalizumab block IgE from binding both receptors? We report a 2.42-Å omalizumab-Fab structure, a docked IgE-Fc/omalizumab-Fab structure consistent with available experimental data, and the free energy contributions of IgE residues to binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcεRI. These results provide a structural and physical basis as to why omalizumab cannot bind receptor-bound IgE and why omalizumab-bound IgE cannot bind to CD23/FcεRI. They reveal the key IgE residues and their roles in binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcεRI. PMID:26113483

  17. Structural and Physical Basis for Anti-IgE Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jon D.; Chu, Hsing-Mao; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ma, Che; Wen Chang, Tse; Lim, Carmay

    2015-06-01

    Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, used to treat severe allergic asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria, binds to IgE in blood or membrane-bound on B lymphocytes but not to IgE bound to its high (FcɛRI) or low (CD23) affinity receptor. Mutagenesis studies indicate overlapping FcɛRI and omalizumab-binding sites in the Cɛ3 domain, but crystallographic studies show FcɛRI and CD23-binding sites that are far apart, so how can omalizumab block IgE from binding both receptors? We report a 2.42-Å omalizumab-Fab structure, a docked IgE-Fc/omalizumab-Fab structure consistent with available experimental data, and the free energy contributions of IgE residues to binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcɛRI. These results provide a structural and physical basis as to why omalizumab cannot bind receptor-bound IgE and why omalizumab-bound IgE cannot bind to CD23/FcɛRI. They reveal the key IgE residues and their roles in binding omalizumab, CD23, and FcɛRI.

  18. Controlled therapy by imaging of functional structures of intact liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Zhuang, Feng Y.; Ruan, G.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, A.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-04-01

    Ligustrazine, a Chinese herb medicine has been used to treat the diseases of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China by Chinese traditional physicians or many years. Recently, results showed that ligustrazine is a powerful hepatic vasodilator. It can greatly change the blood supply of the tissues. Due to micro-optical tissue sensor developed recently it became possible to image functional structures of tissue on the level of intact blood capillaries. In our experiment we used the Oxyscan in order to study the effect of Ligustrazine on the oxygen supply of rat liver.

  19. Structured Sensory Therapy (SITCAP-ART) for Traumatized Adjudicated Adolescents in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raider, Melvyn C.; Steele, William; Delillo-Storey, Margaret; Jacobs, Jacqueline; Kuban, Caelan

    2008-01-01

    This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of a structured group therapy for traumatized, adjudicated adolescents in residential treatment. Youth were randomly assigned to a trauma intervention (SITCAP-ART) or to a waitlist/comparison group. The intervention included both sensory and cognitive/behavioral components. Standardized trauma…

  20. Brief Structural/Strategic Family Therapy with African American and Hispanic High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Mitrani, Victoria; Jean-Gilles, Michele; Szapocnik, Jose

    The intervention described in this paper used Brief Strategic/Structural Family Therapy (BSFT) to reduce the likelihood that African American and Hispanic youth would initiate drug use by decreasing existing behavior problems at the individual level and improving maladaptive family functioning at the family level. The program targeted African…

  1. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points,…

  2. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach. PMID:9883131

  3. Polymeric micelles encapsulating photosensitizer: structure/photodynamic therapy efficiency relation.

    PubMed

    Gibot, Laure; Lemelle, Arnaud; Till, Ugo; Moukarzel, Béatrice; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Pimienta, Véronique; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gaucher, Mireille; Violleau, Frédéric; Chassenieux, Christophe; Vicendo, Patricia

    2014-04-14

    Various polymeric micelles were formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, namely, poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone), poly(ethyleneoxide-b-d,l-lactide), and poly(ethyleneoxide-b-styrene). The micelles were characterized by static and dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. They all displayed a similar size close to 20 nm. The influence of the chemical structure of the block copolymers on the stability upon dilution of the polymeric micelles was investigated to assess their relevance as carriers for nanomedicine. In the same manner, the stability upon aging was assessed by FRET experiments under various experimental conditions (alone or in the presence of blood proteins). In all cases, a good stability over 48 h for all systems was encountered, with PDLLA copolymer-based systems being the first to release their load slowly. The cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity of the carriers were examined with or without their load. Lastly, the photodynamic activity was assessed in the presence of pheophorbide a as photosensitizer on 2D and 3D tumor cell culture models, which revealed activity differences between the 2D and 3D systems. PMID:24552313

  4. Lost but not forgotten details: repeated eyewitness recall leads to reminiscence but not hypermnesia.

    PubMed

    Turtle, J W; Yuille, J C

    1994-04-01

    In 2 experiments, the effects on participants' memory and confidence of repeatedly describing a videotaped crime and of the opportunity to review a previous description were investigated. E. Scrivner and M. A. Safer (1988) demonstrated that witnesses' successive attempts to describe such events can lead to the recall of more new information in comparison with the amount forgotten (i.e., increased net recall, or hypermnesia). In Experiment 1, a more forensically relevant procedure was used, and no support for hypermnesia was found. Witnesses did recall significantly more new information across attempts, but the amount did not exceed how much was forgotten (i.e., increased gross recall, or reminiscence). The opportunity to review a previous statement had no effect on the number of items recalled. In Experiment 2, the more traditional, repeated-recall procedure used by Scrivner and Safer was applied, and their finding of hypermnesia was replicated with the present study's materials. PMID:8206816

  5. Monte Carlo modelling of photodynamic therapy treatments comparing clustered three dimensional tumour structures with homogeneous tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Wood, K; Brown, C T A; Moseley, H

    2016-07-01

    We explore the effects of three dimensional (3D) tumour structures on depth dependent fluence rates, photodynamic doses (PDD) and fluorescence images through Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy. The aim with this work was to compare the commonly used uniform tumour densities with non-uniform densities to determine the importance of including 3D models in theoretical investigations. It was found that fractal 3D models resulted in deeper penetration on average of therapeutic radiation and higher PDD. An increase in effective treatment depth of 1 mm was observed for one of the investigated fractal structures, when comparing to the equivalent smooth model. Wide field fluorescence images were simulated, revealing information about the relationship between tumour structure and the appearance of the fluorescence intensity. Our models indicate that the 3D tumour structure strongly affects the spatial distribution of therapeutic light, the PDD and the wide field appearance of surface fluorescence images. PMID:27273196

  6. Monte Carlo modelling of photodynamic therapy treatments comparing clustered three dimensional tumour structures with homogeneous tissue structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. L.; Wood, K.; Brown, C. T. A.; Moseley, H.

    2016-07-01

    We explore the effects of three dimensional (3D) tumour structures on depth dependent fluence rates, photodynamic doses (PDD) and fluorescence images through Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy. The aim with this work was to compare the commonly used uniform tumour densities with non-uniform densities to determine the importance of including 3D models in theoretical investigations. It was found that fractal 3D models resulted in deeper penetration on average of therapeutic radiation and higher PDD. An increase in effective treatment depth of 1 mm was observed for one of the investigated fractal structures, when comparing to the equivalent smooth model. Wide field fluorescence images were simulated, revealing information about the relationship between tumour structure and the appearance of the fluorescence intensity. Our models indicate that the 3D tumour structure strongly affects the spatial distribution of therapeutic light, the PDD and the wide field appearance of surface fluorescence images.

  7. Life Review: Implementation, Theory, Research, and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2006-01-01

    A selective literature review of publications on life review generated ideas on implementation, theory, research, and therapy. The review begins by differentiating life review from reminiscence, and summarizing ways to conduct a life review. A dozen theories that have been influenced by the life review technique are presented, with a focus placed…

  8. The Bonds That Remind Us: Maternal Reminiscing for Bonding Purposes in Relation to Children's Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkofsky, Sarah; Behrens, Kazuko Y.; Battin, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the relation between characteristics of mother-child reminiscing and children's perceived competence and social acceptance. We focused specifically on conversations for bonding purposes (i.e., conversations that serve the function of maintaining or strengthening the relationship between the child and the mother) as…

  9. Talking about Internal States in Mother-Child Reminiscing Influences Children's Self-Representations: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qi; Doan, Stacey N.; Song, Qingfang

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relation of mother-child discussions of internal states during reminiscing to the development of trait and evaluative self-representations in 131 European American and Chinese immigrant 3-year olds. Mothers and children discussed one positive and one negative event, and children were interviewed for self-descriptions.…

  10. Recent versus Remote: Flashbulb Memory for 9/11 and Self-Selected Events from the Reminiscence Bump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver, Jenny Y.; Lane, Sean M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2010-01-01

    In two related studies, we examined flashbulb memories acquired from different points in the lifespan in younger and older adults. When asked to remember flashbulb memories from their lives, older adults were most likely to recall events from the reminiscence bump (Study 1A). In Study 1B, younger and older adults recalled 9/11 and a personal…

  11. On the Eicosanoid Trail with John Vane and Jack McGiff: 1974-1976. A personal reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Flower, R J

    2015-07-01

    In this brief personal reminiscence I comment upon the friendship and mutual understanding that arose between two great scientists and co-travellers, John Vane and Jack McGiff. I relate the events that led up to their meeting and focus on the brief period of time when they worked together on eicosanoid pharmacology in the UK. PMID:25807880

  12. The Use of Structured Role Play Therapy in the Remediation of Grammatical Deficits in Language Delayed Children: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Alta R.; Benjamin, Barbaranne J.

    1989-01-01

    Three case studies are reported, illustrating use of Structured Role Play Therapy in teaching moderately language-delayed children, aged 4-6, to produce specifically targeted grammatical forms and to generalize production to sentences not included in therapy activities. The role-playing resulted in rapid increases in production accuracy of…

  13. Optimizing insulin pump therapy: the potential advantages of using a structured diabetes management program.

    PubMed

    Lange, Karin; Ziegler, Ralph; Neu, Andreas; Reinehr, Thomas; Daab, Iris; Walz, Marion; Maraun, Michael; Schnell, Oliver; Kulzer, Bernhard; Reichel, Andreas; Heinemann, Lutz; Parkin, Christopher G; Haak, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy improves glycemic control, reduces hypoglycemia and increases treatment satisfaction in individuals with diabetes. As a number of patient- and clinician-related factors can hinder the effectiveness and optimal usage of CSII therapy, new approaches are needed to address these obstacles. Ceriello and colleagues recently proposed a model of care that incorporates the collaborative use of structured SMBG into a formal approach to personalized diabetes management within all diabetes populations. We adapted this model for use in CSII-treated patients in order to enable the implementation of a workflow structure that enhances patient-physician communication and supports patients' diabetes self-management skills. We recognize that time constraints and current reimbursement policies pose significant challenges to healthcare providers integrating the Personalised Diabetes Management (PDM) process into clinical practice. We believe, however, that the time invested in modifying practice workflow and learning to apply the various steps of the PDM process will be offset by improved workflow and more effective patient consultations. This article describes how to implement PDM into clinical practice as a systematic, standardized process that can optimize CSII therapy. PMID:25597225

  14. Tissue-Engineered Articular Cartilage Exhibits Tension-Compression Nonlinearity Reminiscent of the Native Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Terri-Ann N.; Roach, Brendan L.; Weidner, Zachary D.; Mackenzie-Smith, Charles R.; O'Connell, Grace D.; Lima, Eric G.; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, James L.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Hung, Clark T.

    2013-01-01

    The tensile modulus of articular cartilage is much larger than its compressive modulus. This tension-compression nonlinearity enhances interstitial fluid pressurization and decreases the frictional coefficient. The current set of studies examines the tensile and compressive properties of cylindrical chondrocyte-seeded agarose constructs over different developmental stages through a novel method that combines osmotic loading, video microscopy, and uniaxial unconfined compression testing. This method was previously used to examine tension-compression nonlinearity in native cartilage. Engineered cartilage, cultured under free-swelling (FS) or dynamically loaded (DL) conditions, was tested in unconfined compression in hypertonic and hypotonic salt solutions. The apparent equilibrium modulus decreased with increasing salt concentration, indicating that increasing the bath solution osmolarity shielded the fixed charges within the tissue, shifting the measured moduli along the tension-compression curve and revealing the intrinsic properties of the tissue. With this method, we were able to measure the tensile (401±83 kPa for FS and 678±473 kPa for DL) and compressive (161±33 kPa for FS and 348±203 kPa for DL) moduli of the same engineered cartilage specimens. These moduli are comparable to values obtained from traditional methods, validating this technique for measuring the tensile and compressive properties of hydrogel-based constructs. This study shows that engineered cartilage exhibits tension-compression nonlinearity reminiscent of the native tissue, and that dynamic deformational loading can yield significantly higher tensile properties. PMID:23791084

  15. Reminiscing my sixty year pursuit of the physics of the Sun and the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Eugene N.

    2014-01-01

    Reminiscing begins with childhood and passes on to student days through graduate school and the first real contact with research. Then early academic positions and stumbling efforts to pursue my ideas. The first significant progress came as a research associate with Prof. W. M. Elsasser at the University of Utah, beginning with an introduction to magnetohydrodynamics and the generation of the geomagnetic field through induction in the liquid metal core of Earth. A move to the University of Chicago to work with Prof. J. A. Simpson, on the implications of cosmic ray variations and interplanetary magnetic fields, led to the theory of coronal expansion and the solar wind and then to exploring the dynamical effects of cosmic rays on the galactic magnetic field. Spontaneous current sheets and intrinsic rapid reconnection in interlaced magnetic field line topologies were the next big project, leading up to retirement. Finally, it is a pleasure to recall my many associates, whose fresh thinking helped stimulate the daily research activities.

