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Sample records for students health occupations

  1. Health Occupations Students of America Handbooks and Procedures Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice R., Ed.

    This packet includes a Chapter handbook, an officer's handbook, and a policies and procedures manual for Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) members. The Chapter handbook is a resource guide for management and leadership development for the Florida Chapter known as the Florida Association, HOSA. The handbook's six chapters provide…

  2. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  3. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  4. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  5. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... care industry is one of largest providers of jobs in the United States. Many health jobs are in hospitals. Others are in nursing homes, ... clinics and laboratories. To work in a health occupation, you often must have special training. Some, like ...

  6. An Annotated Bibliography for Health Occupations: A Guide for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solon, Lindy

    The bibliography is designed to assist teachers and students at the secondary level in selecting printed and audiovisual materials related to health occupations. The 115 items relate to the following occupations: dental assistant, medical laboratory aide, practical nurse, nurse assistant, rehabilitation aide, physical therapy aide, radiologic…

  7. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Personal Services, Health Oriented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on health oriented personal services is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education for the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to…

  8. Allied Health Occupations II. Dental Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by dentists, dental hygienists, dental laboratory technicians, and dental assistants and also to help students acquire some basic dental assistant…

  9. Allied Health Occupations II. Physical Therapy Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by physical therapists and physical therapy assistants. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the health team for…

  10. Student Assessment System. Student Performance Record. Task Detailing. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This booklet lists tasks and functions the health occupations student should be able to do upon entering an employment situation or a postsecondary school. (Listings are also available for the areas of cosmetology and transportation/automotive mechanics.) Tasks are coded to correspond to those on the Student Performance Record, which details a…

  11. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual is the first of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 1-3 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 1 (three…

  12. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual is the fifth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 14 and 15 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 14…

  13. Health Occupations--Operating Room Technician. Kit No. 63. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the operating room technician are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  14. Health Occupations--Nursing Assistant, Wheelchair. Kit No. 58. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Annie T.

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the nursing assistant--assisting patients in using the wheelchair are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven…

  15. Health Occupations--Practical Nurse. Kit No. 45. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on practical nursing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  16. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  17. Health Occupations--Dental Assistant. Kit No. 62. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on a dental assistant are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  18. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual is the fourth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 8-11 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 8 discusses…

  19. Health Occupations--Respiration Therapy Technician. Kit No. 66. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on respiration therapy technician are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  20. Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

  1. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual is the second of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 4 and 5 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. (Lesson 4…

  2. Health Occupations--Thermometer. Kit No. 2. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the oral thermometer are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  3. Medical Asepsis. Kit No. 302. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Gloria

    This instructor's manual and student learning guide comprise a module on medical asepsis for a secondary-level health occupations program. The six activities in the module cover medical asepsis terms; ways organisms spread; types of medical asepsis; aseptic equipment care; proper handwashing; and procedures for using masks, gloves, and gowns.…

  4. Infection Control Protocol for Student Clinical Experiences. A Protocol Document for Health Occupations Education Programs in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed especially for high school health occupations education programs in Missouri, this guide uses U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules as a base for guidelines for student participation in health care. The document informs administrators and teachers about special circumstances that must be considered in the…

  5. Student internships with unions and workers: building the occupational health and safety movement.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Gail

    2013-01-01

    One of the most successful programs to recruit young professionals to the occupational safety and health field was launched more than 35 years ago, in 1976. Created by the Montefiore Medical Center's Department of Social Medicine collaborating with Tony Mazzocchi of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW), it placed medical, nursing, and public health students in summer internships with local unions to identify and solve health and safety problems in the workplace. The experience of working with and learning from workers about the complex interactions of political, economic, and scientific-technological issues surrounding workplace conditions inspired many students to enter and stay in our field. Many former interns went on to make important medical and scientific contributions directly linked to their union-based projects. Former interns are now among the leaders within the occupational health and safety community, holding key positions in leading academic institutions and governmental agencies. PMID:23896070

  6. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  7. Military Medical Students' Awareness and Practice Concerning Occupational Health and Safety.

    PubMed

    Babayigit, Mustafa Alparslan; Ilhan, Mustafa Necmi; Oysul, Fahrettin Guven

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the awareness and practices of military medical students concerning occupational health and safety. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire composed of 20 open- and closed-ended questions was administered to medical students of the Gulhane Military Medical Faculty (n = 754). The response rate of the questionnaire was 82.4% (n = 622/754). The mean age of the participants was 21.5 ± 1.84 years, and the majority of participants were male (94.1%). A substantial number of participants (41.1%) described their level of awareness and practice as "low/very low," although 95.0% and 76.7% of them had never acquired any occupational disease or had any work accidents, respectively. In total, 28.1% of all students had at least one vaccination, and 5th- and 6th-year students were 92 times and 63 times more likely to have been vaccinated than 1st-year students, respectively (odds ratio = 92.66, 95% confidence interval = 26.70-321.59; odds ratio = 63.01, 95% confidence interval = 17.96-221.01). The knowledge and practice level of medical students concerning occupational health and safety appeared to be increasing by the grades of medical faculty, however students expressed themselves as insufficient about their knowledge and practice level. PMID:27612358

  8. A Guide to Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheu, Janey M. Y.; And Others

    This guide is intended to familiarize secondary students with the variety of occupational opportunities in the health field. It may be used in one of three ways--as a health career reference for guidance counselors, career counselors, teachers, and students; as a guide to introduce students to the health field; or as a text for career education.…

  9. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  10. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the clock, people who work in the health care industry provide care for millions of people, ... newborns to the very ill. In fact, the health care industry is one of largest providers of ...

  11. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices can reduce your risk of these problems. Try to stay fit, reduce stress, set up your work area properly, and use the right equipment and gear.

  12. Selected Health Service Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Arthur D.

    Prepared by an occupational analyst of the Utah Department of Employment Security, this manual provides job guides for 39 health service occupations concerned mainly with doctors, nurses, and related hospital-medical-health consultants and services. Classified according to "The Dictionary of Occupational Titles," each occupational description…

  13. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  14. Teaching Occupational Health to Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegman, David H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive training program is described that prepares students to identify and prevent occupational disease, emphasizing public health. Content areas include epidemiology and biostatistics, toxicology, industrial hygiene, safety and ergonomics, policy issues, administration, and clinical aspects. (Author/LBH)

  15. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  16. Health Occupations. Nursing Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megow, Joye G.

    Materials contained in this package are designed for use with students interested in the occupation of nurses aide. The package has two sections, one which looks closely at the job and the student, and the other--the curriculum phase--which concerns actual student use of learning activity packages (LAPs). These two components together form a "job…

  17. Association between overuse of mobile phones on quality of sleep and general health among occupational health and safety students.

    PubMed

    Eyvazlou, Meysam; Zarei, Esmaeil; Rahimi, Azin; Abazari, Malek

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about health problems due to the increasing use of mobile phones are growing. Excessive use of mobile phones can affect the quality of sleep as one of the important issues in the health literature and general health of people. Therefore, this study investigated the relationship between the excessive use of mobile phones and general health and quality of sleep on 450 Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) students in five universities of medical sciences in the North East of Iran in 2014. To achieve this objective, special questionnaires that included Cell Phone Overuse Scale, Pittsburgh's Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) were used, respectively. In addition to descriptive statistical methods, independent t-test, Pearson correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression tests were performed. The results revealed that half of the students had a poor level of sleep quality and most of them were considered unhealthy. The Pearson correlation co-efficient indicated a significant association between the excessive use of mobile phones and the total score of general health and the quality of sleep. In addition, the results of the multiple regression showed that the excessive use of mobile phones has a significant relationship between each of the four subscales of general health and the quality of sleep. Furthermore, the results of the multivariate regression indicated that the quality of sleep has a simultaneous effect on each of the four scales of the general health. Overall, a simultaneous study of the effects of the mobile phones on the quality of sleep and the general health could be considered as a trigger to employ some intervention programs to improve their general health status, quality of sleep and consequently educational performance. PMID:26942630

  18. Occupational Health Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Medical Training Inst., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used for "Administrative Aspects of Occupational Medicine," one of two officer correspondence courses offered by the Naval Medical Training Institute. Part one comprises guidelines for setting up occupational health clinics, covering the areas of staffing, layout, equipment, other services, and records maintenance.…

  19. Occupational health in China.

    PubMed

    Christiani, David C; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid industrialization and economic growth, resulting in a transformed industrial structure and expansion of the labor force. Occupational health and safety services, nonexistent before 1949, have made remarkable advances over the past decades. However, these services face greater challenges, consisting of both traditional and new occupational health problems. Poorly regulated work environments often lacking health services in recently developed and thriving small-scale industries and joint venture enterprises have created increasing risks for occupational diseases and work-related injuries. A special strategy based on cooperation among and contributions from the legal, administrative, social, economic, and scientific communities is critical to achieving the ultimate goal of control and prevention of these occupational health problems. PMID:12028948

  20. Occupational health in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Carreón, Tania; Santos-Burgoa, Carlos; Baron, Sherry; Hernández, Sendy

    2002-01-01

    The authors discuss the maquiladoras and child labor, and offer an overview of the history of occupational safety and health in Mexico that covers laws and regulations, social security, unions, and enforcement of legislation. The organization and structure of the various institutions responsible for occupational safety and health (OSH), as well as administrative procedures, are described. This article concludes with a list of the new challenges for OSH in Mexico. PMID:12028953

  1. Occupational health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Krishna Gopal; Aw, Tar-Ching; Jefferelli, Shamsul Bahrin

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a detailed examination of Malaysian occupational health agencies and their roles in formulating and enforcing standards, promoting occupational health and safety (OSH), and providing advisory services. Available OSH training is described, and the need for policies and personnel in various industries is outlined. Further, the authors discuss how international models and collaboration have influenced Malaysian OSH, and how some successes can be repeated and failures remedied. PMID:12028951

  2. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  3. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  4. Occupational health in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Ata, Gehad Ahmed Abo; Arnaout, Said N

    2002-01-01

    This review aims to evaluate current occupational health services (OHS) in Egypt. The authors begin with a background on the geography, population, and economy, and then briefly describe the labor force. They discuss the legislative aspects of OHS (including health insurance) and the environment; OHS training and education; and activities such as research, inspection, environmental monitoring, and management of occupational diseases. Occupational accidents and diseases, registered during 2000, are analyzed. Problems with OHS administration in Egypt are presented, along with relevant countermeasures. Various promotion and support measures for administrative policy are prioritized and discussed. PMID:12028958

  5. Occupational health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bedrikow, B; Algranti, E; Buschinelli, J T; Morrone, L C

    1997-01-01

    Brazil is a recently industrialised country with marked contrasts in social and economic development. The availability of public/private services in its different regions also varies. Health indicators follow these trends. Occupational health is a vast new field, as in other developing countries. Occupational medicine is a required subject in graduation courses for physicians. Specialisation courses for university graduated professionals have more than 700 hours of lectures and train occupational health physicians, safety engineers and nursing staff. At the technical level, there are courses with up to 1300 hours for the training of safety inspectors. Until 1986 about 19,000 occupational health physicians, 18,000 safety engineers and 51,000 safety inspectors had been officially registered. Although in its infancy, postgraduation has attracted professionals at university level, through residence programmes as well as masters and doctors degrees, whereby at least a hundred good-quality research studies have been produced so far. Occupational health activities are controlled by law. Undertakings with higher risks and larger number of employees are required to hire specialised technical staff. In 1995 the Ministry of Labour demanded programmes of medical control of occupational health (PCMSO) for every worker as well as a programme of prevention of environmental hazards (PPRA). This was considered as a positive measure for the improvement of working conditions and health at work. Physicians specialising in occupational medicine are the professionals more often hired by the enterprises. Reference centres (CRSTs) for workers' health are connected to the State or City Health Secretariat primary health care units. They exist in more populated areas and are accepted by workers as the best way to accomplish the diagnosis of occupational diseases. There is important participation by the trade unions in the management of these reference centres. For 30 years now employers

  6. Secondary Health Occupations Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzen, Shelley; Muhl, V. Jane

    This color coded curriculum guide for secondary health occupations in Iowa provides units for the first phase of the curriculum, career exploration of the health occupations. The nine units cover the following topics: (1) introduction to health occupations; (2) health occupations career exploration; (3) communication skills; (4) self-care and…

  7. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  8. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume 1: Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and…

  9. Occupational health in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Werner, A F

    2000-07-01

    Argentina is within the denominated "new industrialised countries", with the characteristic of having high contrasts in the urban population, based on service and industry, and in the rural population, based on agriculture and cattle, still the main sources of wealth in the country. The process of globalisation and the need to compete hard in international markets have provoked high unemployment and the transfer of workers from a formal market to an informal one. Legislation on occupational health is old and it is in the process of being updated. The system of prevention, assistance and compensation for accidents at work and for occupational illnesses has changed from being optative for employers, to the compulsory hiring of private insurance companies. The Government keeps the role of supervisor of the system. There are enough professionals in occupational health, hygiene and safety but not occupational nurses. The teaching is given by many universities and professional associations, some of which have an active profile in the occupational health of the country. PMID:10963410

  10. Occupational health in Cuba.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M R

    1981-01-01

    Health and safety regulation, training, and research were practically non-existent in Cuba before the Revolution in 1959. Since that time important advances have been made. Specialized inspectors, occupational physicians, and other such personnel are now trained in Cuba. An Occupational Health Institute, founded in 1976, provides training and specialized technical services, and conducts research. In 1978, a far reaching "Work Safety and Health Law" was enacted which defines the rights and responsibility of government agencies, workplace administrators, unions, and workers. Comprehensive control of toxic substances in workplaces, still at an early stage, is likely to increase in light of the new law, the growing availability of qualified personnel, and the mounting concern of public health authorities with the increasingly "developed" health profile of the population. PMID:7212141

  11. Orientation to Health Occupations: A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Elizabeth V.

    The teacher's guide to Orientation to Health Occupations is an outline for a course designed to create student awareness of the broad range of health occupations. It can be adapted for use at the junior high school through postsecondary levels and is designed to be used in a variety of ways. There are 18 units of instruction, each containing one…

  12. Orientation to Health Occupations: Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations, Phase 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Mary; And Others

    The document outlines a curriculum designed to orient the student to health occupations. It is presented in 12 units which offer basic information under the headings of: orientation to health occupations; personal qualities of health workers; communications; awareness of self; mental health habits; religious and ethnic considerations; body…

  13. Leadership Attributes and Personality Preferences of High School Student Leaders in Health Occupations Students of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.; Wilmoth, James N.

    1989-01-01

    The Leadership Opinion Questionnaire, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and a demographic questionnaire were administered to 115 student organization officers. The level of relationships between leadership attributes and personality preferences as well as differential leadership attributes and/or personality preference patterns were investigated.…

  14. Impact of a Child-Based Health Promotion Service-Learning Project on the Growth of Occupational Therapy Students.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study revealed the lived experiences of occupational therapy students as they embarked on a semester-long volunteer health promotion service-learning project during their entry-level master's program. Data analysis extrapolated themes from student journals, transcriptions of pre- and postinterviews, and field notes. Student roles were exemplified by what students wanted to learn, what they actually learned, and the unexpected benefits they experienced. In particular, issues with teaming, interprofessional development, and time management were discovered. The findings add to the growing literature about the benefits of service learning as a teaching strategy and how it facilitates mindfulness of community service, communication, and clinical reasoning of future therapists. Implications for learning and practice are discussed. PMID:27548859

  15. The influence of occupational stress factors on nicotine dependence among students of health and nonhealth care professional colleges

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Amandeep; Lakhanpal, Manav; Gupta, Nidhi; Suri, Varun; Kaur, Gurwant; Bhudhiraja, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study the relationship between perceived job stress measured using Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) scale and nicotine dependence using Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scale among students of health and nonhealth care professional colleges. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried on convenient sample of 408 health and nonhealth care professional who were current smokers. Nicotine dependence was measured using the FTND. The extent of the stress factors experienced at work was assessed using the ERI. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used for the statistical analysis. Results: Occupational stress factors are actually associated with higher levels of nicotine dependence (odds ratio = 4.523). The degree of nicotine dependence and stress imbalance was found to be more among health care professional students as compared to nonhealth care professional students (P < 0.05). Being religious was found to have a significant effect in reducing nicotine dependence. Conclusion: Being religious, having low occupational stress and being nonhealth care professional have a significant effect on the prevention of nicotine dependence. PMID:26778887

  16. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  17. Stimulating Occupational Health and Safety Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Classroom activities promoting occupational health and safety are outlined to create awareness among students of the nature and magnitude of job-related hazards and illnesses and to promote student attitudes conducive to placing a high value on protecting their health and safety at work. (JMF)

  18. Orientation to Health Occupations: Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Mary; And Others

    The document outlines a curriculum designed to teach appropriate nursing skills to students and to prepare them for career opportunities available in health occupations. It is presented in 10 units offering basic information under the headings of: overview of health occupations; communications; medical terminology; fundamental principles of human…

  19. Health Occupations Module. Communication in Health Occupations--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on communication in health occupations is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic and one learning experience. The learning experience contains six activities (e.g., read…

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  1. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  2. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries Allergy-causing substances Violence Stress Follow good job safety and injury prevention practices. They can reduce your ... find ways to manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  3. The Hospice Concept: Health Occupation 305.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schobel, Deborah A.

    A description is provided of "The Hospice Concept," an elective course offered as part of a two-year college health occupations curriculum. The course is designed to further the students understanding of the multiple facets of death and dying and to prepare them to be hospice volunteers. Following a course description and a glossary of terms,…

  4. Health Occupations Education I. Instructor's Manual. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Patricia E., Ed.; And Others

    This instructor's guide consists of materials for use in teaching the first year of a two-year course in health occupations education that is designed for high school students. Included in the volume are an introduction, a list of modules, a list of tools and supplies, instructional references, a list of suggested instructional filmstrips, an…

  5. Allied Health Occupations II (Health Careers--Core Curriculum).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with background informational material and practical skills used in various health fields. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: safety; ethical and legal…

  6. Occupational Titles Including Job Descriptions for Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This alphabetical compilation of 80 occupational titles for health occupations education is taken from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, (DOT), 4th edition, 1977. An index shows the arrangement of the occupational titles (together with instructional program and DOT code) according to the United States Office of Education code numbers. For…

  7. State Licensing of Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    About 25 health professions and occupations are licensed by one or more states according to the survey of state licensing provisions by the National Center for Health Statistics. Data is presented in 22 chapters on the licensure of administrators, chiropractors, clinical laboratory personnel, dental hygienists, dentists, professional engineers,…

  8. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed by teachers and representatives of the health service industries, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the health field or for entrance into a post-high school or university programs. Section 1, Occupational and Instructional Data, provides manpower data and an analysis…

  9. University Students and Sustainability Skills in Occupational Health and Safety Master Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Míguez-Álvarez, Carla; Arce, Maria Elena; Souto-Gestal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Education is one of the key instruments to achieving global sustainability. In fact, sustainable development has to be integrated into higher education curricula. One of the difficulties of this challenge is to know if students are able to achieve the basic skills, something that is extremely important in emergency management. Thus, assessment of…

  10. The ocean and occupational health.

    PubMed

    Prossin, A

    1983-06-01

    With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. PMID:21283297

  11. The Ocean and Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1983-01-01

    With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. Imagesp1137-a PMID:21283297

  12. Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

    These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

  13. Exploring Careers. Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    "Exploring Careers" is a career education resource program, published in fifteen separate booklets, for junior high school-age students. It provides information about the world of work and offers its readers a way of learning about themselves and relating that information to career choices. The publications aim to build career awareness by means…

  14. Health Occupations: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in health occupations. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Pat

    1975-01-01

    The growing concern for safety in both the workplace and in consumer products will create many new jobs through the mid-1980's--especially in private industry. The largest number of safety professionals are safety engineers; others include fire protection engineers, industrial hygienists, loss control and occupational health consultants, and…

  16. Innovative Approaches to Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurney, Elizabeth, Comp.; Kintgen, Jean, Comp.

    To improve communications between health occupations educators and health professionals about developments in health occupations education, a compilation of 21 approaches used in health occupations education is presented. Outlines of the 21 different courses are presented, grouped in eight areas: (1) career mobility--modified LPN program for…

  17. Allied Health Occupations I (Health Assistant). Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a first-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in such allied health occupations as nurse's aide and health assistant. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: health worker…

  18. Resource Manual for Health Occupations Education Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feilner, Veronica, Ed.; Robling, Jeannine, Ed.

    This resource manual is designed to assist secondary health occupations instructors in implementing their health occupations programs. It contains two types of materials: informational topics and sample forms, letters, memos, and other materials. The manual begins with an overview of the health occupations education program, followed by these…

  19. Occupational Health in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Malan, R. M.

    1963-01-01

    Progress may be fostered as much by spreading information as by research. The aim of this review is to add to the existing knowledge of the pattern of occupational health services in the socialist countries of Eastern Europe. The work consists of two main parts. Part I is based on official information issued by government departments or typewritten reports prepared by government officials, and relates mostly to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and to Czechoslovakia. Part II is largely based on direct observation, discussion, and comparison of the occupational health services in Czechoslovakia, of which I have more extensive knowledge than of the other countries of Eastern Europe. This part embodies a number of conclusions and is followed by a list of bibliographical references. Throughout the review I have endeavoured to show how problems which exist all over the world are dealt with in Eastern Europe. PMID:13932439

  20. Health Care. Georgia Core Standards for Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Occupational Studies.

    This document lists core standards and occupational knowledge and skills that have been identified/validated by industry as necessary to all Georgia students in secondary-level health care occupations programs. First, foundation skills are grouped as follows: basic skills (reading, writing, arithmetic/mathematics, listening, speaking); thinking…

  1. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector

    PubMed Central

    NAG, Anjali; VYAS, Heer; NAG, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector. PMID:26903262

  2. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector.

