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1

Assessing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Solubility Equilibrium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a problem on solubility equilibrium which involves macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic levels of representation as a resource for the evaluation of students, and allows for assessment as to whether students have acquired an adequate conceptual understanding of the phenomenon. Also diagnoses difficulties with regard to previous…

Raviolo, Andres

2001-01-01

2

Conceptual Learning: Enhancing Student Understanding of Physiology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students are leaving undergraduate science programs without the knowledge and skills they are expected to have. This is apparent in professional programs, such as medical and veterinary school, where students do not possess the critical thinking skills necessary to be successful. Physiology is a required discipline for these professional programs and often before, as a pre-requisite. Physiology classrooms are an excellent place to teach critical thinking skills because the content consists of integrated processes. Therefore, in one study, it was investigated whether focusing on physiological concepts improved student understanding of physiology in both a non-physiological science course, Invertebrate Zoology, and in an undergraduate physiology course. An educational intervention was used in Invertebrate Zoology, where students were exposed to human physiology concepts that were similar to comparative physiology concepts they had learned during the semester. A pre-/post-test was used to assess learning gains. In a second study, the use of multimedia file usage was correlated to student exam scores in a physiology course. This was done to see if providing additional study materials that focused on specific concepts improved student understanding, as assessed using exam scores. Overall these studies indicate that encouraging assimilation of new concepts that expand upon material from lecture may help students gain a more complete understanding of a concept. The integration of these concepts into pre-existing conceptual frameworks may serve to teach students valuable critical thinking skills such as evaluation of new ideas within their current understanding and synthesizing the new content with the existing information. Focusing on this type of conceptual learning may enable students to apply content knowledge and think through problems. Additionally, focusing on concepts may enable students to improve their understanding of material without being overwhelmed by content.

Waltz, Micah J.

3

Facilitating Conceptual Change in Students' Understanding of Boiling Concept  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to construct a teaching strategy for facilitating students' conceptual understanding of the boiling concept. The study is based on 52 freshman students in the primary science education department. Students' ideas were elicited by a test consisting of nine questions. Conceptual change strategy was designed based on…

Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa; Niaz, Mansoor; Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer

2007-01-01

4

Evaluation of Students' Conceptual Understanding of Malaria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, a two-tier diagnostic test for understanding malaria was developed and administered to 314 Bruneian students in Year 12 and in a nursing diploma course. The validity, reliability, difficulty level, discriminant indices, and reading ability of the test were examined and found to be acceptable in terms of measuring students'…

Cheong, Irene Poh-Ai; Treagust, David; Kyeleve, Iorhemen J.; Oh, Peck-Yoke

2010-01-01

5

Assessing Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding and Confidence of Electromagnetics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examines how students' conceptual understanding changes from high confidence with incorrect conceptions to high confidence with correct conceptions when reasoning about electromagnetics. The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism test is weighted with students' self-rated confidence on each item in order to infer how strongly…

Leppavirta, Johanna

2012-01-01

6

Modeling studentsconceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a multiple choice test designed to probe studentsconceptual understanding of the relationships among the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration. The test was administered to more than 800 students enrolled in standard or honors introductory physics courses or a second-year physics majors course. The test was found to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test

Rebecca Rosenblatt; Eleanor C. Sayre; Andrew F. Heckler

2009-01-01

7

Modeling students' conceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a multiple choice test designed to probe students' conceptual understanding of the relationships among the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration. The test was administered to more than 800 students enrolled in standard or honors introductory physics courses or a second-year physics majors course. The test was found to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test

Rebecca Rosenblatt; Eleanor C. Sayre; Andrew F. Heckler

2009-01-01

8

Promoting Conceptual Change in First Year Students' Understanding of Evaporation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We constructed the PDEODE (Predict-Discuss-Explain-Observe-Discuss-Explain) teaching strategy, a variant of the classical POE (Predict-Observe-Explain) activity, to promote conceptual change, and investigated its effectiveness on student understanding of the evaporation concept. The sample consisted of 52 first year students in a primary science…

Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa; Niaz, Mansoor

2010-01-01

9

Comparing Student Conceptual Understanding of Thermodynamics in Physics and Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thermodynamics is a core part of curricula in physics and many engineering fields. Despite the apparent similarity in coverage, individual courses in each discipline have distinct emphases and applications. Physics education researchers have identified student difficulties with concepts such as heat, temperature, and entropy as well as with larger grain-sized ideas such as state variables, path-dependent processes, etc. Engineering education research has corroborated some of these findings and has identified additional difficulties unique to engineering contexts such as confusion between steady-state and equilibrium processes. We are beginning a project that provides an opportunity to expand the interdisciplinary research on conceptual understanding in thermodynamics. This project has two goals: first, determine the overlapping content and concepts across the disciplines; second, compare conceptual understanding between these groups using existing conceptual questions from PER and EER. We present a review of PER and EER literature in thermodynamics and highlight some concepts that we will investigate.

Clark, Jessica W.; Thompson, John R.; Mountcastle, Donald B.

2013-05-28

10

Modeling students' conceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a multiple choice test designed to probe students' conceptual understanding of the relationships among the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration. The test was administered to more than 800 students enrolled in standard or honors introductory physics courses or a second-year physics majors course. The test was found to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test score with grade, course level, and the Force Concept Inventory were moderate to strong. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the common incorrect response that velocity must be in the direction of the acceleration or net force, up to 30% of students gave "partially correct" responses, for example that velocity can be either opposite to or in the direction of the acceleration or net force but not zero. The data also suggests that for some students their evolution of understanding may progress through this kind of partially incorrect understanding.

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Heckler, Andrew F.

2009-11-01

11

Introductory College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Stoichiometry: Connections between Conceptual and Computational Understandings and Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many studies of college chemistry students have found a gap between students' success in solving computational chemistry problems and their success in solving conceptual chemistry problems. This paper examines college students' understanding of the concept of stoichiometry, the particulate nature of matter, and chemistry problem solving. This…

Wolfer, Adam J.; Lederman, Norman G.

12

Longitudinal study of student conceptual understanding in electricity and magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We have investigated the long-term effect of student-centered instruction at the freshman level on juniorsâ performance on a conceptual survey of Electricity and Magnetism (E&M). We measured student performance on a research-based conceptual instrumentâthe Brief Electricity & Magnetism Assessment (BEMA)âover a period of 8 semesters (2004â2007). Concurrently, we introduced the University of Washington's Tutorials in Introductory Physics as part of our standard freshman curriculum. Freshmen took the BEMA before and after this Tutorial-based introductory course, and juniors took it after completion of their traditional junior-level E&M I and E&M II courses. We find that, on average, individual BEMA scores do not change significantly after completion of the introductory courseâneither from the freshman to the junior year, nor from upper-division E&M I to E&M II. However, we find that juniors who had completed a non-Tutorial freshman course scored significantly lower on the (post-upper-division) BEMA than those who had completed the reformed freshman courseâindicating a long-term positive impact of freshman Tutorials on conceptual understanding.

Pollock, Steven J.

2010-03-11

13

Crafting an International Study of Students' Conceptual Understanding of Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large international investigations into the learning of science, such as the TIMSS and PISA studies, have been enlightening with regard to effective instructional practices. Data from these studies revealed weaknesses and promising practices within nations' educational systems, with evidence to suggest that these studies have led to international reforms in science education. However, these reforms have focused on the general characteristics of teaching and learning across all sciences. While extraordinarily useful, these studies have provided limited insight for any given content domain. To date, there has been no systematic effort to measure individual's conceptual astronomy understanding across the globe. This paper describes our motivations for a coordinated, multinational study of astronomy understanding. First, reformed education is based upon knowing the preexisting knowledge state of our students. The data from this study will be used to assist international astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) professionals in their efforts to improve practices across global settings. Second, while the US astronomy EPO community has a long history of activity, research has established that many practices are ineffective in the face of robust misconceptions (e.g.: seasons). Within an international sample we hope to find subpopulations that do not conform to our existing knowledge of student misconceptions, leading us to cultural or educational practices that hint at alternative, effective means of instruction. Finally, it is our hope that this first venture into large-scale disciplinary collaboration will help us to craft a set of common languages and practices, building capacity and leading toward long-term cooperation across the international EPO community. This project is sponsored and managed by the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER), in collaboration with members of the International Astronomical Union-Commission 46. We are actively welcoming and seeking partners in this work.

Slater, Stephanie; Bretones, P. S.; McKinnon, D.; Schleigh, S.; Slater, T. F.; Astronomy, Center; Education Research, Physics

2013-01-01

14

Probing Students' Understanding of Some Conceptual Themes in General Relativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work is an attempt to see how physics undergraduates view the basic ideas of general relativity when they are exposed to the topic in a standard introductory course. Since the subject is conceptually and technically difficult, we adopted a "case studies" approach, focusing in depth on about six students who had just finished a one semester…

Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

2010-01-01

15

Enhancing Students' Understanding of Photosynthesis and Respiration in Plant through Conceptual Change Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effectiveness of combining conceptual change text and discussion web strategies on students' understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in plants. Students' conceptual understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in plants was measured using the two-tier diagnostic test developed by Haslam and Treagust (1987,…

Yenilmez, Ayse; Tekkaya, Ceren

2006-01-01

16

The Effect of Distributed Practice on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the effect of the reduced distribution of study activities on students' conceptual understanding of statistics is investigated in a quasi-experiment. Conceptual understanding depends on coherent and error free knowledge structures. Students need time to construct such knowledge structures. A curriculum reform at our university…

Bude, Luc; Imbos, Tjaart; van de Wiel, Margaretha W.; Berger, Martijn P.

2011-01-01

17

Primary Student-Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect: A mixed method study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The greenhouse effect is a reasonably complex scientific phenomenon which can be used as a model to examine students' conceptual understanding in science. Primary student-teachers' understanding of global environmental problems, such as climate change and ozone depletion, indicates that they have many misconceptions. The present mixed method study examines Finnish primary student-teachers' understanding of the greenhouse effect based on the

Ilkka Johannes Ratinen

2011-01-01

18

Probing students' understanding of some conceptual themes in general relativity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This work is an attempt to see how physics undergraduates view the basic ideas of general relativity when they are exposed to the topic in a standard introductory course. Since the subject is conceptually and technically difficult, we adopted a âcase studiesâ approach, focusing in depth on about six students who had just finished a one semester course on special relativity. The methodology of investigation involved a combination of text comprehension questionnaire and detailed clinical interviews. The aim was not to investigate the technical proficiency of the students, but to probe in detail the nuances of their conceptions of several basic points of the subject. Analysis of their responses reveals a large number of âalternative conceptionsâ of students in the domain. The study should be useful to physics education researchers as well as to teachers of introductory general relativity at about the senior undergraduate level.

Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

2011-03-13

19

The Effect of a Conceptual Change Approach on Understanding of Students' Chemical Equilibrium Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on tenth-grade students' conceptual achievement in understanding chemical equilibrium. The study was conducted in two classes of the same teacher with participation of a total of 44 tenth-grade students. In this study, a…

Atasoy, Basri; Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki

2009-01-01

20

A Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy To Facilitate High School Students' Understanding of Electrochemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study that used a teaching strategy based on two teaching experiments which could facilitate students' conceptual understanding of electrochemistry. Involves two sections (n=29 and n=28) of 10th grade high school students in Venezuela. Concludes that the teaching experiments facilitated student understanding of electrochemistry.…

Niaz, Mansoor; Chacon, Eleazar

2003-01-01

21

Identifying students' mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change  

E-print Network

introductory physics students' mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomeno- graphic methodIdentifying students' mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending the "Entity" model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity

Zollman, Dean

22

Facilitating Conceptual Change in Ninth Grade Students' Understanding of Human Circulatory System Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the conceptual change text oriented instruction over traditionally designed instruction on ninth grade students' understanding of the human circulatory system concepts, and their retention of this understanding. The subjects of this study consist of 73 ninth grade female students

Alkhawaldeh, Salem A.

2007-01-01

23

Use of Chemistry Demonstrations to Foster Conceptual Understanding and Cooperative Learning among students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of chemistry demonstrations in fos- tering conceptual understanding and cooperative learning among upper secondary school students. The topic of electrochemistry was selected for this study. Two principal evaluation instruments were used: a survey instrument and a content- based conceptual test. Preliminary results indicate that demonstrations in Chem- istry are effective in stretching the

Erlis Bte Abdul Manaf; R. Subramaniam

2004-01-01

24

Analogy-Integrated e-Learning Module: Facilitating Students' Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study deals with the development of an analogy-integrated e-learning module on Cellular Respiration, which is intended to facilitate conceptual understanding of students with different brain hemisphere dominance and learning styles. The module includes eight analogies originally conceptualized following the specific steps used to prepare…

Florida, Jennifer

2012-01-01

25

Multiple intelligences and alternative teaching strategies: The effects on student academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and attitude  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the interactions between multiple intelligence strengths and alternative teaching methods on student academic achievement, conceptual understanding and attitudes. The design was a quasi-experimental study, in which students enrolled in Principles of Anatomy and Physiology, a developmental biology course, received lecture only, problem-based learning with lecture, or peer teaching with lecture. These students

Michelle Baragona

2009-01-01

26

Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

2012-01-01

27

Argumentation and Students' Conceptual Understanding of Properties and Behaviors of Gases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of argumentation-based pedagogy on college students' conceptual understanding of properties and behaviors of gases. The sample consists of 108 students (52 in the control group and 56 in the intervention group) drawn from 2 general chemistry college courses taught by the same instructor. Data…

Aydeniz, Mehmet; Pabuccu, Aybuke; Cetin, Pinar Seda; Kaya, Ebru

2012-01-01

28

Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text-Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of conceptual change text-oriented instruction over traditional instruction on students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts and their attitudes toward biology as a school subject. The sample of this study consisted of 84 eleventh-grade students from four classes of a high school. Two of the classes…

Cakirt, Ozlem S.; Geban, Omer; Yuruk, Nejla

2002-01-01

29

Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study is to compare the effectiveness of conceptual change text oriented instruction and traditional instruction on students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts and their attitudes toward biology as a school subject. The sample of this study consisted of 84 eleventh-grade students from the 4 classes of a high school.…

Cakir, Ozlem S.; Yuruk, Nejla; Geban, Omer

30

Using Portfolios To Assess Students' Conceptual Understanding of Flotation and Buoyancy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research described in this paper investigates the use of portfolio assessment techniques in middle school science classrooms. It explores how alternative assessment frameworks, such as portfolios, can be used by the classroom teacher and the students as an indicator of students' conceptual understanding and to facilitate changes in science…

Erduran, Sibel; Duschl, Richard A.

31

Improving Students' Conceptual Understanding of Conductors and Insulators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We examine the difficulties that introductory physics students, undergraduate physics majors, and physics graduate students have with concepts related to conductors and insulators covered in introductory physics by giving written tests and interviewing a subset of students. We find that even graduate students have serious difficulties with these concepts. We develop tutorials related to these topics and evaluate their effectiveness by comparing the performance on written pre-/post-tests and interviews of students who received traditional instruction vs. those who learned using tutorials.

Bilak, Joshua; Singh, Chandralekha

2009-07-08

32

Learning in friendship groups: developing studentsconceptual understanding through social interaction  

PubMed Central

The role that student friendship groups play in learning was investigated here. Employing a critical realist design, two focus groups on undergraduates were conducted to explore their experience of studying. Data from the “case-by-case” analysis suggested student-to-student friendships produced social contexts which facilitated conceptual understanding through discussion, explanation, and application to “real life” contemporary issues. However, the students did not conceive this as a learning experience or suggest the function of their friendships involved learning. These data therefore challenge the perspective that student groups in higher education are formed and regulated for the primary function of learning. Given these findings, further research is needed to assess the role student friendships play in developing disciplinary conceptual understanding. PMID:25309488

Senior, Carl; Howard, Chris

2014-01-01

33

Orchestrating student discourse opportunities and listening for conceptual understandings in high school science classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific communities have established social mechanisms for proposing explanations, questioning evidence, and validating claims. Opportunities like these are often not a given in science classrooms (Vellom, Anderson, & Palincsar, 1993) even though the National Science Education Standards (NSES, 1996) state that a scientifically literate person should be able to "engage intelligently in public discourse and debate about important issues in science and technology" (National Research Council [NRC], 1996). Research further documents that students' science conceptions undergo little modification with the traditional teaching experienced in many high school science classrooms (Duit, 2003, Dykstra, 2005). This case study is an examination of the discourse that occurred as four high school physics students collaborated on solutions to three physics lab problems during which the students made predictions and experimentally generated data to support their predictions. The discourse patterns were initially examined for instances of concept negotiations. Selected instances were further examined using Toulmin's (2003) pattern for characterizing argumentation in order to understand the students' scientific reasoning strategies and to document the role of collaboration in facilitating conceptual modifications and changes. Audio recordings of the students' conversations during the labs, written problems turned in to the teacher, interviews of the students, and observations and field notes taken during student collaboration were used to document and describe the students' challenges and successes encountered during their collaborative work. The findings of the study indicate that collaboration engaged the students and generated two types of productive science discourse: concept negotiations and procedure negotiations. Further analysis of the conceptual and procedure negotiations revealed that the students viewed science as sensible and plausible but not as a tool they could employ to answer their questions. The students' conceptual growth was inhibited by their allegiance to the authority of the science laws as learned in their school classroom. Thus, collaboration did not insure conceptual change. Describing student discourse in situ contributes to science education research about teaching practices that facilitate conceptual understandings in the science classroom.

Kinard, Melissa Grass

34

Improving studentsconceptual understanding of the greenhouse effect using theory-based learning materials that promote deep learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students’ everyday ideas of the greenhouse effect are difficult to change. Environmental education faces the challenge of developing instructional settings that foster studentsconceptual understanding concept of the greenhouse effect in order to understand global warming. To facilitate studentsconceptual development with regard to the greenhouse effect, learning materials aimed at promoting active cognitive learning in order to achieve deep

Sibylle Reinfried; Urs Aeschbacher; Benno Rottermann

2012-01-01

35

The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Students' Understanding of the Human Circulatory System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the contribution of conceptual change texts accompanied by concept mapping instruction to 10th-grade students' understanding of the human circulatory system. Indicates that the conceptual change texts accompanied by concept mapping instruction produced a positive effect on students' understanding of concepts. Concludes that students

Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren; Geban, Omer

2001-01-01

36

Can an egg-dropping race enhance students' conceptual understanding of air resistance?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are misconceptions even among undergraduate physics students about how air resistance is affected by the mass and size of falling objects. A study was carried out in Hong Kong to explore Grade 6 students' (aged 11-12) conceptions of air resistance with respect to falling objects of different size and mass, and whether the subjects showed any change in their conceptual understanding after participating in an egg-dropping race. The findings show that students had a wide range of conceptions, which could be characterized into different levels. Their conceptions seem rather robust, and more structured interventions are required to bring about changes in students' conceptual understanding of air resistance.

Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

2009-03-01

37

Effects of Experimenting with Physical and Virtual Manipulatives on Students' Conceptual Understanding in Heat and Temperature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to investigate the comparative value of experimenting with physical manipulatives (PM) in a sequential combination with virtual manipulatives (VM), with the use of PM preceding the use of VM, and of experimenting with PM alone, with respect to changes in students' conceptual understanding in the domain of heat and temperature. A…

Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Olympiou, Georgios; Papaevripidou, Marios

2008-01-01

38

The Effect of Conceptual Change Texts Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of the Solubility Equilibrium Concept  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aimed to investigate the effect of conceptual change texts oriented instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of solubility equilibrium concept. The misconceptions related to solubility equilibrium concept were obtained through interviews with high school chemistry teachers and related literature. The data were obtained…

Onder, Ismail; Geban, Omer

2006-01-01

39

Effect of Instruction Based on Conceptual Change Activities on Students' Understanding of Static Electricity Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of learning activities based on conceptual change conditions and traditionally designed physics instruction on tenth-grade students' understanding of static electricity concepts and their attitudes toward physics as a school subject. Misconceptions related to static electricity concepts…

Baser, Mustafa; Geban, Omer

2007-01-01

40

Modeling students' conceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

E-print Network

Concept Inventory were moderate to strong. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the common to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test score with grade, course level, and the Force understanding of all paired relations among the concepts of force, velocity, and acceleration. Here, we report

Zollman, Dean

41

Conceptual Underpinnings of Students' Ability to Understand Reflections from a Plane Mirror  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this paper we explore students' pre-instruction knowledge of several conceptual and procedural pieces of knowledge that we believe are prerequisite to one's ability to generate correct light ray diagrams and understand image formation by a plane mirror. The research population is an algebra-based, introductory physics class of about 50 students at a medium-sized, urban, public university. Both individual interviews and written free response questions were used to gather data.

Cummings, Karen; Grillo, Edward

2009-11-30

42

Using Two-Tier Test to Identify Primary Students' Conceptual Understanding and Alternative Conceptions in Acid Base  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to identify primary students' conceptual understanding and alternative conceptions in acid-base. For this reason, a 15 items two-tier multiple choice test administered 56 eighth grade students in spring semester 2009-2010. Data for this study were collected using a conceptual understanding scale prepared to include…

Bayrak, Beyza Karadeniz

2013-01-01

43

Avoiding Reflex Responses: Strategies for Revealing Students' Conceptual Understanding in Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is widespread concern about the level of scientific literacy in the U. S. An important, although often overlooked, point, is that student learning is generally only a good as the assessments used to measure it. Unfortunately, most assessments measure recall and recognition rather than conceptual understanding, and as a result over-estimate levels of scientific literacy. We have encountered this fact during the construction of the Biology Concept Inventory (BCI). Using the concept of diffusion, which is taught in a wide range of introductory biology, chemistry, and physics courses, as an exemplar, we describe lessons learned and strategies we use to create questions that better probe student understanding.

Klymkowsky, Michael; Gheen, Rachel; Garvin-Doxas, Kathy

2013-05-08

44

Multiple intelligences and alternative teaching strategies: The effects on student academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and attitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the interactions between multiple intelligence strengths and alternative teaching methods on student academic achievement, conceptual understanding and attitudes. The design was a quasi-experimental study, in which students enrolled in Principles of Anatomy and Physiology, a developmental biology course, received lecture only, problem-based learning with lecture, or peer teaching with lecture. These students completed the Multiple Intelligence Inventory to determine their intelligence strengths, the Students' Motivation Toward Science Learning questionnaire to determine student attitudes towards learning in science, multiple choice tests to determine academic achievement, and open-ended questions to determine conceptual understanding. Effects of intelligence types and teaching methods on academic achievement and conceptual understanding were determined statistically by repeated measures ANOVAs. No significance occurred in academic achievement scores due to lab group or due to teaching method used; however, significant interactions between group and teaching method did occur in students with strengths in logical-mathematical, interpersonal, kinesthetic, and intrapersonal intelligences. Post-hoc analysis using Tukey HSD tests revealed students with strengths in logical-mathematical intelligence and enrolled in Group Three scored significantly higher when taught by problem-based learning (PBL) as compared to peer teaching (PT). No significance occurred in conceptual understanding scores due to lab group or due to teaching method used; however, significant interactions between group and teaching method did occur in students with strengths in musical, kinesthetic, intrapersonal, and spatial intelligences. Post-hoc analysis using Tukey HSD tests revealed students with strengths in logical-mathematical intelligence and enrolled in Group Three scored significantly higher when taught by lecture as compared to PBL. Students with strengths in intrapersonal intelligence and enrolled in Group One scored significantly lower when taught by lecture as compared to PBL. Results of a repeated measures ANOVA for student attitudes showed significant increases in positive student attitudes toward science learning for all three types of teaching method between pretest and posttest; but there were no significant differences in posttest attitude scores by type of teaching method.

Baragona, Michelle

45

Testing the development of student conceptual and visualization understanding in quantum mechanics through the undergraduate career  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order to probe various aspects of student understanding of some of the core ideas of quantum mechanics, and especially how they develop over the undergraduate curriculum, we have developed an assessment instrument designed to test conceptual and visualization understanding in quantum theory. We report data obtained from students ranging from sophomore-level modern physics courses, through juniorâsenior level quantum theory classes, to first year graduate quantum mechanics courses in what may be the first such study of the development of student understanding in this important core subject of physics through the undergraduate career. We discuss the results and their possible relevance to the standard curriculum as well as to the development of new curricular materials.

Robinett, Richard; Cataloglu, E.

2005-10-11

46

College Physics Students' Conceptual Understanding of Area and Volume, and Relationships Between these Concepts and Students' Understanding of Physics Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts such as area and volume are foundational ideas for many concepts introduced in introductory science courses. At the college level, most instructors typically assume that incoming students have already developed an understanding of these underpinning ideas. However, doubt has surfaced in recent years about students' depth of understanding and mastery of these fundamental concepts. Because deficiencies in understanding basic

Jiang Yu

1995-01-01

47

Identifying Students' Mental Models of Sound Propagation: The Role of Conceptual Blending in Understanding Conceptual Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated introductory physics students' mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the "Entity" model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the…

Hrepic, Zdeslav; Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

2010-01-01

48

Constraints on Conceptual Change: How Elementary Teachers' Attitudes and Understanding of Conceptual Change Relate to Changes in Students' Conceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Like their students, teachers may hold a variety of naďve conceptions that have been hypothesized to limit their ability to support students' learning. This study examines whether changes in elementary students' conceptions are related to their teachers' content knowledge, attitudes, and understanding of conceptual change. The study…

Fulmer, Gavin W.

2013-01-01

49

Assessment in Support of Conceptual Understanding and Student Motivation to Learn Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Classroom-based assessment strategies may influence the development of conceptual understanding and motivational beliefs among elementary learners in science. A contextual analysis of how young children (65 second graders) responded to classroom-based assessment--and the impact that assessment may have had on science learning--suggests that these young children enjoyed learning about science. Their positive attitudes may have developed because of the opportunities for active exploration they were given and the intellectual stimulation that resulted from new and unexpected discoveries in science. Successful assessment experiences may also have contributed to the enthusiasm that these students expressed for science.

King, Melissa D.

2006-01-01

50

The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction to eleventh-grade students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature and interviews with teachers regarding their observations of students' difficulties. The test was administrated as

Salem A. Al Khawaldeh; Ali M. Al Olaimat

2010-01-01

51

The Effect of Cooperative Learning Approach Based on Conceptual Change Condition on Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the cooperative learning approach based on conceptual change conditions over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' conceptual understanding and achievement of computational problems related to chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 87 tenth grade…

Bilgin, Ibrahim; Geban, Omer

2006-01-01

52

Using Memes and Memetic Processes to Explain Social and Conceptual Influences on Student Understanding about Complex Socio-Scientific Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated seventh grade learners' decision making about genetic engineering concepts and applications. A social network analyses supported by technology tracked changes in student understanding with a focus on social and conceptual influences. Results indicated that several social and conceptual mechanisms potentially affected how…

Yoon, Susan

2008-01-01

53

The effect of computer simulations and the learning cycle on students' conceptual understanding of Newton's three laws of motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine how three different methods of instruction would affect a student's conceptual understanding of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. The three methods were the expository, learning cycle, and computer simulations. Three sections of students enrolled in a suburban mid-western high school's introductory physics course were the subjects of this study. The

Paul Mason Rutherford Jr.

1999-01-01

54

The Effects of Representations, Constructivist Approaches, and Engagement on Middle School Students' Algebraic Procedure and Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of types of representations, constructivist teaching approaches, and student engagement on middle school algebra students' procedural knowledge and conceptual understanding. Data gathered from 16 video lessons and algebra pretest/posttests were used to run three multilevel structural equation models. Symbolic…

Ross, Amanda; Willson, Victor

2012-01-01

55

Comparing and Combining Real and Virtual Experimentation: An Effort to Enhance Students' Conceptual Understanding of Electric Circuits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate value of combining Real Experimentation (RE) with Virtual Experimentation (VE) with respect to changes in students' conceptual understanding of electric circuits. To achieve this, a pre-post comparison study design was used that involved 88 undergraduate students. The participants were randomly assigned…

Zacharia, Z. C.

2007-01-01

56

Analogical Reasoning for Understanding Solution Rates: Students' Conceptual Change and Chemical Explanations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study aims to demonstrate evidence of (a) students' conceptual change on solution rates; (b) students' sub-microscopic explanations of dissolution; and (c) retention of the concepts of solution rates. The sample consists of 44 Grade 9 students (18 boys and 26 girls) drawn purposively from two different classes (22 each) in the city of Trabzon,…

Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Ebenezer, Jazlin V.

2009-01-01

57

The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction to eleventh-grade students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature…

Al khawaldeh, Salem A.; Al Olaimat, Ali M.

2010-01-01

58

The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction\\u000a to eleventh-grade studentsunderstanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular\\u000a respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature and interviews with teachers regarding\\u000a their observations of students’ difficulties. The test was administrated as

Salem A. Al khawaldeh; Ali M. Al Olaimat

2010-01-01

59

Does using active learning in thermodynamics lectures improve studentsconceptual understanding and learning experiences?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Encouraging ‘active learning’ in the large lecture theatre emerges as a credible recommendation for improving university courses, with reports often showing significant improvements in learning outcomes. However, the recommendations are based predominantly on studies undertaken in mechanics. We set out to examine those claims in the thermodynamics module of a large first year physics course with an established technique, called interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs). The study took place at The University of Sydney, where four parallel streams of the thermodynamics module were divided into two streams that experienced the ILDs and two streams that did not. The programme was first implemented in 2011 to gain experience and refine logistical matters and repeated in 2012 with approximately 500 students. A validated survey, the thermal concepts survey, was used as pre-test and post-test to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided insights into what the ‘active learning’ meant from student experiences. We analysed lecture recordings to capture the time devoted to different activities in a lecture, including interactivity. The learning gains were in the ‘high gain’ range for the ILD streams and ‘medium gain’ for the other streams. The analysis of the lecture recordings showed that the ILD streams devoted significantly more time to interactivity while surveys and interviews showed that students in the ILD streams were thinking in deep ways. Our study shows that ILDs can make a difference in studentsconceptual understanding as well as their experiences, demonstrating the potential value-add that can be provided by investing in active learning to enhance lectures.

Georgiou, H.; Sharma, M. D.

2015-01-01

60

The effects of students' reasoning abilities on conceptual understandings and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if there are relationships among freshmen\\/first year students' reasoning abilities, conceptual understandings and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics. The sample consisted of 165 freshmen science education prospective teachers (female = 86, male = 79; age range 17-21) who were enrolled in an introductory physics course. Data collection was done during the fall

S. Ates; E. Cataloglu

2007-01-01

61

The effects of students' cognitive styles on conceptual understandings and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if there are relationship among freshmen students' Field depended or field independent (FD\\/FI) cognitive style, conceptual understandings, and problem solving skills in mechanics. The sample consisted of 213 freshmen (female = 111, male = 102; age range 17–21) who were enrolled in an introductory physics course required for science education prospective teachers.

Salih Ates; Erdat Cataloglu

2007-01-01

62

The effects of inquiry-based learning on elementary studentsconceptual understanding of matter, scientific process skills and science attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) environments, on studentsconceptual understanding of matter, scientific process skills and attitudes towards science. A teaching intervention was designed on the basis of IBL principles, which was put into practice in a 5th grade science class (n=20). Instruction lasted 8 weeks in total as provided by normal science

P?nar ?im?ek; Filiz Kabap?nar

2010-01-01

63

An Investigation of Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text-Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Solution Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of conceptual change text-oriented instruction over traditional instruction on students' understanding of solution concepts (e.g., dissolving, solubility, factors affecting solubility, concentrations of solutions, types of solutions, physical properties of solutions) and their attitudes towards chemistry. The…

Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Canpolat, Nurtac; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

2006-01-01

64

The Effects of Students' Cognitive Styles on Conceptual Understandings and Problem-Solving Skills in Introductory Mechanics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if there are relationships among freshmen students' Field depended or field independent (FD/FI) cognitive style, conceptual understandings, and problem solving skills in mechanics. The sample consisted of 213 freshmen (female = 111, male = 102; age range 17-21) who were enrolled in an introductory physics…

Ates, Salih; Cataloglu, Erdat

2007-01-01

65

Effect of explicit problem solving instruction on high school students' problem-solving performance and conceptual understanding of physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this study a two-sample, pre/posttest, quasi-experimental design was used to investigate the effect of explicit problem-solving instruction on high school students' conceptual understanding of physics. Eight physics classes, with a total of 145 students, were randomly assigned to either a treatment or comparison group. The four treatment classes were taught how to use an explicit problem-solving strategy, while the four comparison classes were taught how to use a textbook problem-solving strategy. Students' problem-solving performance and conceptual understanding were assessed both before and after instruction. The results indicated that the explicit strategy improved the quality and completeness of students' physics representations more than the textbook strategy, but there was no difference between the two strategies on match of equations with representations, organization, or mathematical execution. In terms of conceptual understanding, there was no overall difference between the two groups; however, there was a significant interaction between the sex of the students and group. The explicit strategy appeared to benefit female students, while the textbook strategy appeared to benefit male students. The implications of these results for physics instruction are discussed.

Huffman, Douglas

2005-11-17

66

Implementation of Scientific Community Laboratories and Their Effect on Student Conceptual Learning, Attitudes, and Understanding of Uncertainty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific Community Laboratories, developed by The University of Maryland, have shown initial promise as laboratories meant to emulate the practice of doing physics. These laboratories have been re-created by incorporating their design elements with the University of Toledo course structure and resources. The laboratories have been titled the Scientific Learning Community (SLC) Laboratories. A comparative study between these SLC laboratories and the University of Toledo physics department's traditional laboratories was executed during the fall 2012 semester on first semester calculus-based physics students. Three tests were executed as pre-test and post-tests to capture the change in students' concept knowledge, attitudes, and understanding of uncertainty. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was used to evaluate students' conceptual changes through the semester and average normalized gains were compared between both traditional and SLC laboratories. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) was conducted to elucidate students' change in attitudes through the course of each laboratory. Finally, interviews regarding data analysis and uncertainty were transcribed and coded to track changes in the way students understand uncertainty and data analysis in experimental physics after their participation in both laboratory type. Students in the SLC laboratories showed a notable an increase conceptual knowledge and attitudes when compared to traditional laboratories. SLC students' understanding of uncertainty showed most improvement, diverging completely from students in the traditional laboratories, who declined throughout the semester.

Lark, Adam

67

Effects of Student-Generated Diagrams versus Student-Generated Summaries on Conceptual Understanding of Causal and Dynamic Knowledge in Plate Tectonics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Grade five students' (n=58) conceptual understanding of plate tectonics was measured by analysis of student-generated summaries and diagrams, and by posttest assessment of both the spatial/static and causal/dynamic aspects of the domain. The diagram group outperformed the summary and text-only groups on the posttest measures. Discusses the effects…

Gobert, Janice D.; Clement, John J.

1999-01-01

68

Effects of Problem-Based Learning on University Students’ Epistemological Beliefs About Physics and Physics Learning and Conceptual Understanding of Newtonian Mechanics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effects of problem-based learning on students’ beliefs about physics and physics learning and\\u000a conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics. The study further examines the relationship between students’ beliefs about\\u000a physics and their conceptual understanding of mechanics concepts. Participants were 124 Turkish university students (PBL = 55,\\u000a traditional = 69) enrolled in a calculus-based introductory physics class. Students’ beliefs about physics and

Mehmet Sahin

2010-01-01

69

Developing a magnetism conceptual survey and assessing gender differences in student understanding of magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We discuss the development of a research-based conceptual multiple-choice survey of magnetism. We also discuss the use of the survey to investigate gender differences in students' difficulties with concepts related to magnetism. We find that while there was no gender difference on the pre-test. However, female students performed significantly worse than male students when the survey was given as a post-test in traditionally taught calculus-based introductory physics courses with similar results in both the regular and honors versions of the course. In the algebra-based courses, the performance of female and male students has no statistical difference on the pre-test or the post-test.

