Science.gov

Sample records for structures selected topics

  1. Selected topics from the structural acoustics program for the B-1 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The major elements of the structural acoustics program for the B-1 aircraft are considered. Acoustic pressures measured at 280 sites on the surface of the vehicle were used to develop pressure models for a resizing of airframe components for aircraft No. 4 (A/C4). Acoustical fatigue design data for two dynamically complex structural configurations were acquired in laboratory programs, the conceptions for and executions of which detailed significant departures from the conventional. Design requirements for mechanical fasteners for configurations other than these two made use of analytical extensions of regrettably limited available information.

  2. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    the Euler, Froude, Reynolds, Weber, and Cauchy numbers are defined as essential tools for interpreting and using experimental data. The derivations of the energy and momentum equations are treated in detail. One-dimensional equations for steady nonuniform flow are developed, and the restrictions applicable to the equations are emphasized. Conditions of uniform and gradually varied flow are discussed, and the origin of the Chezy equation is examined in relation to both the energy and the momentum equations. The inadequacy of all uniform-flow equations as a means of describing gradually varied flow is explained. Thus, one of the definitive problems of river hydraulics is analyzed in the light of present knowledge. This report is the outgrowth of a series of short schools conducted during the spring and summer of 1953 for engineers of the Surface Water Branch, Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey. The topics considered are essentially the same as the topics selected for inclusion in the schools. However, in order that they might serve better as a guide and outline for informal study, the arrangement of the writer's original lecture notes has been considerably altered. The purpose of the report, like the purpose of the schools which inspired it, is to build a simple but strong framework of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. It is believed that this framework is capable of supporting a detailed analysis of most of the practical problems met by the engineers of the Geological Survey. It is hoped that the least accomplishment of this work will be to inspire the reader with the confidence and desire to read more of the recent and current technical literature of modern fluid mechanics.

  3. Selected topics in robotics for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C. (Editor); Kaufman, Howard (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers and abstracts included represent both formal presentations and experimental demonstrations at the Workshop on Selected Topics in Robotics for Space Exploration which took place at NASA Langley Research Center, 17-18 March 1993. The workshop was cosponsored by the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technical Committee of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE) at RPI, Troy, NY. Participation was from industry, government, and other universities with close ties to either Langley Research Center or to CIRSSE. The presentations were very broad in scope with attention given to space assembly, space exploration, flexible structure control, and telerobotics.

  4. Selected topics on parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Saito, K.; Kawamura, H.; Kumano, S.

    2011-12-14

    We report recent studies on structure functions of the nucleon and nuclei. First, clustering effects are investigated in the structure function F{sub 2} of {sup 9}Be for explaining an unusual nuclear correction found in a JLab experiment. We propose that high densities created by formation of clustering structure like 2{alpha}+neutron in {sup 9}Be is the origin of the unexpected JLab result by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). There is an approved proposal at JLab to investigate the structure functions of light nuclei including the cluster structure, so that much details will become clear in a few years. Second, tensor-polarized quark and antiquark distributions are obtained by analyzing HERMES measurements on the structure function b{sub 1} for the deuteron. The result suggests a finite tensor polarization for antiquark distributions, which is an interesting topic for further theoretical and experimental investigations. An experimental proposal exists at JLab for measuring b{sub 1} of the deuteron as a new tensor-structure study in 2010's. Furthermore, the antiquark tensor polarization could be measured by polarized deuteron Drell-Yan processes at hadron facilities such as J-PARC and GSI-FAIR. Third, the recent CDF dijet anomaly is investigated within the standard model by considering possible modifications of the strange-quark distribution. We find that the shape of a dijet-mass spectrum changes depending on the strange-quark distribution. It indicates that the CDF excess could be partially explained as a PDF effect, particularly by the strangeness in the nucleon, within the standard model if the excess at m{sub jj}{approx_equal}140 GeV is not a sharp peak.

  5. Symmetries and fundamental interactions—selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2014-06-01

    High precision experiments at low energies on discrete and continuous symmetries offer the possibility to search for New Physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples are dedicated searches for violations of the C, P, CP and CPT as well as of Lorentz Invariance using matter and anti-matter. Atomic parity violation was not only essential in the past to verify the Standard Model, still today it has a potential to find Z' bosons, leptoquarks or dark matter. Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs) may provide clues to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. There is at present a some 4 standard deviations discrepancy between theory and experiment for the muon magnetic anomaly. At the same time while providing important information on physics beyond the Standard Model, new technology such as precise clocks is developed along with the experiments motivated by fundamental physics questions. This article summarizes an overview talk that was concerned primarily with a selection of topics from a very rich field, in particular such that were not covered otherwise at this conference.

  6. Quark-gluon plasma (Selected Topics)

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2012-09-15

    Introductory lectures to the theory of (strongly interacting) quark-gluon plasma given at the Winter School of Physics of ITEP (Moscow, February 2010). We emphasize theoretical issues highlighted by the discovery of the low viscosity of the plasma. The topics include relativistic hydrodynamics, manifestations of chiral anomaly in hydrodynamics, superfluidity, relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics, effective stringy scalars, holographic models of Yang-Mills theories.

  7. Selected Topics in International Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information on special education topics on the international front. Information is presented on projects that evaluated early intervention programs, a life-centered career education program in the Philippines, a Peruvian vocational program for individuals with severe disabilities, and special classes for children with…

  8. Rheology of the lithosphere: selected topics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Kronenberg, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews recent results concerning the rheology of the lithosphere with special attention to the following topics: 1) the flexure of the oceanic lithosphere, 2) deformation of the continental lithosphere resulting from vertical surface loads and forces applied at plate margins, 3) the rheological stratification of the continents, 4) strain localization and shear zone development, and 5) strain-induced crystallographic preferred orientations and anisotropies in body-wave velocities. We conclude with a section citing the 1983-1986 rock mechanics literature by category.-Authors

  9. Selected Antimicrobial Activity of Topical Ophthalmic Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Margaret M.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endophthalmitis is a rare complication of intravitreal injection (IVI). It is recommended that povidone-iodine be the last agent applied before IVI. Patients have reported povidone-iodine application to be the most bothersome part of IVIs. Topical anesthetics have been demonstrated to have antibacterial effects. This study compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of topical anesthetic eye drops (proparacaine 0.5%, tetracaine 0.5%, lidocaine 2.0%) and the antiseptic, 5.0% povidone-iodine, against two organisms causing endophthalmitis after IVI. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration values of topical anesthetics, povidone-iodine, preservative benzalkonium chloride (0.01%), and saline control were determined using five isolates of each Staphylococcus epidermidis and viridans group Streptococcus species (VGS). A broth microdilution technique was used with serial dilutions. Results Lidocaine (8.53 × 10−5mol/mL) had MICs of 4.27 to 8.53 × 10−5 mol/mL, and tetracaine (1.89 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 9.45 × 10−6 mol/mL for all isolates. Proparacaine (1.7 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.32 to 5.3 × 10−7 and 4.25 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively). Benzalkonium chloride (3.52 × 10−7 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.86 × 10−9 to 1.1 × 10−8 and 4.40 × 10−8 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Povidone-iodine (1.37 × 10−4 mol/mL) had MICs of 2.14 to 4.28 × 10−6 and 8.56 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Conclusion Proparacaine was the anesthetic with the lowest MICs, lower than that of povidone-iodine. Benzalkonium chloride had lower MICs than proparacaine. All tested anesthetics and povidone-iodine inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and VGS at commercially available concentrations. Translational Relevance For certain patients, it could be possible to use topical anesthetic after povidone-iodine for comfort without inhibiting and perhaps contributing additional antimicrobial

  10. Topical Structure in Arabic-English Interlanguage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhri, Ahmed

    A study compared the topical structure (TS) of Arabic and English in order to determine whether Arab learners of English as a Second Language (ESL) transfer potential differences between Arabic and English in their English writing, or whether they use an altogether different TS indicative of developmental factors. Four sets of data were compared…

  11. Fundamental symmetries and interactions—selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2015-11-01

    In the field of fundamental interactions and symmetries numerous experiments are underway or planned in order to verify the standard model in particle physics, to search for possible extensions to it or to exploit the standard model for extracting most precise values for fundamental constants. We cover selected recent developments, in particular such which exploit stored and confined particles. Emphasis is on experiments with transformative character, i.e. such which may be able to guide and steer theoretical model building into new but defined directions. Among those are projects with antiprotons, muons and certain selected atoms and atomic nuclei.

  12. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  13. Selection of Retapamulin, a Novel Pleuromutilin for Topical Use

    PubMed Central

    Rittenhouse, Stephen ; Biswas, Sanjoy; Broskey, John; McCloskey, Lynn; Moore, Terrance; Vasey, Sandra; West, Joshua; Zalacain, Magdalena; Zonis, Rimma; Payne, David

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro activity of retapamulin was determined and compared to that of topical and community antibiotics. The MIC90s of retapamulin against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes were 0.12 μg/ml and 0.016 μg/ml, respectively. Retapamulin has a low propensity to select resistance and produces an in vitro postantibiotic effect. PMID:17065625

  14. Pharmacists' Perceived Knowledge and Expertise in Selected Pediatric Topics

    PubMed Central

    Munzenberger, Paul J; Thomas, Ron L; Edwin, Stephanie B; Tutag-Lehr, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to determine pharmacists' perceived knowledge and expertise required to make recommendations regarding selected pediatric topics. METHODS A questionnaire was distributed to 400 pharmacists practicing in community, hospital, and home care settings. This instrument explored their perceived knowledge, expertise, and comfort in providing recommendations related to 38 pediatric topics. The impact of responder demographics on differences in perceived knowledge and expertise for each topic were evaluated. RESULTS Ninety-five of 400 (24%) questionnaires were returned completed or partially completed. Forty-seven and 36 of responders practiced in the community or inpatient hospital setting, respectively. Seventy percent of responders reported that ≤ 40% of their patients were children. In general, responders believed they had the knowledge and expertise to make recommendations for the frequently occurring conditions or topics but not for the less familiar. Formal pediatric training was the most influential responder characteristic with a larger proportion having training that they believed enables them to have knowledge and expertise to make recommendations. Although less impressive, experience of more than 5 years and a community-based practice were also important factors. CONCLUSION Additional training is beneficial in increasing the perceived knowledge and comfort of pharmacists making recommendations regarding pediatric patients. PMID:22477824

  15. Selected Topics on Hadronic B Decays From BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    Recent measurements of branching fractions and decay-rate asymmetries in charmless hadronic B decays at the BaBar experiment are presented. The selected topics include Dalitz plot analyses of B {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi} and signal searches in B {yields} PP and PV, where isoscalar mesons are involved, and in B {yields} b{sub 1}P, P and V denote a pseudoscalar and vector meson, respectively. Several measurements in charmless hadronic B decays have indicated possible deviations from the theoretical predictions within the Standard Model. The measurements presented would contribute to searching for and resolving such puzzles.

  16. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Selective Membranes: A Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dushyant Shekhawat; David R. Luebke; Henry W. Pennline

    2003-12-01

    Carbon dioxide selective membranes provide a viable energy-saving alternative for CO2 separation, since membranes do not require any phase transformation. This review examines various CO2 selective membranes for the separation of CO2 and N2, CO2 and CH4, and CO2 and H2 from flue or fuel gas. This review attempts to summarize recent significant advances reported in the literature about various CO2 selective membranes, their stability, the effect of different parameters on the performance of the membrane, the structure and permeation properties relationships, and the transport mechanism applied in different CO2 selective membranes.

  17. Selecting Topics for Journals: Some Advice for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2004-01-01

    This article provides suggestions for prospective authors searching for topics for manuscripts. The article first provides examples of topics for non-data-based articles, then for research topics. Authors are invited to submit manuscripts on these, and on any other topics to this journal.

  18. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  19. Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Topics discussed in this column include patterns of inverse multipliers in modular arithmetic; diagrams for product sets, set intersection, and set union; function notation; patterns in the number of partitions of positive integers; and tessellations. (DT)

  20. Topics in the structure of hadronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, R. F.

    1994-04-01

    In this dissertation the author examines a variety of different problems in the physics of strongly-bound systems. Each is elucidated by a different standard method of analysis developed to probe the properties of such systems. It begins with an examination of the properties and consequences of the current algebra of weak currents in the limit of heavy quark spin-flavor symmetry. In particular, the assumptions in the proof of the Ademollo-Gatto theorem in general and for spin-flavor symmetry are examined, and the constraints imposed upon matrix elements by this theorem are exhibited. Then he utilizes the renormalization-group method to create composite fermions in a three-generation electroweak model. Such a model is found to reproduce the same low energy behavior as the top-condensate electroweak model, although in general it may have strong constraints upon its Higgs sector. Next the subtleties in the nonrelativistic quark model that drastically alter the picture of the physical origins of meson electromagnetic and hyperfine mass splittings are uncovered; in particular, the explicit contributions due to (m(sub d)(minus)m(sub u)) and electrostatic potentials may be overwhelmed by other effects. Such novel effects are used to explain the anomalous pattern of mass splittings recently measured in bottom mesons. Finally, the topic of baryon masses in heavy fermion chiral perturbation theory, including both tree-level and loop effects are considered.

  1. Topics in the structure of hadronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lebed, R. F.

    1994-04-01

    In this dissertation the author examines a variety of different problems in the physics of strongly-bound systems. Each is elucidated by a different standard method of analysis developed to probe the properties of such systems. He begins with an examination of the properties and consequences of the current algebra of weak currents in the limit of heavy quark spin-flavor symmetry. In particular, he examines the assumptions in the proof of the Ademollo-Gatto theorem in general and for spin-flavor symmetry, and exhibit the constraints imposed upon matrix elements by this theorem. Then he utilizes the renormalization-group method to create composite fermions in a three-generation electroweak model. Such a model is found to reproduce the same low energy behavior as the top-condensate electroweak model, although in general it may have strong constraints upon its Higgs sector. Next he uncovers subtleties in the nonrelativistic quark model that drastically alter the picture of the physical origins of meson electromagnetic and hyperfine mass splittings; in particular, the explicit contributions due to (m{sub d}{minus}m{sub u}) and electrostatic potentials may be overwhelmed by other effects. Such novel effects are used to explain the anomalous pattern of mass splittings recently measured in bottom mesons. Finally, he considers the topic of baryon masses in heavy fermion chiral perturbation theory, including both tree-level and loop effects.

  2. Topics in the Structure of Hadronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, Richard Felix

    In this dissertation we examine a variety of different problems in the physics of strongly-bound systems. Each is elucidated by a different standard method of analysis developed to probe the properties of such systems. We begin with an examination of the properties and consequences of the current algebra of weak currents in the limit of heavy quark spin-flavor symmetry. In particular, we examine the assumptions in the proof of the Ademollo -Gatto theorem in general and for spin-flavor symmetry, and exhibit the constraints imposed upon matrix elements by this theorem. Then we utilize the renormalization-group method to create composite fermions in a three-generation electroweak model. Such a model is found to reproduce the same low energy behavior as the top-condensate electroweak model, although in general it may have strong constraints upon its Higgs sector. Next we uncover subtleties in the nonrelativistic quark model that drastically alter our picture of the physical origins of meson electromagnetic and hyperfine mass splittings; in particular, the explicit contributions due to (m _{d}-m_{u} ) and electrostatic potentials may be overwhelmed by other effects. Such novel effects are used to explain the anomalous pattern of mass splittings recently measured in bottom mesons. Finally, we consider the topic of baryon masses in heavy fermion chiral perturbation theory, including both tree-level and loop effects. We find that certain mass relations holding at second-order in symmetry breaking (O(m_sp{rm q}{2} ) and O(Q_sp{rm q} {2})) have finite, computable, and numerically small loop corrections within the theory. The numerical values of these corrections are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment. We also find that, within chiral perturbation theory, the experimentally measured baryon masses alone are not enough to place stringent constraints upon the light quark masses.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Mesoscale structures in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, S.

    2007-11-01

    Due to the existence of intermediate mesoscopic internal structures, soft matter exhibits various fascinating non-linear and non-equilibrium phenomena. In this review article, we focus on microemulsions consisting of water, oil, and surfactant from the viewpoint of soft matter physics. Microemulsions exhibit a rich phase behavior as the composition and/or the temperature is varied. In the middle phase, oil and water mix in the presence of surfactant molecules to form a mesoscopic bicontinuous structure. To explain the complex behavior of microemulsions, it is useful to employ phenomenological approaches such as the Ginzburg-Landau theory or the membrane theory. We discuss the Ginzburg-Landau theory and also review the Teubner-Strey model, the Gompper-Schick model, and the two-order-parameter model. Based on these models, we discuss the structure of the middle phase and its wetting transition. The membrane theory proposed by Helfrich is also useful for describing the physical properties of microemulsions. Various structures in microemulsions, such as droplets, bicontinuous and network structures, are properly accounted for by the curvature elasticity model. We focus on the Exxon model which clarifies the physical origin of the middle phase. Within the phenomenological level of description, we review the dynamical aspects of droplet and bicontinuous microemulsions. We also give an overview of microemulsions found in multicomponent polymeric systems (polymeric microemulsions). A discussion on recent applications of microemulsions completes the review.

  4. Topic Sequence and Emphasis Variability of Selected Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2010-01-01

    Textbook choice has a significant effect upon course success. Among the factors that influence this decision, two of the most important are material organization and emphasis. This paper examines the sequencing of 19 organic chemistry topics, 21 concepts and skills, and 7 biological topics within nine of the currently available organic textbooks.…

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography and other selected computer topics

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.R.; Gilday, D.L.; Croft, B.Y.

    1980-01-01

    This volume includes an overview of single photon emission computed tomography and numerous papers that describe and evaluate specific systems and techniques. Papers cover such topics as Auger cameras; seven-pinhole and slant-hole collimators; brain; cardiac; and gated blood-pool studies; and the BICLET and SPECT systems.

  6. Culture, Diet, and Nutrition: Selected Themes and Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grivetti, Louis Evan

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: How do nutritious diets develop? What is the antiquity of nutritional disease? Why do humans consume nonfood items? What impact do religious prohibitions and practices have on nutritional status? And why are some toxic plants and animals consumed and desired by man? (Author/BB)

  7. Topics in Finance. Part V--Capital Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Continuing this series on the theory of financial management, the current article investigates capital structure, offering insight into the roles of stockholder wealth maximization, the risk-return tradeoff, and agency conflicts. Much literature addresses this topic, and some of the most recent literature challenges certain theoretical…

  8. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O'Brien

    2009-08-01

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  9. Strategies for Finding and Selecting an Ideal Thesis or Dissertation Topic: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing an ideal master's thesis or doctoral dissertation topic is probably one of the most important decisions students will make while in graduate school. Some graduate students may spend a year or even longer looking for potential topics before finally selecting one for their thesis or dissertation. There are a number of successful strategies…

  10. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  11. Selected topics on interactions between cirrus clouds and embedded contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.

    2012-09-01

    Persistent contrails and natural cirrus clouds often coexist in the upper troposphere and contrails can be embedded within cirrus clouds. The present paper deals with some questions regarding the interaction of cirrus clouds and embedded contrails. I have selected only questions that can be answered by analytical means. I find that (1) the emission index for water vapour is only slightly changed when an aircraft crosses a cirrus cloud, (2) that contrail formation is not affected by an ambient cirrus, (3) that cirrus ice crystals entrained into the trailing wing tip vortex do not efficiently retard the sublimation of contrail ice crystals, and (4) that cirrus can start to dissolve an embedded contrail after a couple of hours by aggregation.