    PubMed

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Nag, Pranab

    2016-08-01

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector. PMID:26903262

  3. Occupational Health Problems of Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Chong, John; Lynden, Melody; Harvey, David; Peebles, Marie

    1989-01-01

    Musicians, as well as other performing artists, may have their careers interrupted by, interfered with, or terminated by occupational health problems involving the neuro-musculoskeletal system. Adverse working conditions, organization, and activity may affect the health of musicians in all age groups and at all levels of performing ability. Instrument-specific health problems are related to excessive force, static loading, repetitive movement, and duration of musical performance. Important risk factors are 1) change in technique or instrument; 2) intense preparation for a performance; 3) preparation of a new and difficult repertoire; and 4) prolonged periods of performance without rest. Treatment protocols and health promotion or disease prevention programs are being developed in collaboration with the performing arts community. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:21248930

  4. Health Occupations. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on health occupations for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor's and student's sections are…

  5. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Khandare, Shobha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3–4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need–supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower. PMID:25598615

  6. Occupational health in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Torres, Elma B; Greaves, Ian A; Gapas, Joselito L; Ong, Teresita T

    2002-01-01

    The practice of occupational health and safety (OHS) in the Philippines is shaped by both success and failures. Government initiatives have achieved specific goals, particularly in providing better access by local industries to technical services and manpower development. However, the ability to sustain these achievements has been constrained by lack of adequate resources, both financial and human. Large-scale industrial establishments have better success in the implementation of OHS programs in their organizations. Small- and medium-scale enterprises suffer from limited resources to invest in measures for the health and safety of workers. Similarly, the government has little influence on the health and safety conditions migrant workers experience in another nation. The informal sector is the most deprived in terms of access to OHS measures. The deprivation may be alleviated by economic solutions, as their existence is a result of economic situations. Occupational health development in the Philippines is progressing and will be strengthened by better regulation, by increasing awareness among all sector workers of the importance of OHS, and by adequately building up the capacity of government and vital human resources. PMID:12028954

  7. Professional activities of experienced occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Harber, Philip; Alongi, Gabriela; Su, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Occupational health nurses have diverse backgrounds and their practices require the ability to perform unique professional tasks. This study empirically evaluated their activities and skills using a web-based log system to describe activities at 15 specific sampled times. A national sample of 128 occupational health nurses provided 1,893 activity logs revealing occupational health nurses use both clinical and management skills on a regular basis; indirect client care is as common as direct "hands-on" client care. Most occupational health nurses are directly paid by their employer and activities serve to benefit both individual workers and their employers. Occupational health nurses have specific knowledge and skills in addition to general nursing competencies. Understanding the actual work of occupational health nurses is necessary to align training, certification, and competency maintenance systems such as continuing education with the unique skills used in actual practice activities. PMID:24971818

  8. 75 FR 56549 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Safety and Occupational Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Health (NIOSH), Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate grant application(s) received in response... occupational safety and health, and allied areas. It is the intent of NIOSH to support broad-based...

  9. Online resources for occupational health physicians

    PubMed Central

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Negandhi, Himanshu N.; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.

    2011-01-01

    Periodic retraining ensures that experts are updated in the advances in the science and methods of their profession. Such periodic retraining is sparsely accessible to Indian occupational health physicians and researchers. However, there is significant material that is available online in occupational health and related fields. This information is open-source and is freely available. It does not require any special subscription on the client's part. This information can supplement the efforts of motivated occupational health practitioners in India. PMID:21808493

  10. Italian occupational health: concepts, conflicts, implications.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Goldman, R H

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines Italy's worker-based model for occupational health, especially its key concepts and its relation to social conflict. It briefly reviews the history of three approaches to occupational health in Italy: university-based, industry-based, and government-based. It then analyzes the worker-based approach, which emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s as worker groups and trade unions mobilized around new concepts of occupational health. Five key concepts are discussed: the workers' homogeneous group; workers' subjectivity; the use of contract language; the development of local occupational health institutions; and the use of occupational hazard risk maps. The analysis illustrates how the social processes of mobilization and institutionalization affected the ideas and structures of Italian occupational health. Worker mobilization in Italy produced ideological changes in the nation's occupational health system, institutional changes in universities and governments, and legislative changes at national and local levels. The institutionalization of reforms, however, created new conflicts and problems and tended to restrict worker participation and promote expert intervention. The paper concludes with a brief outline of the history of occupational health approaches in the United States and then discusses the implications of the five Italian concepts for US occupational health policy. PMID:6380322

  11. Teacher's Guide for Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckley, Richard; And Others

    This teacher's guide is intended to acompany the Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations student materials--see note. Contents include suggested tests and answer keys for student evaluation and a tool and equipment list. A comprehensive bibliography is organized into these topics: dental hygiene, medical laboratory technology,…

  12. The contribution of occupation to health inequality

    PubMed Central

    Ravesteijn, Bastian; van Kippersluis, Hans; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Health is distributed unequally by occupation. Workers on a lower rung of the occupational ladder report worse health, have a higher probability of disability and die earlier than workers higher up the occupational hierarchy. Using a theoretical framework that unveils some of the potential mechanisms underlying these disparities, three core insights emerge: (i) there is selection into occupation on the basis of initial wealth, education, and health, (ii) there will be behavioural responses to adverse working conditions, which can have compensating or reinforcing effects on health, and (iii) workplace conditions increase health inequalities if workers with initially low socioeconomic status choose harmful occupations and don’t offset detrimental health effects. We provide empirical illustrations of these insights using data for the Netherlands and assess the evidence available in the economics literature. PMID:24899789

  13. Handbook of occupational safety and health

    SciTech Connect

    Slote, L.

    1987-01-01

    With a practical approach valuable to the non-specialist and professional alike, this book delivers up-to-date information on all aspects of the field, with detailed surveys of ergonomics, occupational safety and health management, analytical techniques, occupational safety and health economics, safety and the law, and information resources. Both manufacturing and service industries are discussed in detail.

  14. Health Occupations: Clinical Rotations and Learning Packets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrine, Patricia

    A one-year introductory course covering twelve different health occupations is presented in this curriculum guide designed for use at the secondary education level. Following a list of course objectives and suggested time allotments for each unit, the health occupations course outline is provided. Unit titles are the following: orientation and…

  15. Health Occupations Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary health occupations education programs in Georgia. It provides a model for organizing vocational instructional content in health occupations, such as nurse, dental assistant, medical lab technician, radiologic technician, emergency medical technician, respiratory therapy assistant, medical…

  16. Occupational Safety and Health Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourley, Frank A., Jr., Comp.

    With the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the need for manpower development in the field of industrial safety and hygiene has resulted in the development of a broad based program in Occupational Safety and Health. The manual provides information to administrators and instructors on a program of study in this field for…

  17. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vision & Mission Board of Directors Fellows What is Occupational Health Nursing Public/Legislative Affairs AAOHN Alliances AAOHN Affiliates AAOHN ... Total Worker Health ® Agenda The American Association of Occupational ... nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission ...

  18. An overview of Japanese occupational health.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Frumkin, H

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Japanese occupational health and evaluates the current situation from three perspectives. Major occupational health hazards are assessed using four sources of data, showing patterns similar to those found in other advanced industrial societies. Institutional structures for occupational health policy are then examined, illustrating strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese legal and administrative systems. Trade union activities are presented, indicating the constraints of enterprise unions, and the tendency for a greater orientation toward compensation than prevention. Significant occupational health problems persist among marginal workers in Japan, including women and various minority groups. The analysis demonstrates a record for occupational health in Japan considerably more mixed than the conventional view. PMID:2968056

  19. Understanding occupational therapy students' attitudes, intentions, and behaviors regarding community service.

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Steve; Hellman, Chan M

    2007-01-01

    Community-based practice has always been a central domain of occupational therapy, and evidence supporting its increasing importance is growing. Preparing occupational therapy students for community practice has received considerable attention in professional literature, but students' voices have seldom been heard concerning this issue. This study sought to investigate attitudes, intentions, and behaviors regarding community service among occupational therapy students enrolled in one professional program using the Community Service Attitudes Survey. We present the Theory of Planned Behavior as a conceptual framework linking students' attitudes and intentions with behaviors. Results indicate that these occupational therapy students' attitudes and intentions regarding community service tended to be more strongly positive than those of their counterparts in other allied health disciplines; however, the community service behaviors of occupational therapy students were not significantly different from those of other allied health students, possibly because occupational therapy students perceived high costs to community service. PMID:17944290

  20. 75 FR 44967 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Designation of a Class of Employees..., Division of Compensation Analysis and Support, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH... Occupational Safety and Health. BILLING CODE 4163-19-P...

  1. Work, obesity, and occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A; Wagner, Gregory R; Ostry, Aleck; Blanciforti, Laura A; Cutlip, Robert G; Krajnak, Kristine M; Luster, Michael; Munson, Albert E; O'Callaghan, James P; Parks, Christine G; Simeonova, Petia P; Miller, Diane B

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co-risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker's response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity's role in occupational health and safety. PMID:17267711

  2. Biological risk and occupational health.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Carmela Romana Natalina; Mazzotta, Adele; La Torre, Giuseppe; De Giusti, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many work activities include hazards to workers, and among these biological risk is particularly important, mostly because of different types of exposure, contact with highly dangerous agents, lack of limit values able to compare all exposures, presence of workers with defective immune systems and therefore more susceptible to the risk. Bioaerosols and dust are considered important vehicles of microganisms at workplaces and interaction with other occupational agents is assumed. Moreover, biological risk can be significant in countries with increasing economic development or particular habits and some biological agents are also classified as carcinogenic to human. Specific emerging biological risks have been recently pointed out by Risk Observatory of the European Agency for Safety and Health at work, and we must consider the worker's attitude and behaviour, influenced by his own perception of risk more than his real knowledge, that could over-underestimate the risk itself. Therefore, biological risk at work requires a complex approach in relation to risk assessment and risk management, made more difficult due to the wide variety of biological agents, working environments and working techniques that can determine the exposures. PMID:22785422

  3. Role conflict in occupational therapy student parents.

    PubMed

    Menks, F A; Tupper, L C

    1987-01-01

    Surveys were conducted of occupational therapy curricula and of student parents who had a child or children less than 18 years old living with them. This was done to gather demographic data, to assess students' level of involvement in student and professional activities, to examine extent and sources of role conflict and potential support systems, and to identify curricular modifications that might be helpful in attracting and retaining these students. Of 5165 occupational therapy students, 8.2% were identified as being parents of children less than 18 years old who were living with them. The curricula survey indicated a generally positive attitude towards these nontraditional students. Both the curricula respondents and student respondents indicated that additional resources in the areas of financial support, child care, support groups, and flexible part-time enrollment were needed. Students' responses to the 15 role conflict situations revealed many good problem solving skills and adaptations. PMID:3826270

  4. Health Occupations Trends and Issues: Issue Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covelli, Nicholas J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to identify the trends occurring within the health service industry and their impact on the providers of health care; determine shifts or emerging occupational areas within health services; and assess local health service providers' staffing patterns and anticipated needs. The study involved meetings with local hospital…

  5. Health Occupations Education--Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This compilation presents over 150 resumes of instructional materials in health occupations education which have appeared quarterly in "Abstracts of Instructional Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (AIM), Fall 1967 through Fall 1971. Resumes cover a broad range of fields and occupations, such as dentistry, dietetics, nursing,…

  6. Health Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Health Occupations." It is divided into four units: the hospital, preventive medicine, drug use and abuse, and alcohol and tobacco. Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the unit's purpose, main ideas, quests, and a list of career opportunities…

  7. Understanding privacy in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anne; Wickström, Gustav; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of privacy in occupational health services. Data were collected through in-depth theme interviews with occupational health professionals (n = 15), employees (n = 15) and employers (n = 14). Our findings indicate that privacy, in this context, is a complex and multilayered concept, and that companies as well as individual employees have their own core secrets. Co-operation between the three groups proved challenging: occupational health professionals have to consider carefully in which situations and how much they are entitled to release private information on individual employees for the benefit of the whole company. Privacy is thus not an absolute right of an individual, but involves the idea of sharing responsibility. The findings open up useful new perspectives on ethical questions of privacy and on the development of occupational health practices. PMID:16961115

  8. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  9. Occupational health hazards in mining: an overview.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, A M

    2004-08-01

    This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic and psychosocial occupational health hazards of mining and associated metallurgical processes. Mining remains an important industrial sector in many parts of the world and although substantial progress has been made in the control of occupational health hazards, there remains room for further risk reduction. This applies particularly to traumatic injury hazards, ergonomic hazards and noise. Vigilance is also required to ensure exposures to coal dust and crystalline silica remain effectively controlled. PMID:15289583

  10. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

  11. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  12. Diversified Cooperative Training. Diversified Cooperative Health Occupations. Manual of Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This manual is designed to assist school personnel, employers, parents/guardians, and students in understanding the policies and procedures required to operate effective diversified cooperative training (DCT) and diversified cooperative health occupations (DCHO) programs. Chapter I describes DCT/DCHO programs, their structure, types of program…

  13. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations (HO) education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  14. Strategies for Learners with Special Needs in Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    This Vocational Instructional Management System (VIMS) module illustrates instructional and cognitive strategies that can be used to teach special needs students vocational competencies in three areas of health occupations: (1) identification of pulse sites; (2) taking a radial pulse; and (3) converting ounces to cubic centimeters (cc). Three…

  15. Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.

    This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

  16. Determinants of Behavior of Students as Pedestrian and Car Occupants in Relation to Traffic Laws in 2013, Gorgan, Iran; An Application of Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Heshmati, Hashem; Behnampour, Nasser; Binaei, Golnaz; Khajavai, Samane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the behavioral pattern of Golestan University of Medical Science (GUMS) students as pedestrian and car occupants in relation to traffic law based on Health Belief Model. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed during 2012 in GUMS. A total of 370 students of GUMS were selected using multi-stage sampling method  including stratified and  random  sampling. Data were collected by using a reliable and valid questionnaire. All the participants filled the questionnaire and the data was extracted according to previously described method. Data were analyzed by using SPSS 18 Software. Descriptive statistic and Spearman correlation was used for analyzing the data. Results: Mean age of the participants was 20.92±1.98 (range 17-32) years. Mean score of perceived susceptibility was 81.87±17.18, being in desirable level. Mean score of perceived severity was 73.39±18.4, being also in desirable level. Mean score of perceived benefits was 77.22 ±16.13, which was also assumed to be in desirable level. Mean score of perceived barriers was 53.46±16.27, assumed as moderate level. In the same way the mean score of practice was 66.17±17.51, so practice in students was in moderate level. Television was the most important cues to action. Conclusion: Perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits regarding safety behaviors was in good level but perceived barriers and behavior was in moderate level and according to the importance of Television, we recommended appropriate intervention such as health education and advocacy, especially through national Television. PMID:27162879

  17. Community engagement: outcomes for occupational therapy students, faculty and clients.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Victoria P

    2014-06-01

    Students in health care professions, including occupational therapy, are required to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in mental health and research. Persons diagnosed with a mental illness, a learning disability or an autism-spectrum disorder desire to achieve goals in higher education and employment. Faculty in health care programmes strives to meet professional goals and accreditation and institution requirements for teaching, service and scholarship. The Bridge Program, a programme based on principles of community engagement, was developed to meet the needs of these three stakeholders. The objective of this paper is to provide programme description and outcomes of the effectiveness of the Bridge Program for all three stakeholders. This uses mixed methods research design including descriptive and quantitative and qualitative one-group pre-test-post-test designs. Instruments consisted of the Occupational Therapy Student and Mental Health Population Scale and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quantitative results support that graduate occupational therapy students gained research and clinical skills (n = 100; p = .000); clients increased performance and satisfaction toward goals (n = 113; p = .000) and faculty (n = 1) achieved goals related to teaching, service and scholarship. Programmes based on principles of community engagement can address the needs of the community, can provide outcomes that advance knowledge about community practice and can result in benefits for all stakeholders. This paper is limited to generalization and instrumentation and recommends an ongoing evaluation of other community engagement programmes involving all stakeholders in the future research. PMID:24477943

  18. Health Occupations Education. Biennial National Health Occupations Research Conference Proceedings. (5th, Nashville, Tennessee, December 1, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzonca, Chet, Ed.

    These proceedings include the agenda of the conference, a list of its cosponsors, and the texts of the following six papers presented at the conference: "Hepatitis Vaccine: Are Health Occupations Education Students Protected?" (Cynthia Chappelka); "Integrated Academics: An HOE Model" (Karen E. Gable, Beverly Ransdell); "The Ability of Work Related…

  19. 78 FR 64504 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) Cancellation:...

  20. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  1. Occupational health in fairy tales.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Alice; Arienti, Federica; Smith, Derek R; Cesana, Giancarlo; Riva, Michele A

    2016-05-01

    Myths and folklore, as expressions of popular beliefs, provide valuable information on medical knowledge in earlier times. Fairy tales have often recounted occupational maladies throughout the ages and also provide some insight into the toxic effects of certain metals, such as mercury. Much historical information can be gleaned from unexpected sources, and as such, fairy tales should be more carefully scrutinized by contemporary researchers with an interest in the historical origins of workplace injury and disease. PMID:26756526

  2. Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald W.; Holz, Frank M.

    Detailed statistics on education are provided for a number of health occupations. Data are given as far back as 1950-1951 for medical and dental schools, while for schools of public health, the data begin in 1975-1976. Complete 1980 data are provided only for dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Statistical tables are included on the…

  3. Safety Guide for Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The handbook is intended to be utilized by health occupations teachers as supplementary instructional materials for a unit on safety. The document contains general safety rules applicable to hospitals and other health care institutions. Outlined are general rules for fire safety and office and clerical safety and more specific rules for the…

  4. [Quality assurance in occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Michalak, J

    1996-01-01

    The general conditions influencing the quality assurance and audit in Polish occupational health services are presented. The factors promoting or hampering the implementation of quality assurance and audits are also discussed. The major influence on the transformation of Polish occupational health services in exorted by employers who are committed to cover the costs of the obligatory prophylactic examination of their employees. This is the factor which also contributes to the improvement of quality if services. The definitions of the most important terms are reviewed to highlight their accordance with the needs of occupational health services in Poland. The examples of audit are presented and the elements of selected methods of auditing are suggested to be adopted in Poland. PMID:8760511

  5. Occupational stress in health service employees.

    PubMed

    Rees, D W; Cooper, C L

    1990-11-01

    Levels of occupational stress were examined in 383 employees of various occupations in one health district, as a preliminary to devising a strategy to reduce the negative effects of stress in the workplace. In comparison with white collar and professional workers in industry, health workers reported significantly greater pressure at work, higher ratings of physical and mental ill health, lower job satisfaction, less internal control over their working environment but used more coping strategies. Approximately one in eight of the subjects has stress symptoms of equal magnitude to patients attending clinical psychology outpatient clinics. It was also found that job satisfaction and psychosomatic ill health were related to sickness absence amongst health employees. The implications of these findings and the consequent challenges facing health service managers are discussed. PMID:10125073

  6. Occupational health surveillance in the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Flueckiger, A

    2000-08-01

    Health surveillance has its well defined place within occupational health care. Only a few functions are specific to the chemical industry. Occupational health surveillance used to be targeted at the early detection of occupational illnesses (secondary prevention) but other purposes have gained importance in recent years: ensuring the fitness of every worker for his or her job, promoting workers' health in general, contributing to the safety of the plant operation by identifying workers whose behaviour is likely to endanger others, contributing to product quality by assisting in the fulfilment of good manufacturing practice requirements, etc. If the occupational physician wants to maintain his role as key player in protecting workers' health, he must get involved in the important activities of primary prevention contributing directly to workplace improvements. Such improvements can only be based on systematic assessments of the workplaces. These assessments again provide the necessary objective basis to structure health surveillance in a way that takes into account the possible adverse effects coming from the workplace. PMID:11294324

  7. Evaluation of Secondary School Programs to Prepare Students for Wage Earning in Health Care Occupations Related to Home Economics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Helen Y.; Jacoby, Gertrude P.