Li, Jing; Singh, Chandralekha

2012-04-24

70

Elementary Students' Construction of Proportional Reasoning Problems: Using Writing to Generalize Conceptual Understanding in Mathematics  

E-print Network

364 Elementary Students' Construction of Proportional Reasoning Problems: Using Writing of proportional tasks with focused discussion and concept development by the teacher. In order to understand the proportional reasoning tasks. Introduction Proportionality is one of those important mathematical topics

Spagnolo, Filippo

71

Conceptual Understandings of Seasonal Change by Middle School Students with Visual Impairments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to understand and describe the misconceptions of students with visual impairments about seasonal change. Students who participated in traditional instruction exhibited alternative conceptions before and after instruction, whereas those who participated in inquiry-based instruction had alternative conceptions before…

Wild, Tiffany A.; Trundle, Kathy Cabe

2010-01-01

72

Urban High School Students' Critical Science Agency: Conceptual Understandings and Environmental Actions around Climate Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates how the enactment of a climate change curriculum supports students' development of critical science agency, which includes students developing deep understandings of science concepts and the ability to take action at the individual and community levels. We examined the impact of a four to six week urban ecology curriculum…

McNeill, Katherine L.; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

2012-01-01

73

Arguments, Contradictions, Resistances, and Conceptual Change in Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on a study aimed at facilitating freshman general chemistry students' understanding of atomic structure based on the work of Thomson, Rutherford, and Bohr. Hypothesizes that classroom discussions based on arguments/counterarguments of the heuristic principles on which these scientists based their atomic models can facilitate students'…

Niaz, Mansoor; Aguilera, Damarys; Maza, Arelys; Liendo, Gustavo

2002-01-01

74

Conceptual understanding of thermodynamics: A study of undergraduate and graduate students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a perception among college students that physical chemistry is an impossibly difficult subject. The hypothesis guiding this study is that this perception is caused by the mismatch between the physical chemistry curriculum and the cognitive needs of students, whose learning styles, misconceptions, and difficulties are not explicitly addressed. A qualitative approach was used to examine students' conceptions of concepts such as internal energy, enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, and Gibbs free energy. Students' views about science, physical chemistry, and thermodynamics were also examined. The subjects of the study were nine undergraduate and graduate students taking introductory or review courses in thermodynamics. Data were obtained from twenty-five individual interviews, thirteen of which took place while respondents were taking a course and twelve after they had completed it. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed and the transcripts were analyzed by a cross-case comparison method. The results show that graduate students had many of the same difficulties and misconceptions as undergraduate students. After a semester, students retained a minimal understanding of the main ideas of thermodynamics and the connections between them. They had a limited understanding of the relevance of thermodynamics to chemistry. Students regarded mathematical derivations as a fundamental component of thermodynamics and relied exclusively on mathematical equations to represent concepts such as enthalpy. Mathematical presentations were emphasized in lectures. The mathematical and pictorial symbols that students copied from the blackboard did not necessarily hold the same meaning for them as they did for professors. Many students had difficulty connecting mathematical symbols to physical concepts. They often confused the macroscopic and microscopic pictures and did not understand the concept of equilibrium. They never mentioned equilibrium in their descriptions of the science of thermodynamics. Students did not make connections between thermodynamic concepts such as internal energy and their prior formal knowledge.

Patron, Francis

1997-11-01

75

Enhancing Students' Conceptual Understanding by Engaging Science Text with Reflective Writing as a Hermeneutical Circle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students can have great difficulty reading scientific texts and trying to cope with the professor in the classroom. Part of the reason for students' difficulties is that for a student taking a science gateway course the language, ontology and epistemology of science are akin to a foreign culture. There is thus an analogy between such a student and an anthropologist spending time among a native group in some remote part of the globe. This brings us naturally to the subject of hermeneutics. It is through language that we attempt to understand an alien culture. The hermeneutical circle involves the interplay between our construct of the unfamiliar with our own outlook that deepens with each pass. It can be argued that for novice students to acquire a full understanding of scientific texts, they also need to pursue a recurrent construction of their comprehension of scientific concepts. In this paper it is shown how an activity, reflective-writing, can enhance students' understanding of concepts in their textbook by getting students to approach text in the manner of a hermeneutical circle. This is illustrated using studies made at three post-secondary institutions.

Kalman, Calvin S.

2011-02-01

76

An examination of how middle school science teachers conduct collaborative inquiry and reflection about students' conceptual understanding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative case study examined how middle school science teachers conducted collaborative inquiry and reflection about students' conceptual understanding, and how individual teachers in the middle school science group acted and made reflections in response to their collaborative inquiry. It also examined external influences that affected the teachers' ability to engage in collaborative inquiry. Observational, written, and interview data were collected from observations of teachers' face-to-face meetings and reflections, individual interviews, a focus group interview, and online reflections. The results of this study revealed that collaborative inquiry is a form of professional development that includes answering curricular questions through observation, communication, action, and reflection. This approach was developed and implemented by middle school science teachers. The premise of an inquiry is based on a need with students. Middle school science teachers came to consensus about actions to affect students' conceptual understanding, took action as stated, and shared their reflections of the actions taken with consideration to current and upcoming school activities. Activities involved teachers brainstorming and sharing with one another, talking about how the variables were merged into their curriculum, and how they impacted students' conceptual understanding. Teachers valued talking with one another about science content and pedagogy, but did find the inquiry portion of the approach to require more development. The greatest challenge to conducting collaborative inquiry and reflection was embedding teacher inquiry within a prescribed inquiry that was already being conducted by the Sundown School District. Collaborative inquiry should be structured so that it meets the needs of teachers in order to attend to the needs of students. A conducive atmosphere for collaborative inquiry and reflection is one in which administrators make the process mandatory and facilitate the process by removing an existing inquiry.

Todd-Gibson, Christine

77

The Effects of Writing-to-Learn Activities on Elementary Students' Conceptual Understanding: Learning about Force and Motion through Writing to Older Peers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quasi-experimental and pre/posttest study was designed to examine whether fourth-grade students who engaged in collaboratively writing letters to 11th-grade students performed better on tests of conceptual understanding of a unit on force and motion than students who did not. The participants included 835 fourth-grade students and 416…

Chen, Ying-Chih; Hand, Brian; McDowell, Leah

2013-01-01

78

Can an egg-dropping race enhance students' conceptual understanding of air resistance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are misconceptions even among undergraduate physics students about

Yeung Chung Lee; Ping Wai Kwok

2009-01-01

79

Can an egg-dropping race enhance studentsconceptual understanding of air resistance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are misconceptions even among undergraduate physics students about

Yeung Chung Lee; Ping Wai Kwok

2009-01-01

80

Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their…

Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

2011-01-01

81

Arguments, contradictions, resistances, and conceptual change in students' understanding of atomic structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most general chemistry courses and textbooks emphasize experimental details and lack a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to facilitate freshman general chemistry students' understanding of atomic structure based on the work of Thomson, Rutherford, and Bohr. It is hypothesized that classroom discussions based on arguments\\/counterarguments of the heuristic principles, on which these scientists

Mansoor Niaz; Damarys Aguilera; Arelys Maza; Gustavo Liendo

2002-01-01

82

The effects of students' reasoning abilities on conceptual understandings and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine if there are relationships among freshmen/first year students' reasoning abilities, conceptual understandings and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics. The sample consisted of 165 freshmen science education prospective teachers (female = 86, male = 79; age range 17-21) who were enrolled in an introductory physics course. Data collection was done during the fall semesters in two successive years. At the beginning of each semester, the force concept inventory (FCI) and the classroom test of scientific reasoning (CTSR) were administered to assess students' initial understanding of basic concepts in mechanics and reasoning levels. After completing the course, the FCI and the mechanics baseline test (MBT) were administered. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in problem-solving skill test mean scores, as measured by the MBT, among concrete, formal and postformal reasoners. There were no significant differences in conceptual understanding levels of pre- and post-test mean scores, as measured by FCI, among the groups. The Benferroni post hoc comparison test revealed which set of reasoning levels showed significant difference for the MBT scores. No statistical difference between formal and postformal reasoners' mean scores was observed, while the mean scores between concrete and formal reasoners and concrete and postformal reasoners were statistically significantly different.

Ates, S.; Cataloglu, E.

2007-11-01

83

Students' Communicative Resources in Relation to Their Conceptual Understanding--The Role of Non-Conventionalized Expressions in Making Sense of Visualizations of Protein Function  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how students explain their conceptual understanding of protein function using visualizations. Thirteen upper secondary students, four tertiary students (studying chemical biology), and two experts were interviewed in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were structured around 2D illustrations of proteins and an animated…

Rundgren, Carl-Johan; Hirsch, Richard; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu; Tibell, Lena A. E.

2012-01-01

84

Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication  

E-print Network

impacts on studentsconceptual model development and content knowledge. This dissertation model integrates science and education research and is particularly useful for graduate students who intend to pursue a career in academia and envision teaching...

McNeal, Karen Sue

2009-05-15

85

Development of a Student-Centered Instrument to Assess Middle School Students' Conceptual Understanding of Sound  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development and field test of the Sound Concept Inventory Instrument (SCII), designed to measure middle school students' concepts of sound. The instrument was designed based on known students' difficulties in understanding sound and the history of science related to sound and focuses on two main aspects of…

Eshach, Haim

2014-01-01

86

Representing Chemistry: How Instructional Use of Symbolic, Microscopic, and Macroscopic Mode Influences Student Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chemistry as a subject is difficult to learn and understand, due in part to the specific language used by practitioners in their professional and scientific communications. The language and ways of representing chemical interactions have been grouped into three modes of representation used by chemistry instructors, and ultimately by students in understanding the discipline. The first of these three modes of representation is the symbolic mode, which uses a standard set of rules for chemical nomenclature set out by the IUPAC. The second mode of representation is that of microscopic, which depicts chemical compounds as discrete units made up of atoms and molecules, with a particular ratio of atoms to a molecule or formula unit. The third mode of representation is macroscopic, what can be seen, experienced, or measured directly, like ice melting or a color change during a chemical reaction. Recent evidence suggests that chemistry instructors can assist their students in making the connections between the modes of representation by incorporating all three modes into their teaching and discussions, and overtly connecting the modes during instruction. In this research, chemistry teachers at the community college level were observed over the course of an entire semester, to evaluate their instructional use of mode of representation. The students of these teachers were tested prior to and after a semester's worth of instruction, and changes in the basic chemistry conceptual knowledge of these students were compared. Additionally, a subset of the overall population that was pre- and post-tested was interviewed at length using demonstrations of chemical phenomenon that students were asked to translate using all three modes of representation. Analysis of the instruction of three community college teachers shows there were significant differences among these teachers in their instructional use of mode of representation. Additionally, the students of these three teachers had differential and statistically significant achievement over the course of the semester. This research supports results of other similar studies, as well as providing some unexpected results from the students involved.

Wood, Lorelei

87

The Impact of Peer Instruction on College Students' Beliefs about Physics and Conceptual Understanding of Electricity and Magnetism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to assess students' conceptual learning of electricity and magnetism and examine how these conceptions, beliefs about physics, and quantitative problem-solving skills would change after peer instruction (PI). The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM), Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey…

Gok, Tolga

2012-01-01

88

The Effect of the Conceptual Change Oriented Instruction through Cooperative Learning on 4th Grade Students' Understanding of Earth and Sky Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the conceptual change oriented instruction through cooperative learning (CCICL) and traditional science instruction (TI) on 4th grade students' understanding of earth and sky concepts and their attitudes toward earth and sky concepts. In this study, 56 fourth grade students from the…

Celikten, Oksan; Ipekcioglu, Sevgi; Ertepinar, Hamide; Geban, Omer

2012-01-01

89

Assessing the Development of Chemistry Students' Conceptual and Visual Understanding of Dimensional Analysis via Supplemental Use of Web-Based Software  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a proprietary software program on students' conceptual and visual understanding of dimensional analysis. The participants in the study were high school general chemistry students enrolled in two public schools with different demographics (School A and School B) in the Chattanooga, Tennessee,…

Ellis, Jennifer T.

2013-01-01

90

Conceptual Understandings Resulting from Interactive Science Exhibits.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the relationships between students' free exploration of interactive science museum exhibits, conceptual understandings, and cognitive developmental levels. Classifies participating subjects (n=45), ages 5-13, as preoperational, concrete operational (empirical-inductive), or formal operational (hypothetical-deductive). (Contains 22…

Marek, Edmund A.; Boram, Robert D.; Laubach, Tim; Gerber, Brian L.

2002-01-01

91

Teaching Mathematical Trade Topics for Conceptual Understanding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is intended to assist trade and industrial education teachers in teaching mathematical trade topics in a way that will increase students' conceptual understanding of them. The first chapter provides an overview of the book's contents and suggests ways of using it. The next five chapters address the following aspects of using principles…

Larkin, Alan; Phillips, Keith

92

Effectiveness of the Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Maps about Students' Understanding of the Molecules Carrying Genetical Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to investigate the effects of concept maps, together with conceptual change texts, given to 11th grade students' on the subject of molecules carrying genetical information. The semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 5 upper class students to find misconceptions related to the subject. A success test was developed…

Tastan, Ibrahim; Dikmenli, Musa; Cardak, Osman

2008-01-01

93

Understanding Conservation of Laws in Mechanics: Students' Conceptual Change in Learning about Collisions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on student learning about collisions in physics instruction. Focus is placed on the main differences between the spontaneous perspective in describing/interpreting collisions and the disciplinary perspective based upon the energy and linear momentum conservation laws. (PR)

Grimellini-Tomasini, N.; And Others

1993-01-01

94

Facilitating Students' Conceptual Understanding of Boiling Using a Four-Step Constructivist Teaching Method  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the work presented here was to devise an activity associated with factors affecting boiling points. The intervention used a four-step constructivist-based teaching strategy, which was subsequently evaluated by a cohort of students. Data collection consisted of application of a purpose designed questionnaire consisting of four open-ended…

Calik, Muammer

2008-01-01

95

Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms - Understanding the Source of Student Misconceptions about Rock Formation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes narrative essays--stories of rock formation--written by pre-service elementary school teachers. Reports startling misconceptions among preservice teachers on pebbles that grow, human involvement in rock formation, and sedimentary rocks forming as puddles as dry up, even though these students had completed a college level course on Earth…

Kusnick, Judi

2002-01-01

96

Promoting Students' Conceptual Understanding of Plant Defense Responses Using the Fighting Plant Learning Unit (FPLU)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most students think animals are more interesting than plants as a study topic believing that plants are inferior to animals because they are passive and unable to respond to external challenges, particularly biological invaders such as microorganisms and insect herbivores. The purpose of this study was to develop an inquiry-based learning unit,…

Nantawanit, Nantawan; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

2012-01-01

97

Exploring the Influence of the Mass Media on Primary Students' Conceptual Understanding of Genetics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new Australian Curriculum ignites debate about science content appropriate for primary school children. Abstract genetics concepts such as genes and DNA are still being avoided in primary school, yet research has shown that, by age 10, many students have heard of DNA and/or genes. Scientific concepts appear in the mass media, but primary…

Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

2012-01-01

98

Fundamental Computer Science Conceptual Understandings for High School Students Using Original Computer Game Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2009, the North Carolina Virtual Public Schools worked with researchers at the William and Ida Friday Institute to produce and evaluate the use of game creation by secondary students as a means for learning content related to career awareness in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines, with particular emphasis in…

Ernst, Jeremy V.; Clark, Aaron C.

2012-01-01

99

Using Students' Representations Constructed during Problem Solving to Infer Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The differences in the types of representations constructed during successful and unsuccessful problem-solving episodes were investigated within the context of graduate students working on problems that involve concepts from 2D-NMR. Success at problem solving was established by having the participants solve five problems relating to material just…

Domin, Daniel; Bodner, George

2012-01-01

100

Student Use of Scaffolding Software: Relationships with Motivation and Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to theoretically articulate and empirically assess the role of computer scaffolds. In this project, several examples of educational software were developed to scaffold the learning of students performing high level cognitive activities. The software used in this study, Artemis, focused on scaffolding the learning of…

Butler, Kyle A.; Lumpe, Andrew

2008-01-01

101

PROMOTING STUDENTSCONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING OF PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSES USING THE FIGHTING PLANT LEARNING UNIT (FPLU)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most students think animals are more interesting than plants as a study topic believing that plants are inferior to animals\\u000a because they are passive and unable to respond to external challenges, particularly biological invaders such as microorganisms\\u000a and insect herbivores. The purpose of this study was to develop an inquiry-based learning unit, the Fighting Plant Learning\\u000a Unit (FPLU), which focuses

Nantawan Nantawanit; Bhinyo Panijpan; Pintip Ruenwongsa

102

Evaluation of the Effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding of the Subjects Related to "Matter and Change"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th grade students' conceptual understanding of the subjects related to "Matter and Change". This research is a qualitative research and its design is a multiple (compare) case study. In this study, semi-structured interviews related to the…

Çinar, Derya; Bayraktar, Sule

2014-01-01

103

Can an Egg-Dropping Race Enhance Students' Conceptual Understanding of Air Resistance?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children are familiar with situations in which air resistance plays an important role, such as parachuting. However, it is not known whether they have any understanding about the concept of air resistance, how air resistance affects falling objects, and the differential effect it has on different objects. The literature reveals that there are…

Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

2009-01-01

104

Using the science writing heuristic approach as a tool for assessing and promoting students' conceptual understanding and perceptions in the general chemistry laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis reports on a study that examined the impact of implementing SWH (inquiry-based approach) in a general chemistry lab on non-science-major students' understanding of chemistry concepts and students' perceptions toward writing in science and implementing SWH. This study was conducted in a large university in the Midwest of the United States in a college freshman chemistry laboratory for non-science-major students. The research framework is presented including the following: the qualitative research design with the observation as data collection method for this design and the criteria for teacher level of implementation and the ranking mechanism; and the quantitative research design with data collection and analysis methods including pre- and post-conceptual exams, lecture question, open-ended surveys. This research was based on a quasi-experimental mixed-method design a focus on student performance on higher order conceptual questions, and open-ended survey at the end of semester about their perception toward writing to learn ad implementing SWH. Results from the qualitative and quantitative component indicated that implementing SWH approach has notably enhanced both male and female conceptual understanding and perception toward chemistry and implementing SWH. It is known that there is gender gap in science, where female have lower perception and self confident toward science. Interestingly, my findings have showed that implementing SWH helped closing the gap between male and female who started the semester with a statistically significant lower level of conceptual understanding of chemistry concepts among females than males.

Mohammad, Elham Ghazi

105

The effectiveness of interactive computer simulations on college engineering student conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability related to circular motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past thirty years, the effectiveness of computer assisted learning was found varied by individual studies. Today, with drastic technical improvement, computers have been widely spread in schools and used in a variety of ways. In this study, a design model involving educational technology, pedagogy, and content domain is proposed for effective use of computers in learning. Computer simulation, constructivist and Vygotskian perspectives, and circular motion are the three elements of the specific Chain Model for instructional design. The goal of the physics course is to help students remove the ideas which are not consistent with the physics community and rebuild new knowledge. To achieve the learning goal, the strategies of using conceptual conflicts and using language to internalize specific tasks into mental functions were included. Computer simulations and accompanying worksheets were used to help students explore their own ideas and to generate questions for discussions. Using animated images to describe the dynamic processes involved in the circular motion may reduce the complexity and possible miscommunications resulting from verbal explanations. The effectiveness of the instructional material on student learning is evaluated. The results of problem solving activities show that students using computer simulations had significantly higher scores than students not using computer simulations. For conceptual understanding, on the pretest students in the non-simulation group had significantly higher score than students in the simulation group. There was no significant difference observed between the two groups in the posttest. The relations of gender, prior physics experience, and frequency of computer uses outside the course to student achievement were also studied. There were fewer female students than male students and fewer students using computer simulations than students not using computer simulations. These characteristics affect the statistical power for detecting differences. For the future research, more intervention of simulations may be introduced to explore the potential of computer simulation in helping students learning. A test for conceptual understanding with more problems and appropriate difficulty level may be needed.

Chien, Cheng-Chih

106

Development of a Research-Based Learning Progression for Middle School through Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Size and Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Size and scale are crosscutting ideas integral to scientific understanding. However, research shows that students have little understanding of the size of objects, particularly objects too small to see with the unaided eye. Using a cross-sectional study with 101 middle-school through undergraduate students, a teaching experiment with 24 middle…

Delgado, Cesar

2009-01-01

107

The effects of an interactive computer-based simulation prior to performing a laboratory inquiry-based experiment on students' conceptual understanding of physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We investigate the effects of interactive computer-based simulations which are presented prior to inquiry-based laboratory experiments on students' conceptual understanding of mechanics, waves/optics, and thermal physics. In principle, the simulations should serve as a cognitive framework for enhancing the subsequent more open-ended inquiry learning in the subject matter domain of the experiments. To test this prediction, the simulations and experiments were integrated into a one semester class for prospective physics teachers who served as students in the study. Semi-structured interviews were used to assess their ability to make correct predictions about the phenomenon in the experiments before using the latter and give correct explanations of the discrepancies between their predictions and their following observations. Conceptual tests were presented to assess conceptual understandings of each topic. Our results indicate that the use of the simulations improved the students' ability to make acceptable predictions and explanations of the phenomena in the experiments. The use of simulations also fostered a significant conceptual change in the physics content areas that were studied.

Zacharia, Zacharias; Anderson, O. R.

2005-10-12

108

A Student-centred Approach: Assessing the Changes in Prospective Science Teachers’ Conceptual Understanding by Concept Mapping in a General Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although researchers in higher education propose alternatives to traditional approaches to assessment, traditional methods\\u000a are commonly used in college or university science courses. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and validity\\u000a of Prospective Science Teachers’ (PSTs) concept maps as authentic assessment tools in a student-centred approach to describe\\u000a the changes in the conceptual understanding of the

Osman Nafiz Kaya

2008-01-01

109

Conceptual Change among Students in Science. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This ERIC Digest concerns the constructed knowledge (also called nave knowledge or prior conceptions) held by students and the changes required to alter students' framework to understand and believe the true science concepts involved. This process is called conceptual change. Theoretical framework of conceptual change, what exactly is conceptual

Suping, Shanah M.

110

Understanding Co-development of Conceptual and Epistemic Understanding through Modeling Practices with Mobile Internet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study explores how engaging in modeling practice, along with argumentation, leverages students' epistemic and conceptual understanding in an afterschool science/math class of 16 tenth graders. The study also explores how students used mobile Internet phones (smart phones) productively to support modeling practices. As the modeling practices became more challenging, student discussion occurred more often, from what to model to providing explanations for the phenomenon. Students came to argue about evidence that supported their model and how the model could explain target and related phenomena. This finding adds to the literature that modeling practice can help students improve conceptual understanding of subject knowledge as well as epistemic understanding.

Ryu, Suna; Han, Yuhwha; Paik, Seoung-Hey

2015-01-01

111

A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part III. Evaluating Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys: An Item Response Theory Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the third of five papers detailing our national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we use item response theory to analyze students' responses to three out of the four conceptual cosmology surveys we developed. The specific item response theory model we use is…

Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

2012-01-01

112

Using Science Notebooks to Improve Writing Skills and Conceptual Understanding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to provide teachers with strategies for improving students' writing and deepening their conceptual understanding through the use of science notebooks. The strategies include using various resources and providing a variety of feedback opportunities for students. A sample science investigation and an accompanying science notebook entry illustrate these strategies.

Malcolm B. Butler; Catherine Nesbit

2008-01-01

113

Testing for Conceptual Understanding in General Chemistry 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conceptual understanding involves being able to represent and translate chemical problems using three forms of representation—macroscopic, particulate, and symbolic. In addition to research on chemical problem solving, a great deal of work on student misconceptions involving chemical phenomena has been conducted. Both the representational formats, and the work on student misconceptions, served as framework for a team of chemical educators

CRAIG W. BOWEN; DIANE M. BUNCE

1997-01-01

114

Epistemic Beliefs and Conceptual Understanding in Biotechnology: A Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this investigation was to explore students' epistemic beliefs and conceptual understanding of biotechnology. Epistemic beliefs can influence reasoning, how individuals evaluate information, and informed decision making abilities. These skills are important for an informed citizenry that will participate in debates regarding areas in science such as biotechnology. We report on an in-depth case study analysis of three undergraduate, non-science majors in a biotechnology course designed for non-biochemistry majors. We selected participants who performed above average and below average on the first in-class exam. Data from multiple sources—interviews, exams, and a concept instrument—were used to construct (a) individual profiles and (b) a cross-case analysis of our participants' conceptual development and epistemic beliefs from two different theoretical perspectives—Women's Ways of Knowing and the Reflective Judgment Model. Two independent trained researchers coded all case records independently for both theoretical perspectives, with resultant initial Cohen's kappa values above .715 (substantial agreement), and then reached consensus on the codes. Results indicate that a student with more sophisticated epistemology demonstrated greater conceptual understandings at the end of the course than a student with less sophisticated epistemology, even though the latter performed higher initially. Also a student with a less sophisticated epistemology and low initial conceptual performance does not demonstrate gains in their overall conceptual understanding. Results suggest the need for instructional interventions fostering epistemological development of learners in order to facilitate their conceptual growth.

Rebello, Carina M.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Witzig, Stephen B.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; McClure, Bruce A.

2012-04-01

115

Effects of Conceptual Change Texts and Laboratory Experiments on Fourth Grade Students' Understanding of Matter and Change Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether conceptual change texts and laboratory experiments are effective in overcoming misconceptions and whether the concepts were acquired permanently when these methods were utilized. In this study, we addressed some topics from the "Matter and Change" unit in science and technology class of…

Durmus, Jale; Bayraktar, Sule

2010-01-01

116

Even honors physics students have conceptual difficulties with physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Honors students in an introductory physics course are shown to exhibit some of the same kinds of misconceptions as do students in the usual standard introductory courses. Examples are given of exercises and written exam questions that probe for conceptual understanding, and student responses to these questions are used to identify conceptual difficulties common to many students. Because these misconceptions were found in a very select group of students, the implication may be drawn that conceptual difficulties of the same kind are present in students in all levels of introductory physics.

Peters, P. C.

2005-10-27

117

Students' Understanding of Tides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the findings of research into students' understanding of tides. Students from secondary school and pre-service primary school teacher trainees were chosen as subjects and their understanding was assessed by questionnaire. (Author/CCM)

Viiri, Jouni

2000-01-01

118

Explicit Argumentation Instruction to Facilitate Conceptual Understanding and Argumentation Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Argumentation is accepted by many science educators as a major component of science education. Many studies have investigated students' conceptual understanding and their engagement in argumentative activities. However, studies conducted in the subject of chemistry are very rare. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the…

Cetin, Pinar Seda

2014-01-01

119

Prior Knowledge Moderates Instructional Effects on Conceptual Understanding of Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effects of different teaching and learning methods for statistics for 2 levels of prior knowledge on cognitive load, propositional knowledge, and conceptual understanding. Teaching methods were whether or not to provide students with propositional information, and learning strategies were self-explaining the learning…

Leppink, Jimmie; Broers, Nick J.; Imbos, Tjaart; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Berger, Martijn P. F.

2012-01-01

120

Epistemic Beliefs and Conceptual Understanding in Biotechnology: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to explore students' epistemic beliefs and conceptual understanding of biotechnology. Epistemic beliefs can influence reasoning, how individuals evaluate information, and informed decision making abilities. These skills are important for an informed citizenry that will participate in debates regarding areas in…

Rebello, Carina M.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Witzig, Stephen B.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; McClure, Bruce A.

2012-01-01

121

THE ROLE OF SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IN FOSTERING STUDENTS' CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS WITH HYPERMEDIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) in facilitating students' shifts to more sophisticated mental models of the circulatory system as indicated by both performance and process data. We began with Winne and colleagues' information processing model of SRL (Winne, 2001; Winne & Hadwin, 1998) and used it to examine how students regulated their own learning when using

ROGER AZEVEDO; JOHN T. GUTHRIE; DIANE SEIBERT

2004-01-01

122

Using a schoolyard garden to increase language acquisition and conceptual understanding of science in elementary ELL students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This action research study examined a small cross-section of a Texas public school population. Participants were kindergarten through third grade students enrolled in the English as a Second Language (ESL) Program who were pulled out of their general classroom to receive English support within the content area of science. This study looked at how effective a hands-on learning experience using a schoolyard garden enhanced the academic language and science content of the participants. The study began in mid-March and concluded at the end of April with each group receiving 40 minutes of instruction five days a week. Each group consisted of a Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced/Advanced High student for a total of 12 participants. Four forms of data were used in this study: archival, pre-test, post-test, and journal. Rubrics were used to analyze individual students' level of academic language before and after the study. The results illustrate that the younger students (kindergarten and first grade) descriptions were very basic and concrete while the older students had more accurate and descriptive responses. Upon completion of this research, it was determined that the usage of a schoolyard garden compliments both the acquisition of academic language and the increase in science content knowledge.

Stewart, Morgan

123

A Comparison of Students' Conceptual Understanding of Electric Circuits in Simulation Only and Simulation-Laboratory Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this experimental study was to compare learning outcomes of students using a simulation alone (simulation environment) with outcomes of those using a simulation in parallel with real circuits (combination environment) in the domain of electricity, and to explore how learning outcomes in these environments are mediated by implicit (only…

Jaakkola, Tomi; Nurmi, Sami; Veermans, Koen

2011-01-01

124

Case-Based Instruction: Improving Students' Conceptual Understanding through Cases in a Mechanical Engineering Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, there has been a push within engineering curricula to adopt more learner-centered pedagogies, such as case-based instruction. Case-based instruction has been hypothesized to make the curriculum more relevant and motivating for students by pushing them to integrate the concepts they have learned with other experiences. The current study…

Yadav, Aman; Vinh, Megan; Shaver, Gregory M.; Meckl, Peter; Firebaugh, Stephanie

2014-01-01

125

The Role of Self-Regulated Learning in Fostering Students' Conceptual Understanding of Complex Systems with Hypermedia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) in facilitating students' shifts to more sophisticated mental models of the circulatory system as indicated by both performance and process data. We began with Winne and colleagues' information processing model of SRL (Winne, 2001; Winne & Hadwin, 1998) and used it to examine how…

Azevedo, Roger; Guthrie, John T.; Seibert, Diane

2004-01-01

126

Teacher Candidates' Conceptual Understandings of Mathematics Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As universities strive to produce the best mathematics teachers possible through both graduate and undergraduate programs, teacher educators must constantly work towards helping teacher candidates create their own conceptual understanding of mathematics. This pilot study examined the effect teaching in a constructivist manner had on teacher…

Barlow, Angela T.; Reddish, Jill Mizell

2005-01-01

127

Comment on ‘The effects of students' reasoning abilities on conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics’  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a recent article, Ates and Cataloglu (2007 Eur. J. Phys.28 1161–71), in analysing results for a course in introductory mechanics for prospective science teachers, found no statistically significant correlation between students' pre-instruction scores on the Lawson classroom test of scientific reasoning ability (CTSR) and post-instruction scores on the force concept inventory (FCI). As a possible explanation, the authors suggest

Vincent P Coletta; Jeffrey A Phillips; Antti Savinainen; Jeffrey J Steinert

2008-01-01

128

Modelling Photosynthesis to Increase Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biology students in their first year at university have difficulty understanding the abstract concepts of photosynthesis. The traditional didactic lecture followed by practical exercises that show various macroscopic aspects of photosynthesis often do not help the students visualise or understand the submicroscopic (molecular-level) reactions that…

Ross, Pauline; Tronson, Deidre; Ritchie, Raymond J.

2006-01-01

129

Does active engagement curricula give long-lived conceptual understanding?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Both constructivist and sociocultural views of learning and instruction stresses the crucial role of active engagement. It has been demonstrated in large-scale studies that curricula that use âactive engagementâ instructional strategies achieve good results in conceptual tests. However most testing have been done at the end or immediately after a course. The important question is thus if strategies that purport to achieve high gains in conceptual tests produce a permanent change in studentâs world view from "Aristotelian" to "Newtonian" or if the effects reported are only temporary? Our data and data from Montana State University show that, after active engagement physics courses, student display a good conceptual understanding several years after instruction. It is thus concluded that some instructional strategies do achieve fundamental shifts in studentsâ conceptual framework.

Bernhard, Jonte

2012-07-13

130

College Students' Understanding of Atmospheric Ozone Formation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has shown that high school and college students have a lack of conceptual understanding of global warming, ozone, and the greenhouse effect. Most research in this area used survey methodologies and did not include concepts of atmospheric chemistry and ozone formation. This study investigates college students' understandings of atmospheric…

Howard, Kristen E.; Brown, Shane A.; Chung, Serena H.; Jobson, B. Thomas; VanReken, Timothy M.

2013-01-01

131

The Effectiveness of Brain-Based Teaching Approach in Dealing with the Problems of Students' Conceptual Understanding and Learning Motivation towards Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers of science-based education in Malaysian secondary schools, especially those in the field of physics, often find their students facing huge difficulties in dealing with conceptual ideas in physics, resulting thus in a lack of interest towards the subject. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Brain-Based Teaching…

Saleh, Salmiza

2012-01-01

132

The Effects on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Electric Circuits of Introducing Virtual Manipulatives within a Physical Manipulatives-Oriented Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates whether Virtual Manipulatives (VM) within a Physical Manipulatives (PM)-oriented curriculum affect conceptual understanding of electric circuits and related experimentation processes. A pre-post comparison study randomly assigned 194 undergraduates in an introductory physics course to one of five conditions: three…

Zacharia, Zacharias C.; de Jong, Ton

2014-01-01

133

World History: Building Conceptual Understanding for Citizenship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies contributions which a study of world history can make to students' understanding of good citizenship. A major contribution of world history is that it can encourage students to reflect on situations of current political interest. Teaching methods are suggested (based on recall, inference, value analysis, and hypotheses) to improve…

Alder, Douglas D.; Lindhardt, Sherman J.

1981-01-01

134

Implementation of 5E Inquiry Incorporated with Analogy Learning Approach to Enhance Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Reaction Rate for Grade 11 Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this study was to enhance student understanding of the scientific concepts of chemical reaction rate. Forty-four grade 11 students were the target group. The treatment tools were seven learning plans of 5E inquiry incorporated with an analogy learning approach during 15 hours of class time. In each learning plan, the students

Supasorn, Saksri; Promarak, Vinich

2015-01-01

135

How students understand physics equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What does it mean to understand a physics equation? The use of formal expressions in physics is not just a matter of the rigorous and routinized application of principles, followed by the formal manipulation of expressions to obtain an answer. Rather, successful students learn to understand what equations say in a fundamental sense; they have a feel for expressions, and this guides their work. More specifically, students learn to understand physics equations in terms of a vocabulary of elements that I call symbolic forms. Each symbolic form associates a simple conceptual schema with a pattern of symbols in an equation. This hypothesis has implications for how we should understand what must be taught and learned in physics classrooms. From the point of view of improving instruction, it is absolutely critical to acknowledge that physics expertise involves this more flexible and generative understanding of equations, and our instruction should be geared toward helping students to acquire this understanding. The work described here is based on an analysis of a corpus of videotapes in which university students solve physics problems.

Sherin, Bruce L.

2005-11-23

136

Modeling studentsâ conceptual understanding of force, velocity, and acceleration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We have developed a multiple choice test designed to probe studentsâ conceptual understanding of the relationships among the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration. The test was administered to more than 800 students enrolled in standard or honors introductory physics courses or a second-year physics majors course. The test was found to be reasonably statistically reliable, and correlations of test score with grade, course level, and the Force Concept Inventory were moderate to strong. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the common incorrect response that velocity must be in the direction of the acceleration or net force, up to 30% of students gave âpartially correctâ responses, for example that velocity can be either opposite to or in the direction of the acceleration or net force but not zero. The data also suggests that for some students their evolution of understanding may progress through this kind of partially incorrect understanding.