  16. Mother-child reminiscing about everyday experiences: implications for psychological interventions in the preschool years.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Penny; Salmon, Karen

    2006-09-01

    The preschool years are a critical period for all aspects of child development, and any disruption to cognitive or socio-emotional functioning at this stage has potential repercussions for current and future functioning. There is, therefore, a need for clinical interventions that optimize the functioning of children at risk of psychological disorders. In the current paper, we review research showing that the way in which parents discuss everyday experiences with their young children has significant implications for the children's cognitive and socio-emotional functioning. Specifically, mothers who engage their child in a rich elaborative style of talking about past experiences have children who also develop an elaborative style of remembering and reporting personal experiences. Evidence suggests that elaborative reminiscing can benefit children's social and self understanding, the quality of the parent-child relationship, and language and emergent literacy. Moreover, findings show that elements of the elaborative style can be identified and taught to parents. We propose that elaborative parent-child discussion about the past could form the basis of developmentally sensitive intervention during the preschool period. PMID:16815615

  17. Does recall of a past music event invoke a reminiscence bump in young adults?

    PubMed

    Schubert, Emery

    2016-08-01

    Many studies of the reminiscence bump (RB) in music invoke memories from different autobiographical times by using stimulus specific prompts (SSPs). This study investigated the utility of a non-SSP paradigm to determine whether the RB would emerge when participants were asked to recall a single memorable musical event from "a time long ago". The presence of a RB in response to music has not been obtained in such a manner for younger participants. Eighty-eight 20-22 year olds reported music episodes that peaked when their autobiographical age was 13-14 years. Self-selected stimuli included a range of musical styles, including classical and non-Western pop forms, such as J-pop and K-pop, as well as generational pop music, such as the Beatles. However, most participants reported pop/rock music that was contemporaneous with encoding age, providing support for the utility of published SSP paradigms using pop music. Implications for and limitations of SSP paradigms are discussed. Participants were also asked to relate the selected musical piece to current musical tastes. Most participants liked the music that they selected, with many continuing to like the music, but most also reported a general broadening of their taste, consistent with developmental literature on open-earedness. PMID:26275069

  18. Toward Repurposing Metformin as a Precision Anti-Cancer Therapy Using Structural Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Thomas; Dider, Shihab; Han, Weiwei; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming; Xie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a drug prescribed to treat type-2 diabetes, exhibits anti-cancer effects in a portion of patients, but the direct molecular and genetic interactions leading to this pleiotropic effect have not yet been fully explored. To repurpose metformin as a precision anti-cancer therapy, we have developed a novel structural systems pharmacology approach to elucidate metformin’s molecular basis and genetic biomarkers of action. We integrated structural proteome-scale drug target identification with network biology analysis by combining structural genomic, functional genomic, and interactomic data. Through searching the human structural proteome, we identified twenty putative metformin binding targets and their interaction models. We experimentally verified the interactions between metformin and our top-ranked kinase targets. Notably, kinases, particularly SGK1 and EGFR were identified as key molecular targets of metformin. Subsequently, we linked these putative binding targets to genes that do not directly bind to metformin but whose expressions are altered by metformin through protein-protein interactions, and identified network biomarkers of phenotypic response of metformin. The molecular targets and the key nodes in genetic networks are largely consistent with the existing experimental evidence. Their interactions can be affected by the observed cancer mutations. This study will shed new light into repurposing metformin for safe, effective, personalized therapies. PMID:26841718

  19. Toward Repurposing Metformin as a Precision Anti-Cancer Therapy Using Structural Systems Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Hart, Thomas; Dider, Shihab; Han, Weiwei; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming; Xie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a drug prescribed to treat type-2 diabetes, exhibits anti-cancer effects in a portion of patients, but the direct molecular and genetic interactions leading to this pleiotropic effect have not yet been fully explored. To repurpose metformin as a precision anti-cancer therapy, we have developed a novel structural systems pharmacology approach to elucidate metformin's molecular basis and genetic biomarkers of action. We integrated structural proteome-scale drug target identification with network biology analysis by combining structural genomic, functional genomic, and interactomic data. Through searching the human structural proteome, we identified twenty putative metformin binding targets and their interaction models. We experimentally verified the interactions between metformin and our top-ranked kinase targets. Notably, kinases, particularly SGK1 and EGFR were identified as key molecular targets of metformin. Subsequently, we linked these putative binding targets to genes that do not directly bind to metformin but whose expressions are altered by metformin through protein-protein interactions, and identified network biomarkers of phenotypic response of metformin. The molecular targets and the key nodes in genetic networks are largely consistent with the existing experimental evidence. Their interactions can be affected by the observed cancer mutations. This study will shed new light into repurposing metformin for safe, effective, personalized therapies. PMID:26841718

  20. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  1. Structural Insights on the Role of Antibodies in HIV-1 Vaccine and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Scharf, Louise; Scheid, Johannes F.; Klein, Florian; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite 30 years of effort, there is no effective vaccine for HIV-1. However, antibodies can prevent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and macaques when passively transferred. New single-cell-based methods have uncovered many broad and potent donor-derived antibodies, and structural studies have revealed the molecular bases for their activities. The new data suggest why such antibodies are difficult to elicit and inform HIV-1 vaccine development efforts. In addition to protecting against infection, the newly identified antibodies can suppress active infections in mice and macaques, suggesting they could be valuable additions to anti-HIV-1 therapies and to strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:24529371

  2. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  3. Flexibility and structure may enhance implementation of family-focused therapy in community mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bowen; Mikesell, Lisa; Miklowitz, David

    2014-10-01

    This study elicited provider and administrator preferences in implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) for bipolar disorder or psychosis, family-focused therapy (FFT). Providers (n = 35) and administrators (n = 5) from three community mental health centers took part in FFT training and participated in pre- and post-training focus groups. Transcripts were examined using conventional content analysis. Providers and administrators discussed barriers to implementing EBPs. Successful EBPs were described as incorporating flexibility and close supervision to maximize provider adherence. Providers expressed preferences for structured EBPs like FFT that have both explicit implementation steps and built-in flexibility. PMID:24810982

  4. Celebrating fifty years of research and applications in reminiscence and life review: state of the art and new directions.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2014-04-01

    Fifty years ago, psychiatrist Robert Butler (1963) published an influential article on the recollection and evaluation of personal memories in later life. We discuss the major insights and applications in psychological gerontology that were inspired by Butler. Reminiscence and life review serve to create bonds between people, to cope with important life events, and to attribute meaning to life. We discuss a heuristic framework that relates reminiscence and life review to individual and contextual characteristics as well as to psychological resources and mental health and well-being. The increasing evidence is discussed that different types of interventions can effectively promote mental health and well-being in later life. We propose that processes of reminiscence and life review need further study. This can partly be achieved within the current research tradition by longitudinal studies and good trials that also address the processes accounting for effects of interventions. Synergy with psychological studies on autobiographical remembering and life stories will provide further innovation in the field, as these studies provide new methods and evidence of processes linked to the recollection and evaluation of personal memories. PMID:24655678

  5. Memory Matters: A Mixed-Methods Feasibility Study of a Mobile Aid to Stimulate Reminiscence in Individuals With Memory Loss.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Aimee V; Sims, Tai L; Klassen, Dan; Havey, Thomas; Gaugler, Joseph E

    2016-07-01

    Reminiscence interventions are potentially effective in improving well-being of persons with memory loss (PWMLs) and may also enhance relationships with family and professional caregivers. Using a parallel convergent mixed-methods design, the feasibility of "Memory Matters" (MM), a mobile device application developed to promote reminiscence, was evaluated. Eighteen PWMLs and eight family members were enrolled from a long-term care facility and asked to use MM for 4 weeks. Participants were observed using MM at enrollment and 2 weeks and completed 1-month interviews. Six staff participants also completed a system review checklist and/or focus group at 1 month. Three qualitative domains were identified: (a) context of use, (b) barriers to use, and (c) MM influences on outcomes. Participants reported real-time social engagement, ease of use, and other benefits. However, PWMLs were unlikely to overcome barriers without assistance. Empirical data indicated that family and staff perceived MM favorably. Participants agreed that MM could provide stimulating, reminiscence-based activity. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(7), 15-24.]. PMID:26870986

  6. Non-swarming grasshoppers exhibit density-dependent phenotypic plasticity reminiscent of swarming locusts.

    PubMed

    Gotham, Steven; Song, Hojun

    2013-11-01

    Locusts are well known for exhibiting an extreme form of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity known as locust phase polyphenism. At low density, locust nymphs are cryptically colored and shy, but at high density they transform into conspicuously colored and gregarious individuals. Most of what we know about locust phase polyphenism come from the study of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål), which is a devastating pest species affecting many countries in North Africa and the Middle East. The desert locust belongs to the grasshopper genus Schistocerca Stål, which includes mostly non-swarming, sedentary species. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest that the desert locust is the earliest branching lineage within Schistocerca, which raises a possibility that the presence of density-dependent phenotypic plasticity may be a plesiomorphic trait for the whole genus. In order to test this idea, we have quantified the effect of rearing density in terms of the resulting behavior, color, and morphology in two non-swarming Schistocerca species native to Florida. When reared in both isolated and crowded conditions, the two non-swarming species, Schistocerca americana (Drury) and Schistocerca serialis cubense (Saussure) clearly exhibited plastic reaction norms in all traits measured, which were reminiscent of the desert locust. Specifically, we found that both species were more active and more attracted to each other when reared in a crowded condition than in isolation. They were mainly bright green in color when isolated, but developed strong black patterns and conspicuous background colors when crowded. We found a strong effect of rearing density in terms of size. There were also more mechanoreceptor hairs on the outer face of the hind femora in the crowded nymphs in both species. Although both species responded similarly, there were some clear species-specific differences in terms of color and behavior. Furthermore, we compare and contrast our findings with

  7. Structure to Function Correlations of Cationic Lipid Carriers for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle L.; Lin, Alison J.; George, Cyril X.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    The use of cationic lipids as carriers of genes (stretches of DNA) for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral-carriers for gene therapy. However, there exists a lack of knowledge regarding interactions and structures of cationic lipid:DNA (CL:DNA) complexes which is essential for the development of the optimal cationic lipid carrier. We are using x-ray diffraction and biological assays to elucidate the solution structures of CL:DNA complexes and how these structures affect transfection efficiencies. We determine transfection efficiencies by X-Gal assays which measure protein synthesized as a result of reporter gene expression. We have found that cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) or hexagonal phase depending on the composition of the cationic and neutral lipid. We present correlation data between solution structures and transfection efficiencies based on x-ray and X-Gal results. Supported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC: 96-108.

  8. [Effects of antiresorptive therapy on the structural and material properties of bone strength].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone strength depends on its structural and material properties. Structural properties are determined by the size and shape of bone and also the microarchitecture. Material properties are determined by mineral crystallinity, collagen structure and microdamage in bone. The strength of bone is adapted to the needs of physical activities by biologic mechanisms, bone modeling and remodeling. The deterioration of bone strength in postmenopausal women is characterized by a trabecular bone deficit with poor trabecular connectivity and followed by a cortical bone deficit with trabeculation of endocortical bone and intracortical porosity due to accelerated bone remodeling. In high turnover osteoporosis antiresorptive therapy is effective in preventing the structural deficit and in increasing the stiffness and the toughness(bone strength)by increasing the mean degree of mineralization of bone tissue through the prolongation of secondary mineralization. But the long-term use of strong antiresorber, i.e. bisphosphonate or denosumab, would result in highly mineralized bone and disturbed repair of microcracks by inhibition of bone remodeling. Intermittent use or discontinuation of strong antiresorber after about 3-5 years of administration could be recommended to avoid the deterioration of bone strength. PMID:26728537

  9. Structural network changes in patients with major depression and schizophrenia treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Robert Christian; Nolte, Henrike Maria; Hirjak, Dusan; Hofer, Stefan; Seidl, Ulrich; Depping, Malte Sebastian; Stieltjes, Bram; Maier-Hein, Klaus; Sambataro, Fabio; Thomann, Philipp Arthur

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments in severe and treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). In schizophrenia (SZ), ECT is frequently considered in drug-resistant cases, as an augmentation of antipsychotic treatment or in cases when rapid symptom relief is indicated. Accumulating neuroimaging evidence suggests modulation of medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortical regions in MDD by ECT. In SZ, ECT-effects on brain structure have not been systematically investigated so far. In this study, we investigated brain volume in 21 ECT-naïve patients (12 with MDD, 9 with SZ) who received right-sided unilateral ECT. Twenty-one healthy controls were included. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired before and after ECT. Healthy participants were scanned once. Source-based morphometry was used to investigate modulation of structural networks pre/post ECT. ECT had an impact on distinct structural networks in MDD and SZ. In both MDD and SZ SBM revealed a medial temporal lobe (MTL) network (including hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex) which showed a significant increase after ECT. The increase in MTL network strength was not associated with clinical improvement in either MDD or SZ. In SZ a lateral prefrontal/cingulate cortical network showed a volume increase after ECT, and this effect was accompanied by clinical improvement. These findings provide preliminary evidence for structural network change in response to ECT in MDD and SZ. The data suggest both diagnosis-specific and transdiagnostic ECT-effects on brain volume. In contrast to SZ, in MDD structural network modulation by ECT was not associated with clinical improvement. PMID:27424799

  10. Structure-function relationships in pulmonary surfactant membranes: from biophysics to therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex to maintain an operative respiratory surface at the mammalian lungs. It reduces surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to stabilise the lungs against physical forces operating along the compression-expansion breathing cycles. At the same time, surfactant integrates elements establishing a primary barrier against the entry of pathogens. Lack or deficiencies of the surfactant system are associated with respiratory pathologies, which treatment often includes supplementation with exogenous materials. The present review summarises current models on the molecular mechanisms of surfactant function, with particular emphasis in its biophysical properties to stabilise the lungs and the molecular alterations connecting impaired surfactant with diseased organs. It also provides a perspective on the current surfactant-based strategies to treat respiratory pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. PMID:24525076

  11. Modulating the Structure of EGFR with UV Light: New Possibilities in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel; Gajula, Gnana Prakash; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. EGFR is activated upon binding to e.g. epidermal growth factor (EGF), leading to cell survival, proliferation and migration. EGFR overactivation is associated with tumor progression. We have previously shown that low dose UVB illumination of cancer cells overexpressing EGFR prior to adding EGF halted the EGFR signaling pathway. We here show that UVB illumination of the extracellular domain of EGFR (sEGFR) induces protein conformational changes, disulphide bridge breakage and formation of tryptophan and tyrosine photoproducts such as dityrosine, N-formylkynurenine and kynurenine. Fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and thermal studies confirm the occurrence of conformational changes. An immunoassay has confirmed that UVB light induces structural changes in the EGF binding site. A monoclonal antibody which competes with EGF for binding sEGFR was used. We report clear evidence that UVB light induces structural changes in EGFR that impairs the correct binding of an EGFR specific antibody that competes with EGF for binding EGFR, confirming that the 3D structure of the EGFR binding domain suffered conformational changes upon UV illumination. The irradiance used is in the same order of magnitude as the integrated intensity in the solar UVB range. The new photonic technology disables a key receptor and is most likely applicable to the treatment of various types of cancer, alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:25386651