  12. Beyond Topical Relevance: Document Selection Behavior of Real Users of IR Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peiling; Soergel, Dagobert

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of users' document selection behavior that was conducted to build a tentative cognitive model of document selection behavior to be used in designing intelligent information retrieval systems. Topics addressed include studies of relevance and of decision making; value judgments; and document information elements considered during…

  13. Structural features of ultradeformable archaeosomes for topical delivery of ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Carrer, Dolores C; Higa, Leticia H; Tesoriero, Maria Victoria Defain; Morilla, Maria Jose; Roncaglia, Diana I; Romero, Eder Lilia

    2014-09-01

    The ultradeformable archaeosomes (UDA, made of total polar archaeolipids (TPA) extracted from the extreme halophile archaea Halorubrum tebenquichense:soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC):sodium cholate (NaChol), 3:3:1 w:w), are promising topical adjuvants showing high deformability, an essential property for intact skin penetration up to the viable epidermis/dermis. To gain insights on UDA structure, the interactions between TPA, SPC and the edge activator NaChol, were assessed by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) and confocal fluorescence microscopy of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV). The non covalent heterodimers NaChol-SPC, NaChol-phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ether (PGPMe), NaChol-sulfated diglycosyl diphytanyl-glycerol diether (SDGD5) and SPC-PGPMe detected in the gas phase by ESI-MS after direct infusion of UDA, together with the homogeneous partition of FASTDiO and DiIC18 in GUV suggested that in these proportions, lipids and NaChol were miscible. We propose therefore, a model where in UDA the SPC diluted sufficient enough in the rich PGPMe TPA, so as to the low lateral mobility of molecules (typical of rich in PGPMe bilayers) was no longer experienced. We also found that 50μm deep within in vitro human skin canyons, the fluorescence of Alexa fluor 647-ovalbumin in UDL was ∼1.5 folds higher than in UDA, indicating a potential steric hindrance of the voluminous structure of PGPMe UDA bilayer, to the penetration of a particulate cargo such as the 7nm diameter ovalbumin. According to these observations, a further reduction in PGPMe - a lipid playing no immune role - content could help to improve the performance of UDA as topical adjuvants. PMID:24974012

  14. Cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons by atoms: selected topics related to electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    We begin with a resume of the Bethe theory, which provides a general framework for discussing the inelastic scattering of fast electrons and leads to powerful criteria for judging the reliability of cross-section data. The central notion of the theory is the generalized oscillator strength as a function of both the energy transfer and the momentum transfer, and is the only non-trivial factor in the inelastic-scattering cross section. Although the Bethe theory was initially conceived for free atoms, its basic ideas apply to solids, with suitable generalizations; in this respect, the notion of the dielectric response function is the most fundamental. Topics selected for discussion include the generalized oscillator strengths for the K-shell and L-shell ionization for all atoms with Z less than or equal to 30, evaluated by use of the Hartree-Slater potential. As a function of the energy transfer, the generalized oscillator strength most often shows a non-monotonic structure near the K-shell and L-shell thresholds, which has been interpreted as manifestations of electron-wave propagation through atomic fields. For molecules and solids, there are additional structures due to the scattering of ejected electrons by the fields of other atoms.

  15. Teachers and Teaching: Annotated Bibliographies on Selected Topics. Volume 3: Characteristics, Attitudes, and Values of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacay, Valerie Hakam, Ed.

    This bibliobraphy is comprised of annotations of 142 selected research articles and reports, on topics relating to factors which influence teachers' perception and fulfillment of their professional role, which have appeared in the literature from 1968 to 1972. Items relating to factors such as organizational climate, curriculum, job satisfaction,…

  16. Exploring and Contrasting EFL Learners' Perceptions of Textbook-Assigned and Self-Selected Discussion Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, James P.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to explore the significance of a "willingness to communicate" (WTC) variable in second language (L2) acquisition, this article reports on a survey study that investigated 101 Japanese university English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions of textbook-assigned and self-selected discussion topics. Additionally, the study…

  17. Aging Management of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures - Overview and Suggested Research Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and their operating experience noted. Primary considerations related to management of their aging are noted and an indication of their status provided: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, nondestructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Several activities are identified that provide background information and data on areas of concern with respect to nondestructive examination of nuclear power plant concrete structures: inspection of thick-walled, heavily-reinforced sections, basemats, and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. Topics are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  18. VDAC Structure, Selectivity, and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colombini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    VDAC channels exist in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotic organisms. Of the different isoforms present in one organism, it seems that one of these is the canonical VDAC whose properties and 3D structure is highly conserved. The fundamental role of these channels is to control the flux of metabolites between the cytosol and mitochondrial spaces. Based on many functional studies, the fundamental structure of the pore wall consists of one α helix and 13 β strands tilted at a 46° angle. This results in a pore with an estimated internal diameter of 2.5 nm. This structure has not yet been resolved. The published 3D structure consists of 19 β strands and is different from the functional structure that forms voltage-gated channels. The selectivity of the channel is exquisite, being able to select for ATP over molecules of the same size and charge. Voltage gating involves two separate gating processes. The mechanism involves the translocation of a positively charged portion of the wall of the channel to the membrane surface resulting in a reduction in pore diameter and volume and an inversion in ion selectivity. This mechanism is consistent with experiments probing changes in selectivity, voltage gating, kinetics and energetics. Other published mechanisms are in conflict with experimental results. PMID:22240010

  19. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  20. Strategy selection in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Tarnita, Corina E; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Antal, Tibor; Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A

    2009-08-01

    Evolutionary game theory studies frequency dependent selection. The fitness of a strategy is not constant, but depends on the relative frequencies of strategies in the population. This type of evolutionary dynamics occurs in many settings of ecology, infectious disease dynamics, animal behavior and social interactions of humans. Traditionally evolutionary game dynamics are studied in well-mixed populations, where the interaction between any two individuals is equally likely. There have also been several approaches to study evolutionary games in structured populations. In this paper we present a simple result that holds for a large variety of population structures. We consider the game between two strategies, A and B, described by the payoff matrix(abcd). We study a mutation and selection process. For weak selection strategy A is favored over B if and only if sigma a+b>c+sigma d. This means the effect of population structure on strategy selection can be described by a single parameter, sigma. We present the values of sigma for various examples including the well-mixed population, games on graphs, games in phenotype space and games on sets. We give a proof for the existence of such a sigma, which holds for all population structures and update rules that have certain (natural) properties. We assume weak selection, but allow any mutation rate. We discuss the relationship between sigma and the critical benefit to cost ratio for the evolution of cooperation. The single parameter, sigma, allows us to quantify the ability of a population structure to promote the evolution of cooperation or to choose efficient equilibria in coordination games. PMID:19358858

  1. Strategy selection in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Tarnita, Corina E.; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Antal, Tibor; Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary game theory studies frequency dependent selection. The fitness of a strategy is not constant, but depends on the relative frequencies of strategies in the population. This type of evolutionary dynamics occurs in many settings of ecology, infectious disease dynamics, animal behavior and social interactions of humans. Traditionally evolutionary game dynamics are studied in well-mixed populations, where the interaction between any two individuals is equally likely. There have also been several approaches to study evolutionary games in structured populations. In this paper we present a simple result that holds for a large variety of population structures. We consider the game between two strategies, A and B, described by the payoff matrix (abcd). We study a mutation and selection process. If the payoffs are linear in a, b, c, d, then for weak selection strategy A is favored over B if and only if σa + b > c + σd. This means the effect of population structure on strategy selection can be described by a single parameter, σ. We present the values of σ for various examples including the well-mixed population, games on graphs and games in phenotype space. We give a proof for the existence of such a σ, which holds for all population structures and update rules that have certain (natural) properties. We assume weak selection, but allow any mutation rate. We discuss the relationship between σ and the critical benefit to cost ratio for the evolution of cooperation. The single parameter, σ, allows us to quantify the ability of a population structure to promote the evolution of cooperation or to choose efficient equilibria in coordination games. PMID:19358858

  2. An Empirical Study of Knowledge Structures of Research Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peiling

    1999-01-01

    Examines cognitive maps on research topics generated by experts and non-experts. Both experts and non-experts modified the given vocabulary by either adding or dropping terms. The dominant configuration for the maps was top-down. Experts tended to use a problem-oriented approach to organize vocabulary while non-experts often applied a…

  3. Structural tailoring of select fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    A multidisciplinary design process for aerospace propulsion composite structures was formalized and embedded into computer codes. These computer codes are streamlined to obtain tailored designs for select composite structures. The codes available are briefly described with sample cases to illustrate their applications. The sample cases include aircraft engine blades, propfans (turboprops), flat, and cylindrical panels. Typical results illustrate that the use of these codes enable the designer to obtain designs which meet all the design requirements with maximum benefits in efficiency, noise, weight or thermal distortions.

  4. Structural, Linguistic and Topic Variables in Verbal and Computational Problems in Elementary Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardslee, Edward C.; Jerman, Max E.

    Five structural, four linguistic and twelve topic variables are used in regression analyses on results of a 50-item achievement test. The test items are related to 12 topics from the third-grade mathematics curriculum. The items reflect one of two cases of the structural variable, cognitive level; the two levels are characterized, inductive…

  5. Selected Topical Agents Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Minor Injuries- A Review

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ping-chung; Ko, Erik Chun-hay; Siu, Wing-sum; Pang, Ellie Suet-yee; Lau, Clara Bik-san

    2016-01-01

    Topical medicinal patches have been popular for the treatment of minor injuries like sprains and avulsions. Other inflammatory conditions like chronic musculo-tendinous pain and or fasciitis are also taken care of by local ointments or rubs. In the oriental communities, medicinal herbs frequently form the major components of the patches. In spite of the lack of scientific evidence of efficacy, the popularity of such traditional application persists for centuries. In this era of evidence-based clinical treatment, there is an urgent need to look into this traditional practice. The purpose should include a scientific verification of the efficacy of the practice, and once proven, further explorations would be indicated to bring the practice to a higher level. A system of comprehensive exploration was proposed and practiced in the past years to fulfill the aspiration. The research consisted of four areas: (1) Identification of the suitable medicinal herbs for the topical study; (2) Study of the biological activities of the selected herbs, concentrating on the areas of anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, angiogenesis and cellular proliferation; (3) Study on the transcutaneous transport of the chemicals of the selected herbs to deeper tissues; and (4) Pilot clinical studies on common superficial inflammatory musculo-skeletal conditions to give objective clinical evidences to the topical applications. Five herbs were identified as suitable candidates of study. They were put into relevant laboratory platforms and were proven to be anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic. Three of the herbs were prepared as topical patches with an enhancer and used to treat three common ailments in pilot clinical trials, viz., plantar fasciitis, undisplaced metatarsal fracture and tendonitis of the wrist (de-Quervain’s disease) and the elbow (Tennis elbow). The clinical results of the pilot studies were very positive. It is therefore concluded that further explorations are

  6. Selected Topical Agents Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Minor Injuries- A Review.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Ko, Erik Chun-Hay; Siu, Wing-Sum; Pang, Ellie Suet-Yee; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2016-01-01

    Topical medicinal patches have been popular for the treatment of minor injuries like sprains and avulsions. Other inflammatory conditions like chronic musculo-tendinous pain and or fasciitis are also taken care of by local ointments or rubs. In the oriental communities, medicinal herbs frequently form the major components of the patches. In spite of the lack of scientific evidence of efficacy, the popularity of such traditional application persists for centuries. In this era of evidence-based clinical treatment, there is an urgent need to look into this traditional practice. The purpose should include a scientific verification of the efficacy of the practice, and once proven, further explorations would be indicated to bring the practice to a higher level. A system of comprehensive exploration was proposed and practiced in the past years to fulfill the aspiration. The research consisted of four areas: (1) Identification of the suitable medicinal herbs for the topical study; (2) Study of the biological activities of the selected herbs, concentrating on the areas of anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, angiogenesis and cellular proliferation; (3) Study on the transcutaneous transport of the chemicals of the selected herbs to deeper tissues; and (4) Pilot clinical studies on common superficial inflammatory musculo-skeletal conditions to give objective clinical evidences to the topical applications. Five herbs were identified as suitable candidates of study. They were put into relevant laboratory platforms and were proven to be anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic. Three of the herbs were prepared as topical patches with an enhancer and used to treat three common ailments in pilot clinical trials, viz., plantar fasciitis, undisplaced metatarsal fracture and tendonitis of the wrist (de-Quervain's disease) and the elbow (Tennis elbow). The clinical results of the pilot studies were very positive. It is therefore concluded that further explorations are

  7. The Effects of Topic Familiarity, Author Expertise, and Content Relevance on Norwegian Students' Document Selection: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Stenseth, Tonje; Bråten, Ivar; Strømsø, Helge I.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study investigated the extent to which author expertise and content relevance were salient to secondary Norwegian students (N = 153) when they selected documents that pertained to more familiar and less familiar topics. Quantitative results indicated that author expertise was more salient for the less familiar topic (nuclear…

  8. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  9. Implications of Teachers' Recollections of Topics Selected by Boys and Girls for Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, Eileen D.; Bunderson, C. Victor

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes science fair choices of 2149 students for diversity of topics and scientific merit and matches them with teachers' recollections of topics thought most likely to be chosen. Reports that teachers recollections of topics seldom matched students' choices and teachers assumed more gender-based diversity in students' choice of topics than…

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Multimodality imaging of structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, D. W.

    2008-02-01

    Historically, medical devices to image either anatomical structure or functional processes have developed along somewhat independent paths. The recognition that combining images from different modalities can nevertheless offer significant diagnostic advantages gave rise to sophisticated software techniques to coregister structure and function. Recently, alternatives to retrospective software-based fusion have become available through instrumentation that combines two imaging modalities within a single device, an approach that has since been termed hardware fusion. As a result, following their recent introduction into the clinic, combined PET/CT and SPECT/CT devices are now playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of human disease. Recently, although limited to the brain, the first clinical MR scanner with a PET insert, a technically-challenging design, has been undergoing evaluation. This review will follow the development of multimodality instrumentation for clinical use from conception to present-day technology and assess the status and future potential for such devices.

  11. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wind-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  12. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wing-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  13. Combining Chemistry and Music to Engage Student Interest: Using Songs to Accompany Selected Chemical Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Last, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of recorded music to add interest to a variety of lecture topics is described. Topics include the periodic table, the formation of ionic compounds, thermodynamics, carbohydrates, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative analysis. (Contains 1 note.)

  14. A Comparison of Two Methods of Teaching Selected Topics in Plane Analytic Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundrick, Charles Michael

    Reported are the results of a study to determine if there is a difference in learning as measured by an achievement test between high school students who study plane analytic geometric topics via a vector approach and those who study the same topics via a traditional approach. Secondary objectives concerned the transfer to further topics in solid…

  15. Topics in cosmology: Structure formation, dark energy and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar

    The field of theoretical cosmology consists of numerous, inter-related branches, whose ambitious goal is to uncover the history of the universe from its beginning to its future. Achieving this, no doubt, requires a deep understanding of many areas of physics. In this thesis I touch upon a few of these areas in which I worked during my PhD studies. Chapter (2) describes our work in finding the accretion and merger history of dark matter halos. Dark matter halos are the collapsed dark matter structures in the late time evolution of the universe, whose existence is vital for the formation of galaxies in the Universe as they act as the potential wells where normal matter (collectively called Baryons) can accumulate, cool, and form stars. It is then no surprise that the properties of galaxies depends on the properties of the dark matter halo in which it resides, including its merger history, i.e. the number of times it merged with other halos. Even though these merger rates can be calculated theoretically for infinitesimal time steps, in order to find the merger history over an extended period of time one had to use either Monte-Carlo simulations to build up the total rates of merging and accreting from the infinitesimal rates or use N-body simulations. In chapter (2) we show how we used random walk formalism to write down an analytical (integral) equation for the merger history of halos. We have solved this equation numerically and find very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations. This work can be used in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. We then switch from the overdense regions of the Universe, halos, to the underdense ones, voids. These structures have not attracted as much attention from cosmologists as their overdense counterparts in probing the cosmological models. We show here that the shapes of voids as a probe can be of use for future surveys to pin down the equation of state of the dark energy, i.e. the ratio of its pressure to its energy

  16. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Selected topics in risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, E.O.

    1993-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that human health is intricately related to our chemical and physical surroundings. Recognizing the interdependence between health and environment, the Medical University of South Carolina has begun to implement a graduate program in Environmental Risk Assessment. While the infrastructure for such a program had been in place for quite a while, providing education in biostatistics, epidemiology, and mathematical modeling, specific courses in risk assessment were not available. To expedite the educational process in this area, the Department of Biometry and Epidemiology offered the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis in the Spring semester of 1993. This course was intended as an introduction for graduate students, but one faculty and one postdoctoral fellow also enrolled. The course was organized in the form of a seminar, with students or faculty presenting selected materials from the literature that covered some of the central issues in risk analysis. The presentations were subsequently written up as reports and revised according to suggestions by the instructor. This technical report comprises the presentations and reflects what has been learned in the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis. It also may serve as an easy to read introduction to the complex area of risk analysis. By the very nature of the course and this report, most of the presented material is not original. It does not necessarily reflect the authors` or the editor`s opinion and is not intended for citation. Nonetheless, the students and the instructor have paid attention to citing relevant literature in order to enable the reader to trace ideas back to the original sources. As an Appendix, this volume contains the course syllabus as well as hand-out material that the students prepared independently and that has not been edited or revised.

  17. Finding scientific topics

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Steyvers, Mark

    2004-01-01

    A first step in identifying the content of a document is determining which topics that document addresses. We describe a generative model for documents, introduced by Blei, Ng, and Jordan [Blei, D. M., Ng, A. Y. & Jordan, M. I. (2003) J. Machine Learn. Res. 3, 993-1022], in which each document is generated by choosing a distribution over topics and then choosing each word in the document from a topic selected according to this distribution. We then present a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for inference in this model. We use this algorithm to analyze abstracts from PNAS by using Bayesian model selection to establish the number of topics. We show that the extracted topics capture meaningful structure in the data, consistent with the class designations provided by the authors of the articles, and outline further applications of this analysis, including identifying “hot topics” by examining temporal dynamics and tagging abstracts to illustrate semantic content. PMID:14872004

  18. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael S.; Lee, Gil U.

    2005-07-01

    systems and tissue engineering; nanotechnology for drug delivery and imaging; bionanotechnology in cancer and cardiovascular disease; nanostructured biomaterials; nanotechnology in bioengineering; nanofabrication of biosensing devices. We are pleased to present a selection of research papers in this special issue of Nanotechnology on behalf of the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum (NSEF). NSEF was established in 2001 as a new division of AIChE to promote nanotechnology efforts in chemical engineering. The chemical engineering discipline deals with the production and processing of chemicals and materials, and does so through a fundamental understanding of the core issues of transport, thermodynamics, and kinetics that exist at multiple length scales. Thus, it should come as no surprise that chemical engineers have been pursuing nanotechnology research for the last fifty years. For example, fuel production has benefited immensely from improved catalysts in which their pore structure is controlled with nanoscale precision, and polymer properties have been improved by controlling the polymer supramolecular structure at the nanometre scale. Chemical engineering will continue to make important contributions to nanotechnology, and will play a critical role in the transition from basic science and engineering research to commercial applications. We would like to thank all of the authors who contributed to this special issue; the three NSEF poster presentation award winners for their papers (Sureshkumar, Sunkara, and Rinaldi groups); Dr Nina Couzin, Publisher of Nanotechnology, for her support and enthusiasm for this project; Drs Sharon Glotzer and Dan Coy who chaired the topical conference; and Drs Meyya Meyyappan and Brett Cruden (NASA Ames Research Center) for their assistance in the initial planning stages. We also take this opportunity to thank the many people and organizations who have supported the 2004 topical conference along the way, which include all the session

  19. Louisiana Parish School Board Members, 1977: Profile and Opinions on Selected Topics. Research Report, Vol. 8, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmon, C. Robert; Jones, Sue C.