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Heckler, Andrew F.

2010-01-19

137

A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part V. The Effects of a New Suite of Cosmology "Lecture-Tutorials" on Students' Conceptual Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the final paper in a five-paper series describing our national study of the teaching and learning of cosmology in general education astronomy college-level courses. A significant portion of this work was dedicated to the development of five new "Lecture-Tutorials" that focus on addressing the conceptual and reasoning difficulties that our…

Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

2012-01-01

138

Enhancing College Students' Understanding of Lunar Phases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Astronomy education researchers now know that college students do not enter the introductory astronomy classroom as blank slates, but rather with a pre-existing understanding of many introductory astronomy concepts, including lunar phases. Sometimes this understanding is scientifically correct, but often students' understanding is incomplete, inadequate or simply incorrect and cannot explain observed phenomenon. Unfortunately, students' pre-existing understandings are often deeply rooted, and many students leave the classroom without a scientifically correct understanding of lunar phases. The purpose of this research study was to design instruction that enhances college students' understanding of lunar phases. This multi-phase study utilized qualitative and quantitative research methods to fulfill this purpose by identifying students' prior understanding of lunar phases, developing the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (LPCI) to measure conceptual change, designing and evaluating an in-class group activity designed to teach the concept of lunar phases. Using a qualitative phenomenology, fourteen college students' conceptual understanding of lunar phases was uncovered and organized into a conceptual framework with eight dimensions of student understanding, each with alternative facets. Based upon this conceptual framework, the LPCI was developed. This instrument consists of fourteen multiple-choice items designed to assess student understanding of lunar phases. Based on a modified Karplus Learning Cycle, an in-class group activity was developed to teach the concept of lunar phases. During the fall of 1999, this activity was implemented at a midwestern university as part of a restructured astronomy course during two fifty-minute class periods. Administered prior to and after instruction, the LPCI shows the instruction was effective. A statistical analysis of the results shows that the instruction produced an effect size of 2.99 and a normalized gain of 0.63.

Lindell, Rebecca S.

2013-05-28

139

High School Intervention for Influenza Biology and Epidemics/Pandemics: Impact on Conceptual Understanding among Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding real-life issues such as influenza epidemiology may be of particular interest to the development of scientific knowledge and initiation of conceptual changes about viruses and their life cycles for high school students. The goal of this research project was to foster the development of adolescents' conceptual understanding of viruses…

Dumais, Nancy; Hasni, Abdelkrim

2009-01-01

140

High School Intervention for Influenza Biology and Epidemics\\/Pandemics: Impact on Conceptual Understanding among Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding real-life issues such as influenza epidemiology may be of particular interest to the development of scientific knowledge and initiation of conceptual changes about viruses and their life cycles for high school students. The goal of this research project was to foster the develop- ment of adolescents' conceptual understanding of viruses and influenza biology. Thus, the project included two components:

Nancy Dumais; Abdelkrim Hasni

2009-01-01

141

Mathematical vs. Conceptual Understanding: Where Do We Draw The Line?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This research involved high school physics students and how they learn to understand Newtonâs laws as they relate to falling bodies and projectile motion. Students in introductory, algebra-based, high school physics classes were evaluated based on their prior knowledge through a pretest, designed to assess their initial comprehension of the motion of falling bodies and projectiles. Groups were divided and taught separately with an emphasis on either mathematical derivation of equations, followed by brief conceptual discussions, or on thorough conceptual analysis, followed by a brief mathematical verification. After a post-test was given, an evaluation of the responses and explanations of each group of students was used to determine which method of instruction was more effective. Results indicate that after the conceptual group and math groups achieved similar scores on the pretest, the conceptual group obtained a slightly higher normalized gain of 25% on the post-test, compared to the mathematical groupâs normalized gain of 16% (unpaired two-tailed t-test P value for post-test results was 0.1037) and, while within standard deviations, also achieved higher overall scores on all post-test questions and higher normalized gains on all but one post-test question. Further, most students, even those in the mathematically-instructed group, were more inclined to give conceptually-based responses on post-test questions than mathematically-based ones. In the context of this topic, the dominating difficulty for both groups was in analyzing two-dimensional projectile motion and, more specifically, the behavior of each one-dimensional component of such motion.

Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.; Aguilera, Nicholas

2013-07-17

142

Enhancing college students' understanding of lunar phases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy education researchers now know that college students do not enter the introductory astronomy classroom as blank slates, but rather these students enter the classroom with a pre-existing understanding of many introductory astronomy concepts, including lunar phases. Sometimes this understanding is scientifically correct, but often students' understanding is incomplete, inadequate or simply incorrect and cannot explain observed phenomenon. Unfortunately, students' pre- existing understandings are often deeply rooted, and many students leave the classroom without a scientifically correct understanding of lunar phases. The question now arises, how do instructors develop successful instruction so that students leave the classroom with a scientifically correct understanding of lunar phases? The purpose of this research study was therefore to design instruction that enhances college students' understanding of lunar phases. This multi-phase study utilized both qualitative and quantitative research methods to fulfill this purpose by identifying students' prior understanding of lunar phases, developing the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (LPCI) to measure conceptual change, designing and evaluating an in-class group activity designed to teach the concept of lunar phases. Using a qualitative phenomenology, fourteen college students' conceptual understanding of lunar phases was uncovered. This conceptual understanding was organized into a conceptual framework with eight separate dimensions of student understanding, each with alternative facets of student understanding. Based upon this conceptual framework, the LPCI was developed. This instrument consists of fourteen multiple-choice items designed to assess student understanding of lunar phases. Based on a modified Karplus Learning Cycle, an in-class group activity was developed to teach the concept of lunar phases. During the fall semester of 1999, this activity was implemented at a midwestern university as part of a restructured astronomy course. This activity took only two fifty-minute class periods. Administered prior to and after instruction, the LPCI shows that the instruction was indeed effective. A statistical analysis of the results shows that the instruction produced an effect size of 2.99 and a normalized gain of 0.63.

Lindell, Rebecca Susan

143

Helping Students Understand Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the central role of risk assessment in analyzing and making decisions about many environmental issues, most people are poorly equipped to understand key concepts about risk or apply them successfully. I present three class activities in which students develop a better appreciation for the magnitude of a one in a million increased risk of…

Weihe, Paul

2006-01-01

144

Procedural and Conceptual Understandings of the Arithmetic Mean: A Comparison of Visual and Numerical Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the average, or arithmetic mean, has a rich conceptual meaning, it is often defined simply as the outcome of a procedure. The purpose of this study was to compare the nature and extent of the procedural and conceptual understandings developed by two groups of students who received different forms of instruction, one based on the…

George, Elizabeth Ann

145

Understanding cellular respiration: An analysis of conceptual change in college biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored and documented the frequencies of conceptual difficulties confronted by college students seeking to understand the basic processes of cellular respiration. Using concept maps, clinical interviews and an open-ended instrument, viewpoints were elicited from 100 (novice) introductory biology students before and after relevant instruction in cellular respiration and from 100 (experienced) students enrolled in advanced biology courses. Chi-square

Catherine J. Songer; Joel J. Mintzes

1994-01-01

146

Improving Students' Understanding of Electricity and Magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Electricity and magnetism are important topics in physics. Research shows that students have many common difficulties in understanding concepts related to electricity and magnetism. However, research to improve studentsâ understanding of electricity and magnetism is limited compared to introductory mechanics. This thesis explores issues related to studentsâ common difficulties in learning some topics in electricity and magnetism and how these difficulties can be reduced by research-based learning tutorials. We investigated studentsâ difficulties in solving problems involving light bulbs and equations involving circuit elements. We administered multiple choice questions and essay questions to many classes and conducted individual interviews with a subset of students. Based on these investigations, we provide suggestions to improve learning. We also developed and evaluated five tutorials on Coulombâs law, Gaussâs law and the superposition principle to help students build a robust knowledge structure and firm understanding of these concepts. Studentsâ performance on the corresponding pre- and post-tests indicates that these tutorials effectively improved their understanding. We also designed a Magnetism Conceptual Survey (MCS) that can help instructors probe studentsâ understanding of magnetism concepts. The validity and reliability of this MCS is discussed. The performance of students from different groups (e.g. female students vs. male students, calculus-based students vs. algebra-based students) was compared. We also compare the MCS and the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) on common topics.

Li, Jing

2012-04-21

147

Learning environment, learning styles and conceptual understanding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years there have been many studies on learners developing conceptions of natural phenomena. However, so far there have been few attempts to investigate how the characteristics of the learners and their environment influence such conceptions. This study began with an attempt to use an instrument developed by McCarthy (1981) to describe learners in Malaysian primary schools. This proved inappropriate as Asian primary classrooms do not provide the same kind of environment as US classrooms. It was decided to develop a learning style checklist to suit the local context and which could be used to describe differences between learners which teachers could appreciate and use. The checklist included four dimensions — perceptual, process, self-confidence and motivation. The validated instrument was used to determine the learning style preferences of primary four pupils in Penang, Malaysia. Later, an analysis was made regarding the influence of learning environment and learning styles on conceptual understanding in the topics of food, respiration and excretion. This study was replicated in the Philippines with the purpose of investigating the relationship between learning styles and achievement in science, where the topics of food, respiration and excretion have been taken up. A number of significant relationships were observed in these two studies.

Ferrer, Lourdes M.

1990-01-01

148

Understanding Conceptual Change: Connecting and Questioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We engage in a metalogue based on eight papers in this issue of "Cultural Studies of Science Education" that review the state of conceptual change research and its possible affect on the teaching and learning of science. Our discussion addresses three aspects of conceptual change research: theoretical, methodological, and practical, as we discuss…

Milne, Catherine; Kirch, Susan; Basu, Sreyashi Jhumki; Leou, Mary; Fraser-Abder, Pamela

2008-01-01

149

Analysis of Student Understanding of Statics Principles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An analysis of introductory physics studentsâ understanding of statics principles was conducted. The prior development and use of Tutorials in Introductory Physics has addressed student difficulties concerning introductory physics concepts, including fundamental statics principles; yet, conceptual difficulties persist, particularly when the complexity of an assessment question increases. To assess the extent to which the introductory physics curriculum prepared students for an engineering statics course, students completed multiple-choice questions taken from the âStatics Concept Inventoryâ. Responses illuminated remaining areas of difficulty for students, as well as trends in student understanding. Interestingly, students commonly made the same errors as those reported in the analysis of the âStatics Concept Inventory,â especially with regard to applying a limit on the friction force in order to maintain static equilibrium. Further exploration of student difficulties with statics concepts is needed so curricula can be adapted for extensive instruction.

Johnson, Brittany

2012-03-29

150

Conceptual Understanding of Multiplicative Properties through Endogenous Digital Game Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study purposed to determine the effect of an endogenously designed instructional game on conceptual understanding of the associative and distributive properties of multiplication. Additional this study sought to investigate if performance on measures of conceptual understanding taken prior to and after game play could serve as predictors of…

Denham, Andre

2012-01-01

151

Impact of Animation on Assessment of Conceptual Understanding in Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the effect of computer animation on assessment and the conditions under which animation may improve or hinder assessment of conceptual understanding in physics. An instrument was developed by replacing static pictures and descriptions of motion with computer animations on the Force Concept Inventory, a commonly used pencil and paper test. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The animated and static versions of the test were given to students and the results were statistically analyzed. Think-aloud interviews were also conducted to provide additional insight into the statistical findings. We found that good verbal skills tended to increase performance on the static version but not on the animated version of the test. In general, students had a better understanding of the intent of the question when viewing an animation and gave an answer that was more indicative of their actual understanding, as reflected in separate interviews. In some situations this led students to the correct answer and in others it did not. Overall, we found that animation can improve assessment under some conditions by increasing the validity of the instrument.

Dancy, Melissa H.

2007-04-01

152

Impact of animation on assessment of conceptual understanding in physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the effect of computer animation on assessment and the conditions under which animation may improve or hinder assessment of conceptual understanding in physics. An instrument was developed by replacing static pictures and descriptions of motion with computer animations on the Force Concept Inventory, a commonly used pencil and paper test. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The animated and static versions of the test were given to students and the results were statistically analyzed. Think-aloud interviews were also conducted to provide additional insight into the statistical findings. We found that good verbal skills tended to increase performance on the static version but not on the animated version of the test. In general, students had a better understanding of the intent of the question when viewing an animation and gave an answer that was more indicative of their actual understanding, as reflected in separate interviews. In some situations this led students to the correct answer and in others it did not. Overall, we found that animation can improve assessment under some conditions by increasing the validity of the instrument.

Dancy, Melissa H.; Beichner, Robert

2006-06-01

153

Conceptualization and image understanding by neural networks  

E-print Network

Towards Intelligent Imaging C. Intelligent Image Analysis Neural Network System 1. Sensory System-Control System-Knowledge Base Loop PRINCIPLES OF CONCEPTUALIZATION A. Knowledge Representation in the Form of Concepts B. Conceptualization 1. Pattern... upon the integration of the three modules: Sensory System, Control System and Knowledge Base, by fusing neural network approaches with conventional AI approaches, to perform image analysis. l. Sensory System-Control System-Knowledge Base Loop...

Gudipalley, Chandu

2012-06-07

154

Cross-Grade Comparison of Students' Understanding of Energy Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this cross-grade study were (1) to determine the level of understanding of energy concepts of students at different academic grades and the differences in understanding between these grades and (2) to analyse the conceptual development of these students. Two hundred and forty-three students at 3 different levels (high school,…

Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul

2010-01-01

155

Identifying studentsâ mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We investigated introductory physics studentsâ mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the âEntityâ model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the medium through which it propagates. All other observed alternative models contain elements of both Entity and Wave models, but at the same time are distinct from each of the constituent models. We called these models âhybridâ or âblendâ models. We discuss how students use these models in various contexts before and after instruction and how our findings contribute to the understanding of conceptual change. Implications of our findings for teaching are summarized.

Hrepic, Zdeslav; Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. S.

2012-01-20

156

CHAPTER 9: Conceptual Understanding I. OVERVIEW  

E-print Network

of students' common sense beliefs based on the students' previous real world experiences. The second in chapters 2 and 4, PER indicates that instruction that takes the students' common sense beliefs into account with questions that can trigger and identify students' common sense beliefs. These concept tests are a good

Maryland at College Park, University of

157

Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Instruction on Understanding of Heat and Temperature Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the differential effects of two modes of instructional program (conceptual change oriented and traditionally designed) and gender difference on students' understanding of heat and temperature concepts, and their attitudes toward science as a school subject. The subjects of this study consisted of 72 seventh grade students

Baser, Mustafa; Geban, Omer

2007-01-01

158

Studentâs understanding of light and its properties: teaching to engender conceptual change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This research assessed Australian high school students' understanding of light, developed materials to conceptual change with respect to the concept, and evaluated the effectiveness of teaching strategies utilizing the materials. After instruction, students were able to construct significantly more scientifically acceptable answers. An appendix includes a sample instructional module.

Fetherstonhaugh, T.; Treagust, David

2006-05-17

159

Supporting Conceptual Change in School Science: A Possible Role for Tacit Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When students reason during school science, they often refer to conceptions that are derived from out-of-school experiences and are poor proxies for science orthodoxy. However, for some areas of science, these conceptions represent only a proportion of students' full conceptual knowledge, for tacit understanding exists that is superior to the…

Howe, Christine; Devine, Amy; Tavares, Joana Taylor

2013-01-01

160

A study of change in students' conceptual frameworks in astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

School students' conceptual frameworks in astronomy and students' levels of knowledge and conceptualization were examined for 130 students in grades 2 through 12. Knowledge and conceptualization increased with school age. A test administered to 892 students in 7 schools demonstrated that schools contributed little to education in astronomy.

Finegold, Menahem; Pundak, David

2006-05-16

161

Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, biodiversity has received a great deal of attention worldwide, especially in environmental education. The reasons for this attention are the increase of human activities on biodiversity and environmental problems. The purpose of this study is to investigate biology student teachers' conceptual frameworks regarding biodiversity.…

Dikmenli, Musa

2010-01-01

162

Conceptual Challenges in Learning Ozone Formation for Collegiate Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric chemistry in general, and tropospheric ozone formation in particular, are complex processes that to be understood require students to learn several interrelated concepts. These systems are particularly difficult to grasp because they are inherently nonlinear and because they are abstract- students do not have an obvious tangible model for how gases behave in an unbounded atmosphere. To address perceived shortfalls in our studentsconceptualizations of atmospheric chemical processes, we have endeavored to develop, implement, and assess curricular materials that can be used from the freshmen to graduate level. Our goal was to both improve student understanding of the fundamental concepts of atmospheric chemistry while simultaneously reinforcing the scientific method and what it means to do science. Our approach for achieving this was to build student-friendly interfaces to adapt existing research models for use in the classroom and thereby provide students with a means of exploring the evolution of pollutants in the atmosphere. A major focus of the project was student understanding of ozone formation. In this presentation we provide insight regarding collegiate students’ conceptions of ozone formation and discuss possible explanations for student misconceptions in this and related environmental topics of concern. In order to extract student understanding and conceptions of ozone formation, qualitative interview and analysis methodologies were implemented. These qualitative procedures allowed us to gain a rich and detailed understanding of the specific nature of students’ mental models of these concepts. Forty-five participants were included in the study, all of which were collegiate students enrolled in a junior-level Introduction to Environmental Engineering course at Washington State University. Our results show that the students seemed to comprehend many individual concepts within ozone production cycle to some extent. However, there were very few students who were able to link together overlapping ideas, especially when it came to piecing together a process model for ozone formation. This caused them to have a weak conceptual understanding of the overall material. Our results further suggest that a reason for these weak conceptions may be due to underlying incorrect understandings of fundamental concepts in chemistry and physics. Interestingly, students frequently verbalized synthetic models of understanding that included correct and incorrect concepts from class and information they had learned from the media. These models conflated the process being studied- tropospheric ozone formation- with two other atmospheric processes that receive extensive public attention: stratospheric ozone destruction and greenhouse gas-induced global warming. Results have implications for teaching and the challenges in guiding students in the integration of knowledge obtained outside of class and classroom concepts to develop expert understandings.

Howard, K. E.; Chung, S. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Vanreken, T. M.; Brown, S. A.

2010-12-01

163

Surveying Students' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Acid-Base Behavior of Substances  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By the end of their high school studies, students should be able to understand macroscopic and sub-microscopic conceptualization of acid-base behavior and the relationship between these conceptual models. The aim of this article is to ascertain whether grade-12 students have sufficient background knowledge to explain the properties of acids,…

Furio-Mas, Carles; Calatayud, Maria-Luisa; Barcenas, Sergio L.

2007-01-01

164

Dialogic Framing of Scientific Content for Conceptual and Epistemic Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article draws on M. M. Bakhtin's (1981) notion of dialogism to articulate what it means to understand a scientific idea. In science, understanding an idea is both conceptual and epistemic and is exhibited by an ability to use it in explanation and argumentation. Some distillation of these activities implies that dialogic understanding of a…

Ford, Michael J.; Wargo, Brian M.

2012-01-01

165

Understanding psychiatric institutionalization: a conceptual review  

PubMed Central

Background Since Goffman’s seminal work on psychiatric institutions, deinstitutionalization has become a leading term in the psychiatric debate. It described the process of closure or downsizing of large psychiatric hospitals and the establishment of alternative services in the community. Yet, there is a lack of clarity on what exactly the concept of institutionalization means in present-day psychiatry. This review aims to identify the meaning of psychiatric institutionalization since the early 1960s to present-day. Method A conceptual review of institutionalization in psychiatry was conducted. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize the findings. Results Four main themes were identified in conceptualizing institutionalization: bricks and mortar of care institutions; policy and legal frameworks regulating care; clinical responsibility and paternalism in clinician-patient relationships; and patients’ adaptive behavior to institutionalized care. Conclusions The concept of institutionalization in psychiatry reflects four distinct themes. All themes have some relevance for the contemporary debate on how psychiatric care should develop and on the role of institutional care in psychiatry. PMID:23773398

2013-01-01

166

Evaluation of Students' Understanding of Thermal Concepts in Everyday Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were to determine the underlying conceptual structure of the thermal concept evaluation (TCE) questionnaire, a pencil-and-paper instrument about everyday contexts of heat, temperature, and heat transfer, to investigate students' conceptual understanding of thermal concepts in everyday contexts across several school years and…

Chu, Hye-Eun; Treagust, David F.; Yeo, Shelley; Zadnik, Marjan

2012-01-01

167

High-School Students' Conceptual Difficulties and Attempts at Conceptual Change: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested for deep understanding and critical thinking about basic quantum chemical concepts taught at 12th grade (age 17-18). Our aim was to achieve conceptual change in students. A quantitative study was conducted first (n = 125), and following this 23 selected students took part in semi-structured interviews either individually or in…

Tsaparlis, Georgios; Papaphotis, Georgios

2009-01-01

168

Building Conceptual Understanding in Young Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of a new pedagogic approach to geology used to create a sequence of investigative activities enabling students to speculate, hypothesize, observe, test, reason, and infer about the characteristics of rocks. The approach is framed by two questions: (1) What are the key characteristics of different rock groups?; and (2) How did the…

Hawley, Duncan

2002-01-01

169

Students' Experiences of Understanding University Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research in the field of student learning in higher education has mostly focused on conceptual issues of students at the individual concept or task level. There has been little research of students' conceptions of whole subjects, and virtually no previous research of students' feelings of their conceptual experiences. This paper aims to…

Waterhouse, Fiona; Prosser, Michael

170

Conceptual Understanding of the Arithmetic Mean. Draft.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The understanding of children and adults regarding four component properties of the arithmetic mean was studied. The component properties were: (1) the mean is a data point between extreme values of a score distribution; (2) the sum of deviations about the mean equals zero; (3) when the mean is calculated, any value of zero must be taken into…

Leon, Marjorie Roth; Zawojewski, Judith S.

171

Understanding the Role of Academic Language on Conceptual Understanding in an Introductory Materials Science and Engineering Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students may use the technical engineering terms without knowing what these words mean. This creates a language barrier in engineering that influences student learning. Previous research has been conducted to characterize the difference between colloquial and scientific language. Since this research had not yet been applied explicitly to engineering, conclusions from the area of science education were used instead. Various researchers outlined strategies for helping students acquire scientific language. However, few examined and quantified the relationship it had on student learning. A systemic functional linguistics framework was adopted for this dissertation which is a framework that has not previously been used in engineering education research. This study investigated how engineering language proficiency influenced conceptual understanding of introductory materials science and engineering concepts. To answer the research questions about engineering language proficiency, a convenience sample of forty-one undergraduate students in an introductory materials science and engineering course was used. All data collected was integrated with the course. Measures included the Materials Concept Inventory, a written engineering design task, and group observations. Both systemic functional linguistics and mental models frameworks were utilized to interpret data and guide analysis. A series of regression analyses were conducted to determine if engineering language proficiency predicts group engineering term use, if conceptual understanding predicts group engineering term use, and if conceptual understanding predicts engineering language proficiency. Engineering academic language proficiency was found to be strongly linked to conceptual understanding in the context of introductory materials engineering courses. As the semester progressed, this relationship became even stronger. The more engineering concepts students are expected to learn, the more important it is that they are proficient in engineering language. However, exposure to engineering terms did not influence engineering language proficiency. These results stress the importance of engineering language proficiency for learning, but warn that simply exposing students to engineering terms does not promote engineering language proficiency.

Kelly, Jacquelyn

172

Investigating Student Understanding of the Universe: Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chicago State University (CSU) offers an introductory astronomy course that services students from a variety of majors including pre-service teachers. At CSU, we have been investigating methods and tools that will improve student conceptual understanding in astronomy for this diverse group of students. We have analyzed pre-course surveys, pre-course essays, exams, and interviews in an effort to better understand the ideas and difficulties in understanding that students have in regards to the structure of the universe. Analysis of written essays has revealed that our students do have some knowledge of the objects in the universe, but interviews inform us that their understanding of the structure of the universe is superficial. This project is a part of a larger study; also see our posters on student ideas about dark matter, the age and expansion of the universe, and perceptions of astronomical sizes and distances. This work was supported by NASA ROSES E/PO Grant #NNXlOAC89G, as well as by the Illinois Space Grant Consortium and National Science Foundation CCLI Grant #0632563 at Chicago State University and the Fermi E/PO program at Sonoma State University.

Hayes, Virginia; Coble, K.; Nickerson, M.; Cochran, G.; Camarillo, C. T.; Bailey, J. M.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

2011-05-01

173

A Confirmatory Structural Equation Model of Achievement Estimated by Dichotomous Attitudes, Interest, and Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many models in science education have tried to clarify the causal relationships of affective variables on student performance, by presenting theoretical models, exploratory SEM (structural equation models), and confirmatory SEM. Based on the literature, the recent AS-TI-CU model scrutinised the most robust stimuli of conceptual understanding (CU):…

Kim, Minkee; Song, Jinwoong

2010-01-01

174

Supporting Conceptual Understandings of and Pedagogical Practice in Technology through a Website in New Zealand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the up-date and development of an on-line resource to support of teachers' conceptual understandings and pedagogical practice in New Zealand. Techlink is a website dedicated to supporting technology teachers, students and those with an interest in technology education. This research documents part of a Ministry of Education…

Fox-Turnbull, Wendy; O'Sullivan, Gary

2013-01-01

175

Understanding Early Elementary Children's Conceptual Knowledge of Plant Structure and Function through Drawings  

PubMed Central

This study examined children's drawings to explain children's conceptual understanding of plant structure and function. The study explored whether the children's drawings accurately reflect their conceptual understanding about plants in a manner that can be interpreted by others. Drawing, survey, interview, and observational data were collected from 182 students in grades K and 1 in rural southeastern United States. Results demonstrated the children held a wide range of conceptions concerning plant structure and function. These young children held very simple ideas about plants with respect to both their structure and function. Consistent with the drawings, the interviews presented similar findings. PMID:25185222

Ellis, Jane P.; Jones, Alan M.

2014-01-01

176

College physics students' epistemological self-reflection and its relationship to conceptual learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students should develop self-reflection skills and appropriate views about knowledge and learning, both for their own sake and because these skills and views may be related to improvements in conceptual understanding. We explored the latter issue in the context of an introductory physics course for first-year engineering honors students. As part of the course, students submitted weekly reports, in which they reflected on how they learned specific physics content. The reports by 12 students were analyzed for the quality of reflection and some of the epistemological beliefs they exhibited. Students' conceptual learning gains were measured with standard survey instruments. We found that students with high conceptual gains tend to show reflection on learning that is more articulate and epistemologically sophisticated than students with lower conceptual gains. Some implications for instruction are suggested.

May, David; Etkina, Eugenia

2005-11-02

177

Assessing Student Understanding with Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Most science teachers are amazed when grading tests and quizzes, often wondering how and why students have reached a conclusion, particularly when students fail to provide a detailed account of their logic. Ideally, a variety of assessments should be used to identify alternate student conceptions or gaps in understanding, particularly when preparing students for state-mandated exams. With this in mind, a free internet-based software package, IMMEX (interactive multimedia exercises) was designed to use authentic scenarios to gauge students' problem-solving skills and science knowledge.

Jr., Charles T.; Jordan, Joni; Cooper, Melanie M.; Stevens, Ron

2006-06-01

178

Student Understanding of The First Law of Thermodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The teaching of many areas of undergraduate physics, especially mechanics and electric circuits, has been influenced by the results of physics education research. We report on results from an ongoing investigation designed to improve the research base on student understanding of concepts in thermal physics and to investigate strategies for addressing common conceptual and reasoning difficulties. The students involved were

Michael Loverude

2002-01-01

179

Student Understanding of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation from the 2006 PTEC Conference presents education research on topics in thermodynamics. Student responses to conceptual thermodynamics questions, and the conceptions they reveal, are presented. Tutorial materials developed to help students gain a better understanding of the topic are also presented.

Heron, Paula R.

2006-09-30

180

LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Comment on 'The effects of students' reasoning abilities on conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics'  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a recent article, Ates and Cataloglu (2007 Eur. J. Phys. 28 1161-71), in analysing results for a course in introductory mechanics for prospective science teachers, found no statistically significant correlation between students' pre-instruction scores on the Lawson classroom test of scientific reasoning ability (CTSR) and post-instruction scores on the force concept inventory (FCI). As a possible explanation, the authors

Vincent P. Coletta; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Antti Savinainen; Jeffrey J. Steinert

2008-01-01

181

Impact of Animation on Assessment of Conceptual Understanding in Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the effect of computer animation on assessment and the conditions under which animation may improve or hinder assessment of conceptual understanding in physics. An instrument was developed by replacing static pictures and descriptions of motion with computer animations on the Force Concept Inventory, a commonly used pencil and paper test. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected.

Melissa H. Dancy

2007-01-01

182

Impact of animation on assessment of conceptual understanding in physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the effect of computer animation on assessment and the conditions under which animation may improve or hinder assessment of conceptual understanding in physics. An instrument was developed by replacing static pictures and descriptions of motion with computer animations on the Force Concept Inventory, a commonly used pencil and paper test. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected.

Melissa H. Dancy; Robert Beichner

2006-01-01

183

Graduate Employability: A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Employers' Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding what employers think about the value of graduates with similar educational credentials in the workplace (their employability), using insights from the new institutionalism. In this framework, the development of employers' beliefs about graduates' employability is broken into a number of…

Cai, Yuzhuo

2013-01-01

184

Probing Student Understanding of Cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, powerful new observations and advances in computation and visualization have led to a revolution in our understanding of the origin, evolution and structure of the universe. These gains have been vast, but their impact on education has been limited. At Chicago State (CSU), we are implementing new inquiry-based instructional materials in our astronomy lab course. We are researching the effectiveness of these materials, focusing on student understanding of cosmology. As part of a collaborative effort with the University of Nevada Las Vegas and Sonoma State (SSU) to develop a cosmological subject inventory, we administered an open-ended survey prior to instruction and conducted student interviews using the survey. Students taking the CSU course were also required to write a guided essay on their beliefs about cosmology. We have collected open-ended post-test data through student exams. Preliminary results regarding student misconceptions in cosmology and student attitudes toward inquiry will be presented.

Coble, Kimberly A.; Cochran, G.; Larrieu, D.; Bailey, J.; Sanchez, R.; Cominsky, L.; McLin, K.

2010-01-01

185

Concept Development of Decimals in Chinese Elementary Students: A Conceptual Change Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine the concept development of decimal numbers in 244 Chinese elementary students in grades 4-6. Three grades of students differed in their intuitive sense of decimals and conceptual understanding of decimals, with more strategic approaches used by older students. Misconceptions regarding the density nature of…

Liu, Ru-De; Ding, Yi; Zong, Min; Zhang, Dake

2014-01-01

186

Students' Perceptions of Statistics: An Exploration of Attitudes, Conceptualizations, and Content Knowledge of Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although statistics education research has focused on students' learning and conceptual understanding of statistics, researchers have only recently begun investigating students' perceptions of statistics. The term perception describes the overlap between cognitive and non-cognitive factors. In this mixed-methods study, undergraduate students

Bond, Marjorie E.; Perkins, Susan N.; Ramirez, Caroline

2012-01-01

187

LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Comment on 'The effects of students' reasoning abilities on conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in introductory mechanics'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a recent article, Ates and Cataloglu (2007 Eur. J. Phys. 28 1161-71), in analysing results for a course in introductory mechanics for prospective science teachers, found no statistically significant correlation between students' pre-instruction scores on the Lawson classroom test of scientific reasoning ability (CTSR) and post-instruction scores on the force concept inventory (FCI). As a possible explanation, the authors suggest that the FCI does not probe for skills required to determine reasoning abilities. Our previously published research directly contradicts the authors' finding. We summarize our research and present a likely explanation for their observation of no correlation.

Coletta, Vincent P.; Phillips, Jeffrey A.; Savinainen, Antti; Steinert, Jeffrey J.

2008-09-01

188

Writing to Promote and Assess Conceptual Understanding in College Algebra  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concept-focused quiz questions required College Algebra students to write about their understanding. The questions can be viewed in three broad categories: a focus on sense-making, a focus on describing a mathematical object such as a graph or an equation, and a focus on understanding vocabulary. Student responses from 10 classes were analyzed.…

Gay, A. Susan; Peterson, Ingrid

2014-01-01

189

High School Intervention for Influenza Biology and Epidemics/Pandemics: Impact on Conceptual Understanding among Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Understanding real-life issues such as influenza epidemiology may be of particular interest to the development of scientific knowledge and initiation of conceptual changes about viruses and their life cycles for high school students. The goal of this research project was to foster the development of adolescents' conceptual understanding of viruses and influenza biology. Thus, the project included two components: 1) pre- and posttests to determine students' conceptions about influenza biology, epidemics/pandemics, and vaccination; and 2) design an intervention that supports conceptual change to promote improvements in influenza knowledge based on these primary conceptions. Thirty-five female students from a high school biology class participated in a series of instructional activities and pre- and posttest assessments. Results from the pretest indicated that high school students exhibit a limited understanding of concepts related to viruses. Six weeks after an intervention that promoted active learning, results from a posttest showed that conceptions about influenza are more accurately related to the provided scientific knowledge. Although adolescents have nonscientific models to explain influenza biology, we showed that a carefully designed intervention can affect students' knowledge as well as influence the implementation of health education programs in secondary schools. PMID:19255137

Hasni, Abdelkrim

2009-01-01

190

Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Energy and Momentum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this article, the authors describe their investigation of student understanding of energy and momentum concepts at the level of introductory physics by designing and administering a 25-item multiple choice test and conducting individual interviews. They find that most students have difficulty in qualitatively interpreting basic principles related to energy and momentum and in applying them in physical situations. The test development process and a summary of results are presented.

Singh, Chandralekha; Rosengrant, David

2006-12-06

191

University Physics Students' Conceptualizations of Factors Affecting the Speed of Sound Propagation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report discusses university physics students' conceptualizations of the factors affecting the speed of sound propagation. The data source consists of a set of detailed explanations which Canadian and South African physics graduates provided during the course of clinical-like interviews dealing with their understanding of sound. The analysis of the students' explanations was set in the phenomenographic tradition: their categorization led to the characterization of three qualitatively different conceptualizations. The conceptualizations are illustrated with dialogue excerpts taken from the student interviews. Implications for physics teaching are discussed.

Linder, Cedric J.

2006-06-22

192

Conceptual and mathematical barriers to students learning quantum mechanics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum mechanics has revolutionized the way we view the physical world. This theory has required a dramatic revision in the structure of the laws of mechanics governing the behavior of the particles and led to the discovery of macroscopic quantum effects ranging from lasers and superconductivity to neutron stars and radiation from black holes. Though its validity is well confirmed by the experimental evidence available, quantum mechanics remains somewhat of a mystery. The purpose of this study is to identify students' conceptual and mathematical difficulties in learning the core concepts of introductory quantum mechanics, with the eventual goal of developing instructional material to help students with these difficulties. We have investigated student understanding of several core topics in the introductory courses, including quantum measurement, probability, Uncertainty Principle, wave functions, energy eigenstates, recognizing symmetry in physical systems, and mathematical formalism. Student specific difficulties with these topics are discussed throughout this dissertation. In addition, we have studied student difficulties in learning, applying, and making sense out of complex mathematical processes in the physics classroom. We found students' achievement in quantum courses is not independent of their math backgrounds (correlation coefficient 0.547 for P631 and 0.347 for P263). In addition, there is a large jump in the level of mathematics at which one needs to succeed in physics courses after the sophomore level in The Ohio State University's physics curriculum. Many students do not have a functional understanding of probability and its related terminologies. For example, many students confuse the "expectation value" with "probability density" in measurement and some students confuse "probability density" with "probability amplitude" or describe the probability amplitude as a "place" or "area." Our data also suggested that students tend to use classical models when interpreting quantum systems; for example, some students associate a higher energy to a larger amplitude in a wave function. Others, have difficulty differentiating wave functions from energy eigenstates. Furthermore, some students do not use the relationship between the wave function and the wavenumber as a primary resource in for qualitative analysis of wave functions in regions of different potential. Many students have difficulty recognizing mathematical symbols for a given graph and lack the ability to associate the correct functions with their respective graphs. I addition, students do not distinguish an oscillatory function such as e-ix from an exponential decay function such as e-x. The results reported suggest recommendations for further study of student understanding of quantum mechanics and for the development of materials to aid understanding. These recommendations have potentially important implications for the teaching of introductory quantum mechanics and for the development of teaching aids, texts, and technology resources.

Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.

193

A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it "mean" to understand science…

Anderson, Megan M.

2012-01-01

194

From Words to Concepts: Focusing on Word Knowledge When Teaching for Conceptual Understanding Within an Inquiry-Based Science Setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative video study explores how two elementary school teachers taught for conceptual understanding throughout different phases of science inquiry. The teachers implemented teaching materials with a focus on learning science key concepts through the development of word knowledge. A framework for word knowledge was applied to examine the students' level of word knowledge manifested in their talk. In this framework, highly developed knowledge of a word is conceptual knowledge. This includes understanding how the word is situated within a network of other words and ideas. The results suggest that students' level of word knowledge develops toward conceptual knowledge when the students are required to apply the key concepts in their talk throughout all phases of inquiry. When the students become familiar with the key concepts through the initial inquiry activities, the students use the concepts as tools for furthering their conceptual understanding when they discuss their ideas and findings. However, conceptual understanding is not promoted when teachers do the talking for the students, rephrasing their responses into the correct answer or neglecting to address the students' everyday perceptions of scientific phenomena.

Haug, Berit S.; Řdegaard, Marianne

2014-10-01

195

Surveying Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Electricity and Magnetism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) which was developed to assess students' knowledge of topics in electricity and magnetism. Reports on the number of student difficulties in electricity and magnetism. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

Maloney, David P.; O'Kuma, Thomas L.; Hieggelke, Curtis J.; Van Heuvelen, Alan

2001-01-01

196

Conceptual Understanding in Social Education. ACER Research Monograph No. 45.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the results of a 1992 survey of students' economic, geographical, cultural, historical, and political understandings in the state of Victoria (Australia). The conception of some 2,900 students in Years 5 and 9 in government, Catholic and independent schools are investigated and described. The survey is one of a series of…

Doig, Brian; And Others

197

Effects of Conceptual Change and Traditional Confirmatory Simulations on Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding of Direct Current Circuits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of simulations based on conceptual change conditions (CCS) and traditional confirmatory simulations (TCS) on pre-service elementary school teachers' understanding of direct current electric circuits. The data was collected from a sample consisting of 89 students; 48 students in the…

Baser, Mustafa

2006-01-01

198

Effects of Conceptual Change and Traditional Confirmatory Simulations on Pre-Service Teachers’ Understanding of Direct Current Circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of simulations based on conceptual change conditions (CCS) and traditional confirmatory simulations (TCS) on pre-service elementary school teachers’ understanding of direct current electric circuits. The data was collected from a sample consisting of 89 students; 48 students in the experimental group who were taught simulations based on CCS, and 41

Mustafa Baser

2006-01-01

199

Students' Understanding of Trigonometric Functions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article students' understanding of trigonometric functions in the context of two college trigonometry courses is investigated. The first course was taught by a professor unaffiliated with the study in a lecture-based course, while the second was taught using an experimental instruction paradigm based on Gray and Tall's (1994) notion of…

Weber, Keith

2005-01-01

200

Scaffolding students' understanding of force in pulley systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research results have found that students using virtual manipulatives perform as well or better on measures of conceptual understanding than their peers who used physical equipment. We report on a study with students in a conceptual physics laboratory using either physical or virtual manipulatives to investigate forces in pulley systems. Written materials guided students through a sequence of activities designed to scaffold their understanding of force in pulley systems. The activity sequences facilitated students' sense making by requiring them to make and test predictions about various pulley systems by building and comparing different systems. We investigate the ways in which students discuss force while navigating the scaffolding activities and how these discussions compare between the physical and virtual treatments.

Rouinfar, Amy; Madsen, Adrian M.; Hoang, Tram Do Ngoc; Puntambekar, Sadhana; Rebello, N. Sanjay

2013-01-01

201

Evolution in students' understanding of thermal physics with increasing complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze the development in studentsunderstanding of fundamental principles in the context of learning a current interdisciplinary research topic—soft matter—that was adapted to the level of high school students. The topic was introduced in a program for interested 11th grade high school students majoring in chemistry and/or physics, in an off-school setting. Soft matter was presented in a gradual increase in the degree of complexity of the phenomena as well as in the level of the quantitative analysis. We describe the evolution in students’ use of fundamental thermodynamics principles to reason about phase separation—a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in soft matter. In particular, we examine the impact of the use of free energy analysis, a common approach in soft matter, on the understanding of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics. The study used diagnostic questions and classroom observations to gauge the student’s learning. In order to gain insight on the aspects that shape the understanding of the basic principles, we focus on the responses and explanations of two case-study students who represent two trends of evolution in conceptual understanding in the group. We analyze changes in the two case studies’ management of conceptual resources used in their analysis of phase separation, and suggest how their prior knowledge and epistemological framing (a combination of their personal tendencies and their prior exposure to different learning styles) affect their conceptual evolution. Finally, we propose strategies to improve the instruction of these concepts.

Langbeheim, Elon; Safran, Samuel A.; Livne, Shelly; Yerushalmi, Edit

2013-12-01

202

Introductory Biology Students' Conceptual Models and Explanations of the Origin of Variation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mutation is the key molecular mechanism generating phenotypic variation, which is the basis for evolution. In an introductory biology course, we used a model-based pedagogy that enabled students to integrate their understanding of genetics and evolution within multiple case studies. We used student-generated conceptual models to assess…

Bray Speth, Elena; Shaw, Neil; Momsen, Jennifer; Reinagel, Adam; Le, Paul; Taqieddin, Ranya; Long, Tammy

2014-01-01

203

Remediating High School Students' Misconceptions Concerning Diffusion and Osmosis through Concept Mapping and Conceptual Change Text.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the effectiveness of combining conceptual change text and concept mapping strategies on students' understanding of diffusion and osmosis. Results indicate that while the average percentage of students in the experimental group holding a scientifically correct view rose, the percentage of correct responses in the control group…

Tekkaya, Ceren

2003-01-01

204

The Effect of Supplementing Instruction with Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Conceptions of Electrochemical Cells  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of instruction supplemented by conceptual change texts (CCTs) over traditional instruction on students' understanding of electrochemical (galvanic and electrolytic) cell concepts. The participants of the study consisted of 64 students from the two classes of a high school located in…

Yuruk, Nejla

2007-01-01

205

Using Analogy and Model to Enhance Conceptual Change in Thai Middle School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined conceptual change of Thai middle school students after learning photosynthesis with analogy and model. The analogy mapped key features from the analog (cooking food) to the target concept (photosynthesis). Modeling photosynthesis activity provided the opportunity for students to understand how plants use sugar to synthesize…

Wichaidit, Sittichai; Wongyounoi, Somson; Dechsri, Precharn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

2011-01-01

206

Students' beliefs, attitudes, and conceptual change in a traditional and a constructivistic high school physics classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the relationships between student beliefs about the nature of science, student attitudes, and conceptual change about the nature of forces were investigated within a traditional and within a constructivistic high school physics classroom. Students in both classrooms were honors students taking a first year high school physics course and were primarily white and middle to upper SES. Students in the traditional classroom were all high ability juniors, and physics instruction was integrated with pre-calculus. Students in the constructivistic classroom were a mixture of juniors and seniors. Due to the interrelated nature of these factors and the complexity of their interactions, a naturalistic inquiry design was chosen. The data sources included videotape of 7-9 weeks of instruction; analysis of the videotapes using the Secondary Teacher Analysis Matrix (Gallagher & Parker, 1995); field notes; pretest/posttest assessment with the Force Concept Inventory (Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhammer, 1992); student responses from the Views on Science-Technology-Society questionnaire (Aikenhead & Ryan, 1992), the Questionnaire for the Assessment of a Science Course (Chiappetta, 1995), and the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (Taylor, Fraser, & White, 1994); student interviews; and teacher interviews. In the traditional classroom, (a) students did not think that physics was relevant to everyday experiences; (b) high conceptual change students were more likely to have an angular world view (Cobern, 1993) and have views more similar to the teacher's about the nature of science; and (c) high conceptual change students were able to develop an internally consistent understanding of the content; however, that content appeared to be isolated knowledge in some students. In the constructivistic classroom, (a) students saw physics as relevant and useful; (b) there was no difference in world view or agreement with the teacher's views on the nature of science between high and low conceptual change students; (c) students appreciated the importance of empirical evidence; and (d) low conceptual change students had low classroom engagement. Mean gains in conceptual change were larger for the traditional classroom.

Adams, April Dean

207

The discourse of engagement: An approach to analyzing conceptual understanding in an inquiry-based learning environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineering educators are increasingly being encouraged to adopt instructional methods that engage students in authentic activities to foster inquiry and deeper conceptual understanding. However, a significant challenge facing professors who would like to incorporate such methods into their teaching is a lack of understanding of its basic principles, mechanisms, and features. This paper reports results of an innovative means of

Kerrie Kephart

2008-01-01

208

Conceptual Ecology of Evolution Acceptance among Greek Education Students: The Contribution of Knowledge Increase  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we explored the factors related to acceptance of evolutionary theory among students/preservice preschool education teachers using conceptual ecology for biological evolution as a theoretical frame. We aimed to examine the acceptance and understanding of evolutionary theory and also the relationship of acceptance and understanding of…

Athanasiou, Kyriacos; Katakos, Efstratios; Papadopoulou, Penelope

2012-01-01

209

University Students' Understanding of Thermal Physics in Everyday Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thermal physics is in the realm of everyday experience, underlies current environmental concerns, and underpins studies in sciences, health and engineering. In the state of NSW in Australia, the coverage of thermal topics in high school is minimal, and, hence, so is the conceptual understanding of students. This study takes a new approach at…

Georgiou, Helen; Sharma, Manjula Devi

2012-01-01

210

Reconsidering Conceptual Change from a Socio-Cultural Perspective: Analyzing Students' Meaning Making in Genetics in Collaborative Learning Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the learning sciences, students' understanding of scientific concepts has often been approached in terms of "conceptual change". These studies are grounded in a cognitive or a socio-cognitive approach to students' understanding and imply a focus on the individuals' mental representations of scientific concepts and ideas. We approach students'…

Furberg, Anniken; Arnseth, Hans Christian

2009-01-01

211

Gender differences in conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics: a UK cross-institution comparison  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a combined study from three UK universities where we investigate the existence and persistence of a performance gender gap in conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics. Using the Force Concept Inventory, we find that students at all three universities exhibit a statistically significant gender gap, with males outperforming females. This gap is narrowed but not eliminated after instruction, using a variety of instructional approaches. Furthermore, we find that before instruction the quartile with the lowest performance on the diagnostic instrument comprises a disproportionately high fraction (?50%) of the total female cohort. The majority of these students remain in the lowest-performing quartile post-instruction. Analysis of responses to individual items shows that male students outperform female students on practically all items on the instrument. Comparing the performance of the same group of students on end-of-course examinations, we find no statistically significant gender gaps.

Bates, Simon; Donnelly, Robyn; MacPhee, Cait; Sands, David; Birch, Marion; Walet, Niels R.

2013-03-01

212

Gender differences in conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics: a UK cross-institution comparison  

E-print Network

We present results of a combined study from three UK universities where we investigate the existence and persistence of a performance gender gap in conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics. Using the Force Concept Inventory, we find that students at all three universities exhibit a statistically significant gender gap, with males outperforming females. This gap is narrowed but not eliminated after instruction, using a variety of instructional approaches. Furthermore, we find that before instruction the quartile with the lowest performance on the diagnostic instrument comprises a disproportionately high fraction (~50%) of the total female cohort. The majority of these students remain in the lowest-performing quartile post-instruction. Analysis of responses to individual items shows that male students outperform female students on practically all items on the instrument. Comparing the performance of the same group of students on end-of-course examinations, we find no statistically significant gender gaps...

Bates, Simon; MacPhee, Cait; Sands, David; Birch, Marion; Walet, Niels R

2012-01-01

213

Understanding systematic conceptual structures in polysemous medical terms.  

PubMed Central

Polysemy is a bottleneck for the demanding needs of semantic data management. We suggest the importance of a well-founded conceptual analysis for understanding some systematic structures underlying polysemy in the medical lexicon. We present some cases studies, which exploit the methods (ontological integration and general theories) and tools (description logics and ontology libraries) of the ONIONS methodology defined elsewhere by the authors. This paper addresses an aspect (systematic metomymies) of the project we are involved in, which investigates the feasibility of building a large-scale ontology library of medicine that integrates the most important medical terminology banks. PMID:11079890

Gangemi, A.; Pisanelli, D. M.; Steve, G.

2000-01-01

214

Enhancing college students' understanding of lunar phases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Astronomy education researchers now know that college students do not enter the introductory astronomy classroom as blank slates, but rather these students enter the classroom with a pre-existing understanding of many introductory astronomy concepts, including lunar phases. Sometimes this understanding is scientifically correct, but often students' understanding is incomplete, inadequate or simply incorrect and cannot explain observed phenomenon. Unfortunately, students'

Rebecca Susan Lindell

2001-01-01

215

Comet Inquiry in Action: Developing Conceptual Understanding of Comets through Stardust and Deep Impact Mission EPO Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA Discovery Program missions to comets - Deep Impact and Stardust, and their extended missions - are the rich source that their respective Education and Public Outreach teams mine to convey investigative concepts to K-12 students. Specially designed curricular activities strive to be engaging and represent science authentically. Even more, they unpack complex science content so students' conceptual understanding can develop. Multimedia elements - interactives, interviews, and games - enhance an educator's toolbox of materials used to reach diverse audiences and deepen understanding.

Feaga, L.; Warner, E.; Ristvey, J.; Cobb, W.; Meyer, A.

2012-08-01

216

Conceptual change among middle school students studying elementary thermodynamics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Studies the conceptual changes and factors affecting eighth- grade physical science students (n=180) investigating elementary thermodynamics. Classifies three types of students regarding their learning methods: converging, progressing, and oscillating. Reports that original intuitive conceptions are difficult to change and that students engaged in activities requiring sustained reflection make greater cognitive gains.

Lewis, Eileen

2006-05-31

217

Promoting student teacher learning through conceptual change or direct instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on a promising approach to student teacher learning which treats the pre-existing beliefs of student teachers as a starting point for their active inquiry into relevant educational knowledge bases for teaching. A group of teacher educators and researchers, jointly developed a conceptual change program in which student teachers were stimulated to explicate their beliefs, search for new

H. H. Tillema; W. E. Knol

1997-01-01

218

Students Conceptualizing Transcription and Translation from a Cellular Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is difficult for students to conceptualize biochemical processes that are portrayed as two-dimensional figures in a textbook. Instead of relying on overheads, PowerPoint, or textbook figures, the authors have students imagine themselves actually being inside a cell. Students have a specific role in the cell: helping with the transcription and…

Concannon, James; Buzzetta, Maegan

2010-01-01

219

Teaching Fluids: Intended Knowledge and Students' Actual Conceptual Evolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an approach to teaching the conceptually demanding topic of fluids which focuses on promoting student teachers' continual evolution toward a suggested scientific model. Discusses the approach in detail. Contains 45 references. (DDR)

Psillos, D.; Kariotoglou, P.

1999-01-01

220

Students' ways of understanding aromaticity and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies in organic chemistry education focus mainly on increasing students' performance. Studies from general chemistry education reveal that students' performance is not a good indicator of conceptual understanding. In support, Bhattacharyya and Bodner (2005) reveal that chemistry graduate students can produce correct answers to reaction mechanisms tasks in organic chemistry without understanding the underlying concepts behind the tasks. This dissertation uses the constructs of Harel's DNR-based instruction (1998, 2001, in press [a]) to categorize students' ways of understanding aromaticity and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions. DNR refers to three instructional principles: Duality Principle, Necessity Principle and Repeated Reasoning Principle. Primarily, this study applies the following constructs integral to the Duality Principle: ways of understanding and ways of thinking. The purpose of this study is three-fold. The first purpose is to identify students' ways of understanding aromaticity and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions and subsequently the ways of thinking that are inferred by these ways of understanding. The second purpose of this study is to provide quantitative evidence of students' beliefs (one category of ways of thinking) about learning organic chemistry. The third purpose is to show how we can help students develop more desirable ways of understanding aromaticity. First, several ways of understanding were identified from semi-structured interviews conducted with 12 undergraduate-level students. Three ways of thinking were inferred from these ways of understanding: (1) non-referential symbolic reasoning, (2) non-referential use of terminology, and (3) beliefs about learning organic chemistry. Second, the results of a 46-Item Likert-scale survey provided empirical evidence to support the claim that the students have a tendency towards memorization when learning organic chemistry. Third, this study demonstrated the potential for students' developing more scientific ways of understanding aromaticity through teaching interview sessions where problem tasks were designed to perturb students existing ways of understanding.

Duffy, Anne Merete

221

Teaching to the Test…or Testing to Teach: Exams Requiring Higher Order Thinking Skills Encourage Greater Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to test the effect of exam-question level on fostering student conceptual understanding, low-level and high-level quizzes and exams were administered in two sections of an introductory biology course. Each section was taught in a high-level inquiry based style but was assigned either low-level questions (memory oriented) on the quizzes…

Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Woodard, Steven M.; Kummer, Tyler A.

2014-01-01

222

The Effectiveness of Peer Instruction and Structured Inquiry on Conceptual Understanding of Force and Motion: A Case Study from Thailand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study proposed to investigate the effectiveness of learning activities based on a conceptual change theoretical framework by embedding a peer instruction method with structured inquiry (PISI) on tenth grade students' understanding of force and motion concepts. This teaching method was compared to the existing traditional instruction (TI).…

Suppapittayaporn, Decha; Emarat, Narumon; Arayathanitkul, Kwan

2010-01-01

223

Conceptualizations of Spirituality, Religion, and Faith: Comparing Biblical Notions with the Perspectives of Protestant Christian Students at a Lutheran College  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a larger investigation into the spiritual climate at one Lutheran college, we interviewed Protestant Christian students in order to compare their conceptualizations of spirituality, religion, and faith with biblical notions of those concepts. We found that the studentsunderstandings of those concepts only loosely reflected general understanding within the higher education literature, and a significant disconnect existed

Christy Moran Craft; Alyssa Bryant Rockenbach

2011-01-01

224

Student Perceptions of a Conceptual Physical Education Activity Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceptual physical education (CPE) courses are typically included in university course work to provide students knowledge and skills to engage in physical activity for life. The purpose of this study was to identify CPE course characteristics that contributed to positive and negative student perceptions. Participants included 157 undergraduates…

Jenkins, Jayne M.; Jenkins, Patience; Collums, Ashley; Werhonig, Gary

2006-01-01

225

The Force Concept Inventory as a Measure of Students Conceptual Coherence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is a multiple choice test designed to monitor students' understanding of the conceptual domain of force and related kinematics (Hestenes et al. "Physics Teacher" 30:141-158 1992; Halloun et al., 1995, Online at http://modeling.asu.edu/R&E/Research.html). It has gained wide popularity among both researchers and…

Savinainen, Antti; Viiri, Jouni

2008-01-01

226

Probing adults' conceptual understanding and transfer of learning via problem posing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper reports on two experiments in which high performing university students having finished an introductory physics course were asked to pose mechanics questions. In Experiment 1, subjects were given problem situations (i.e. a story line accompanied with a diagram from which problems could be constructed) and asked to generate "textbook-like" problems that could be solved with specific concepts (e.g. conservation of mechanical energy, Newton's Second Law). In Experiment 2, subjects were given Concept Scenarios (i.e. a description of the physics principles and concepts that apply to a problem and the order in which they apply) and asked to generate problems that matched the scenarios. Interviews conducted immediately following the experiment asked the subjects to explain how the problems posed matched either the specified concepts, or the Concept Scenarios. Findings indicate that, when followed by an interview, problem solving is a powerful assessment tool for probing students' understanding of physics concepts, as well as their ability to transfer their knowledge to novel contexts. In many instances, students posed appropriate solvable problems, yet displayed major flaws in conceptual understanding. This suggests that even good novices are lacking in the way their conceptual knowledge is organized in memory and linked to problem contexts and procedures. Suggestions for using problem posing as a pedagogical tool are presented.

Mestre, Jose P.

2006-06-09

227

Students' understanding and perceptions of the content of a lecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In spite of advances in physics pedagogy, the lecture is by far the most widely used instructional format. We investigated students' understanding and perceptions of the content delivered during a physics lecture. Students participating in our study responded to a written conceptual survey on sound propagation. Next, they looked for answers to the survey questions in a videotaped lecture by a nationally known teacher. As they viewed the lecture, they indicated instances, if any, in which the survey questions were answered during the lecture. A group of experts (physics instructors) also participated in our study. We discuss students' and experts' responses to the survey questions.

Hrepic, Zdeslav; Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. S.

2005-11-23

228

High School Students' Physical Education Conceptual Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts…

Ayers, Suzan F.

2004-01-01

229

Students' understandings of the behavior of a gaseous substance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One hundred sixteen community college students enrolled in a basic chemistry class who had completed a unit on the behavior of a gaseous substance were given a written instrument that presented several mathematical and conceptual problems describing the behavior of a gas. Nine students representing a range of achievement levels were chosen for more intensive clinical interviews. Interview results revealed that students commonly experience difficulties at three different levels: (1) Mathematical understanding. Most students could manipulate the gas law equations, but few had a real understanding of the equation. There were some unique understanding of proportional relationships. (2) Conceptual understanding. Many students could represent pictorially the notion that gas molecules randomly occupy the entire space of its container. Many, however, had a different conception of this when the air was compressed. The reason for this seemed to be due to a misunderstanding of the kinetic molecular theory. (3) Real-world application . Students' use of their mathematical understanding to explain the behavior of air in a real syringe revealed some internal consistency found in mathematical explanations of real-world phenomena. Many students used mathematical strategies consistent with their mathematical understanding and satisfactory for producing reasonable estimates of numerical values. All of the 9 students had misconceptions about mathematical proportionality with most of them understanding proportional relationships as being additive in nature. Although some of the students were able to state the relationship between two variables, they could only do so outside of the context of the gas law equation. Only one student was able to propose a reasonable explanation of the proportional relationships between variables in a gas law equation. All 9 students were classified as either transitional or naive in the real-world use of their mathematical understandings with 3 of the 9 clearly having naive conceptions of the mathematics of gas behavior. Also, a majority of the 9 students could clearly represent the nature of the submicroscopic level of gas behavior when asked to draw it during the clinical interview. However, only 2 of these students had the chemist's understanding of this concept when put to use with a real-world task.

Jones, Edward Louis, II

230

Long-Term Outcomes of Early Childhood Science Education: Insights from a Cross-National Comparative Case Study on Conceptual Understanding of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to explore the long-term outcomes of either participating or not participating in early childhood science education on grade 6 students' conceptual understanding of science. The research is situated in a conceptual framework that evokes Piagetian developmental levels as both potential curriculum constraints and…

Tao, Ying; Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady

2012-01-01

231

Student Satisfaction and Retention: A Conceptual Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in institutions of higher education are becoming more "consumer oriented" than ever before. As a result, the turnover rate is increasing-students are leaving universities almost as fast as new students are enrolled. This is both costly and inefficient. Major efforts are underway in all areas of traditional for-profit institutions to…

Schertzer, Clinton B; Schertzer, Susan M. B.

2004-01-01

232

Effects of Conceptual Change and Traditional Confirmatory Simulations on Pre-Service Teachersâ Understanding of Direct Current Circuits  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of simulations based on conceptual change conditions (CCS) and traditional confirmatory simulations (TCS) on pre-service elementary school teachersâ understanding of direct current electric circuits. The data was collected from a sample consisting of 89 students; 48 students in the experimental group who were taught simulations based on CCS, and 41 students in control group who followed the TCS. Subjects in both groups used open source software (Qucs) to simulate electric circuits. All students were administered Electric Circuits Concepts Test (DIRECT), Science Process Skills Test, Physics Attitude Scale, and Computer Attitude Scale before the treatment. Pre-test analyses revealed that there is no significant difference between experimental and control groups in terms of understanding of direct current electricity. After completing 3 weeks treatment, all students received the DIRECT again as a post-test. Analysis of covariance was used. Science process skills and attitudes toward computers were taken as covariates. The results showed that the conceptual change based simulations caused significantly better acquisition of conceptual change of direct current electricity concepts than the confirmatory simulation. While science process skills and attitudes towards computer made significant contributions to the variations in achievement, gender differences and interactions between gender and treatment did not. Eleven weeks later, the DIRECT was reapplied to the students in both groups. Eleven weeks delayed post-test results showed that the experimental group outperformed the control group in understanding of direct current electric concepts.

Baser, Mustafa

2010-03-11

233

A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos  

E-print Network

Recent experiments have led to the production of neutrinos with transit times indicating the appearance of traveling faster than the speed of light. In this paper, we present a conceptual framework to understand how faster-than-light events involving neutrinos (as indicated by time-of-flight) might occur. We propose that observations of this kind do not violate the special theory of relativity; instead, they only help to provide evidence in support of the general theory of relativity at quantum scales. Given the relativistic effects of the neutrino on its local spacetime environment, the measured time-of-flight at the macroscopic level is attributable to a decrease in the effective path length traversed by the neutrino. Specifically, along preferred directions, we show that the Kerr metric allows for the compression of spacetime; hence, the decreased path length hypothesis is plausible. Furthermore, when the motion of the neutrino is along the preferred direction for spacetime compression, the Kerr metric also predicts strong frame dragging effects near the Planck length. In the region where strong frame dragging occurs, we propose that the microscopic explanation for the path length compression is due to the formation of 'micro-wormholes' near the Planck length.

Eric Sakk; Aradhya P. Kumar

2012-02-24

234

Improving high school physical science students' understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum: A modified diagram approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this study was to identify major conceptual difficulties that selected public high school physical science students encounter in understanding a standard electromagnetic spectrum diagram. A research-driven, modified version of that standard diagram was used in this study to determine the value added to student understanding of electromagnetic waves. A content analysis was performed on electromagnetic spectrum diagrams

James Edward Quebedeaux

2007-01-01

235

Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

Chung, Gawon

2013-01-01

236

Investigating the Effectiveness of a POE-Based Teaching Activity on Students' Understanding of Condensation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the development of a Predict-Observe-Explain, POE-based teaching strategy to facilitate conceptual change and its effectiveness on student understanding of condensation. The sample consisted of 52 first-year students in primary science education department. Students' ideas were elicited using a test consisting of five probe…

Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa; Niaz, Mansoor

2012-01-01

237

IMPROVING STUDENTSUNDERSTANDING OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM.  

E-print Network

??Electricity and magnetism are important topics in physics. Research shows that students have many common difficulties in understanding concepts related to electricity and magnetism. However,… (more)

Li, Jing

2012-01-01

238

Influence of student-designed experiments with fast plants on their understanding of plants and of scientific inquiry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation investigates the influence of student designed experiments with Fast Plants in an undergraduate agroecology course on the students' conceptual understanding of plant life cycles and on their procedural understanding of scientific experimentation. It also considers students' perspectives on the value of these experiences. Data sources included semi-structured interviews with students and the instructor, a written task, course evaluations,

Ann Kosek Akey

2000-01-01

239

Consistency of students' conceptions of wave propagation: Findings from a conceptual survey in mechanical waves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We administered a multiple-choice conceptual survey in mechanical waves to 902 students ranging from high school to second year university. Analysis identified several conceptual models the students seemed to be using when answering survey questions. In this paper we investigate the strength with which students were committed to these conceptual models, as evidenced by the consistency with which they answered the questions. For this purpose we focus on the patterns of student responses to questions in a subtopic, wave propagation. This study has three main purposes: (1) to investigate the consistency of student conceptions, (2) to explore the relative usefulness of different analysis techniques, and (3) to determine what extra information a study of consistency can give about student understanding of basic concepts. We used two techniques: (1) categorizing and counting, and (2) model analysis, recently introduced into PER. Categorizing and counting is used in very diverse ways while model analysis has been employed only in prescriptive ways. Research studies have reported that students often use their conceptual models inconsistently when solving a series of questions that test the same idea. Our results support their conclusions. Moreover, our findings suggest that students with more experience in physics learning use the scientifically accepted models more consistently. Further, our findings show that model analysis can be used in more diverse ways, provides flexibility in analyzing multiple-choice questions, and provides more information about consistency of student conceptions. An unexpected finding is that studying waves in other contexts (for example, quantum mechanics or electromagnetism) leads to more consistent answers about mechanical waves. This suggests studying more abstract topics may solidify studentsâ understanding of more concrete waves. While perhaps intuitive, we have not actually found direct empirical studies supporting this conjecture.

Tongchai, Apisit; Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Soankwan, Chernchok

2012-05-09

240

Using Student-Led Seminars and Conceptual Workshops to Increase Student Participation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the use of two strategies designed to increase student participation in a teacher education class: student-led seminars and conceptual workshops. Quantitative data, collected by a graduate student observer, showed increased student participation in classroom discussion and activities. Also, qualitative findings collected…

McMullen, Victoria Budzinski

2014-01-01

241

Conceptualizing Moon Phases: Helping Students Learn How to Learn  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Helping students understand how to learn is an important goal for all subjects and levels of education. While this goal is highly regarded, promoting it is extremely difficult. Many times, we as teachers are consumed with how to better help our students understand the content and forget to draw their attention to how they came to understand a…

Kruse, Jerrid; Wilcox, Jesse

2009-01-01

242

Understanding Early Elementary Children's Conceptual Knowledge of Plant Structure and Function through Drawings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined children's drawings to explain children's conceptual understanding of plant structure and function. The study explored whether the children's drawings accurately reflect their conceptual understanding about plants in a manner that can be interpreted by others. Drawing, survey, interview, and observational data…

Anderson, Janice L.; Ellis, Jane P.; Jones, Alan M.

2014-01-01

243

Conceptual Change in Students' Molecular Biology Education: Tilting at Windmills?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hands-on instructional approach with medium-achieving 10th-grade students (N = 294) successfully demonstrated the achievement of a conceptual change. Two teaching variations were applied (I-1, I-2), both dealing with a hands-on gene technology lesson in an out-of-school laboratory. I-2 additionally confronted the participants with alternative…

Franke, Gaitano; Bogner, Franz X.

2011-01-01

244

Developing a New Framework for Conceptualizing "Student-Centered Learning"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instead of being a simple concept, "student-centered learning" is actually a complicated and messy idea that has encompassed a wide range of sometimes fundamentally different meanings, each holding important implications for education. Thus, educators need a more nuanced and more productive framework for conceptualizing

Neumann, Jacob W.

2013-01-01

245

Conceptualizing the Use of Online Technologies for Gifted Secondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an era where technology is advancing at a rapid pace, and where information is readily accessible on the World Wide Web, educators should be capitalizing on these resources for gifted students. This paper proposes a conceptual framework to support individualized and independent learning within a network of peers that will provide challenging…

Ng, Wan; Nicholas, Howard

2007-01-01

246

Interactive Patterns and Conceptual Convergence during Student Collaborations in Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines cognitive and social processes in group interactions that shape collaborative learning in science classrooms. Three small groups of students were observed while working collaboratively on explaining the burning of a candle under a jar. The learning environment served as a context for examination of conceptual convergence, a…

Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Sadler, Troy D.

2008-01-01

247

Assessing Student Understanding of Physical Hydrology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our objective is to characterize and assess upper division and graduate student thinking by developing and testing an assessment tool for a physical hydrology class. The class' learning goals are: (1) Quantitative process-based understanding of hydrologic processes, (2) Experience with different methods in hydrology, (3) Learning, problem solving, communication skills. These goals were translated into two measurable tasks asked of students in a questionnaire: (1) Describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and (2) Describe laws governing these processes. A third question below assessed the students' ability to apply their knowledge: You have been hired as a consultant by __ to (1) assess how urbanization and the current drought have affected a local spring and (2) predict what the effects will be in the future if the drought continues. What information would you need to gather? What measurements would you make? What analyses would you perform? Student and expert responses to the questions were then used to develop a rubric to score responses. Using the rubric, 3 researchers independently blind-coded the full set of pre and post artifacts, resulting in 89% inter-rater agreement on the pre-tests and 83% agreement on the post-tests. We present student scores to illustrate the use of the rubric and to characterize student thinking prior to and following a traditional course. Most students interpreted Q1 in terms of physical processes affecting the water cycle, the primary organizing framework for hydrology, as intended. On the pre-test, one student scored 0, indicating no response, on this question. Twenty students scored 1, indicating rudimentary understanding, 2 students scored a 2, indicating a basic understanding, and no student scored a 3. Student scores on this question improved on the post-test. On the 22 post-tests that were blind scored, 11 students demonstrated some recognition of concepts, 9 students showed a basic understanding, and 2 students had a full understanding of the processes linked to hydrology. Half the students had provided evidence of the desired understanding; however, half still demonstrated only a rudimentary understanding. Results on Q2 were similar. On the pre-test, 2 students scored 0, 21 students scored 1, indicating rudimentary understanding, 2 students scored a 2, and no student scored a 3. On the post-test, again approximately half the students achieved the desired understanding: 9 students showed some recognition of concepts, 12 students demonstrated a basic understanding; only one student exhibited full understanding. On Q3, no student scored 0, 9 scored 1, 15 scored 2 and 1 student scored 3. On the post-test, one student scored 1, 16 students scored 2, and 5 students scored 3. Students were significantly better at responding to Q3 (the application) as opposed to Q1 and Q2, which were more abstract. Research has shown that students are often better able to solve contextualized problems when they are unable to deal with more abstract tasks. This result has limitations including the small number of participants, all from one institution, and the fact that the rubric was still under development. Nevertheless, the high inter-rater agreement by a group of experts is significant; the rubric we developed is a potentially useful tool for assessment of learning and understanding physical hydrology. Supported by NSF CAREER grant (EAR-0955750).

Castillo, A. J.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M. B.

2012-12-01

248

Students' Understanding of Direct Current Resistive Electrical Circuits  

E-print Network

Research has shown that both high school and university students' reasoning patterns regarding direct current resistive electric circuits often differ from the currently accepted explanations. At present, there are no standard diagnostic examinations in electric circuits. Two versions of a diagnostic instrument called Determining and Interpreting Resistive Electric circuits Concepts Tests (DIRECT) were developed, each consisting of 29 questions. The information provided by the exam provides classroom instructors a means with which to evaluate the progress and conceptual difficulties of their students and their instructional methods. It can be used to evaluate curricular packages and/or other supplemental materials for their effectiveness in overcoming students' conceptual difficulties. The analyses indicate that students, especially females, tend to hold multiple misconceptions, even after instruction. During interviews, the idea that the battery is a constant source of current was used most often in answering the questions. Students tended to focus on current in solving the problems and to confuse terms, often assigning the properties of current to voltage and/or resistance. Results indicated that students do not have a clear understanding of the underlying mechanisms of electric circuit phenomena. On the other hand, students were able to translate easily from a "realistic" representation of a circuit to the corresponding schematic diagram.