    To evaluate course effectiveness, determine relationship to selected characteristics of success in the course and on the job, and provide answers to a number of educational questions, 16 occupational home economics classes providing training for dietary aides, nurses aides, and health careers were selected for study. Course effectiveness was…

  8. Consulting in occupational health nursing. An overview.

    PubMed

    Roy, D R

    1997-01-01

    1. The term consultant is defined as anyone who provides professional advice or services, which may include internal and external consultants. Consulting is a challenging way to practice occupational health nursing. 2. The consulting process involves problem solving and the creation of change. This process may be illustrated by using the nursing process and the steps of assessment, analysis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. 3. Successful occupational health nursing consultants are excellent communicators, are willing to market themselves, love problem solving, and are self starters. PMID:9043229

  9. Interwoven threads: occupational therapy, feminism, and holistic health.

    PubMed

    Miller, R J

    1992-11-01

    Occupational therapy is a predominantly female profession; 93% to 95% of occupational therapists are women. The implications and ramifications of this reality have seldom been directly addressed. In this article, beliefs about balance, activity, environment, and autonomy are explored from the perspectives of occupational therapy, feminism, holistic health, and medicine. The assertion that occupational therapy has more in common philosophically with feminism and holistic health than it does with medicine is supported. This awareness provides a new framework for examining current issues of concern to the profession, such as support for purposeful activity, existence outside the mainstream of power holders, and problems and powers inherent in being seen as a women's profession. Recommendations are made that occupational therapists commit more money and energy to encourage, facilitate, and support female leadership; develop innovative strategies for keeping members who take time out to raise families informed; support more holistic and feminist reorganization of work settings; instill awareness of these issues in our students; and address our strengths as a women's profession. All occupational therapists must also confront their own anti-women prejudice. PMID:1463073

  10. Total Worker Health: Implications for the Occupational Health Nurse.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Karen; Burns, Candace

    2015-07-01

    Total Worker Health™ is defined as a "strategy integrating occupational safety and health protection with health promotion to prevent worker injury and illness and to advance worker health and well-being." This strategy aligns workplace safety with individual behaviors that support healthy lifestyles. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 presumes that incentive-oriented worksite health promotion provides a critical pathway to reduce group health costs. Because of their scientific and clinical backgrounds, professional nurses are well qualified to educate and assist individuals with healthy lifestyle choices. Occupational health nurses and patient advocates can shape wellness initiatives that best serve both employees and their employers. PMID:26187174

  11. [Effectiveness of health examinations by occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Sauni, Riitta; Leino, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Health examinations are part of the activities of occupational health services in preventing diseases and promoting occupational health. Their aim is to protect workers from health risks on one hand but also to promote the worker's own resources and health in order to maintain their capacity for work. Initiation of preventive, corrective and rehabilitative measures and those directed toward the workplace is attempted at the earliest possible stage. When interpreting the examination data it is in fact important to recognize whether it is the effectiveness of the health examination visit or the subsequent procedures that is being evaluated. PMID:26939488

  12. A Guide to Health Occupations. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheu, Janey M. Y.; And Others

    This guide is intended to assist teachers in using a companion health career reference as a class text for introducing students to the health field. The first two sections describe the purposes and organization of the companion guide. Discussed next are ways of helping students explore health career opportunities and options and come to understand…

  13. Occupational health related concerns among surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Anjuman Gul; Naeem, Zahid; Zaman, Atif; Zahid, Faryal

    2016-01-01

    The surgeon’s daily workload renders him/her susceptible to a variety of the common work-related illness. They are exposed to a number of occupational hazards in their professional work. These hazards include sharp injuries, blood borne pathogens, latex allergy, laser plumes, hazardous chemicals, anesthetic gases, equipment hazards, static postures, and job related stressors. However, many pay little attention to their health, and neither do they seek the appropriate help when necessary. It is observed that occupational hazards pose a huge risk to the personal well-being of surgeons. As such, the importance of early awareness and education alongside prompt intervention is duly emphasized. Therefore, increased attention to the health, economic, personal, and social implications of these injuries is essential for appropriate management and future prevention. These risks are as great as any other occupational hazards affecting surgeons today. The time has come to recognize and address them. PMID:27103909

  14. Occupational health related concerns among surgeons.

    PubMed

    Memon, Anjuman Gul; Naeem, Zahid; Zaman, Atif; Zahid, Faryal

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon's daily workload renders him/her susceptible to a variety of the common work-related illness. They are exposed to a number of occupational hazards in their professional work. These hazards include sharp injuries, blood borne pathogens, latex allergy, laser plumes, hazardous chemicals, anesthetic gases, equipment hazards, static postures, and job related stressors. However, many pay little attention to their health, and neither do they seek the appropriate help when necessary. It is observed that occupational hazards pose a huge risk to the personal well-being of surgeons. As such, the importance of early awareness and education alongside prompt intervention is duly emphasized. Therefore, increased attention to the health, economic, personal, and social implications of these injuries is essential for appropriate management and future prevention. These risks are as great as any other occupational hazards affecting surgeons today. The time has come to recognize and address them. PMID:27103909

  15. Health and productivity: a role for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J

    2001-01-01

    The impressive economic gains achieved by many nations within the past decade have been attributed primarily to improvements in productivity from technological changes. The resultant low unemployment levels, however, emphasize the importance of human capital in the success of any enterprise. Concurrently, some economists have proposed an alternative economic view regarding the relationship between health and income, postulating that improvements in the health of the nation's population have a substantial effect on its economic viability. Such a view directly pertains to occupational health professionals, who are often charged with promoting the health of the worker. Although studies relating the beneficial impact of occupational health on productivity and human performance are limited, some efforts have shown impressive effects, as measured primarily by reduced absenteeism. The prompt, assertive management of occupational injuries and illnesses and their treatment have been well documented. Illnesses not considered traditional occupational ailments, such as migraine headaches, allergic disorders, infectious diseases, and depression, offer opportunities for occupational health professionals to ensure an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment for minimizing the impact on work performance. Considerable opportunities exist for occupational health professionals to demonstrate the importance of certain services to productivity. PMID:11201767

  16. Health Occupations Module. The Integumentary System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the integumentary system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, objectives (e.g., list and describe the types of glands formed in the skin, and explain the…

  17. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  18. Interactive Laser Video Disc. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Glennie; Wright, Patsy

    This module is intended to assist secondary school instructors in selecting and evaluating courseware related to the health occupations education curriculum. The main section contains descriptions of 20 pieces of courseware. Each entry includes the following information: title, description, audience, vendor, price, and recommendation. A glossary…

  19. Health Occupations Education Program Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This final report describes a project to develop a secondary education program management guide for health occupations education in Iowa. Introductory material includes the following: a summary sheet on project objectives, a description of how the objectives were met, the audience served, an educational equity statement, a statement that the…

  20. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  1. Occupational Health Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Marjorie J.; May, W. Theodore

    A 4-year project was conducted at the University of Tennessee College of Nursing to identify occupational health nursing content essential in baccalaureate education for professional nursing. In the process of determining content, a review of relevant literature was made, and a theoretical framework was developed which consisted of an integration…

  2. Health Occupations Education II. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This instructor's manual accompanies the 46 modules in Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Contents include a list of the modules and the performance skills covered in each module, a listing of tools and supplies required for learning activities in the modules cited by module title, an instructional…

  3. Health Occupations Education--A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Kaye Reames

    Developed to provide curriculum materials that secondary Health Occupations Education (HOE) teachers/coordinators can use in organizing their individual programs, this curriculum guide contains performance-based units covering the majority of a four-semester program of study in HOE. The following topics are covered: medical ethics, law, and…

  4. [Occupational injury, a public health priority].

    PubMed

    Benavides, Fernando G; Delclos, Jordi; Benach, Joan; Serra, Consol

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to stimulate new ideas and actions for the prevention of this important public health problem. In 2002 and 2003, respectively, the number of non-fatal occupational injuries was 971,406 and 906,638. Thus, every day in Spain there are more than 2500 non-fatal and between 2 and 3 fatal occupational injuries. Although the profile of the at-risk worker population has changed greatly over the past decade, both quantitatively and qualitatively, the risk of occupational injury still centers on blue collar workers, whether qualified or nonqualified, in the primary and secondary sectors of economic activity. The most common mechanisms of occupational injuries are overexertion for non-fatal injuries and traffic-related for fatal events. The adverse health consequences of new types of employment, which emphasize flexibility and deregulation of the labour market, are exemplified by the association between temporary employment and increased risk of occupational injury. New injury prevention programs have emerged in the last decade, but they appear to have had limited impact. Preventive activities should focus both on working conditions at the company level (micro) as well as on employment and industrial public policies (macro). Greater evaluation is needed of these latter policies. PMID:17193816

  5. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  6. 78 FR 56235 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) In accordance with... the magnitude of the aggregate health burden associated with occupational injuries and illnesses,...

  7. 77 FR 27776 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2..., pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will...

  8. 76 FR 3908 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS); National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS); National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); Meeting Notice In accordance with...-1403. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and...

  9. 75 FR 5333 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss,...

  10. 76 FR 52330 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  11. 77 FR 4048 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a... Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  12. 75 FR 26266 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2.... Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate...

  13. 78 FR 24751 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) In accordance with... Services Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health...

  14. 76 FR 18220 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2..., pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will...

  15. [The emergence of positive occupational health psychology].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Derks, Daantje

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the emerging concept of Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP). We discuss the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs in order to understand the path to health and well-being at work. We describe research findings on several POHP topics, including engagement, psychological capital, and job crafting. Additionally, we review the first positive interventions in this field and conclude by identifying some specific questions for future research. PMID:22269366

  16. Exploring Manufacturing Occupations. Student's Manual. The Manufacturing Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., Rutherford, NJ.

    This student manual and the accompanying instructor's guide (CE 010 376) are directed toward exploring manufacturing occupations. It is designed to help the student explore the various career, occupational, and job related fields found within the manufacturing occupations. Four sections are included. An overview of career education and…

  17. [Causality in occupational health: the Ardystil case].

    PubMed

    García García, A M; Benavides, F G

    1995-01-01

    Establishing causal relationships has been and is today a matter of debate in epidemiology. The observational nature of epidemiological research rends difficult the proving of these relationships. Related to this, different models and causal criteria have been proposed in order to explain health and disease determinants, from pure determinism in Koch postulates, accepting unicausal explanation for diseases, to more realistic multicausal models. In occupational health it is necessary to formulate causal models and criteria to assess causality, and frequently causal assessment in this field has important social, economic and juridical relevance. This paper deal with evaluation of causal relationships in epidemiology and this evaluation is illustrated with a recent example of an occupational health problem in our milieu: the Ardystil case. PMID:8666516

  18. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; Couto, Djalma Ticiani; Merchán-Hamann, Edgar; Branco, Anadergh Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS) was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree. PMID:21994814

  19. Occupational Safety and Health in Peru.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Ismael; Huerta-Mercado, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Peru is a country located on the Pacific coast of South America with a population of more than 30 million inhabitants. In the past 10 years, Peru has had a steady economic growth. Peru is predominantly an extractive industry country, but the manufacturing and construction sectors are booming. It is in this context that regulations have been implemented to protect the safety and health of workers. One of the most important regulations is the Law on Safety and Health at Work, which has been recently promulgated. Regulations are complemented by training and education in occupational safety and health. The measures are yet to be fully implemented thus a positive effect in reducing accidents and occupational diseases at work has not yet been seen. PMID:26709289

  20. [Occupational and non-occupational factors influencing health state of small and medium business workers].

    PubMed

    Fasikov, R M; Khuzhakhmetova, I B; Stepanov, E G

    2010-01-01

    Complex study of work conditions and health parameters of workers engaged into small and medium business proved that preserved and better health of these workers, prevention of occupational and occupationally mediated diseases necessitate federal and regional complex system of measures including legal basis, database on work conditions and their influence on small and medium business workers' health, occupational medicine training for employers and employees, more active involvement of medical institutioins into screening for occupational diseases. PMID:20734853

  1. Recent Cases: Administrative Law--Occupational Safety and Health Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Law Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 are described in two cases: Brennan v. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (Underhill Construction Corp.), and Anning-Johnson Co. v. United States Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. (LBH)

  2. Development of a Health Occupations Continuing Education Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joyce; Latshaw, Lois L.

    The final report summarized the development of a health occupations continuing education center. The project was designed to assess the needs of selected health occupations at the vocational level and to develop guidelines for the establishment of a model for a health occupations continuing education center. The learning needs of licensed…

  3. [The German occupation and health services].

    PubMed

    Gogstad, A C

    1990-12-10

    It was of considerable importance for the German occupants and their Norwegian collaborators, and for the Resistance Movement, to maintain a satisfactory status of health in the civilian population. Thus it was of common interest to keep the health services intact. Health aspects were also important elements of the nazi ideology. Recent studies of German archives reveal that the German civilian administration, Reichskommissariat, played a central role in the nazi revolution of the health services. But certain disagreements arose at an early stage between the German and Norwegian occupation administration concerning strategies of health policy. The collaborator party, Nasjonal Samling, tried to gain control over the professional organizations, but met great resistance. The Norwegian Medical Association lost 85% of its members and was reduced to an appendix of the Ministry. However, the health services were still kept under strict German control. A deterioration of the health services took place from 1944, mainly due to lack of resources because of increased German military needs. PMID:2281452

  4. Environmental and Occupational Exposures in Immigrant Health

    PubMed Central

    Eamranond, Pracha P.; Hu, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation’s health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status. PMID:21572847

  5. 78 FR 75922 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) In accordance with..., Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684-0653. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational...

  6. Occupational safety and health objectives of Healthy People 2010: a systematic approach for occupational health nurses--Part II.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Kimberly; Parks, Carol; Chikotas, Noreen E

    2007-03-01

    Occupational safety and health objectives 20.6 through 20.11 focus on reducing work-related assaults, lead exposure, skin diseases and disorders, needlestick injuries, and work-related, noise-induced hearing loss and promoting worksite stress reduction programs. Using the intervention strategies provided, occupational health nurses can play a key role in reducing workplace-related injury, disease, disability, and death. variety of resources pertaining to occupational health and safety from the federal, national, health care, nursing, and environmental realms can assist occupational health nurses in developing and implementing programs appropriate for their workplaces. Through the Healthy People 2010 occupational health and safety objectives, occupational health nurses have the opportunity to develop and implement workplace policies and programs promoting not only a safe and healthy work environment but also improved health and disease prevention. Occupational health nurses can implement strategies to increase quality and years of life and eliminate health disparities in the American work force. PMID:17405588

  7. The Experience of Student Occupational Therapists with Disabilities in Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Bonny; Baptiste, Sue; Dhillon, Shami; Kravchenko, Tasha; Stewart, Deb; Vanderkaay, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Canadian health professions strive for inclusivity in practice and it is imperative to extend this philosophy to health science students with disabilities. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of student occupational therapists with disabilities enrolled in Canadian universities. Methods: A…

  8. 78 FR 68865 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)...

  9. 77 FR 64549 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and a NACOSH...

  10. 77 FR 62536 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of renewal of... Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Deborah...

  11. 78 FR 21977 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of... Occupational Safety and Health. The Committee will better enable OSHA to perform its duties under...

  12. 76 FR 39902 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH). SUMMARY:...

  13. 76 FR 73689 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  14. 75 FR 78775 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  15. 77 FR 31398 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  16. 77 FR 5577 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH... Occupational Safety and Health, authorized the preparation of this notice under the authority granted...

  17. 77 FR 46126 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nomination of members to serve on the Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health....

  18. 77 FR 33495 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH..., Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, authorized the preparation of this...

  19. 76 FR 54806 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH Meeting. SUMMARY: The Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)...

  20. 76 FR 32374 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH...

  1. Perceived stress in occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Teresa A; Kranz, Peter L; Scoggin, Angela E

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived stress of entry-level master's occupational therapy (OT) students enrolled at a Texas university. A total of 29 students including nine men and 20 women participated in the study. Questionnaires and interviews were used for data collection. The participants were interviewed during the end of the first and second year of the entry-level master's programme in OT. Questionnaires, given at the same time, contained demographic data, open-end questions and force choice questions rated on a Likert scale. The results indicated that the majority of students (66.4%) rated their current level of stress as above average or the highest in their lives. The students expressed feelings of being overwhelmed, confused regarding course expectations and wanted more hands-on experience. When responding to how they managed stress, more than half of the students in the study took an active approach by utilizing exercise. Limitations of the study include using a non-standardized questionnaire, a small number of participants, and that the participants did not represent diversity and were for the most part Hispanic. It is recommended that future research address the cultural and generational issues that may affect perceptions of stress and how students cope with stress. PMID:18798169

  2. Motor variability in occupational health and performance.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Divya; Mathiassen, Svend Erik

    2012-12-01

    Several recent reviews have reported that 'repetitive movements' constitute a risk factor for occupational musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder and arm regions. More variation in biomechanical exposure is often suggested as an effective intervention in such settings. Since increasing variation using extrinsic methods like job rotation may not always be possible in an industrial context, the intrinsic variability of the motor system may offer an alternative opportunity to increase variation. Motor variability refers to the natural variation in postures, movements and muscle activity observed to different extents in all tasks. The current review discusses research appearing in motor control, sports sciences and occupational biomechanics literature to answer whether motor variability is important to consider in an occupational context, and if yes, whether it can be manipulated by training the worker or changing the working conditions so as to increase biomechanical variation without jeopardizing production. The review concludes that motor variability is, indeed, a relevant issue in occupational health and performance and suggests a number of key issues for further research. PMID:22954427

  3. Personal Safety. Cooperative Occupational Education, Unit 18. Instructor Material and Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This unit, one in a series of packets of teacher and student materials for cooperative occupational education (COE) designed for special needs students, stresses to students the importance of taking care of themselves by maintaining good health, avoiding accidents, and making wise choices about the use of drugs and alcohol. The instructor material…

  4. The Health and Welfare Module: An Evaluation Report for the Occupational Exploration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altschuld, James W.; And Others

    The evaluation report is one of seven produced for the Occupational Exploration Program (OEP), a series of simulated occupational experiences designed for junior high school students. Describing the pilot testing of the simulation dealing with health and welfare, the report contains sections describing the simulation context, evaluation…

  5. Health Related Occupations. Revised Summary Report: Technical Employment in Northeast Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William E.; And Others

    The document is one of five summary reports, all part of a Pre-Technical Curriculum Planning Project for secondary students who aspire to technical employment or post secondary technical education. This report represents the results of an assessment of the northeast Florida area's technical occupations in health related occupations. A three-phase…

  6. A Comparison of Osteopathic, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant and Occupational Therapy Students' Personality Styles: Implications for Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardigan, Patrick C.; Cohen, Stanley R.

    This study compared personality traits of students in five health professions. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator was completed by 1,508 osteopathic students, 654 pharmacy students, 165 physical therapy students, 211 physician assistant students, and 70 occupational therapy students. Comparing the extrovert/introvert dimension revealed that pharmacy…

  7. Occupational health and safety in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, H; Câmara, V de M

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Brazil is the world's fifth largest and sixth most populous nation. Its economy is varied, with strong manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and service sectors. Therefore, a wide variety of workplace hazards confronts its work force. This paper describes Brazil's occupational safety and health regulatory scheme, workers' compensation system, plant-level practices, training, and data collection. METHODS. We reviewed and analyzed Brazilian regulatory legislation and government and non-governmental organization (NGO) activity in occupational safety and health, as well as the structure and function of the workers' compensation system. We also reviewed available data on injuries and diseases from major sources, including the now-defunct Instituto Nacional do Previdencia Social (INPS) and the workers' compensation scheme, Seguro de Acidente de Trabalho (SAT). RESULTS. The incidence of workplace injuries has decreased in recent years and is now reported to be about 5 per 100 workers per year. The case fatality rate has been constant at about 5 fatalities per 1000 injuries. Less than 6% of reported injuries are classified as "diseases." Brazil's rates are comparable to those of Mexico and Zimbabwe, and two to four times higher than in most industrialized countries. CONCLUSIONS. Brazil has a high incidence of occupational injuries and diseases; these injuries and diseases are underreported; there is a large informal sector at special risk; and Brazil illustrates the disparity that exists in many countries between legislation on the books and legislation that is actually implemented. PMID:1836110

  8. Low Wages as Occupational Health Hazards.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; De Vogli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The history of occupational medicine has been characterized by ever-widening recognition of hazards, from fires in 1911 to asbestos in the 1960s, to job strain in the 1990s. In this essay, we argue for broadening the recognition further to include low wages. We first review possible mechanisms explaining the effects of wages on health or health behaviors. Mechanisms involve self-esteem, job satisfaction, deprivation, social rank, the "full" price of bad health, patience, and the ability to purchase health-producing goods and services. Second, we discuss empirical studies that rely on large, typically national, data sets and statistical models that use either instrumental variables or natural experiments and also account for other family income. Finally, we draw implications for laws governing minimum wages and labor unions. PMID:27158950

  9. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  10. [Construction: critical issues and occupational health].

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Riva, M M; Santini, M

    2012-01-01

    Construction is strategic in Italy and worldwide, on top for employees number and turnover but also for occupational accidents and diseases. The building site is at high risk and it is difficult to maintain good levels of safety: in recent years they have had an improvement, but the economic crisis did not favour it. The knowledge in the field of prevention is not as widespread as it would be necessary and as requested (OSHA - UE). The Occupational Physician, engaged in risk assessment and management of medical services, must protect the health of workers at high risk for health, aging and performing tiring work, without adequate vocational training and culture, often in precarious conditions of health and lifestyle at risk. There are good experiences around the world and in Italy. Implementation of research in technology and ergonomics, materials and the tools, reduction of workload are needed, improvement of building site organization, of knowledge about health effects, the rehabilitation and reintegration to work. The procedures and processes should improve productivity and at the same time be safer and less dangerous and the lows should be more fitting with the specific characteristics of the construction industry. PMID:23213801

  11. Study on a model for future occupational health: proposal for an occupational health service model in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Toshiaki

    2006-10-01

    The Study Model for Future Occupational Health (funded by a research grant from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Labor) is a joint research project involving various organizations and agencies undertaken from 2002 to 2004. Society has undergone a dramatic transformation due to technological developments and internationalization. At the same time a low birth rate and an aging population have resulted in an increase in both the percentage of workers experiencing strong anxiety and stress in relation to their jobs and the working environment and the number of suicides. As a natural consequence, occupational health services are now expected to provide EAP, consulting and other functions that were formerly considered outside the realm of occupational health. In consideration of this background, the present study propose the following issues to provide a model for future occupational health services that meet the conditions presently confronted by each worker. 1. How to provide occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: 1) a basic time of 20 minutes of occupational health services per year should be allotted to each worker and to all workers; 2) the obligatory regulations should be revised to expand the obligation from businesses each with 50 or more employees under the present laws to businesses each with 30 or more employees. 2. Providers of occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: (1) reinforcement of outside occupational health agencies; (2) fostering occupational health consultant firms; (3) development of an institute of occupational safety and health; (4) support of activities by authorized occupational physicians in the field; (5) expanding of joint selection of occupational physicians including subsidy increase and the extension of a period of subsidy to five hears; (6) licensing of new entry into occupational health undertaking. 3. Introduction of new report system: (1) establishment of the obligation to

  12. Occupational Wellbeing in a School Community--Staff's and Occupational Health Nurses' Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Vertio, Harri

    2006-01-01

    This study is part of an action research project titled "Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Wellbeing in Co-operation with Occupational Health Nurses" (2001-04), which aims to promote occupational wellbeing by actions that maintain the staff's ability to work in 12 school communities in Eastern Finland. This paper describes…

  13. 77 FR 75633 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  14. 77 FR 51810 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  15. Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnstad, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented. Aims To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation. Methods A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011. Results The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process. Conclusions The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey. PMID:26276757

  16. 76 FR 28816 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting and member appointment. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and......

  17. 75 FR 62147 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting and member appointments. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...

  18. 76 FR 71077 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of... advise the Secretary of Labor (Secretary) on all matters relating to the occupational safety and...

  19. 77 FR 43616 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and...

  20. 76 FR 60085 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and...

  1. Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures.

  2. Respiratory protection competencies for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Candace; Lachat, Ann M; Gordon, Kimberly; Ryan, Mary Gene; Gruden, MaryAnn; Barker, D Paxon; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 5 million workers employed at 1.3 million work settings are required to wear some form of respiratory protection as part of their jobs. Occupational health nurses can protect the respiratory health of America's workforce. In 2012, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Grants Committee Working Group conducted a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses to assess their knowledge, comfort, skills, and abilities relative to respiratory protection. The Working Group used the survey findings as a foundation for the development of respiratory protection competencies for occupational health nurses and a guide for the development of educational modules. PMID:24811695

  3. A Survey of the Occupational Interests of Junior College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, G. Gordon; Bellezza, Francis S.