    The purpose of this study was to construct a profile of the characteristics of the 684 Louisiana public school board members serving in 1976 and to report on their opinions on selected education topics. A total of 341 board members responded to the instrument constructed and mailed by the researchers. Among the results is the finding that the…

  20. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  1. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  2. The Effect of Topical Structure Analysis Instruction on University Students' Writing Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liangprayoon, Somlak; Chaya, Walaiporn; Thep-ackraphong, Tipa

    2013-01-01

    Coherence is considered one of the characteristics of effective writing. Topical structure analysis (TSA) has been taught to students as a revision strategy to raise their awareness of importance of textual coherence and helps them clearly understand its concept. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of TSA instruction in improving…

  3. Influence of Professional Preparation and Class Structure on Sexuality Topics Taught in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Darson L.; Kirchofer, Gregg; Hammig, Bart J.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the impact of professional preparation and class structure on sexuality topics taught and use of practice-based instructional strategies in US middle and high school health classes. Methods: Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs were used. A series of multivariable…

  4. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  5. Visual Orientation Selectivity Based Structure Description.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinjian; Lin, Weisi; Shi, Guangming; Zhang, Yazhong; Dong, Weisheng; Chen, Zhibo

    2015-11-01

    The human visual system is highly adaptive to extract structure information for scene perception, and structure character is widely used in perception-oriented image processing works. However, the existing structure descriptors mainly describe the luminance contrast of a local region, but cannot effectively represent the spatial correlation of structure. In this paper, we introduce a novel structure descriptor according to the orientation selectivity mechanism in the primary visual cortex. Research on cognitive neuroscience indicate that the arrangement of excitatory and inhibitory cortex cells arise orientation selectivity in a local receptive field, within which the primary visual cortex performs visual information extraction for scene understanding. Inspired by the orientation selectivity mechanism, we compute the correlations among pixels in a local region based on the similarities of their preferred orientation. By imitating the arrangement of the excitatory/inhibitory cells, the correlations between a central pixel and its local neighbors are binarized, and the spatial correlation is represented with a set of binary values, which is named the orientation selectivity-based pattern. Then, taking both the gradient magnitude and the orientation selectivity-based pattern into account, a rotation invariant structure descriptor is introduced. The proposed structure descriptor is applied in texture classification and reduced reference image quality assessment, as two different application domains to verify its generality and robustness. Experimental results demonstrate that the orientation selectivity-based structure descriptor is robust to disturbance, and can effectively represent the structure degradation caused by different types of distortion. PMID:26219097

  6. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  7. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Task 3 -- System selection; Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated has elected to pursue an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine system to exceed the goals of the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, which are to develop and commercialize an industrial gas turbine system that operates at thermal efficiencies at least 15% higher than 1991 products, and with emissions not exceeding eight ppmv NOx and 20 ppmv CO and UHC. Solar`s goal is to develop a commercially viable industrial system (3--20 MW) driven by a gas turbine engine with a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50), with the flexibility to meet the differing operational requirements of various markets. Dispersed power generation is currently considered to be the primary future target market for the ICR in the 5--15 MW size class. The ICR integrated system approach provides an ideal candidate for the assumed dispersed power market, with its small footprint, easy transportability, and environmental friendliness. In comparison with other systems that use water or toxic chemicals such as ammonia for NOx control, the ICR has no consumables other than fuel and air. The low pressure ratio of the gas turbine engine also is favorable in that less parasitic power is needed to pump the natural gas into the combustor than for simple-cycle machines. Solar has narrowed the ICR configuration to two basic approaches, a 1-spool, and a 2-spool version of the ATS50. The 1-spool engine will have a lower first-cost but lower part-power efficiencies. The 2-spool ATS may not only have better part-power efficiency, its efficiency will also be less sensitive to reduced turbine rotor inlet temperature levels. Thus hot-end parts life can be increased with only small sacrifices in efficiency. The flexibility of the 2-spool arrangement in meeting customer needs is its major advantage over the 1-spool. This Task 3 Topical Report is intended to present Solar`s preliminary system selection based upon the initial trade-off studies performed to date.

  8. Excerpts on Selected Topics in Collective Bargaining Agreements and a Brief Review of the Status of Collective Bargaining in Community Colleges 1972 to 1975; an ERIC Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, John, Comp.

    To acquaint the faculty and administrators with the scope and breadth of community college collective bargaining agreements, excerpts of selected topics are reproduced in this document without comment. On each topic two or three excerpts from different agreements are reproduced. The following topics are treated: (1) recognition of the employee…

  9. Orientation selectivity based structure for texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinjian; Lin, Weisi; Shi, Guangming; Zhang, Yazhong; Lu, Liu

    2014-10-01

    Local structure, e.g., local binary pattern (LBP), is widely used in texture classification. However, LBP is too sensitive to disturbance. In this paper, we introduce a novel structure for texture classification. Researches on cognitive neuroscience indicate that the primary visual cortex presents remarkable orientation selectivity for visual information extraction. Inspired by this, we investigate the orientation similarities among neighbor pixels, and propose an orientation selectivity based pattern for local structure description. Experimental results on texture classification demonstrate that the proposed structure descriptor is quite robust to disturbance.

  10. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  11. Selected Price Topical Papers for Career Education: Working Paper No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Donald J., Ed.

    Presented are 15 papers on topics relevant to Project PRICE (Programing Retarded in Career Education), a project designed to develop a methodology by which school districts can educate school, community, and family personnel to provide more relevant instruction and supportive services to retarded students. The following titles and entries are…

  12. PREFACE: Topics in the application of scattering methods to investigate the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-09-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter gathers together a series of contributions presented at the workshop entitled `Topics in the Application of Scattering Methods to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Soft Condensed Matter' held at Pensione Bencista, Fiesole, Italy, a wonderful Italian jewel tucked high in the hills above Florence. This immaculate 14th century villa is a feast for the eyes with antiques and original artwork everywhere you turn, and a stunning view of Florence, overlooking numerous villas and groves of olive trees. The meeting consisted of about 40 invited talks delivered by a selected group of prominent physicists and chemists from the USA, Mexico, Europe and Asia working in the fields of complex and glassy liquids. The topics covered by the talks included: simulations on the liquid-liquid transition phenomenon dynamic crossover in deeply supercooled confined water thermodynamics and dynamics of complex fluids dynamics of interfacial water structural arrest transitions in colloidal systems structure and dynamics in complex systems structure of supramolecular assemblies The choice of topics is obviously heavily biased toward the current interests of the two organizers of the workshop, in view of the fact that one of the incentives for organizing the meeting was to celebrate Sow-Hsin Chen’s life-long scientific activities on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The 21 articles presented in this issue are a state-of-the-art description of the different aspects reported at the workshop from all points of view---experimental, theoretical and numerical. The interdisciplinary nature of the talks should make this special issue of interest to a broad community of scientists involved in the study of the properties of complex fluids, soft condensed matter and disordered glassy systems. We are grateful to the Consorzio per lo Sviluppo dei Sistemi a Grande Interfase (CSGI), Florence, Italy and to the Materials Science Program of

  13. Emergence of social structures via preferential selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota; Ferreira, Antonio Luis

    2014-09-01

    We examine a weighted-network multiagent model with preferential selection such that agents choose partners with probability p (w), where w is the number of their past selections. When p (w) increases sublinearly with the number of past selections [p(w)˜wα,α<1], agents develop a uniform preference for all other agents. At α =1, this state loses stability and more complex structures form. For a superlinear increase (α>1), strong heterogeneities emerge and agents make selections mainly within small and sometimes asymmetric clusters. Even in a few-agent case, the formation of such clusters resembles phase transitions with spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  14. The skin health and beauty pyramid: a clinically based guide to selecting topical skincare products.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Flor A; Kenner, Julie R; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-04-01

    The use of cosmeceuticals by patients is now commonplace. Without consultation and direction from an informed clinician, marketing pressures can lead consumers to make poor product choices that can result in wasted money and unsatisfactory outcomes. Skin professionals need a scientifically based, succinct tool to guide their patients toward best topical skincare practices. The Skin Health and Beauty Pyramid is an educational framework and product guide created from extensive scientific literature and study review on ingredients, formulations and technologies affecting skin biology. This clinical tool can simplify product choices for physicians and clinicians in the process of professionally guiding patients toward the optimal use of topical products to achieve best outcomes for skin health and beauty. PMID:24719060

  15. Selected Research and Development Topics on Aerospace Communications at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses some of the efforts on communications RD that have been performed or are currently underway at NASA Glenn Research Center. The primary purpose of this presentation is to outline some RD topics to serve as talking points for a Technical Interchange Meeting with the Ohio State University. The meeting is scheduled to take place at The ElectroScience Laboratory of the Ohio State University on February 24, 2014.

  16. Photocarcinogenicity of selected topically applied dermatological drugs: calcineurin inhibitors, corticosteroids, and vitamin D analogs.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Catharina M; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2010-08-31

    Topical therapies constitute the mainstay of dermatological treatments for skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, or acne. Since some of these diseases are often chronic, treatment duration may last for years and may even last the patient's entire lifetime. Obviously, such long-term therapy may raise safety concerns, which also include the potential photocarcinogenic effect. Most patients are exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during leisure, work, vacations, or in tanning beds. Additionally, the patients may receive UVR via UVB phototherapy or psoralens plus UVA radiation (PUVA). The use of immunosuppressant's, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, has markedly increased. Patients with skin diseases have benefited from both systemic and topical treatment of both new and established drugs. The issue of a black box warning by the US Food and Drug Administration has increased concerns about photocarcinogenesis, which raises the question: "Are these drugs safe?" This review focuses on the mechanism of action and photocarcinogenic potential of commonly used topical treatments, such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and vitamin D analogs. PMID:25386250

  17. The transfer of drugs and therapeutics into human breast milk: an update on selected topics.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Hari Cheryl

    2013-09-01

    Many mothers are inappropriately advised to discontinue breastfeeding or avoid taking essential medications because of fears of adverse effects on their infants. This cautious approach may be unnecessary in many cases, because only a small proportion of medications are contraindicated in breastfeeding mothers or associated with adverse effects on their infants. Information to inform physicians about the extent of excretion for a particular drug into human milk is needed but may not be available. Previous statements on this topic from the American Academy of Pediatrics provided physicians with data concerning the known excretion of specific medications into breast milk. More current and comprehensive information is now available on the Internet, as well as an application for mobile devices, at LactMed (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov). Therefore, with the exception of radioactive compounds requiring temporary cessation of breastfeeding, the reader will be referred to LactMed to obtain the most current data on an individual medication. This report discusses several topics of interest surrounding lactation, such as the use of psychotropic therapies, drugs to treat substance abuse, narcotics, galactagogues, and herbal products, as well as immunization of breastfeeding women. A discussion regarding the global implications of maternal medications and lactation in the developing world is beyond the scope of this report. The World Health Organization offers several programs and resources that address the importance of breastfeeding (see http://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/). PMID:23979084

  18. Material Selection for Cryogenic Support Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Erik; Kellaris, Nicholas; Daal, Miguel; Sadoulet, Bernard; Golwala, Sunil; Hollister, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Design specifications for the support structures of low temperature instrumentation often call for low thermal conductivity between temperature stages, high stiffness, and specific load bearing capabilities. While overall geometric design plays an important role in both overall stiffness and heat conduction between stages, material selection can affect a structure's properties significantly. In this contribution, we suggest and compare several alternative materials to the current standard materials for building cryogenic support structures.

  19. Preface to Special Topic: Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on Optofluidics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Zhenchuan

    2016-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Optofluidics (Optofluidics 2015) was held in Taipei, Taiwan, July 26-29, 2015. The aim of this conference was to provide a forum to promote scientific exchange and to foster closer networks and collaborative ties between leading international researchers in optics and micro/nanofluidics across various disciplines. The scope of Optofluidics 2015 was deliberately broad and interdisciplinary, encompassing the latest advances and the most innovative developments in micro/nanoscale science and technology. Topics ranged from fundamental research to its applications in chemistry, physics, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27076863

  20. Preface to Special Topic: Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on Optofluidics

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shih-Kang; Yang, Zhenchuan

    2016-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Optofluidics (Optofluidics 2015) was held in Taipei, Taiwan, July 26–29, 2015. The aim of this conference was to provide a forum to promote scientific exchange and to foster closer networks and collaborative ties between leading international researchers in optics and micro/nanofluidics across various disciplines. The scope of Optofluidics 2015 was deliberately broad and interdisciplinary, encompassing the latest advances and the most innovative developments in micro/nanoscale science and technology. Topics ranged from fundamental research to its applications in chemistry, physics, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27076863

  1. Selecting their Own Research Topic: An Effective Means of Engaging Undergraduates in Geoscience Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V.; Haacker-Santos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences have been shown to successfully help draw undergraduates into STEM fields. In the SOARS and RESESS summer internship programs, which focus on the atmospheric and Earth sciences respectively, we attempt to match each intern with a project that is of specific interest to them, and to place the student with a science mentor with that expertise. Initially interns are solicited before the summer on their preferred topics of interest by having applicants or reapplicants choose fields of study from a list of topics. Follow-up conversations help to better define their area of interest. We then match those with the projects that have been proposed by prospective mentors, or seek scientists in the community who do research in that subdiscipline. Mentors also evaluate the intern's course background to determine if they have the foundation necessary for that work. Interns report that the opportunity to work on a topic that they perceive as interesting is vital to their engagement in the research. One intern wrote, "One of the most important components of internships like this is definitely letting the students somewhat chose their project. I think that a really good way to turn students OFF from research is by having them spend a summer researching something they are not even close to interested in." Another commented, "I really appreciated being matched with a project in my interest area. I think that's really important, even if it just teaches you that you might want to work in a different field than you initially thought." Being immersed in such a research group or lab provides interns with a rich opportunity to learn relevant content and skills, and to start developing a professional support network. Interns continue to engage with experts in their field of interest when they present at at scientifically relevant meeting sessions during the following academic year. Many of our interns go on to study the same subdiscipline of atmospheric or Earth

  2. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1995-10-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Editing and changes to the authors` contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on eight presentations: ``Application of Accelerator-Driven Spallation Targets - Including Tritium Production and Nuclear Waste Transmutation``, ``BNL 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source Study``, ``Designing and Understanding of Magnets with the Help of Conformal Mapping``, ``Laser - Electron Beam Scattering Coherent Compton X-Ray Sources``, ``The LHC Project``, ``Optimization of the Photocathode-Linac Separation for the ATF [Accelerator Test Facility] Injection System``, ``On CEBAF Commissioning: First Results``, and ``The Proposed Booster Application Facility at BNL``. An Appendix lists dates, topics, and speakers from October 1989 to December 1994.

  3. Analysis of multiple instructional techniques on the understanding and retention of select mechanical topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetsco, Sara Elizabeth

    There are several topics that introductory physics students typically have difficulty understanding. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate if multiple instructional techniques will help students to better understand and retain the material. The three units analyzed in this study are graphing motion, projectile motion, and conservation of momentum. For each unit students were taught using new or altered instructional methods including online laboratory simulations, inquiry labs, and interactive demonstrations. Additionally, traditional instructional methods such as lecture and problem sets were retained. Effectiveness was measured through pre- and post-tests and student opinion surveys. Results suggest that incorporating multiple instructional techniques into teaching will improve student understanding and retention. Students stated that they learned well from all of the instructional methods used except the online simulations.

  4. Students Fail to Transfer Knowledge of Chromosome Structure to Topics Pertaining to Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Dina L.; Catavero, Christina M.; Wright, L. Kate

    2012-01-01

    Cellular processes that rely on knowledge of molecular behavior are difficult for students to comprehend. For example, thorough understanding of meiosis requires students to integrate several complex concepts related to chromosome structure and function. Using a grounded theory approach, we have unified classroom observations, assessment data, and in-depth interviews under the theory of knowledge transfer to explain student difficulties with concepts related to chromosomal behavior. In this paper, we show that students typically understand basic chromosome structure but do not activate cognitive resources that would allow them to explain macromolecular phenomena (e.g., homologous pairing during meiosis). To improve understanding of topics related to genetic information flow, we suggest that instructors use pedagogies and activities that prime students for making connections between chromosome structure and cellular processes. PMID:23222838

  5. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  6. Selected Topics from LVCSR Research for Asian Languages at Tokyo Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Sadaoki

    This paper presents our recent work in regard to building Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition (LVCSR) systems for the Thai, Indonesian, and Chinese languages. For Thai, since there is no word boundary in the written form, we have proposed a new method for automatically creating word-like units from a text corpus, and applied topic and speaking style adaptation to the language model to recognize spoken-style utterances. For Indonesian, we have applied proper noun-specific adaptation to acoustic modeling, and rule-based English-to-Indonesian phoneme mapping to solve the problem of large variation in proper noun and English word pronunciation in a spoken-query information retrieval system. In spoken Chinese, long organization names are frequently abbreviated, and abbreviated utterances cannot be recognized if the abbreviations are not included in the dictionary. We have proposed a new method for automatically generating Chinese abbreviations, and by expanding the vocabulary using the generated abbreviations, we have significantly improved the performance of spoken query-based search.

  7. Selected Topics on the Synthesis, Properties and Applications of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, B.R.; Brown, B.; Glass, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In summary, MWCNTs have been examined for a variety of electronic applications due to their unique structure and chemistry. Electrodes for field emission, energy and sensor applications hold particular interest. MWCNTs provide a very high surface area, relatively easy methods of surface modification, controllable and high concentration of reactive surface sites, and high specific capacitance. Combining MWCNTs with graphene structures, oxide and metal nanoparticles and certain polymers extends their performance and functionality. Such hybrid structures have been produced in situ during CNT growth and in two-step processes. Excellent progress on understanding the mechanisms of CNT growth has enabled numerous growth methods to all yield MWCNT structures in a variety of morphologies. PMID:24910503

  8. Structural context shapes the aquaporin selectivity filter

    PubMed Central

    Savage, David F.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Miercke, Larry J. W.; Finer-Moore, Janet; Stroud, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporins are transmembrane channels that facilitate the permeation of water and small, uncharged amphipathic molecules across cellular membranes. One distinct aquaporin subfamily contains pure water channels, whereas a second subfamily contains channels that conduct small alditols such as glycerol, in addition to water. Distinction between these substrates is central to aquaporin function, though the contributions of protein structural motifs required for selectivity are not yet fully characterized. To address this question, we sequentially engineered three signature amino acids of the glycerol-conducting subfamily into the Escherichia coli water channel aquaporin Z (AqpZ). Functional analysis of these mutant channels showed a decrease in water permeability but not the expected increase in glycerol conduction. Using X-ray crystallography, we determined the atomic resolution structures of the mutant channels. The structures revealed a channel surprisingly similar in size to the wild-type AqpZ pore. Comparison with measured rates of transport showed that, as the size of the selectivity filter region of the channel approaches that of water, channel hydrophilicity dominated water conduction energetics. In contrast, the major determinant of selectivity for larger amphipathic molecules such as glycerol was channel cross-section size. Finally, we find that, although the selectivity filter region is indeed central to substrate transport, other structural elements that do not directly interact with the substrates, such as the loop connecting helices M6 and M7, and the C loop between helices C4 and C5, play an essential role in facilitating selectivity. PMID:20855585

  9. On the structure selectivity of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-06-30

    We propose a strategic method to search for a new clathrate hydrate by investigating the selectivity of its crystalline structure, which has been expected to depend mostly on the guest species and less on the thermodynamic conditions. Relative stability among various morphologies is examined in terms of the chemical potential of water of clathrate hydrates in equilibrium with guest gases. This evaluation is performed by calculating the free energy of cage occupancy according to the standard statistical mechanical theory with the aid of the Yarmolyuk and Kripyakevich's rule on the Frank-Kasper type alloys to estimate the numbers of cages of various types. Thus, a comprehensive interpretation of the selectivity of crystalline structures is successfully made. We explain why two major structures are stable in most of the thermodynamic conditions and establish a relation between polymorphism of clathrate hydrate and the guest size and other parameters, thereby suggesting a way to find a new clathrate hydrate by appropriate choice of the guest species and/or the thermodynamic properties. It is found that there is a small room in the above parameter space for the other structure than the major two to be the most stable, including a new structure. In addition, simple but thorough elucidation is given for preferential formation of TS-I structure in bromine hydrate. PMID:21619053

  10. Gas Research Institute`s appalachian basin research: Selected bibliography. Topical report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1995-07-01

    The Appalachian Basin citations listed in this bibliography present select research reports that provide an overview of research and development (R&D) efforts related to the basin. The bibliography is organized in three sections, one for each of the following unconventional gas resources: coalbed methane, gas shales, and tight gas sands. Citations are further divided into geology and engineering subsections. The citations are only for those reports resulting directly from GRI`s research investment or reviews that extensively used GRI results.

  11. Development of BEACON technology: Hydrogen catalyst selection and preparation: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Bench scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter 1983 and the results reported to DOE. Bench scale development of the hydrogen process is currently underway. This document summarizes the effort expended in the selection and preparation of the primary and back-up hydrogen production catalysts to be used in multi-cycle testing at bench scale. The effort comprised the Task 1 experimentation of the current BEACON program and was six weeks in duration. From 20 catalysts screened at laboratory scale as candidates for hydrogen production from BEACON carbon, two were selected as promising for exhibiting good performance (activity and selectivity) at reaction pressures above ambient. These two catalysts, No. 6 and No. 11, were subjected to extensive carbon deposition-steaming testing at 50, 75 and 100 psig (3 to 5 cycles at each pressure); 10 to 20 gram batches of solids were used in these tests. Performance comparisons led to the selection of Catalyst No. 11 as the primary catalyst for the hydrogen process. Catalyst No. 6 performed well enough at pressures up to 50 psig to be considered as a potential replacement to Catalyst No. 11 should the latter fail multi-cycle testing (long-term activity tests at elevated pressures). The multi-cycle testing (a minimum operation of 250 hours of simultaneous carbon deposition and steaming to hydrogen) will be performed in the existing Tandem Reactor apparatus under Task 2 of this program. 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. The selection of sun-blocking topical agents to protect the skin.