Paula V. Engelhardt; Robert J. Beichner

2004-06-07

249

Tactical Underlife: Understanding Students' Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes one urban classroom and the language and literacy practices jointly constructed by a veteran urban teacher, Lynn Gatto, and her 3rd grade students. Drawing from two ethnographic studies of Gattos 2nd-4th grade looped classroom, we argue that Gatto and her students use the interplay between strategies and tactics (De Certeau,…

Larson, Joanne; Gatto, Lynn Astarita

2004-01-01

250

Sensing: Supporting Student Understanding of Decimal Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Informed by theory and research in inquiry-based classrooms, this paper examines how classroom practices support students' understanding of decimals. Data from a six-month teaching experiment, based on the work of Moss and Case's (1999) use of percentages and metric measure as visible representations for students' emerging understanding of…

Hunter, Roberta; Anthony, Glenda

2003-01-01

251

Conceptual and Motoric Impulsivity in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-three college students of both sexes were given the adult version of Kagan's Matching Familiar Figures Test; tests requiring them to draw a line and a circle slowly vs. rapidly; and a motor inhibition task in which they were instructed to press a telegraph key in response to tones presented in the presence of only particular light displays. Ss also

Andrew R. Gilpin; William Larsen

1981-01-01

252

Assessing student learning of Newton's laws: The Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation and the Evaluation of Active Learning Laboratory and Lecture Curricula  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation, a research-based, multiple-choice assessment of student conceptual understanding of Newton's Laws of Motion. We discuss a subset of the questions in detail, and give evidence for their validity. As examples of the application of this test, we first present data which examine student learning of dynamics concepts in traditional

Ronald K. Thornton; David R. Sokoloff

1998-01-01

253

Students' Understanding of Z[subscript N  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we explore six students' conceptions of Z[subscript n] in an effort to understand students' conceptions of quotient groups in general. We discovered that there were three different ways our students thought about Z[subscript n], namely as infinite sets, element-set combinations, and representative elements. We explore how…

Siebert, Daniel; Williams, Steven R.

2003-01-01

254

Understanding Chemical Hazards: A Guide for Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this safety guide is to enable students to take more responsibility for lab safety by using the Self-Audit System for Students and to understand the responsibility for safety shared by the institution through the development and maintenance of a Chemical Hygiene Plan. This student guide discusses safety equipment and the procedures…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

255

Coupling Conceptual and Quantitative Problems to Develop Expertise in Introductory Physics Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We discuss the effect of administering conceptual and quantitative isomorphic problem pairs (CQIPP) back to back vs. asking students to solve only one of the problems in the CQIPP in introductory physics courses. Students who answered both questions in a CQIPP often performed better on the conceptual questions than those who answered the corresponding conceptual questions only. Although students often took advantage of the quantitative counterpart to answer a conceptual question of a CQIPP correctly, when only given the conceptual question, students seldom tried to convert it into a quantitative question, solve it and then reason about the solution conceptually. Even in individual interviews, when students who were only given conceptual questions had difficulty and the interviewer explicitly encouraged them to convert the conceptual question into the corresponding quantitative problem by choosing appropriate variables, a majority of students were reluctant and preferred to guess the answer to the conceptual question based upon their gut feeling.

Singh, Chandralekha

2009-01-24

256

A conceptual physics class where students found meaning in calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prior to taking a translated version of the Maryland Open Source Tutorials (OSTs) as a stand-alone course, most students at Tokyo Gakugei University in Japan had experienced physics as memorizing laws and equations to use as computational tools. We might expect this reformed physics class, which emphasizes common sense and conceptual reasoning and rarely invokes equations, to produce students who see a disconnect between equation use and intuitive/conceptual reasoning. Many students at Gakugei, however, somehow learned to integrate mathematics into their "constructivist" epistemologies of physics, even though OSTs do not emphasize this integration. Tadao, for example, came to see that although a common-sense solution to a problem is preferable for explaining to someone who doesn't know physics, solving the problem with a quantitative calculation (that connects to physical meaning) can bring clarity and concreteness to communication between experts. How this integration occurred remains an open question for future research.

Hull, Michael M.; Elby, Andrew

2013-01-01

257

Assessing student understanding of measurement and uncertainty  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A test to assess student understanding of measurement and uncertainty has been developed and administered to more than 500 students at two large research universities. The aim is two-fold: 1) to assess what students learn in the first semester of introductory physics labs and 2) to uncover patterns in student reasoning and practice. The forty-minute, eleven item test focuses on direct measurement and student attitudes toward multiple measurements. The test was administered to students to three groups: students enrolled in traditional laboratory lab sections of first semester physics, students in an experimental (SCALE-UP) section of first semester physics, and students in first semester physics. The results were analyzed using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods. Test items were grouped into four main aspects of performance: âpoint/setâ reasoning, meaning of spread, ruler reading and âstacking.â Student performance on the pretest was examined to identify links between these aspects. Items within each aspect are correlated to one another, sometimes quite strongly, but items from different aspects rarely show statistically significant correlation. Taken together, these results suggest that student difficulties may not be linked to a single underlying cause. The study shows that current instruction techniques improve student understanding, but hat many students exit the introductory physics lab course without appreciation or coherent understanding for the concept of measurement uncertainty.

Abbott, David

2006-10-11

258

Creating meaningful learning experiences: Understanding students' perspectives of engineering design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a societal need for design education to prepare holistic engineers with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to innovate and compete globally. Design skills are paramount to the espoused values of higher education, as institutions of higher learning strive to develop in students the cognitive abilities of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. To meet these interests from industry and academia, it is important to advance the teaching and learning of engineering design. This research aims to understand how engineering students learn and think about design, as a way for engineering educators to optimize instructional practice and curriculum development. Qualitative research methodology was used to investigate the meaning that engineering students' ascribe to engineering design. The recruitment of participants and corresponding collection of data occurred in two phases using two different data collection techniques. The first phase involved the distribution of a one-time online questionnaire to all first year, third year, and fourth year undergraduate engineering students at three Canadian Universities. After the questionnaire, students were asked if they would be willing to participate in the second phase of data collection consisting of a personal interview. A total of ten students participated in interviews. Qualitative data analysis procedures were conducted on students' responses from the questionnaire and interviews. The data analysis process consisted of two phases: a descriptive phase to code and categorize the data, followed by an interpretative phase to generate further meaning and relationships. The research findings present a conceptual understanding of students' descriptions about engineering design, structured within two educational orientations: a learning studies orientation and a curriculum studies orientation. The learning studies orientation captured three themes of students' understanding of engineering design: awareness, relevance, and transfer. With this framework of student learning, engineering educators can enhance learning experiences by engaging all three levels of students' understanding. The curriculum studies orientation applied the three holistic elements of curriculum---subject matter, society, and the individual---to conceptualize design considerations for engineering curriculum and teaching practice. This research supports the characterization of students' learning experiences to help educators and students optimize their teaching and learning of design education.

Aleong, Richard James Chung Mun

259

Surveying students' conceptual knowledge of electricity and magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) was developed to assess students' knowledge about topics in electricity and magnetism. The survey is a 32-question, multiple-choice test that can be used as both a pretest and posttest. During four years of testing and refinement, the survey has been given in one form or another to more than 5000 introductory physics students at 30 different institutions. Typical pretest results are that students in calculus-based courses get 31% of the questions correct and student's in algebra/trigonometry-based courses average 25% correct. Posttest correct results only rise to 47% and 44%, respectively. From analysis of student responses, a number of student difficulties in electricity and magnetism are indicated.

Maloney, David; O'Kuma, Thomas L.; Hieggelke, Curtis J.; Van Heuvelen, Alan

2006-06-22

260

Revitalizing Astronomy Teaching Through Research on Student Understanding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the years, considerable rhetoric exists about which instructional strategies induce the largest conceptual and attitude gains in non-science majoring, undergraduate university students. To determine the effectiveness of lecture-based approaches in astronomy and astrobiology, we found that student scores on a 68-item pre-test/post-test concept inventory showed a statistically significant increase from 30% to 52% correct. In contrast, students evaluated after the use of Lecture-Tutorials increased to 72%. The Lecture Tutorials are intended for use during lecture by small student groups and compliment existing courses with conventional lectures. Based on extensive research on student understanding, Lecture-Tutorials offer professors an effective, learner-centered, classroom-ready alternative to lecture that does not require any outside equipment or drastic course revision for implementation. Each 15-minute Lecture-Tutorial poses a carefully crafted sequence of conceptually challenging, Socratic-dialogue driven questions, along with graphs and data tables, all designed to encourage students to reason critically about difficult concepts in astronomy and astrobiology.

Slater, T.

2006-08-01

261

Conceptual and procedural understanding of algebra concepts in the middle grades  

E-print Network

In this study, the balance between conceptual and procedural teaching and its effect on the development of algebraic reasoning was examined. Participants included two seventh grade mathematics teachers and their students in targeted classes (N = 33...

Joffrion, Heather Kyle

2007-04-25

262

Western Australian school students' understanding of biotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Are science educators providing secondary school students with the background to understand the science behind recent controversies such as the recently introduced compulsory labelling of genetically modified foods? Research from the UK suggests that many secondary school students do not understand the processes or implications of modern biotechnology. The situation in Australia is unclear. In this study, 1116 15-year-old students from eleven Western Australian schools were surveyed to determine their understanding of, and attitude towards, recent advances in modern biotechnology. The results indicate that approximately one third of students have little or no understanding of biotechnology. Many students over-estimate the use of biotechnology in our society by confusing current uses with possible future applications. The results provide a rationale for the inclusion of biotechnology, a cutting edge science, in the school science curriculum

Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

2003-01-01

263

Teacher Development in Action: Understanding Language Teachers' Conceptual Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bringing together multiple sources of data and combining existing theories across language teacher cognition, teacher education, second language motivation, and psychology, this empirically-grounded analysis of teacher development in action offers new insights into the complex and dynamic nature of language teachers' conceptual change. (Contains…

Kubanyiova, Magdalena

2012-01-01

264

The Effect of Concept Mapping on Student Understanding and Correlation with Student Learning Styles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the use of concept mapping as a pedagogical strategy to promote change in the learning styles of pre-nursing students. Students' individual learning styles revealed two subsets of students; those who demonstrated a learning style that favors abstract conceptualization and those who demonstrated a learning style that favors concrete experience. Students in the experimental groups performed concept mapping activities designed to facilitate an integrative understanding of interactions between various organ systems of the body while the control group received a traditional didactic instruction without performing concept mapping activities. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected in order to measure differences in student achievement. Analysis of the quantitative data revealed no significant change in the learning styles of students in either the control or experimental groups. Learning style groups were analyzed qualitatively for recurring or emergent themes that students identified as facilitating their learning. An analysis of qualitative data revealed that most students in the pre-nursing program were able to identify concepts within the class based upon visual cues, and a majority of these students exhibited the learning style of abstract conceptualization. As the laboratory experience for the course involves an examination of the anatomical structures of the human body, a visual identification of these structures seemed to be the most logical method to measure students' ability to identify anatomical structures.

Mosley, William G.

265

Investigating Student Understanding of Histograms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Histograms are adept at revealing the distribution of data values, especially the shape of the distribution and any outlier values. They are included in introductory statistics texts, research methods texts, and in the popular press, yet students often have difficulty interpreting the information conveyed by a histogram. This research identifies…

Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Gabrosek, John G.; Curtiss, Phyllis; Malone, Chris

2014-01-01

266

Effect of the 5E Model on Prospective Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis: A Mixed Method Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to explore a group of prospective primary teachers' conceptual understanding of diffusion and osmosis as they implemented a 5E constructivist model and related materials in a science methods course. Fifty prospective primary teachers' ideas were elicited using a pre- and post-test and delayed post-test survey consisting of ten two-tier questions of which an explanatory part was integral. Individual interviews were conducted with six prospective teachers at the end of the implementation of the unit using four questions. Test scores were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Post-instructional interviews were analyzed qualitatively. Statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA of student test scores pointed to statistically significant differences between pre- and post- and delayed post-test ( p < 0.05). A qualitative analysis of the prospective teachers' explanations in the two-tier questions revealed changes in their ideas overtime. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that the teaching activities promoted students' conceptual understanding. No statistically significant differences were found between post-test and delayed post-test scores, suggesting that the teaching activities based on 5E model enabled students to retain their new conceptual understanding.

Artun, Hüseyin; Co?tu, Bayram

2013-02-01

267

5-Minute Demonstrations to Enhance the Conceptual Understanding of Engineering Lectures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Introductory engineering classes are often taught in large lecture halls, but due to a lack of laboratory apparatus, professors use chalk or erasers to demonstrate physical principles. "Imagine this chalk is a Gaussian sphere" is a phrase underclassmen hear and are expected to learn by. Clearly, easily accessible, illustrative instructional aids could facilitate learning complex engineering concepts. This paper describes a set of 5-minute demonstrations that are simple to execute, require very little equipment, and can be used to increase students' conceptual understanding. Each activity demonstrates a basic engineering principle taken from courses, such as Differential Equations, Physics, Circuits, and Thermodynamics - topics that are required classes for all disciplines. Emphasis is placed on convenience and ease of use by the professor, with most equipment small enough to carry in a pocket or briefcase. These demonstrations introduce a laboratory element into the lecture without the necessity of having a laboratory onsite.

Perrin, Michele

2011-10-14

268

Science Olympiad students' nature of science understandings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent reform efforts in science education focus on scientific literacy for all citizens. In order to be scientifically literate, an individual must have informed understandings of nature of science (NOS), scientific inquiry, and science content matter. This study specifically focused on Science Olympiad students' understanding of NOS as one piece of scientific literacy. Research consistently shows that science students do not have informed understandings of NOS (Abd-El-Khalick, 2002; Bell, Blair, Crawford, and Lederman, 2002; Kilcrease and Lucy, 2002; Schwartz, Lederman, and Thompson, 2001). However, McGhee-Brown, Martin, Monsaas and Stombler (2003) found that Science Olympiad students had in-depth understandings of science concepts, principles, processes, and techniques. Science Olympiad teams compete nationally and are found in rural, urban, and suburban schools. In an effort to learn from students who are generally considered high achieving students and who enjoy science, as opposed to the typical science student, the purpose of this study was to investigate Science Olympiad students' understandings of NOS and the experiences that formed their understandings. An interpretive, qualitative, case study method was used to address the research questions. The participants were purposefully and conveniently selected from the Science Olympiad team at a suburban high school. Data collection consisted of the Views of Nature of Science -- High School Questionnaire (VNOS-HS) (Schwartz, Lederman, & Thompson, 2001), semi-structured individual interviews, and a focus group. The main findings of this study were similar to much of the previous research in that the participants had informed understandings of the tentative nature of science and the role of inferences in science, but they did not have informed understandings of the role of human imagination and creativity, the empirical nature of science, or theories and laws. High level science classes and participation in Science Olympiad did not translate into informed understandings of NOS. There were implications that labs with a set procedure and given data tables did not contribute to informed NOS understandings, while explicit instruction may have contributed to more informed understandings. Exploring these high achieving, Science Olympiad students' understandings of NOS was a crucial step to understanding what experiences formed these students' understandings so that teachers may better their practices and help more students succeed in becoming scientifically literate citizens.

Philpot, Cindy J.

2007-12-01

269

Consistency of students' conceptions of wave propagation: Findings from a conceptual survey in mechanical waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We recently developed a multiple-choice conceptual survey in mechanical waves. The development, evaluation, and demonstration of the use of the survey were reported elsewhere [A. Tongchai , Developing, evaluating and demonstrating the use of a conceptual survey in mechanical waves, Int. J. Sci. Educ. 31, 2437 (2009)ISEDEB0950-069310.1080/09500690802389605]. We administered the survey to 902 students from seven different groups ranging from high school to second year university. As an outcome of that analysis we were able to identify several conceptual models which the students seemed to be using when answering the questions in the survey. In this paper we attempt to investigate the strength with which the students were committed to these conceptual models, as evidenced by the consistency with which they answered the questions. For this purpose we focus on the patterns of student responses to questions in one particular subtopic, wave propagation. This study has three main purposes: (1) to investigate the consistency of student conceptions, (2) to explore the relative usefulness of different analysis techniques, and (3) to determine what extra information a study of consistency can give about student understanding of basic concepts. We used two techniques: first, categorizing and counting, which is widely used in the science education community, and second, model analysis, recently introduced into physics education research. The manner in which categorizing and counting is used is very diverse while model analysis has been employed only in prescriptive ways. Research studies have reported that students often use their conceptual models inconsistently when solving a series of questions that test the same idea. Our results support their conclusions. Moreover, our findings suggest that students who have had more experiences in physics learning seem to use the scientifically accepted models more consistently. Further, the two analysis techniques have different advantages and disadvantages. Our findings show that model analysis can be used in more diverse ways, provides flexibility in analyzing multiple-choice questions, and provides more information about consistency and inconsistency of student conceptions. An unexpected finding is that studying waves in other contexts (for example, quantum mechanics or electromagnetism) leads to more consistent answers about mechanical waves. The suggestion is that studying more abstract topics may solidify studentsunderstanding of more concrete waves. While this might be considered to be intuitive, we have not actually found direct empirical studies supporting this conjecture.

Tongchai, Apisit; Sharma, Manjula Devi; Johnston, Ian D.; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Soankwan, Chernchok

2011-12-01

270

The Mismatch among Students' Views about Nature of Science, Acceptance of Evolution, and Evolutionary Science Understandings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored interrelationships among high school students' views about nature of science (NOS), acceptance of evolution, and conceptual understanding of evolution, and the extent to which these may have shifted from pre- to post-instruction on evolutionary theory. Eighty-one students enrolled in ninth-grade Biology responded to…

Cavallo, Ann M. L.; White, Kevin J.; McCall, David

2011-01-01

271

College Students' Use of Science Content during Socioscientific Issues Negotiation: Impact of Evolution Understanding and Acceptance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the evolution science content used during college students' negotiation of biology-based socioscientific issues (SSI) and examine how it related to students' conceptual understanding and acceptance of biological evolution. Specific research questions were, (1a) what specific evolutionary science content do…

Fowler, Samantha R.

2009-01-01

272

High School Students' Understanding of Chromosome/Gene Behavior during Meiosis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates high school students' understanding of the physical relationship of chromosomes and genes as expressed in their conceptual models and in their ability to manipulate the models to explain solutions to dihybrid cross problems. Describes three typical models and three students' reasoning processes. Discusses four implications. (YP)

Stewart, Jim; Dale, Michael

1989-01-01

273

A Cross-Age Study of Student Understanding of the Concept of Homeostasis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conceptual views of homeostasis held by students (n=300) in seventh grade life science, tenth grade biology, and college zoology were examined. A biographical questionnaire, the results from two Piagetian-like developmental tasks, and a concept evaluation statement of homeostasis were collected from each student. Understanding of the concept…

Westbrook, Susan L.; Marek, Edmund A.

1992-01-01

274

An Investigation into the Understanding of Earth Sciences among Students Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the students teachers' opinions, including rock formation and improper terms related to or different from these ideas, all of which are considered or must be considered in geology classes, have been analyzed. Alternative conception is used to inform our understanding of students teachers' ideas and describe any conceptual

Dal, Burckin

2009-01-01

275

Understanding Student Cognition through an Analysis of Their Preconceptions in Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last three decades, many studies have been conducted to identify students' preconceptions on various science topics. It is time now for a synthetic study of preconceptions to enhance our understanding of students' everyday cognition and to benefit our effort in developing effective instructional inventions for conceptual change. Through a…

Zhou, George; Nocente, Norma; Brouwer, Wytze

2008-01-01

276

Using Multiple Representations to Promote Grade 11 Students' Scientific Understanding of the Particle Theory of Matter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored two groups of Grade 11 (age 16-17) students' conceptual understandings about aspects of particle theory before, immediately after, and 3 months after instruction with multiple representations (IMR) and instruction with verbal representations (IVR). Data sources included open-ended questionnaires, interviews, and student

Adadan, Emine

2013-01-01

277

Using Virtual Reality Computer Models to Support Student Understanding of Astronomical Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine how 3-dimensional (3-D) models of the Solar System supported student development of conceptual understandings of various astronomical phenomena that required a change in frame of reference. In the course described in this study, students worked in teams to design and construct 3-D virtual reality computer…

Barnett, Michael; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa; Keating, Tom; Barab, Sasha A.; Hay, Kenneth E.

2005-01-01

278

Student Understanding of the Wave Nature of Matter: Diffraction and Interference of Particles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on a study of student understanding of the wave nature of matter in the context of the pattern produced by the diffraction and interference of particles. Errors made by students after standard instruction indicates the presence of similar conceptual and reasoning difficulties at three different educational levels. (Contains over 20…

Vokos, Stamatis; Shaffer, Peter S.; Ambrose, Bradley S.; McDermott, Lillian C.

2000-01-01

279

Mechanisms influencing student understanding on an outdoor guided field trip  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field trips are a basic and important, yet often overlooked part of the student experience. They provide the opportunity to integrate real world knowledge with classroom learning and student previous personal experiences. Outdoor guided field trips leave students with an increased understanding, awareness and interest and in science. However, the benefits of this experience are ambiguous at best (Falk and Balling, 1982; Falk and Dierking, 1992; Kisiel, 2006.) Students on an outdoor guided field trip to a local nature park experienced a significant increase in their understanding of the rock cycle. The changes in the pre-field trip test and the post-field trip test as well as their answers in interviews showed a profound change in the students' understanding and in their interest in the subject matter. The use of the "student's voice" (Bamberger and Tal, 2008) was the motivation for data analysis. By using the students' voice, I was able to determine the mechanisms that might influence their understanding of a subject. The central concepts emerging from the data were: the outdoor setting; the students' interest; the social interaction. From these central concepts, a conceptual model was developed. The outdoor setting allows for the freedom to explore, touch, smell and movement. This, in turn, leads to an increased interest in subject matter. As the students are exploring, they are enjoying themselves and become more open to learning. Interest leads to a desire to learn (Dewey, 1975). In addition to allowing the freedom to explore and move, the outdoor setting creates the condition for social interaction. The students talk to each other as they walk; they have in-depth discourse regarding the subject matter---with the teachers, each other and with the guides. The guides have an extremely important role in the students' learning. The more successful guides not only act as experts, but also adjust to the students' needs and act or speak accordingly. The interconnections of these three concepts---the outdoor setting, the students' interest, the social interaction---worked to provide the mechanisms by which the students increased their understanding of the rock cycle.

Caskey, Nourah Al-Rashid

280

Comparing students' performance on research-based conceptual assessments and traditional classroom assessments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The use of concept inventories to investigate students' learning gains is common in physics education research. However, comparatively little research has compared students' learning gains on concept inventories with other more traditional assessments in the classroom. We present a study comparing second semester calculus-based physics students' performance on traditional classroom assessments including exams and homework with learning gains on SEMCO (Survey of Electricity, Magnetism, Circuits and Optics), which was previously created by combining questions on other conceptual surveys such as CSEM and DIRECT. We report on students' performance on specific items on SEMCO and corresponding traditional classroom assessments that are based on the same topic. Our results indicate that while the overall performance on SEMCO might correlate with aggregate performance on class exams, the performance on clusters of SEMCO items that assess conceptual understanding in various topical areas does not correlate as strongly with performance on corresponding traditional exams. These results raise some potentially interesting issues on the validity and usefulness of traditional classroom assessments and conceptual assessments that are often used to measure student learning in introductory physics.

Rebello, N. S.

2012-05-15

281

Western Australian School Students' Understanding of Biotechnology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveys (n=1116) 15-year-old students from 11 Western Australian schools to determine their understanding of and attitude towards recent advances in modern biotechnology. Discusses reasons for students' over-estimation of the use of biotechnology in society. Provides a rationale for the inclusion of biotechnology, a cutting edge science, in the…

Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

2003-01-01

282

Investigating Students' Understanding of the Dissolving Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a previous study, the authors identified several student misconceptions regarding the process of dissolving ionic compounds in water. The present study used multiple-choice questions whose distractors were derived from these misconceptions to assess students' understanding of the dissolving process at the symbolic and particulate levels. The…

Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

2013-01-01

283

Students' Understanding of Orbitals: A Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of chemistry includes many abstract concepts that students may find difficult to understand. A fundamental yet troublesome part of introductory chemistry courses is the topic of electron configuration and specifically quantum-mechanical orbitals. In an effort to examine the way students internalize the concept of atomic orbitals and how…

MacKinnon, Gregory R.

284

Understanding and Preventing College Student Suicide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death among college students in the United States. This complex issue on college campuses is often overlooked, and this book combines the efforts from several leaders in the field of suicidology in an attempt to grasp a better understanding of college student suicide. The book is divided into four…

Lamis, Dorian A.; Lester, David

2011-01-01

285

Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement  

SciTech Connect

We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement. To reduce these difficulties, we have developed research-based learning tools such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) and peer instruction tools. A preliminary evaluation shows that these learning tools are effective in improving students' understanding of concepts related to quantum measurement.

Zhu Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260 (United States)

2010-10-24

286

Developing Students' Understanding of Exponents and Logarithms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we describe instruction designed to teach students about exponents and logarithms and report a pilot study to test the effectiveness of this instruction. Based on the theoretical work of Dubinsky and Sfard, we postulate a set of mental constructions that a student could make to understand the concepts of exponents and logarithms. We…

Weber, Keith

287

Understanding and Counseling Asian American Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asian American students who encounter personal problems may hesitate to utilize counseling and mental health facilities on campuses, being fearful that family, friends and/or relatives may consider them emotionally unstable. Counselors and mental health workers may lack understanding of language and cultural background of Asian-American students,…

Chandras, Kananur V.

288

Investigating the students' understanding of surface phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated students' understanding of surface phenomena. The main purpose for conducting this research endeavor was to understand how students think about a complex topic about which they have little direct or formal instruction. The motivation for focusing on surface phenomena stemmed from an interest in integrating research and education. Despite the importance of surfaces and interfaces in research laboratories, in technological applications, and in everyday experiences, no previous systematic effort was done on pedagogy related to surface phenomena. The design of this research project was qualitative, exploratory, based on a Piagetian semi-structured clinical piloted interview, focused on obtaining a longitudinal view of the intended sample. The sampling was purposeful and the sample consisted of forty-four undergraduate students at Kansas State University. The student participants were enrolled in physics classes that spanned a wide academic spectrum. The data were analyzed qualitatively. The main themes that emerged from the analysis were: (a) students used analogies when confronted with novel situations, (b) students mixed descriptions and explanations, (c) students used the same explanation for several phenomena, (d) students manifested difficulties transferring the meaning of vocabulary across discipline boundaries, (e) in addition to the introductory chemistry classes, students used everyday experiences and job-related experiences as sources of knowledge, and (f) students' inquisitiveness and eagerness to investigate and discuss novel phenomena seemed to peak about the time students were enrolled in second year physics classes.

Hamed, Kastro Mohamad

1999-11-01

289

Students' understanding of density: A cognitive linguistics perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Density is an important, multifaceted concept that occurs at many levels of physics education. Previous research has shown that a primary instantiation of the concept, mass density, is not well understood by high school or university students. This study seeks to determine how students understand the broad concept of density, and whether particular aspects of their understanding are helpful in structuring the concept of charge density. Qualitative data were gathered in the form of questionnaires distributed to 172 freshmen comprising three different academic groups. Broad, open ended questions prompted for responses involving free writing and drawn diagrams. The data were analysed by an approach suggested by Grounded Theory. Using the theoretical lens of Conceptual Metaphor Theory, six underlying (foothold) concepts were identified in terms of which density was conceptualised: `filled container'; `packing'; `weight/heaviness'; `intensive property'; `floating/sinking'; `impenetrability/solidity'. The foothold concept of `packing' proved to be the most productive for conceptualising `charge density'.

Southey, Philip; Allie, Saalih; Demaree, Dedra

2013-01-01

290

Upper High School Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although electromagnetism is an important component of upper secondary school physics syllabuses in many countries, there has been relatively little research on students' understanding of the topic. A written test consisting of 16 diagnostic questions was developed and used to survey the understanding of electromagnetism of upper secondary school…

Saglam, Murat; Millar, Robin

2006-01-01

291

Emerging Conceptual Understanding of Complex Astronomical Phenomena by Using a Virtual Solar System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes high school students' conceptual development of the basic astronomical phenomena during real-time interactions with a Virtual Solar System (VSS). The VSS is a non-immersive virtual environment which has a dynamic frame of reference that can be altered by the user. Ten 10th grade students were given tasks containing a set of…

Gazit, Elhanan; Yair, Yoav; Chen, David

2005-01-01

292

Revelations from Counting: A Window to Conceptual Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A design research study was conducted over two years with 20 second grade students who are part of the Measure Up (MU) research and development project underway at the University of Hawai'i. Students were asked to count in multiple bases. After doing so, they were asked how they knew when to go to a new place value and why it was necessary. All 20…

Slovin, Hannah

2011-01-01

293

Research and Teaching: Student Understanding of Ionizing Radiation and Radioactivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Results from research into the teaching and learning of physics have shown that many college students have significant conceptual and reasoning difficulties relating to topics of radioactivity. Interviewing students from three different science background

Edward E. Prather

2001-10-01

294

Conceptualizing Nanoscale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One strategy for enhancing students' understanding of nanoscale is to shift students' existing understandings of relative scale by helping them conceptually transport their strongest scale benchmark--themselves--into the nanoscale world. This article describes a set of activities to scaffold high school students' nanoscsale conceptions and to help them appreciate the scale at which nanotechnology operates, both in a relative and an absolute sense.

Tretter, Thomas

2006-12-01

295

College students' conceptualizations of deficits involved in mild intellectual disability.  

PubMed

Precedential rulings in recent capital murder trials may, in some cases, leave it up to a jury to determine whether or not an individual meets criteria for an intellectual disability (ID) and should be spared from the death penalty. Despite the potential for misconceptions about ID to bias decisions, few empirical studies have examined the public's conceptualizations of individuals with ID. This study sought to examine 890 college students' conceptualizations of the deficits involved in mild ID. Students were asked to respond to two online surveys about the cognitive and adaptive behavior deficits that people with mild ID may experience. While most students were correct about basic facts, such as ID is not contagious and not curable, there was no clear consensus regarding beliefs about individuals with ID getting married, having children, or engaging in other mainstream activities of adult living. Students' responses are examined in light of results of studies that identify and examine bona fide deficits and areas of successful mainstreaming among persons with ID. Implications of misconceptions are discussed. PMID:22093668

Musso, Mandi W; Barker, Alyse A; Proto, Daniel A; Gouvier, Wm Drew

2012-01-01

296

Toward a Conceptual Framework for Understanding Cosmopolitanism on the Ground  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, a continuum of resistance and receptivity constitutes a framework for understanding a cosmopolitan orientation "on the ground." Such a continuum is based on an understanding of the effects of globalization, when it comes to individual people, as both containing a potential for an active interest in other ways of life,…

Wahlström, Ninni

2014-01-01

297

Socioscientific Issues: A Path Towards Advanced Scientific Literacy and Improved Conceptual Understanding of Socially Controversial Scientific Theories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis investigates the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in the high school science classroom as an introduction to argumentation and socioscientific reasoning, with the goal of improving students' scientific literacy (SL). Current research is reviewed that supports the likelihood of students developing a greater conceptual understanding of scientific theories as well as a deeper understanding of the nature of science (NOS), through participation in informal and formal forms of argumentation in the context of SSI. Significant gains in such understanding may improve a student's ability to recognize the rigor, legitimacy, and veracity of scientific claims and better discern science from pseudoscience. Furthermore, students that participate in significant SSI instruction by negotiating a range of science-related social issues can make significant gains in content knowledge and develop the life-long skills of argumentation and evidence-based reasoning, goals not possible in traditional lecture-based science instruction. SSI-based instruction may therefore help students become responsible citizens. This synthesis also suggests that that the improvements in science literacy and NOS understanding that develop from sustained engagement in SSI-based instruction will better prepare students to examine and scrutinize socially controversial scientific theories (i.e., evolution, global warming, and the Big Bang).

Pinzino, Dean William

298

Student understanding of symmetry and Gauss's law of electricity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We investigate the difficulties that students in calculus-based introductory physics courses have with the concepts of symmetry, electric field, and electric flux which are important for applying Gauss's law. The determination of the electric field using Gauss's law requires determining the symmetry of a particular charge distribution and predicting the direction of the electric field everywhere if a high symmetry exists. Effective application of Gauss's law implicitly requires understanding the principle of superposition for electric fields. Helping students learn when Gauss's law can be readily applied to determine the strength of the electric field, and then helping them learn to determine the appropriate shape of Gaussian surfaces if sufficient symmetry exists, can help develop their reasoning and problem-solving skills. We administered free-response and multiple-choice questions and conducted interviews with individual students using a think-aloud protocol to elucidate the difficulties that students have with the concepts of symmetry, electric field, and electric flux. We also developed a multiple-choice test that targets these conceptual issues to obtain quantitative information about their difficulties and administered it to 541 students in the introductory calculus-based physics courses and to upper-level undergraduates in an electricity and magnetism course and to graduate students enrolled in a teaching assistant seminar course. We find that undergraduate students have many common difficulties with these concepts.

Singh, Chandralekha

2010-06-30

299

High school students' understanding and problem solving in population genetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is an investigation of student understanding of population genetics and how students developed, used and revised conceptual models to solve problems. The students in this study participated in three rounds of problem solving. The first round involved the use of a population genetics model to predict the number of carriers in a population. The second round required them to revise their model of simple dominance population genetics to make inferences about populations containing three phenotype variations. The third round of problem solving required the students to revise their model of population genetics to explain anomalous data where the proportions of males and females with a trait varied significantly. As the students solved problems, they were involved in basic scientific processes as they observed population phenomena, constructed explanatory models to explain the data they observed, and attempted to persuade their peers as to the adequacy of their models. In this study, the students produced new knowledge about the genetics of a trait in a population through the revision and use of explanatory population genetics models using reasoning that was similar to what scientists do. The students learned, used and revised a model of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium to generate and test hypotheses about the genetics of phenotypes given only population data. Students were also interviewed prior to and following instruction. This study suggests that a commonly held intuitive belief about the predominance of a dominant variation in populations is resistant to change, despite instruction and interferes with a student's ability to understand Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and microevolution.

Soderberg, Patti D.