    1968-01-01

    To develop better occupational programs--especially paraprofessional--the college surveyed the interests of 421 students in the General College (Spring 1967). The students were asked to identify their occupational interests on entering college, their current interests, and to indicate whether these had changed or ramained constant. They were also…

  4. A Guide for Working with Handicapped Students in Occupational Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Martha; Thompson, Barbara

    Intended to help teachers provide occupational exploration for handicapped students, this guide is also a source of information on handicapping conditions for regular classroom teachers. Guidelines are offered for occupational exploration classes, and descriptions and characteristics of students with the various handicapping conditions are…

  5. Performance Evaluation of Occupational Therapy Students: A Reliability Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polatajko, Helene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Two occupational therapists rated 13 students after 1-week placements, using the Performance Evaluation of Occupational Therapy Students (PEOTS). The instrument had good interrater reliability but test-retest reliability was difficult to evaluate. Preliminary findings support the use of PEOTS as an evaluation tool. (JOW)

  6. Career Objectives of Wyoming Secondary Students Compared with Parental Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Olive

    The study was conducted to determine the influence of current parental occupations upon the career objectives of secondary students in Wyoming, including variables related to sex and to mother's employment. The study also sought to delineate the career clusters in which there was scant parental occupation and few students' career objectives, to…

  7. Reciprocal service-learning: Texas border head start and master of occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Beck, Alison J; Barnes, Karin J

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a reciprocal service-learning project between Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) students and a Head Start program on the Texas-Mexico border. Education of occupational therapy students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio includes local community learning experiences. However, this project challenged the students and faculty to step outside of and beyond their boundaries to address the unique needs of children in Del Rio, Texas. In a reciprocal service-learning situation, students provided developmental screenings, presentations, and classroom suggestions to the Head Start staff. In turn, the Head Start staff reciprocated by providing presentations and classroom cultural inclusion experiences to the students. The project outcomes suggest that collaborative participation can give students and their community partners broader frameworks from which to view enablement and a sense of mutual responsibility. From this starting point students can be encouraged to explore issues of social inclusion and occupational justice. PMID:23926966

  8. Environmental and occupational health and human rights.

    PubMed

    Slatin, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Modern environmental- and occupational-related morbidities and mortality are determined by the power relations inherent in our existing capitalist systems of production and consumption. These systems thwart human public health rights because of the priority to maximize profit for the systems' owners rather than to establish ecologically sound and socially just development for all. The international public health community must return to its primary prevention roots and take action to eliminate the potential for population morbidities that result from hazardous substance exposures in work and community environments. The 1988 Adelaide Recommendations on Healthy Public Policy provide us with guidelines that incorporate a human rights approach and build on several decades of international public health declarations and charters. To succeed, public health must work with the labor movement. A human rights approach to environmental public health can help us make a transition to sustainable modes of production and consumption. The environmental justice movement's strategy for an economic greening that sets as a priority "pathways out of poverty" can help to advance environmental public health rights. PMID:21733799

  9. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  10. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  11. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  12. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  13. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  14. Leadership attributes identified by practicing occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Murray, M B; Hill, J

    1992-10-01

    This study examined which theoretical approaches to leadership occupational health nurses perceive as most desirable. The trait approach dominates in North American research literature, with occupational health nurses favoring the more traditional leadership attributes of "visionary," "intellectually creative," and "strong linguistic ability." Australian occupational health nurses identified the managerial character traits of "being well informed," "good communication skills," and "objective decision maker" as most appropriate traits of good leaders. Occupational health nurses need to develop alternative leadership approaches to acquire effective political and organizational strategies in today's competitive environment. PMID:1463549

  15. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  16. Occupational health priorities for health standards: the current NIOSH approach.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, J L; Rose, V E

    1979-01-01

    Government agencies responsible for protecting the public from the adverse effects of toxic chemicals must set priorities for research, regulatory action, protocol testing, and monitoring due to the vast number of toxic chemicals and the limited resources available to these agencies. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) must set priorities for research on hazards encountered in the workplace. Priorities are also utilized by NIOSH in preparing criteria for recommended occupational standards which are forwarded to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor, for possible promulgation. For various reasons, including rapidly changing conditions in the American workplace, NIOSH has instituted a revised priorities program. In the future, NIOSH research and recommended standards activities will focus not only on individual chemicals, but also on industries, occupations, chemical classes, and general industrial processes. NIOSH has also implemented a new program which will allow recommended control procedures for certain chemicals to be forwarded to OSHA in a shorter time period than has been experienced previously. PMID:434273

  17. Occupational health in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed Central

    Christiani, D C

    1984-01-01

    China's drive to modernize its economy will produce new occupational health problems even as it resolves earlier ones. Well aware of this, Chinese occupational health experts are intensifying efforts to improve workers' health and establish a modern occupational health program. Occupational lung disease, occupational cancer, heavy metal poisoning, industrial chemical poisoning, and physical factor-induced diseases (noise and heat) have all been targeted for expanded research which will serve as a basis for standard setting. Hazard control efforts include engineering controls, particularly in new construction, limited use of personal protective equipment, and expansion of environmental and medical monitoring. Worker education and professional activities have been expanded. International exchanges have been initiated and will prove occupational health a promising area of scientific cooperation. PMID:6228153

  18. Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-10-01

    The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health. PMID:25160794

  19. Student Perceptions and Lessons Learned from Flipping a Master's Level Environmental and Occupational Health Course (Perceptions des étudiants et leçons tirées d'une classe inversée pour un cours de maîtrise en santé environnementale et professionnelle)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galway, Lindsay P.; Berry, Barbara; Takaro, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom instructional model has emerged as an alternative to the conventional lecture-based teaching that has dominated higher education for decades. In 2013, a cohort of graduate-level public health students participated in a flipped environmental and occupational health course. We present the design, implementation, and evaluation…

  20. Hand VR Exergame for Occupational Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Saskia; Uribe-Quevedo, Alvaro; Kapralos, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use and ubiquity of mobile computing technologies such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and portable gaming consoles has led to an increase in musculoskeletal disorders due to overuse, bad posture, repetitive movements, fixed postures and physical de-conditioning caused by low muscular demands while using (and over-using) these devices. In this paper we present the development of a hand motion-based virtual reality-based exergame for occupational health purposes that allows the user to perform simple exercises using a cost-effective non-invasive motion capture device to help overcome and prevent some of the muskoloskeletal problems associated with the over-use of keyboards and mobile devices. PMID:27046592

  1. Gender issues on occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Eugenio; Vona, Rosa; Monterosso, Davide; Giammarioli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing proportion of women in the workforce raises a range of gender-related questions about the different effects of work-related risks on men and women. Few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries, although at this time, the gender sensitive approach is starting to acquire relevance in the field of human preventive medicine. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has encouraged a policy of gender equality in all European member states. Italy has adopted European provisions with new specific legislation that integrates the previous laws and introduces the gender differences into the workplace. Despite the fact that gender equal legislation opportunities have been enacted in Italy, their application is delayed by some difficulties. This review examines some of these critical aspects. PMID:27364393

  2. Biennial National Health Occupations Education Research Conference (4th, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, October 9-11, 1991). Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice R., Ed.

    These proceedings contain 11 presentations: "The Impact of Multiskilled Practice upon Medical Laboratory Personnel's Job Satisfaction" (Akroyd et al.); "Health Occupations Students of America--A Profile" (Sandiford); "Competencies for Teaching and Need for Update: Perceptions of Secondary Health Occupations Teachers" (Southern et al.); "The…

  3. Occupational safety and health training in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hild, C M

    1992-01-01

    We have eleven years of experience delivering a wide variety of worker education programs in cross-cultural settings to reduce the levels of occupational fatalities and injuries in Alaska. We published an instructional manual and informational poster for workers, on Alaska's "Right-To-Know" law regarding chemical and physical hazards. The "Job Hazard Recognition Program" curriculum for high school students has received national acclaim for being proactive in dealing with worker safety education before the student becomes a member of the work force. Adult educational programs and materials have been designed to include less lecture and formal presentation, and more practical "hands on" and on-the-job experience for specific trades and hazards. New industry specific manuals deal with hazardous waste reduction as a method to reduce harm to the employee. Difficulty in getting instructors and training equipment to rural locations is dealt with by becoming creative in scheduling classes, using locally available equipment, and finding regional contacts who support the overall program. Alternative approaches to funding sources include building on regional long-term plans and establishing complementary program objectives. PMID:1285824

  4. The Genitourinary System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Genitourinary System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the genitourinary system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use…

  5. The Reproductive System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Reproductive System. Health Occupations Education Module. Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the reproductive system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use…

  6. The Musculoskeletal System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Musculoskeletal System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the musculoskeletal system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to…

  7. The Nervous System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Nervous System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the nervous system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  8. The Circulatory System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Circulatory System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the circulatory system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit subset on anatomy and physiology within the set of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  9. Curriculum Study: Health Occupations Education. A Report from the Health Occupations Education Curriculum Study Task Force to the North Carolina Board of Education. 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    A study examined health occupations education (HOE) in secondary public schools in North Carolina. A task force consisting of secondary and postsecondary educators, industry representatives, administrators, and program consultants analyzed preexisting data from 11 sources. These included program standards, student followup, and curriculum…

  10. The Respiratory System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Respiratory System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the respiratory system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use…

  11. The Endocrine System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Endocrine System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the endocrine system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  12. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. IX-A to IX-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 4 modules on intake and output is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each…

  13. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. VI-A to VI-F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 6 modules on personal care is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module…

  14. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. I-A to I-G.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 7 modules on medical and surgical asepsis is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

  15. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. IV-A to IV-F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 6 modules on patient body mechanics is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each…

  16. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations Education. Revised and Expanded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Charles; Swinney, Peggy

    Designed to emphasize the acquisition of job skills, job-practical knowledge, job-theoretical knowledge, and associative needs, this curriculum guide for health occupations education utilizes principles of competency-based education and is reflective of a training model approach to health occupations education. The first of three major parts…

  17. Stepping Up Occupational Safety and Health Through Employee Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 is examined, and it is suggested that employee participation could help improve occupational safety and health in the future, through safety committees, safety circles, safety teams, and individual participation. (MSE)

  18. The CIS Database: Occupational Health and Safety Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Herbert; Scurr, Erica

    1985-01-01

    Describes document acquisition, selection, indexing, and abstracting and discusses online searching of the CIS database, an online system produced by the International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre. This database comprehensively covers information in the field of occupational health and safety. Sample searches and search…

  19. Development of a Health Occupations Continuing Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latshaw, Lois L.

    The project was designed to assess the learning needs of selected health occupations at the vocational level and to develop guidelines for the establishment and administration of a model for a health occupations continuing education center based upon these needs. Licensed practical nurses, nurses aides, and operating room technicians employed in…

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Systems: A Three-Country Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    This article compares the occupational safety and health systems of Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, looking at the origins of their legislation and its effects on occupational safety and health, with a view to determining what lessons may emerge, particularly for developing countries. (Author/SSH)

  1. 77 FR 22358 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657), 29 CFR part 1911, and Secretary's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preparations for the 23rd Session of the UN Sub-Committee of... Stakeholder Input for the Regulatory Coordination Council (RCC) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and...

  2. Software for the occupational health and safety integrated management system

    SciTech Connect

    Vătăsescu, Mihaela

    2015-03-10

    This paper intends to present the design and the production of a software for the Occupational Health and Safety Integrated Management System with the view to a rapid drawing up of the system documents in the field of occupational health and safety.

  3. Occupational health and safety issues in military field hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    2001-10-01

    This paper considers the occupational health and safety issues that apply within a military field hospital. It considers NHS occupational health and safety activities and examines how these might be applied within an Army Medical Services unit. Areas that are unique to field hospitals are highlighted in comparison with a static NHS hospital. Some issues for future work are also considered. PMID:11766206

  4. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  5. Occupational Safety and Health Programs in Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Robert D.; And Others

    This resource guide was developed in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and is intended to assist teachers in implementing courses in occupational safety and health as part of a career education program. The material is a synthesis of films, programed instruction, slides and narration, case studies, safety pamphlets,…

  6. A Career Guidance Curriculum for Ninth Grade Students. Occupational Cluster Learning Activities. Health-Technical. Part 2 of 2. Ninth Grade Career Guidance Project. Project Duration: July 16, 1979, to June 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cape May County Vocational Schools, NJ.

    This second of two parts presents learning activities for four occupational clusters of a ninth-grade cluster program. It contains theory and hands-on activities that explore the occupational requirements and working environment of these areas to help students make intelligent decisions of possible career choices based on levels of interest and…

  7. A Bibliographic Guide to Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease, Sue

    1981-01-01

    Lists government publications, periodicals, loose-leaf services, reports, and reference materials dealing with health and safety in the work environment. Addresses for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regional offices are provided. (FM)

  8. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Distributive Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on distributive services is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handcapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  9. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Packaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on packaging is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  10. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Building Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on building trades is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  11. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Automotive Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on automotive maintenance is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  12. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on floriculture is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  13. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Mechanical Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on mechanical assembly is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education for the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  14. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Building Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on building maintenance is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  15. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Body & Fender Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on body and fender repair is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education for the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  16. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Office Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on office services is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  17. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Ornamental Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on ornamental horticulture is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  18. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Electronic Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on electronic assembly is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  19. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on graphics is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  20. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Wood Products Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on wood products assembly is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  1. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Food Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on food services is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

  2. Rx for Student Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Collegiate Health Care, the only private managed-care company devoted solely to administering college health centers, is addressing student concerns about care and efficiency at traditional campus infirmaries. Detractors take exception to aggressive marketing tactics, and feel students will interpret any care other than the family doctor's as…

  3. Protecting Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2004-01-01

    Public schools have certain responsibilities for the health of their students. Approximately half of the states require schools to implement health standards, including physical exams, as a prerequisite to attendance. All 50 states require public school students to be vaccinated against diseases such as diphtheria, measles, and rubella. And,…

  4. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Dental Assisting. Occupation: Dental Assistant. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Janice

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (dental assistant) in the dental assisting cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing…

  5. Reduction in force perspectives--the occupational health nurse as the employee.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Olga

    2009-06-01

    The occupational health nurse usually encounters reduction in force issues from a company perspective. This article discusses strategies for the occupational health nurse who is downsized. PMID:19552341

  6. Health professions students' use of social media.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carolyn; Giordano, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career. PMID:21695367

  7. Developing an Occupational Health Program: The Team Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Occupational health and safety programs involve professionals in occupational medicine and nursing, industrial hygiene, safety and accident prevention, psychology, sociology and health physics. Occupational health programs should allow regular health evaluations of workers, and the recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental hazards. When designing in-plant medical facilities, accommodation should be made for possible future expansion, disabled people, and an access route for an ambulance. Treatment and prevention facilities should be separate. Patients' records must be complete and kept confidential. The occupational health program must also be evaluated regularly. Education of management and the work force is necessary to ensure that the environment is safe and to prevent accidents. Special programs may be introduced, based on the particular risks, toxicants, and problems in different industries. Imagesp1912-a PMID:21274204

  8. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W.; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting. PMID:24287863

  9. Occupational health concerns in the welding industry.

    PubMed

    Korczynski, R E

    2000-12-01

    The Workplace Safety and Health Branch initiated a proactive study in the welding industry in Manitoba. Eight welding companies participated in this study. Health concerns raised by welders were welders' flash, sore/red/teary eyes, headaches, nosebleeds, and a black mucous discharge from their nasal membrane. Most welders expressed concern regarding excessive smoke levels in the workplace and inadequate ventilation. Types of welding identified were MIG mild steel, MIG stainless steel, and TIG aluminum. Monitoring involved an assessment of noise levels, fume composition, and carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations. Metal analyses were according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7300. Noise dosimeters used were the Quest model 100 and Micro 14 & 15. Carbon monoxide was monitored using the Gastech Model 4700 and ozone using the AID Portable Ozone Meter Model 560. In Manitoba, a hearing conservation program is required when the equivalent sound exposure level (normalized Lex 8-hr) exceeds 80 dBA-weighted. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' threshold limit value-time weighted average (ACGIH TLV-TWA) for iron is 5.0 mg/m3, manganese is 0.2 mg/m3, carbon monoxide is 25 ppm, and ozone is 0.05 ppm (heavy work), 0.08 ppm (moderate work), and 0.1 ppm (light work). Welders' personal exposures to manganese ranged from 0.01-4.93 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 0.5; GM = 0.2; SD +/- 0.9; GSD +/- 3.2) and to iron ranged from 0.04-16.29 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 3.0; GM = 1.4; SD +/- 3.5; GSD +/- 2.5). Noise exposures ranged from 79-98 dBA (N = 44; AM = 88.9; GM = 88.8; SD +/- 4.2; GSD +/- 1.0). Carbon monoxide levels were less than 5.0 ppm (at source) and ozone levels varied from 0.4-0.6 ppm (at source). Ventilation upgrades in the workplace were required in most welding shops. Only 7 percent of the welders wore respiratory protection. A hearing conservation program and hearing protection were required at all monitored workplaces

  10. [Occupational dermatitis in health care personnel].

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick

    2002-09-01

    Occupational dermatosis are frequent among healthcare workers. Irritant hand dermatitis is more common than allergic contact dermatitis. It is enhanced by the exposure to irritants: water, detergents, disinfectants and a history of atopic dermatitis. Natural rubber latex contained in rubber gloves can induce contact urticaria or generalized immediate allergic reactions. Contact eczema can be induced by rubber accelerators such as thiurams, disinfectants (glutaraldehyde, dodecyldimethylammonium). Nurses can become sensitized to handled drugs (antibiotics, propacetamol...). These occupational allergies have to be diagnosed, because sensitized nurses can develop severe generalized cutaneous adverse drug reactions if they are systemically exposed to the same drug than those that has previously induced an occupational contact allergy. PMID:12385152

  11. Occupational hygiene science and its application in occupational health policy, at home and abroad.

    PubMed

    Vincent, J H

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the role of occupational hygiene in the overall framework of occupational health. It draws attention to the unique combination of required individual science subjects, and to the way in which occupational hygiene science contributes to the practice of occupational hygiene in the real world. It focuses in particular on occupational exposure standards. The paper provides, as an example, the specific case of occupational aerosol exposures. It is here that scientific research has made a notable impact on standards and led to a considerable degree of international harmonization. Finally, some broader insights into occupational exposure standards are given, based on experience gained during visits to a number of contrasting countries. The similarities and differences between the various national approaches help indicate what is generic in how standards are set. Such insights provide a basis for further international harmonization in the future. It is concluded that occupational exposure standards appear to be most effectively applied in countries where there are strong occupational hygiene cultures. PMID:10451584

  12. Perceptions among Occupational and Physical Therapy Students of a Nontraditional Methodology for Teaching Laboratory Gross Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, K. Jackson; Denham, Bryan E.; Dinolfo, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the perceptions of physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) students regarding the use of computer-assisted pedagogy and prosection-oriented communications in the laboratory component of a human anatomy course at a comprehensive health sciences university in the southeastern United States. The…

  13. A Pilot Program, Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beliveau, Joseph E.

    Described is the Occupational Conditioning Center Program, a vocational education program in which moderately to severely retarded persons are taught proper work attitudes and basic industrial skills. Program goals are said to include: exposing students to simulated work situations, giving students an opportunity to work in cooperation with…

  14. Occupational Health and Safety Program at Metropolitan State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Fred M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews various aspects of the Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Program at Metropolitan State College, Denver, including the historical development of the program, its curriculum, continuing education courses, and resources for the OH&S Program. (CS)

  15. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH Industries & Occupations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Agriculture ... Health Fatalities in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry Fire Fighters Resources Directory Flight Crew Research Program ...

  16. [Occupational physicians' system in the United kingdom and fit note to promote access to occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    The Statement of Fitness for Work (Fit Note) policy was started in the UK in 2010 in order to promote return to work after sickness absence. Fit Note is issued by General Practitioners (GP). We conducted an interview survey of 2 occupational physicians working in the UK to ascertain the impact of the introduction of Fit Note on occupational health in the UK. They regard the low coverage of occupational health services in the UK, especially among small companies and self-employed workers, as a serious issue. Fit Note was regarded as a tool to induce GPs to participate in occupational health services, and it is expected that they will be new partners in occupational health. The English occupational physicians evaluated the Fit Note system highly, and believe that the increasing participation of GPs in occupational health services will be a steady advancement in occupational health in the UK. PMID:24334697

  17. Prevention through pre-review in occupational health and safety.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, E D; Kretzmer, D

    1980-01-01

    Occupational health problems have needlessly been produced at many worksites as a consequence of their not having been anticipated during design and construction. Pre-review may be an effective and efficient mechanism for preventive intervention in occupational health and safety. Legal and administrative precedents are cited from the United States and other countries. Proposals are presented, with Israel as an example, which aim to implement the principle of pre-review. PMID:7352610

  18. Competencies most valued by employers--Implications for master's-prepared occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hart, Pamela A; Olson, Debra K; Fredrickson, Ann L; McGovern, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    Educational institutions seek to prepare students to compete for positions in the workplace with a competency-based education. Employers are important stakeholders in the preparation of occupational health nurses. Competencies considered most valuable by employers will affect their hiring decisions. This study identifies competencies valued by employers in the workplace. PMID:16862880

  19. "2 + 2" Articulated Health Occupations Project. Nursing Program. First Year Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris Independent School District, TX.