  12. Modulating the structure of EGFR with UV light: new possibilities in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Correia, Manuel; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel; Gajula, Gnana Prakash; Petersen, Steffen B; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. EGFR is activated upon binding to e.g. epidermal growth factor (EGF), leading to cell survival, proliferation and migration. EGFR overactivation is associated with tumor progression. We have previously shown that low dose UVB illumination of cancer cells overexpressing EGFR prior to adding EGF halted the EGFR signaling pathway. We here show that UVB illumination of the extracellular domain of EGFR (sEGFR) induces protein conformational changes, disulphide bridge breakage and formation of tryptophan and tyrosine photoproducts such as dityrosine, N-formylkynurenine and kynurenine. Fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and thermal studies confirm the occurrence of conformational changes. An immunoassay has confirmed that UVB light induces structural changes in the EGF binding site. A monoclonal antibody which competes with EGF for binding sEGFR was used. We report clear evidence that UVB light induces structural changes in EGFR that impairs the correct binding of an EGFR specific antibody that competes with EGF for binding EGFR, confirming that the 3D structure of the EGFR binding domain suffered conformational changes upon UV illumination. The irradiance used is in the same order of magnitude as the integrated intensity in the solar UVB range. The new photonic technology disables a key receptor and is most likely applicable to the treatment of various types of cancer, alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:25386651

  13. From structural biology to designing therapy for inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wyatt W

    2016-07-01

    At the SSIEM Symposium in Istanbul 2010, I presented an overview of protein structural approaches in the study of inborn errors of metabolism (Yue and Oppermann 2011). Five years on, the field is going strong with new protein structures, uncovered catalytic functions and novel chemical matters for metabolic enzymes, setting the stage for the next generation of drug discovery. This article aims to update on recent advances and lessons learnt on inborn errors of metabolism via the protein-centric approach, citing examples of work from my group, collaborators and co-workers that cover diverse pathways of transsulfuration, cobalamin and glycogen metabolism. Taking into consideration that many inborn errors of metabolism result in the loss of enzyme function, this presentation aims to outline three key principles that guide the design of small molecule therapy in this technically challenging field: (1) integrating structural, biochemical and cell-based data to evaluate the wide spectrum of mutation-driven enzyme defects in stability, catalysis and protein-protein interaction; (2) studying multi-domain proteins and multi-protein complexes as examples from nature, to learn how enzymes are activated by small molecules; (3) surveying different regions of the enzyme, away from its active site, that can be targeted for the design of allosteric activators and inhibitors. PMID:27240455

  14. Laser speckle contrast imaging: monitoring blood flow dynamics and vascular structure of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhou, Sibo; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a noninvasive optical image technique that has been developed for imaging in vivo blood flow dynamics and vascular structure with high spatial and temporal resolution. It records the full-field spatio-temporal characteristics of microcirculation in real time without the need of laser beam flying. In this paper applications of this technique for monitoring changes of blood flow and vascular structure following photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vivo model were demonstrated. In this study, an in vivo model of chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at embryo age (EA) of 10~13 days, was observed following PDT irradiated by a power tunable laser diode (λ = 656.5 nm). Laser intensity incident on the treatment site was maintained at 40 mW/cm2 and photosensitizer of Pyropheophorbide Acid (Pyro-Acid) was used. CAM was adopted in PDT since it is a transparent in vivo model and the irradiated lights of laser can penetrate tumor with greater depth. The laser delivered through fiber bundle to the treatment site in PDT also acted as the coherent light source of LSCI. This study shows that LSCI can be used to assess the efficacy of peripheral vessels damage of tumor in PDT by monitoring changes of blood flow and vascular structure.

  15. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. PMID:24958498

  16. Measuring Professional Behaviour in Canadian Physical Therapy Students' Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: An Environmental Scan

    PubMed Central

    Ellerton, Cindy; Evans, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify professional behaviours measured in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) by Canadian university physical therapy (PT) programs. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted to review current practice and determine which OSCE items Canadian PT programs are using to measure PT students' professional behaviours. Telephone interviews using semi-structured questions were conducted with individual instructors responsible for courses that included an OSCE as part of the assessment component. Results: Nine PT programmes agreed to take part in the study, and all reported conducting at least one OSCE. The number and characteristics of OSCEs varied both within and across programs. Participants identified 31 professional behaviour items for use in an OSCE; these items clustered into four categories: communication (n=14), respect (n=10), patient safety (n=4), and physical therapists' characteristics (n=3). Conclusions: All Canadian entry-level PT programmes surveyed assess professional behaviours in OSCE-type examinations; however, the content and style of assessment is variable. The local environment should be considered when determining what professional behaviours are appropriate to assess in the OSCE context in individual programmes. PMID:25931656

  17. Structural-level factors affecting implementation of the methadone maintenance therapy program in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou; Rou, Keming; Yin, Wenyuan; Wang, Changhe; Shoptaw, Steven; Detels, Roger

    2010-03-01

    This study identifies structural-level factors influencing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) program implementation in China. Twenty-eight service providers and 560 randomly selected clients from 28 MMT clinics in the study area underwent face-to-face interviews. Number of clients, retention rate, coverage, and structural-level factors were collected from a survey of service providers. Individual-level factors and self-reported illicit drug use information were obtained from clients. Urine specimens were collected from the client participants to test for heroin use. Clinics affiliated with the local Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had more clients, higher retention rates, and broader coverage than those not affiliated with the CDC. Longer operating hours, incentive for compliant clients, and comprehensive services were positively associated with client recruitment and coverage. Comprehensive services and incentives for compliant clients were negatively associated with concurrent illicit drug use. Comprehensive services should be incorporated into the MMT program. Extended operating hours and incentives for compliant clients should be implemented. PMID:20015606

  18. Crystal structure and interaction of phycocyanin with β-secretase: A putative therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Hasan, Syed S; Kumar, Jitendra; Raj, Isha; Pathan, Amrin A; Parmar, Asha; Shakil, Shazi; Gourinath, Samudrala; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a neurological disorder, which is caused by enzymatic degradation of an amyloid precursor protein into short peptide fragments that undergo association to form insoluble plaques. Preliminary studies suggest that cyanobacterial extracts, especially the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin, may provide a means to control the progression of the disease. However, the molecular mechanism of disease control remains elusive. In the present study, intact hexameric phycocyanin was isolated and crystallized from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. N62DM, and the structure was solved to a resolution of 2.6 A. Molecular docking studies show that the phycocyanin αβ-dimer interacts with the enzyme β-secretase, which catalyzes the proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein to form plaques. The molecular docking studies suggest that the interaction between phycocyanin and β-secretase is energetically more favorable than previously reported inhibitor-β-secretase interactions. Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans worms, with a genotype to serve as an AD-model, were significantly protected by phycocyanin. Therefore, the present study provides a novel structure-based molecular mechanism of phycocyanin-mediated therapy against AD. PMID:24576002

  19. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization. PMID:27125562

  20. Not all semantics: similarities and differences in reminiscing function and content between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Nile, Emma; Van Bergen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    This study explored why and how Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians remember the past. Indigenous Australians traditionally share a strong oral tradition in which customs, personal and cultural histories, and other narratives are passed across groups and between generations by word of mouth. Drawing on this tradition, in which inherent value is placed on sharing knowledge and maintaining connectedness with others, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would be more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to report reminiscing to fulfil social functions (but not self or directive functions). Furthermore, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would recall personal past experiences more elaborately than would non-Indigenous Australians. In Study 1, 33 Indigenous Australians and 76 non-Indigenous Australians completed Webster's Reminiscence Functions Scale. As predicted, Indigenous participants reported higher scores on subscales related to social functions than did non-Indigenous Australians: particularly "Teach/Inform" and "Intimacy Maintenance". They also scored higher on the "Identity" subscale. In Study 2, 15 Indigenous and 14 non-Indigenous Australians shared three memories from the distant and recent past. While Indigenous and non-Indigenous narratives did not differ in either emotion or elaboration, Indigenous Australians provided more memory context and detail by including a greater proportion of semantic memory content. Taken together, these findings suggest differences in both why and how Australians remember. PMID:24999815

  1. Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive African American Women: Effects on Psychological Distress, Family Hassles, and Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapocznik, Jose; Feaster, Daniel J.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Prado, Guillermo; Smith, Lila; Robinson-Batista, Carleen; Schwartz, Seth J.; Mauer, Magaly H.; Robbins, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    This study tests the efficacy of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family-ecological intervention, in improving psychosocial functioning when compared with an attention-comparison person-centered condition and a community control condition. A sample of 209 HIV-seropositive, urban, low-income, African American women was randomized into 1 of…

  2. Changes in Self-Schema Structure in Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozois, David J. A.; Bieling, Peter J.; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; Hoar, Lori; Chudzik, Susan; McCabe, Katie; Westra, Henny A.

    2009-01-01

    Negative cognitive structure (particularly for interpersonal content) has been shown in some research to persist past a current episode of depression and potentially to be a stable marker of vulnerability for depression (D. J. A. Dozois, 2007; D. J. A. Dozois & K. S. Dobson, 2001a). Given that cognitive therapy (CT) is highly effective for…

  3. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  4. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  5. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy: pilot study of a structural intervention in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, James L; Haug, Nancy A; Larios, Sandra; Gruber, Valerie A; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Powelson, Elisabeth; Logan, Deborah P; Shapiro, Bradley

    2012-12-01

    Devising interventions to provide integrated treatment for addiction and medical problems is an urgent issue. This study piloted a structural intervention, Directly Administered Antiretroviral Therapy (DAART), to assist methadone-maintenance patients in HIV medication adherence. Twenty-four participants received: (1) antiretroviral medications at the methadone clinic daily before receiving their methadone; (2) take-home antiretroviral medication for days they were not scheduled to attend the methadone clinic, and (3) brief adherence counseling to address adherence barriers. DAART lasted 24 weeks, with a planned step-down to twice-weekly administration in weeks 25-36, followed by self-administration in weeks 37-48. Retention rates at weeks 24, 36, and 48 were 83, 92, and 75% respectively. DAART was associated with improvement in the proportion of participants achieving viral suppression as well as with high medication adherence rates (clinic-verified; 85% and self-reported 97%) during the active intervention phase. DAART was effective as an intervention but did not promote transition to self-administration. This study demonstrates that DAART is adaptable and simple enough to be implemented into methadone treatment programs interested in providing HIV adherence services. PMID:23007110

  6. Gold conjugate-based liposomes with hybrid cluster bomb structure for liver cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Huan; Liu, Ai-Yun; Shen, Jia-Jia; Shah, Vishva; Zhang, Can; Hong, Jin; Ding, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid drug delivery system containing both organic and inorganic nanocarriers is expected to achieve its complementary advantages for the aim of improving the performance of antineoplastic drugs in tumor therapy. Here we report the use of liposomes and gold nanoparticles to construct a liposome with a hybrid Cluster Bomb structure and discuss its unique multi-order drug release property for liver tumor treatment. A very simple method is used for the hybrid liposome preparation and involves mixing two solutions containing liposomes loaded with either non-covalent or covalent Paclitaxel (PTX, namely free PTX or PTX-conjugated GNPs, respectively) by different ratio of volume (25:75, 50:50, 25:75, v/v). Various mixed liposomes were tested to determine the optimal conditions for maximum drug delivery. The optimized liposome was then tested using xenograft Heps tumor-bearing mice and showed the best efficacy for chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumor at PTX liposome: PTX-conjugated GNP liposome of 25:75 ratio (v/v). This system allows for simple and easy preparation while providing a more accurate site- and time-release mode for tumor treatment using antitumor drugs. PMID:26461120

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotype structure and steroid therapy outcome in IBD patients

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Jessica; Wenger, Christa; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) gene haplotypes influence the steroid therapy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We sequenced all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR3C1 gene in 181 IBD patients, determined the single nucleotide polymorphisms, and predicted the NR3C1 haplotypes. Furthermore, we investigated whether certain NR3C1 haplotypes are significantly associated with steroid therapy outcomes. RESULTS: We detected 13 NR3C1 variants, which led to the formation of 17 different haplotypes with a certainty of > 95% in 173 individuals. The three most commonly occurring haplotypes were included in the association analysis of the influence of haplotype on steroid therapy outcome or IBD activity. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed statistically significant association with glucocorticoid therapy success. CONCLUSION: NR3C1 haplotypes are not related to steroid therapy outcome. PMID:20712049

  8. Interpenetration of a 3D Icosahedral M@Ni12 (M=Al, Ga) Framework with Porphyrin-Reminiscent Boron Layers in MNi9 B8.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Wagner, Frank R; Ormeci, Alim; Prots, Yurii; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Schmidt, Marcus; Schnelle, Walter; Grin, Yuri; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Two ternary borides MNi9 B8 (M=Al, Ga) were synthesized by thermal treatment of mixtures of the elements. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data reveal AlNi9 B8 and GaNi9 B8 crystallizing in a new type of structure within the space group Cmcm and the lattice parameters a=7.0896(3) Å, b=8.1181(3) Å, c=10.6497(4) Å and a=7.0897(5) Å, b=8.1579(4) Å, c=10.6648(7) Å, respectively. The boron atoms build up two-dimensional layers, which consist of puckered [B16 ] rings with two tailing B atoms, whereas the M atoms reside in distorted vertices-condensed [Ni12 ] icosahedra, which form a three-dimensional framework interpenetrated by boron porphyrin-reminiscent layers. An unusual local arrangement resembling a giant metallo-porphyrin entity is formed by the [B16 ] rings, which, due to their large annular size of approximately 8 Å, chelate four of the twelve icosahedral Ni atoms. An analysis of the chemical bonding by means of the electron localizability approach reveals strong covalent B-B interactions and weak Ni-Ni interactions. Multi-center dative B-Ni interaction occurs between the Al-Ni framework and the boron layers. In agreement with the chemical bonding analysis and band structure calculations, AlNi9 B8 is a Pauli-paramagnetic metal. PMID:26418894

  9. "Reminiscences of Los Alamos": Narrative, Critical Theory, and the Organizational Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Bryan C.