300

Articles Student Understanding of pH \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

In foundation biochemistry and biological chemistry courses, a major problem area that has been identified is students' lack of understanding of pH, acids, bases, and buffers and their inability to apply their knowledge in solving acid\\/base problems. The aim of this study was to explore students' conceptions of pH and their ability to solve problems associated with the behavior of

Dianne J. Watters; James J. Watters

301

Teaching Care Ethics: Conceptual Understandings and Stories for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An ethic of care acknowledges the centrality of the role of caring relationships in moral education. Care ethics requires a conception of "care" that differs from the quotidian use of the word. In order to teach care ethics more effectively, this article discusses four interrelated ways that teachers' understandings of care differ…

Rabin, Colette; Smith, Grinell

2013-01-01

302

Middle school students' conceptual change in global climate change: Using argumentation to foster knowledge construction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research examined middle school student conceptions about global climate change (GCC) and the change these conceptions undergo during an argument driven instructional unit. The theoretical framework invoked for this study is the framework theory of conceptual change (Vosniadou, 2007a). This theory posits that students do not simply correct incorrect ideas with correct ones, but instead weigh incoming ideas against already existing explanatory frameworks, which have likely served the learner well to this point. The research questions were as follows: (1) What are the patterns of students' conceptual change in GCC? (a) What conceptions are invoked in student learning in this arena? (b) What conceptions are most influential? (c) What are the extra-rational factors influencing conceptual change in GCC? This research took place in an urban public school in a medium sized city in the southeastern United States. A sixth grade science teacher at Central Middle school, Ms. Octane, taught a course titled "Research Methods I., which was an elective science course that students took as part of a science magnet program. A unit was designed for 6th grade instruction that incorporated an Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) approach, centered on the subject matter of Global Climate change and Global Warming. Students were immersed in three separate lessons within the unit, each of which featured an emphasis upon creating scientific explanations based upon evidence. Additionally, each of the lessons placed a premium on students working towards the development of such explanations as a part of a group, with an emphasis on peer review of the robustness of the explanations proposed. The students were involved in approximately a two week unit emphasizing global climate change. This unit was based on an argumentation model that provided data to students and asked them to develop explanations that accounted for the data. The students then underwent a peer-review process to determine if their explanations could be modified to better account for the data as pointed out by peers. As the students experienced the three lessons comprising the unit, data were taken of various modes, including pre-unit, mid-unit, post-unit, and delayed-post unit interviews, observer notes from the classroom, and artifacts created by the students as individuals and as members of a group. At the end of the unit, a written post-assessment was administered, and post-interviews were conducted with the selected students. These varied data sources were analyzed in order to develop themes corresponding to their frameworks of climate change. Negative cases were sought in order to test developing themes. Themes that emerged from the data were triangulated across the various data sources in order to ensure quality and rigor. These themes were then used to construct understandings of various students' frameworks of the content. Several findings emerged from this research. The first finding is that each student underwent some conceptual change regarding GCC, although of varying natures. The students' synthetic frameworks of GCC were more complex than their initial, or naive frameworks. Some characteristics of the naive frameworks included that the students tended to conflate climate change with a broader, generic category of environmental things. Examples of this conflation include the idea that climate change entails general pollution, litter, and needless killing of dolphins while fishing for tuna. This research suggests that students might benefit from explicit attention to this concept in terms of an ontological category, with the ideal synthetic view realizing that GCC is itself an example of an emergent process. Another characteristic of their naive frameworks includes some surprisingly accurate notions of GCC, including a general sense that temperatures and sea levels are rising. At the same time, none of the students were able to adequately invoke data to support their understandings of GCC. Instead, when data were invoked, students tended to include anecdotal informat

Golden, Barry W.

303

The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

2009-01-01

304

Students' Understanding of Stern Gerlach Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Stern Gerlach experiment has played a central role in the discovery of spin angular momentum and it has also played a pivotal role in elucidating foundational issues in quantum mechanics. Here, we discuss investigation of students' difficulties related to the Stern Gerlach experiment by giving written tests and interviewing advanced undergraduate and graduate students in quantum mechanics. We also discuss preliminary data that suggest that the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) related to the Stern Gerlach experiment is helpful in improving students' understanding of these concepts.

Zhu Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260 (United States)

2009-11-05

305

Understanding Student Preparation of Exam Note Sheets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In a previous study, I allowed introductory physics students to create a notecard (or sheet) for their midterm and final exams in an attempt to remove equation memorizing as a focus of the course. I hoped to use the study of these cards as an epistemological lens that would uncover their perceptions and attitudes about the course. Without follow-up questions, though, epistemology remained unclear. I have continued this line of research by adding anonymous survey questions that probe why students chose to include what they did, how (if at all) the notes were helpful, and how their card preparation changed throughout the semester. Through my analysis, I found cases where the survey questions reveal epistemological insight about students the note sheets alone would not. For example, one student with an equation-centered note sheet did not see equations as the most central course component, but he considered himself fluent enough in concepts that he felt he could leave conceptual statements out. I also discuss some of the more thoughtful survey answers I received, some future study possibilities, and efforts to discuss exam preparation in the classroom.

Mccaskey, Timothy L.

2014-01-31

306

Probing physics students' conceptual knowledge structures through term association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Traditional tests are not effective tools for diagnosing the content and structure of students' knowledge of physics. As a possible alternative, a set of term-association tasks (the ConMap tasks) was developed to probe the interconnections within students' store of conceptual knowledge. The tasks have students respond spontaneously to a term or problem or topic area with a sequence of associated terms; the response terms and time-of-entry data are captured. The tasks were tried on introductory physics students, and preliminary investigations show that the tasks are capable of eliciting information about the structure of their knowledge. Specifically, data gathered through the tasks is similar to that produced by a hand-drawn concept map task, has measures that correlate with in-class exam performance, and is sensitive to learning produced by topic coverage in class. Although the results are preliminary and only suggestive, the tasks warrant further study as student-knowledge assessment instruments and sources of experimental data for cognitive modeling efforts.

Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.

2005-10-11

307

Experiment to Help Students Understand Pulmonary Compliance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Compliance is a difficult concept for students to grasp, and in partic-ular, pulmonary compliance is quite difficult because it involves an understanding of both lung and chest compliance. To help students understand pulmonary compliance characteristics, relaxation curves for the chest cage (Fig. 1A), lung (Fig. 1B), and combined lung-chest cage (Fig. 1C) are often presented to medical students. To facilitate an understanding of the relaxation curves, we demonstrate how the curves are generated by substituting a balloon for the lungs and a tennis ball for the chest cage. Students are told that when the lung is removed from the chest cage, it closely resembles a collapsed balloon. Subsequently, a collapsed balloon is connected to a pressure transducer that is coupled to a data acquisition system. The students observe that, when pressure inside the balloon equals outside pressure, or transmural pressure is zero, balloon volume is close to zero. Starting from essentially zero balloon volume, a measured volume of air is put into the balloon, and the recoil or relaxation pres-sure associated with the addition of that air volume is recorded. Additional measured volumes of air are added to the balloon, and the corresponding recoil or relaxation pressure is recorded. Compliance of the balloon is obtained by plotting balloon recoil or relaxation pressure on the x-axis and balloon volume on the y-axis. The slope of this plot is balloon compliance.

PhD Stephen M. DiCarlo (Wayne State Univ Sch Med Dept of Physiology); PhD Heidi L. Collins (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine Dept. of Physiology); Mr. David W. Rodenbaugh (Wayne State University Department of Physiology)

2002-06-01

308

Students' Different Understandings of Class Diagrams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The software industry needs well-trained software designers and one important aspect of software design is the ability to model software designs visually and understand what visual models represent. However, previous research indicates that software design is a difficult task to many students. This article reports empirical findings from a…

Boustedt, Jonas

2012-01-01

309

Understanding Student Article Retrieval Behaviors: Instructional Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluates the use of full-text databases amongst 425 undergraduate and graduate students in western New York. A review of literature implicated convenience, time issues, article retrieval option knowledge, and the appreciation and understanding of research article quality as potential predictors of full-text reliance. These variables…

Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Schoen, David

2005-01-01

310

Student Solutions Manual to accompany Understanding Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work more effectively and check solutions as you go along with the text! This Student Solutions Manual is designed for use with Cummings' Understanding Physics. Its primary purpose is to show readers by example how to solve various types of problems given at the end of each chapter in the text. Most of the solutions start from definitions or fundamental

Karen Cummings; Priscilla W. Laws; Edward F. Redish; Patrick J. Cooney; J. Richard Christman

2004-01-01

311

Elementary School Students' Understandings of Technology Concepts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in grades 2 (n=27), 4 (n=37), and 6 (n=28) were asked questions about artifacts or pictures. Their explanations, which revealed their understanding of such technological concepts as material properties and stability, were classified as naive, artifact related, or not artifact related. Explanations tended to cluster in a classification at…

Davis, Robert S.; Ginns, Ian S.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

2002-01-01

312

Embedding Evolution: Exploring Changes in Students' Conceptual Development, Beliefs, and Motivations in a Population Ecology Unit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore student changes in conceptual development, epistemology, and motivations when evolution concepts are embedded and explicit reflective discourse is used in a unit for population ecology. The two research problems were: (1) What changes are observed in student's conceptual development, epistemology, and motivations when there is explicit reflective discourse within a population ecology unit with embedded evolution?, and (2) In what ways does explicit reflection influence students' mental models within a population ecology unit with embedded evolution? This mixed-method, quasi-experimental study assessed two regular high school biology classes in a small, urban, Midwestern high school. Students in this study had not studied evolution within any formal chapters, but had been immersed in a curriculum with embedded evolution. The study was conducted over a four-week period in a population ecology unit near the beginning of second semester. Instruction emphasized basic conceptions in population ecology. Five key intervention activities included evolutionary concepts as part of an embedded curriculum. The independent variable was explicit reflective discourse with one or two intervention questions after completion of these activities. Data included pre- and posttest surveys measuring (a) evolutionary understanding of natural selection, (b) science beliefs, and (c) science motivations. Written artifacts included (a) explanations to scenarios, (b) pre- and post-argument reflections revealing student's science beliefs and science motivations resultant from two argumentations, and (c) three, pre-, post-, and 6-week final concept maps constructed from 12 concepts. All data sources provided descriptive data. Conceptual change was interpreted from an ontological, epistemological, and motivational perspective. The experimental class receiving explicit reflective discourse showed greater overall increases in conceptual development. Students in both classes constructed teleological and proximate explanations. Overall, the experimental class gave greater numbers of evolutionary explanations. Scored propositions from concept maps showed a mixture of synthetic and scientific conceptions in both classes, however the experimental group showed greater scientific quality. Students in both classes exhibited direct-process ontology. Both classes had high degrees of epistemological and motivational commitments demonstrated by their engagement and subsequent improvements in conceptual development in both evolutionary and ecological conceptions.

Rose, Nancy L.

313

Using a conceptual flow, inquiry based learning, and language development to yield enduring understanding in science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This project was designed to incorporate three curriculum development strategies that have been created to increase student achievement in various content areas. Conceptual flow design, the 5E Instructional Model, and English language development strategies were used to create a seventh grade Genetics Unit. The unit was evaluated by three external experts and carried out in two seventh grade classrooms in an effort to assess its effectiveness. Based on the evaluators' feedback, the initial conceptual flow and lessons were found to be inconsistent and confusing. Overall, the organization of this unit seemed to support student achievement. The conceptual flow and the lesson layout of the unit were revised based on the evaluation data. All revisions and the established protocols will serve as models for further science curriculum development in the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District.

Gunderson, Angelica E.

314

Enhancing Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Solution Chemistry with Conceptual Change Text  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the use of a constructivist-based pedagogy to enhance understanding of some features of solution chemistry. Pre-service science teacher trainees' prior knowledge about the dissolution of salts and sugar in water were elicited by the use of a simple diagnostic tool. The test revealed widespread alternative conceptions. These…

Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard Kevin

2007-01-01

315

Targeting Students' Physical Science Misconceptions Using the Conceptual Change Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This handbook is dedicated to giving teachers clear information on how to correct physical science misconceptions in the classroom. It aims to help teachers help students develop appropriate understanding based on hands-on, inquiry-based experiences that challenge preconceptions. The book is organized into units ranging from matter to heat and waves. Each unit includes a list of common misconceptions and activities that help students develop an accurate understanding of each concept. Background information and lessons are provided. The National Science Education Standards for content and instructional strategies in the physical sciences are also addressed.

Stepans, Joseph

2007-11-01

316

Mental models of recursion: investigating students' understanding of recursion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental models of recursion provide some idea into a student's understanding of recursion. However there has been concern regarding whether viable trace mental models of recursion show students' true understanding of recursion. We have conducted an investigation to further examine the understanding of recursion of students with viable trace mental models. The investigation looked at students' understanding of the termination

Tamarisk Lurlyn Scholtz; Ian Sanders

2010-01-01

317

The Development of Four Fifth Grade Students' Understanding and Skill Representing Fractions as Quotients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation investigated the conceptual schemes children constructed as they related division number sentences to various types of fractions: Proper fractions, improper fractions, and mixed numbers in both contextual and abstract symbolic forms. It was hypothesized that student's understanding depends heavily on the role played by factors…

Kim, Ahyoung

2009-01-01

318

College Students' Understanding of the Particulate Nature of Matter across Reaction Types  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research in chemical education has shown that while students (K-20) can perform well on tasks that require use of algorithmic and symbolic skills, they struggle with tasks that require conceptual understanding of chemistry. One area where such a trend has been observed is the Particulate Nature of Matter (PNM). A number of factors have been…

Nyachwaya, James Mochoge

2012-01-01

319

Identifying Students Difficulties in Understanding Concepts Pertaining to Cell Water Relations: An Exploratory Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identified students' conceptual difficulties in understanding concepts and processes associated with cell water relationships (osmosis), determined possible reasons for these difficulties, and pilot-tested instruments and research strategies for a large scale comprehensive study. Research strategies used included content analysis of…

Friedler, Y.; And Others

320

Promoting the Understanding of Photosynthesis Among Elementary School Student Teachers Through Text Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary school pre-service teachers' understanding of photosynthesis and to examine if a refutational text can support understanding of photosynthesis better than a non-refutational text. A total of 91 elementary school pre-service teachers read either a refutational or a non-refutational text concerning photosynthesis and then answered open-ended questions. Our results indicate that there are critical problems associated with student teachers learning about the process of photosynthesis, even after it has been systematically taught in teacher education. However, the results positively indicate that refutational science texts seem to foster effective conceptual change among student teachers. The results interestingly showed that students who read a refutational text improved their systemic and factual understanding of photosynthesis more than did those who read a non-refutational text. Especially students who had naďve prior understanding regarding photosynthesis benefitted more from a refutational text. Thus, a refutational text may act as an effective facilitator of conceptual change. These results have implications for teacher education, where conceptual mastery of the most important science phenomena, such as photosynthesis, should be achieved. A refutational text is an easy and effective way to support conceptual change in higher education. Thus, this study highlights the importance of domain-specific science education in teacher programmes.

Södervik, Ilona; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Vilppu, Henna

2014-08-01

321

The Effect of Guided Inquiry-Based Instruction on Middle School Students' Understanding of Lunar Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of non-traditional guided inquiry instruction on middle school students' conceptual understandings of lunar concepts. Multiple data sources were used to describe participants' conceptions of lunar phases and their cause, including drawings, interviews, and a lunar shapes card sort. The data were analyzed via a…

Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Atwood, Ronald K.; Christopher, John E.; Sackes, Mesut

2010-01-01

322

Introductory Biology StudentsConceptual Models and Explanations of the Origin of Variation  

PubMed Central

Mutation is the key molecular mechanism generating phenotypic variation, which is the basis for evolution. In an introductory biology course, we used a model-based pedagogy that enabled students to integrate their understanding of genetics and evolution within multiple case studies. We used student-generated conceptual models to assess understanding of the origin of variation. By midterm, only a small percentage of students articulated complete and accurate representations of the origin of variation in their models. Targeted feedback was offered through activities requiring students to critically evaluate peers’ models. At semester's end, a substantial proportion of students significantly improved their representation of how variation arises (though one-third still did not include mutation in their models). Students’ written explanations of the origin of variation were mostly consistent with their models, although less effective than models in conveying mechanistic reasoning. This study contributes evidence that articulating the genetic origin of variation is particularly challenging for learners and may require multiple cycles of instruction, assessment, and feedback. To support meaningful learning of the origin of variation, we advocate instruction that explicitly integrates multiple scales of biological organization, assessment that promotes and reveals mechanistic and causal reasoning, and practice with explanatory models with formative feedback. PMID:25185235

Shaw, Neil; Momsen, Jennifer; Reinagel, Adam; Le, Paul; Taqieddin, Ranya; Long, Tammy

2014-01-01

323

Do the students understand the thermodynamics concepts?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years, researchers have made efforts to evaluate how thermodynamical concepts and laws are being learned by students. In a previous study, we based our research on the answers to a test presented to a restrict number of university students. We have identified a number of specific difficulties such as the understanding of heat, temperature, work and internal energy concepts and applications of the first and second laws of thermodynamics to simple physical processes. In this work, we extend our study to students of other different university courses to realize how thermodynamics concepts and laws are being learned and understood. We are particularly interested how the university students are able to apply the first and second laws to irreversible processes. The methodology consists on the analysis of the results obtained with a questionnaire of multiple choice forms with only one correct answer. The investigation was carried in the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, in Portugal, with students of several courses such as Forest, Environmental and Animal Science Engineering, Physics/Chemistry teaching among others. We found that many students had difficulties with the application of first and second laws to irreversible processes. Many others are misunderstanding the energy transfer signal convention.

Pereira, Mário; Caramelo, Liliana; Anacleto, Joaquim

2010-05-01

324

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Student Success in Community Colleges: A Conceptual Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Career and technical education (CTE) students pursuing occupational associate's degrees or certificates differ from students seeking academic majors at 2-year institutions in several ways. This article examines several theoretical models of student persistence and offers a conceptual model of student success focused on CTE students in community…

Hirschy, Amy S.; Bremer, Christine D.; Castellano, Marisa

2011-01-01

325

Examining the effects of computational tools on students' understanding of thermodynamics of material concepts and representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Technology is becoming a more critical agent for supporting learning as well as research in science and engineering. In particular, technology-based tools in the form of simulations and virtual environments support learning using mathematical models and computational methods. The purpose of this research is to: (a) measure the value added in conveying Thermodynamics of materials concepts with a blended learning environment using computational simulation tools with lectures; and (b) characterize students' use of representational forms to convey their conceptual understanding of core concepts within a learning environment that blended Gibbs computational resource and traditional lectures. A mix-method approach was implemented that included the use of statistical analysis to compare student test performance as a result of interacting with Gibbs tool and the use of Grounded Theory inductive analysis to explore students' use of representational forms to express their understanding of thermodynamics of material concepts. Results for the quantitative study revealed positive gains in students' conceptual understanding before and after interacting with Gibbs tool for the majority of the concepts tested. In addition, insight gained from the qualitative analysis helped provide understanding about how students utilized representational forms in communicating their understanding of thermodynamics of material concepts. Knowledge of how novice students construct meaning in this context will provide insight for engineering education instructors and researchers in understanding students' learning processes in the context of educational environments that integrate expert simulation tools as part of their instructional resources for foundational domain knowledge.

Ogunwuyi, Oluwatosin

326

Student performance on conceptual questions: Does instruction matter?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the tutorial component of introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington, students take weekly pretests that consist of conceptual questions. Pretests are so named because they precede each tutorial, but they are frequently administered after lecture instruction. Many variables associated with class composition and prior instruction (if any) could, in principle, affect student performance on these questions. Nonetheless, the results are often found to be "essentially the same" in all classes. With data available from a large number of classes, it is possible to characterize the typical variation quantitatively. In this paper three questions for which we have accumulated thousands of responses, from dozens of classes representing different conditions with respect to the textbook in use, the amount of prior instruction, etc., serve as examples. For each question, we examine the variation in student performance across all classes. We also compare subsets categorized according to the amount of relevant prior instruction each class had received. A preliminary analysis suggests that the variation in performance is essentially random. No statistically significant difference is observed between results obtained before relevant instruction begins and after it has been completed. The results provide evidence that exposure to concepts in lecture and textbook is not sufficient to ensure an improvement in performance on questions that require qualitative reasoning.

Heron, Paula R.

2013-08-31

327

Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

Wagner, Doris J.; Rivera, Janet J.; Mateycik, Frances; Jennings, Sybillyn

2011-01-01

328

Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

Wagner, D. J.; Rivera, J. J.; Mateycik, Fran; Jennings, Sybillyn

2005-09-01

329

Reconsidering conceptual change from a socio-cultural perspective: analyzing students' meaning making in genetics in collaborative learning activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the learning sciences, students' understanding of scientific concepts has often been approached in terms of conceptual change. These studies are grounded in a cognitive or a socio-cognitive approach to students' understanding and imply a focus on the individuals' mental representations of scientific concepts and ideas. We approach students' conceptual change from a socio-cultural perspective as they make new meaning in genetics. Adhering to a socio-cultural perspective, we emphasize the discursive and interactional aspects of human learning and understanding. This perspective implies that the focus is on students' meaning making processes in collaborative learning activities. In the study, we conduct an analysis of a group of students' who interact while working to solve problems in genetics. In our analyses we emphasize four analytical aspects of the students' meaning making: (a) the students' use of resources in problematizing, (b) teacher interventions, (c) changes in interactional accomplishments, and (d) the institutional aspect of meaning making. Our findings suggest that students' meaning making surrounding genetics concepts relates not only to an epistemic concern but also to an interactional and an institutional concern.

Furberg, Anniken; Arnseth, Hans Christian

2009-03-01

330

Chinese and Australian Year 3 Children's Conceptual Understanding of Science: A Multiple Comparative Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children have formal science instruction from kindergarten in Australia and from Year 3 in China. The purpose of this research was to explore the impact that different approaches to primary science curricula in China and Australia have on children's conceptual understanding of science. Participants were Year 3 children from three schools of high,…

Tao, Ying; Oliver, Mary Colette; Venville, Grady Jane

2012-01-01

331

Effect of Current Electricity Simulation Supported Learning on the Conceptual Understanding of Elementary and Secondary Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the impact of computer simulation and supported science learning on a teacher's understanding and conceptual knowledge of current electricity. Pre/Post tests were used to measure the teachers' concept attainment. Overall, there was a significant and large knowledge difference effect from Pre to Post test. Two interesting…

Kumar, David Devraj; Thomas, P. V.; Morris, John D.; Tobias, Karen M.; Baker, Mary; Jermanovich, Trudy

2011-01-01

332

Chinese and Australian Children's Understandings of the Earth: A Cross Cultural Study of Conceptual Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore Chinese and Australian primary children's conceptual understandings of the Earth. The research was conducted in the interpretive paradigm and was designed to be descriptive with comparative and cross sectional elements. Participants were Year 3 and Year 6 children from three schools in Hunan Province,…

Tao, Ying; Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady

2013-01-01

333

Understanding and Theorizing the Role of Culture in the Conceptualizations of Successful Aging and Lifelong Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Successful aging and lifelong learning are value-laden concepts that are culturally determined. To this effect, people with different value systems and cultural backgrounds may perceive and understand these two concepts differently, resulting in different definitions and conceptualizations by people in diverse cultural contexts. There have been…

Tam, Maureen

2014-01-01

334

High School Students' Motivation To Engage in Conceptual Change Learning in Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated motivational factors that are related to engaging in conceptual change learning. While previous studies have recognized the resistance of students' scientific conceptions to change, few have investigated the role that non-cognitive factors might play when students are exposed to conceptual change instruction. In this study,…

Barlia, Lily; Beeth, Michael E.

335

The Relationship between Comprehension and Conceptual Mathematics of Third Grade Students at a Selected Elementary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between reading comprehension scores and conceptual mathematics scores of third grade students at a selected elementary school. The sample consisted of 27 students of which 15 were females and 12 were males. Data were collected using a teacher made conceptual math exam and the scores from…

Kariuki, Patrick N.; Morris, Dustin A.

2013-01-01

336

Medical studentsconceptualizations of quality of life associated with children who have Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To investigate second year medical studentsunderstanding of quality of life associated with childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS Cross-sectional study in a major teaching institution in San Francisco. A questionnaire was administered following an hour long gastroenterology lecture which featured two young patients with pediatric-onset IBD who addressed everyday life with the disease. Analyses of numerate responses to the questionnaire were paired with a content and thematic analysis of audiotape recordings of the patients’ commentaries. RESULTS Medical student responses to the patient interviews were very positive. Medical students gained a new awareness of the psychosocial complexities associated with living with a pediatric chronic illness and a new way of thinking about the meaning of “healthy.” Despite listening to two healthy young patients, however, the medical students still conceptualized pediatric IBD in mostly, although not exclusively, negative terms. CONCLUSIONS Medical students’ perceptions of pediatric IBD improved as a result of listening to the patient interviews. While this teaching modality effectively introduced students to a complex condition, it did not overcome their unfavorable impression of IBD’s impact on children’s lives. The symptoms associated with IBD have stigma attached to them, and these stereotypes influence how medical students perceive those living with this chronic illness. More research and training in this area is necessary. PMID:23752075

Salazar, Guadalupe; Barker, Judith C.; Heyman, Melvin B.

2013-01-01

337

Using cluster analysis to identify patterns in students' responses to contextually different conceptual problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined the evolution of student responses to seven contextually different versions of two Force Concept Inventory questions in an introductory physics course at the University of Arkansas. The consistency in answering the closely related questions evolved little over the seven-question exam. A model for the state of student knowledge involving the probability of selecting one of the multiple-choice answers was developed. Criteria for using clustering algorithms to extract model parameters were explored and it was found that the overlap between the probability distributions of the model vectors was an important parameter in characterizing the cluster models. The course data were then clustered and the extracted model showed that students largely fit into two groups both pre- and postinstruction: one that answered all questions correctly with high probability and one that selected the distracter representing the same misconception with high probability. For the course studied, 14% of the students were left with persistent misconceptions post instruction on a static force problem and 30% on a dynamic Newton’s third law problem. These students selected the answer representing the predominant misconception slightly more consistently postinstruction, indicating that the course studied had been ineffective at moving this subgroup of students nearer a Newtonian force concept and had instead moved them slightly farther away from a correct conceptual understanding of these two problems. The consistency in answering pairs of problems with varied physical contexts is shown to be an important supplementary statistic to the score on the problems and suggests that the inclusion of such problem pairs in future conceptual inventories would be efficacious. Multiple, contextually varied questions further probe the structure of students’ knowledge. To allow working instructors to make use of the additional insight gained from cluster analysis, it is our hope that the physics education research community will make these methods available though their Web sites.

Stewart, John; Miller, Mayo; Audo, Christine; Stewart, Gay

2012-12-01

338

An educational ethnography of teacher-developed science curriculum implementation: Enacting conceptual change-based science inquiry with Hispanic students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An achievement gap exists between White and Hispanic students in the United States. Research has shown that improving the quality of instruction for minority students is an effective way to narrow this gap. Science education reform movements emphasize that science should be taught using a science inquiry approach. Extensive research in teaching and learning science also shows that a conceptual change model of teaching is effective in helping students learn science. Finally, research into how Hispanic students learn best has provided a number of suggestions for science instruction. The Inquiry for Conceptual Change model merges these three research strands into a comprehensive yet accessible model for instruction. This study investigates two questions. First, what are teachers' perceptions of science inquiry and its implementation in the classroom? Second, how does the use of the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model affect the learning of students in a predominantly Hispanic, urban neighborhood. Five teachers participated in a professional development project where they developed and implemented a science unit based on the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model. Three units were developed and implemented for this study. This is a qualitative study that included data from interviews, participant reflections and journals, student pre- and post-assessments, and researcher observations. This study provides an in-depth description of the role of professional development in helping teachers understand how science inquiry can be used to improve instructional quality for students in a predominantly Hispanic, urban neighborhood. These teachers demonstrated that it is important for professional development to be collaborative and provide opportunities for teachers to enact and reflect on new teaching paradigms. This study also shows promising results for the ability of the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model to improve student learning.

Brunsell, Eric Steven

339

Student understanding of time in special relativity: Simultaneity and reference frames  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article reports on an investigation of student understanding of the concept of time in special relativity. A series of research tasks are discussed that illustrate, step-by-step, how student reasoning of fundamental concepts of relativity was probed. The results indicate that after standard instruction students at all academic levels have serious difficulties with the relativity of simultaneity and with the role of observers in inertial reference frames. Evidence is presented that suggests many students construct a conceptual framework in which the ideas of absolute simultaneity and the relativity of simultaneity harmoniously co-exist.

Scherr, Rachel E.; Shaffer, Peter S.; Vokos, Stamatis

2005-11-23

340

Examining the Conceptual Organization of Students in an Integrated Algebra and Physical Science Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the conceptual organization of students in an integrated algebra and physical science class (SAM 9) with that of students in a discipline-specific physical science class (PSO). Analysis of students' concept maps indicates that the SAM9 students used a greater number of procedural linkages to connect mathematics and science concepts than…

Westbrook, Susan L.

1998-01-01

341

Student conceptualizations of the nature of science in response to a socioscientific issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates student conceptualizations of the nature of science (NOS) and how students interpret and evaluate conflicting evidence regarding a socioscientific issue. Eighty?four high school students participated in the study by reading contradictory reports about the status of global warming and responding to questions designed to elicit ideas pertinent to the research goals. A subsample of 30 students was

Troy D. Sadler; F. William Chambers; Dana L. Zeidler

2004-01-01

342

The Development of a Conceptual Model of Student Satisfaction with Their Experience in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual model of student satisfaction with their higher education (HE) experience, based on the identification of the variable determinants of student perceived quality and the impact of those variables on student satisfaction and/or dissatisfaction with the overall student experience. The…

Douglas, Jacqueline; McClelland, Robert; Davies, John

2008-01-01

343

Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary goal is to stimulate thinking about  

E-print Network

Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary facets of social life. Using the conceptual and methodological tools that sociology provides, we gain; the application of sociology can lead to a better understanding of social problems and issues and suggest how

Seldin, Jonathan P.

344

Toward a Comprehensive Picture of Student Understanding of Force, Velocity, and Acceleration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Studentsâ difficulties with conceptual questions about force, velocity, and acceleration have been well documented. However, there has been no single systematic study of student understanding of all paired relations among the concepts of force, velocity, and acceleration. For example, a student who believes an object with a net force on it must be moving might not believe an accelerating object must be moving. In this paper, we describe the development of a test to build a more comprehensive picture of student understanding. We describe modifications to increase the validity of the test by reducing false positives and unwanted inconsistencies. We also report preliminary data suggesting that there are definite patterns in student understanding of the various relations between force, velocity, and acceleration. For example, there are a higher number of students reporting that force and velocity are directionally related then that acceleration and velocity are directionally related.

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Heckler, Andrew F.

2009-01-24

345

Chinese and Australian children's understandings of the Earth: a cross cultural study of conceptual development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore Chinese and Australian primary children's conceptual understandings of the Earth. The research was conducted in the interpretive paradigm and was designed to be descriptive with comparative and cross sectional elements. Participants were Year 3 and Year 6 children from three schools in Hunan Province, central south China ( n = 38) and Year 3 and Year 6 children from three schools in Western Australia ( n = 36). In-depth interviews including drawings were carried out to explore the participants' conceptual understandings of the Earth's shape, gravity, day/night cycle and seasons. The results showed that, regardless of different cultures, children from the same year group constructed similar concepts about the Earth. The Year 3 children were more likely than the Year 6 children to demonstrate intuitive conceptions of a round and flat Earth. The Year 6 children were more likely to demonstrate consistent understandings of a spherical Earth. The findings supported the universality of entrenched presuppositions hypothesis. Cultural mediation was found to have a subtle impact on children's understanding of the Earth. A model of conceptual development is proposed.

Tao, Ying; Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady

2013-06-01

346

Systematic Study of Student Understanding of the Relationships between the Directions of Force, Velocity, and Acceleration in One Dimension  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed an instrument to systematically investigate student conceptual understanding of the relationships between the directions of net force, velocity, and acceleration in one dimension and report on data collected on the final version of the instrument from over 650 students. Unlike previous work, we simultaneously studied all six possible…

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Heckler, Andrew F.

2011-01-01

347

Using Pictures to Enhance Students' Understanding of Bayes' Theorem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students often have difficulty understanding algebraic proofs of statistics theorems. However, it sometimes is possible to prove statistical theorems with pictures in which case students can gain understanding more easily. I provide examples for two versions of Bayes' theorem.

Trafimow, David

2011-01-01

348

Mining Students' Inquiry Actions for Understanding of Complex Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study lies at an intersection between advancing educational data mining methods for detecting students' knowledge-in-action and the broader question of how conceptual and mathematical forms of knowing interact in exploring complex chemical systems. More specifically, it investigates students' inquiry actions in three computer-based models of…

Levy, Sharona T.; Wilensky, Uri

2011-01-01

349

Science Teachers' Diagnosis and Understanding of Students' Preconceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has established that students enter their science classes with ideas about the natural world that do not align with accepted scientific beliefs. The diagnosis of these student preconceptions may be seen as an initial, crucial step in the process of teacher-facilitated conceptual change. So as to capture what science teachers do in their…

Morrison, Judith A.; Lederman, Norman G.

2003-01-01

350

Assessing Junior High Students' Understanding of Density and Solubility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three density questions were administered to 290 ninth-grade students to assess their understanding of this concept. Found two-thirds of students understand displacement and/or density concepts. Three solubility questions were administered to 385 ninth-graders to assess understandings of solubility. Found students have difficulty with some aspects…

Gennaro, Eugene D.

1981-01-01

351

Understanding childbirth practices as an organizational cultural phenomenon: a conceptual framework  

PubMed Central

Understanding the main values and beliefs that might promote humanized birth practices in the specialized hospitals requires articulating the theoretical knowledge of the social and cultural characteristics of the childbirth field and the relations between these and the institution. This paper aims to provide a conceptual framework allowing examination of childbirth practices through the lens of an organizational culture theory. A literature review performed to extrapolate the social and cultural factors contribute to birth practices and the factors likely overlap and mutually reinforce one another, instead of complying with the organizational culture of the birth place. The proposed conceptual framework in this paper examined childbirth patterns as an organizational cultural phenomenon in a highly specialized hospital, in Montreal, Canada. Allaire and Firsirotu’s organizational culture theory served as a guide in the development of the framework. We discussed the application of our conceptual model in understanding the influences of organizational culture components in the humanization of birth practices in the highly specialized hospitals and explained how these components configure both the birth practice and women’s choice in highly specialized hospitals. The proposed framework can be used as a tool for understanding the barriers and facilitating factors encountered birth practices in specialized hospitals. PMID:24215446

2013-01-01

352

Mapping for Conceptual Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students' understanding of science develops through everyday experiences. As a result, they come to the science classroom with their own notions of how the world works. As teachers, we often must help students overcome their prior na?ve notions and move them toward a more scientific understanding. This process, known as conceptual change, is fundamental to student learning. It can be aided with strategies designed to help students rationalize their perceptions in light of accepted scientific understanding. This article outlines one such strategy: a process of recursive concept mapping the authors call "mapping for conceptual change."

Cindy Kern

2008-09-01

353

Revitalizing Astronomy Teaching Through Research on Student Understanding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the years, considerable rhetoric exists about which instructional strategies induce the largest conceptual and attitude gains in non-science majoring, undergraduate university students. To determine the effectiveness of lecture-based approaches in astronomy and astrobiology, we found that student scores on a 68-item pre-test\\/post-test concept inventory showed a statistically significant increase from 30% to 52% correct. In contrast, students evaluated after

T. Slater

2006-01-01

354

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on students' understanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its…

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-01-01

355

Addressing Students' Difficulties in Understanding Two Different Expressions of Gravitational Potential Energy (I): mgh & -GMm/r  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During our investigation of students' understanding of gravitational potential energy, we found some difficulties that students have with this topic. Many students who took upper-level mechanics courses had difficulties in understanding why there are two different expressions of gravitational potential energy. These students said they had some difficulties in understanding why there should be two different signs (+ & ?) and two different forms (g & 1/r) even though these expressions were considered as representing the same gravitational potential energy. To gain understanding of the sources of student difficulties, we used weekly reports and individual interviews. We analyzed student difficulties in terms of conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and contextual knowledge. The results of these research have guided the development of teaching material that addresses students' difficulties in understanding gravitational potential energy. We will show the development process and contents of the material in the second paper on this topic.

Lee, Gyoungho; Yi, Jinseog

2007-11-25

356

Seeking to Understand Faculty-Student Interaction at Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One fundamental aspect of engagement in higher education is faculty-student interaction (FSI). FSI has been associated with student success and persistence in both four- and two-year institutions. Due to limited research concerning diverse students, understanding student engagement in higher education is based on White, traditional-age students

Wirt, Lesley G.; Jaeger, Audrey J.