    This report describes the procedures and accomplishments of the first year of a multiyear project to develop a "2 + 2" articulated training program in health careers that links the last 2 years of secondary and the first 2 years of postsecondary training to prepare students for employment in one or more occupations. A related goal for this project…

  20. Health Care Assisting Lesson Planning Guide for Long-Term Care Aide Certification. South Carolina Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This document consists of 13 competency outlines/lesson plans that have been developed for use in preparing students for certification as long-term care aides through South Carolina's health occupations education program. The following competencies are covered in the individual lessons: identify the function and responsibilities of nurses aides;…

  1. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony. PMID:12033091

  2. Occupational health nurses' educational needs: what do they want?

    PubMed

    Mackey, Thomas A; Cole, Frank L; Parnell, Susan

    2003-12-01

    Educational preferences, impediments to obtaining an education, and the needs of occupational health nurses are not well understood. The purposes of this regional study were to determine the graduate and continuing educational preferences, impediments, and needs of occupational health nurses in the states of Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Questionnaires (1,172) were mailed to all occupational health nurses identified by the respective state boards of nursing (N = 5). Results from 256 (response rate of 21.8%) returned questionnaires show 43.8% were interested in obtaining a graduate degree in occupational health nursing while only 48.8% of employers encourage them to obtain a higher degree. Only 33.2% reported the company for which they work provides rewards for obtaining an advanced degree or certification as an occupational health nurse. The two greatest impediments to obtaining a graduate degree as an occupational health nurse were a long distance from campus (56.3%) and lack of money (37.9%). PMID:14680154

  3. The President's Report on Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This report describes what has been done to implement the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 during its first year of operation. The report examines the responsibilities of the Department of Labor for setting safety and health standards and also explores the activities of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in research and…

  4. Proceedings of the 1992 Annual Meeting NASA Occupational Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to exchange information across NASA facilities that is critical to agency-wide improvement in the efforts to maintain and enhance employee health. The topics covered include the following: occupational medicine, environmental health, physical fitness, and health education.

  5. Functions and Positions of Corporate Occupational Health Managers in Company-Wide Occupational Health Management.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Nagata, Tomohisa; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Hino, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Masako

    2013-08-21

    Objectives: It has become necessary for Japanese corporations to manage occupational health (OH) programs consistently throughout their organizations. Corporations need to clarify their health policies, develop standardized programs, assign OH staff, and ensure that they communicate with each other. To realize such conditions, many occupational physicians (OPs), who have the skills to lead corporation-wide OH activities, are now being assigned to head offices of corporations and referred to as corporate OH managers. However, there has been no research to date in Japan on their actual situation and function. We conducted an interview study of corporate OH managers to clarify their functions and positions in corporations. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semi-structural interviews with 14 corporate OH managers in large corporations employing more than 5,000 workers and multiple OPs. Interview scripts were coded to identify their functions as corporate OH managers and the context of their positions within corporate-wide OH management systems. Results: Five contexts were suggested. 1) Corporate OH managers played central roles in developing corporate health policies, standards and plans. 2) Head office department managers who supervised the sites distributed the policies and standards, and corporate OH managers instructed site OPs and OH staff. 3) In some corporations, corporate OH managers participated in the evaluation process of OH programs as part of occupational safety and health management systems or business audits. 4) Corporate OH managers led communications among OPs and OH staff by facilitating corporate OH meetings, and provided technical training. 5) Corporate OH managers in positions that enabled them to report directly or indirectly to decision makers (i.e., directors in charge) on human resource issues. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that companies that promote consistent company-wide OH programs also utilized the professional knowledge

  6. Occupational health assessment of chromite toxicity among Indian miners

    PubMed Central

    Das, Alok Prasad; Singh, Shikha

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentration of hexavalent chromium pollution and contamination has contributed a major health hazard affecting more than 2 lakh mine workers and inhabitants residing in the Sukinda chromite mine of Odisha, India. Despite people suffering from several forms of ill health, physical and mental deformities, constant exposure to toxic wastes and chronic diseases as a result of chromite mining, there is a tragic gap in the availability of 'scientific’ studies and data on the health hazards of mining in India. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Odisha State Pollution Control Board and the Odisha Voluntary Health Association data were used to compile the possible occupational health hazards, hexavalent chromium exposure and diseases among Sukinda chromite mines workers. Studies were reviewed to determine the routes of exposure and possible mechanism of chromium induced carcinogenicity among the workers. Our studies suggest all forms of hexavalent chromium are regarded as carcinogenic to workers however the most important routes of occupational exposure to Cr (VI) are inhalation and dermal contact. This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial occupational health hazards of chromite mining and associated metallurgical processes to monitor the mining environment as well as the miners exposed to these toxicants to foster a safe work environment. The authors anticipate that the outcome of this manuscript will have an impact on Indian chromite mining industry that will subsequently bring about improvements in work conditions, develop intervention experiments in occupational health and safety programs. PMID:21808494

  7. Housekeeper in Health Care Facilities. Student Manual [and] Instructor Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane

    This packet contains a student manual and instructor key for a course in housekeeping for health care facilities in secondary health occupations programs. The student manual is divided into six units: (1) introduction to housekeeping; (2) interpersonal relations; (3) infection control and safety; (4) general cleaning procedures; (5) cleaning areas…

  8. The sociologic context of occupational health in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J E; Macun, I

    1989-01-01

    The early history of the occupational health system in South Africa is outlined up to the early 1970s which mark a political and social transition in the society. Relevant demographic and social data are provided, and the roles and mutual relations of capital, labor, state, and academic sectors are discussed. During the past 15 years there has been heightened occupational health activity. Major legislative activity has included several commissions, the promulgation of new laws and regulations governing the workplace, and deregulatory measures in a contradictory mix. Conflictual relations between social forces are illustrated by two examples involving the introduction of safety representatives in the workplace, and compensation for occupational lung disease. The implications of wider political and economic realities are analyzed, and current and probable future trends in the evolution of the occupational health system are identified. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:2521546

  9. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. PMID:25101931

  10. A Comparative Study between CETA, Special Needs, and Office Occupations Students on Attainment of Occupational Survival Skills and Career Attitude Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) students, special needs students, and office occupations students on attainment of occupational survival skills and career attitudes maturity found that CETA students have attained a greater level of occupational survival skills than both cooperative office occupations and…

  11. 78 FR 30937 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of a... electronically. The NACOSH meeting is open to the public. Section 7(a) of the Occupational Safety and Health...

  12. 78 FR 54923 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH). SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary...

  13. 77 FR 58488 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... federal OSHA plan approval on December 28, 1973 (39 FR 1010) and the Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 RIN 1218-AC78 Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Department of Labor....

  14. Technology enhanced learning for occupational and environmental health nursing: a global imperative.

    PubMed

    Olson, D K; Cohn, S; Carlson, V

    2000-04-01

    One strategy for decreasing the barriers to higher education and for increasing the competency and performance of the occupational and environmental health nurse in the information age is technology enhanced learning. Technology enhanced learning encompasses a variety of technologies employed in teaching and learning activities of presentation, interaction, and transmission to on campus and distant students. Web based learning is growing faster than any other instructional technology, offering students convenience and a wealth of information. PMID:11111417

  15. [Mobbing: a problem in occupational health].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; D'Andrea, R

    2001-01-01

    Occupational stress may be the cause of psychosomatic and mental disorders. A development of conflicts into a negative direction may trigger a mobbing behaviour at workplace and a mobbing syndrome on the victims. On account of the frequency of mobbing activities at work, it is to assert the need of preventive interventions. PMID:11260971

  16. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee...

  17. Occupational hazards to the health of professional gardeners.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D

    2014-01-01

    Professional gardening is a broad occupation that involves a wide range of tasks. Gardeners confront an equally wide variety of physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial hazards in their workplace. Consequently, occupational injuries and mortality are unfortunately common. The aim of this brief review is to collate and summarise the main hazards of gardening, their health effects and control measures. The diversity and size of gardeners' occupational exposures to the hazards outlined in this paper highlight some of the underlying causes of their increased risk of occupational injury or death. The risk can be reduced in many cases by ensuring appropriate protective strategies are adopted. Other ways through which the burden of occupational injury and mortality can be minimised are introduced and discussed in this paper. PMID:24517285

  18. Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations. Results…

  19. Occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers.

    PubMed Central

    Mobed, K; Gold, E B; Schenker, M B

    1992-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farm workers are one of the most underserved and understudied populations in the United States. The total US population of such farm workers has been estimated at 5 million, of whom about 20% live or work in California. Farm workers perform strenuous tasks and are exposed to a wide variety of occupational risks and hazards. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to health care also contribute to existing health problems in this population. Potential farm work-related health problems include accidents, pesticide-related illnesses, musculoskeletal and soft-tissue disorders, dermatitis, noninfectious respiratory conditions, reproductive health problems, health problems of children of farm workers, climate-caused illnesses, communicable diseases, bladder and kidney disorders, and eye and ear problems. Few epidemiologic studies exist of these occupational health problems. No comprehensive epidemiologic studies have assessed the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers and their dependents. Although the migratory nature of this population makes long-term studies difficult, the development of standardized data collection instruments for health consequences and scientific assessment of farm work exposures and working conditions are vital to characterize and reduce the occupational health risks in farm workers. PMID:1413786

  20. The occupational health and safety of flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robin F; Powell, David M C

    2012-05-01

    In order to perform safety-critical roles in emergency situations, flight attendants should meet minimum health standards and not be impaired by factors such as fatigue. In addition, the unique occupational and environmental characteristics of flight attendant employment may have consequential occupational health and safety implications, including radiation exposure, cancer, mental ill-health, musculoskeletal injury, reproductive disorders, and symptoms from cabin air contamination. The respective roles of governments and employers in managing these are controversial. A structured literature review was undertaken to identify key themes for promoting a future agenda for flight attendant health and safety. Recommendations include breast cancer health promotion, implementation of Fatigue Risk Management Systems, standardization of data collection on radiation exposure and health outcomes, and more coordinated approaches to occupational health and safety risk management. Research is ongoing into cabin air contamination incidents, cancer, and fatigue as health and safety concerns. Concerns are raised that statutory medical certification for flight attendants will not benefit either flight safety or occupational health. PMID:22606869

  1. Current issues in occupational health nursing. A Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunter, C

    1991-07-01

    The National Association of Occupational Health Nurses is still in its infancy and is striving to become an interest group under the umbrella of the Canadian Nurses Association. This will bring together the provincial associations in a common goal of promoting worker health and safety. The diversity of the country and the sheer magnitude of the various occupations of Canadians reflect the need for the occupational health nurse to be well educated and kept abreast of new developments. Changes in the worksite echo changes in health and safety legislation that will help to improve conditions in the workplace. Future challenges arise from changes in the work force and the nature of work and include: ergonomic issues, job stress, older workers, EAPs, and increased competition. PMID:2069607

  2. Towards an Inclusive Occupational Health and Safety For Informal Workers.

    PubMed

    Lund, Francie; Alfers, Laura; Santana, Vilma

    2016-08-01

    Large numbers of workers worldwide work informally. Yet the discipline and practice of occupational health and safety covers largely only formal workers, in formal work places. A comprehensive approach would have to take into account specific hazards faced by those in different occupations, working in "atypical" work places. Local authorities exert significant influence in the provision of infrastructure that impacts on health and safety, such as water and sanitation. Examples from Brazil and Ghana show that positive interventions are possible so long as informal workers are recognized as contributing to the economy. A more inclusive occupational health and safety is most likely to happen in contexts where informal workers have an organized voice and where there are responsive health and safety personnel who understand that the world of work has changed. Some policy interventions that impact on healthy and safe work will need to involve multiple stakeholders and institutions. PMID:27261445

  3. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenghong; Chi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China's regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  4. Health Track System—An Automated Occupational Medical System

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Jack E.; Hartridge, Anne D.; Maluish, Andrew G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an automated occupational health and hazards system is being undertaken at the Department of Energy by Electronic Data Systems. This system, called the Health Track System (HTS), involves the integration and collection of data from the fields of occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, health physics, safety and personnel. This in itself is an exciting prospect, however, the scope of the system calls for it to be installed throughout DOE and contractor organizations across the country, which is even more exciting. Presented here are the main ideas behind the system, and how state of the art technology can be applied to this task.

  5. Occupational health hazards of mine workers*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K. S.; Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Mining has always been among the most hazardous of occupations, and with the increasing demand for coal and minerals safety in mines assumes even greater importance. This article describes the present situation with regard to conditions in mines, the diseases and disabilities resulting from them, and measures that can be taken to prevent or treat them. The hazards covered are: accidents, dust (including poisoning by certain ores), high temperature and humidity, noise and vibration, toxic gases, and miscellaneous other hazards. PMID:307452

  6. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  7. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Administrator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual guides an instructor in conducting a training course for first-line supervisors to familiarize them with six aspects relating to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970: (1) requirements of the Act, (2) compliance with its standards, (3) identification of health and safety hazards, (4) correction of adverse conditions, (5) record…

  8. Health Occupations Education. Units of Instruction. Teacher's Guide. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This manual is the first part of a two-volume teacher's guide to a series of instructional units for use in health occupations education programs in Texas. Covered in the 10 units included in this volume are the following topics: taking and recording vital signs; job applications and interviews; grooming and personal hygiene; health careers;…

  9. Integrating Occupational Health and Safety into TAFE Courses: Curriculum Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Bob; Mageean, Pauline

    This guide is designed to help technical and further education (TAFE) curriculum writers in Australia integrate safety education into vocational education courses. It provides a general overview of occupational health and safety from the perspective of TAFE trade training and a brief summary of the major health and safety issues that might be…

  10. Nursing III. A Course of Study. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.

    This curriculum guide for instructors provides a course of study (Nursing III) requisite for the third and concluding portion of a 1-year practical nursing curriculum designed to continue opportunities for career mobility in the health occupations. Content is in three sections: (1) Medical Surgical Nursing II, (2) Mental Health Nursing, and (3)…

  11. Educational and Occupational Preferences of High School Students in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimaki, Katerina; Kaminioti, Olympia; Kostaki, Anastasia; Psarakis, Stelios; Tsourti, Zoi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of personal and structural characteristics in the development of educational and occupational preferences, and examine the formation of students' perceptions about the labour market and the factors influencing the formation of these perceptions. Design/methodology/approach - Data…

  12. The Educational Interaction between Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Kimberly K.; Howell, Dana M.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) program directors (n=123) to identify the prevalence of shared learning found that two-thirds shared some coursework; most OT and PT students do not have opportunities to practice interdisciplinary teamwork; and some perceived benefits of shared learning also posed barriers. (Contains…

  13. A Model for Teaching Group Dynamics to Occupational Therapy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kautzmann, Lisette

    A model for teaching group dynamics to undergraduate occupational therapy students was developed. The model incorporated adult education methodology in the teaching of group leadership and personal growth. A literature review was undertaken to identify the purpose and components of laboratory education, which was recognized as the preferred method…

  14. Recommendations for Biomonitoring of Emergency Responders: Focus on Occupational Health Investigations and Occupational Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Decker, John A.; DeBord, D. Gayle; Bernard, Bruce; Dotson, G. Scott; Halpin, John; Hines, Cynthia J.; Kiefer, Max; Myers, Kyle; Page, Elena; Schulte, Paul; Snawder, John

    2015-01-01

    The disaster environment frequently presents rapidly evolving and unpredictable hazardous exposures to emergency responders. Improved estimates of exposure and effect from biomonitoring can be used to assess exposure–response relationships, potential health consequences, and effectiveness of control measures. Disaster settings, however, pose significant challenges for biomonitoring. A decision process for determining when to conduct biomonitoring during and following disasters was developed. Separate but overlapping decision processes were developed for biomonitoring performed as part of occupational health investigations that directly benefit emergency responders in the short term and for biomonitoring intended to support research studies. Two categories of factors critical to the decision process for biomonitoring were identified: Is biomonitoring appropriate for the intended purpose and is biomonitoring feasible under the circumstances of the emergency response? Factors within these categories include information needs, relevance, interpretability, ethics, methodology, and logistics. Biomonitoring of emergency responders can be a valuable tool for exposure and risk assessment. Information needs, relevance, and interpretability will largely determine if biomonitoring is appropriate; logistical factors will largely determine if biomonitoring is feasible. The decision process should be formalized and may benefit from advance planning. PMID:23356122

  15. From occupational safety and health to Workers' Health: history and challenges to the Brazilian Journal of Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Jackson Filho, José Marçal; Algranti, Eduardo; Saito, Cézar Akiyoshi; Garcia, Eduardo Garcia

    2015-07-01

    The Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional (RBSO) - Brazilian Journal of Occupational Health - is an academic peer-reviewed journal in the field of Workers' Health that has been published by Fundacentro since 1973. Its historical trajectory, current performance, challenges and future perspectives were approached, in this paper, from a documental analysis. The journal's history can be divided into three periods, starting during the military government. At the beginning, the journal was the official vehicle for the Brazilian occupational accidents prevention policy, in which Fundacentro played a central role. The early 1980s opens space for technical-scientific publications and the field of Workers' Health emerges on the journal's pages. In 2005-6, a restructuring process is implemented, ensuring independent editorial policy and structures. Since 2006, 139 original papers and 9 thematic issues have been published. The journal is indexed in 9 bibliographic databases, has been ranked B1 in the field of interdisciplinary studies and B2 in the field of public health by CAPES, has an upward trend in the SciELO Impact Factor, and has an h-index of 5 in Google Scholar. Nevertheless, the low scientific production in the field and the high rate of rejection of manuscripts may jeopardize the survival of the journal, which is the main locus for scientific publications in the field of Workers' Health. PMID:26132243

  16. Business analysis in occupational health and safety consultations.

    PubMed

    Snyder, T B; Himmelstein, J; Pransky, G; Beavers, J D

    1991-10-01

    We present a method for incorporating business analysis into comprehensive health and safety consultations using as an example a plant with an elevated incidence of cumulative trauma disorders. Business information, including product and management history, short- and long-term corporate goals, functional analysis, profit history, organizational structure with respect to health and safety, and personnel and labor-management relationships are evaluated simultaneously with traditional ergonomic factors. The additional business data allow consultants to identify the full scope of etiologies and make practical, credible recommendations that are more likely to be adopted by management and labor. We propose that techniques of "business analysis" be routinely incorporated into occupational health and safety consultations. However, because collection and interpretation of these data require business skills outside the occupational safety and health expert's usual repertoire, the consulting team must include participants with business expertise. We have found that occupational health medical personnel with an understanding of business analysis concepts can be very effective advocates for changes in health and safety practices. We strongly recommend incorporating methods of business analysis into the occupational health and safety curriculum. PMID:1753300

  17. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  19. 75 FR 10629 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Programs), 41 CFR part 102-3, and Secretary of Labor's Order 5-2007 (72 FR 31160... Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on......

  20. 76 FR 60535 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Reopening of the record and extension of... submitting nominations for membership on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...

  1. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... OHN Career Profiles Professional Liability Publications Online Store Workplace Health & Safety Journal AAOHN.org News Archive Foundation About ... Honor/Memory of Someone Conference Information NIOSH Total Worker Health ® AAOHN Academy News AAOHN 2017 National Conference April ...

  2. Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

    The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

  3. Occupational health effects of nonionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, M.G. )

    1992-07-01

    Nonionizing radiation includes electromagnetic energy distributed as near-ultraviolet and visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves, radio frequencies, and very low frequency and extremely low frequency alternating electric and magnetic fields, and almost every member of modern society is exposed to it in some form. Usually the intensity of exposure is low in the general population but can be greatly increased in the workplace. The forms of nonionizing radiation are described and their physical characteristics, occupational sources, biologic effects, and exposure criteria are delineated.90 references.

  4. [The role of ergonomics in occupational health - past and future].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    The aim of working condition and ergonomics is to control the task method and condition for the best productive activity with the highest efficiency and sustainability. The Principles of Scientific Management by Frederick Winslow Taylor and its criticism by Gito Teruoka, the 1st director of The Institute for Science of Labour, are introduced for a better understanding of work condition and ergonomics in this article. Occupational physician have a duty to control working method and condition to reduce the health hazards induced by job duty. Not only the technical knowledge of medicine, but also a fundamental knowledge of manufacturing is needed for the occupational physician. The development of tools for early detection of health hazards and workload evaluation, the introduction of work management systems with cooperation between occupational physicians and technical experts of manufacturing are needed for effective control of the workplace. The strengthening of the Industrial Safety and Health Law should help to drive these improvements. PMID:24107345

  5. Promoting Occupational Safety and Health for Cambodian Entertainment Sector Workers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lee-Nah; Howard, Richard; Torriente, Anna Maria; Por, Chuong

    2016-08-01

    Cambodia has developed booming textile, garment, tourism, and entertainment service industries since the mid-1990s. The 2007 global financial crisis pushed many garment workers, who lost their jobs, into the entertainment sector. Entertainment workers are typically engaged informally by their employers and are subjected to long working hours, sexual harassment, and violence. Many who sell beverages are forced into excessive alcohol consumption as part of their work. Many are also expected by their employers and clients to provide sexual services. To address unsafe and unhealthy working conditions for these workers, an innovative occupational safety and health regulation was adopted in 2014. This first-of-its-kind occupational safety and health regulation was developed jointly by the Cambodian Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training and employers' and workers' organizations in the entertainment sector. The implementation of this regulation can also be a viable contribution of occupational safety and health to HIV interventions for these workers. PMID:27242184

  6. Quality and quality improvement in occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Widtfeldt, A K

    1992-07-01

    Donabedian first defined quality as the result of assessing the structures, processes, and outcomes of health care. The emphasis on quality assurance is changing to quality improvement. The definition of quality in health care has expanded to include the expectations and opinion of patients, their representative, and society. As the cost of health care continues to rise at twice the rate of inflation, business wants to know how health care dollars are spent. Occupational health nurses, to add value to the businesses in which they work, must be a part of the trend in measuring the quality of the products and services of their health services. PMID:1616507

  7. Readiness for interprofessional learning: a cross-faculty comparison between architecture and occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan; Stagnitti, Karen

    2013-09-01

    Health and wellbeing includes a need for built environments to accommodate and be inclusive of the broadest range of people and a corresponding need to ensure graduates are ready to engage in this field of interprofessional and inter-industry practise. All too often, interprofessional education in higher education is neglected with a tendency towards educational silos, particularly at a cross-faculty level. This paper reports on an initiative that embedded universal design practice education into the curricula of first year architecture and third year occupational therapy students and evaluated the impact on students' readiness for interprofessional learning. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was given to students at the beginning and end of the semester during which students participated in a variety of online and face-to-face curriculum initiatives. Results showed that at the beginning of semester, occupational therapy students were significantly more positive about interprofessional learning than their architecture counterparts. Post-results showed that this trend continued but that occupational therapy students became less positive on some items after the interprofessional learning experience. This study provides insights into the interprofessional learning experiences of a group of students who have not previously been studied within the available literature. PMID:23914981

  8. Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Health Occupations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClurg, Ronald B.