    1990-01-01

    Examines autobiographical narratives of three scientists from the wartime Los Alamos Laboratory. Finds an organizational structure manifest in ideological discourses for nuclear practice and sensemaking, permitting rationalization for working identities and labor objectives. Considers implications for the critical study of organizational…

  10. Autonomy Support and Structure Enhance Children's Memory and Motivation to Reminisce: A Parental Training Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe; Morris, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Thirty parents observed their preschoolers (M [subscript age] = 4;2) experience a standardized laboratory event and discussed the event with their child later that day. Children's memory for this event was subsequently tested at two delay intervals. Prior to the laboratory event, parents were randomly assigned to receive either…

  11. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies.

  12. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    IKEKAWA, Nobuo; FUJIMOTO, Yoshinori; ISHIGURO, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970–1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids. PMID:24126284

  13. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth.

    PubMed

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies. PMID:25326825

  14. Does It Matter if Preschool Children and Mothers Discuss Positive vs. Negative Events during Reminiscing? Links with Mother-Reported Attachment, Family Emotional Climate, and Socioemotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laible, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differential relations between mother-child reminiscing about a positive emotional event vs. a negative emotional event and attachment security, family climate, and young children's socioemotional development. Fifty preschool children (M age = 50.69 months, SD = 4.64) and their mothers completed two…

  15. Mothers' Attributions in Reminiscing Conversations about Children's Successes and Failures: Connections with Children's Self-Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodvin, Rebecca; Rolfson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Effects of feedback on children's self-evaluations are well established, yet little is known about how parents talk with children about everyday successes and failures, despite the importance of parent-child reminiscing in children's psychological understanding. We examine mothers' attributions and performance evaluations in…

  16. [Reminiscences on the occasion of the Whipple's disease centenary: a summary paper].

    PubMed

    Kojecký, Z; Benýsek, L; Krc, I; Ehrmann, J; Kod'ousek, R; Malínský, J

    2008-03-01

    The disease referred to eponymically as Whipple's disease (WD) in medical literature was thoroughly described by the American physician and pathologist George Hoyot Whipple (1878-1976) in 1907 and given a temporary denomination of "intestinal lipodystrophy". According to literature, WD is rare, but its precise incidence has not yet been established. Familial incidence of the disease is acknowledged, and its immunogenetic pathogenesis is assumed. The incidence ofWD is prevailingly observed in middle-aged men (mean age 55), exceptionally at child age - the ratio being 3 to 6 for men and women, respectively. 1. Clinical diagnosis is based on symptoms in the GIT region and, in rare cases, on extraintestinal symptoms. Clinical symptomatology includes: abdominal pain with persistent diarrhoea (steatorrhoea), symptoms typical of malabsorption connected with weight loss, fevers, polyarthritic symptoms, swollen lymph nodes and, in part of patients, skin hyperpigmentation. Anaemia and hypoalbuminaemia (reduced IgA) are typically detected in laboratory tests. Rarer extraintestinal symptoms of the disease are of a diverse nature: cardiac lesions, cerebral lesions, ocular symptoms, conspicuous or even tumour-like enlargement of lymph nodes, lesions of the hemopoietic system. The clinical course ofWD is of progressive or remittent nature and the disease is fatal without treatment. Long-term therapy with antibiotics, especially a combination oftetracyclines (doxycyclin) and corticoids (dexametazone), or chloramphenicol in case of cerebral lesion, have a significantly positive effect on the course and prognosis of WD. From the point of view of pathology, WD is a multisystem infectious disease (Tropheryma whipplei) primarily affecting the GIT (39, 47, 52, 103) or different extraintestinal locations. Due to the known diversity of clinical symptoms, no clinical-diagnostic standard has been established for WD. Differential diagnosis includes different multisystem diseases, primarily

  17. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program. PMID:22365782

  18. Effects of Structure of Marathon Group Therapy and Locus of Control on Therapeutic Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Howell, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    This study compared the outcome of external and internal scorers on the locus of control scale and considered the association between internal-external orientation and direct and nondirect marathon group therapy. The findings suggest that internals are better therapeutic risks than externals, regardless of a direct or nondirect therapist…

  19. Leaf-cutting ant fungi produce cell wall degrading pectinase complexes reminiscent of phytopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leaf-cutting (attine) ants use their own fecal material to manure fungus gardens, which consist of leaf material overgrown by hyphal threads of the basidiomycete fungus Leucocoprinus gongylophorus that lives in symbiosis with the ants. Previous studies have suggested that the fecal droplets contain proteins that are produced by the fungal symbiont to pass unharmed through the digestive system of the ants, so they can enhance new fungus garden growth. Results We tested this hypothesis by using proteomics methods to determine the gene sequences of fecal proteins in Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. Seven (21%) of the 33 identified proteins were pectinolytic enzymes that originated from the fungal symbiont and which were still active in the fecal droplets produced by the ants. We show that these enzymes are found in the fecal material only when the ants had access to fungus garden food, and we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to show that the expression of six of these enzyme genes was substantially upregulated in the fungal gongylidia. These unique structures serve as food for the ants and are produced only by the evolutionarily advanced garden symbionts of higher attine ants, but not by the fungi reared by the basal lineages of this ant clade. Conclusions Pectinolytic enzymes produced in the gongylidia of the fungal symbiont are ingested but not digested by Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants so that they end up in the fecal fluid and become mixed with new garden substrate. Substantial quantities of pectinolytic enzymes are typically found in pathogenic fungi that attack live plant tissue, where they are known to breach the cell walls to allow the fungal mycelium access to the cell contents. As the leaf-cutting ant symbionts are derived from fungal clades that decompose dead plant material, our results suggest that their pectinolytic enzymes represent secondarily evolved adaptations that are convergent to those normally found in

  20. Secondary traumatic stress, psychological distress, sharing of traumatic reminiscences, and marital quality among spouses of Holocaust child survivors.

    PubMed

    Lev-Wiesel, R; Amir, M

    2001-10-01

    In this study, we examined the issue of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among spouses of Holocaust survivors who were children during the World War II. STS is defined as comprising the same components as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), except that the person evidencing the symptoms has not actually been exposed to the traumatic event(s), but has developed them as a result of caring for someone with PTSD. Participants were 90 couples who completed self-report questionnaires regarding posttraumatic symptoms, psychological distress, and marital quality. The results showed that about one-third of the spouses suffered from some degree of STS symptoms. Secondary traumatic stress symptoms and psychological distress among spouses were significantly related to hostility, anger, paranoia, and interpersonal sensitivity in the survivor, but unrelated to whether the survivor had shared his/her reminiscences with the spouse. Female spouses were found to suffer more distress than male spouses, especially when their partner suffered high levels of PTSD. The results suggest that STS is, to a large degree, related to the demands of living with a symptomatic survivor, possibly more than to the empathic element thought to be central to this syndrome. PMID:11594012

  1. A pilot study for a structured, time-limited therapy group for sexually abused pre-adolescent children.

    PubMed

    Corder, B F; Haizlip, T; DeBoer, P

    1990-01-01

    The critical role of specific types of mastery skill development in the treatment of sexually abused children is explored, and defense mechanisms of "invulnerable children," who function adequately despite trauma and stress, are described. The authors describe their development of structured group therapy techniques designed to foster these types of mastery skills with sexually abused children aged 6 to 8. These techniques include development of intellectualization defenses through original coloring books and therapeutic board games, cathartic exploration of feelings through structured art and storytelling exercises, cognitive relabeling and self-esteem building through role-play, "chants and cheers," homework shared with mothers, and other structured group procedures designed to develop specific coping skills. PMID:2340432

  2. Class I HDACs Affect DNA Replication, Repair, and Chromatin Structure: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Kristy R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The contribution of epigenetic alterations to cancer development and progression is becoming increasingly clear, prompting the development of epigenetic therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) represent one of the first classes of such therapy. Two HDIs, Vorinostat and Romidepsin, are broad-spectrum inhibitors that target multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) and are FDA approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, the mechanism of action and the basis for the cancer-selective effects of these inhibitors are still unclear. Recent Advances: While the anti-tumor effects of HDIs have traditionally been attributed to their ability to modify gene expression after the accumulation of histone acetylation, recent studies have identified the effects of HDACs on DNA replication, DNA repair, and genome stability. In addition, the HDIs available in the clinic target multiple HDACs, making it difficult to assign either their anti-tumor effects or their associated toxicities to the inhibition of a single protein. However, recent studies in mouse models provide insights into the tissue-specific functions of individual HDACs and their involvement in mediating the effects of HDI therapy. Critical Issues: Here, we describe how altered replication contributes to the efficacy of HDAC-targeted therapies as well as discuss what knowledge mouse models have provided to our understanding of the specific functions of class I HDACs, their potential involvement in tumorigenesis, and how their disruption may contribute to toxicities associated with HDI treatment. Future Directions: Impairment of DNA replication by HDIs has important therapeutic implications. Future studies should assess how best to exploit these findings for therapeutic gain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 51–65. PMID:24730655

  3. Reminiscing on School Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper examines how former and current school health programs differ (e.g., school nurses moved from simply treating minor injuries and communicable diseases to working cooperatively with physicians and school staff to develop policies and procedures, and health education moved from simple anatomy and physiology to broader personal and…

  4. Can Senior Volunteers Deliver Reminiscence and Creative Activity Interventions? Results of the Legacy Intervention Family Enactment (LIFE) Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Harris, Grant M.; Burgio, Louis D.; Azuero, Casey B.; Miller, Leslie A.; Shin, Hae Jung; Eichorst, Morgan K.; Csikai, Ellen L.; DeCoster, Jamie; Dunn, Linda L.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Context Palliative care patients and their family caregivers may have a foreshortened perspective of time left to live, or the expectation of the patient’s death in the near future. Patients and caregivers may report distress in physical, psychological, or existential/spiritual realms. Objectives To conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of retired senior volunteers (RSVs) in delivering a reminiscence and creative activity intervention aimed at alleviating palliative care patient and caregiver distress. Methods Of the 45 dyads that completed baseline, 28 completed post-intervention and 24 completed follow-up. The intervention group received three home visits by RSVs; control group families received three supportive telephone calls by research staff. Measures included symptom assessment and associated burden, depression, religiousness/spirituality, and meaning in life. Results Patients in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in frequency of emotional symptoms (P = 0.02) and emotional symptom bother (P = 0.04) than the control group, as well as improved spiritual functioning. Family caregivers in the intervention group were more likely than control caregivers to endorse items on the Meaning in Life Scale (P = 0.02). Only improvement in intervention patients’ emotional symptom bother maintained at follow-up after discontinuing RSV contact (P = 0.024). Conclusion Delivery of the intervention by RSVs had a positive impact on palliative care patients’ emotional symptoms and burden and caregivers’ meaning in life. Meaningful prolonged engagement with palliative care patients and caregivers, possibly through alternative modes of treatment delivery such as continued RSV contact, may be necessary for maintenance of therapeutic effects. PMID:24667180

  5. Structure-based optimization of GRP78-binding peptides that enhances efficacy in cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Hung; Lee, Andy Chi-Lung; Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Han-Chung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chang, Ya-Jen; Lee, Te-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Yu, Alice L; Yu, John

    2016-07-01

    It is more challenging to design peptide drugs than small molecules through molecular docking and in silico analysis. Here, we developed a structure-based approach with various computational and analytical techniques to optimize cancer-targeting peptides for molecular imaging and therapy. We first utilized a peptide-binding protein database to identify GRP78, a specific cancer cell-surface marker, as a target protein for the lead, L-peptide. Subsequently, we used homologous modeling and molecular docking to identify a peptide-binding domain within GRP78 and optimized a series of peptides with a new protein-ligand scoring program, HotLig. Binding of these peptides to GRP78 was confirmed using an oriented immobilization technique for the Biacore system. We further examined the ability of the peptides to target cancer cells through in vitro binding studies with cell lines and clinical cancer specimens, and in vivo tumor imaging and targeted chemotherapeutic studies. MicroSPECT/CT imaging revealed significantly greater uptake of (188)Re-liposomes linked to these peptides as compared with non-targeting (188)Re-liposomes. Conjugation with these peptides also significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Lipo-Dox. Notably, peptide-conjugated Lipo-Dox significantly reduced stem-cell subpopulation in xenografts of breast cancer. The structure-based optimization strategy for peptides described here may be useful for developing peptide drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27088408

  6. Patients with moderate Alzheimer’s disease engage in verbal reminiscence with the support of a computer-aided program: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O’Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; D’Amico, Fiora; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Denitto, Floriana; De Vanna, Floriana; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the assessment of a program recently developed for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer’s disease engage in computer-mediated verbal reminiscence (Lancioni et al., 2014a). Sixteen participants were involved in the study. Six of them used the original program version with the computer showing a virtual partner posing questions and providing attention and guidance. The other 10 used a slightly modified program version with the computer presenting photos and videos and providing encouragements to talk as well as attention and guidance. Participants were exposed to brief program sessions individually. The results showed that 15 participants (five of those using the first version and all of those using the second version) had a clear and lasting increase in verbal engagement/reminiscence during the intervention sessions with the program. Those 15 participants had mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence below 10 during baseline and between about 45 and 75 during the intervention. The results’ implications and the need for new research were discussed. PMID:26089797

  7. Patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence with the support of a computer-aided program: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; D'Amico, Fiora; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Denitto, Floriana; De Vanna, Floriana; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the assessment of a program recently developed for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in computer-mediated verbal reminiscence (Lancioni et al., 2014a). Sixteen participants were involved in the study. Six of them used the original program version with the computer showing a virtual partner posing questions and providing attention and guidance. The other 10 used a slightly modified program version with the computer presenting photos and videos and providing encouragements to talk as well as attention and guidance. Participants were exposed to brief program sessions individually. The results showed that 15 participants (five of those using the first version and all of those using the second version) had a clear and lasting increase in verbal engagement/reminiscence during the intervention sessions with the program. Those 15 participants had mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence below 10 during baseline and between about 45 and 75 during the intervention. The results' implications and the need for new research were discussed. PMID:26089797

  8. Structure of solid tumors and their vasculature: Implications for therapy with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, H.F.; Nagy, J.A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibodies to solid tumors is a vexing problem that must be solved if these antibodies are to realize their promise in therapy. Such success as has been achieved with monoclonal antibodies is attributable to the local hyperpermeability of the tumor vasculature, a property that favors antibody extravasation at tumor sites and that is mediated by a tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. However, leaky tumor blood vessels are generally some distance removed from target tumor cells, separated by stroma and by other tumor cells that together represent significant barriers to penetration by extravasated monoclonal antibodies. For this reason, alternative approaches may be attractive. These include the use of antibody-linked cytotoxins, which are able to kill tumor cells without immediate contact, and direction of antibodies against nontumor cell targets, for example, antigens unique to the tumor vascular endothelium or to tumor stroma. 50 refs.