2014-01-01

357

The Effect of Information Mapping Strategy on Mathematics Conceptual Knowledge of Junior High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of information mapping strategy on mathematics conceptual knowledge of junior high school students in Rokan Hulu Riau, Indonesia. The study also examined the relationship between mathematics conceptual knowledge and mathematics achievement. Using a quasi-experimental method, the study was…

Zulnaidi, Hutkemri; Zakaria, Effandi

2010-01-01

358

Connecting Practice, Theory and Method: Supporting Professional Doctoral Students in Developing Conceptual Frameworks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From an instrumental view, conceptual frameworks that are carefully assembled from existing literature in Educational Technology and related disciplines can help students structure all aspects of inquiry. In this article we detail how the development of a conceptual framework that connects theory, practice and method is scaffolded and facilitated…

Kumar, Swapna; Antonenko, Pavlo

2014-01-01

359

A Repeat Performance? Challenges In Developing Robust Conceptual Understanding in Quantum Mechanics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ongoing physics education research (PER) at Grand Valley State University (GVSU) is guiding the development of instructional materials for teaching modern physics. Results from this project can help address the question: To what extent should we expect upper-level physics students to be able to apply concepts previously covered in classâeven those addressed through PER-based instruction at the advanced levelâto different situations? Extensive research at the introductory level has already revealed that such transfer is extremely difficult for beginning students to do on their own. Preliminary results from this project suggest that, even among upper level students, specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties must be addressed explicitly and at multiple instances during instruction.

Ambrose, Bradley S.

2009-10-12

360

Addressing secondary school students' everyday ideas about freshwater springs in order to develop an instructional tool to promote conceptual reconstruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Water knowledge" has now become a socio-political and future-orientated necessity. Everyday ideas or preconceptions of hydrology can have a deleterious effect one people's understanding of the scientific facts and their interrelations that are of relevance to sustainable water management. This explorative pilot study shows that preconceived notions about the origin of freshwater springs are common at the lower secondary school level. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to investigate the nature of everyday ideas about freshwater springs among 81 13-yr-old Swiss students, and (2) to develop an efficient instructional tool that promotes conceptual reconstruction in the learners' minds. To assess students' everyday ideas we conducted interviews, examined student work, and asked students to fill in a questionnaire. The results indicate that half of the students have some basic hydrological knowledge. However, several preconceived notions that can significantly impede the understanding of hydrological concepts have been found. A common preconception concerns the idea that solid rocks cannot be permeable and that large underground cavities constitute a necessary precondition for the formation of springs. While these ideas may well be true for karst springs they inhibit the understanding of the concept of other spring types due to their plausibility and intelligibility. We therefore chose the concept of the hillslope spring to construct an instructional tool that takes into account the findings of the psychology of learning aimed at promoting deep learning, thus facilitating a lasting conceptual reconstruction of the concept of springs.

Reinfried, S.; Tempelmann, S.; Aeschbacher, U.

2012-05-01

361

A Conceptual Model of Medical Student Well-Being: Promoting Resilience and Preventing Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This article proposes and illustrates a conceptual model of medical student well-being. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical student stress, coping, and well-being and developed a model of medical student coping termed the "coping reservoir." Results: The reservoir can be replenished or drained by various aspects of…

Dunn, Laura B.; Iglewicz, Alana; Moutier, Christine

2008-01-01

362

Students' mental models of sound propagation: Implications for a theory of conceptual change  

E-print Network

1 Students' mental models of sound propagation: Implications for a theory of conceptual change-2601 srebello@phys.ksu.edu Tel: 785-532-1539 Fax: 785-532-6806 #12;2 Students' mental models of sound students' mental models of sound propagation. The study was phenomenographic. In addition

Zollman, Dean

363

Assessing Students' Misclassifications of Physics Concepts: An Ontological Basis for Conceptual Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A comparison of the physics concepts explanations of ninth graders and of physics graduates and graduate students found that physics novices were strongly inclined to conceptualize physics concepts as material substances, whereas experts' protocols revealed distinctly nonmaterialistic representations.

Slotta, James D.; Chi, Michelene T.; Joram, Elena

2006-12-07

364

Student Solutions Manual to accompany Understanding Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Work more effectively and check solutions as you go along with the text! This Student Solutions Manual is designed for use with Cummings' Understanding Physics. Its primary purpose is to show readers by example how to solve various types of problems given at the end of each chapter in the text. Most of the solutions start from definitions or fundamental relationships and the final equation is derived. This technique highlights the fundamentals and at the same time gives readers the opportunity to review the mathematical steps required to obtain a solution. The mere plugging of numbers into equations derived in the text is avoided for the most part. Readers will learn to examine any assumptions that are made in setting up and solving each problem. Using an interactive strategy, Understanding Physics provides a hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of physics. Built on the foundations of Halliday, Resnick, and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics, 6th Edition, this text represents the latest methods in physics instruction. Incorporating new approaches based on Physics Education Research (PER), this text is designed for courses that use computer-based laboratory tools, and promote Activity Based Physics in lectures, labs, and recitations.

Cummings, Karen; Laws, Priscilla W.; Redish, Edward F.; Cooney, Patrick J.; Christman, J. Richard

2004-05-01

365

Studying conceptual change in learning physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Discusses (1) the need for teachers to understand student conceptions; (2) alternative conceptions that students formulate; (3) changing conceptions; (4) representing conceptual knowledge for studying conceptual change; (5) strategies for inducing change; and (6) a taxonomy of conceptual change. (Contains 61 references.)

Dykstra, Dewey; Boyle, Franklin; Monarch, Ira A.

2006-05-22

366

Toward the conceptual and quantitative understanding of biosolids conditioning: the gel approach.  

PubMed

Proper chemical conditioning of wastewater solids is crucial for both operational and economic reasons, but the process has defied satisfactory description to date, in either conceptual or quantitative terms. In this research, a new conceptual model of biosolids structure--likening it to a colloidal gel--was assessed as a means of interpreting conditioning mechanisms. The basis of the gel approach lies in the colligative properties that are altered by lowering of the solvent chemical potential by introducing a solute. Results indicate that inorganic conditioners form precipitates and complexes thus collapsing the gel network and forming particulates, whereas organic polymers lead to heterogeneous collapse with limited diffusion inside the gel. A gel model, based on the osmotic pressure, was found reasonably successful in defining the conditioning efficacy of biosolids. Beyond the model's fundamental value, these results validate a new way of understanding how conditioning and dewatering operate, which should help to improve the selection and optimization of these processes. PMID:19448301

Dursun, Derya; Dentel, Steven K

2009-01-01

367

Student Understanding of Ionizing Radiation and Radioactivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes how researchers identified specific difficulties students had with ionizing radiation and radioactivity using interviews. They also explore students' pre-instruction thoughts on these topics.

Prather, Edward E.; Harrington, Randal R.

2006-06-19

368

The Department of Sociology Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary goal is  

E-print Network

The Department of Sociology Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary goal is to stimulate sociological thinking, applying imagination and critical analysis to the many facets of social life. Using the conceptual and methodological tools that sociology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

369

The Department of Sociology Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary goal is  

E-print Network

The Department of Sociology Sociology provides the conceptual and methodological framework to understand society. Its primary goal is to stimulate sociological thinking, applying imagination and critical analysis to the many facets of social life. Using the conceptual and methodological tools which sociology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

370

Middle School Students' Understandings About Anthropogenic Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the complexity of the science involving climate change (IPCC, 2007), its lack of curricular focus within US K-12 schooling (Golden, 2009; Golden & Francis, 2013), and the difficulty in effecting conceptual change in science (Vosniadou, 2007), we sought to research middle school students' conceptions about climate change, in addition to how those conceptions changed during and as a result of a deliberately designed global climate change (GCC) unit. In a sixth grade classroom, a unit was designed which incorporated Argumentation-Driven Inquiry (Sampson & Grooms, 2010). That is, students were assigned to groups and asked to make sense of standard GCC data such as paleoclimate data from ice cores, direct temperature measurement, and Keeling curves, in addition to learning about the greenhouse effect in a modeling lesson (Hocking, et al, 1993). The students were then challenged, in groups, to create, on whiteboards, explanations and defend these explanations to and with their peers. They did two iterations of this argumentation. The first iteration focused on the simple identification of climate change patterns. The second focused on developing causal explanations for those patterns. After two rounds of such argumentation, the students were then asked to write (individually) a "final" argument which accounted for the given data. Interview and written data were analyzed prior to the given unit, during it, and after it, in order to capture complicated nuance that might escape detection by simpler research means such as surveys. Several findings emerged which promised to be of interest to climate change educators. The first is that many students tended to "know" many "facts" about climate change, but were unable to connect these disparate facts in any meaningful ways. A second finding is that while no students changed their entire belief systems, even after a robust unit which would seemingly challenge such, each student engaged did indeed modify the manner in which they discussed the validation of their beliefs. That is, we argue that the unit, and the emphases contained within the unit, resulted in the "epistemic scaffolding" of their ideas, to the extent that they shifted from arguing from anecdotes to arguing based on other types of data, especially from line graphs. Additionally, we found that students' understandings of climate change were tied to their ontological constructions of the subject matter, i.e., many perceived climate change as just another environmentally sensitive issue such as littering and pollution, and were therefore limited in their ability to understand anthropogenic climate change in the vast and robust sense meant by current scientific consensus. Given these known difficulties, it is critical to explore further research of this sort in order to better understand what students are actually thinking, and how that thinking is prone to change, modification, or not. Subsequently, K-12 strategies might be better designed, if that is indeed a priority of US/Western society.

Golden, B. W.

2013-12-01

371

Exploring Grade 11 Students' Conceptual Pathways of the Particulate Nature of Matter in the Context of Multirepresentational Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the conceptual pathways of 19 Grade 11 introductory chemistry students (age 16-17) as they participated in a multirepresentational instruction on the particulate nature of matter (PNM). This study was grounded in contemporary conceptual change theory, in particular, research on students' conceptual pathways that focuses on…

Adadan, Emine; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Irving, Karen E.

2010-01-01

372

Ninth Grade Students' Understanding of The Nature of Scientific Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the 9th-grade students' understandings of the nature of scientific knowledge. The study also aimed to investigate the differences in students' understanding of the nature of scientific knowledge by gender, and school types. A total of 575 ninth grade students from four different school types (General…

Kilic, Kerem; Sungur, Semra; Cakiroglu, Jale; Tekkaya, Ceren

2005-01-01

373

Australian Secondary School Students' Understanding of Climate Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated 438 Year 10 students (15 and 16 years old) from Western Australian schools, on their understanding of the greenhouse effect and climate change, and the sources of their information. Results showed that most students have an understanding of how the greenhouse effect works, however, many students merge the processes of the…

Dawson, Vaille; Carson, Katherine

2013-01-01

374

Students' Understanding of Advanced Properties of Java Exceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how Information Systems Engineering School students on the verge of their graduation understand the mechanism of exception handling. The main contributions of this paper are as follows: we construct a questionnaire aimed at examining students' level of understanding concerning exceptions; we classify and analyse the students'…

Rashkovits, Rami; Lavy, Ilana

2012-01-01

375

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on studentsunderstanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its curriculum. For the first three years of school, Brunei children are taught in Malay and then for the remainder of their education, instruction is in English. This research is concerned with the influence that this bilingual education system has on children’s learning of science. The purpose was to document the patterns of Brunei students’ developing understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things and examine the impact in the change in language as the medium of instruction. A cross-sectional case study design was used in one primary school. Data collection included an interview ( n = 75), which consisted of forced-response and semi-structured interview questions, a categorisation task and classroom observation. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that the transition from Malay to English as the language of instruction from Primary 4 onwards restricted the students’ ability to express their understandings about living things, to discuss related scientific concepts and to interpret and analyse scientific questions. From a social constructivist perspective these language factors will potentially impact on the students’ cognitive development by limiting the expected growth of the studentsunderstandings of the concepts of living and non-living things.

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-07-01

376

Initial understanding of vector concepts among students in introductory physics courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We report the results of an investigation into physics students' understanding of vector addition, magnitude, and direction for problems presented in graphical form. A seven-item quiz, including free-response problems, was administered in all introductory general physics courses during the 2000/2001 academic year at Iowa State. Responses were obtained from 2031 students during the first week of class. We found that more than one quarter of students beginning their second semester of study in the calculus-based physics course, and more than half of those beginning the second semester of the algebra-based sequence, were unable to carry out two-dimensional vector addition. Although the total scores on the seven-item quiz were somewhat better for students in their second semester of physics in comparison to students in their first semester, many students retained significant conceptual difficulties regarding vector methods that are heavily employed throughout the physics curriculum.

Nguyen, Ngoc-Loan; Meltzer, David E.

2005-10-27

377

Physics Students' Understanding of Relative Speed: A Phenomenographic Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students' understanding of the concept of relative speed is described. A variety of ways of understanding relative speed and of viewing a problem that dealt with this concept were uncovered. The results are used to suggest ways for teachers to proceed in assisting students to enhance their understanding of relative speed.

Walsh, E.; Dall'Alba, G.; Bowden, J.; Martin, E.; Marton, F.; Masters, G.

2006-10-11

378

Physics students' understanding of relative speed: A phenomenographic study  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important that students of physics develop both quantitative and qualitative understanding of physical concepts and principles. Although accuracy and reliability in solving quantitative problems is necessary, a qualitative understanding is required in applying concepts and principles to new problems and in real-life situations. If students are not able to understand what underlies quantitative problem-solving procedures nor interpret the

E. Walsh; G. Dall'Alba; J. Bowden; E. Martin; F. Marton; G. Masters; P. Ramsden; A. Stephanou

1993-01-01

379

Peeling the Onion: Student Teacher's Conceptions of Literary Understanding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied the theories student teachers held about literary understanding through interviews with 25 Hungarian and 8 Swedish student teachers. Categories of theories captured a substantial portion of the variation in how literary understanding can be seen. Three central aspects of human understanding, variation, discernment, and simultaneity, could…

Carlsson, Maj Asplund; Fulop, Marta; Marton, Ference

2001-01-01

380

Helping Students Understand Challenging Topics in Science through Ontology Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chi (2005) proposed that students experience difficulty in learning about physics concepts such as light, heat, or electric current because they attribute to these concepts an inappropriate ontological status of material substances rather than the more veridical status of emergent processes. Conceptual change could thus be facilitated by training…

Slotta, James D.; Chi, Michelene T. H.

2006-01-01

381

Results from a Pilot Study of a Curriculum Unit Designed to Help Middle School Students Understand Chemical Reactions in Living Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students often have trouble understanding key biology ideas because they lack an understanding of foundational chemistry ideas. AAAS Project 2061 is collaborating with BSCS in the development a curriculum unit that connects core chemistry and biochemistry ideas in order to help eighth grade students build the conceptual foundation needed for high…

Herrmann-Abell, Cari F.; Flanagan, Jean C.; Roseman, Jo Ellen

2012-01-01

382

Student Understanding of Chromatography: A Hands-On Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a series of exercises intended to help students develop a better understanding of chromatography that employ plant pigments. A collaborative approach leads students to a level of competence that permits them to complete an open-ended exercise. (WRM)

Curtright, Robert; Markwell, John; Emry, Randy

1999-01-01

383

Understanding Nursing Students' Stress: A Proposed Framework.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Adaptation Nursing Model suggests that nursing students' level of adaptation to stress is influenced by their hardiness and use of social resources. Faculty can use the information to facilitate students' coping. (SK)

Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V.

1998-01-01

384

Investigation of student understanding of the concept of acceleration in one dimension  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper describes a systematic investigation of the understanding of the concept of acceleration among students enrolled in a variety of introductory physics courses at the University of Washington. The criterion for assessing understanding of a kinematical concept is the ability to apply it successfully in interpreting simple motions of real objects. The main thrust of this study has been on the qualitative understanding of acceleration as the ratio Deltav/Deltat. The primary data source has been the individual demonstration interview in which students are asked specific questions about simple motions they observe. Results are reported for the success of different student populations in comparing accelerations for two simultaneous motions. Failure to make a proper comparison was due to various conceptual difficulties which are identified and described. Some implications for instruction are briefly discussed.

Trowbridge, David E.; Mcdermott, Lillian C.

2005-11-28

385

Conceptual Change regarding middle school students' experience with Global Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the complexity of the science involving climate change (IPCC, 2007), its lack of curricular focus within US K-12 schooling (Golden, 2009), and the difficulty in effecting conceptual change in science (Vosniadou, 2007), we sought to research middle school students' conceptions about climate change, in addition to how those conceptions changed during and as a result of a deliberately designed global climate change (GCC) unit. In a sixth grade classroom, a unit was designed which incorporated Argumentation-Driven Inquiry (Sampson & Grooms, 2010). That is, students were assigned to groups and asked to make sense of standard GCC data such as paleoclimate data from ice cores, direct temperature measurement, and Keeling curves, in addition to learning about the greenhouse effect in a modeling lesson (Hocking, et al, 1993). The students were then challenged, in groups, to create, on whiteboards, explanations and defend these explanations to and with their peers. They did two iterations of this argumentation. The first iteration focused on the simple identification of climate change patterns. The second focused on developing causal explanations for those patterns. After two rounds of such argumentation, the students were then asked to write (individually) a "final" argument which accounted for the given data. Interview and written data were analyzed prior to the given unit, during it, and after it, in order to capture complicated nuance that might escape detection by simpler research means such as surveys. Several findings emerged which promised to be of interest to climate change educators. The first is that many students tended to "know" many "facts" about climate change, but were unable to connect these disparate facts in any meaningful ways. A second finding is that while no students changed their entire belief systems, even after a robust unit which would seemingly challenge such, each student engaged did indeed modify the manner in which they discussed the validation of their beliefs. That is, we argue that the unit, and the emphases contained within the unit, resulted in the "epistemic scaffolding" of their ideas, to the extent that they shifted from arguing from anecdote to arguing based on other types of data, especially from line graphs. A third finding underscores prior research in conceptual change, indicating that learning, especially conceptual change, is not a strictly rational process. Students, and others, are highly influenced by extra rational factors, such as the given political, scientific, and/or religious leanings of their families, their own willingness to explore anomalies, and other factors. Given these known difficulties, it is critical to explore further research of this sort in order to better understand what students are actually thinking, and how that thinking is prone to change, modification, or not. Subsequently, K-12 strategies might be better designed, if that is indeed a priority of US/Western society.

Golden, B. W.; Lutz, B.

2011-12-01

386

On the Impact of Formative Assessment on Student Motivation, Achievement, and Conceptual Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Formative assessment was hypothesized to have a beneficial impact on students' science achievement and conceptual change, either directly or indirectly by enhancing motivation. We designed and embedded formatives assessments within an inquiry science unit. Twelve middle-school science teachers with their students were randomly assigned either to…

Yin, Yue; Shavelson, Richard J.; Ayala, Carlos C.; Ruiz-Primo, Maria Araceli; Brandon, Paul R.; Furtak, Erin Marie; Tomita, Miki K.; Young, Donald B.

2008-01-01

387

The Effects of Peer Instruction on Students' Conceptual Learning and Motivation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of peer instruction on college students' conceptual learning, motivation, and self-efficacy in an algebra-based introductory physics course for nonmajors. Variables were studied via a quasi-experiment, Solomon four-group design on 123 students. Treatment groups were taught by peer instruction.…

Gok, Tolga

2012-01-01

388

The Effect of Conceptual Change Pedagogy on Students' Conceptions of Rate of Reaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of conceptual change pedagogy on students' conceptions of "rate of reaction" concepts. The study used a pre-test/post-test non-equivalent comparison group design approach and the sample consisted of 72 Turkish grade-11 students (aged 16-18 years) selected from two intact classrooms. The "Rate of…

Calik, Muammer; Kolomuc, Ali; Karagolge, Zafer

2010-01-01

389

The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in Remediating High School Students' Alternative Conceptions Concerning Chemical Equilibrium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effectiveness of conceptual change texts in remediating high school students' alternative conceptions concerning chemical equilibrium. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. The subjects for this study consisted of a total 78 tenth-grade students, 38 of them in the experimental group and 40 of them in the…

Ozmen, Haluk

2007-01-01

390

Application of a Conceptual Model of College Withdrawal to Disadvantaged Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Retention and attrition after the freshman year among disadvantaged students at a senior college of the City University of New York were studied. A conceptual model of Tinto (1975) was applied to a group of students participating in the Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge (SEEK) program, which provided remedial and/or developmental…

Fox, Richard N.

391

Middle School Students' Conceptual Change in Global Climate Change: Using Argumentation to Foster Knowledge Construction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined middle school student conceptions about global climate change (GCC) and the change these conceptions undergo during an argument driven instructional unit. The theoretical framework invoked for this study is the "framework theory" of conceptual change (Vosniadou, 2007a). This theory posits that students do not simply correct…

Golden, Barry W.

2011-01-01

392

Student understanding of the ideal gas law, Part I: A macroscopic perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Our findings from a long-term investigation indicate that many students cannot properly interpret or apply the ideal gas law after instruction in introductory physics and chemistry as well as more advanced courses. The emphasis in this paper is on the concepts of pressure, volume, and temperature at the macroscopic level. We describe some serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties that we have identified. Results from our research were applied in the design of a curriculum that has helped improve student understanding of the ideal gas law.

Kautz, Christian H.; Heron, Paula R.; Loverude, Michael E.; Mcdermott, Lillian C.

2012-07-12

393

Analyzing the Effect of Metaconceptual Teaching Practices on Students' Understanding of Force and Motion Concepts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the effect of metaconceptual teaching interventions on studentsunderstanding of force and motion concepts. A multimethod research design including quasi-experimental design and case study designs was employed to compare the effect of the metaconceptual activities and traditional instruction and investigate students’ reactions to metaconceptual teaching interventions. The participants (45 high school students in the USA) were enrolled in one of the two physics classes instructed by the same science teacher. In the experimental group, students’ engagement in metaconceptual knowledge and processes was facilitated through various instructional activities, including poster drawing, journal writing, group debate, concept mapping, and class and group discussions. These activities were intended to facilitate students’ engagement in (a) becoming aware of their existing and past conceptions, associated beliefs, everyday experiences, and contextual differences, (b) monitoring their understanding of the new conception, the changes in ideas, and the consistency between existing and new conceptions, and (c) evaluating the relative ability of competing conceptions to explain a physical phenomenon. In the comparison group, the same content knowledge was explained by the teacher along with the use of laboratory experiments, demonstrations, and quantitative problem solving. Students’ reactions to the designed instructional activities indicated that metaconceptual teaching interventions were successful in facilitating students’ engagement in several types of metaconceptual functioning. The results showed that students in the experimental group had significantly better conceptual understanding than their counterparts in the comparison group and this positive impact remained after a period of 9 weeks.

Yuruk, Nejla; Beeth, Michael E.; Andersen, Christopher

2009-08-01

394

Helping students develop an understanding of Archimedes' principle. I. Research on student understanding  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper is the first of two that describe how research on student understanding of Archimedes' principle is being used to guide the development of instructional materials on this topic. Our results indicate that standard instruction on hydrostatics leaves many science and engineering majors unable to predict and explain the sinking and floating behavior of simple objects. A number of serious and persistent difficulties with the concepts and principles used to analyze such behavior are identified. Although some of these difficulties are specific to the concept of the buoyant force, many others seem to reflect lingering confusion about concepts that are widely assumed to be understood by students before the study of hydrostatics begins.

Loverude, Michael E.; Kautz, Christian H.; Heron, Paula R.

2005-10-27

395

Effects of Argumentation Scaffolds on Student Performance on Conceptual Physics Problems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Studies have shown that embedding scientific argumentation in problem solving can enhance problem solving skills. However, research has also indicated that students have difficulties constructing arguments without appropriate scaffolds. We investigated the use of argumentation scaffolds on studentsâ argumentation quality, conceptual quality, and solution strategies on conceptual problems in an introductory physics class. In this mixed method study we compared studentsâ performance in two guided conditions â constructing an argument and evaluating two arguments â as well as one control condition. Our results indicate that the use of guiding prompts improves the argumentation and conceptual quality of studentsâ solutions. Further, students in the guided conditions tended to use a wider variety of problem solving strategies than in the control condition. We discuss the implications of these results on the use of argumentation prompts on conceptual problems in introductory physics.

Rebello, Carina M.; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Rebello, N. S.

2014-02-01

396

Students' conceptual practices in science education. Productive disciplinary interactions in a participation trajectory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research has to a limited extent explored the characteristics of students' conceptual practices as sociocultural phenomena in general and in science education in particular. I approach this issue by studying a group of students while solving a particular scientific problem from A to Z, and as part of this analyse how different cultural means (the knowledge domain and the tools in use) structure the students' interactions and how their interpersonal relations change over this period of time. The aim is to illustrate how these cultural means intersect in productive and less productive ways during the students' conceptual practices. The study has its point of departure in a design experiment where a group of four students, together with their teacher, solve different problems related to the biological phenomenon of sequencing a DNA molecule (the insulin gene). Video-recordings of the students' interactions constitute the basis for this analysis. The cultural means strongly structure the students' conceptual practices during their problem solving processes. Whereas the knowledge domain structured the whole process, the significant roles of the website and the computer-based 3D model of the insulin gene were especially apparent during the second part of the trajectory. The intersection of these cultural means appear productive in terms of disciplinary knowledge when the students' became aware of how to handle this relationship. The interpersonal relations between the students and their teacher altered slightly in the beginning and became increasingly more fixed during the students' progression.

Krange, Ingeborg

2007-01-01

397

Building bridges: understanding student transition to university  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores challenges in ensuring effective student transition from school or college to university. It examines the complex liaison needed for students to progress to appropriate courses, settle into university life and succeed as higher education learners. Secondary data (international literature on transition and the formation of learner identity) are analysed to identify underpinning concepts. Primary data are taken

A. R. J. Briggs; J. Clark; I. Hall

2012-01-01

398

Developing Student Understanding: Contextualizing Calculus Concepts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the practice of one high school teacher who provided students with concrete examples from their physics class to give them a contextually rich environment in which to explore the abstractions of calculus. Indicates that students discovered connections between the physics concepts of position, velocity, and acceleration and the calculus…

Schwalbach, Eileen M.; Dosemagen, Debra M.

2000-01-01

399

Exploring Students' Conceptions of Density: Assessing Nonmajors' Understanding of Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Employing action research in a large-enrollment university-level physical science class, the author assessed students' understanding of density with short answer pop quizzes. The result was that the more opportunities the students had to test, explore, and discuss the concept of density, the greater understanding they demonstrated of the subject.

Roach, Linda E.

2006-10-09

400

PROBING 6TH GRADE STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF GEOSCIENCE  

E-print Network

1 PROBING 6TH GRADE STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF GEOSCIENCE: AN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT understanding of geoscience. On three separate assessments, students provided written responses to two open-ended geoscience questions. These responses were scored using rubrics to systematically analyze our assessment data

401

Improving Students' Understanding of Electricity and Magnetism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electricity and magnetism are important topics in physics. Research shows that students have many common difficulties in understanding concepts related to electricity and magnetism. However, research to improve students' understanding of electricity and magnetism is limited compared to introductory mechanics. This thesis explores issues…

Li, Jing

2012-01-01

402

Understanding and affecting student reasoning about sound waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student learning of sound waves can be helped through the creation of group-learning classroom materials whose development and design rely on explicit investigations into student understanding. We describe reasoning in terms of sets of resources, i.e. grouped building blocks of thinking that are commonly used in many different settings. Students in our university physics classes often used sets of resources

Michael C. Wittmann; Richard N. Steinberg; Edward F. Redish

2003-01-01

403

Characterizing Student Mathematics Teachers' Levels of Understanding in Spherical Geometry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an exploratory study aimed at the identification of students' levels of understanding in spherical geometry as van Hiele did for Euclidean geometry. To do this, we developed and implemented a spherical geometry course for student mathematics teachers. Six structured, "task-based interviews" were held with eight student

Guven, Bulent; Baki, Adnan

2010-01-01

404

Mechanisms Influencing Student Understanding on an Outdoor Guided Field Trip  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field trips are a basic and important, yet often overlooked part of the student experience. They provide the opportunity to integrate real world knowledge with classroom learning and student previous personal experiences. Outdoor guided field trips leave students with an increased understanding, awareness and interest and in science. However, the…

Caskey, Nourah Al-Rashid

2009-01-01

405

Playing "Sherlock Holmes": Enhancing Students' Understanding of Prejudice and Stereotyping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiential classroom exercise that was designed to help students understand stereotyping and prejudice. The instructor read behavioral and psychological descriptions, asked students to imagine they were Sherlock Holmes, and identify classmates to whom the descriptions might apply. States that students of color reported more benefits…

Junn, Ellen N.; Grier, Leslie K.; Behrens, Debra P.

2001-01-01

406

Science Sampler: Enhancing Student Understanding of Physical and Chemical Changes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students within the Findlay, Ohio, City School District, as well as students across the country, struggle with understanding physical and chemical changes. Therefore, in this article, the authors suggest some standards-based activities to clarify misconceptions and provide formative assessments to measure your students' progress as they determine…

McIntosh, Julie; White, Sandra; Suter, Robert

2009-01-01

407

University Students' Understanding of Electromagnetic Induction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined engineering and physical science students' understanding of the electromagnetic induction (EMI) phenomena. It is assumed that significant knowledge of the EMI theory is a basic prerequisite when students have to think about electromagnetic phenomena. To analyse students' conceptions, we have taken into account the…

Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose M.; Zuza, Kristina

2013-01-01

408

Students' understanding of superposition of electric fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this article an analysis of the difficulties experienced by students when applying the principle of superposition to electric fields is presented. A study of university level students in France and Sweden revealed the existence of difficulties arising out of two issues: (1) a causal interpretation of some relationships, (2) the student's need for an effect, motion of some kind, to accept the existence of a field. The links between these obstacles and a lack of a unified view on electric phenomena are discussed from a pedagogical point of view.

Rainson, Sylvie; Transtră¶mer, G.; Viennot, Laurence

2005-10-24

409

Understanding vision: students’ use of light and optics resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a qualitative study designed to examine how students construct an understanding of the human eye and vision from their knowledge of light and optics. As would be expected, vast differences are shown to exist between pre- and post-instruction students in terms of not only resource use, but also willingness to transfer their existing knowledge. However, we have found that appropriate scaffolding can facilitate resource activation and guide students to construct an understanding of vision and vision defects.

Jones, Dyan L.; Zollman, Dean

2014-09-01

410

The role of genetics in students' understandings of biological evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important element of an education is an understanding of biology. Science education researchers have shown that both high school and college biology students finish their biology instruction with a poor understanding of evolution, an important unifying concept of the discipline. The goal of this study is to examine the role of genetics in students understanding of evolution. Eight introductory college biology students' understandings of evolutionary biology and their use of genetics concepts as they addressed problems in evolution were examined. Data collected included students' classwork and individual student interviews. Data analysis began with an examination of each students understanding of evolution concepts. The framework for this analysis was based on Mayr's (1982) description of Darwin's five theories: evolution as such, common descent, natural selection, gradualism, and multiplication of species. The descriptions of students' understandings of evolution are followed by an account of how students used genetics concepts to support their explanations of evolutionary processes. The data from this study illustrate how students used transmission genetics, molecular biology and population genetics to support their understandings of evolution. The students in this study constructed syntheses of genetics and evolution concepts that they employed to solve problems. These syntheses fell into three categories: productive, semi-productive and obstructive. Students who achieved a productive synthesis of genetics and evolution concepts also held appropriate understandings of common descent, natural selection, gradualism, and speciation. Students who constructed either a semi-productive or obstructive synthesis of genetics and evolution did not benefit in the same way. Productive synthesis students benefited from their syntheses of genetics and evolution concepts in three ways. They were able to construct complete problem solutions for evolutionary problems, to dismiss common misconceptions associated with natural selection, and to construct an appropriate understanding of evolutionary processes, particularly natural selection and speciation. The findings of this study suggest one way teachers can help their students to develop an understanding of evolution is to teach genetics first. Knowledge of genetics provided students in this study a tool to explain the origin of variations in populations, evidence for common descent, and strengthened their understandings of the mechanisms of evolution.

Rowe, Mary Frances

2001-10-01

411

Understanding adolescent student perceptions of science education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study used the Relevance of Science Education (ROSE) survey (Sjoberg & Schreiner, 2004) to examine topics of interest and perspectives of secondary science students in a large school district in the southwestern U.S. A situated learning perspective was used to frame the project. The research questions of this study focused on (a) perceptions students have about themselves and their science classroom and how these beliefs may influence their participation in the community of practice of science; (b) consideration of how a future science classroom where the curriculum is framed by the Next Generation Science Standards might foster students' beliefs and perceptions about science education and their legitimate peripheral participation in the community of practice of science; and (c) reflecting on their school science interests and perspectives, what can be inferred about students' identities as future scientists or STEM field professionals? Data were collected from 515 second year science students during a 4-week period in May of 2012 using a Web-based survey. Data were disaggregated by gender and ethnicity and analyzed descriptively and by statistical comparison between groups. Findings for Research Question 1 indicated that boys and girls showed statistically significant differences in scientific topics of interest. There were no statistical differences between ethnic groups although. For Research Question 2, it was determined that participants reported an increase in their interest when they deemed the context of the content to be personally relevant. Results for Research Question 3 showed that participants do not see themselves as youthful scientists or as becoming scientists. While participants value the importance of science in their lives and think all students should take science, they do not aspire to careers in science. Based on this study, a need for potential future work has been identified in three areas: (a) exploration of the perspectives and interests of non-mainstream students and urban students whose representation in this study was limited; (b) investigation of topics where students expressed low interests topics; and (c) development and design of authentic communities of practice in the science classroom.

Ebert, Ellen Kress

412

Student understanding of Symmetry and Gauss's law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Helping students learn why Gauss's law can or cannot be easily applied to determine the strength of the electric field at various points for a particular charge distribution, and then helping them learn to determine the shape of the Gaussian surfaces if sufficient symmetry exists can develop their reasoning and problem solving skills. We investigate the difficulties that students in calculus-based introductory physics courses have with the concepts of symmetry, electric field and electric flux that are pivotal to Gauss's law of electricity. Determination of the electric field using Gauss's law requires discerning the symmetry of a particular charge distribution and being able to predict the direction of the electric field everywhere if a high symmetry exists. It requires a good grasp of how to add the electric field vectors using the principle of superposition, and the concepts of area vector and electric flux. We administered free response and multiple-choice questions and conducted interviews with individual students using a think-aloud protocol to elucidate the difficulties students have with the concepts of symmetry, electric field and electric flux. Here we discuss student responses to some questions on a multiple-choice test administered to them. The test can be used both as a teaching and assessment tool.

Singh, Chandralekha

2010-01-18

413

Understanding Cryptography A Textbook for Students and Practitioners  

E-print Network

Understanding Cryptography ­ A Textbook for Students and Practitioners by Christof Paar and Jan prepared by Stefan Heyse and Christof Paar and Jan Pelzl #12;2/22 Chapter 11 of Understanding Cryptography book "Understanding Cryptography" by Springer and the author's names must remain on each slide

Shamos, Michael I.

414

Understanding Cryptography A Textbook for Students and Practitioners  

E-print Network

Understanding Cryptography ­ A Textbook for Students and Practitioners by Christof Paar and Jan prepared by Georg Becker, Christof Paar and Jan Pelzl #12;2/26 Chapter 10 of Understanding Cryptography book "Understanding Cryptography" by Springer and the author's names must remain on each slide

Shamos, Michael I.

415

On Understanding Compatibility of Student Pair Programmers  

E-print Network

. Freshmen seem to work better with partners with different Myers Briggs personality type. Students' self-esteem does not appear to be a major contributor to pair compatibility. Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2 programming, compatibility, computer science classroom, collaboration, Myers Briggs 1 INTRODUCTION The authors

Gehringer, Ed

416

On Understanding Compatibility of Student Pair Programmers  

E-print Network

. Freshmen seem to work better with partners with similar Myers Briggs personality type. Students' self-esteem does not appear to be a major contributor to pair compatibility. Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2 programming, compatibility, computer science classroom, collaboration, Myers Briggs 1 INTRODUCTION The authors

417

Enhancing Student Understanding of Environmental Sciences Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an authentic semi-guided student research project. Studies the impact of a regional invasion of non-indigenous worm species on decomposition in forest soils. Describes the experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation of the data. (Contains 16 references.) (YDS)

Gurwick, Noel P.; Krasny, Marianne E.