    An analysis of competencies practiced by seventeen health occupation groups was conducted to determine the extent to which commonality existed in job activities. (The groups include accredited records technician, aide/orderly, dental assistant, dental hygienist, dental lab technician, dietetic technician, licensed practical nurse, medical…

  9. Health and Human Services. Occupational Analyses. Worker Task Lists and Supplementary Information for Selected Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This publication contains worker task lists and supplementary information for eight occupations in the health and human services cluster: (1) criminal justice; (2) protective services; (3) dental assistant; (4) dental hygienist; (5) diagnostic medical sonographer; (6) medical office assistant; (7) fire medic; and (8) parks and recreation manager.…

  10. Health Occupations. Dental Auxiliaries, Nursing, Therapy and Rehabilitation, Health Services Administration. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental…

  11. 77 FR 40622 - Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (MSHRAC, NIOSH) In accordance with section..., safety culture, occupational health and safety management systems, preventing coal dust explosions, and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  12. Occupational health issues in marine and freshwater research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Marine and freshwater scientists are potentially exposed to a wide variety of occupational hazards. Depending on the focus of their research, risks may include animal attacks, physiological stresses, exposure to toxins and carcinogens, and dangerous environmental conditions. Many of these hazards have been investigated amongst the general population in their recreational use of the environment; however, very few studies have specifically related potential hazards to occupational exposure. For example, while the incidence of shark and crocodile attacks may invoke strong emotions and the occupational risk of working with these animals is certainly real, many more people are stung by jellyfish or bitten by snakes or dogs each year. Furthermore, a large proportion of SCUBA-related injuries and deaths are incurred by novice or uncertified divers, rather than professional divers using aquatic environments. Nonetheless, marine and freshwater research remains a potentially risky occupation, and the likelihood of death, injury and long-term health impacts still needs to be seriously considered. PMID:22429712

  13. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, TOM; FLYNN, MICHAEL; WEINSTOCK, DEBORAH; ZANONI, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the essential elements of effective occupational safety and health education and training programs targeting under-served communities. While not an exhaustive review of the literature on occupational safety and health training, the paper provides a guide for practitioners and researchers to the key factors they should consider in the design and implementation of training programs for underserved communities. It also addresses issues of evaluation of such programs, with specific emphasis on considerations for programs involving low-literacy and limited-English-speaking workers. PMID:25053607

  14. The network of WHO Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health and the role of maritime centres.

    PubMed

    Kortum, Evelyn; Fingerhut, Marilyn A

    2003-01-01

    The WHO Network of Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health comprises 70 Collaborating Centres. Four of these Centres are specialised in Maritime Occupational Health and they are situated in Poland, Germany, Denmark and the Ukraine. All Collaborating Centres follow the mandate of the Occupational Health Programme in WHO, which is the Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All. Collaborating Centres in Maritime Occupational Health cover a specific group of workers who are exposed to different work environments than workers on land. They are often not at all or only insufficiently covered by any health services. The Collaborating Centres in Maritime Occupational Health provide an excellent example of international collaboration. PMID:14974788

  15. Occupational Therapy and Sexual and Reproductive Health Promotion in Adolescence: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, Daniela Tavares; de Sena e Vasconcelos, Anna Carolina; Monteiro, Rosana Juliet Silva; Facundes, Vera Lúcia Dutra; Trajano, Maria de Fátima Cordeiro; de Lima, Luciane Soares

    2016-03-01

    Occupational therapy can contribute to sexual and reproductive health through health education. The purpose of this study was to describe an occupational therapy intervention aimed at sexual and reproductive health promotion in adolescents. Fifty-eight adolescents were involved in the study, before, during and after the interventions. Educative activities such as puzzles, storytelling, mime and board games were used, which occupational therapy faculty and students had constructed. The games were employed as mediators for gaining knowledge in sexual and reproductive health. Outcome was measured using a questionnaire, audio recordings and field diaries. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic content analysis. The results showed the adolescents' increased knowledge of sexual and reproductive health information immediately after the intervention. The thematic analysis was grouped into three categories: the adolescents' initial expectations regarding the project, reflections on the process experienced during the interventions and use of educational games by occupational therapists. The importance of rapport and dialogue was highlighted in the construction of interventions based on participatory methods. The absence of a longitudinal follow-up is a limitation in this study. Further research is important to systematically assess sexual health promotion strategies in adolescence. PMID:26174484

  16. Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

    2010-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

  17. Occupational mercury exposure and male reproductive health

    SciTech Connect

    Alcser, K.H.; Brix, K.A.; Fine, L.J.; Kallenbach, L.R.; Wolfe, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship of male occupational exposure to elemental mercury and several reproductive outcomes. All subjects worked at least 4 months between 1953 and 1966 at a plant that used elemental mercury; 247 white male employees who had the highest exposures were compared to 255 matched nonexposed employees. Individual exposure to mercury was estimated from urinary mercury measurement records. Information on reproductive history and potential confounding variables was obtained through personal interview with each of the employees and with a subset of their wives. No associations were demonstrated between mercury exposure and decreased fertility or increased rates of major malformations or serious childhood illnesses. After controlling for previous miscarriage history, mercury exposure was not a significant risk factor for miscarriage. Because of this study's potential problems with long-term recall, further studies of the effect of mercury on pregnancy outcome are warranted in other populations.

  18. A short history of occupational fitness and health promotion.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1991-05-01

    The suggestion of a linkage between adequate exercise and occupational health dates back to Ramazzini's classical observations on cobblers and tailors. However, excessive hours of work at too high an intensity were of greater concern than increase of fitness or health promotion in the early phases of the industrial revolution. Loss of physical condition is a more recent phenomenon, and it can be traced to automation in industry and the home, progressive urbanization, and widespread use of the automobile. The Canadian government has seen worksite fitness and health promotion programs as convenient tactics to reverse this trend. Exercise programs apparently yield a healthier and more effective labor force, and major corporations have thus followed the government's lead in developing fitness and health promotional facilities as a part of personnel or occupational health departments. Some health economists have suggested a substantial return upon such investment, but most corporations still regard the promotion of fitness and a healthy lifestyle as an expression of good citizenship. Currently, unifocal fitness programs are being replaced by modular health programs that address a wide range of lifestyle issues, including nutrition, stress relaxation, cigarette addiction, and drug abuse. The purpose of the present brief review is to trace from a personal perspective the development of an interest in employee fitness as an important component of occupational health programs over the past 300 years. The linkage of this phenomenon to the changing human demands of the worksite will also be explored. PMID:1862064

  19. Occupational Health Education--A Vital Topic for Adding to the School Health Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    School health education curricula can be an important vehicle for including units on occupational and vocational health. The traditional cognitive learning of health concepts in the classroom should be expanded to include the functional learning of health on the job through positive health behavior. Together with the media and social and political…

  20. Occupational health and health care in Russia and Russian Arctic: 1980–2010

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paradox in Russia and its Arctic regions which reports extremely low rates of occupational diseases (ODs), far below those of other socially and economically advanced circumpolar countries. Yet, there is widespread disregard for occupational health regulations and neglect of basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises. Study design and methods This review article presents official statistics and summarises the results of a search of peer-reviewed scientific literature published in Russia on ODs and occupational health care in Russia and the Russian Arctic, within the period 1980–2010. Results Worsening of the economic situation, layoff of workers, threat of unemployment and increased work load happened during the “wild market” industrial restructuring in 1990–2000, when the health and safety of workers were of little concern. Russian employers are not legally held accountable for neglecting safety rules and for underreporting of ODs. Almost 80% of all Russian industrial enterprises are considered dangerous or hazardous for health. Hygienic control of working conditions was minimised or excluded in the majority of enterprises, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. There is direct evidence of general degradation of the occupational health care system in Russia. The real levels of ODs in Russia are estimated to be at least 10–100 times higher than reported by official statistics. The low official rates are the result of deliberate hiding of ODs, lack of coverage of working personnel by properly conducted medical examinations, incompetent management and the poor quality of staff, facilities and equipment. Conclusions Reform of the Russian occupational health care system is urgently needed, including the passing of strong occupational health legislation and their enforcement, the maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers, improved training of

  1. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  2. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, three objectives (e.g., define the skeletal system and list its functions), and three learning…

  3. Unintentional Learning and the Occupational Health and Safety Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, R. Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Evidence from the occupational safety and health field suggests that much unintentional learning takes place in the workplace that is not a result of conscious decisions and lacks critical reflection. Such learning may have negative consequences. Action can be taken to identify and mitigate the effects of unintentional learning. (SK)

  4. Integrating Occupational Safety and Health into TAFE Courses: Policy Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Graham L.; Mageean, Pauline

    Intended to help administrators, curriculum developers, and teachers integrate occupational health and safety into Australian vocational courses on bricklaying, metal fabrication, and horticulture, this document suggests specific policies and provides further amplification concerning three general policies for that integration. The three general…

  5. NASA Occupational Health Program FY98 Self-Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Functional Management Review process requires that each NASA Center conduct self-assessments of each functional area. Self-Assessments were completed in June 1998 and results were presented during this conference session. During FY 97 NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team activities, a decision was made to refine the NASA Self-Assessment Process. NASA Centers were involved in the ISO registration process at that time and wanted to use the management systems approach to evaluate their occupational health programs. This approach appeared to be more consistent with NASA's management philosophy and would likely confer status needed by Senior Agency Management for the program. During FY 98 the Agency Occupational Health Program Office developed a revised self-assessment methodology based on the Occupational Health and Safety Management System developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association. This process was distributed to NASA Centers in March 1998 and completed in June 1998. The Center Self Assessment data will provide an essential baseline on the status of OHP management processes at NASA Centers. That baseline will be presented to Enterprise Associate Administrators and DASHO on September 22, 1998 and used as a basis for discussion during FY 99 visits to NASA Centers. The process surfaced several key management system elements warranting further support from the Lead Center. Input and feedback from NASA Centers will be essential to defining and refining future self assessment efforts.

  6. Vocational Education State Instructional Materials for Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    This annotated listing of curriculum materials is provided to inform planners, administrators, vocational educators, and others interested in vocational education programs of the available curriculum materials in health occupations education developed by the various States. The materials have been identified with the instructional titles and codes…

  7. Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Kneessy, A.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned and operated industrial plants, arsenals and depots, and privately owned and operated ordnance explosive establishments. The end of World War II was the beginning of the nuclear age and attendant Medical Department responsibilities for radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection. The US Army has undertaken the demilitarization of obsolete and excess chemical munitions. The Medical Systems Safety and Health Branch is tasked to survey Army hospitals within the United States, to identify and recommend corrective action for safety and health hazards. At present, a continuing study is underway to evaluate the waste anesthetic gases to operating room personnel in Army hospitals. Noise-induced hearing loss is considered the most widespread occupational injury incurred by DA personnel.

  8. Engineering Maintenance. Occupational Analysis. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; And Others

    The report has described the results of a questionnaire survey covering task performance in the occupational area of hospital engineering and maintenance and the implications for curriculum development in personnel training. Survey respondents were selected from among personnel of 48 health care facilities in six cities, representing various sized…

  9. An Evaluation of an Occupational Health Advice Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearn, P.; Ford, Norma J.; Murphy, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to identify the profile of service users of an occupational health (OH) support service and establish areas of need, and to gather client feedback on the experience of participating in the support service and perceived outcomes and the impact of the advice received. Design and Setting: We carried out…

  10. Community and occupational health concerns in pork production: a review.

    PubMed

    Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    Public concerns relative to adverse consequences of large-scale livestock production have been increasingly voiced since the late 1960s. Numerous regional, national, and international conferences have been held on the subject since 1994. This paper provides a review of the literature on the community and occupational health concerns of large-scale livestock production with a focus on pork production. The industry has recognized the concerns of the public, and the national and state pork producer groups are including these issues as an important component of their research and policy priorities. One reason large-scale livestock production has raised concern is that a significant component of the industry has separated from traditional family farming and has developed like other industries in management, structure, and concentration. The magnitude of the problem cited by environmental groups has often been criticized by the pork production industry for lack of science-based evidence to document environmental concerns. In addition to general environmental concerns, occupational health of workers has become more relevant because many operations now are employing more than 10 employees, which brings many operations in the United States under the scrutiny of the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In this paper, the scientific literature is reviewed relative to the science basis of occupational and environmental impacts on community and worker health. Further, recommendations are made to help promote sustainability of the livestock industry within the context of maintaining good stewardship of our environmental and human capital. PMID:20154166

  11. Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide No. 5: Dental Assisting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Occupational Education Instruction.

    The bulletin, which is part of the New York State "Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide Series," focuses on the dental assisting program. The curriculum is designed to provide training for dental assistants in their assistant role at chairside, in the dental operatory and laboratory, and in the dental office and reception area. A…

  12. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards for health occupations programs in Florida. Standards are provided for a total of 71 exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary or postsecondary level. Each program courses standard consists of a curriculum framework and…

  13. Orientation to Health Occupations: Year One Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum document for the first year of the secondary educations health occupations program contains the following introductory material: (1) a description of the program design; (2) a list of first-year areas of competency; (3) a foundation and job-readiness skills task list; and (4) a core curriculum task list. The curriculum…

  14. A STUDY OF HEALTH AND RELATED SERVICE OCCUPATIONS IN WISCONSIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Employment Service, Madison.

    THE SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED AT THE REQUEST OF REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS TO DETERMINE THE PRESENT AND FUTURE EMPLOYMENT NEEDS IN 10 OCCUPATIONS IN WHICH THERE MIGHT BE A SHORTAGE OF MANPOWER AND IN WHICH PERSONS COULD BE TRAINED UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE AREA REDEVELOPMENT AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACTS. A…

  15. The Microscope: I--Structure. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the structure of the microscope is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to the module topic, a list of resources needed, and two learning experiences. Each learning experience contains…

  16. Resource Guide to Competency-Based Vocational Education: Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Phillip R., Comp.

    This resource guide for classroom teachers contains annotations of resources representing recent instructional development in competency-based education for health occupations. It is also intended to assist curriculum specialists, administrators, and supervisors in development of performance-based instructional programs. The guide is divided into…

  17. Cluster Matrices for Health Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Janice

    These cluster matrices provide duties and tasks that form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult training programs for health occupations. The eight clusters (and the job titles included in each cluster) are as follows: (1) dental assisting (dental assistant); (2) dental laboratory technology (dental laboratory…

  18. Anatomy and Physiology. Module No. IV. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of 31 modules on anatomy and physiology is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities,…

  19. Shaping the future: ten years of the occupational health internship program.

    PubMed

    Delp, Linda; Riley, Kevin; Jacobs, Sarah; Bush, Diane; Kirkland, Katherine; Denis, Ingrid; London, Matt; Harrison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Occupational Health Internship Program (OHIP) was initiated in 2003 to recruit a new, diverse generation of occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals and to advance OSH within union and community-based initiatives. It retains the principles of the original OCAW/Montefiore internship program while adapting to the changed landscape of the 21st-century workplace. Case studies of OHIP projects illustrate how students have contributed to key OSH policies-to regulate silica exposure among construction workers, apply principles of green chemistry with Vietnamese nail salon workers, and integrate OSH into "green" jobs in the recycling industry. They have supported innovative campaigns with immigrant workers in contingent jobs-from taxi drivers to warehouse workers. The students, in turn, have been inspired to enter the OSH arena as professionals and worker advocates with the potential to contribute new energy to an OSH movement. PMID:23896071

  20. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health...

  1. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health...

  2. Occupational health and unemployment in India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, T K

    1999-01-01

    Unemployment is a serious problem in India. Rural workers have no stable and durable employment. Educated and women experience more unemployment which is a greater problem in urban than in rural areas. An unemployed takes a long time to find work and secures it at an inadequate remuneration since job seekers far outnumber the available opportunities. Unavailability of social security makes life more difficult for the unemployed. Latest figures place the number of unemployed at 37.2 million. However, the figure is disputed as no national survey to determine the extent of unemployment has been undertaken in India. The health of unemployed has not been an issue. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the effect of tuberculosis on employment in Delhi. Tuberculosis appeared to be a significant cause of unemployment and loss of income specially among unskilled workers. The health and labour ministries may formulate a strategy to promote research and focus on health protection of unemployed. PMID:10197464

  3. Occupational health and safety legislation and implementation in China.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhi

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the current statistics of employment and work-related injuries and illness in China, as well as the history of occupational health and safety legislation in the country. Comprehensive, newly promulgated workplace health and safety legislation is described, and the specific responsibilities of employers, government agencies, trade unions, and employees are detailed. The government's implementation plan for this and prior legislation is also outlined. PMID:14664481

  4. Planning for Students with Complex Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Dianne Koontz

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the efforts of Virginia school divisions as they prepared for and received students with complex health care needs. Findings from four studies that interviewed early childhood special education teachers and occupational therapies are described. The need for team planning and the development of a Health Services Plan is…

  5. Medical Physicists and Health Physicists: Radiation Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Physics is the study of matter and energy and the ways in which the two interact. Some physicists use their expertise in physics to focus on radiation. These specialists, called medical physicists and health physicists, work to help people or protect the environment. Medical physicists work with physicians, assisting patients who need imaging…

  6. [Worksite health promotion and occupational physicians: interventional effects of exercises].

    PubMed

    Ohta, Masanori; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Results of annual health checkups at workplaces revealed a steady increase in the incidence of cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension in Japan. With the aging of the workforce, the incidence is expected to increase further. These risk factors are modifiable through a lifestyle modification program including mild exercise and nutritional guidance. In 1988, the Japanese government revised the Industrial Safety and Health Law to promote health in the workplace and implemented the Total Health Promotion Plan (THP). However, only 5.0% of workplaces were implementing THP programs according to a survey conducted in 2007. Therefore, we have recommended some measures for worksite health promotion, such as collaboration between community health and occupational health for implementing health promotion activities especially in small and medium scale enterprises, environmental improvement to promote occupational health, and an approach to increase physical activity that includes walking to work and using the stairs. Worksite health promotion should be considered an important company initiative in terms of work-related outcomes such as job satisfaction, work ability, and absenteeism in addition to cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24107347

  7. In vitro assessment of equivalence of occupational health risk: welders.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R M

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of using in vitro testing to determine the equivalence of risk for various occupational groups is discussed. In the absence of epidemiological evidence or relevant animal in vivo bioassays on which to determine the health effects of specific occupational exposures, it is proposed to use similarities in the in vitro response to substances with known (or strongly suspected) and unknown risk to demonstrate their risk equivalence. Identification and evaluation of a high risk "hot spot" due to exposure to Cr(VI) for stainless steel welders is discussed in terms of recent developments in collection, analysis and bioassay of welding fumes. PMID:6641655

  8. Intervention research in occupational safety and health: examples from construction.

    PubMed

    Ringen, K; Stafford, E J

    1996-04-01

    Construction is one of the largest industries in the United States, with 13% of the gross national product and 5-6% of the labor force. It is also one of the most dangerous industries, accounting for 15% of occupational fatalities and 17% of all workers' compensation costs. In 1989, the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, completed an agreement with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to develop a national labor-management initiative to improve occupational safety and health throughout the construction industry. The aim was to remedy a lack of research on construction occupational safety and health. The first years were spent on surveillance to characterize construction safety and health problems, development of awareness about safety and health issues among decisionmakers in the industry, and some limited interventions. A second phase was initiated in 1994, which focuses on intervention activities. Results from this joint program include a growth in annual federal construction safety and health research expenditure from $300,000 in 1989 to $12 million in 1995, a research network that now encompasses more than 30 institutions, a national conference that established an agenda to change construction safety and health, four regional conferences to develop coalitions and implementation strategies, and the development of a feasible goal to reduce fatality and injury rates by 80%. The program may already be having an impact. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, lost-time injury rates for construction for the three most recent years of reporting declined by 20%. PMID:8728131

  9. Occupational safety and health management among five ASEAN countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Occupational safety and health is one of important issues for workforce movement among ASEAN countries. The objective was to study laws, main agencies, and law enforcement regarding occupational safety and health in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. This documentary research covered laws, main agencies' duties, and occupational safety and health law enforcement in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. Thailand has its Occupational Safety, Health, and Work EnvironmentAct 2011. Its main agency was Department of Labor Protection and Welfare. Indonesia had WorkSafety Act (Law No. 1, 1970). Its main agency was Department of Manpower and Transmigration. Malaysia had Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) 1994. Its main agency is the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The Philippines has its Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Its main agency was Department ofLabor and Employment. Singapore has its Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006. Its main agency is Occupational Safety and Health Division. Occupational safety and health law enforcement among each county covers work environment surveillance, workers' health surveillance, advice about prevention and control of occupational health hazards, training and education of employers and employees, data systems, and research. Further in-depth surveys of occupational safety and health among each ASEAN county are needed to develop frameworks for occupational safety and health management for all ASEAN countries. PMID:26211106

  10. Microcomputer Programs for Health Occupations Education. A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This annotated bibliography describes materials available for computer-assisted instruction in secondary and postsecondary health and allied health programs. The materials are suitable for use by regular, disadvantaged, and handicapped students and by students whose facility in English is limited. The bibliography includes software programs…

  11. Work organization research at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    PubMed

    Rosenstock, L

    1997-01-01

    For 25 years, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted and sponsored laboratory, field, and epidemiological studies that have helped define the role of work organization factors in occupational safety and health. Research has focused on the health effects of specific job conditions, occupational stressors in specific occupations, occupational difference in the incidence of stressors and stress-related disorders, and intervention strategies. NIOSH and the American Psychological Association have formalized the concept of occupational health psychology and developed a postdoctoral training program. The National Occupational Research Agenda recognizes organization of work as one of 21 national occupational safety and health research priority areas. Future research should focus on industries, occupations, and populations at special risk; the impact of work organization on overall health; the identification of healthy organization characteristics; and the development of intervention strategies. PMID:9552275

  12. Discretionary Review by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission: Is It Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Robert D.