  9. REMCARE: Pragmatic Multi-Centre Randomised Trial of Reminiscence Groups for People with Dementia and their Family Carers: Effectiveness and Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Martin; Bruce, Errollyn; Edwards, Rhiannon T.; Hounsome, Barry; Keady, John; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Rees, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Background Joint reminiscence groups, involving people with dementia and family carers together, are popular, but the evidence-base is limited. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups as compared to usual care. Methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial had two parallel arms: intervention group and usual-care control group. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used, with an overall allocation ratio of 1:1, restricted to ensure viable sized intervention groups. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, three months and ten months (primary end-point), usually in the person's home. Participants were recruited in eight centres, mainly through NHS Memory Clinics and NHS community mental health teams. Included participants were community resident people with mild to moderate dementia (DSM-IV), who had a relative or other care-giver in regular contact, to act as informant and willing and able to participate in intervention. 71% carers were spouses. 488 people with dementia (mean age 77.5)were randomised: 268 intervention, 220 control; 350 dyads completed the study (206 intervention, 144 control). The intervention evaluated was joint reminiscence groups (with up to 12 dyads) weekly for twelve weeks; monthly maintenance sessions for further seven months. Sessions followed a published treatment manual and were held in a variety of community settings. Two trained facilitators in each centre were supported by volunteers. Primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia (QoL-AD), psychological distress for the carer (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-28). Secondary outcome measures included: autobiographical memory and activities of daily living for the person with dementia; carer stress for the carer; mood, relationship quality and service use and costs for both. Results The intention to treat analysis (ANCOVA

  10. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-05-19

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, inmore » combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. Furthermore, this combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions.« less

  11. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. This combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27194387

  12. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Luke F; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab-Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. This combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27194387

  13. Beam Path Toxicities to Non-Target Structures During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Chambers, Mark S.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-11-01

    Background: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams traverse nontarget normal structures not irradiated during three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). This study estimates the doses and toxicities to nontarget structures during IMRT. Materials and Methods: Oropharyngeal cancer IMRT and 3D-CRT cases were reviewed. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to evaluate radiation dose to the lip, cochlea, brainstem, occipital scalp, and segments of the mandible. Toxicity rates were compared for 3D-CRT, IMRT alone, or IMRT with concurrent cisplatin. Descriptive statistics and exploratory recursive partitioning analysis were used to estimate dose 'breakpoints' associated with observed toxicities. Results: A total of 160 patients were evaluated for toxicity; 60 had detailed DVH evaluation and 15 had 3D-CRT plan comparison. Comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT, there was significant (p {<=} 0.002) nonparametric differential dose to all clinically significant structures of interest. Thirty percent of IMRT patients had headaches and 40% had occipital scalp alopecia. A total of 76% and 38% of patients treated with IMRT alone had nausea and vomiting, compared with 99% and 68%, respectively, of those with concurrent cisplatin. IMRT had a markedly distinct toxicity profile than 3D-CRT. In recursive partitioning analysis, National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria adverse effects 3.0 nausea and vomiting, scalp alopecia and anterior mucositis were associated with reconstructed mean brainstem dose >36 Gy, occipital scalp dose >30 Gy, and anterior mandible dose >34 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Dose reduction to specified structures during IMRT implies an increased beam path dose to alternate nontarget structures that may result in clinical toxicities that were uncommon with previous, less conformal approaches. These findings have implications for IMRT treatment planning and research, toxicity assessment, and multidisciplinary patient

  14. Can the success of structured therapy for giggle incontinence be predicted?

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Onur; Hamidi, Nurullah; Kayis, Aytac; Suer, Evren; Soygur, Tarkan; Burgu, Berk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To evaluate possible factors that can guide the clinician to predict potential cases refractoriness to medical treatment for giggle incontinence (GI) and to examine the effectiveness of different treatment modalities. Material and methods: The data of 48 children referred to pediatric urology outpatient clinic between 2000 and 2013 diagnosed as GI were reviewed. Mean age, follow-up, GI frequency, associated symptoms, medical and family history were noted. Incontinence frequency differed between several per day to less than once weekly. Children were evaluated with uroflowmetry-electromyography and post-void residual urine. Clinical success was characterized as a full or partial response, or nonresponse as defined by the International Children's Continence Society. Univariate analysis was used to find potential factors including age, sex, familial history, GI frequency, treatment modality and dysfunctional voiding to predict children who would possibly not respond to treatment. Results: Mean age of the patients was 8.4 years (range 5 to 16). Mean follow-up time and mean duration of asymptomatic period were noted as 6.7±1.4 years and 14.2±2.3 months respectively. While 12 patients were treated with only behavioral urotherapy (Group-1), 11 patients were treated with alpha-adrenergic blockers and behavioral urotherapy (Group-2) and 18 patients with methylphenidate and behavioral urotherapy (Group-3). Giggle incontinence was refractory to eight children in-group 1; six children in-group 2 and eight children in-group 3. Daily GI frequency and dysfunctional voiding diagnosed on uroflowmetry-EMG were found as outstanding predictive factors for resistance to treatment modalities. Conclusions: A variety of therapies for GI have more than 50% failure rate and a standard treatment for GI has not been established. The use of medications to treat these patients would not be recommended, as they appear to add no benefit to symptoms and may introduce

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  16. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  17. Pharmacogenomics of the RNA World: Structural RNA Polymorphisms in Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadee, W; Wang, D; Papp, AC; Pinsonneault, JK; Smith, RM; Moyer, RA; Johnson, AD

    2011-01-01

    The use of pharmacogenomic biomarkers can enhance treatment outcomes. Regulatory polymorphisms are promising biomarkers that have proven difficult to uncover. They come in two flavors: those that affect transcription (regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs)) and those that affect RNA functions such as splicing, turnover, and translation (termed structural RNA SNPs (srSNPs)). This review focuses on the role of srSNPs in drug metabolism, transport, and response. An understanding of the nature and diversity of srSNPs and rSNPs enables clinical scientists to evaluate genetic biomarkers. PMID:21289622

  18. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Samantha Y.A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage ({gamma}H2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of {gamma}H2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) compared with IR alone (16 {+-} 0.6 and 14 {+-} 0.3 vs. 12 {+-} 0.4 and 11 {+-} 0.2, respectively). More {gamma}H2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/{mu}g) plus SAHA vs. {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 {+-} 0.3 and 12 {+-} 0.7 vs. 9 {+-} 0.4 and 7 {+-} 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) vs. IR alone (0.6% {+-} 0.01 and 0.3% {+-} 0.2 vs. 5.8% {+-} 0.2 and 2% {+-} 0.1, respectively) and after {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% {+-} 0.4% and 19% {+-} 4.6 vs. 33% {+-} 2.3 and 32% {+-} 3.7). SAHA did not affect {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer {gamma}H2AX foci per cell

  19. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K. J.; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Dominguez, Jesus H.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  20. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  1. Modification of Structural and Luminescence Properties of Graphene Quantum Dots by Gamma Irradiation and Their Application in a Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Svetlana P; Syrgiannis, Zois; Marković, Zoran M; Bonasera, Aurelio; Kepić, Dejan P; Budimir, Milica D; Milivojević, Dušan D; Spasojević, Vuk D; Dramićanin, Miroslav D; Pavlović, Vladimir B; Todorović Marković, Biljana M

    2015-11-25

    Herein, the ability of gamma irradiation to enhance the photoluminescence properties of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) was investigated. Different doses of γ-irradiation were used on GQDs to examine the way in which their structure and optical properties can be affected. The photoluminescence quantum yield was increased six times for the GQDs irradiated with high doses compared to the nonirradiated material. Both photoluminescence lifetime and values of optical band gap were increased with the dose of applied gamma irradiation. In addition, the exploitation of the gamma-irradiated GQDs as photosensitizers was examined by monitoring the production of singlet oxygen under UV illumination. The main outcome was that the GQDs irradiated at lower doses act as better photoproducers than the ones irradiated at higher doses. These results corroborate that the structural changes caused by gamma irradiation have a direct impact on GQD ability to produce singlet oxygen and their photostability under prolonged UV illumination. This makes low-dose irradiated GQDs promising candidates for photodynamic therapy. PMID:26540316

  2. Structural Barriers to Antiretroviral Therapy Among Sex Workers Living with HIV: Findings of a Longitudinal Study in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Montaner, Julio; Duff, Putu; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Guillemi, Silvia; Shannon, Kate

    2016-05-01

    In light of limited data on structural determinants of access and retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) among sex workers, we examined structural correlates of ART use among sex workers living with HIV over time. Longitudinal data were drawn from a cohort of 646 female sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (2010-2012) and linked pharmacy records on ART dispensation. We used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine correlates of gaps in ART use (i.e., treatment interruptions or delayed ART initiation), among HIV seropositive participants (n = 74). Over a 2.5-year period, 37.8 % of participants experienced gaps in ART use (i.e., no ART dispensed in a 6-month period). In a multivariable GEE model, younger age, migration/mobility, incarceration, and non-injection drug use independently correlated with gaps in ART use. In spite of successes scaling-up ART in British Columbia, younger, mobile, or incarcerated sex workers face persistent gaps in access and retention irrespective of drug use. Community-based, tailored interventions to scale-up entry and retention in ART for sex workers should be further explored in this setting. PMID:26148850

  3. Structural design of disialoganglioside GD2 and CD3-bispecific antibodies to redirect T cells for tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ming; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Xu, Hong; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody based immunotherapy has proven efficacy for patients with high risk neuroblastoma. However, despite being the most efficient tumoricidal effectors, T cells are underutilized because they lack Fc receptors. Using a monovalent single chain fragment (ScFv) platform, we engineered tandem scFv bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) that specifically target disialoganglioside (GD2) on tumor cells and CD3 on T cells. Structural variants of BsAbs were constructed and ranked based on binding to GD2, and on competency in inducing T cell mediated tumor cytotoxicity. In vitro thermal stability and binding measurements were used to characterize each of the constructs, and in silico molecular modeling was used to show how the orientation of the variable region heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains of the anti-GD2 ScFv could alter the conformations of key residues responsible for high affinity binding. We showed that the VH-VL orientation, the (GGGGS)3 linker, disulfide bond stabilization of scFv, when combined with an affinity matured mutation provided the most efficient BsAb to direct T cells to lyse GD2 positive tumor cells. In vivo, the optimized BsAb could efficiently inhibit melanoma and neuroblastoma xenograft growth. These findings provide preclinical validation of a structure-based method to assist in designing BsAb for T-cell mediated therapy. PMID:24895182

  4. Validation of geometric measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary veins for analysis of reverse structural remodeling following ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R., III; Gunawan, M. S.; Ge, X.; Karwoski, R. A.; Breen, J. F.; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    Geometric analysis of the left atrium and pulmonary veins is important for studying reverse structural remodeling following cardiac ablation therapy. It has been shown that the left atrium decreases in volume and the pulmonary vein ostia decrease in diameter following ablation therapy. Most analysis techniques, however, require laborious manual tracing of image cross-sections. Pulmonary vein diameters are typically measured at the junction between the left atrium and pulmonary veins, called the pulmonary vein ostia, with manually drawn lines on volume renderings or on image cross-sections. In this work, we describe a technique for making semi-automatic measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary vein ostial diameters from high resolution CT scans and multi-phase datasets. The left atrium and pulmonary veins are segmented from a CT volume using a 3D volume approach and cut planes are interactively positioned to separate the pulmonary veins from the body of the left atrium. The cut plane is also used to compute the pulmonary vein ostial diameter. Validation experiments are presented which demonstrate the ability to repeatedly measure left atrial volume and pulmonary vein diameters from high resolution CT scans, as well as the feasibility of this approach for analyzing dynamic, multi-phase datasets. In the high resolution CT scans the left atrial volume measurements show high repeatability with approximately 4% intra-rater repeatability and 8% inter-rater repeatability. Intra- and inter-rater repeatability for pulmonary vein diameter measurements range from approximately 2 to 4 mm. For the multi-phase CT datasets, differences in left atrial volumes between a standard slice-by-slice approach and the proposed 3D volume approach are small, with percent differences on the order of 3% to 6%.