    PubMed

    Tipton, J B

    1978-08-01

    A simple method, based on scientific evidence, for the selection of a proper sun protective agent has been presented. To make it even easier, the surgeon need only look for a product containing both PABA and titanium dioxide. The author is aware there may be many other fine products available but not mentioned here, and some of those mentioned here serve the purpose for which they were designed but may not do all the things the plastic surgeon desires. In any event, the statements made herein should not be construed as an endorsement of one product over another. PMID:674411

  13. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activationmore » by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.« less

  14. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activation by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.

  15. Selected topics on the interaction between cirrus clouds and embedded contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.

    2012-12-01

    Persistent contrails and natural cirrus clouds often coexist in the upper troposphere and contrails can be embedded within cirrus clouds. The present paper deals with some questions regarding the interaction of cirrus clouds and embedded contrails. I have selected only questions that can be answered by analytical means. I find that (1) the emission index for water vapour is only slightly changed when an aircraft crosses a cirrus cloud, (2) that contrail formation is not affected by an ambient cirrus, (3) that cirrus ice crystals entrained into the trailing wing tip vortex do not efficiently retard the sublimation of contrail ice crystals, and (4) that cirrus can start to dissolve an embedded contrail after a couple of hours by aggregation.

  16. The Influence of Topical Prostaglandin Analogues in Inflammation After Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Enping

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) seems to be the only treatment that slows progression in glaucoma. The IOP can be decreased by pharmaceutical treatment, laser [selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT)] treatment, or surgery. Prostaglandin analogues have been postulated to share action mechanisms with SLT and to possibly diminish the effects of SLT treatment. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of prostaglandin analogues in inflammation and IOP reduction after SLT treatment. Methods Prospective nonrandomized study. One hundred and eighteen patients were included in the study. Inclusion criteria: Glaucoma (open-angle or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma) patients who will be treated with SLT. Inflammation was measured with a laser flare meter (Kowa FM-500). Measurements were made before SLT and then 2 h, 1 week, and 1 month after SLT treatment. IOP was also checked at the same time intervals. The SLT treatment was performed over 90°. All patients were divided into two groups: those receiving prostaglandins analogues and those treated with nonprostaglandin analogues. Results Inflammation before and after SLT showed no significant difference between the groups at all the time intervals studied (t-test, before: P=0.16; 2 h: P=0.14; 1 week: P=0.12; and 1 month: P=0.36). IOP reduction showed no significant difference between the groups (t-test, P=0.31). Conclusions SLT treatment effects do not seem to be influenced by the use of prostaglandin analogues. PMID:22087857

  17. In-Depth Analysis of Selected Topics Related to the Quality Assessment of E-Commerce Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Antonia; Stavrinoudis, Dimitris; Xenos, Michalis

    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of selected important topics related to the quality assessment of e-commerce systems. It briefly introduces to the reader a quality assessment model based on Bayesian Networks and presents in detail the practical application of this model, highlighting practical issues related to the involvement of human subjects, conflict resolution, and calibration of the measurement instruments. Furthermore, the paper presents the application process of the model for the quality assessment of various e-commerce systems; it also discusses in detail how particular features (data) of the assessed e-commerce systems can be identified and, using the described automated assessment process, lead to higher abstraction information (desiderata) regarding the quality of the assessed e-commerce systems.

  18. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    OMS'07 was the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society (EOS) on Optical Microsystems (OMS). It was organized by the EOS in the frame of its international topical meeting activity, and after the success of the inaugural meeting was once again held in Italy, 30 September to 3 October 2007, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. The local organizing committee was composed of researchers from `La Sapienza' University in Rome and the National Council of Research (CNR) in Naples, Italy. A selected group of leading scientists in the field formed the international scientific committee. The conference was fully dedicated to the most recent advancements carried out in the field of optical microsystems. More then 150 scientists coming from five continents attended the conference and more than 100 papers were presented, organized into the following sessions: Photonic cystals and metamaterials Optofluidic microsystems and devices Optical microsystems and devices New characterization methods for materials and devices Application of optical systems Optical sources and photodetectors Optical resonators Nonlinear optic devices Micro-optical devices. Four keynote lecturers were invited for the Plenary sessions: Federico Capasso, Harvard University, USA; Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut, USA (Distinguished Lecturer, Emeritus of LEOS--IEEE Society); Demetri Psaltis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Ammon Yariv, California Institute of Technology, USA. Furthermore, 21 invited speakers opened each session of the conference with their talks. In addition a special session was organized to celebrate eighty years of the Isituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (INOA) of CNR. The special invited speaker for this session was Professor Theodor W Hänsch (Nobel Prize in Physics, 2005), who gave a lecture entitled `What can we do with optical frequency combs?' In this special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics, a selection of the most interesting

  19. Structured Correspondence Topic Models for Mining Captioned Figures in Biological Literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amr; Xing, Eric P; Cohen, William W; Murphy, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    A major source of information (often the most crucial and informative part) in scholarly articles from scientific journals, proceedings and books are the figures that directly provide images and other graphical illustrations of key experimental results and other scientific contents. In biological articles, a typical figure often comprises multiple panels, accompanied by either scoped or global captioned text. Moreover, the text in the caption contains important semantic entities such as protein names, gene ontology, tissues labels, etc., relevant to the images in the figure. Due to the avalanche of biological literature in recent years, and increasing popularity of various bio-imaging techniques, automatic retrieval and summarization of biological information from literature figures has emerged as a major unsolved challenge in computational knowledge extraction and management in the life science. We present a new structured probabilistic topic model built on a realistic figure generation scheme to model the structurally annotated biological figures, and we derive an efficient inference algorithm based on collapsed Gibbs sampling for information retrieval and visualization. The resulting program constitutes one of the key IR engines in our SLIF system that has recently entered the final round (4 out 70 competing systems) of the Elsevier Grand Challenge on Knowledge Enhancement in the Life Science. Here we present various evaluations on a number of data mining tasks to illustrate our method. PMID:25485170

  20. Acne Treatment Based on Selective Photothermolysis of Sebaceous Follicles with Topically Delivered Light-Absorbing Gold Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Paithankar, Dilip Y; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A; Kositratna, Garuna; Blomgren, Richard D; Meyer, Todd J; Faupel, Linda J; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Cheung, Wang L; Owczarek, Witold D; Suwalska, Anna M; Kochanska, Katarzyna B; Nawrocka, Agnieszka K; Paluchowska, Elwira B; Podolec, Katarzyna M; Pirowska, Magdalena M; Wojas-Pelc, Anna B; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-07-01

    The pathophysiology of acne vulgaris depends on active sebaceous glands, implying that selective destruction of sebaceous glands could be an effective treatment. We hypothesized that light-absorbing microparticles could be delivered into sebaceous glands, enabling local injury by optical pulses. A suspension of topically applied gold-coated silica microparticles exhibiting plasmon resonance with strong absorption at 800 nm was delivered into human pre-auricular and swine sebaceous glands in vivo, using mechanical vibration. After exposure to 10-50 J cm(-2), 30 milliseconds, 800 nm diode laser pulses, microscopy revealed preferential thermal injury to sebaceous follicles and glands, consistent with predictions from a computational model. Inflammation was mild; gold particles were not retained in swine skin 1 month after treatment, and uptake in other organs was negligible. Two independent prospective randomized controlled clinical trials were performed for treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne, using unblinded and blinded assessments of disease severity. Each trial showed clinically and statistically significant improvement of inflammatory acne following three treatments given 1-2 weeks apart. In Trial 2, inflammatory lesions were significantly reduced at 12 weeks (P=0.015) and 16 weeks (P=0.04) compared with sham treatments. Optical microparticles enable selective photothermolysis of sebaceous glands. This appears to be a well-tolerated, effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25748556

  1. Acne Treatment Based on Selective Photothermolysis of Sebaceous Follicles with Topically Delivered Light-Absorbing Gold Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Paithankar, Dilip Y; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A; Kositratna, Garuna; Blomgren, Richard D; Meyer, Todd J; Faupel, Linda J; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Cheung, Wang L; Owczarek, Witold D; Suwalska, Anna M; Kochanska, Katarzyna B; Nawrocka, Agnieszka K; Paluchowska, Elwira B; Podolec, Katarzyna M; Pirowska, Magdalena M; Wojas-Pelc, Anna B; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acne vulgaris depends on active sebaceous glands, implying that selective destruction of sebaceous glands could be an effective treatment. We hypothesized that light-absorbing microparticles could be delivered into sebaceous glands, enabling local injury by optical pulses. A suspension of topically applied gold-coated silica microparticles exhibiting plasmon resonance with strong absorption at 800 nm was delivered into human pre-auricular and swine sebaceous glands in vivo, using mechanical vibration. After exposure to 10–50 J cm−2, 30 milliseconds, 800 nm diode laser pulses, microscopy revealed preferential thermal injury to sebaceous follicles and glands, consistent with predictions from a computational model. Inflammation was mild; gold particles were not retained in swine skin 1 month after treatment, and uptake in other organs was negligible. Two independent prospective randomized controlled clinical trials were performed for treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne, using unblinded and blinded assessments of disease severity. Each trial showed clinically and statistically significant improvement of inflammatory acne following three treatments given 1–2 weeks apart. In Trial 2, inflammatory lesions were significantly reduced at 12 weeks (P=0.015) and 16 weeks (P=0.04) compared with sham treatments. Optical microparticles enable selective photothermolysis of sebaceous glands. This appears to be a well-tolerated, effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25748556

  2. Modeling the Relationships among Topical Knowledge, Anxiety, and Integrated Speaking Test Performance: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Heng-Tsung Danny

    2010-01-01

    Thus far, few research studies have examined the practice of integrated speaking test tasks in the field of second/foreign language oral assessment. This dissertation utilized structural equation modeling (SEM) and qualitative techniques to explore the relationships among topical knowledge, anxiety, and integrated speaking test performance and to…

  3. Lexical and Syntactic Influences on Structural Selection in Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazer, Alexandra Kate

    2016-01-01

    We still know surprisingly little about how grammatical structures are selected for use in sentence production. A major debate concerns whether structural selection is competitive or noncompetitive. Competitive accounts propose that alternative structures or structural components actively suppress one another's activation until one option reaches…

  4. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  5. Freshman Health Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  6. Effect of parental selection of healthy behavior topic during well child visit on plan to change childs eating or physical activity behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations direct pediatricians to address obesity and obesity prevention routinely during well child visits and to tailor their counseling, but clinicians may feel ineffective because of time constraints and lack of parent interest. To prompt parents to select a healthy lifestyle topic...

  7. The Structure of Scientific Arguments by Secondary Science Teachers: Comparison of Experimental and Historical Science Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Ron; Kang, Nam-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Just as scientific knowledge is constructed using distinct modes of inquiry (e.g. experimental or historical), arguments constructed during science instruction may vary depending on the mode of inquiry underlying the topic. The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how secondary science teachers construct scientific arguments during…

  8. Selective induction of apoptosis in the hamster flank sebaceous gland organ by a topical liposome 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor: a treatment strategy for acne.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingna; Tang, Li; Baranov, Eugene; Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-02-01

    Acne is a very widespread cosmesis problem. Isotretinoin, a synthetic oral retinoid is used to treat acne, which is androgen dependent. Numerous side-effects occur from this treatment. 5-alpha-Reductase plays a critical role in normal and pathological androgen-dependent processes. We have taken the approach to develop a selective, effective, topically-applied 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor to modify unwanted or pathological processes in the pilosebaceous unit such as acne. Toward this goal, we have previously developed a selective liposome hair follicle targeting system. We demonstrate in this report that the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5alpha-androstane-17beta-carboxamide (4-MA) incorporated into liposomes induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of the dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent hamster flank organ sebaceous gland. We have compared topical application of liposome 4-MA and solvent-formulated 4-MA and observed selective efficacy of topical application of liposome 4-MA by the reduction of size and induction of apoptosis only in the treated hamster flank organ. Apoptosis induced by liposome 4-MA in the treated flank organ sebaceous gland cells was observed both by assays for DNA fragments (transferase deoxytidyl uridine end labeling) and by observation of condensed and fragmented nuclei. When 4-MA was topically applied formulated in ethanol and glycerol without liposomes, the selective efficacy was lost. Liposome 4-MA did not significantly affect prostate weight, testosterone/DHT ratios or bodyweight gain compared to controls indicating safety as well as efficacy of topical application of liposome 4-MA for pathological processes such as acne. PMID:20175850

  9. Succinyl hydroxamates as potent and selective non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase: design, synthesis, and evaluation as topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agents.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Simon; Fish, Paul V; Billotte, Stephane; Bordner, Jon; Greiling, Doris; James, Kim; McElroy, Andrew; Mills, James E; Reed, Charlotte; Webster, Robert

    2008-12-15

    Succinyl hydroxamates 1 and 2 are disclosed as novel series of potent and selective inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) which may have potential as anti-fibrotic agents. Carboxamide 7 demonstrated good PCP inhibition and had excellent selectivity over MMPs involved in wound healing. In addition, 7 was effective in a cell-based model of collagen deposition (fibroplasia model) and was very effective at penetrating human skin in vitro. Compound 7 (UK-383,367) was selected as a candidate for evaluation in clinical studies as a topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agent. PMID:18945617

  10. Structural selectivity of human SGLT inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Charles S.; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Jie; Ghezzi, Chiari; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Loo, Donald D. F.; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2012-01-01

    Human Na+-d-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT) inhibitors constitute the newest class of diabetes drugs, blocking up to 50% of renal glucose reabsorption in vivo. These drugs have potential for widespread use in the diabetes epidemic, but how they work at a molecular level is poorly understood. Here, we use electrophysiological methods to assess how they block Na+-d-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 and SGLT2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK-293T) cells and compared them to the classic SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. Dapagliflozin [(1S)-1,5,5-anhydro-1-C-{4-chloro-3-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)methyl]phenyl}-d-glucitol], two structural analogs, and the aglycones of phlorizin and dapagliflozin were investigated in detail. Dapagliflozin and fluoro-dapagliflozin [(1S)-1,5-anhydro-1-C-{4-chloro-3-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)methyl]phenyl}-4-F-4-deoxy-d-glucitol] blocked glucose transport and glucose-coupled currents with ≈100-fold specificity for hSGLT2 (Ki = 6 nM) over hSGLT1 (Ki = 400 nM). As galactose is a poor substrate for SGLT2, it was surprising that galacto-dapagliflozin [(1S)-1,5-anhydro-1-C-{4-chloro-3-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)methyl]phenyl}-d-galactitol] was a selective inhibitor of hSGLT2, but was less potent than dapagliflozin for both transporters (hSGLT2 Ki = 25 nM, hSGLT1 Ki = 25,000 nM). Phlorizin and galacto-dapagliflozin rapidly dissociated from SGLT2 [half-time off rate (t1/2,Off) ≈ 20–30 s], while dapagliflozin and fluoro-dapagliflozin dissociated from hSGLT2 at a rate 10-fold slower (t1/2,Off ≥ 180 s). Phlorizin was unable to exchange with dapagliflozin bound to hSGLT2. In contrast, dapagliflozin, fluoro-dapagliflozin, and galacto-dapagliflozin dissociated quickly from hSGLT1 (t1/2,Off = 1–2 s), and phlorizin readily exchanged with dapagliflozin bound to hSGLT1. The aglycones of phlorizin and dapagliflozin were poor inhibitors of both hSGLT2 and hSGLT1 with Ki values > 100 μM. These results show that inhibitor binding to SGLTs is composed of two synergistic forces

  11. Structured variable selection with q-values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When some of the regressors can act on both the response and other explanatory variables, the already challenging problem of selecting variables when the number of covariates exceeds the sample size becomes more difficult. A motivating example is a metabolic study in mice that has diet groups and gu...

  12. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Selected Environmental Topics for Use With Elementary and Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Alan D., Ed.

    This guide contains learning activities in environmental education developed by teachers and intended for use at the elementary or junior high school levels. Topics covered include: water, esthetics, air, soil and sediment, solid waste, energy, noise, population, and transportation. Generally, each activity contains an introduction, a listing of…

  13. Glass science tutorial lecture {number_sign}6: The melting of silicate glasses, a review of selected topics

    SciTech Connect

    Swarts, E.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a two-day lecture given at Westinghouse Hanford Company in March, 1995 and includes the data used in the presentation. Topics included the special needs of a low-level waste vitrification process, glass melting, mechanisms of the formation of foam, glass refining (bubble removal), and homogenization (reduction of chemical heterogeneity to acceptable levels). 96 refs.

  14. Structural Implications for Selective Targeting of PARPs

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Armen, Roger S.; Pascal, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that use NAD+ as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) as post-translational modifications of proteins. PARPs have important cellular roles that include preserving genomic integrity, telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, and cell fate determination. The diverse biological roles of PARPs have made them attractive therapeutic targets, which have fueled the pursuit of small molecule PARP inhibitors. The design of PARP inhibitors has matured over the past several years resulting in several lead candidates in clinical trials. PARP inhibitors are mainly used in clinical trials to treat cancer, particularly as sensitizing agents in combination with traditional chemotherapy to reduce side effects. An exciting aspect of PARP inhibitors is that they are also used to selectivity kill tumors with deficiencies in DNA repair proteins (e.g., BRCA1/2) through an approach termed “synthetic lethality.” In the midst of the tremendous efforts that have brought PARP inhibitors to the forefront of modern chemotherapy, most clinically used PARP inhibitors bind to conserved regions that permits cross-selectivity with other PARPs containing homologous catalytic domains. Thus, the differences between therapeutic effects and adverse effects stemming from pan-PARP inhibition compared to selective inhibition are not well understood. In this review, we discuss current literature that has found ways to gain selectivity for one PARP over another. We furthermore provide insights into targeting other domains that make up PARPs, and how new classes of drugs that target these domains could provide a high degree of selectivity by affecting specific cellular functions. A clear understanding of the inhibition profiles of PARP inhibitors will not only enhance our understanding of the biology of individual PARPs, but may provide improved therapeutic options for patients. PMID:24392349

  15. Selection of Cooperation in Spatially Structured Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyunmo; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    The social dilemma games give rise to an emergence of cooperation in which altruistic individuals survive the natural selection at higher rate than random chance. We try to extend our understanding of this spatial reciprocity by including the impact of degree-degree correlation on the propensity toward prosocial behaviour in an otherwise well-mixed population. In a stochastic death-birth process with weak selection, we find that the disassortative degree mixing, or negative correlation between the degrees of neighbouring nodes significantly promotes the fixation of cooperators whereas the assortative mixing acts to suppress it. This is consistent with the fact that the spatial heterogeneity weakens the average tendency of a population to cooperate, which we describe in a unified scheme of the effective isothermality in coarse-grained networks. We also discuss the individual-level incentives that indirectly foster restructuring the social networks toward the more cooperative topologies.

  16. The perfidious effect of topical placebo: calibration of Staphylococcus aureus ventilator-associated pneumonia incidence within selective digestive decontamination studies versus the broader evidence base.