    1974-01-01

    Deficiencies in the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (OSAHRC), a court system created to carry out adjudicatory functions under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, are exposed and alternative solutions offered. (JT)

  13. [Occupational health and therapeutic patient education programmes for chronic low back pain and asthma].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    As current educational formats largely neglect occupational health, occupational health physicians could possibly be enlisted to help make TPE programmes more effective in this domain.. PMID:27531430

  14. NIOH and NIOSH basis for an occupational health standard: Chlorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, B.

    1993-01-01

    Information relevant for assessing potential adverse health effects from occupational exposure to chlorobenzene was reviewed and summarized. Topics included physical properties, chemical properties, production levels, industrial uses, occupational exposure levels, toxicokinetics, acute and chronic toxicity, organ system toxicity, immunotoxicity, allergy, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, reproductive toxicity, dose/response relationships, and research needs. Studies have indicated that chlorobenzene is absorbed via respiratory and dermal routes and has resulted in headaches, dizziness, somnolence, and dyspeptic disorders in humans chronically exposed. There were no case reports or epidemiological studies available concerned with the potential carcinogenicity of chlorobenzene in humans. There was some limited evidence indicating that the compound is genotoxic and that it may induce hematopoietic toxicity at relatively moderate doses. The author concludes that the central nervous system effects and the hepatotoxic effects should be considered in setting occupational exposure limits.

  15. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  16. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  17. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China

    PubMed Central

    WU, Fenghong; CHI, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China’s regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  18. Occupational health and safety issues among nurses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A B; Cabrera, Suzanne L; Gee, Gilbert C; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A

    2009-04-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  19. Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  20. Occupation and mental health in a national UK survey

    PubMed Central

    Rasul, F. R.; Head, J.; Singleton, N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD) by occupation in a representative sample of Great Britain and to identify occupations with increased and decreased risk of CMD. Methods A cross-sectional interview-based survey was carried out including 5,497 working male and female respondents, 16–64 years from a stratified random survey of private households in Britain. Occupations were classified by the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) into four groups: major, sub-major, minor and constituent unit groups. Common Mental Disorder was measured by the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Results Major SOC groups with higher prevalence of common mental disorder included clerical and secretarial, sales, and personal and protective services whereas craft and related, ‘other’ professional occupations and plant and machine operatives had lower prevalence compared to 13% overall prevalence in all adults. In sub-major SOC groups managers and administrators, teaching professionals, clerical and secretarial, ‘other’ sales and personal service occupations had higher prevalence whereas many professional and skilled occupations had lower prevalence. Specific SOC unit groups with higher prevalence included primary and secondary teachers, welfare community, youth workers, security staff, waiters, bar staff, nurse auxiliaries and care assistants. General managers in government and large organizations (OR = 2.79, 95% CI 1.41–5.54), managers in transport and storing (OR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.18–5.03), buyers and mobile sales persons (OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.09–5.60), sales occupations (NES) (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.25–6.19) and clerks (NES) (OR = 2.71, 95% CI 1.59–4.61) had increased risk of common mental disorder relative to specialist managers adjusting for social and financial factors and physical ill-health. Conclusions Occupations with higher risk of common mental disorder may be typified by high levels of job demands, especially

  1. A successful occupational health nurse-driven health promotion program to support corporate sustainability.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Michael S; Kalina, Christine M

    2009-12-01

    Health promotion programs offer an opportunity to support the health of employees, their families, and the communities in which they reside. By integrating health promotion programs with a company's sustainability efforts, the occupational health nurse can directly impact the company's bottom line by ensuring the benefits from a healthy, safe, and fully productive employee who is able to remain in the workplace for some time. This article discusses a successful health promotion program developed and implemented by an occupational health nurse in support of a company's sustainability effort. PMID:19928715

  2. The Educational Outcomes of Occupational Sub-Baccalaureate Students: Evidence from the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfonso, Mariana; Bailey, Thomas R.; Scott, Marc

    This study asks if occupational education bestows advantages or disadvantages on the students who pursue it, and how the educational experiences of occupational students compare to the experiences of students in academic programs. The authors used the Beginning Postsecondary Student Longitudinal Study of 1989-94 and 1995-98 to analyze educational…

  3. Finding toxicological information: An approach for occupational health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Laamanen, Irja; Verbeek, Jos; Franco, Giuliano; Lehtola, Marika; Luotamo, Marita

    2008-01-01

    Background It can be difficult for occupational health professionals to assess which toxicological databases available on the Internet are the most useful for answering their questions. Therefore we evaluated toxicological databases for their ability to answer practical questions about exposure and prevention. We also propose recommended practices for searching for toxicological properties of chemicals. Methods We used a systematic search to find databases available on the Internet. Our criteria for the databases were the following: has a search engine, includes factual information on toxic and hazardous chemicals harmful for human health, and is free of charge. We developed both a qualitative and a quantitative rating method, which was used by four independent assessors to determine appropriateness, the quality of content, and ease of use of the database. Final ratings were based on a consensus of at least two evaluators. Results Out of 822 results we found 21 databases that met our inclusion criteria. Out of these 21 databases 14 are administered in the US, five in Europe, one in Australia, and one in Canada. Nine are administered by a governmental organization. No database achieved the maximum score of 27. The databases GESTIS, ESIS, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, TOXNET and NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards all scored more than 20 points. The following approach was developed for occupational health professionals searching for the toxicological properties of chemicals: start with the identity of the chemical; then search for health hazards, exposure route and measurement; next the limit values; and finally look for the preventive measures. Conclusion A rating system of toxicological databases to assess their value for occupational health professionals discriminated well between databases in terms of their appropriateness, quality of information, and ease of use. Several American and European databases yielded high scores and provide a valuable source for

  4. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  5. [Occupational health and immigration: skills, perspectives and areas of intervention].

    PubMed

    Porru, S; Arici, C

    2011-01-01

    The occupational physician (OP) has nowadays to face health and safety of migrant workers on new ethical, scientific, epidemiologic and legislative basis. Objective of our contribution is to describe area of interventions and perspectives in good medical practices for OP when dealing with migrant workers. Risk assessment should focus on differences of immigrants versus natives as regards exposures and effects, quality of and access to health services, organizational issues. Health surveillance should take into account cultural, educational, religious, life style differences, as well as susceptibility; time must be dedicated by the OP to search and evaluate such differences. Counselling, health promotion and case management are part of good medical practice. The professional role of the OP is depicted, trying to identify weaknesses and strengths, as well as priorities for intervention especially in applied research. In conclusion, migrant workers may suffer from occupational health inequalities. By means of good medical practices in risk assessment, health surveillance, fitness for work and health promotion, OP can proactively improve migrant workers' health and guarantee same levels of protection and prevention in workplaces as for the natives. PMID:22187917

  6. [Occupational health problems in dental practice].

    PubMed

    Lewczuk, Ewa; Affelska-Jercha, Anna; Tomczyk, Jarosław

    2002-01-01

    The overload of the osteoarticular system resulting from standing and stooping position of the body is the main health problem of dentists. This may cause vertebral pain, symptoms of sciatica and foot valgo-planus. Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome are induced by repeated carpus movements. Frequent numbness associated with the peripheral nerves changes result from using drills by dentists. Menstruation disturbances observed in dental assistants could be related to the increased levels of mercury in serum and urine. Allergy is also a frequent medical problem, particularly allergy to latex. manifested by contact eczema or allergic urticaria, asthma and shock. There also is an increased risk for infectious diseases through the contact with biological material, mostly saliva and blood. PMID:12116907

  7. Occupational safety and health aspects of voice and speech professions.

    PubMed

    Vilkman, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    A well-functioning voice is an essential tool for one third of the labour force. Vocal demands vary to a great extent between the different voice and speech professions. In professions with heavy vocal loading (e.g. school and kindergarten teachers), occupational voice disorders threatening working ability are common. Vocal loading is a combination of prolonged voice use and additional loading factors (e.g. background noise, acoustics, air quality) affecting the fundamental frequency, type and loudness of phonation or the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds as well as the external frame of the larynx. The prevention and treatment of occupational voice disorders calls for improved occupational safety and health (OSH) arrangements for voice and speech professionals. On the basis of epidemiological and acoustic-physiological research, the presence of risk to vocal health can be substantiated. From the point of view of the physical load on the vocal apparatus, loading-related physiological changes (adaptation) may play a role in the occupational risk. Environmental factors affect vocal loading changes. In teaching professions, the working environment is shared with children, who benefit from amendments of OSH legislation concerning their teachers. PMID:15258436

  8. [Need for occupational and environmental allergology in occupational health - the 45th Japanese society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy Annual Meeting 2014 in Fukuoka].

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Reiko; Oshikawa, Chie

    2014-12-01

    The 45th Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy (OEA) Annual Meeting 2014 was held in Fukuoka city in conjunction with a technical course for occupational health physicians to learn occupational and environmental diseases more deeply. Allergic reaction due to low concentrations of chemical and biological materials is important in toxicological diseases due to highly concentrated chemical materials in the field of occupational and environmental medicine. In this paper we describe the activities of the OEA, which was established in 1970 and has completely cured patients with severe occupational asthma, such as the regional Konjac asthma in Gunma prefecture and Sea Squirt asthma in Hiroshima prefecture. Regard for the occupational environment will prevent the onset and/or exacerbation of allergic occupational disease in individual employees with allergy. Occupational cancer of the bile duct and asbestosis are also current, serious issues that should be resolved as soon as possible. It is desirable for the occupational health physician to have a large stock of knowledge about toxicological and allergic diseases in various occupational settings to maintain the health and safety of workers. PMID:25501761

  9. Impact of cultural contact on intercultural competency of occupational therapy students and international graduate students.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Sandra J; Miller, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    This study examined changes in cultural perceptions and communication of 47 occupational therapy students and 39 international graduate students following 5 peer teaching activities. The peer-teaching activities were designed on the premise that positive contact between people of equal status improves intercultural competency, and included social exchanges, interviews, feedback on practice teaching, and role-playing. Changes in intercultural competency were measured with pre- and post administration of the Cross Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI), as well as questionnaires and journals. Significant positive change between pre- and post-test scores on the CCAI (p<.0002) was found for the 86 participants. When stratified into 3 subgroups (international students and occupational therapy students with and without international travel experience), changes were more pronounced. Occupational therapy students with international travel experience benefited the most from the peer-teaching activities (p<.002) and international graduate students benefited as well (p<.009). Occupational therapy students without international travel experienced no significant change. The findings indicate that peer teaching activities significantly impacted cross-cultural communication for students with prior international travel experience and confirm the importance of contextual learning. PMID:19759982

  10. A Survey of Occupational Safety & Health Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Karen S.

    There is very little published information available about occupational safety and health libraries. This study identified, described, and compared the occupational safety and health libraries in the United States. The questionnaire first filtered out those libraries that did not fit the definition of an occupational safety and health library;…

  11. Examination of the Health Occupations Education Curriculum from a Futurist Perspective: I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Occupational and Continuing Education.

    A project examined the curriculum in the health occupations program to determine what curriculum changes will be necessary to keep pace with and anticipate advances in health occupations. A statewide Texas health occupations education review committee composed of employers, graduates, educators, a union representative, and representatives from…

  12. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... § 1960.35 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (a) The Director of the...

  13. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety...

  14. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. (a) Copies of the Act, Executive Order 12196,...

  15. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. (a) Copies of the Act, Executive Order 12196,...

  16. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health with regard to plans submitted by the States...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. (a) Where employees of different...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. (a) Where employees of different...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... § 1960.35 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (a) The Director of the...

  1. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of the Act established a National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. The Committee is...

  2. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health with regard to plans submitted by the States...

  3. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Type of occupational... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  4. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Type of occupational... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  5. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Type of occupational... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  6. The New Nurse in Industry. A Guide for the Newly Employed Occupational Health Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.

    These guidelines for professional nurses and employers in industrial settings present basic and fundamental nursing principles, duties, and responsibilities in the practice of occupational health. The content is presented in four chapters. The first briefly introduces occupational health. Chapter 2 on occupational health nursing service covers…

  7. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960... § 1960.35 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (a) The Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) shall, upon request by the Secretary, assist in:...

  8. 76 FR 9577 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of...

  9. Globalization and occupational health: a perspective from southern Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Loewenson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Increased world trade has generally benefited industrialized or strong economies and marginalized those that are weak. This paper examines the impact of globalization on employment trends and occupational health, drawing on examples from southern Africa. While the share of world trade to the world's poorest countries has decreased, workers in these countries increasingly find themselves in insecure, poor-quality jobs, sometimes involving technologies which are obsolete or banned in industrialized countries. The occupational illness which results is generally less visible and not adequately recognized as a problem in low-income countries. Those outside the workplace can also be affected through, for example, work-related environmental pollution and poor living conditions. In order to reduce the adverse effects of global trade reforms on occupational health, stronger social protection measures must be built into production and trade activities, including improved recognition, prevention, and management of work-related ill-health. Furthermore, the success of production and trade systems should be judged on how well they satisfy both economic growth and population health. PMID:11584735

  10. Occupational safety and health in India: now and the future.

    PubMed

    Pingle, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    India, a growing economy and world's largest democracy, has population exceeding 1.2 billion. Out of this huge number, 63.6% form working age group. More than 90% work in the informal economy, mainly agriculture and services. Less than 10% work in the organized sector; mainly industry, mining and some services. New service industries like Information Technology (IT), Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) are increasing rapidly; so is the proportion of females in the workforce. The occupational safety and health (OSH) scenario in India is complex. Unprecedented growth and progress go hand in hand with challenges such as huge workforce in unorganized sector, availability of cheap labor, meager public spending on health, inadequate implementation of existing legislation, lack of reliable OSH data, shortage of OSH professionals, multiplicity of statutory controls, apathy of stakeholders and infrastructure problems. The national policy on OSH at workplace, adopted by the government in 2009, is yet to be implemented. Some of the major occupational risks are accidents, pneumoconiosis, musculoskeletal injuries, chronic obstructive lung diseases; pesticide poisoning and noise induced hearing loss. The three most important OSH needs are: 1. legislation to extend OSH coverage to all sectors of working life including the unorganized sector; 2. spreading the awareness about OSH among stakeholders; 3. development of OSH infrastructure and OSH professionals. Other issues include integration of occupational health with primary health care. PMID:22790480

  11. Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993), efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997), a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present), a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes. PMID:22953192

  12. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. 9.10 Section 9.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a)...

  13. Follow Me, Like Me, Tweet Me! Implementing Social Media Into Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Kimberly; Wolf, Debra M

    2015-06-01

    Occupational health nurses can advance their professional practices through virtual platforms (e.g., social media and mobile applications). Virtual platforms allow occupational health nurses to disseminate occupational safety and health information efficiently to employees, families, and other stakeholders. Occupational health nurses exchange information with employees, enhancing communication and disseminating appropriate and accurate safety and health information to workers and their families. This article assists occupational health nurses in understanding how to use social media and other mobile applications to enhance their practices. PMID:26089112

  14. Occupational health services for shift and night workers.

    PubMed

    Koller, M

    1996-02-01

    It is important for an occupational health service to plan health supervision and measures for shift and night workers considering the biorhythmic and psychosocial desynchronisation, as well as the frequent prevalence of combined effects of adverse environmental and working conditions. The measures taken should be preventive to reduce the expected health risks rather than being rehabilitative. Both a medical surveillance and a counselling service are recommended before and during engagement in shift and night work. Sleep, digestive, metabolic and cardiovascular troubles should be noted and followed up. Medical counselling is especially necessary in the first months of shift and night work exposure and then after long-term exposure. The postulate for timed surveillance and intervention is supported by data of our epidemiologic investigations. The importance of the single health measures is underlined by direct reference to the relevant literature. Recommendations that should be applied in all countries and enterprises are in accordance with the ILO Night Work Convention 1990a and include: (1) appropriate occupational health services provided for night and shift workers, including counselling; (2) first aid facilities during all shift hours; (3) the option of transfer to day work when certified unfit for night work for reasons of health; and (4) measures for women on night shifts, in particular special maternity protection (transfer to day work, social security benefits or an extension of maternity leave). Examples of occupational health services already installed in some states for shift and night workers, and information on future developments are given. Up to now the medical service has been implemented mostly on the basis of collective agreements rather than on the basis of legal provisions. The Austrian Night Shift/Heavy Work Law Regulations of 1981, revised 1993, are cited: workers exposed to night shifts under defined single or combined additional heavy

  15. [Current status of occupational health activities and the way that occupational health services should be offered to small- and medium-scale enterprises].

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kotaro

    2013-10-01

    Activating occupational safety and health activities among Small- and Medium-scale Enterprises (SMEs) is a major issue because more than 80% of Japanese workers belong to these enterprises, in which the number of workers are less than 300 people. However, as the size of the enterprise decreases, the occurrence of problems of safety and health management systems and safety and health activities increases. Reasons for this include both the limitations of investments shortages of human resources. Occupational health services in SMEs has been provided by the cooperation of the following institutions: public associations (such as Regional Occupational Health Centers, Occupational Health Promotion Centers, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association (JISHA)), occupational health agencies which provide checkup services, health insurance associations, and regional medical services. In contrast to the low coverage of occupational health services among SMEs in Japan, there are some countries in Europe in which this coverage is almost 100%. This is because of the development of occupational health services outside the company. To show the benefits of the safety and health activities to managers of SMEs, and to motivate them to take advantage of the services, it is important to consider measurements. Also, establishing systems that provide those services, improving the quality of specialists such as occupational physicians, and educating human resources, are all necessary. PMID:24107334

  16. Proceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor); O'Donnell, Michele D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The theme of the 1998 NASA Occupational Health Conference was "Benchmarking for Excellence." Conference participants included NASA and contractor Occupational Health professionals, as well as speakers from NASA, other Federal agencies and private companies. Addressing the Conference theme, speakers described new concepts and techniques for corporate benchmarking. They also identified practices used by NASA, other Federal agencies, and by award winning programs in private industry. A two-part Professional Development Course on workplace toxicology and indoor air quality was conducted a day before the Conference. A program manager with the International Space Station Office provided an update on station activities and an expert delivered practical advice on both oral and written communications. A keynote address on the medical aspects of space walking by a retired NASA astronaut highlighted the Conference. Discipline breakout sessions, poster presentations, and a KSC tour complemented the Conference agenda.

  17. Trial-Based Economic Evaluations in Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    van Wier, Marieke F.; Tompa, Emile; Bongers, Paulien M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Bosmans, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    To allocate available resources as efficiently as possible, decision makers need information on the relative economic merits of occupational health and safety (OHS) interventions. Economic evaluations can provide this information by comparing the costs and consequences of alternatives. Nevertheless, only a few of the studies that consider the effectiveness of OHS interventions take the extra step of considering their resource implications. Moreover, the methodological quality of those that do is generally poor. Therefore, this study aims to help occupational health researchers conduct high-quality trial-based economic evaluations by discussing the theory and methodology that underlie them, and by providing recommendations for good practice regarding their design, analysis, and reporting. This study also helps consumers of this literature with understanding and critically appraising trial-based economic evaluations of OHS interventions. PMID:24854249

  18. Building the occupational health team: keys to successful interdisciplinary collaboration.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Joy E

    2005-04-01

    Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital to solving today's complex problems cost-effectively. No single discipline can meet all the needs of workers and the workplace. However, teamwork can be time-consuming and difficult if attention is not given to the role of the team leader, the necessary skills of team members, and the importance of a supportive environment. Bringing team members together regularly to foster positive relationships and infuse them with the philosophy of strength in diversity is essential for teams to be sustained and work to be accomplished. By working in tandem, occupational health and safety professionals can become the model team in business and industry delivering on their promise of a safe and healthy workplace for America's work force. PMID:15853292

  19. New Consultant Joins Occupational Health Services’ Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of Occupational Health Services’ (OHS') most valuable resources is new medical consultant Anusha Belani, M.D., chief of epidemiology at Frederick Memorial Hospital (FMH). Belani graduated from the University of Delhi and received her medical degree from Lady Hardinge Medical College in 1979. She is currently the only physician in Frederick County who specializes in infectious diseases. After completing her residency at Sinai Hospital, Belani established her own practice in Frederick in January of 1987.