  5. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion; Paulson, Eric; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV{sub DCE}, and GTV{sub ADC}), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V{sub CT}), T1-weighted MRI (V{sub T1}), and T2-weighted MRI (V{sub T2}) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm{sup 3} for GTV{sub DCE}, GTV{sub ADC}, GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller

  6. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Mechanistic Investigation of Lithocholic Acid Amphiphiles for Colon Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Ashima; Motiani, Rajender K.; Shyam, Radhey; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Sengupta, Sagar; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    We report a structure-activity relationship of lithocholic acid amphiphiles for their anticancer activities against colon cancer. We synthesized ten cationic amphiphiles differing in nature of cationic charged head groups using lithocholic acid. We observed that anticancer activities of these amphiphiles against colon cancer cell lines are contingent on nature of charged head group. Lithocholic acid based amphiphile possessing piperidine head group (LCA-PIP1) is ~10 times more cytotoxic as compared to its precursor. Biochemical studies revealed that enhanced activity of LCA-PIP1 as compared to lithocholic acid is due to greater activation of apoptosis.LCA-PIP1 induces sub G0 arrest and causes cleavage of caspases. A single dose of lithocholic acid-piperidine derivative is enough to reduce the tumor burden by 75% in tumor xenograft model. PMID:25685308

  7. Structural Integration, an Alternative Method of Manual Therapy and Sensorimotor Education

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The objectives of this report are to review the clinical practice of Structural Integration (SI), an alternative method of soft-tissue manipulation and sensorimotor education, and to summarize the evidence to date for mechanism and clinical efficacy. Methods The author's personal knowledge of SI literature, theory, and practice was supplemented by a database search, consultation with other senior SI practitioners, and examination of published bibliographies and websites that archive SI literature. Results SI purports to improve biomechanical functioning as a whole by progressively approximating specific ideals of posture and movement, rather than to treat particular symptoms. Hypothesized mechanisms at the level of local tissue change include increases in soft-tissue pliability, release of adhesions between adjacent soft-tissue structures, and increased interstitial fluid flow with consequently improved clearance of nociceptive potentiators. Hypothesized mechanisms for more global changes include improved biomechanical organization leading to reductions in mechanical stress and nociceptive irritation, a perception of improved biomechanical efficiency and coordination that generalizes to the self, and improvements in sensory processing and vagal tone. Emotional catharsis is also thought to contribute to psychologic changes. Limited preliminary evidence exists for improvements in neuromotor coordination, sensory processing, self-concept and vagal tone, and for reductions in state anxiety. Preliminary, small sample clinical studies with cerebral palsy, chronic musculoskeletal pain, impaired balance, and chronic fatigue syndrome have reported improvements in gait, pain and range-of-motion, impaired balance, functional status, and well-being. Adverse events are thought to be mild and transient, although survey data are not available. Contraindications are thought to be the same as for massage. Conclusions Evidence for clinical effectiveness and

  8. Folate-vinca alkaloid conjugates for cancer therapy: a structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Leamon, Christopher P; Vlahov, Iontcho R; Reddy, Joseph A; Vetzel, Marilynn; Santhapuram, Hari Krishna R; You, Fei; Bloomfield, Alicia; Dorton, Ryan; Nelson, Melissa; Kleindl, Paul; Vaughn, Jeremy F; Westrick, Elaine

    2014-03-19

    Vintafolide is a potent folate-targeted vinca alkaloid small molecule drug conjugate (SMDC) that has shown promising results in multiple clinical oncology studies. Structurally, vintafolide consists of 4 essential modules: (1) folic acid, (2) a hydrophilic peptide spacer, (3) a disulfide-containing, self-immolative linker, and (4) the cytotoxic drug, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH). Here, we report a structure-activity study evaluating the biological impact of (i) substituting DAVLBH within the vintafolide molecule with other vinca alkaloid analogues such as vincristine, vindesine, vinflunine, or vinorelbine; (ii) substituting the naturally (S)-configured Asp-Arg-Asp-Asp-Cys peptide with alternative hydrophilic spacers of varied composition; and (iii) varying the composition of the linker module. A series of vinca alkaloid-containing SMDCs were synthesized and purified by HPLC and LCMS. The SMDCs were screened in vitro against folate receptor (FR)-positive cells, and anti-tumor activity was tested against well-established subcutaneous FR-positive tumor xenografts. The cytotoxic and anti-tumor activity was directly compared to that produced by vintafolide. Among all the folate vinca alkaloid SMDCs tested, DAVLBH-containing SMDCs were active, while those constructed with vincristine, vindesine, or vinorelbine analogues failed to produce meaningful biological activity. Within the DAVLBH series, having a bioreleasable, self-immolative linker system was found to be critical for activity since multiple analogues constructed with thioether-based linkers all failed to produce meaningful activity both in vitro and in vivo. Substitutions of some or all of the natural amino acids within vintafolide's hydrophilic spacer module did not significantly change the in vitro or in vivo potency of the SMDCs. Vintafolide remains one of the most potent folate-vinca alkaloid SMDCs produced to date, and continued clinical development is warranted. PMID:24564229

  9. Structural recovery of the retina in a retinoschisin-deficient mouse after gene replacement therapy by solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Apaolaza, P S; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, A; Solinís, M A; Rodríguez, J M; Friedrich, U; Torrecilla, J; Weber, B H F; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2016-06-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal degenerative disorder caused by mutations in the RS1 gene encoding a protein termed retinoschisin. The disease is an excellent candidate for gene replacement therapy as the majority of mutations have been shown to lead to a complete deficiency of the secreted protein in the retinal structures. In this work, we have studied the ability of non-viral vectors based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to induce the expression of retinoschisin in photoreceptors (PR) after intravitreal administration to Rs1h-deficient mice. We designed two vectors prepared with SLN, protamine, and dextran (DX) or hyaluronic acid (HA), bearing a plasmid containing the human RS1 gene under the control of the murin opsin promoter (mOPS). In vitro, the nanocarriers were able to induce the expression of retinoschisin in a PR cell line. After injection into the murine vitreous, the formulation prepared with HA induced a higher transfection level in PR than the formulation prepared with DX. Moreover, the level of retinoschisin in the inner nuclear layer (INL), where bipolar cells are located, was also higher. Two weeks after vitreal administration into Rs1h-deficient mice, both formulations showed significant improvement of the retinal structure by inducing a decrease of cavities and PR loss, and an increase of retinal and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. HA-SLN resulted in a significant higher increase in the thickness of both retina and ONL, which can be explained by the higher transfection level of PR. In conclusion, we have shown the structural improvement of the retina of Rs1h-deficient mice with PR specific expression of the RS1 gene driven by the specific promoter mOPS, after successful delivery via SLN-based non-viral vectors. PMID:26986855

  10. Theranostic self-assembly structure of gold nanoparticles for NIR photothermal therapy and X-Ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Heng; Zhong, Yanqi; Du, Meihong; Liu, Qinjun; Fan, Zhanming; Dai, Fengying; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The controllable self-assembly of amphiphilic mixed polymers grafted gold nanoparitcles (AuNPs) leads to strong interparticle plasmonic coupling, which can be tuned to the near-infrared (NIR) region for enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT). In this study, an improved thiolation method was adopted for ATRP and ROP polymer to obtain amphiphilic brushes of PMEO2MA-SH and PCL-SH. By anchoring PCL-SH and PMEO2MA-SH onto the 14 nm AuNPs, a smart hybrid building block for self-assembly was obtained. Increasing the PCL/PMEO2MA chain ratio from 0.8:1, 2:1 and 3:1 to 7:1, the structure of gold assemblies (GAs) was observed to transfer from vesicle to large compound micelle (LCM). Contributed to the special dense packed structure of gold nanoparticles in LCM, the absorption spectrometry of gold nanoparticles drastically red-shifted from 520 nm to 830 nm, which endowed the GAs remarkable NIR photothermal conversion ability. In addition, gold has high X-ray absorption coefficient which qualifies gold nanomaterial a potential CT contrast agent Herein, we obtain a novel gold assembly structure which can be utilized as potential photothermal therapeutic and CT contrast agents. In vitro and In vivo studies testified the excellent treatment efficacy of optimum GAs as a PTT and CT contrast agent. In vitro degradation test, MTT assay and histology study indicated that GAs was a safe, low toxic reagent with good biodegradability. Therefore, the optimum GAs with strong NIR absorption and high X-ray absorption coefficient could be used as a theranostic agent and the formation of novel gold large compound micelle might offers a new theory foundation for engineering design and synthesis of polymer grafted AuNPs for biomedical applications. PMID:25057315

  11. Theranostic Self-Assembly Structure of Gold Nanoparticles for NIR Photothermal Therapy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Heng; Zhong, Yanqi; Du, Meihong; Liu, Qinjun; Fan, Zhanming; Dai, Fengying; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The controllable self-assembly of amphiphilic mixed polymers grafted gold nanoparitcles (AuNPs) leads to strong interparticle plasmonic coupling, which can be tuned to the near-infrared (NIR) region for enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT). In this study, an improved thiolation method was adopted for ATRP and ROP polymer to obtain amphiphilic brushes of PMEO2MA-SH and PCL-SH. By anchoring PCL-SH and PMEO2MA-SH onto the 14 nm AuNPs, a smart hybrid building block for self-assembly was obtained. Increasing the PCL/PMEO2MA chain ratio from 0.8:1, 2:1 and 3:1 to 7:1, the structure of gold assemblies (GAs) was observed to transfer from vesicle to large compound micelle (LCM). Contributed to the special dense packed structure of gold nanoparticles in LCM, the absorption spectrometry of gold nanoparticles drastically red-shifted from 520 nm to 830 nm, which endowed the GAs remarkable NIR photothermal conversion ability. In addition, gold has high X-ray absorption coefficient which qualifies gold nanomaterial a potential CT contrast agent Herein, we obtain a novel gold assembly structure which can be utilized as potential photothermal therapeutic and CT contrast agents. In vitro and In vivo studies testified the excellent treatment efficacy of optimum GAs as a PTT and CT contrast agent. In vitro degradation test, MTT assay and histology study indicated that GAs was a safe, low toxic reagent with good biodegradability. Therefore, the optimum GAs with strong NIR absorption and high X-ray absorption coefficient could be used as a theranostic agent and the formation of novel gold large compound micelle might offers a new theory foundation for engineering design and synthesis of polymer grafted AuNPs for biomedical applications. PMID:25057315

  12. Can dialectical behavior therapy be learned in highly structured learning environments? Results from a randomized controlled dissemination trial.

    PubMed

    Dimeff, Linda A; Woodcock, Eric A; Harned, Melanie S; Beadnell, Blair

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of methods of training community mental health providers (N=132) in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) distress tolerance skills, including (a) Linehan's (1993a) Skills Training Manual for Borderline Personality Disorder (Manual), (b) a multimedia e-Learning course covering the same content (e-DBT), and (c) a placebo control e-Learning course (e-Control). Participants were randomized to a condition, and the training took place in a highly structured and controlled learning environment. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-training, and 2, 7, 11, and 15 weeks following training. The results indicate that one or both of the active DBT conditions outperformed the control condition on all outcomes except motivation to learn and use the treatment. While clinicians preferred e-DBT over the Manual and found it more helpful and engaging, the active DBT conditions generally did not differ on the primary outcomes of knowledge and self-efficacy, with the exception that e-DBT significantly outperformed the Manual on knowledge at the 15-week follow-up. E-DBT also produced the highest rate of applying and teaching the newly learned skills in clinical practice. Overall, results from this study support the efficacy of e-Learning in disseminating knowledge of empirically supported treatments to clinicians, while also indicating that treatment manuals can be effective training tools. PMID:21496511

  13. Short-term group cognitive behavior therapy contributes to recovery from mild depression: Evidence from functional and structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Du, Xue; Mao, Yu; Ran, Qian; Zhang, Qinglin; Luo, QingHua; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-05-30

    We used the functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural correlates of response to group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in mild depression. College students with mild depressive symptoms participated in our 4-week group CBT training. The behavioral results showed that depression symptoms decreased after participation in group CBT. After the training, the gray matter volume (GMV) in the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) increased and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) decreased. In addition, GMV in the left postcentral gyrus decreased after the group CBT. Moreover, the increase of percentage change in the right MFG was positively correlated with the decrease of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score, while less decrease in percentage change in the left postcentral gyrus was significantly correlated with greater decrease of BDI score. Finally, after the training, functional connectivity between the right MFG and the insula decreased, while the connectivity between the left postcentral gyrus and the parahippocampal gyrus increased. These findings suggested that short-term participation in group CBT had an effective impact on mild depression. It contributed to decreasing negative bias (salience detection for negative stimuli). PMID:27124424

  14. Studies of the significance of functional and structural changes in mitochondria in PhotofrinTM-photodynamic-therapy-resistant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brian C.; Olivo, Malini; Moorehead, Roger; Singh, Gurmit

    1994-07-01

    This paper reports further studies of Radiation Induced Fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor cells which have been made resistant to Photodynamic Therapy by multiple treatment and regrowth in vitro using the hematoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer Photofrin. Previous work has shown both structural and functional changes in the mitochondria of the resistant (RIF-8A) cells. Colocalization of Photofrin and the mitochondrial localizer Rhodamine-123 was assessed by double-label confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). At 18h Photofrin incubation, there was strong correlation in discrete subcellular sites between Photofrin and Rhodamine fluorescence. However, in RIF-8A cells there were also discrete regions of Rhodamine localization which showed weak or no Photofrin fluorescence. This was not observed in RIF-1 cells. CFM measurements also showed that the Photofrin fluorescence after 18h incubation was reduced by increasing concentration of Rhodamine (30 min. incubation), and that this dependence was different for the two cell types. The RIF-8A cells were also shown to be cross-resistant to cisplatin and to have an associated reduced level of Pt-DNA adducts, suggesting the possibility of increased repair capacity. Cross-resistance was not observed, however, with a ruthenium phthalocyanine photosensitizer nor, as previously reported, with other chemotherapeutic agents such as Adriamcyin. Thus, there is a complex pattern of cross-resistance with these cells. Preliminary observations of the effects of a respiratory chain inhibitor (oligomycin) and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation (FCCP) indicate differences between RIF-8A and RIF-1 which may be related to the condensed mitochondrial structure of the RIF-8A cells.