    PubMed

    Hurley, James C

    2013-09-01

    Among various methods for preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), the evidence base for selective digestive decontamination (SDD) appears most compelling. However, the extent of Staphylococcus aureus emergence with SDD use remains uncertain. Groups from 37 observational studies and component (control and intervention) groups from 58 studies of SDD and other methods of VAP prevention were sourced exclusively from 10 systematic reviews. S. aureus as a proportion of VAP isolates (S. aureus isolate proportion [S. aureus IP]) among component groups was calibrated versus that among observational groups (the benchmark). The influence of topical placebo used for blinding purposes and other group-level factors was estimated using generalized estimating equation methods (GEE). The mean S. aureus IP is 22% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19 to 25) for 37 observational groups versus 32% (24 to 41) and 20% (15 to 25) for 22 control groups from the SDD evidence base which did versus did not receive topical placebo, respectively. In GEE models including all 148 observational and component groups, membership of a control (P = 0.03) or intervention (P < 0.001) group of an SDD study that used topical placebo was associated with higher S. aureus IP, whereas, in contrast, membership of these groups was without effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Topical placebo is implicated as a vehicle for selective cross-infection with S. aureus within the specific context of the SDD evidence base. This effect of topical placebo is perfidious; it could contribute to the higher VAP incidence and inflate the apparent "effectiveness" of SDD. The SDD evidence base requires reappraisal. PMID:23836178

  17. A pilot study on the incidence of severe photosensitivity reactions leading to hospitalization linked to topical ketoprofen and other medications in selected European regions.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Simone; Naldi, Luigi; Lecchi, Silvia; Kürzinger, Marie-Laure; Auclert, Laurent; Gori, Mario; Chosidow, Olivier; Hercogova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of exposure to topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly ketoprofen, in a convenience sample of the population, to obtain estimates of the incidence of severe photosensitivity leading to hospitalization, and to assess causative factors in three catchment areas: the Paris metropolitan area, the Lombardy region (Italy) and the Prague area. All cases of severe photosensitivity not explained by underlying conditions and admitted to hospitals in the selected areas were included in the study. Controls were patients consecutively admitted to hospitals, in the same areas, for an acute condition or for an elective procedure not suspected of being related to medication use. From October 2012 to September 2013, 920 controls were recruited (median age 44 years, 50.8% females); 8 severe photosensitivity cases were reported in the population aged 18-74 years of the 3 geographical areas during the 1-year surveillance period, corresponding to an incidence rate of 4.81 cases per 10 million person-years (95% confidence interval - CI, 2.07-9.48). Six controls reported 1-month exposure to topical ketoprofen, with an estimated prevalence of 0.65% (95% CI, 0.24-1.42). The population attributable risk for severe photosensitivity reactions linked to ketoprofen was 11.92% (95% CI, -0.12-52.99). This study was conducted in selected European areas and showed that the incidence of severe photosensitivity reactions leading to hospitalization as well as the exposure rate to topical ketoprofen were low. Among topical NSAIDs, topical ketoprofen was the leading cause of photosensitivity reactions but accounted for a limited number of hospitalized cases. Probably most of the relevant reactions were managed in the outpatient setting and a community based case-control study is advisable. PMID:27433339

  18. Target Selection and Determination of Function in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Watson, James D.; Todd, Annabel E.; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A.; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question. PMID:12880206

  19. Structures and Functions of Selective Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.

    While neuropsychology relates the neural structures damaged in traumatic brain injury with their cognitive functions in daily life, this report reviews evidence that elementary operations of cognition as defined by cognitive studies are the level at which the brain localizes its computations. Orienting of visual attention is used as a model task.…

  20. Ciclopirox Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... ciclopirox topical solution.Ciclopirox topical solution may catch fire. Do not use this medication near heat or ... have ever had any disease that affects your immune system, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or ...

  1. Testosterone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with ... topical may control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. Continue to use testosterone topical even ...

  2. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  3. A Structured Interview for the Selection of Physician's Assistant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebuhr, Bruce R.; And Others

    To improve the reliability of selection interviews, the faculty of the University of Texas Medical Branch physician's assistant program developed a structured fourteen-category interview. The thirty-minute interview was used to select from 94 applicants; each applicant was interviewed three times and independently rated on a five-point scale of…

  4. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10–12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area. PMID:27191008

  5. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S L

    2016-03-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10-12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area. PMID:27191008

  6. Students Fail to Transfer Knowledge of Chromosome Structure to Topics Pertaining to Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Dina L.; Catavero, Christina M.; Wright, L. Kate

    2012-01-01

    Cellular processes that rely on knowledge of molecular behavior are difficult for students to comprehend. For example, thorough understanding of meiosis requires students to integrate several complex concepts related to chromosome structure and function. Using a grounded theory approach, we have unified classroom observations, assessment data, and…

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW Elasto-capillarity: deforming an elastic structure with a liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, B.; Bico, J.

    2010-12-01

    Although negligible at macroscopic scales, capillary forces become dominant as the sub-millimetric scales of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are considered. We review various situations, not limited to micro-technologies, where capillary forces are able to deform elastic structures. In particular, we define the different length scales that are relevant for 'elasto-capillary' problems. We focus on the case of slender structures (lamellae, rods and sheets) and describe the size of a bundle of wet hair, the condition for a flexible rod to pierce a liquid interface or the fate of a liquid droplet deposited on a flexible thin sheet. These results can be generalized to similar situations involving adhesion or fracture energy, which widens the scope of possible applications from biological systems, to stiction issues in micro-fabrication processes, the manufacturing of 3D microstructures or the formation of blisters in thin film coatings.

  8. Selective reinforcement of wing structure for flutter prevention.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Stroud, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an analytical study are presented on the use of boron polyimide filamentary composite material for the purpose of increasing the flutter speed of a simple titanium full depth sandwich wing structure designed for strength. The results clearly demonstrate that selective reinforcement of wing surfaces, using judiciously placed filamentary composites, promises sizable mass savings in the design of advanced aircraft structures.

  9. Early Childhood Education: Organization of Reference Topics for Use in Undergraduate Courses. ERIC 1967-Spring 1973. (A Selective Listing).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallat, Cynthia, Comp.

    This selective bibliography cites references pertaining to early childhood education from "Research in Education" (RIE) and "Current Index to Journals in Education" (CIJE). The bibliography is divided into three sections. The first two sections contain references from RIE and CIJE from spring 1967 through spring 1973; the last section updates the…

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Trends in the electronic structure of dilute nitride alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, E. P.; Lindsay, A.; Klar, P. J.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.

    2009-03-01

    The band-anticrossing (BAC) model has been widely applied to analyse the electronic structure of dilute nitride III-V-N alloys such as GaNxAs1-x. The BAC model describes the strong band gap bowing observed at low N composition in GaNxAs1-x in terms of an interaction between the GaAs host matrix conduction band edge and a higher lying band of localized N resonant states. In practice, replacing As by N introduces a range of N-related defect levels, associated with isolated N atoms, N-N pairs and larger clusters of N atoms. We show that the effect of such defect levels on the alloy conduction band structure is strongly dependent on the relative energy of the defect levels and the host conduction band edge. We first consider GaNxAs1-x, where we show that the unexpectedly large electron effective mass and gyromagnetic ratio, and their non-monotonic variation with x, are due to hybridization between the conduction band edge and specific nitrogen states close to the band edge. The N-related defect levels lie below the conduction band edge in GaNxP1-x. We must therefore explicitly treat the interaction between the higher lying GaP host Γ conduction band minimum and defect states associated with a random distribution of N atoms in order to obtain a good description of the lowest conduction states in disordered GaPN alloys. Turning to other alloys, N-related defect levels should generally lie well above the conduction band minimum in InNSb, with the band dispersion of InNSb then well described by a two-level BAC model. Both InP and InAs are intermediate between InSb and GaAs. By contrast, we calculate that N-related defect levels lie close to the conduction band minimum in GaNSb, and will therefore strongly perturb the lowest conduction states in this alloy. Overall, we conclude that the BAC model provides a good qualitative explanation of the electronic properties of dilute nitride alloys, but that it is in many cases necessary to include the details of the distribution of

  11. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Supermolecular liquid-crystalline structures in solutions of amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Levchenko, E. B.

    1983-09-01

    This paper reviews the physical properties of liquid-crystalline phases arising in solutions containing molecules of amphiphilic substances. The basic characteristics of micelle formation in dilute solutions, models of sphere-disk or sphere-cylinder structural transformations, as well as phase transitions related to the appearance of lyotropic mesophases in the system, including nematic, lamellar, hexagonal, and others, are examined. The results of experimental and theoretical investigation of "solvation" forces acting between micelles in the solvent, as well as recently studied models of swelling of lamellar phases are presented. The phenomena occurring near the inversion point of microemulsions in amphiphile-oil-water systems are examined briefly. The role of liquid-crystalline ordering in some biological systems is discussed.

  12. Selecting Earthquake Records for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mario E.

    2008-07-08

    An area in earthquake risk reduction that needs an urgent examination is the selection of earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. An often-mentioned shortcoming from results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of structures is that these results are limited to the type of records that these analyses use as input data. This paper proposes a procedure for selecting earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. This procedure uses a seismic damage index evaluated using the hysteretic energy dissipated by a Single Degree of Freedom System (SDOF) representing a multi-degree-of freedom structure responding to an earthquake record, and the plastic work capacity of the system at collapse. The type of structural system is considered using simple parameters. The proposed method is based on the evaluation of the damage index for a suite of earthquake records and a selected type of structural system. A set of 10 strong ground motion records is analyzed to show an application of the proposed procedure for selecting earthquake records for structural design.

  13. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  14. Multi-Topic Tracking Model for dynamic social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhua; Liu, Changzheng; Zhao, Ming; Li, Ruixuan; Xiao, Hailing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The topic tracking problem has attracted much attention in the last decades. However, existing approaches rarely consider network structures and textual topics together. In this paper, we propose a novel statistical model based on dynamic bayesian network, namely Multi-Topic Tracking Model for Dynamic Social Network (MTTD). It takes influence phenomenon, selection phenomenon, document generative process and the evolution of textual topics into account. Specifically, in our MTTD model, Gibbs Random Field is defined to model the influence of historical status of users in the network and the interdependency between them in order to consider the influence phenomenon. To address the selection phenomenon, a stochastic block model is used to model the link generation process based on the users' interests to topics. Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis (PLSA) is used to describe the document generative process according to the users' interests. Finally, the dependence on the historical topic status is also considered to ensure the continuity of the topic itself in topic evolution model. Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is utilized to estimate parameters in the proposed MTTD model. Empirical experiments on real datasets show that the MTTD model performs better than Popular Event Tracking (PET) and Dynamic Topic Model (DTM) in generalization performance, topic interpretability performance, topic content evolution and topic popularity evolution performance.

  15. Materials research at selected Japanese laboratories. Based on a 1992 visit: Overview, summary of highlights, notes on laboratories and topics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    I visited Japan from June 29 to August 1, 1992. The purpose of this visit was to assess the status of materials science research at selected governmental, university and industrial laboratories and to established acquaintances with Japanese researchers. The areas of research covered by these visits included ceramics, oxide superconductors, intermetallics alloys, superhard materials and diamond films, high-temperature materials and properties, mechanical properties, fracture, creep, fatigue, defects, materials for nuclear reactor applications and irradiation effects, high pressure synthesis, self-propagating high temperature synthesis, microanalysis, magnetic properties and magnetic facilities, and surface science.

  16. Selected topics in point-of-care testing. Urinalysis, pregnancy testing, microbiology, fecal occult blood, and other tests.

    PubMed

    Lee-Lewandrowski, E; Lewandrowski, K

    2001-06-01

    The menu of tests available at the point of care continues to expand. Many of these tests present unique opportunities to deploy point-of-care technologies in the home, outpatient, and hospital settings. The future will inevitably create new applications for POCT. The success of these efforts will be in part determined by how technologies for specific applications are selected and by the ability to manage new point-of-care tests as part of an organizational point-of-care program. The possibilities to improve patient care are obvious, provided adequate attention is paid to ensuring quality testing and to managing patient data from these novel technologies. PMID:11396091

  17. Tracking topic birth and death in LDA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Andrew T.; Robinson, David Gerald

    2011-09-01

    Most topic modeling algorithms that address the evolution of documents over time use the same number of topics at all times. This obscures the common occurrence in the data where new subjects arise and old ones diminish or disappear entirely. We propose an algorithm to model the birth and death of topics within an LDA-like framework. The user selects an initial number of topics, after which new topics are created and retired without further supervision. Our approach also accommodates many of the acceleration and parallelization schemes developed in recent years for standard LDA. In recent years, topic modeling algorithms such as latent semantic analysis (LSA)[17], latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA)[10] and their descendants have offered a powerful way to explore and interrogate corpora far too large for any human to grasp without assistance. Using such algorithms we are able to search for similar documents, model and track the volume of topics over time, search for correlated topics or model them with a hierarchy. Most of these algorithms are intended for use with static corpora where the number of documents and the size of the vocabulary are known in advance. Moreover, almost all current topic modeling algorithms fix the number of topics as one of the input parameters and keep it fixed across the entire corpus. While this is appropriate for static corpora, it becomes a serious handicap when analyzing time-varying data sets where topics come and go as a matter of course. This is doubly true for online algorithms that may not have the option of revising earlier results in light of new data. To be sure, these algorithms will account for changing data one way or another, but without the ability to adapt to structural changes such as entirely new topics they may do so in counterintuitive ways.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Fabrication of micro- and nano-structured materials using mask-less processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sudipta

    2007-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale devices are used in electronics, micro-electro- mechanical, bio-analytical and medical components. An essential step for the fabrication of such small scale devices is photolithography. Photolithography requires a master mask to transfer micrometre or sub-micrometre scale patterns onto a substrate. The requirement of a physical, rigid mask can impede progress in applications which require rapid prototyping, flexible substrates, multiple alignment and 3D fabrication. Alternative technologies, which do not require the use of a physical mask, are suitable for these applications. In this paper mask-less methods of micro- and nano-scale fabrication have been discussed. The most common technique, which is the laser direct imaging (LDI), technique has been applied to fabricate micrometre scale structures on printed circuit boards, glass and epoxy. LDI can be combined with chemical methods to deposit metals, inorganic materials as well as some organic entities at the micrometre scale. Inkjet technology can be used to fabricate micrometre patterns of etch resists, organic transistors as well as arrays for bioanalysis. Electrohydrodynamic atomisation is used to fabricate micrometre scale ceramic features. Electrochemical methodologies offer a variety of technical solutions for micro- and nano-fabrication owing to the fact that electron charge transfer can be constrained to a solid liquid interface. Electrochemical printing is an adaptation of inkjet printing which can be used for rapid prototyping of metallic circuits. Micro-machining using nano-second voltage pulses have been used to fabricate high precision features on metals and semiconductors. Optimisation of reactor, electrochemistry and fluid flow (EnFACE) has also been employed to transfer micrometre scale patterns on a copper substrate. Nano-scale features have been fabricated by using specialised tools such as scanning tunnelling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and focused ion beam. The

  19. Computational approaches to selecting and optimising targets for structural biology.

    PubMed

    Overton, Ian M; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2011-09-01

    Selection of protein targets for study is central to structural biology and may be influenced by numerous factors. A key aim is to maximise returns for effort invested by identifying proteins with the balance of biophysical properties that are conducive to success at all stages (e.g. solubility, crystallisation) in the route towards a high resolution structural model. Selected targets can be optimised through construct design (e.g. to minimise protein disorder), switching to a homologous protein, and selection of experimental methodology (e.g. choice of expression system) to prime for efficient progress through the structural proteomics pipeline. Here we discuss computational techniques in target selection and optimisation, with more detailed focus on tools developed within the Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility (SSPF); namely XANNpred, ParCrys, OB-Score (target selection) and TarO (target optimisation). TarO runs a large number of algorithms, searching for homologues and annotating the pool of possible alternative targets. This pool of putative homologues is presented in a ranked, tabulated format and results are also visualised as an automatically generated and annotated multiple sequence alignment. The target selection algorithms each predict the propensity of a selected protein target to progress through the experimental stages leading to diffracting crystals. This single predictor approach has advantages for target selection, when compared with an approach using two or more predictors that each predict for success at a single experimental stage. The tools described here helped SSPF achieve a high (21%) success rate in progressing cloned targets to diffraction-quality crystals. PMID:21906678

  20. The Structure of Linkage Disequilibrium Around a Selective Sweep

    PubMed Central

    McVean, Gil

    2007-01-01

    The fixation of advantageous mutations by natural selection has a profound impact on patterns of linked neutral variation. While it has long been appreciated that such selective sweeps influence the frequency spectrum of nearby polymorphism, it has only recently become clear that they also have dramatic effects on local linkage disequilibrium. By extending previous results on the relationship between genealogical structure and linkage disequilibrium, I obtain simple expressions for the influence of a selective sweep on patterns of allelic association. I show that sweeps can increase, decrease, or even eliminate linkage disequilibrium (LD) entirely depending on the relative position of the selected and neutral loci. I also show the importance of the age of the neutral mutations in predicting their degree of association and describe the consequences of such results for the interpretation of empirical data. In particular, I demonstrate that while selective sweeps can eliminate LD, they generate patterns of genetic variation very different from those expected from recombination hotspots. PMID:17194788

  1. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Jiang, Deen

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  2. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 2. Special topics in soil/structure interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: definition of seismic input ground motion, review of state-of-the-art procedures, analysis guidelines, rock/structure interaction analysis example, comparison of two- and three-dimensional analyses, and comparison of analyses using FLUSH and TRI/SAC Codes. (DLC)

  3. Structural features for functional selectivity at serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2013-05-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or noncanonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies showing that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide, its precursor ergotamine (ERG), and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT2B 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor, whereas they are relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure and function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways is important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  4. Fluorouracil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by years of too much exposure to sunlight). Fluorouracil cream and topical solution are also used ... plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and UV light (such as tanning booths) and ...

  5. Estradiol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medication that is applied topically to the vagina. Estradiol is in a class of medications called ... swelling, redness, burning, irritation, or itching of the vagina vaginal discharge Some side effects can be serious. ...

  6. Mometasone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Mometasone comes as a topical cream, ointment, and lotion. It usually is applied externally once a day. ... affected skin areas once daily.To apply the lotion, place a few drops on the affected areas ...

  7. Fluorouracil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... topical solution are used to treat actinic or solar keratoses (scaly or crusted lesions [skin areas] caused ... you are using fluorouracil to treat actinic or solar keratoses, you should continue using it until the ...

  8. Bexarotene Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... talking to your doctor.Bexarotene gel may catch fire. Do not use this medication near a source ... sunlamps and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Topical bexarotene may make your skin sensitive to ...

  9. Future high intensity ISOL facilities: Selected current R&D topics and possible synergies with other projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Alex C.

    2003-05-01

    The long-term future of ISOL facilities will be governed by the quest for ever increasing secondary beam intensities. One important aspect concerns a new generation of high-power driver accelerators which aim at multi-megawatt beam powers, used in a two-step production scheme for fission products. Within the EURISOL study, e.g. a 1 GeV, 5 mA proton has been investigated in some detail. It would be upgradeable in energy and also have, up to a certain extend, the capability for heavy-ion acceleration. The required R&D programme was assessed, and found to be in the mainstream of today's accelerator development which addresses also other projects like accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste, neutrino beams, …. The concomitant development of high-power spallation targets and the secondary uranium targets is the second issue where a lot of R&D effort is done by several communities. Linked to this are also the studies in which photo-fission is used as a "low-cost" option for a dedicated region of the nuclear chart. The present paper will introduce in this general context, and discuss (selected) relevant new experimental results which are obtained in linac in particular.

  10. The frequency selectivity of double H-shaped metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Guozhong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design and numerical simulation of the double H-shaped metallic periodic structure based on finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in terahertz frequency range. The double H-shaped structure unit cell consists of two H structures overlapped in the same plane. Numerical simulation results show that the double H-shaped structure results in a distinct and strong transmission trap in 0.2~3.0THz range. The position and the full wave at half maximum (FWHM) of transmission trap are changed with different structure size. The surface current distribution of structure is numerical simulated, which clarifies the frequency selection mechanism of the transmission spectra.

  11. Interest area selection for navigation based on structured edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Shang, Ke; Li, ShaoJun; Dou, Hao; Tian, JinWen; Ming, Delie

    2015-12-01

    The scene matching based navigation is an important precision navigation technology for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Selection of interest area where reference image is made has an important influence on the precision of matching result besides the performance of match algorithm. In this paper, a method to select interest area based on structured edge detection is proposed. We use a data driven approach that classifies each pixel with a typical structured edge label. We propose a method that combines these labels into a feature measuring suitable to match of a region. Then a SVM classifier is trained to classify the features and get the final result of the selection of interest area. The experimental result shows that the proposed method is valid and effective.

  12. LIFE Materials: Topical Assessment Report for LIFE Volume 1 TOPIC: Solid First Wall and Structural Components TASK: Radiation Effects on First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A

    2008-11-26

    This report consists of the following chapters: CHAPTER A: LIFE Requirements for Materials. Part 1: The structure of the First Wall--Basic requirements; A qualitative view of the challenge; The candidate materials; and Base-line material's properties. CHAPTER B: Summary of Existing Knowledge--Brief historical introduction; Design window; The temperature window; Evolution of the design window with damage; Damage calculations; He and H production; Swelling resistance; Incubation dose for swelling; Design criterion No. 1, Strength; Design criterion No. 2, Corrosion resistance; Design criterion No. 3, Creep resistance; Design criterion No. 4, Radiation induced embrittlement; and Conclusions. CHAPTER C: Identification of Gaps in Knowledge & Vulnerabilities. CHAPTER D: Strategy and Future Work.