2001-01-01

418

Middle School Students' Conceptual Learning from the Implementation of a New NSF Supported Curriculum: Interactions in Physical Science[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new National Science Foundation supported curriculum, Interactions in Physical Science[TM], was evaluated on students' conceptual change in the twelve concept areas of the national physical science content standard (B) for grades 5-8. Eighth grade students (N = 66) were evaluated pre and post on a 31-item multiple-choice test of conceptual

Eick, Charles J.; Dias, Michael; Smith, Nancy R. Cook

2009-01-01

419

Addressing Student Misconceptions Concerning Electron Flow in Aqueous Solutions with Instruction Including Computer Animations and Conceptual Change Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the effects of both computer animations of microscopic chemical processes occurring in a galvanic cell and conceptual-change instruction based on chemical demonstrations on students' conceptions of current flow in electrolyte solutions. Finds that conceptual change instruction was effective at dispelling student misconceptions but…

Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

2000-01-01

420

Understanding Malaysian students as gamers: experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer games are very popular among children, teenager as well as adults. For that matter, computer games should be exploited as medium of teaching and learning. We intended to investigate the possibilities of exploring the idea of adapting computer games for Science learning in class. However, we first need to understand the background and experiences among the users in order

Rubijesmin Abdul Latif

2007-01-01

421

The Impact of Recurrent On-Line Synchronous Scientific Argumentation on Students' Argumentation and Conceptual Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports the impact of Recurrent On-Line Synchronous Scientific Argumentation learning on 8th grade students' scientific argumentation ability and conceptual change involving physical science. The control group (N = 76) were recruited to receive conventional instruction whereas the experimental group (N = 74) received the Recurrent…

Chen, Chien-Hsien; She, Hsiao-Ching

2012-01-01

422

Conceptual Ecology of the Evolution Acceptance among Greek Education Students: Knowledge, Religious Practices and Social Influences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we explored some of the factors related to the acceptance of evolution theory among Greek university students training to be teachers in early childhood education, using conceptual ecology for biological evolution as a theoretical framework. We examined the acceptance of evolution theory and we also looked into the relationship…

Athanasiou, Kyriacos; Papadopoulou, Penelope

2012-01-01

423

High-Ability Students: New Ways to Conceptualize Giftedness and Provide Psychological Services in the Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychologists working in the schools have an opportunity to affect in new and exciting ways the services they provide to high-ability students. A talent development framework offers a unique lens through which gifted services is conceptualized. The framework moves school psychologists beyond viewing giftedness and high IQ as synonymous to…

Nicpon, Megan Foley; Pfeiffer, Steven I.

2011-01-01

424

Consistency of Students' Conceptions of Wave Propagation: Findings from a Conceptual Survey in Mechanical Waves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We recently developed a multiple-choice conceptual survey in mechanical waves. The development, evaluation, and demonstration of the use of the survey were reported elsewhere [A. Tongchai et al. Int. J. Sci. Educ. 31 2437 (2009)]. We administered the survey to 902 students from seven different groups ranging from high school to second year…

Tongchai, Apisit; Sharma, Manjula Devi; Johnston, Ian D.; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Soankwan, Chernchok

2011-01-01

425

Using Conceptual Metaphor and Functional Grammar to Explore How Language Used in Physics Affects Student Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper introduces a theory about the role of language in learning physics. The theory is developed in the context of physics students and physicists talking and writing about the subject of quantum mechanics. We found that physicists' language encodes different varieties of analogical models through the use of grammar and conceptual metaphor.…

Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

2007-01-01

426

Perceptual Influence of Ugandan Biology Students' Understanding of HIV/AIDS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Uganda, curbing the spread of HIV/AIDS has largely depended on public and private media messages about the disease. Media campaigns based on Uganda’s cultural norms of communication are metaphorical, analogical and simile-like. The topic of HIV/AIDS has been introduced into the Senior Three (Grade 11) biology curriculum in Uganda. To what extent do students’ pre-conceptions of the disease, based on these media messages influence students’ development of conceptual understanding of the disease, its transmission and prevention? Of significant importance is the impact the conceptions students have developed from the indirect media messages on classroom instruction on HIV/AIDS. The study is based in a theoretical framework of conceptual change in science learning. An interpretive case study to determine the impact of Ugandan students’ conceptions or perceptions on classroom instruction about HIV/AIDS, involving 160 students aged 15-17, was conducted in four different Ugandan high schools: girls boarding, boys boarding, mixed boarding, and mixed day. Using questionnaires, focus group discussions, recorded biology lessons and informal interviews, students’ preconceptions of HIV/AIDS and how these impact lessons on HIV/AIDS were discerned. These preconceptions fall into four main categories: religious, political, conspiracy and traditional African worldviews. Results of data analysis suggest that students’ prior knowledge is persistent even after biology instructions. This has implications for current teaching approaches, which are mostly teacher-centred in Ugandan schools. A rethinking of the curriculum with the intent of offering science education programs that promote understanding of the science of HIV/AIDS as opposed to what is happening now—insensitivity to misconceptions about the disease—is needed.

Mutonyi, Harriet; Nashon, Samson; Nielsen, Wendy S.

2010-08-01

427

INVESTIGATIONS OF STUDENT UNDERSTANDING OF SOUND PROPAGATION AND RESONANCE  

E-print Network

INVESTIGATIONS OF STUDENT UNDERSTANDING OF SOUND PROPAGATION AND RESONANCE By Katherine Ver Committee: John R. Thompson, Assistant Professor of Physics, Cooperating Assistant Professor of Education; Advisor Michael C. Wittmann, Assistant Professor of Physics: Cooperating Assistant Professor of Education

Maine, University of

428

Digital video, learning styles, and student understanding of kinematics graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Student ability to analyze and interpret motion graphs following laboratory instruction that utilized interactive digital video as well as traditional instructional techniques was investigated. Research presented suggested that digital video tools serve to motivate students and may be an effective mechanism to enhance student understanding of motion concepts. Two laboratory exercises involving motion concepts were developed for this study. Students were divided into two instructional groups. The treatment group used digital video techniques and the control group used traditional techniques to perform the laboratory exercises. Student understanding of motion concepts were assessed, in part, using the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Other assessment measures included student responses to a set of written graphical analysis questions and two post-lab activities. Possible relationships between individual learning style preferences and student understanding of motion concepts were also addressed. Learning style preferences were assessed using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey prior to the instructional treatments. Students were asked to comment in writing about their learning styles before and after they were given the learning style assessment. Student comments revealed that the results they received from Productivity Environmental Preference Survey accurately reflected their learning styles. Results presented in this study showed that no significant relationship exists between students' learning style preferences and their ability to interpret motion graphs as measured by scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. In addition, the results showed no significant difference between instructional treatment and mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Analysis of writing activities revealed that students in the treatment group responded more effectively than students in the control group to graphical interpretation questions that closely paralleled the motions they had observed during the laboratory. However, students in both instructional groups displayed similar levels of difficulty when confronted with motions that deviated from what they had observed in the laboratory. After controlling for differences in student ability levels using SAT scores and course grades, a significant difference in mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics was observed between males and females. Males and females as a separate population had similar mean SAT scores and course grades. A suggestion was made that the observed difference between males and females based on mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs- Kinematics could be due to a gender bias inherent in the instrument. A recommendation was made that future studies could address this observed gender difference.

Hein, Teresa Lee

1997-12-01

429

Argumentation skills and conceptual knowledge of undergraduate students in a physics by inquiry class  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teaching argumentation skills has been the focus of science education research which views argumentation instruction as a way to improve scientific reasoning skills in science classrooms. Argumentation research has mostly focused on examining the quality of classroom discourse in science classes, scaffolding student argumentation process, and in-service science teacher development of pedagogical skills related to argumentation. Yet, there is paucity of studies exist in the literature which has examined prospective science teacher development of argumentation skills. This study aims to reduce this gap in the argumentation literature. This study investigated prospective science teacher development of argumentation skills and conceptual knowledge, relationship between argumentation skills and conceptual knowledge, and the relation of argumentation and conceptual knowledge gains to prospective science teacher initial conceptual knowledge level in an undergraduate course where argumentation skills were incorporated to the science curriculum. Initially, data were collected from 125 students who were involved in an inquiry-based physics course at a midwestern university. Argumentation skills for the concepts of balancing and sinking and floating were assessed by the use of argumentation tests which were constructed for this study and administered four times during the course. In addition to written argumentation tests, argumentation discourse of one small group of students was audio-taped two times during the course. Physics conceptual knowledge was administered at the beginning and at the end of the instruction by a conceptual test which was constructed for this study. A total of 36 students who responded to all the data collection activities comprised the analysis sample. It was found that the prospective science teacher argumentation skills regarding balancing and sinking and floating concepts improved during the course. More specifically, their counter-argument and rebuttal evidence and justification scores developed during the course. It was also found that improvement of counter-argument and rebuttal evidence scores was content independent whereas improvement of counter-argument and rebuttal justification scores was content dependent. The results showed that prospective science teacher conceptual physics knowledge was improved from the beginning to the end of the instruction. More specifically, their declarative and situational knowledge scores increased from the pretest to the posttest. The results also showed that prospective science teacher argumentation scores can be related to physics conceptual knowledge pretest and posttest scores. In addition, it was found that argumentation gain scores were not related to prospective science teacher initial conceptual knowledge level. According to these findings, implications regarding prospective science teacher education and explicit teaching about argumentation were discussed.

Acar, Omer

430

High School Students' Understandings and Representations of the Electric Field  

E-print Network

This study investigates the understandings and representations of the electric field expressed by Chinese high school students ages 15 to 16 who have not yet received high school-level physics instruction. The literature has reported students' ideas of the electric field post-instruction as indicated by their performance on textbook-style questionnaires. However, by relying on measures such as questionnaires, previous research has inadequately captured the thinking process that led students to answer questions in the ways that they did. The present study portrays the beginning of this process by closely examining students' understandings pre-instruction. The participants in this study were asked to engage in a lesson that included informal group tasks that involved playing a Web-based hockey game that replicated an electric field and drawing comic strips that used charges as characters. The lesson was videotaped, students' work was collected, and three students were interviewed afterward to ascertain more det...

Cao, Ying

2014-01-01

431

Understanding Retention in US Graduate Programs by Student Nationality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to better understand the differences in selected retention constructs by student nationality in US graduate programs. Surveys administered at four universities across the United States during fall 2010 resulted in responses from 685 PhD students from six international regions. Using univariate ANOVA, responses were…

Crede, Erin; Borrego, Maura

2014-01-01

432

Understanding the Complexities of Student Motivations in Mathematics Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student motivation has long been a concern of mathematics educators. However, commonly held distinctions between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations may be insufficient to inform our understandings of student motivations in learning mathematics or to appropriately shape pedagogical decisions. Here, motivation is defined, in general, as an…

Walter, Janet G.; Hart, Janelle

2009-01-01

433

Secondary Students' Understanding of Basic Ideas of Special Relativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major topic that has marked "modern physics" is the theory of special relativity (TSR). The present work focuses on the possibility of teaching the basic ideas of the TSR to students at the upper secondary level in such a way that they are able to understand and learn the ideas. Its aim is to investigate students' learning processes towards the…

Dimitriadi, Kyriaki; Halkia, Krystallia

2012-01-01

434

Understanding and Affecting Student Reasoning about Sound Waves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the design and development of curriculum materials that ask students to think about physics from a different view. These group-learning classroom materials specifically aim to bring about improvement of student understanding of sound waves. (Contains 29 references.) (Author/SOE)

Wittmann, Michael C.; Steinberg, Richard N.; Redish, Edward F.

2003-01-01

435

Using Molecular Representations to Aid Student Understanding of Stereochemical Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stereochemistry is an important topic in organic chemistry. It is also a difficult topic for students to learn. This study investigated the relative effectiveness on students' understanding of three kinds of molecular representations of stereochemistry concepts. Instructional activities compared the use of either: (i) computer-based molecular…

Abraham, Michael; Varghese, Valsamma; Tang, Hui

2010-01-01

436

Contrasting Cases of Calculus Students' Understanding of Derivative Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study adds momentum to the ongoing discussion clarifying the merits of visualization and analysis in mathematical thinking. Our goal was to gain understanding of three calculus students' mental processes and images used to create meaning for derivative graphs. We contrast the thinking processes of these three students as they attempted to…

Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk; Aspinwall, Leslie; Presmeg, Norma C.

2010-01-01

437

Science Sampler: Enhancing student understanding of physical and chemical changes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students within the Findlay, Ohio, City School District, as well as students across the country, struggle with understanding physical and chemical changes. Therefore, in this article, the authors suggest some standards-based activities to clarify misconceptions and provide formative assessments to measure your studentsâ progress as they determine the difference between chemical and physical changes.

Mcintosh, Julie; White, Sandra; Suter, Robert

2010-10-01

438

Effects of Cooperative Learning on Students' Understanding of Metallic Bonding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study focused on investigating the effectiveness of instruction via newly developed teaching materials based on cooperative learning when compared to a traditional approach, on ninth grade students' understanding of metallic bonding. Fifty-seven ninth grade science students from two science classes in the same high school participated…

Acar, Burcin; Tarhan, Leman

2008-01-01

439

Invisible Misconceptions: Student Understanding of Ultraviolet and Infrared Radiation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of nonvisible wavelengths for the study of astronomy suggests that student understanding of nonvisible light is an important consideration in astronomy classrooms. Questionnaires, interviews, and panel discussions were used to investigate 6-12 student and teacher conceptions of ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR). Alternative…

Libarkin, Julie C.; Asghar, Anila; Crockett, C.; Sadler, Philip

2011-01-01

440

Understanding Students' Choice of Electives and Its Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to examine the attributes which influence students' selection of electives as part of their university degree programme. Marketing students at a public university in Malaysia participated in the research. Conjoint analysis was used to understand the trade-offs between three attributes when selecting elective subjects.…

Ting, Ding Hooi; Lee, Christina Kwai Choi

2012-01-01

441

Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) of students' understanding of vector subtraction  

E-print Network

Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) of students' understanding of vector subtraction Tianren Wang- dimensional vector subtraction tasks. We use Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) analysis to analyze students (both pointing to the right or opposed), and operation (left-right subtraction or right-left subtraction

Zollman, Dean

442

Understanding How Domestic Violence Affects Behavior in High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper will provide the reader with an understanding of how domestic violence affects the behavior of high school students. The presentation is designed to provide the reader with a working definition of domestic violence, the rate of occurrence and its effects on high school students. Additionally the paper will summarize the negative effects…

Frank, Malika

2011-01-01

443

Students' Understanding of Theory in Undergraduate Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates undergraduate students' application of theory in their analysis of problems presented in authentic leadership cases. Taking a phenomenographic research approach, the paper identifies two levels at which students understand "theory": Level 1-Theory as knowledge acquired from books; Level 2-Theory as support…

Liff, Roy; Rovio-Johansson, Airi

2014-01-01

444

How Do Organic Chemistry Students Understand and Apply Hydrogen Bonding?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines how students completing a two-semester organic sequence understand, explain, and apply hydrogen bonding to determine the physical attributes of molecules. Suggests that some students completing what is typically their second year of college-level chemistry still possess misconceptions about hydrogen bonds. (Contains 21 references.) (ASK)

Henderleiter, J.; Smart, R.; Anderson, J.; Elian, O.

2001-01-01

445

Understanding Students' Interactions: Why Varied Social Tasks Matter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many social interactions between school-age children contain both competitive and cooperative elements. In order to gain a better understanding of how students at risk for emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) negotiate social exchanges in cooperative and competitive-related tasks in comparison with non-EBD students: (a) prosocial; (b)…

Rinaldi, Christina M.; Kates, Allison D.; Welton, Christine

2008-01-01

446

Postreading Questioning and Middle School Students' Understanding of Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the effectiveness of a "story map," a questioning technique (Beck & McKeown, 1981) for improving students' understanding of literature. Though the story map idea was widely adopted as a student-initiated strategy, the original story map--a teacher-generated, postreading questioning framework--was never empirically tested. This…

Liang, Lauren Aimonette; Watkins, Naomi M.; Graves, Michael F.; Hosp, John

2010-01-01

447

Using Student Development Theories as Conceptual Frameworks in Leadership Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theories of student learning and development are particularly important in leadership education because they make prescriptions about how people can adopt increasingly complex ways of being, knowing, and doing--essential forms of development for leadership learning. Increasingly, there is a call for leadership educators to adopt interdisciplinary…

Owen, Julie E.

2012-01-01

448

New insights into student understanding of complete circuits and the conservation of current  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research reported in this paper represents an in-depth examination of the finding from an earlier investigation that university students often do not develop a functional understanding of the concept of a complete circuit. Participants in this study included undergraduates in introductory and upper-division physics courses as well as graduate teaching assistants. Although the concept of a complete circuit is covered in the standard undergraduate curriculum, students in all three groups had difficulty in applying this concept to single-loop, resistive circuits. Students frequently did not apply the conservation of current when analyzing circuits containing more than one battery. Certain basic conceptual difficulties spanned all of the populations and even persisted after instruction in upper-division courses that involved analog electronics.

Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; van Kampen, Paul; Shaffer, Peter S.; McDermott, Lillian C.

2013-02-01

449

Effect of the 5E Model on Prospective Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Diffusion and Osmosis: A Mixed Method Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to explore a group of prospective primary teachers' conceptual understanding of diffusion and osmosis as they implemented a 5E constructivist model and related materials in a science methods course. Fifty prospective primary teachers' ideas were elicited using a pre- and post-test and delayed post-test survey consisting…

Artun, Huseyin; Costu, Bayram

2013-01-01

450

Exploring the Usefulness of Two Conceptual Frameworks for Understanding How Organizational Factors Influence Innovation Implementation in Cancer Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Moving knowledge into practice and the implementation of innovations in health care remain significant challenges. Few researchers adequately address the influence of organizations on the implementation of innovations in health care. The aims of this article are to (1) present 2 conceptual frameworks for understanding the organizational factors…

Urquhart, Robin; Sargeant, Joan; Grunfeld, Eva

2013-01-01

451

Understanding Cryptography A Textbook for Students and Practitioners  

E-print Network

Understanding Cryptography ­ A Textbook for Students and Practitioners by Christof Paar and Jan Cryptography by Christof Paar and Jan Pelzl Some legal stuff (sorry): Terms of Use · The slides can used free "Understanding Cryptography" by Springer and the author's names must remain on each slide. · If the slides

Shamos, Michael I.

452

Assessing Elementary Science Methods Students' Understanding about Global Climate Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global climate change, referred to as climate change in this paper, has become an important planetary issue, and given that K-12 students have numerous alternative conceptions or lack of prior knowledge, it is critical that teachers have an understanding of the fundamental science underlying climate change. Teachers need to understand the natural…

Lambert, Julie L.; Lindgren, Joan; Bleicher, Robert

2012-01-01

453

How Do Students Acquire an Understanding of Logarithmic Concepts?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of logarithms, an important tool for calculus and beyond, has been reduced to symbol manipulation without understanding in most entry-level college algebra courses. The primary aim of this research, therefore, was to investigate college students' understanding of logarithmic concepts through the use of a series of instructional tasks…

Mulqueeny, Ellen

2012-01-01

454

Student Understanding Of Sound Propagation: Research And Curriculum Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We describe recent results in an ongoing investigation of student understanding of sound, especially of sound propagation in solid media. We have recently administered written questions and conducted interviews to probe student reasoning about this topic, specifically the effect on the pitch or frequency of a sound that is propagated from one object to another. Our findings show that the concepts of propagation and resonance are not functionally distinguished by these students; many students seem to be distracted by the resonant properties of an object that is propagating sound. Furthermore, students have more difficulty when considering propagation of a sound through objects with sound generating properties than with objects not associated with sound generation. This work forms the basis for instructional materials to improve student learning, especially among preservice teachers. The curriculum developed to date is reasonably successful at addressing these student difficulties.

Menchen, Katherine; Thompson, John R.

2010-01-18

455

Science teachers' diagnosis and understanding of students' preconceptions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research has established that students enter their science classes with ideas about the natural world that do not align with accepted scientificbeliefs. The diagnosis of these student preconceptions may be seen as aninitial, crucial step in the process of teacher-facilitated conceptualchange. So as to capture what science teachers do in their everydayclassroom routines to diagnose these student preconceptions, in-depthobservations and interviews were conducted with four exemplary secondaryscience teachers. The teachers' strategies for diagnosing students' preconceptions, their use of information found through diagnosis, and the teachers' understanding of students' preinstructional ideas were all analyzed. The four teachers in this study did not use any formal assessment tools such as pretests, concept maps, interviews, or journal writing to diagnose students' ideas, although they all stated that finding out what students know prior to instruction is important. The teachers all declared that they used questioning to gather information on student ideas but were seen in their classes to rely heavily on low-level, recall questions. One of the teachers, the most experienced, did conduct class discussions where the students were encouraged to express their ideas and preconceptions. The four teachers' understanding of what student preconceptions consist of and the justification for attempting to diagnose these ideas was seen to be weak.The implications of these findings and recommendations for teacher trainingare made in the article.

Morrison, Judith A.; Lederman, Norman G.

2003-11-01

456

Characterizing and Representing Student's Conceptual Knowledge of Chemical Bonding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chemical bonding knowledge is fundamental and essential to the understanding of almost every topic in chemistry, but it is very difficult to learn. While many studies have characterized some of the central elements of knowledge of this topic, these elements of knowledge have not been systematically organized. We describe the development and…

Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Fortus, David

2012-01-01

457

Toward Understanding Student Conceptions of the Photoelectric Effect  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The photoelectric effect is part of a group of phenomena that provide the experimental basis for the photon model of light. Most students pursuing a degree in physics or a related field first study the photoelectric effect and the photon model of light in a "modern physics" course following directly after the introductory physics sequence. It has been documented that many students have trouble understanding the photoelectric effect itself, and its connection to the photon model of light. In an attempt to better understand student preconceptions and misconceptions of this topic, we conducted a study of students in a modern physics class at California State University, San Marcos. In this paper we will provide preliminary results of our research with specific emphasis on the knowledge base required to understand the photoelectric effect.

De Leone, Charles; Oberem, Graham

2005-10-26

458

Student beliefs and learning environments: Developing a survey of factors related to conceptual change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a model for the type of classroom environment believed to facilitate scientific conceptual change. A survey based on this model contains items about students' motivational beliefs, their study approach and their perceptions of their teacher's actions and learning goal orientation. Results obtained from factor analyses, correlations and analyses of variance, based on responses from 113 students, suggest that an empowering interpersonal teacher-student relationship is related to a deep approach to learning, a positive attitude to science, and positive self-efficacy beliefs, and may be increased by a constructivist approach to teaching.

Hanrahan, Mary

1994-12-01

459

Predictors of scientific understanding of middle school students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine if middle school student scientific understanding could be predicted by the variables: standardized 5th grade score in science, standardized 5th grade score in mathematics, standardized 5th grade score in reading, student attitude towards science, socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnicity. The areas of the comprehensive literature review were trends in science learning and teaching, research in the K-12 science education arena, what factors have influenced K-12 science education, scientific understanding, what research has been done on K-12 scientific understanding, and what factors have influenced science understanding in the K-12 arenas. Based on the results of the literature review, the researcher of this study examined a sample of middle school 8th grade students. An Attitude Towards Science Survey (SATS) Simpson & Oliver (1990) and a Survey of Scientific Understandings (Klapper, DeLucia, & Trent, 1993) were administered to these 116 middle school 8th grade students drawn from a total population of 1109 who attend this middle school in a typical county in Florida during the 2010- 2011 school year. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test each sub-hypothesis and to provide a model that attempted to predict student scientific understanding. Seven null sub-hypotheses were formed to determine if there were significant relationships between student scientific understanding and the abovementioned variables. The results of the tests of the seven null sub-hypotheses showed that the sub-hypothesis that involved socioeconomic status was rejected, which indicated that the socioeconomic status of a family does influence the level of scientific understanding of a student. Low SES students performed lower on the scientific understanding survey, on average, than high SES students. This study can be a source of information for teachers in low-income schools by recognizing potential areas of concern for low-income students in their science classrooms. The study is also a guide for administrators in developing science curriculum that is designed to remediate critical science content. Recommendations, further research, and implications for stakeholders in the science education process are then identified in order to focus on the concerns that these stakeholders need to address through a needs assessment.

Strate, Joshua Matthew

460

Students Make a Plan: Understanding Student Agency in Constraining Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on Archer's perspectives on the agency/structure relationship, this paper explains situations where students in varied, challenging circumstances find ways to negotiate difficult conditions. It reports on a 2007 study undertaken through a survey at three quite different universities in three South African provinces, addressing…

Czerniewicz, Laura; Williams, Kevin; Brown, Cheryl

2009-01-01

461

Use of the computer for research on instruction and student understanding in physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This dissertation describes an investigation of how the computer may be utilized to perform research on instruction and on student understanding in physics. The research was conducted within three content areas: kinematics, waves and dynamics. The main focus of the research on instruction was the determination of factors needed for a computer program to be instructionally effective. The emphasis in the research on student understanding was the identification of specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties students encounter with the subject matter. Most of the research was conducted using the computer-based interview, a technique developed during the early part of the work, conducted within the domain of kinematics. In a computer-based interview, a student makes a prediction about how a particular system will behave under given circumstances, observes a simulation of the event on a computer screen, and then is asked by an interviewer to explain any discrepancy between prediction and observation. In the course of the research, a model was developed for producing educational software. The model has three important components: (i) research on student difficulties in the content area to be addressed, (ii) observations of students using the computer program, and (iii) consequent program modification. This model was used to guide the development of an instructional computer program dealing with graphical representations of transverse pulses. Another facet of the research involved the design of a computer program explicitly for the purposes of research. A computer program was written that simulates a modified Atwood's machine. The program was than used in computer-based interviews and proved to be an effective means of probing student understanding of dynamics concepts. In order to ascertain whether or not the student difficulties identified were peculiar to the computer

Grayson, Diane J.

2006-12-07

462

Student understanding of rotational and rolling motion concepts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We investigated the common difficulties that students have with concepts related to rotational and rolling motion covered in the introductory physics courses. We compared the performance of calculus- and algebra-based introductory physics students with physics juniors who had learned rotational and rolling motion concepts in an intermediate level mechanics course. Interviews were conducted with six physics juniors and ten introductory students using demonstration-based tasks. We also administered free-response and multiple-choice questions to a large number of students enrolled in introductory physics courses, and interviewed six additional introductory students on the test questions (during the test design phase). All students showed similar difficulties regardless of their background, and higher mathematical sophistication did not seem to help acquire a deeper understanding. We found that some difficulties were due to related difficulties with linear motion, while others were tied specifically to the more intricate nature of rotational and rolling motion.

Rimoldini, Lorenzo G.; Singh, Chandralekha

2007-11-19

463

Student understanding of the wave nature of matter: Diffraction and interference of particles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper reports on a study of student understanding of the wave nature of matter in the context of the pattern produced by the diffraction and interference of particles. Students in first-year, second-year, and third-year physics courses were asked to predict and explain how a single change in an experimental setup would affect the pattern produced when electrons or other particles are incident on a single slit, double slit, or crystal lattice. The errors made by students after standard instruction indicated the presence of similar conceptual and reasoning difficulties at all levels. Among the most serious was an inability to interpret diffraction and interference in terms of a basic wave model. Other errors revealed a lack of a functional understanding of the de Broglie wavelength. Students often treated it as a fixed property of a particle, not as a function of the momentum. An important goal of this investigation was to provide a research base for the design of instruction to help students develop and apply a basic wave model for matter.

Vokos, Stamatis; Shaffer, Peter S.; Mcdermott, Lillian C.; Ambrose, Bradley S.

2005-11-28

464

Research Seminars on learning: How to Understand and Explain Learning and Development. Conceptual and  

E-print Network

and development. Secondly, to critically evaluate the major assumptions of those theories and Development. Conceptual and Philosophical Issues October 11, 25 and November 8 2012 and several of the social sciences, with developmental psychology playing an increasingly

Sokolowski, Marla

465

Students' understanding of the addition of angular momentum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with concepts related to the addition of angular momentum. We also describe the development and implementation of a research-based learning tool, a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT), to reduce these difficulties. The preliminary evaluation shows that the QuILT on the addition of angular momentum is helpful in improving students' understanding of these concepts.

Singh, Chandralekha; Zhu, Guangtian

2012-05-15

466

Survey Instrument Probing Student Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through student interviews and multiple iterations of open-ended and multiple-choice surveys (involving over 3,600 undergraduate non-science majors), we have developed at multiple-choice survey instrument for assessing undergraduate student understanding of the atmospheric greenhouse effect. Central topics include: 1) the energies of light given off by the sun and absorbed and given off by Earth's atmosphere and surface, 2) energy balance,

John M. Keller; T. F. Slater; E. E. Prather

2006-01-01

467

Student understanding in mechanics: A large population survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There has recently been a considerable growth in research probing student understanding in mechanics. Questions based on four such research probes were included in the end-of-high-school physics examination undertaken by some 5500 students. The results obtained give an indication of the extent to which various interpretations of some physical situations are held in a whole population. The possibilities of using research probes as a basis for assessment questions are also illustrated.

Gunstone, Richard

2005-10-20

468

Students Meet Wilfred Gordon: Helping Students with Special Needs Understand Their Memory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding how memory works is important for success in school, for "all" students. One way for teachers to help students with disabilities learn about memory is to use picture books and then learn strategies. Picture books are useful for students with disabilities because these resources have moved beyond a means to scaffold early literacy…

Zambo, Debby M.

2006-01-01

469

Indicators of Understanding: What TAs Listen for in Student Responses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Before we can develop effective, research-based professional development programs for graduate student physics TAs, we must first identify their current classroom practices and why they engage in these practices. Framing, a theoretical framework developed in sociology and linguistics, provides an analytical toolbox for examining the expectations that guide the actions and attention of individuals while teaching. We use framing to develop fine-grained analyses of two episodes of TAs teaching tutorials. Despite the differences in their behaviors, the two TAs are in a sense both doing the same thing; they organize their interactions with students around âsearching for indicatorsâ that the students understand the targeted ideas.

Goertzen, Renee M.; Scherr, Rachel E.; Elby, Andrew

2009-05-05

470

Improving Students' Understanding of Lock-In Amplifiers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A lock-in amplifier is a versatile instrument frequently used in physics research. However, many students struggle with the basic operating principles of a lock-in amplifier which can lead to a variety of difficulties. To improve students' understanding, we have been developing and evaluating a research-based tutorial which makes use of a computer simulation of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial is based on a field-tested approach in which students realize their difficulties after predicting the outcome of simulated experiments involving a lock-in amplifier and check their predictions using the simulated lock-in amplifier. Then, the tutorial guides and helps students develop a coherent understanding of the basics of a lock-in amplifier. The tutorial development involved interviews with physics faculty members and graduate students and iteration of many versions of the tutorial with professors and graduate students. The student difficulties and the development and assessment of the research-based tutorial are discussed.

Devore, Seth; Gauthier, Alexandre; Levy, Jeremy; Singh, Chandralekha

2014-01-30

471

Inductive Influence of Related Quantitative and Conceptual Problems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physics education research shows that conceptual understanding is not necessary for students to do well on standard quantitative problems in introductory physics. This study addresses a related question: is conceptual understanding sufficient or helpful for students to do well in quantitative problems?

Dukes, Philip; Pritchard, David E.

2006-12-06

472

Inductive Influence of Related Quantitative and Conceptual Problems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper, presented at the 2001 Physics Education Research Conference, the authors' assert that physics education research shows that conceptual understanding is not necessary for students to do well on standard quantitative problems in introductory physics. The specific question the research asks is "Is conceptual understanding sufficient or helpful for students to do well in quantitative problems?"

Dukes, Phillip; Pritchard, David E.

2010-08-04

473

Remediating Misconceptions Concerning Chemical Bonding through Conceptual Change Text  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of conceptual change texts oriented instruction on 9th grade students' understanding of chemical bonding concepts. In this study, the main aim of the preparation of conceptual change texts was to activate students' prior knowledge and misconceptions and to help them to understand the chemical…

Pabuccu, Aybuke; Geban, Omer

2006-01-01

474

Systematic study of student understanding of the relationships between the directions of force, velocity, and acceleration in one dimension  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We developed an instrument to systematically investigate student conceptual understanding of the relationships between the directions of net force, velocity, and acceleration in one dimension and report on data collected on the final version of the instrument from over 650 students. Unlike previous work, we simultaneously studied all six possible conditional relations between force, velocity, and acceleration in order to obtain a coherent picture of student understanding of the relations between all three concepts. We present a variety of evidence demonstrating the validity and reliability of the instrument. An analysis of student responses from three different course levels revealed three main findings. First, a significant fraction of students chose âpartially correctâ responses, and from pre- to post-test, many students moved from âmisconceptionâ to partially correct responses, or from partially correct to fully correct responses. Second, there were asymmetries in responding to conditional relations. For example, students answered questions of the form âGiven the velocity, what can be inferred about the net force?â differently than converse questions âGiven the net force, what can be inferred about the velocity?â Third, there was evidence of hierarchies in student responses, suggesting, for example, that understanding the relation between velocity and acceleration is necessary for understanding the relation between velocity and force, but the converse is not true. Finally, we briefly discuss how these findings might be applied to instruction.

Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Heckler, Andrew F.

2012-05-21

475

Understanding the Role of Academic Language on Conceptual Understanding in an Introductory Materials Science and Engineering Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students may use the technical engineering terms without knowing what these words mean. This creates a language barrier in engineering that influences student learning. Previous research has been conducted to characterize the difference between colloquial and scientific language. Since this research had not yet been applied explicitly to…

Kelly, Jacquelyn

2012-01-01

476

Using the Conceptual Change Instruction To Improve Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the effect of conceptual change instruction on grade 11 students' understanding of respiration. The Respiration Concept Test was developed and used to test students' misconceptions. Results indicate that the conceptual change instruction that explicitly addressed students' misconceptions produced significantly greater achievement in…

Alparslan, Cem; Tekkaya, Ceren; Geban, Omer

2003-01-01

477

Digital Video 1 DIGITAL VIDEO, LEARNING STYLES AND STUDENT UNDERSTANDING  

E-print Network

Digital Video 1 DIGITAL VIDEO, LEARNING STYLES AND STUDENT UNDERSTANDING Digital Video, Learning University in 1997. Her doctoral work involved the assessment of and interactive digital video technique #12;Digital Video 2 teachers, particularly those teachers whose background does not include

Larkin, Teresa L.

478

Students' Understanding of Boiling Points and Intermolecular Forces  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In introductory chemistry courses students are presented with the model that matter is composed of particles, and that weak forces of attraction exist between them. This model is used to interpret phenomena such as solubility and melting points, and aids in understanding the changes in states of matter as opposed to chemical reactions. We…

Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen; Kaufmann, Birgit; Treagust, David F.

2009-01-01

479

Students Understanding Of The Equal Sign Not Equal, Prof Says  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article summarizes the research of Texas A&M faculty Robert M. Capraro and Mary Capraro comparing students' interpretation of the equal sign internationally and its relationship to achievement in mathematics. The page includes a 1-minute video of Robert Capraro discussing the importance of understanding the concept of equivalence and how misunderstandings arise.

2010-08-12

480

Oral Language, Representations and Mathematical Understanding: Indigenous Australian Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the role of oral language and representations in negotiating mathematical understanding. The data were gathered from two Indigenous Australian classrooms in Northern Queensland. The first classroom, a Year 6/7 consisted of 15 students whose ages range from 10 years to 12 years with eight being Aboriginal, six from Torres Strait…

Warren, Elizabeth; Young, Janelle

2008-01-01

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