  15. Estrogen Therapy, Independent of Timing, Improves Cardiac Structure and Function in Oophorectomized mRen2.Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jessup, Jewell A.; Wang, Hao; MacNamara, Lindsay M.; Presley, Tennille D.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Alex F.; Groban, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    Objective mRen2.Lewis Rats exhibit exacerbated increases in blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and diastolic impairment following the loss of estrogens. In this same model, depletion of estrogens has marked effects on the cardiac biopterin profile concomitant with suppressed nitric oxide (NO) release. With respect to the establishment of overt systolic hypertension after oophorectomy (OVX), we assessed the effects of timing chronic 17 β-estradiol (E2) therapy on myocardial function, structure, and the cardiac NO system. Methods Oophrectomy (OVX; n=24) or sham-operation (Sham; n=13) was performed in 4-week-old, female mRen2.Lewis rats. Following randomization, OVX rats received E2 immediately (OVX + early E2; n=7), E2 at 11 weeks of age (OVX + late E2 N=8), or no E2 at all (OVX N=9). Results Early E2 was associated with lower body weight, less hypertension-related cardiac remodeling, and decreased LV filling pressure compared to OVX rats without E2 supplementation. Late E2 similarly attenuated the adverse effects of ovarian hormone loss on tissue-Doppler derived LV filling pressures and perivascular fibrosis, and significantly improved myocardial relaxation, or mitral annular velocity (e′). Early and late exposure to E2 decreased dihydrobiopterin, but only late E2 yielded significant increases in cardiac nitrite concentrations. Conclusions Although there were some similarities between early and late E2 treatment on preservation of diastolic function and cardiac structure after OVX, the lusitropic potential of E2 was most consistent with late supplementation. The cardioprotective effects of late E2 were independent of blood pressure and may have occurred through regulation of cardiac biopterins and NO production. PMID:23481117

  16. Using Marginal Structural Measurement-Error Models to Estimate the Long-term Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy on Incident AIDS or Death

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stephen R.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Tien, Phyllis C.; Kingsley, Lawrence; Chmiel, Joan S.; Anastos, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the net effect of imperfectly measured highly active antiretroviral therapy on incident acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or death, the authors combined inverse probability-of-treatment-and-censoring weighted estimation of a marginal structural Cox model with regression-calibration methods. Between 1995 and 2007, 950 human immunodeficiency virus–positive men and women were followed in 2 US cohort studies. During 4,054 person-years, 374 initiated highly active antiretroviral therapy, 211 developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or died, and 173 dropped out. Accounting for measured confounders and determinants of dropout, the weighted hazard ratio for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or death comparing use of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the prior 2 years with no therapy was 0.36 (95% confidence limits: 0.21, 0.61). This association was relatively constant over follow-up (P = 0.19) and stronger than crude or adjusted hazard ratios of 0.75 and 0.95, respectively. Accounting for measurement error in reported exposure using external validation data on 331 men and women provided a hazard ratio of 0.17, with bias shifted from the hazard ratio to the estimate of precision as seen by the 2.5-fold wider confidence limits (95% confidence limits: 0.06, 0.43). Marginal structural measurement-error models can simultaneously account for 3 major sources of bias in epidemiologic research: validated exposure measurement error, measured selection bias, and measured time-fixed and time-varying confounding. PMID:19934191

  17. Ciliated muconodular papillary tumor of the lung: a newly defined low-grade malignant tumor with CT findings reminiscent of adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hata, Yoshinobu; Yuasa, Rena; Sato, Fumitomo; Otsuka, Hajime; Goto, Hidenori; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Mitsuda, Aki; Wakayama, Megumi; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Takagi, Keigo; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    A ciliated muconodular papillary tumor has been reported to be a peripheral low-grade malignant tumor, consisting of ciliated columnar cells and goblet cells with basaloid cell proliferation. Although ciliated muconodular papillary tumors have not yet been classified according to the World Health Organization classification, they can pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Here we report a resected case of ciliated muconodular papillary tumor with computed tomography findings reminiscent of adenocarcinoma, showing a small irregular nodule adjacent to the intersegment pulmonary vein. There was no uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. The patient underwent surgical resection, and a lobectomy was performed because intraoperative needle biopsy suggested neoplastic proliferation. No EGFR mutations were detected. No recurrence was noted during 24-month follow-up after lobectomy. PMID:23275641

  18. Towards the Determination of the Structure of HIV-1 p24: A Possible Target for Antiviral Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prongay, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of targeting certain stages in the life cycle of the virus for antiviral therapy is discussed with reference to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. Research conducted on a core antigen, p24, is described. (MSE)

  19. TOPOS: A new topometric patient positioning and tracking system for radiation therapy based on structured white light

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, Bastian L.; Mueller, Reinhold G.; Lang, Stephanie; Herraiz Lablanca, Maria D.; Kloeck, Stephan

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A patient positioning system for radiation therapy based on structured white light and using off-the-shelf hardware components for flexibility and cost-effectiveness has been developed in house. Increased accuracy, patient comfort, abandonment of any skin marks, accelerated workflow, objective reading/recording, better usability and robust sensor design, compared to other positioning approaches, were the main goals of this work. Another aim was the application of a 6 degrees of freedom tracking system working without dose deposition. Methods: Two optical sensors are the main parts of the TOPOS Registered-Sign system (Topometrical Positioning, cyberTECHNOLOGIES, Germany). The components: cameras, projectors, and computers are commercial off-the-shelf products, allowing for low production costs. The black/white cameras of the prototype are capable of taking up to 240 frames per second (resolution: 640 Multiplication-Sign 488 pixels). The projector has a resolution of 1024 Multiplication-Sign 768 and a refresh rate of 120 Hz. The patient's body surface is measured continuously and registered to a reference surface, providing a transformation to superimpose the patient's surface to the reference (planning CT) surface as best as possible. The execution of the calculated transformation provides the correct patient position before the treatment starts. Due to the high-speed acquisition of the surfaces, a surveillance of the patient's (respiration) motion during treatment is also accomplished. The accuracy of the system was determined using a male mannequin. Two treatment sites were evaluated: one simulating a head and neck treatment and the other simulating a thoracic wall treatment. The mannequin was moved to predefined positions, and shift vectors given by the surface registration were evaluated. Additionally manual positioning using a color-coding system was evaluated. Results: Two prototypes have been developed, each allowing a continuous high density scan of

  20. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  1. Replacement therapy of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. Reversal of protease-antiprotease imbalance within the alveolar structures of PiZ subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gadek, J E; Klein, H G; Holland, P V; Crystal, R G

    1981-01-01

    The emphysema associated with the inherited serum deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin appears to result from an imbalance between neutrophil elastase and its major inhibitor within the alveolar structures. In the present study we assessed the feasibility of reversing this biochemical defect within the lung via parenteral replacement therapy with an alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrate of normal plasma. A 20--40% polyethylene glycol precipitate of pooled human donor plasma was used to obtain an enriched alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrate devoid of hepatitis B antigen and immunoglobulins. Using this material, five individuals with severe serum alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ phenotype) and advanced emphysema received 4 g of alpha 1-antitrypsin intravenously at weekly intervals for four doses. During this period of weekly replacement therapy alpha 1-antitrypsin serum levels were maintained at greater than or equal to 70 mg/dl, the level likely required for effective antielastase protection of the lung. In addition, assessment of lower respiratory tract antielastase activity by bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated that parenteral replacement of alpha 1-antitrypsin resulted in establishment of effective antielastase activity within the alveolar structures. There were no untoward side effects consequent to this approach to the replacement therapy of alpha 1-antitrypsin. These results demonstrate that the parenteral replacement of alpha 1-antitrypsin provides a means of obtaining elastase-antielastase balance within the lung of individuals with this serum protease inhibitor deficiency. PMID:7028785

  2. Can Dialectical Behavior Therapy Be Learned in Highly Structured Learning Environments? Results from a Randomized Controlled Dissemination Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Linda A.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Harned, Melanie S.; Beadnell, Blair

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of methods of training community mental health providers (N=132) in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) distress tolerance skills, including (a) Linehan's (1993a) Skills Training Manual for Borderline Personality Disorder (Manual), (b) a multimedia e-Learning course covering the same content (e-DBT), and (c) a…

  3. The first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes and a PNA-PNA duplex containing mismatches—toward anti-sense therapy against TREDs

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Banaszak, Katarzyna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    PNA is a promising molecule for antisense therapy of trinucleotide repeat disorders. We present the first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes. They contain CUG repeats, relevant to myotonic dystrophy type I, and CAG repeats associated with poly-glutamine diseases. We also report the first PNA–PNA duplex containing mismatches. A comparison of the PNA homoduplex and the PNA–RNA heteroduplexes reveals PNA's intrinsic structural properties, shedding light on its reported sequence selectivity or intolerance of mismatches when it interacts with nucleic acids. PNA has a much lower helical twist than RNA and the resulting duplex has an intermediate conformation. PNA retains its overall conformation while locally there is much disorder, especially peptide bond flipping. In addition to the Watson–Crick pairing, the structures contain interesting interactions between the RNA's phosphate groups and the Π electrons of the peptide bonds in PNA. PMID:26717983

  4. Plasmid replication initiator RepB forms a hexamer reminiscent of ring helicases and has mobile nuclease domains

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D Roeland; Ruíz-Masó, José A; López-Blanco, José R; Blanco, Alexander G; Vives-Llàcer, Mireia; Chacón, Pablo; Usón, Isabel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Espinosa, Manuel; Llorca, Oscar; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    RepB initiates plasmid rolling-circle replication by binding to a triple 11-bp direct repeat (bind locus) and cleaving the DNA at a specific distant site located in a hairpin loop within the nic locus of the origin. The structure of native full-length RepB reveals a hexameric ring molecule, where each protomer has two domains. The origin-binding and catalytic domains show a three-layer α–β–α sandwich fold. The active site is positioned at one of the faces of the β-sheet and coordinates a Mn2+ ion at short distance from the essential nucleophilic Y99. The oligomerization domains (ODs), each consisting of four α-helices, together define a compact ring with a central channel, a feature found in ring helicases. The toroidal arrangement of RepB suggests that, similar to ring helicases, it encircles one of the DNA strands during replication to confer processivity to the replisome complex. The catalytic domains appear to be highly mobile with respect to ODs. This mobility may account for the adaptation of the protein to two distinct DNA recognition sites. PMID:19440202

  5. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  6. A novel platform designed by Au core/inorganic shell structure conjugated onto MTX/LDH for chemo-photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, De-Ying; Wang, Wei-Yuan; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong; Sha, Zhao-Lin

    2016-05-30

    A novel platform making up of methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxide (MTX/LDH) hybrid doped with gold nanoparticles (NPs) may have great potential both in chemo-photothermal therapy and the simultaneous drug delivery. In this paper, a promising platform of Au@PDDA-MTX/LDH was developed for anti-tumor drug delivery and synergistic therapy. Firstly, Au NPs were coated using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technology by alternate deposition of poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and MTX molecules, and then the resulting core-shell structures (named as Au@PDDA-MTX) were directly conjugated onto the surface of MTX/LDH hybrid by electrostatic attraction to afford Au@PDDA-MTX/LDH NPs. Here MTX was used as both the agent for surface modification and the anti-tumor drug for chemotherapy. The platform of Au@PDDA-MTX/LDH NPs not only had a high drug-loading capacity, but also showed excellent colloidal stability and interesting pH-responsive release profile. In vitro drug release studies demonstrated that MTX released from Au@PDDA-MTX/LDH was relatively slow under normal physiological pH, but it was enhanced significantly at a weak acidic pH value. Furthermore, the combined treatment of cancer cells by using Au@PDDA-MTX/LDH for synergistic hyperthermia ablation and chemotherapy was demonstrated to exhibit higher therapeutic efficacy than either single treatment alone, underscoring the great potential of the platform for cancer therapy. PMID:26997424

  7. Forebrain overexpression of CK1δ leads to down-regulation of dopamine receptors and altered locomotor activity reminiscent of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingming; Rebholz, Heike; Brocia, Christine; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer L.; Fienberg, Allen A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission controls motor and perseverative behavior, is mediated by protein phosphorylation, and may be perturbed in disorders of attention and hyperactivity. To assess the role of casein kinase I (CK1) in the regulation of dopamine signaling, we generated a genetically modified mouse line that overexpresses CK1δ (CK1δ OE) specifically in the forebrain. Overexpression was confirmed both at the mRNA and at the protein levels. Under basal conditions, CK1δ OE mice exhibited horizontal and vertical hyperactivity, reduced anxiety, and nesting behavior deficiencies. The CK1δ OE mice also presented paradoxical responses to dopamine receptor stimulation, showing hypoactivity following injection of d-amphetamine or methylphenidate, indicating that CK1 activity has a profound effect on dopamine signaling in vivo. Interestingly, CK1δ overexpression led to significantly reduced D1R and D2R dopamine receptor levels. All together, under basal conditions and in response to drug stimulation, the behavioral phenotype of CK1δ OE mice is reminiscent of the symptoms and drug responses observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and therefore the CK1δ OE mice appear to be a model for this disorder. PMID:20145109

  8. Signaling Mechanism(S) of Reactive Oxygen Species in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Reminiscent of Cancer Stem Cells in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to serve as a second messenger in the intracellular signal transduction pathway for a variety of cellular processes, including inflammation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, aging and cancer. Recently, ROS have been found to be associated with tumor metastasis involving the processes of tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Emerging evidence also suggests that Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), a process that is reminiscent of cancer stem cells, is an important step towards tumor invasion and metastasis, and intimately involved in de novo and acquired drug resistance. In the light of recent advances, we are summarizing the role of ROS in EMT by cataloging how its deregulation is involved in EMT and tumor aggressiveness. Further attempts have been made to summarize the role of several chemopreventive agents that could be useful for targeted inactivation of ROS, suggesting that many natural agents could be useful for the reversal of EMT, which would become a novel approach for the prevention of tumor progression and/or the treatment of human malignancies especially by killing EMT-type cells that share similar characteristics with cancer stem cells. PMID:19951255

  9. Enhanced up/down-conversion luminescence and heat: Simultaneously achieving in one single core-shell structure for multimodal imaging guided therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Feng, Lili; Yang, Piaoping; Liu, Bin; Gai, Shili; Yang, Guixin; Dai, Yunlu; Lin, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Upon near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation, the Nd(3+) doping derived down-conversion luminescence (DCL) in NIR region and thermal effect are extremely fascinating in bio-imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) fields. However, the concentration quenching induced opposite changing trend of the two properties makes it difficult to get desired DCL and thermal effect together in one single particle. In this study, we firstly designed a unique NaGdF4:0.3%Nd@NaGdF4@NaGdF4:10%Yb/1%Er@NaGdF4:10%Yb @NaNdF4:10%Yb multiple core-shell structure. Here the inert two layers (NaGdF4 and NaGdF4:10%Yb) can substantially eliminate the quenching effects, thus achieving markedly enhanced NIR-to-NIR DCL, NIR-to-Vis up-conversion luminescence (UCL), and thermal effect under a single 808 nm light excitation simultaneously. The UCL excites the attached photosensitive drug (Au25 nanoclusters) to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) for photodynamic therapy (PDT), while DCL with strong NIR emission serves as probe for sensitive deep-tissue imaging. The in vitro and in vivo experimental results demonstrate the excellent cancer inhibition efficacy of this platform due to a synergistic effect arising from the combined PTT and PDT. Furthermore, multimodal imaging including fluorescence imaging (FI), photothermal imaging (PTI), and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been obtained, which is used to monitor the drug delivery process, internal structure of tumor and photo-therapeutic process, thus achieving the target of imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:27512942

  10. Psychodynamic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa HM; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different psychodynamic therapy approaches (drive/structural, relational and integrative analytic models) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural, ‘third-wave’ CBT) for acute depression. PMID:25267905

  11. Current Status of Magnetite-Based Core@Shell Structures for Diagnosis and Therapy in Oncology Short running title: Biomedical Applications of Magnetite@Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Angela Leao; Fabris, Jose Domingos; Domingues, Rosana Zacarias; Pereira, Marcio C