  13. Item Selection, Evaluation, and Simple Structure in Personality Data

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Erik; Turkheimer, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We report an investigation of the genesis and interpretation of simple structure in personality data using two very different self-reported data sets. The first consists of a set of relatively unselected lexical descriptors, whereas the second is based on responses to a carefully constructed instrument. In both data sets, we explore the degree of simple structure by comparing factor solutions to solutions from simulated data constructed to have either strong or weak simple structure. The analysis demonstrates that there is little evidence of simple structure in the unselected items, and a moderate degree among the selected items. In both instruments, however, much of the simple structure that could be observed originated in a strong dimension of positive vs. negative evaluation. PMID:20694168

  14. Instant fabrication and selection of folded structures using drop impact

    PubMed Central

    Antkowiak, Arnaud; Audoly, Basile; Josserand, Christophe; Neukirch, Sébastien; Rivetti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A drop impacting a target cutout in a thin polymer film is wrapped by the film in a dynamic sequence involving both capillary forces and inertia. Different 3D structures can be produced from a given target by slightly varying the impact parameters. A simplified model for a nonlinear dynamic Elastica coupled with a drop successfully explains this shape selection and yields detailed quantitative agreement with experiments. This first venture into the largely unexplored dynamics of elastocapillary assemblies opens up the perspective of mass production of 3D packages with individual shape selection. PMID:21670249

  15. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  16. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation. PMID:25466089

  17. Selection of active member locations in adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bruno, R.; Salama, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effective use of multiple passive and active members in adaptive structures necessitates that these members be optimally distributed throughout the structure. In truss structures, the problem falls into the class of combinatorial optimization for which the solution becomes exceedingly intractable as the problem size increases. This is overcome by using the simulated annealing algorithm to obtain near optimal locations for passive and/or active members. The maximization of the rate of energy dissipation over a finite time period as the measure of optimality is adopted. The selection of optimal locations for both passive and active members is consistently treated through the use of the energy dissipation rate criterion within the simulated annealing algorithm. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology for large truss structures.

  18. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  19. Evaluation of hydroxyimine as cytochrome P450-selective prodrug structure.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, Hanna; Mähönen, Niina; Laitinen, Marja-Leena; Jaurakkajärvi, Marja; Raunio, Hannu; Juvonen, Risto O; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Järvinen, Tomi; Rautio, Jarkko

    2006-02-01

    Hydroxyimine derivatives of ketoprofen (1) and nabumetone (2) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo as cytochrome P450-selective intermediate prodrug structures of ketones. 2 released nabumetone in vitro in the presence of isolated rat and human liver microsomes and in different recombinant human CYP isoforms. Bioconversion of 2 to both nabumetone and its active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), was further confirmed in rats in vivo. Results indicate that hydroxyimine is a useful intermediate prodrug structure for ketone drugs. PMID:16451086

  20. Wireless structural sensor made with frequency selective surface antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Jaehwan

    2012-04-01

    Nondestructive Structural health monitoring (SHM) system using wireless sensor network is the one of important issue for aerospace and civil engineering. Chipless passive wireless sensor system is one of novel methods for SHM which uses the electromagnetic wave characteristic change by geometrical change of electromagnetic resonators or impedance change of functional material sensing part without RFID chip. In this paper, the chipless passive wireless SHM sensor using frequency selective surface (FSS) is investigated. Electromagnetic characteristic change of FSS by mechanical strain or structural damage is investigated by simulation and experiment.

  1. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    PubMed Central

    Standley, Daron M; Toh, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website . Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies. PMID:17407606

  2. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Rashid, Asim J; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W; Iyer, Shrivats M; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L; Malenka, Robert C; Josselyn, Sheena A; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-26

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near -65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼ 15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor-based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure-function relationships of the light-gated pore. PMID

  3. Select topics in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Noto, Anthony; Marcolini, Evie

    2014-11-01

    Neurocritical care aims to improve outcomes in patients with life-threatening neurologic illness. The scope of neurocritical care extends beyond the more commonly encountered and important field of cerebrovascular disease, as described previously. This article focuses on neuromuscular, neuroinfectious, and neuroimmunologic conditions that are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the acutely neurologically ill patient. As understanding continues to increase regarding the physiology of these conditions and the best treatment, rapid identification, triage, and treatment of these patients in the emergency department is paramount. PMID:25441043

  4. Selected topics in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2013-06-10

    In this lectures after a brief introduction to stellar reaction rates and its implementation in nuclear networks, I discuss the nuclear physics aspects of core collapse supernova and explosive nucleosynthesis and their significance for the production of heavy elements by the rapid neutron capture process and potentially also by the recently discovered {nu}p process.

  5. Generating Topic Headings during Reading of Screen-Based Text Facilitates Learning of Structural Knowledge and Impairs Learning of Lower-Level Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Marker, Anthony W.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation considers the effects of learner-generated headings on memory. Participants (N = 63) completed a computer-based lesson with or without learner-generated text topic headings. Posttests included a cued recall test of factual knowledge and a sorting task measure of structural knowledge. A significant disordinal interaction was…

  6. Inexpensive Method for Selecting Receptor Structures for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zunnan; Wong, Chung F

    2016-01-25

    This article introduces a screening performance index (SPI) to help select from a number of experimental structures one or a few that are more likely to identify more actives among its top hits from virtual screening of a compound library. It achieved this by docking only known actives to the experimental structures without considering a large number of decoys to reduce computational costs. The SPI is calculated by using the docking energies of the actives to all the receptor structures. We evaluated the performance of the SPI by applying it to study eight protein systems: fatty acid binding protein adipocyte FABP4, serine/threonine-protein kinase BRAF, beta-1 adrenergic receptor ADRB1, TGF-beta receptor type I TGFR1, adenosylhomocysteinase SAHH, thyroid hormone receptor beta-1 THB, phospholipase A2 group IIA PA2GA, and cytochrome P450 3a4 CP3A4. We found that the SPI agreed with the results from other popular performance metrics such as Boltzmann-Enhanced Discrimination Receiver Operator Characteristics (BEDROC), Robust Initial Enhancement (RIE), Area Under Accumulation Curve (AUAC), and Enrichment Factor (EF) but is less expensive to calculate. SPI also performed better than the best docking energy, the molecular volume of the bound ligand, and the resolution of crystal structure in selecting good receptor structures for virtual screening. The implications of these findings were further discussed in the context of ensemble docking, in situations when no experimental structure for the targeted protein was available, or under circumstances when quick choices of receptor structures need to be made before quantitative indexes such as the SPI and BEDROC can be calculated. PMID:26651874

  7. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E.; Rashid, Asim J.; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W.; Iyer, Shrivats M.; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near −65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor–based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure–function relationships of the light-gated pore. PMID

  8. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  9. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  10. Topical Research: Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Karen

    This lesson plan can be used in social studies, language arts, or library research. The instructional objective is for students to select a topic of study relating to Africa, write a thesis statement, collect information from media sources, and develop a conclusion. The teacher may assign the lesson for written or oral evaluation. The teacher…

  11. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  12. Optimization of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    1994-01-01

    Research carried out is grouped under two topics: (1) Design Optimization, and (2) Integrated Force Method of Analysis. Design Optimization Research Topics are singularity alleviation enhances structural optimization methods, computer based design capability extended through substructure synthesis, and optimality criteria provides optimum design for a select class of structural problems. Integrated Force Method of Analysis Research Topics are boundary compatibility formulation improves stress analysis of shell structures. Brief descriptions of the four topics are appended.

  13. Structural principles of nucleoside selectivity in a 2'-deoxyguanosine riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Pikovskaya, Olga; Polonskaia, Anna; Patel, Dinshaw J; Serganov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    Purine riboswitches have an essential role in genetic regulation of bacterial metabolism. This family includes the 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) riboswitch, which is involved in feedback control of deoxyguanosine biosynthesis. To understand the principles that define dG selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the natural Mesoplasma florum riboswitch bound to cognate dG as well as to noncognate guanosine, deoxyguanosine monophosphate and guanosine monophosphate. Comparison with related purine riboswitch structures reveals that the dG riboswitch achieves its specificity through modification of key interactions involving the nucleobase and rearrangement of the ligand-binding pocket to accommodate the additional sugar moiety. In addition, we observe new conformational changes beyond the junctional binding pocket extending as far as peripheral loop-loop interactions. It appears that re-engineering riboswitch scaffolds will require consideration of selectivity features dispersed throughout the riboswitch tertiary fold, and structure-guided drug design efforts targeted to junctional RNA scaffolds need to be addressed within such an expanded framework. PMID:21841796

  14. In vitro spectrum of pexiganan activity; bactericidal action and resistance selection tested against pathogens with elevated MIC values to topical agents.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Robert K; Rhomberg, Paul R; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-09-01

    Pexiganan, in Phase 3 clinical development for topical use, exhibited bactericidal activity in vitro against Gram-positive and -negative isolates and was also shown to have a low potential for resistance development in broth serial passage experiments. Susceptibility studies were performed against bacterial isolates (110 total from 2004 to 2013; primarily from skin and soft tissue infections) selected for elevated MIC values (non-wildtype [WT] distributions) to bacitracin, polymyxin B, neomycin, mupirocin, retapamulin, fusidic acid, or gentamicin. A narrow range of pexiganan MIC values (4-32 μg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus was observed (MIC50 and MIC90 values, 16 μg/mL) with a pexiganan mode and MIC50 value for the subsets of isolates with non-WT MIC values to bacitracin and neomycin (n = 14), fusidic acid (n = 11), mupirocin (n = 12) and retapamulin (n = 11) at 16 μg/mL. For coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), the pexiganan mode and MIC50 values were 4 μg/mL. The pexiganan mode and MIC50 for each non-WT CoNS subset was also 4 μg/mL. Pexiganan MIC values for Enterococcus faecium was 8 μg/mL, but E. faecalis isolates exhibited MIC values that ranged from 128-256 μg/mL. Pexiganan was active against β-hemolytic streptococci including non-WT subsets (MIC range, 4-64 μg/mL). MIC values for pexiganan varied by species for viridans group streptococci, with highest values occurring for Streptococcus oralis. The broad bactericidal spectrum of pexiganan activity and low potential for resistance selection offers the possibility that this experimental agent may be able to play an important role in the current environment of emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens. PMID:27352729

  15. Topical Steroids.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gretchen M; Harvey, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an inflammatory condition with heterogeneous pathophysiology. A cornerstone of the management of this condition is the use of anti-inflammatory agents. Corticosteroids are very effective and the most commonly used, but other drugs with immunodulatory activity such as anti-IL5, doxycycline (Th2), and macrolides (anti-neutrophilic/IL8) have been shown to have efficacy. Although systemic corticosteroids have shown benefit in managing this condition, the frequency of use often required in this condition is associated with significant adverse effects. Topical corticosteroids, particularly when utilized after endoscopic sinus surgery and delivered in a high volume, high pressure manner, provide the desired anti-inflammatory effects with nearly negligible systemic absorption. Studies assessing the long-term use of second generation topical corticosteroids have demonstrated no significant effects on cortisol levels, growth rate, intraocular pressures or lens opacification, or local mucosal atrophy. Patients who often respond most favorably to corticosteroid treatment are those with a Th2-mediated, highly eosinophilic CRSwNP. However, there is a subset of patients who are steroid resistant. In the case of a predominantly neutrophilic CRSwNP, it is important to be aware that patients may respond well to the use of macrolide therapy. Additionally, the use of verapamil has shown promise in increasing steroid responsiveness in a difficult to treat group of patients with steroid resistance. Topical corticosteroids play a key role in the long term management of this complicated inflammatory condition by providing the much needed pharmacologic local control with minimal systemic adverse effects. PMID:27466854

  16. Transmission properties of frequency selective structures with air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Li-Feng; Lü, Ming-Yun; Wu, Zhe

    2010-12-01

    The transmission properties of compound frequency selective structures with dielectric slab and air gaps were investigated by computation and experimentation. Mechanism analyses were also carried out. Results show that the air gaps have a distinct influence on the transmission properties. Resonant frequency of the structure would increase rapidly when the air gap appears. After the gap gets larger to a specific value, generally 1/5 wavelength corresponding to the resonant frequency, the transmission properties would change periodically with the gap thickness. The change of transmission properties in one period has a close relationship with the dielectric thickness. These results provide a new method for designing a bandpass radome of large incidence angle and low loss with the concept of stealth shield radome.

  17. Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Erin L.; Tobalske, Bret W.; Emlen, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of sexually selected weapons differ widely among species, but the drivers of this diversity remain poorly understood. Existing explanations suggest weapon shapes reflect structural adaptations to different fighting styles, yet explicit tests of this hypothesis are lacking. We constructed finite element models of the horns of different rhinoceros beetle species to test whether functional specializations for increased performance under species-specific fighting styles could have contributed to the diversification of weapon form. We find that horns are both stronger and stiffer in response to species-typical fighting loads and that they perform more poorly under atypical fighting loads, which suggests weapons are structurally adapted to meet the functional demands of fighting. Our research establishes a critical link between weapon form and function, revealing one way male–male competition can drive the diversification of animal weapons. PMID:25201949

  18. Cre recombinase expression or topical tamoxifen treatment do not affect retinal structure and function, neuronal vulnerability or glial reactivity in the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Boneva, S K; Groß, T R; Schlecht, A; Schmitt, S I; Sippl, C; Jägle, H; Volz, C; Neueder, A; Tamm, E R; Braunger, B M

    2016-06-14

    Mice with a constitutive or tamoxifen-induced Cre recombinase (Cre) expression are frequently used research tools to allow the conditional deletion of target genes via the Cre-loxP system. Here we analyzed for the first time in a comprehensive and comparative way, whether retinal Cre expression or topical tamoxifen treatment itself would cause structural or functional changes, including changes in the expression profiles of molecular markers, glial reactivity and photoreceptor vulnerability. To this end, we characterized the transgenic α-Cre, Lmop-Cre and the tamoxifen-inducible CAGG-CreER™ mouse lines, all having robust Cre expression in the neuronal retina. In addition, we characterized the effects of topical tamoxifen treatment itself in wildtype mice. We performed morphometric analyses, immunohistochemical staining, in vivo ERG and angiography analyses and realtime RT-PCR analyses. Furthermore, the influence of Cre recombinase or topical tamoxifen exposure on neuronal vulnerability was studied by using light damage as a model for photoreceptor degeneration. Taken together, neither the expression of Cre, nor topical tamoxifen treatment caused detectable changes in retinal structure and function, the expression profiles of investigated molecular markers, glial reactivity and photoreceptor vulnerability. We conclude that the Cre-loxP system and its induction through tamoxifen is a safe and reliable method to delete desired target genes in the neural retina. PMID:27026593

  19. Structural basis for selective inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni: kinetic and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Marcelo S; Postigo, Matheus P; Pereira, Humberto M; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2010-02-15

    Selectivity plays a crucial role in the design of enzyme inhibitors as novel antiparasitic agents, particularly in cases where the target enzyme is also present in the human host. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni (SmPNP) is an attractive target for the discovery of potential antischistosomal agents. In the present work, kinetic studies were carried out in order to determine the inhibitory potency, mode of action and enzyme selectivity of a series of inhibitors of SmPNP. In addition, crystallographic studies provided important structural insights for rational inhibitor design, revealing consistent structural differences in the binding mode of the inhibitors in the active sites of the SmPNP and human PNP (HsPNP) structures. The molecular information gathered in this work should be useful for future medicinal chemistry efforts in the design of new inhibitors of SmPNP having increased affinity and selectivity. PMID:20129792

  20. Identifying Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Research in Selected Journals Published from 2003 to 2012: A Content Analysis of Research Topics and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Huang, Ronghuai; Yu, Junhui

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identity the emerging research trends in the field of computed-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) so as to provide insights for researchers and educators into research topics and issues for further exploration. This paper analyzed the research topics, methods and technology adoption of CSCL from 2003 to 2012. A total of 706…

  1. Composite Interstage Structural Concept Down Select Process and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Thoma, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Technologies (ACT) project evaluated several composite construction options for the Ares V Interstage to support the Constellation Program's goal of reducing the mass of vehicle dry structures. In Phase 1 of the project, eight candidate construction concepts were evaluated for the Ares V Interstage design. Trade studies were performed using finite element analyses to determine weight estimates for the construction concepts. An evaluation process was then used to down select the construction concepts down to two concepts for further consideration in Phase 2 of the project. In Phase 2 of the project, additional trade studies were performed using detailed finite element analyses of the Interstage and a final down select process was used to choose the recommended Interstage construction concept. The results of the study showed that a honeycomb sandwich design was the most favorable Interstage construction concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost. Details of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trade studies and down select process with final results are presented in the paper.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillaspy, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of highly charged ions, the methods of producing them (with particular emphasis on table-top devices), and their use as a tool for both basic science and applied technology. Topics discussed include: charge dependence and scaling laws along isoelectronic or isonuclear sequences (for wavefunction size or Bohr radius, ionization energy, dipole transition energy, relativistic fine structure, hyperfine structure, Zeeman effect, Stark effect, line intensities, linewidths, strength of parity violation, etc), changes in angular momentum coupling schemes, selection rules, interactions with surfaces, electron-impact ionization, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT), ion accelerators, atomic reference data, cosmic chronometers, laboratory x-ray astrophysics, vacuum polarization, solar flares, ion implantation, ion lithography, ion microprobes (SIMS and x-ray microscope), nuclear fusion diagnostics, nanotechnology, quantum computing, cancer therapy and biotechnology.

  3. Composite Load Spectra for Select Space Propulsion Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Hing W.; Newell, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Generic load models are described with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra (CLS) that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. These generic (coupled) models combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients are then determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. The entire simulation process is included in a CLS computer code. Applications of the computer code to various components in conjunction with the PSAM (Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method) to perform probabilistic load evaluation and life prediction evaluations are also described to illustrate the effectiveness of the coupled model approach.

  4. Population structure, migration, and diversifying selection in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Knijff, Peter de; Nivard, Michel G; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Brooks, Andrew; Ehli, Erik A; Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E; Hudziak, James J; Sullivan, Patrick F; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation in a population can be summarized through principal component analysis (PCA) on genome-wide data. PCs derived from such analyses are valuable for genetic association studies, where they can correct for population stratification. We investigated how to capture the genetic population structure in a well-characterized sample from the Netherlands and in a worldwide data set and examined whether (1) removing long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions and LD-based SNP pruning significantly improves correlations between PCs and geography and (2) whether genetic differentiation may have been influenced by migration and/or selection. In the Netherlands, three PCs showed significant correlations with geography, distinguishing between: (1) North and South; (2) East and West; and (3) the middle-band and the rest of the country. The third PC only emerged with minimized LD, which also significantly increased correlations with geography for the other two PCs. In addition to geography, the Dutch North–South PC showed correlations with genome-wide homozygosity (r=0.245), which may reflect a serial-founder effect due to northwards migration, and also with height (♂: r=0.142, ♀: r=0.153). The divergence between subpopulations identified by PCs is partly driven by selection pressures. The first three PCs showed significant signals for diversifying selection (545 SNPs - the majority within 184 genes). The strongest signal was observed between North and South for the functional SNP in HERC2 that determines human blue/brown eye color. Thus, this study demonstrates how to increase ancestry signals in a relatively homogeneous population and how those signals can reveal evolutionary history. PMID:23531865

  5. Population structure, migration, and diversifying selection in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Knijff, Peter; Nivard, Michel G; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Brooks, Andrew; Ehli, Erik A; Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E; Hudziak, James J; Sullivan, Patrick F; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-11-01

    Genetic variation in a population can be summarized through principal component analysis (PCA) on genome-wide data. PCs derived from such analyses are valuable for genetic association studies, where they can correct for population stratification. We investigated how to capture the genetic population structure in a well-characterized sample from the Netherlands and in a worldwide data set and examined whether (1) removing long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions and LD-based SNP pruning significantly improves correlations between PCs and geography and (2) whether genetic differentiation may have been influenced by migration and/or selection. In the Netherlands, three PCs showed significant correlations with geography, distinguishing between: (1) North and South; (2) East and West; and (3) the middle-band and the rest of the country. The third PC only emerged with minimized LD, which also significantly increased correlations with geography for the other two PCs. In addition to geography, the Dutch North-South PC showed correlations with genome-wide homozygosity (r=0.245), which may reflect a serial-founder effect due to northwards migration, and also with height (♂: r=0.142, ♀: r=0.153). The divergence between subpopulations identified by PCs is partly driven by selection pressures. The first three PCs showed significant signals for diversifying selection (545 SNPs - the majority within 184 genes). The strongest signal was observed between North and South for the functional SNP in HERC2 that determines human blue/brown eye color. Thus, this study demonstrates how to increase ancestry signals in a relatively homogeneous population and how those signals can reveal evolutionary history. PMID:23531865

  6. Structures of Potent Selective Peptide Mimetics Bound to Carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Buckman, B.; Bryant, J.; Chang, Z.; Chu, K.; Emayan, K.; Hrvatin, P.; Islam, I.; Morser, J.; Sukovich, D.; West, C.; Yuan, S.; Whitlow, M.

    2009-05-11

    This article reports the crystal structures of inhibitors of the functional form of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa). In vivo experiments indicate that selective inhibitors of TAFIa would be useful in the treatment of heart attacks. Since TAFIa rapidly degrades in solution, the homologous protein porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (pp-CpB) was used in these crystallography studies. Both TAFIa and pp-CpB are zinc-based exopeptidases that are specific for basic residues. The final development candidate, BX 528, is a potent inhibitor of TAFIa (2 nM) and has almost no measurable effect on the major selectivity target, carboxypeptidase N. BX 528 was designed to mimic the tripeptide Phe-Val-Lys. A sulfonamide replaces the Phe-Val amide bond and a phosphinate connects the Val and Lys groups. The phosphinate also chelates the active-site zinc. The electrostatic interactions with the protein mimic those of the natural substrate. The primary amine in BX 528 forms a salt bridge to Asp255 at the base of the S1 pocket. The carboxylic acid interacts with Arg145 and the sulfonamide is hydrogen bonded to Arg71. Isopropyl and phenyl groups replace the side chains of Val and Phe, respectively. A series of structures are presented here that illustrate the evolution of BX 528 from thiol-based inhibitors that mimic a free C-terminal arginine. The first step in development was the replacement of the thiol with a phosphinate. This caused a precipitous drop in binding affinity. Potency was reclaimed by extending the inhibitors into the downstream binding sites for the natural substrate.

  7. Current perspectives on the pediatric hip: selected topics in hip dysplasia, Perthes disease, and chondrolysis: synopsis of the hip subspecialty session at the POSNA Annual Meeting, May 1, 2013, Toronto.

    PubMed

    Millis, Michael B; Zaltz, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The following are proceedings from the Hip Breakout Session held at the 2013 annual meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America in Toronto, Canada. The organizer's goal of the meeting was to gather experts with years of clinical experience to discuss topics based upon both experience and current clinical evidence. The topics that were selected represented the most commonly encountered pathology where there are wide variations of clinical practice. The invited speakers were asked to summarize both their clinical experience and the current scientific evidence and to summarize areas that require further scientific investigation. PMID:25207735

  8. Structural deterministic safety factors selection criteria and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    Though current deterministic safety factors are arbitrarily and unaccountably specified, its ratio is rooted in resistive and applied stress probability distributions. This study approached the deterministic method from a probabilistic concept leading to a more systematic and coherent philosophy and criterion for designing more uniform and reliable high-performance structures. The deterministic method was noted to consist of three safety factors: a standard deviation multiplier of the applied stress distribution; a K-factor for the A- or B-basis material ultimate stress; and the conventional safety factor to ensure that the applied stress does not operate in the inelastic zone of metallic materials. The conventional safety factor is specifically defined as the ratio of ultimate-to-yield stresses. A deterministic safety index of the combined safety factors was derived from which the corresponding reliability proved the deterministic method is not reliability sensitive. The bases for selecting safety factors are presented and verification requirements are discussed. The suggested deterministic approach is applicable to all NASA, DOD, and commercial high-performance structures under static stresses.

  9. Structure-guided development of heterodimer-selective GPCR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Harald; Schellhorn, Tamara; Gienger, Marie; Schaab, Carolin; Kaindl, Jonas; Leeb, Laurin; Clark, Timothy; Möller, Dorothee; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand complexes allow a rational design of novel molecular probes and drugs. Here we report the structure-guided design, chemical synthesis and biological investigations of bivalent ligands for dopamine D2 receptor/neurotensin NTS1 receptor (D2R/NTS1R) heterodimers. The compounds of types 1–3 consist of three different D2R pharmacophores bound to an affinity-generating lipophilic appendage, a polyethylene glycol-based linker and the NTS1R agonist NT(8-13). The bivalent ligands show binding affinity in the picomolar range for cells coexpressing both GPCRs and unprecedented selectivity (up to three orders of magnitude), compared with cells that only express D2Rs. A functional switch is observed for the bivalent ligands 3b,c inhibiting cAMP formation in cells singly expressing D2Rs but stimulating cAMP accumulation in D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. Moreover, the newly synthesized bivalent ligands show a strong, predominantly NTS1R-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment at the D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. PMID:27457610

  10. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  11. Structural considerations on the selectivity of an immunoassay for sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Holger; Baldofski, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Kristin; Flemig, Sabine; Silva, Carla Patrícia; Esteves, Valdemar I; Emmerling, Franziska; Panne, Ulrich; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2016-09-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a sulfonamide, is a widely used bacteriostatic antibiotic and therefore a promising marker for the entry of anthropogenic pollution in the environment. SMX is frequently found in wastewater and surface water. This study presents the production of high affinity and selective polyclonal antibodies for SMX and the development and evaluation of a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of SMX in environmental water samples. The crystal structures of the cross-reacting compounds sulfamethizole, N(4)-acetyl-SMX and succinimidyl-SMX were determined by x-ray diffraction aiming to explain their high cross-reactivity. These crystal structures are described for the first time. The quantification range of the ELISA is 0.82-63µg/L. To verify our results, the SMX concentration in 20 environmental samples, including wastewater and surface water, was determined by ELISA and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). A good agreement of the measured SMX concentrations was found with average recoveries of 97-113% for the results of ELISA compared to LC-MS/MS. PMID:27343596

  12. [Topical contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  13. CHF6001 I: a novel highly potent and selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor with robust anti-inflammatory activity and suitable for topical pulmonary administration.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Nadia; Caruso, Paola; Bosco, Raffaella; Marchini, Gessica; Pastore, Fiorella; Armani, Elisabetta; Amari, Gabriele; Rizzi, Andrea; Ghidini, Eleonora; De Fanti, Renato; Capaldi, Carmelida; Carzaniga, Laura; Hirsch, Emilio; Buccellati, Carola; Sala, Angelo; Carnini, Chiara; Patacchini, Riccardo; Delcanale, Maurizio; Civelli, Maurizio; Villetti, Gino; Facchinetti, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the pharmacologic characterization of CHF6001 [(S)-3,5-dichloro-4-(2-(3-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-4-(difluoromethoxy)phenyl)-2-(3-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-4-(methylsulfonamido)benzoyloxy)ethyl)pyridine 1-oxide], a novel phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor designed for treating pulmonary inflammatory diseases via inhaled administration. CHF6001 was 7- and 923-fold more potent than roflumilast and cilomilast, respectively, in inhibiting PDE4 enzymatic activity (IC50 = 0.026 ± 0.006 nM). CHF6001 inhibited PDE4 isoforms A-D with equal potency, showed an elevated ratio of high-affinity rolipram binding site versus low-affinity rolipram binding site (i.e., >40) and displayed >20,000-fold selectivity versus PDE4 compared with a panel of PDEs. CHF6001 effectively inhibited (subnanomolar IC50 values) the release of tumor necrosis factor-α from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, human acute monocytic leukemia cell line macrophages (THP-1), and rodent macrophages (RAW264.7 and NR8383). Moreover, CHF6001 potently inhibited the activation of oxidative burst in neutrophils and eosinophils, neutrophil chemotaxis, and the release of interferon-γ from CD4(+) T cells. In all these functional assays, CHF6001 was more potent than previously described PDE4 inhibitors, including roflumilast, UK-500,001 [2-(3,4-difluorophenoxy)-5-fluoro-N-((1S,4S)-4-(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzamido)cyclohexyl)nicotinamide], and cilomilast, and it was comparable to GSK256066 [6-((3-(dimethylcarbamoyl)phenyl)sulfonyl)-4-((3-methoxyphenyl)amino)-8-methylquinoline-3-carboxamide]. When administered intratracheally to rats as a micronized dry powder, CHF6001 inhibited liposaccharide-induced pulmonary neutrophilia (ED50 = 0.205 μmol/kg) and leukocyte infiltration (ED50 = 0.188 μmol/kg) with an efficacy comparable to a high dose of budesonide (1 μmol/kg i.p.). In sum, CHF6001 has the potential to be an effective topical treatment of conditions associated with pulmonary inflammation, including

  14. Terahertz wave filter based on frequency-selective surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz radiations, which refer to the frequencies from 100GHz to 10THz, lie in the frequency gap between the infrared and microwave, have received considerable attention during the past decades. Due to their special prosperties, THz radiations have been applied in many fields such as gases, semiconductors, explosives materials, and environment pollutants. The technique is based on recording the time dependence of the electric field of a short electromagnetic pulse transmitted through a sample. The ratio of the Fourier transforms of the data recorded with and without the sample yields the complex transmission coefficient of the sample in the frequency domain. The absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the material studied are directly related to the amplitude and phase respectively of the transmitted field. Terahertz wave filter, a frequency-selective surface structure, has been characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the region from 0.1 to 3THz. We have compared THz-TDS measurement and calculation results of the mode-matching theory of the terahertz wave filter, and find that the two data sets agree very closely. The peak of the transmittance of about 90.5%occurs at 0.45THz for the first case and the peak of the transmittance of about 89.4% occurs at 0.79THz for the second case.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra. PMID:27187329

  16. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Objective is to address the keys to understanding the relation between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Of concern are questions related to enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts and critical active site requirements for molecular synthesis and rearrangement. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Our research program builds upon our previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well we are exploiting our recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. The program is proceeding toward the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  17. Terahertz wave filter based on frequency-selective surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2011-11-01

    Terahertz radiations, which refer to the frequencies from 100GHz to 10THz, lie in the frequency gap between the infrared and microwave, have received considerable attention during the past decades. Due to their special prosperties, THz radiations have been applied in many fields such as gases, semiconductors, explosives materials, and environment pollutants. The technique is based on recording the time dependence of the electric field of a short electromagnetic pulse transmitted through a sample. The ratio of the Fourier transforms of the data recorded with and without the sample yields the complex transmission coefficient of the sample in the frequency domain. The absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the material studied are directly related to the amplitude and phase respectively of the transmitted field. Terahertz wave filter, a frequency-selective surface structure, has been characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the region from 0.1 to 3THz. We have compared THz-TDS measurement and calculation results of the mode-matching theory of the terahertz wave filter, and find that the two data sets agree very closely. The peak of the transmittance of about 90.5%occurs at 0.45THz for the first case and the peak of the transmittance of about 89.4% occurs at 0.79THz for the second case.

  18. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  19. Structural aspects of host molecules acting as ionophores in ion-selective electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocheńska, Maria

    1998-09-01

    Structural aspects of ligand molecules acting as neutral ionophores in ion-selective membrane electrodes are discussed and examples of Li-selective ionophores are presented. The relationship between the structure of ionophore and its complex determined by X-ray and NMR study and the selectivity of ISE was determined.

  20. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  1. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs. PMID:25616091

  2. Topical delivery of hexamidine.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Nicola; Paz-Alvarez, Miguel; Matts, Paul J; Lever, Rebecca; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2016-06-15

    Hexamidine diisethionate (HEX D) has been used for its biocidal actions in topical preparations since the 1950s. Recent data also suggest that it plays a beneficial role in skin homeostasis. To date, the extent to which this compound penetrates the epidermis has not been reported nor how its topical delivery may be modulated. In the present work we set out to characterise the interaction of HEX D with the skin and to develop a range of simple formulations for topical targeting of the active. A further objective was to compare the skin penetration of HEX D with its corresponding dihydrochloride salt (HEX H) as the latter has more favourable physicochemical properties for skin uptake. Candidate vehicles were evaluated by in vitro Franz cell permeation studies using porcine skin. Initially, neat solvents were investigated and subsequently binary systems were examined. The solvents and chemical penetration enhancers investigated included glycerol, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), 1,2-pentanol (1,2-PENT), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) and Transcutol(®)P (TC). Of a total of 30 binary solvent systems evaluated only 10 delivered higher amounts of active into the skin compared with the neat solvents. In terms of topical efficacy, formulations containing PGML far surpassed all other solvents or binary combinations. More than 70% of HEX H was extracted from the skin following application in PG:PGML (50:50). Interestingly, the same vehicle effectively promoted skin penetration of HEX D but demonstrated significantly lower uptake into and through the skin (30%). The findings confirm the unpredictable nature of excipients on delivery of actives with reference to skin even where there are minor differences in molecular structures. We also believe that they underline the ongoing necessity for fundamental studies on the interaction of topical excipients with the skin. PMID:27130367

  3. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  4. Selective formation of turbulent structures in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I

    2008-05-15

    The mechanism of nonlinear structural formation has been studied with a three-field reduced fluid model, which is extended to describe the resistive drift wave turbulence in magnetized cylindrical plasmas. In this model, ion-neutral collisions strongly stabilize the resistive drift wave, and the formed structure depends on the collision frequency. If the collision frequency is small, modulational coupling of unstable modes generates a zonal flow. On the other hand, if the collision frequency is large, a streamer, which is a localized vortex in the azimuthal direction, is formed. The structure is generated by nonlinear wave coupling and is sustained for a much longer duration than the drift wave oscillation period. This is a minimal model for analyzing the turbulent structural formation mechanism by mode coupling in cylindrical plasmas, and the competitive nature of structural formation is revealed. These turbulent structures affect particle transport.

  5. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection (GS) has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the Coefficient of D...

  6. Structural determinants of the alpha2 adrenoceptor subtype selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ostopovici-Halip, Liliana; Curpăn, Ramona; Mracec, Maria; Bologa, Cristian G.

    2012-01-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) subtypes, acting mainly on the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, represent important targets for drug design, confirmed by the high number of studies published so far. Presently, only few α2-AR subtype selective compounds are known. Using homology modeling and ligand docking, the present study analyzes the similarities and differences between binding sites, and between extracellular loops of the three subtypes of α2-AR. Several α2-AR subtype selective ligands were docked in the active sites of the three α2-AR subtypes, key interactions between ligands and receptors were mapped, and the predicted results were compared to experimental results. Binding site analysis reveals a strong identity between important amino acid residues in each receptor, the very few differences being the key towards modulating selectivity of α2-AR ligands. The observed differences between binding site residues provide an excellent starting point for virtual screening of chemical databases in order to identify potentially selective ligands for α2-ARs. PMID:21602069

  7. Reconsidering the logical structure of the theory of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Tam

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection has been criticized as a tautology. This would be a major problem for evolutionary biology, if true, because tautological statements can't be falsified and, therefore, can't be scientific. There is merit to this critique insofar as the theory of natural selection is indeed generally described in a tautological manner. However, natural selection can be described non-tautologically if we’re careful. Natural selection should be defined as the theory that attempts to predict and retrodict evolutionary change through environmental forces acting upon organisms. However, this re-framing comes at a cost: it reveals, based on our current knowledge of evolutionary forces, the lack of ability to make accurate predictions about expected changes except in the most simple of circumstances. I suggest that evolutionary biologists should work to develop “principles of evolution,” based on an expanded and more focused research program designed to identify common trends in evolution, which will ultimately allow us to make more accurate predictions and retrodictions about evolution. PMID:26478764

  8. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the coefficient of determ...

  9. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures. [application of structural design criteria for weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  10. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  11. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  12. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  13. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for select space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project developed at the Southwest Research Institute integrates state-of-the-art structural analysis techniques with probability theory for the design and analysis of complex large-scale engineering structures. An advanced efficient software system (NESSUS) capable of performing complex probabilistic analysis has been developed. NESSUS contains a number of software components to perform probabilistic analysis of structures. These components include: an expert system, a probabilistic finite element code, a probabilistic boundary element code and a fast probability integrator. The NESSUS software system is shown. An expert system is included to capture and utilize PSAM knowledge and experience. NESSUS/EXPERT is an interactive menu-driven expert system that provides information to assist in the use of the probabilistic finite element code NESSUS/FEM and the fast probability integrator (FPI). The expert system menu structure is summarized. The NESSUS system contains a state-of-the-art nonlinear probabilistic finite element code, NESSUS/FEM, to determine the structural response and sensitivities. A broad range of analysis capabilities and an extensive element library is present.

  14. Method of forming silicon structures with selectable optical characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Schowalter, Leo (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Silicon and metal are coevaporated onto a silicon substrate in a molecular beam epitaxy system with a larger than stoichiometric amount of silicon so as to epitaxially grow particles of metal silicide embedded in a matrix of single crystal epitaxially grown silicon. The particles interact with incident photons by resonant optical absorption at the surface plasmon resonance frequency. Controlling the substrate temperature and deposition rate and time allows the aspect ratio of the particles to be tailored to desired wavelength photons and polarizations. The plasmon energy may decay as excited charge carriers or phonons, either of which can be monitored to indicate the amount of incident radiation at the selected frequency and polarization.

  15. The Economics of Structured Continuing Education in Selected Professional Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasmor, James C.

    A study determined what business administration considerations were elements in the managerial decision making process to include structured continuing education in a professional journal and what the positive or negative results have been in terms of operating benefits and profits. An initial literature review showed the need for exploratory…

  16. Belief Structures about People Held by Selected Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Arthur A.; And Others

    Wrightsman has established that assumptions about human nature distinguish religious, occupational, political, gender, and other groups, and that they predict behavior in structured situations. Hjelle and Ziegler proposed a set of nine basic bipolar assumptions about the nature of people: freedom-determinism; rationality-irrationality;…

  17. Resources for Topics in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, Dale B.

    This guide is intended to help the user become familiar with a selected group of reference tools and resources which are useful in nursing education and practice. It is important for students to use the correct medical or scientific terminology, understand the scope of a topic, and then utilize the tools necessary to research subjects of interest.…

  18. Helping Kids Choose a Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunce-Crim, Marna

    1991-01-01

    Thinking about how published authors get their ideas for stories is one way for children to generate their own story ideas. The article discusses how elementary teachers can use storytelling, reading, examining picture books, and learning writing techniques to help their students select a topic. (SM)

  19. Prediction of formulation effects on dermal absorption of topically applied ectoparasiticides dosed in vitro on canine and porcine skin using a mixture-adjusted quantitative structure permeability relationship.