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxides, as magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), are primary materials with intrinsic properties that enable them, as single components or as special composites, to base advanced techniques in medical clinical practices, as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as magnetically-induced hyperthermic heat generator, and as a magnetic guide to locally deliver drugs to specific sites in the human body. An interesting approach to developing nanoplatforms for those applications consists in manufacturing core@shell nanostructures, in which the precursor magnetic iron oxide (usually, magnetite) acts as a core, and an organic, or inorganic compound is used as a shell in a multifunctional composite. In this review, we report the current advances in the use of magnetite-based core@shell nanostructures, including Fe3O4@SiO2 and Fe3O4@polymers, in MRI, magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy of tumor cells. The development of nanoplatforms for combined therapy and diagnostic (theranostic) is also addressed. PMID:26377654

  12. Loss of Tropomodulin4 in the zebrafish mutant träge causes cytoplasmic rod formation and muscle weakness reminiscent of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Hall, Thomas E; Arner, Anders; Currie, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is an inherited muscle disease that is mainly diagnosed by the presence of nemaline rods in muscle biopsies. Of the nine genes associated with the disease, five encode components of striated muscle sarcomeres. In a genetic zebrafish screen, the mutant träge (trg) was isolated based on its reduction in muscle birefringence, indicating muscle damage. Myofibres in trg appeared disorganised and showed inhomogeneous cytoplasmic eosin staining alongside malformed nuclei. Linkage analysis of trg combined with sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in tropomodulin4 (tmod4), a regulator of thin filament length and stability. Accordingly, although actin monomers polymerize to form thin filaments in the skeletal muscle of tmod4(trg) mutants, thin filaments often appeared to be dispersed throughout myofibres. Organised myofibrils with the typical striation rarely assemble, leading to severe muscle weakness, impaired locomotion and early death. Myofibrils of tmod4(trg) mutants often featured thin filaments of various lengths, widened Z-disks, undefined H-zones and electron-dense aggregations of various shapes and sizes. Importantly, Gomori trichrome staining and the lattice pattern of the detected cytoplasmic rods, together with the reactivity of rods with phalloidin and an antibody against actinin, is reminiscent of nemaline rods found in nemaline myopathy, suggesting that misregulation of thin filament length causes cytoplasmic rod formation in tmod4(trg) mutants. Although Tropomodulin4 has not been associated with myopathy, the results presented here implicateTMOD4 as a novel candidate for unresolved nemaline myopathies and suggest that the tmod4(trg) mutant will be a valuable tool to study human muscle disorders. PMID:25288681

  13. Maternal Structure and Autonomy Support in Conversations about the Past: Contributions to Children's Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Emily Sutcliffe; Reese, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the contributions of maternal structure and autonomy support to children's collaborative and independent reminiscing. Fifty mother-child dyads discussed past experiences when the children were 40 and 65 months old. Children also discussed past events with an experimenter at each age. Maternal structure and autonomy support…

  14. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    PubMed

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART. PMID:26427376

  15. Effect of Neurohormonal Blockade Drug Therapy on Outcomes and Left Ventricular Function and Structure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Grupper, Avishay; Zhao, Yanjun M; Sajgalik, Pavol; Joyce, Lyle D; Park, Soon J; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Burnett, John C; Edwards, Brooks S; Daly, Richard C; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Schirger, John A

    2016-06-01

    Neurohormonal blockade drug therapy (NHBDT) is the cornerstone therapy in heart failure (HF) management for promoting reverse cardiac remodeling and improving outcomes. It's utility in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) supported patients remains undefined. Sixty-four patients who received continuous flow LVAD at our institution were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 2 groups: no-NHBDT group (n = 33) received LVAD support only and NHBDT group (n = 31) received concurrent NHBDT based on the clinical judgment of the attending physicians. Cardiac remodeling (echocardiographic parameters and biomarkers) and clinical outcome (functional status, HF-related hospital readmissions, and mortality) data were collected. A statistically significant increase in ejection fraction, decrease in LV end-diastolic diameter index and LV mass index, and a sustained reduction in N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) were observed in the NHBDT group at 6 months after LVAD implant (p <0.05). NHBDT-treated patients experienced significantly greater improvement in New York Heart Association functional classification and 6-minute-walk distance throughout the study. The combined end point of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization was significantly reduced in patients receiving NHBDT (p = 0.013) associated primarily with a 12.1% absolute reduction in HF-related hospitalizations (p = 0.046). In conclusion, NHBDT in LVAD-supported patients is associated with a significant reversal in adverse cardiac remodeling and a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared with LVAD support alone. PMID:27079215

  16. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  17. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them ... places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  18. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have radiation therapy may feel more tired than usual, not feel hungry, or lose their ... of radiation therapy include: Fatigue. Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common side effect of radiation ...

  19. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001918.htm Radiation therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or ...

  20. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: Evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Zoë A.; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study. PMID:25610796

  1. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy.

    PubMed

    Englander, Zoë A; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study. PMID:25610796

  2. Structure and function of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) and their relevance to drug therapy and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nies, Anne T; Damme, Katja; Kruck, Stephan; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE; SLC47A) proteins are membrane transporters mediating the excretion of organic cations and zwitterions into bile and urine and thereby contributing to the hepatic and renal elimination of many xenobiotics. Transported substrates include creatinine as endogenous substrate, the vitamin thiamine and a number of drug agents with in part chemically different structures such as the antidiabetic metformin, the antiviral agents acyclovir and ganciclovir as well as the antibiotics cephalexin and cephradine. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structural and molecular features of human MATE transporters including data on expression and localization in different tissues, important aspects on regulation and their functional role in drug transport. The role of genetic variation of MATE proteins for drug pharmacokinetics and drug response will be discussed with consequences for personalized medicine. PMID:27165417

  3. Structural characterization of inhibitor complexes with checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a drug target for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-01-20

    Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) is a serine/threonine kinase that participates in a series of signaling networks responsible for maintaining genomic integrity and responding to DNA damage. The development of selective Chk2 inhibitors has recently attracted much interest as a means of sensitizing cancer cells to current DNA-damaging agents used in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, selective Chk2 inhibitors may reduce p53-mediated apoptosis in normal tissues, thereby helping to mitigate adverse side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. Thus far, relatively few selective inhibitors of Chk2 have been described and none have yet progressed into clinical trials. Here, we report crystal structures of the catalytic domain of Chk2 in complex with a novel series of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors. These compounds exhibit nanomolar potencies and are selective for Chk2 over Chk1. The structures reported here elucidate the binding modes of these inhibitors to Chk2 and provide information that can be exploited for the structure-assisted design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  4. Feminist Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  5. Leptin Therapy Alters Appetite and Neural Responses to Food Stimuli in Brain Areas of Leptin-Sensitive Subjects Without Altering Brain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Fiorenza, Christina; Papageorgiou, Panagiotis; Brinkoetter, Mary; Ziemke, Florencia; Koo, Bang-Bon; Rojas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Leptin is a key regulator of energy intake and expenditure. Individuals with congenital leptin deficiency demonstrate structural and functional brain changes when given leptin. However, whether acquired leptin deficiency may operate similarly is unclear. Objective: We set out to determine whether the brains of individuals with acquired leptin deficiency may react to leptin in a similar manner. Design: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after short- and long-term metreleptin treatment in three leptin-sensitive patients with acquired hypoleptinemia. Nine healthy women were scanned as normoleptinemic controls. Setting: The setting was an academic medical center. Patients or Other Participants: The participants were 3 hypoleptinemic women and nine normoleptinemic, matched women. Interventions: We used metreleptin, recombinant leptin, therapy for 24 weeks in hypoleptinemic women only. Main Outcome Measure: We measured neural changes in response to viewing food as compared to nonfood images. We hypothesized that metreleptin treatment would increase brain activity in areas related to cognitive control and inhibition and would decrease brain activity in areas related to reward processing, as compared to the normoleptinemic counterparts. Results: Unlike patients with congenital leptin deficiency, hypoleptinemic patients demonstrated no structural brain differences from healthy controls and/or structural changes in response to treatment. Short-term metreleptin treatment in leptin-sensitive hypoleptinemic subjects enhances areas involved in detecting the salience and rewarding value of food during fasting, whereas long-term treatment decreases attention to food and the rewarding value of food after feeding. Furthermore, hypothalamic activity is modulated by metreleptin treatment, and leptin decreases functional connectivity of the hypothalamus to key feeding-related areas in these hypoleptinemic subjects. Conclusions: Leptin replacement in

  6. Whole-eye electrical stimulation therapy preserves visual function and structure in P23H-1 rats.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Adam M; Kim, Moon K; Thomas, Joel G; Ciavatta, Vincent T; Chrenek, Micah; Hetling, John R; Pardue, Machelle T

    2016-08-01

    Low-level electrical stimulation to the eye has been shown to be neuroprotective against retinal degeneration in both human and animal subjects, using approaches such as subretinal implants and transcorneal electrical stimulation. In this study, we investigated the benefits of whole-eye electrical stimulation (WES) in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa. Transgenic rats with a P23H-1 rhodopsin mutation were treated with 30 min of low-level electrical stimulation (4 μA at 5 Hz; n = 10) or sham stimulation (Sham group; n = 15), twice per week, from 4 to 24 weeks of age. Retinal and visual functions were assessed every 4 weeks using electroretinography and optokinetic tracking, respectively. At the final time point, eyes were enucleated and processed for histology. Separate cohorts were stimulated once for 30 min, and retinal tissue harvested at 1 h and 24 h post-stimulation for real-time PCR detection of growth factors and inflammatory and apoptotic markers. At all time-points after treatment, WES-treated rat eyes exhibited significantly higher spatial frequency thresholds than untreated eyes. Inner retinal function, as measured by ERG oscillatory potentials (OPs), showed significantly improved OP amplitudes at 8 and 12 weeks post-WES compared to Sham eyes. Additionally, while photoreceptor segment and nuclei thicknesses in P23H-1 rats did not change between treatment groups, WES-treated eyes had significantly greater numbers of retinal ganglion cell nuclei than Sham eyes at 20 weeks post-WES. Gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), caspase 3, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and glutamine synthetase (GS) were significantly higher at 1 h, but not 24 h after WES treatment. Our findings suggest that WES has a beneficial effect on visual function in a rat model of retinal degeneration and that post-receptoral neurons may be particularly responsive to electrical stimulation therapy. PMID:27327393

  7. [The efficacy of drug therapy in structural lesions of the hair and in diffuse effluvium--comparative double blind study].

    PubMed

    Petri, H; Pierchalla, P; Tronnier, H

    1990-11-20

    Growth and quality of hair was studied after treatment with Pantogar, another prescription (Verum-2) and placebo for four months in 60 patients with diffuse effluvium capillorum and agnogenic structural alternations of hair. Efficacy was assessed by measurements of swelling, dye-binding and thickness for hair-quality and evaluation of hair-density and trichograms for hair-growth. Statistical analysis of swelling properties and trichogram data indicated that Pantogar was effective, the second preparation improved quality of hair and retarded hair loss. Placebo was ineffective judged by the used parameters. Tolerance of the treatment was good and adverse effects could not be substantiated. PMID:1709511

  8. Structure-based design, discovery and development of checkpoint kinase inhibitors as potential anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas P; Jones, Alan M; Collins, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Checkpoint kinase inhibitors offer the promise of enhancing the effectiveness of widely prescribed cancer chemotherapies and radiotherapy by inhibiting the DNA damage response, as well as the potential for single agent efficacy. Areas covered This article surveys structural insights into the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 that have been exploited to enhance the selectivity and potency of small molecule inhibitors. The use of mechanistic cellular assays to guide the optimisation of inhibitors is reviewed. The status of the current clinical candidates and emerging new clinical contexts for CHK1 and CHK2 inhibitors are discussed, including the prospects for single agent efficacy. Expert opinion Protein bound water molecules play key roles in structural features that can be targeted to gain high selectivity for either enzyme. The results of early phase clinical trials of checkpoint inhibitors have been mixed, but significant progress has been made in testing the combination of CHK1 inhibitors with genotoxic chemotherapy. Second generation CHK1 inhibitors are likely to benefit from increased selectivity and oral bioavailability. While the optimum therapeutic context for CHK2 inhibition remains unclear, the emergence of single agent preclinical efficacy for CHK1 inhibitors in specific tumour types exhibiting constitutive replication stress represents exciting progress in exploring the therapeutic potential of these agents. PMID:23594139

  9. Structure-based Engineering of Species Selectivity in the Interaction Between Urokinase and its Receptor: Implication for Preclinical Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Gardsvoll, H; Huai, Q; Huang, M; Ploug, M

    2010-01-01

    The high affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR) is decisive for cell surface-associated plasminogen activation. Because plasmin activity controls fibrinolysis in a variety of pathological conditions, including cancer and wound healing, several intervention studies have focused on targeting the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction in vivo. Evaluations of such studies in xenotransplanted tumor models are, however, complicated by the pronounced species selectivity in this interaction. We now report the molecular basis underlying this difference by solving the crystal structure for the murine uPA {center_dot} uPAR complex and demonstrate by extensive surface plasmon resonance studies that the kinetic rate constants for this interaction can be swapped completely between these orthologs by exchanging only two residues. This study not only discloses the structural basis required for a successful rational design of the species selectivity in the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction, which is highly relevant for functional studies in mouse models, but it also suggests the possible development of general inhibitors that will target the uPA {center_dot} uPAR interaction across species barriers.

  10. Myofascial Structural Integration Therapy on Gross Motor Function and Gait of Young Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Elizabeth C.; Buysse, Christina A.; Price, Karen S.; Jaramillo, Theresa M.; Pico, Elaine L.; Hansen, Alexis B.; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Though the cause of motor abnormalities in cerebral palsy is injury to the brain, structural changes in muscle and fascia may add to stiffness and reduced function. This study examined whether myofascial structural integration therapy, a complementary treatment that manipulates muscle and fascia, would improve gross motor function and gait in children <4 years with cerebral palsy. Participants (N = 29) were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01815814, https://goo.gl/TGxvwd) or Open Label Extension. The main outcome was the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 assessed at 3-month intervals. Gait (n = 8) was assessed using the GAITRite® electronic walkway. Parents completed a survey at study conclusion. Comparing Treatment (n = 15) and Waitlist-Control groups (n = 9), we found a significant main effect of time but no effect of group or time × group interaction. The pooled sample (n = 27) showed a main effect of time, but no significantly greater change after treatment than between other assessments. Foot length on the affected side increased significantly after treatment, likely indicating improvement in the children’s ability to approach a heel strike. Parent surveys indicated satisfaction and improvements in the children’s quality of movement. MSI did not increase the rate of motor skill development, but was associated with improvement in gait quality. PMID:26442234