    PubMed

    Riviere, J E; Brooks, J D; Collard, W T; Deng, J; de Rose, G; Mahabir, S P; Merritt, D A; Marchiondo, A A

    2014-10-01

    Topical application of ectoparasiticides for flea and tick control is a major focus for product development in animal health. The objective of this work was to develop a quantitative structure permeability relationship (QSPeR) model sensitive to formulation effects for predicting absorption and skin deposition of five topically applied drugs administered in six vehicle combinations to porcine and canine skin in vitro. Saturated solutions (20 μL) of (14) C-labeled demiditraz, fipronil, permethrin, imidacloprid, or sisapronil were administered in single or binary (50:50 v/v) combinations of water, ethanol, and transcutol (6 formulations, n = 4-5 replicates per treatment) nonoccluded to 0.64 cm(2) disks of dermatomed pig or dog skin mounted in flow-through diffusion cells. Perfusate flux over 24 h and skin deposition at termination were determined. Permeability (logKp), absorption, and penetration endpoints were modeled using a four-term Abrahams and Martin (hydrogen-bond donor acidity and basicity, dipolarity/polarizability, and excess molar refractivity) linear free energy QSPeR equation with a mixture factor added to compensate for formulation ingredient interactions. Goodness of fit was judged by r(2) , cross-validation coefficient, coefficients (q(2) s), and Williams Plot to visualize the applicability domain. Formulation composition was the primary determinant of permeation. Compounds generally penetrated dog skin better than porcine skin. The vast majority of permeated penetrant was deposited within the dosed skin relative to transdermal flux, an attribute for ectoparasiticides. The best QSPeR logKp model for pig skin permeation (r(2) = 0.86, q(2) s = 0.85) included log octanol/water partition coefficient as the mixture factor, while for dogs (r(2) = 0.91, q(2) s = 0.90), it was log water solubility. These studies clearly showed that the permeation of topical ectoparasiticides could be well predicted using QSPeR models that account for both the physical

  20. Topical Products for the Aging Face.

    PubMed

    McCook, John P

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on nonprescription home-use topical treatment technologies for the aging face and is intended to serve as a guide for the core cosmeceutical technologies currently used and to help educate and assist the selection of topical antiaging products by the professional staff and their patients. Antiaging topical treatments for patient home use should be nonirritating, compatible with the patient skin type, effective, and complementary to surgical and minimally invasive office procedures, and aesthetically elegant. New topical antiaging technologies, formulated as monotherapy or as combinations with well-known cosmeceuticals, should present adequate clinical studies to support their selection for use. PMID:27363774

  1. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  2. Structural Insight into Substrate Selectivity of Erwinia chrysanthemil-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    l-Asparaginases of bacterial origin are a mainstay of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these enzyme drugs is associated with their capacity to deplete the amino acid l-asparagine from the blood. However, clinical use of bacterial l-asparaginases is complicated by their dual l-asparaginase and l-glutaminase activities. The latter, even though representing only ∼10% of the overall activity, is partially responsible for the observed toxic side effects. Hence, l-asparaginases devoid of l-glutaminase activity hold potential as safer drugs. Understanding the key determinants of l-asparaginase substrate specificity is a prerequisite step toward the development of enzyme variants with reduced toxicity. Here we present crystal structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemil-asparaginase in complex with l-aspartic acid and with l-glutamic acid. These structures reveal two enzyme conformations—open and closed—corresponding to the inactive and active states, respectively. The binding of ligands induces the positioning of the catalytic Thr15 into its active conformation, which in turn allows for the ordering and closure of the flexible N-terminal loop. Notably, l-aspartic acid is more efficient than l-glutamic acid in inducing the active positioning of Thr15. Structural elements explaining the preference of the enzyme for l-asparagine over l-glutamine are discussed with guidance to the future development of more specific l-asparaginases. PMID:26855287

  3. Lactobionic acid as antioxidant and moisturizing active in alkyl polyglucoside-based topical emulsions: the colloidal structure, stability and efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tasic-Kostov, M; Pavlovic, D; Lukic, M; Jaksic, I; Arsic, I; Savic, S

    2012-10-01

    Cosmeceutical antioxidants may protect the skin against oxidative injury, involved in the pathogenesis of many skin disorders. However, an unsuitable topical delivery system with compromising safety profile can affect the efficacy of an antioxidant active. This study investigated the antioxidant potential of lactobionic acid (LA), a newer cosmeceutical active, per se (in solution) and incorporated into natural alkyl polyglucoside (APG) emulsifier-based system using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. The α-tocopherol was used as a reference compound. The physical stability (using rheology, polarization microscopy, pH and conductivity measurements) of an Alkyl glucoside-based emulsion was evaluated with and without the active (LA); colloidal structure was assessed using polarization and transmission electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and texture analysis. Additionally, the safety profile and moisturizing potential were investigated using the methods of skin bioengineering. Good physical stability and applicative characteristics were obtained although LA strongly influenced the colloidal structure of the vehicle. LA per se and in APG-based emulsion showed satisfying antioxidant activity that promotes it as mild multifunctional cosmeceutical efficient in the treatment and prevention of the photoaged skin. Employed assays were shown as suitable for the antioxidant activity evaluation of LA in APG-based emulsions, but not for α-tocopherol in the same vehicle. PMID:22691034

  4. Hypersensitivity to topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M

    1994-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity from topical corticosteroids is becoming increasingly recognized; it is present in 2-5% of the patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. The use of a corticosteroid series containing tixocortal pivalate 1% (petrolatum), to detect hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone, and other steroids 1% (ethanol), depending on local corticosteroid usage, detects the majority of cases of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. In selected cases, the use of intradermal tests further improves the diagnosis of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. Corticosteroid hypersensitivity occurs most frequently among patients with stasis dermatitis. However, corticosteroid hypersensitivity is also common in other types of dermatitis, occurring as frequently as hypersensitivity to several allergens (e.g. wool alcohols and colophony) in the European standard battery. Although hypersensitivity has mainly been reported with corticosteroids applied to the skin, reactions may also occur on mucosal surfaces, following systemic administration and with sex steroids. PMID:8313630

  5. Restoration of Retinal Structure and Function after Selective Photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Huie, Philip; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Leung, Loh-Shan S.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Beier, Corinne; Marc, Robert E.; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    CNS neurons change their connectivity to accommodate a changing environment, form memories, or respond to injury. Plasticity in the adult mammalian retina after injury or disease was thought to be limited to restructuring resulting in abnormal retinal anatomy and function. Here we report that neurons in the mammalian retina change their connectivity and restore normal retinal anatomy and function after injury. Patches of photoreceptors in the rabbit retina were destroyed by selective laser photocoagulation, leaving retinal inner neurons (bipolar, amacrine, horizontal, ganglion cells) intact. Photoreceptors located outside of the damaged zone migrated to make new functional connections with deafferented bipolar cells located inside the lesion. The new connections restored ON and OFF responses in deafferented ganglion cells. This finding extends the previously perceived limits of restorative plasticity in the adult retina and allows for new approaches to retinal laser therapy free of current detrimental side effects such as scotomata and scarring. PMID:23595739

  6. Microbial utilization and selectivity of pectin fractions with various structures.

    PubMed

    Onumpai, Chatchaya; Kolida, Sofia; Bonnin, Estelle; Rastall, Robert A

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the fermentation properties of oligosaccharides derived from pectins and their parent polysaccharides, a 5-ml-working-volume, pH- and temperature-controlled fermentor was tested. Six pectic oligosaccharides representing specific substructures found within pectins were prepared. These consisted of oligogalacturonides (average degrees of polymerization [DP] of 5 and 9), methylated oligogalacturonides (average DP of 5), oligorhamnogalacturonides (average DP of 10 as a disaccharide unit of galacturonic acid and rhamnose), oligogalactosides (average DP of 5), and oligoarabinosides (average DP of 6). The influence of these carbohydrates on the human fecal microbiota was evaluated. Use of neutral sugar fractions resulted in an increase in Bifidobacterium populations and gave higher organic acid yields. The Bacteroides-Prevotella group significantly increased on all oligosaccharides except oligogalacturonides with an average DP of 5. The most selective substrates for bifidobacteria were arabinan, galactan, oligoarabinosides, and oligogalactosides. PMID:21724897

  7. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite (combined) load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen posts and system ducting. The first approach will consist of using state of the art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The second approach will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the deterministic models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high pressure, and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data.

  8. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  9. Considering Future Potential Regarding Structural Diversity in Selection of Forest Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena

    2016-01-01

    A rich structural diversity in forests promotes biodiversity. Forests are dynamic and therefore it is crucial to consider future structural potential when selecting reserves, to make robust conservation decisions. We analyzed forests in boreal Sweden based on 17,599 National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots with the main aim to understand how effectiveness of reserves depends on the time dimension in the selection process, specifically by considering future structural diversity. In the study both the economic value and future values of 15 structural variables were simulated during a 100 year period. To get a net present structural value (NPSV), a single value covering both current and future values, we used four discounting alternatives: (1) only considering present values, (2) giving equal importance to values in each of the 100 years within the planning horizon, (3) applying an annual discount rate considering the risk that values could be lost, and (4) only considering the values in year 100. The four alternatives were evaluated in a reserve selection model under budget-constrained and area-constrained selections. When selecting young forests higher structural richness could be reached at a quarter of the cost over almost twice the area in a budget-constrained selection compared to an area-constrained selection. Our results point to the importance of considering future structural diversity in the selection of forest reserves and not as is done currently to base the selection on existing values. Targeting future values increases structural diversity and implies a relatively lower cost. Further, our results show that a re-orientation from old to young forests would imply savings while offering a more extensive reserve network with high structural qualities in the future. However, caution must be raised against a drastic reorientation of the current old-forest strategy since remnants of ancient forests will need to be prioritized due to their role for disturbance

  10. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  11. Coexistence of structured populations with size-based prey selection.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2013-11-01

    Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator-prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending on the maximum adult sizes and population size distributions. We explore the assembly and potential for coexistence of small communities where all species experience ontogenetic trophic niche shifts. The life-history of each species is described by a physiologically structured model and species identity is characterised by the trait: size at maturation. We show that a single species can exist in two different states: a 'resource driven state' and a 'cannibalistic state' with a large scope for emergent Allee effects and bistable states. Two species can coexist in two different configurations: in a 'competitive coexistence' state when the ratio between sizes at maturation of the two species is less than a predator-prey mass ratio and the resource level is low to intermediate, or in a 'trophic ladder' state if the ratio of sizes at maturation is larger than the predator-prey mass ratio at all resource levels. While there is a large scope for coexistence of two species, the scope for coexistence of three species is limited and we conclude that further trait differentiation is required for coexistence of more species-rich size-structured communities. PMID:23927897

  12. Instructional Complements for Undergraduate World History or Western Civilization Courses: Selected Topics in the Ancient, Medieval, and Modern History of India: A Curriculum Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Wayne Hamilton

    This curriculum supplement on India consists of three modules that have been used with undergraduates in introductory world civilization courses. Module 1, "Ancient Period: Hinduism and the Caste System in India: Origin, Development, and Social Functions" discusses the religious doctrines of Hinduism, the caste system, and its structure. The…

  13. Effect of parental selection of healthy behavior topic on immediate and delayed plan to change child’s eating or physical activity behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recommendations direct pediatricians to address obesity and obesity prevention routinely during well child visits and to tailor their counseling, but clinicians feel ineffective because of time constraints and lack of parent interest. This intervention was designed to maintain the structure of the o...

  14. Selective visualization of gene structure with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Becker, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The ability of the ultraviolet (UV) footprinting technique to detect chromatin has been investigated in vitro. Two basic types of chromatin, a phased nucleosome and a phased nucleosome containing a phased H1 protein, have been reconstituted onto a cloned 5S ribosomal RNA gene from sea urchin. The histone-DNA interactions in each complex have been probed with exonuclease III, DNase I, dimethyl sulfate, and UV light. Whereas DNase I and exonuclease III readily detect interactions between histones and DNA, UV light and dimethyl sulfate do not. In contrast to histone-DNA interactions, we demonstrate that intimate sequence-specific contacts between the same sea urchin 5S DNA and the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) are readily detected with UV light. Since the sensitivity of UV light for TFIIIA contacts is similar to its sensitivity for other regulatory protein-DNA contacts, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using UV light to selectively visualize regulatory protein-DNA interactions in vivo with little or no interference from histone-DNA interactions.

  15. Structural Dynamics of GaN Microcrystals in Evolutionary Selection Selective Area Growth probed by X-ray Microdiffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kachkanov, V.; Leung, B.; Song, J.; Zhang, Y.; Tsai, M.-C.; Yuan, G.; Han, J.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    2014-01-01

    A method to grow high quality, single crystalline semiconductor material irrespective of the substrate would allow a cost-effective improvement to functionality and performance of optoelectronic devices. Recently, a novel type of substrate-insensitive growth process called Evolutionary Selection Selective Area Growth (ES-SAG) has been proposed. Here we report the use of X-ray microdiffraction to study the structural properties of GaN microcrystals grown by ES-SAG. Utilizing high resolution in both direct and reciprocal spaces, we have unraveled structural dynamics of GaN microcrystals in growth structures of different dimensions. It has been found that the geometric proportions of the growth constrictions play an important role: 2.6 μm and 4.5 μm wide growth tunnels favor the evolutionary selection mechanism, contrary to the case of 8.6 μm growth tunnels. It was also found that GaN microcrystal ensembles are dominated by slight tensile strain irrespective of growth tunnel shape. PMID:24722064

  16. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Kurth, R. E.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop generic load models with multiple levels of progressive sophistication to simulate the composite load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components, representative of Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), such as transfer ducts, turbine blades, and liquid oxygen (LOX) posts and system ducting. These models will be developed using two independent approaches. The first approach consists of using state-of-the-art probabilistic methods to describe the individual loading conditions and combinations of these loading conditions to synthesize the composite load spectra simulation. The methodology required to combine the various individual load simulation models (hot-gas dynamic, vibrations, instantaneous position, centrifugal field, etc.) into composite load spectra simulation models will be developed under this program. A computer code incorporating the various individual and composite load spectra models will be developed to construct the specific load model desired. The second approach, which is covered under the options portion of the contract, will consist of developing coupled models for composite load spectra simulation which combine the (deterministic) models for composite load dynamic, acoustic, high-pressure and high rotational speed, etc., load simulation using statistically varying coefficients. These coefficients will then be determined using advanced probabilistic simulation methods with and without strategically selected experimental data. This report covers the efforts of the third year of the contract. The overall program status is that the turbine blade loads have been completed and implemented. The transfer duct loads are defined and are being implemented. The thermal loads for all components are defined and coding is being developed. A dynamic pressure load model is under development. The parallel work on the probabilistic methodology is essentially completed. The overall effort is being

  17. Selective Reinforcement to Enhance the Structural Performance of Metallic Compression Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the influence of selective reinforcement on metallic panels with cutouts was conducted. Selective reinforcement was shown to be a weight effective concept for increasing structural performance of panels with cutouts designed to carry loads into the post-buckled regime. For instance, a selectively reinforced aluminum panel under shear load exhibited a 68 percent increase in specific-buckling load as compared to a geometrically comparable unreinforced aluminum panel. In comparison, a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer composite panel only produced a 45 percent higher specific-buckling load than the same unreinforced aluminum panel. Selective reinforcement offers the potential to tailor structural response through local strengthening and stiffening the structure for a broad range of structural application.

  18. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, M. ); Komarneni, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

  19. The Structure of Genealogies in the Presence of Purifying Selection: A Fitness-Class Coalescent

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Nicolaisen, Lauren E.; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Desai, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Compared to a neutral model, purifying selection distorts the structure of genealogies and hence alters the patterns of sampled genetic variation. Although these distortions may be common in nature, our understanding of how we expect purifying selection to affect patterns of molecular variation remains incomplete. Genealogical approaches such as coalescent theory have proven difficult to generalize to situations involving selection at many linked sites, unless selection pressures are extremely strong. Here, we introduce an effective coalescent theory (a “fitness-class coalescent”) to describe the structure of genealogies in the presence of purifying selection at many linked sites. We use this effective theory to calculate several simple statistics describing the expected patterns of variation in sequence data, both at the sites under selection and at linked neutral sites. Our analysis combines a description of the allele frequency spectrum in the presence of purifying selection with the structured coalescent approach of Kaplan et al. (1988), to trace the ancestry of individuals through the distribution of fitnesses within the population. We also derive our results using a more direct extension of the structured coalescent approach of Hudson and Kaplan (1994). We find that purifying selection leads to patterns of genetic variation that are related but not identical to a neutrally evolving population in which population size has varied in a specific way in the past. PMID:22135349

  20. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  1. Comparative topical anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids and cannabivarins.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Aurelia; Giangaspero, Anna; Sosa, Silvio; Negri, Roberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Casano, Salvatore; Della Loggia, Roberto; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    A selection of seven phytocannabinoids representative of the major structural types of classic cannabinoids and their corresponding cannabivarins was investigated for in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in the Croton oil mouse ear dermatitis assay. Differences in the terpenoid moiety were far more important for anti-inflammatory activity than those at the C-3 alkyl residue, suggesting the involvement not only of cannabinoid receptors, but also of other inflammatory end-points targeted by phytocannabinoids. PMID:20450962

  2. Improving a consensus approach for protein structure selection by removing redundancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingguo; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    In protein tertiary structure prediction, a crucial step is to select near-native structures from a large number of predicted structural models. Over the years, extensive research has been conducted for the protein structure selection problem with most approaches focusing on developing more accurate energy or scoring functions. Despite significant advances in this area, the discerning power of current approaches is still unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a novel consensus-based algorithm for the selection of predicted protein structures. Given a set of predicted models, our method first removes redundant structures to derive a subset of reference models. Then, a structure is ranked based on its average pairwise similarity to the reference models. Using the CASP8 data set containing a large collection of predicted models for 122 targets, we compared our method with the best CASP8 quality assessment (QA) servers, which are all consensus based, and showed that our QA scores correlate better with the GDT-TSs than those of the CASP8 QA servers. We also compared our method with the state-of-the-art scoring functions and showed its improved performance for near-native model selection. The GDT-TSs of the top models picked by our method are on average more than 8 percent better than the ones selected by the best performing scoring function. PMID:21519117

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The

  4. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  5. The structure of XIAP BIR2: understanding the selectivity of the BIR domains

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, Christine Belunis, Charles; Crowther, Robert; Danho, Waleed; Gao, Lin; Goggin, Barry; Janson, Cheryl A.; Li, Shirley; Remiszewski, Stacy; Schutt, Andrew; Thakur, Manish K.; Singh, Saroj K.; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Pandey, Rajat; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah; Kamath, Ajith V.; Kuglstatter, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The high-resolution crystal structures of apo and peptide-bound XIAP BIR2 are presented and compared with BIR3 structures to understand their selectivity. This crystal system can be used to determine the structures of BIR2–inhibitor complexes. XIAP, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins, is a critical regulator of apoptosis. Inhibition of the BIR domain–caspase interaction is a promising approach towards treating cancer. Previous work has been directed towards inhibiting the BIR3–caspase-9 interaction, which blocks the intrinsic apoptotic pathway; selectively inhibiting the BIR2–caspase-3 interaction would also block the extrinsic pathway. The BIR2 domain of XIAP has successfully been crystallized; peptides and small-molecule inhibitors can be soaked into these crystals, which diffract to high resolution. Here, the BIR2 apo crystal structure and the structures of five BIR2–tetrapeptide complexes are described. The structural flexibility observed on comparing these structures, along with a comparison with XIAP BIR3, affords an understanding of the structural elements that drive selectivity between BIR2 and BIR3 and which can be used to design BIR2-selective inhibitors.

  6. The Acceptance of Universalism: The Importance of Selected Aspects of School Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert A.

    This report describes a study that investigated empirically the relationships between selected aspects of the organizational structure of elementary schools and the extent to which students endorsed the norm of universalism. Four aspects of structure were studied: degree of departmentalization, school enrollment, student-teacher ratio, and extent…

  7. Discovery and Structure-Activity Relationships of a Highly Selective Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibitor by Structure-Based Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Satish N; Deora, Girdhar Singh; De la Mora, Eugenio; Nachon, Florian; Chan, Stephen; Parat, Marie-Odile; Brazzolotto, Xavier; Ross, Benjamin P

    2016-08-25

    Structure-based virtual screening of two libraries containing 567 981 molecules was used to discover novel, selective BuChE inhibitors, which are potentially superior symptomatic treatments in late-stage Alzheimer's disease. Compound 16 was identified as a highly selective submicromolar inhibitor of BuChE (huBuChE IC50 = 0.443 μM) with high permeability in the PAMPA-BBB model. The X-ray crystal structure of huBuChE in complex with 16 revealed the atomic-level interactions and offers opportunities for further development of the series. PMID:27405689

  8. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  9. Microphase separated structures of block copolymer thin film with non-volatile selective solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Umegaki, Naoya; Matsutani, Taito; Takagi, Hideaki; Ito, Eri; Sakurai, Shinichi

    2010-11-01

    Microphase separated structures of block copolymer, polystyrene-b-polyisoprene (PS-b-PI, phiPS = 14%) including non-volatile selective solvent thin films were investigated using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering technique. The diethyl phthalate (DEP) was used as a non-volatile selective solvent which solves PS only. The DEP swelled PS phase selectively and the microphase separated structure transited from the PS spherical domain to the lamellar domain with an increase in DEP content in the bulk state. Similarly, the phase separated structure in the thin film prepared by spin cast on a silicon wafer from the mixture of toluene/DEP and block copolymer changed according to the initial DPE concentration. However, the morphologies developed in the thin film were shifted to the structures at lower DEP concentration than that expected from the initial concentration. Moreover, the cylindrical and lamellar domains were aligned parallel and perpendicularly to the substrate, respectively.

  10. IT vendor selection model by using structural equation model & analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Sarit; Dominic, P. D. D.

    2012-11-01

    Selecting and evaluating the right vendors is imperative for an organization's global marketplace competitiveness. Improper selection and evaluation of potential vendors can dwarf an organization's supply chain performance. Numerous studies have demonstrated that firms consider multiple criteria when selecting key vendors. This research intends to develop a new hybrid model for vendor selection process with better decision making. The new proposed model provides a suitable tool for assisting decision makers and managers to make the right decisions and select the most suitable vendor. This paper proposes a Hybrid model based on Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) for long-term strategic vendor selection problems. The five steps framework of the model has been designed after the thorough literature study. The proposed hybrid model will be applied using a real life case study to assess its effectiveness. In addition, What-if analysis technique will be used for model validation purpose.