  20. The Union Health Center: a working model of clinical care linked to preventive occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R; Plattus, B; Kellogg, L; Luo, J; Marcus, M; Mascolo, A; Landrigan, P J

    1997-03-01

    As health care provision in the United States shifts to primary care settings, it is vital that new models of occupational health services be developed that link clinical care to prevention. The model program described in this paper was developed at the Union Health Center (UHC), a comprehensive health care center supported by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (now the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees) serving a population of approximately 50,000 primarily minority, female garment workers in New York City. The objective of this paper is to describe a model occupational medicine program in a union-based comprehensive health center linking accessible clinical care with primary and secondary disease prevention efforts. To assess the presence of symptoms suggestive of occupational disease, a health status questionnaire was administered to female workers attending the UHC for routine health maintenance. Based on the results of this survey, an occupational medicine clinic was developed that integrated direct clinical care with worker and employer education and workplace hazard abatement. To assess the success of this new approach, selected cases of sentinel health events were tracked and a chart review was conducted after 3 years of clinic operation. Prior to initiation of the occupational medicine clinic, 64% (648) of the workers surveyed reported symptoms indicative of occupational illnesses. However, only 42 (4%) reported having been told by a physician that they had an occupational illness and only 4 (.4%) reported having field a workers' compensation claim for an occupational disease. In the occupational medicine clinic established at the UHC, a health and safety specialist acts as a case manager, coordinating worker and employer education as well as workplace hazard abatement focused on disease prevention, ensuring that every case of occupational disease is treated as a potential sentinel health event. As examples of the success

  1. Applying research to practice. Practical guidelines for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Mary K

    2002-11-01

    Much has been written about the research practice gap--and there is no doubt this gap exists in occupational health nursing. It is an irony that the professionals who would benefit most from occupational health and safety research may be the ones who do not participate in or contribute to research. Closing the gap requires a commitment on the part of both practitioners and researchers. It behooves occupational health nurses to constantly seek ways to make the connection--to forge relationships that can continue to advance the specialty. Researchers must increase their efforts to conduct research in "real world" conditions, because this research is most likely to improve practice. Practitioners must be willing to familiarize themselves with research so they can become active participants in the ongoing effort to find answers to troubling occupational health and safety problems. Rosenheck (2001) presents an interesting perspective on the barriers to eliminating the research practice gap. He purports that, although professionals often are highly respectful of scientific endeavors, in reality, "daily decision making is shaped more by power structures, ingrained routines, and established resource configuration than by current scientific findings." In most organizations, standard operating procedures and behavioral norms are the major influences on workplace practices; scientific evidence plays a minor role (Rosenheck, 2001). Several reasons can be found for this lack of reliance on research as a basis for practice. Studies may demonstrate effectiveness among large groups. However, practitioners may not see the relevance or applicability of such studies to individuals or small groups of clients. Also, practitioners may fear that the implementation of new strategies will require more oversight than they are able to provide. Another logistical barrier is the application of the research may require the collaboration of multiple individuals--dynamic environments with

  2. Kaizen: ergonomics approach to occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    Kumashiro, Masaharu

    2011-12-01

    Kaizen (work improvement) is the forte of Japanese industry. Kaizen activities were born in the early 20th century under the name efficiency research. These activities were the beginning of industrial engineering (IE). Later on people began to rethink the single-minded devotion to improving productivity. Then the job re-design concept was developed. The main target of kaizen in the area of occupational health and safety in Japanese manufacturing is the improvement of inadequate working posture followed by the improvement of work for transporting and lifting heavy objects. Unfortunately, the kaizen activities undertaken by most Japanese companies are still focused on improving productivity and quality. The know-how for promoting kaizen activities that integrate the three aspects of IE, occupational health, and ergonomics is not being accumulated, however. In particular, the IE techniques should be incorporated into kaizen activities aimed at occupational safety and health, and the quantitative assessment of workload is required. In addition, it is important for on-the-job kaizen training in the ERGOMA Approach for production supervisors, who are the main advocates of IE kaizen. PMID:25665221

  3. Occupational health and the rural worker: agriculture, mining, and logging.

    PubMed

    Pratt, D S

    1990-10-01

    More than 50 million Americans live in rural areas. These rural residents often work for small businesses or in the extraction industries (farming, mining, and logging). Because of the size of the businesses, the mandate of the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) does not cover these workers and they are seldom afforded the same protection as urban workers. This review focuses on the special health problems facing farm workers, farmers, miners, and loggers. Farm workers are often ill and are affected by psychological illness, injuries, parasites, skin diseases, and the dangers of agrichemicals. Farm owners also face the hazards of stress and have very high rates of suicide. In addition, they are often injured on the job and suffer the highest rate of job related fatality of any work group. The complex farm environment presents a continuous threat to the lungs. This danger has worsened with the increased use of confinement buildings for poultry, hogs, and cattle. As farming has changed with increased mechanization, attendant medical problems have arisen. These "illnesses of innovation" are important. Mining and logging also are dangerous occupations with acute and chronic problems including respiratory illness, vascular problems, and malignancy. The decade of the 1990s must be one of increased attention to rural occupational health care and research. PMID:10107682

  4. Occupational health and safety among commercial sex workers.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael W; Crisp, Beth R; Månsson, Sven-Axel; Hawkes, Sarah

    2012-03-01

    The concept of occupational health and safety (OHS) for commercial sex workers has rarely been investigated, perhaps because of the often informal nature of the workplace, the associated stigma, and the frequently illegal nature of the activity. We reviewed the literature on health, occupational risks, and safety among commercial sex workers. Cultural and local variations and commonalities were identified. Dimensions of OHS that emerged included legal and policing risks, risks associated with particular business settings such as streets and brothels, violence from clients, mental health risks and protective factors, alcohol and drug use, repetitive strain injuries, sexually transmissible infections, risks associated with particular classes of clients, issues associated with male and transgender commercial sex workers, and issues of risk reduction that in many cases are associated with lack of agency or control, stigma, and legal barriers. We further discuss the impact and potential of OHS interventions for commercial sex workers. The OHS of commercial sex workers covers a range of domains, some potentially modifiable by OHS programs and workplace safety interventions targeted at this population. We argue that commercial sex work should be considered as an occupation overdue for interventions to reduce workplace risks and enhance worker safety. PMID:21808944

  5. Cardiovascular Health Status by Occupational Group - 21 States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shockey, Taylor M; Sussell, Aaron L; Odom, Erika C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for one of every three deaths in the United States, making it the leading cause of mortality in the country (1). The American Heart Association established seven ideal cardiovascular health behaviors or modifiable factors to improve CVD outcomes in the United States. These cardiovascular health metrics (CHMs) are 1) not smoking, 2) being physically active, 3) having normal blood pressure, 4) having normal blood glucose, 5) being of normal weight, 6) having normal cholesterol levels, and 7) eating a healthy diet (2). Meeting six or all seven CHMs is associated with a lower risk for all-cause, CVD, and ischemic heart disease mortalities compared with the risk to persons who meet none or only one CHM (3). Fewer than 2% of U.S. adults meet all seven of the American Heart Association's CHMs (4). Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality account for an estimated annual $120 billion in lost productivity in the workplace; thus, workplaces are viable settings for effective health promotion programs (5). With over 130 million employed persons in the United States, accounting for about 55% of all U.S. adults, the working population is an important demographic group to evaluate with regard to cardiovascular health status. To determine if an association between occupation and CHM score exists, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) industry and occupation module, which was implemented in 21 states. Among all occupational groups, community and social services employees (14.6%), transportation and material moving employees (14.3%), and architecture and engineering employees (11.6%) had the highest adjusted prevalence of meeting two or fewer CHMs. Transportation and material moving employees also had the highest prevalence of "not ideal" ("0" [i.e., no CHMs met]) scores for three of the seven CHMs: physical activity (54.1%), blood pressure (31.9%), and weight (body mass index [BMI]; 75.5%). Disparities

  6. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  7. Behavioral Health Competence: An Exploration of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Paul B.; DeCleene, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The behavioral health competence of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists (OT) was examined by electronic survey to determine current levels of competence and highlight pre-deployment training needs. Results indicated that while Army Reserve OTs report high levels of behavioral health competence, many questions regarding diagnosis, assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, and progress arose throughout deployment. OT’s often relied on skills from Level II fieldwork education and entry-level didactic education for competency. Perceived competencies may be compromised by curriculum changes in entry-level education, available fieldwork settings, and a lack of adequate training currently available prior to deployment. PMID:25368437

  8. Occupational health nurses--the solution to absence management?

    PubMed

    Wallace, Myra A

    2009-03-01

    Business and industry are currently focused on increasing employee productivity, reducing employee injuries and lost work time, and minimizing costs. Absence from work due to either injury or health-related leave negatively affects both direct and indirect costs. Absenteeism, regardless of reason, negatively impacts company profit. To decrease the multiple costs of unplanned absences, the occupational health nurse can collaborate with Human Resources professionals and management to create cost-saving short- and long-term disability programs, manage Family and Medical Leave Act programs, and case manage the care of all employees with workers' compensation claims. PMID:19338262

  9. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Professional Nurse (Associate Degree). Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (professional nurse) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  10. 77 FR 47850 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Technologies, and Health Hazard Evaluations; Construction Safety and Health, Respiratory Disease Studies, and... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... occupational safety and health and to mine health. The Board of Scientific Counselors shall provide guidance...

  11. Industry and Occupation in the Electronic Health Record: An Investigation of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Industry and Occupation Computerized Coding System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Inclusion of information about a patient’s work, industry, and occupation, in the electronic health record (EHR) could facilitate occupational health surveillance, better health outcomes, prevention activities, and identification of workers’ compensation cases. The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed an autocoding system for “industry” and “occupation” based on 1990 Bureau of Census codes; its effectiveness requires evaluation in conjunction with promoting the mandatory addition of these variables to the EHR. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the intercoder reliability of NIOSH’s Industry and Occupation Computerized Coding System (NIOCCS) when applied to data collected in a community survey conducted under the Affordable Care Act; to determine the proportion of records that are autocoded using NIOCCS. Methods Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) codes are used by several federal agencies in databases that capture demographic, employment, and health information to harmonize variables related to work activities among these data sources. There are 359 industry and occupation responses that were hand coded by 2 investigators, who came to a consensus on every code. The same variables were autocoded using NIOCCS at the high and moderate criteria level. Results Kappa was .84 for agreement between hand coders and between the hand coder consensus code versus NIOCCS high confidence level codes for the first 2 digits of the SOC code. For 4 digits, NIOCCS coding versus investigator coding ranged from kappa=.56 to .70. In this study, NIOCCS was able to achieve production rates (ie, to autocode) 31%-36% of entered variables at the “high confidence” level and 49%-58% at the “medium confidence” level. Autocoding (production) rates are somewhat lower than those reported by NIOSH. Agreement between manually coded and autocoded data are “substantial” at the 2-digit level, but only

  12. Long-Term Effect of College Quality on the Occupational Status of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Eric L.; Wimsatt, Leslie A.; Rhee, Byung-Shik; Meader, Ellen Waterson.

    This study examined whether, and to what extent, college quality has a longitudinal impact on the occupational status of students after controlling for students' background characteristics, ability, and years of schooling. The study also explored whether college quality differentially affects the long-term occupational status of students. Data for…

  13. Self-Efficacy for Careers and Occupational Consideration in Minority High School Equivalency Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, A. Timothy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Tested Bandura's self-efficacy theory with 85 minority high school equivalency students from seasonal farm worker backgrounds. Students' self-efficacy expectations, interests, and perceived incentives satisfaction for specific occupations predicted their willingness to consider occupations. Students' generality of self-efficacy was related to…

  14. Occupational safety and health implications of increased coal utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Bridbord, K; Costello, J; Gamble, J; Groce, D; Hutchison, M; Jones, W; Merchant, J; Ortmeyer, C; Reger, R; Wagner, W L

    1979-01-01

    An area of major concern in considering increased coal production and utilization is the health and safety of increased numbers of workers who mine, process, or utilize coal. Hazards related to mining activities in the past have been especially serious, resulting in many mine related accidental deaths, disabling injuries, and disability and death from chronic lung disease. Underground coal mines are clearly less safe than surface mines. Over one-third of currently employed underground miners experience chronic lung disease. Other stresses include noise and extremes of heat and cold. Newly emphasized technologies of the use of diesel powered mining equipment and the use of longwall mining techniques may be associated with serious health effects. Workers at coal-fired power plants are also potentially at risk of occupational diseases. Occupational safety and health aspects of coal mining are understood well enough today to justify implementing necessary and technically feasible and available control measures to minimize potential problems associated with increased coal production and use in the future. Increased emphasis on safety and health training for inexperienced coal miners expected to enter the work force is clearly needed. The recently enacted Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 will provide impetus for increased control over hazards in coal mining. PMID:540621

  15. Worker participation in occupational health research: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Mergler, D

    1987-01-01

    In the area of occupational health, progressive scientists in many countries are attempting to carry out scientific inquiry into the effects of working conditions on the health of workers in a participatory relationship with workers. The author proposes an action research model to describe the underlying research process, taking into account the interests of both workers and academics. For worker/scientist cooperation to be effective, means must be found for the two groups to work on an equal footing. Workers' participation in occupational health research projects takes two forms: informational input-workers' knowledge of working conditions and health problems systematized and used to better understand the work situation and its effects on health and well-being; and partnership--workers' participation in the design and realization of all stages of the research project. Institutional context and worker participation are analyzed in the present article in the light of the experiences of our research group, Group de Recherche-action en Biologie de Travail (Action Research on Work Biology), at the Université du Québec à Montréal. The group has been involved in action research with unions for the past ten years under the terms of a signed agreement between the University and the two major Québec unions, the Féderation des travailleurs (travailleuses) du Québec and the Conféderation des syndicats nationaux. PMID:3557770

  16. Gender in occupational health research of farmworkers: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Rima R; Hojeij, Safa; Elzein, Kareem

    2014-01-01

    Background Farmwork is one of the most hazardous occupations for men and women. Research suggests sex/gender shapes hazardous workplace exposures and outcomes for farmworkers. This paper reviews the occupational health literature on farmworkers, assessing how gender is treated and interpreted in exposure-outcome studies. Methods The paper evaluates peer-reviewed articles on men and women farmworkers' health published between 2000 and 2012 in PubMed or SCOPUS. Articles were identified and analyzed for approaches toward sampling, data analysis, and use of exposure indicators in relation to sex/gender. Results 18% of articles reported on and interpreted sex/gender differences in health outcomes and exposures. Sex/gender dynamics often shaped health outcomes, yet adequate data was not collected on established sex/gender risk factors relating to study outcomes. Conclusion Research can better incorporate sex/gender analysis into design, analytical and interpretive approaches to better explore its mediation of health outcomes in light of emerging calls to mainstream gender research. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:1344–1367, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:25227724

  17. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    PubMed

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  18. Prejudicial attitudes toward clients who are obese: measuring implicit attitudes of occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Vroman, Kerryellen; Cote, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stigmatizing attitudes can undermine the quality of health care. This study examines the attitudes and beliefs of 189 occupational therapy students toward clients who are obese. Results indicate that the occupational therapy students were more likely to make negative evaluations of clients who were obese. The univariate between-subjects analysis of the Attitudes Toward Obesity-Prejudicial Evaluation and Social Interaction Scale scores found that the difference between the means for overweight and average-weight clients for Social Distance and Judgment were statistically significant (t(187) = 2.06, p = .04; t(187) = -2.008, p = .04). There was also a statistically significant difference between the Social Distance score means for female and male clients (t(187) = -2.12, p = .03). The explicit measures, the Attitudes Toward Obese Persons and the Beliefs About Obese Persons scores, showed that many students in the sample had stereotypical beliefs and, to a lesser extent, had negative attitudes about obesity. These results add support to the inclusion in occupational therapy curricula content that specifically addresses the awareness of stigmatizing stereotypes and attitudes toward clients who are obese. PMID:23898985

  19. Occupational health and safety risks and potential health consequences perceived by U.S. workers, 1985.

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, S; Brackbill, R M

    1987-01-01

    Data from the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Questionnaire, part of the 1985 National Health Interview Survey, were used to report workers' perceptions of occupational risk in their present jobs. This information will be used to monitor progress between 1985 and 1990 toward achieving broad goals in health promotion and disease prevention. The proportions of currently employed persons who perceived exposure to health-endangering substances, work conditions, or risks of injuries were reported for age, race, sex, and occupation groups. Occupational groups were further characterized by the proportion of men and women who reported specific exposures (such as exposure to chemicals or to loud noise) and specific health consequences of exposure (such as risk of developing cancer or hearing impairment). Greater proportions of men than women reported perceived risk from exposure to health-endangering substances, work conditions, and injuries in their present job. Also, a greater proportion of workers perceived risk of injury in their present job than other occupational risk categories. The greatest proportions of perceived exposure to occupational risk were reported by farm operators and managers, police and firefighters, and by workers in forestry and fishing occupations. Among workers reporting perceived exposures, chemicals, noise, and risk of injuries from vehicles were cited by the greatest proportion of workers, as were such health consequences as lung and respiratory problems and hearing impairment. Data from this study may be used to target employment groups for health promotion or education and to develop indepth studies of specific occupational groups to reduce or prevent risk at the worksite. PMID:3101121

  20. International Students and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  1. Clinical Supervision Skills: Managing the Clinical Environment. Health Occupations Clinical Teacher Education Series for Secondary and Post-Secondary Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou; And Others

    This learning module, which is part of a staff development program for health occupations clinical instructors, discusses the process of managing the physical clinical environment and students' experiences within the clinical environment. It includes learning activities dealing with various aspects of managing the physical environment and student…

  2. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  3. Effects upon health of occupational exposure to microwave radiation (radar)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, C.D.; Silverman, C.; Jablon, S.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of occupational experience with microwave radiation (radar) on the health of US enlisted Naval personnel were studied in cohorts of approximately 20,000 men with maximum opportunity for exposure (electronic equipment repair) and 20,000 with minimum potential for exposure (equipment operation) who served during the Korean War period. Potential exposure was assessed in terms of occupational duties, length of time in occupation and power of equipment at the time of exposure. Actual exposure to members of each cohort could not be established. Mortality by cause of death, hospitalization during military service, later hospitalization in Veterans Administration (VA) facilities, and VA disability compensation were the health indexes studied, largely through the use of automated record systems. No adverse effects were detected in these indexes that could be attributed to potential microwave radiation exposures during the period 1950-1954. Functional and behavioral changes and ill-defined conditions, such as have been reported as microwave effects, could not be investigated in this study but subgroups of the living study population can be identified for expanded follow-up.

  4. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  5. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  6. Improving occupational health care for construction workers: a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the process of a job-specific workers’ health surveillance (WHS) in improving occupational health care for construction workers. Methods From January to July 2012 were 899 bricklayers and supervisors invited for the job-specific WHS at three locations of one occupational health service throughout the Netherlands. The intervention aimed at detecting signs of work-related health problems, reduced work capacity and/or reduced work functioning. Measurements were obtained using a recruitment record and questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. The process evaluation included the following: reach (attendance rate), intervention dose delivered (provision of written recommendations and follow-up appointments), intervention dose received (intention to follow-up on advice directly after WHS and remembrance of advice three months later), and fidelity (protocol adherence). The workers scored their increase in knowledge from 0–10 with regard to health status and work ability, their satisfaction with the intervention and the perceived (future) effect of such an intervention. Program implementation was defined as the mean score of reach, fidelity, and intervention dose delivered and received. Results Reach was 9% (77 workers participated), fidelity was 67%, the intervention dose delivered was 92 and 63%, and the intervention dose received was 68 and 49%. The total programme implementation was 58%. The increases in knowledge regarding the health status and work ability of the workers after the WHS were graded as 7.0 and 5.9, respectively. The satisfaction of the workers with the entire intervention was graded as 7.5. The perceived (future) effects on health status were graded as 6.3, and the effects on work ability were graded with a 5.2. The economic recession affected the workers as well as the occupational health service that enacted the implementation. Conclusions Programme implementation was acceptable. Low reach, limited protocol adherence and

  7. Occupational Risk Factors and Asthma among Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, George L.; Gimeno, David; Arif, Ahmed A.; Burau, Keith D.; Carson, Arch; Lusk, Christine; Stock, Thomas; Symanski, Elaine; Whitehead, Lawrence W.; Zock, Jan-Paul; Benavides, Fernando G.; Antó, Josep M.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Recent U.S. data suggest an increased risk of work-related asthma among health care workers, yet only a few specific determinants have been elucidated. Objectives: To evaluate associations of asthma prevalence with occupational exposures in a cross-sectional survey of health care professionals. Methods: A detailed questionnaire was mailed to a random sample (n = 5,600) of all Texas physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and occupational therapists with active licenses in 2003. Information on asthma symptoms and nonoccupational asthma risk factors obtained from the questionnaire was linked to occupational exposures derived through an industry-specific job-exposure matrix. Measurements: There were two a priori defined outcomes: (1) physician-diagnosed asthma with onset after entry into health care (“reported asthma”) and (2) “bronchial hyperresponsiveness–related symptoms,” defined through an 8-item symptom-based predictor. Main Results: Overall response rate was 66%. The final study population consisted of 862 physicians, 941 nurses, 968 occupational therapists, and 879 respiratory therapists (n = 3,650). Reported asthma was associated with medical instrument cleaning (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34–3.67), general cleaning (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.20–3.40), use of powdered latex gloves between 1992 and 2000 (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.27–3.73), and administration of aerosolized medications (OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.05–2.83). The risk associated with latex glove use was not apparent after 2000. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness–related symptoms were associated with general cleaning (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.21–2.19), aerosolized medication administration (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.06–1.84), use of adhesives on patients (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22–2.24), and exposure to a chemical spill (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.28–3.21). Conclusions: The contribution of occupational exposures to asthma in health care professionals is not trivial

  8. Occupational and environmental health nursing in the era of consumer-directed health care.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Bruce; Click, Elizabeth

    2007-05-01

    Consumer-directed health care plans (CDHPs) present an opportunity to control health care costs. Health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) are two different approaches to providing pre-tax funding for CDHP enrollees. Each has a significant impact on the nature and business aspects of worksite health care. Worksite clinics can provide support via on-site education, expanded acute care services, and referral to other health-related benefits and resources for all CDHP enrollees. With attention to the type of employee health benefits funding support (HSA or HRA), occupational health nurses can maximize the effectiveness and value of worksite clinic services for CDHP enrollees. PMID:17526298

  9. Occupational health profile of Brazilian immigrant housecleaners in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, C Eduardo; Roche, Andrea Gouveia

    2013-01-01

    The occupational health and safety conditions of a sample of Brazilian housecleaners in Massachusetts are examined in this article. We administered a main survey to a convenience sample of 626 Brazilian immigrant workers of all trades and a supplemental survey to 163 Brazilian housecleaners in Massachusetts in 2005 and 2006. Survey questions addressed housecleaner demographics, socioeconomic status, working conditions, and hazards of housecleaning work. Housecleaners are exposed to a variety of ergonomic, chemical, and biological hazards. Professional housecleaners' work is fast-paced, requires awkward postures, and involves repetitive movements, use of force, and heavy lifting. The most common symptoms reported include back pain, and pain in the muscles, arms, legs, neck, shoulder, hands, fingers, and feet. To reduce exposures to occupational hazards, we propose the substitution of green cleaners for toxic chemical cleaning products, the use of ergonomic equipment, the use of personal protective equipment, and changes in work organization. PMID:24401486

  10. Occupational health problems of bridge and tunnel officers.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R; Szeinuk, J; O'Brien, S

    2001-01-01

    Bridge and tunnel officers (BTOs) sustain potential exposure to a number of physical, chemical, and work-organizational factors. They are at risk for both fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries due to moving vehicles, workplace violence, vehicular fires, and physical hazards, such as slippery walking surfaces due to oil or ice on roadways. This chapter describes the spectrum of occupational injuries and illnesses which may be seen in BTOs, focusing on: 1) vehicular exhaust and air pollution, 2) ergonomic hazards, 3) job strain, 4) noise, 5) blood-borne pathogens, 6) chemicals used in road work and maintenance (e.g., lead-based paint), and 7) with the recent advent of electronic traffic sensors, microwave radiation. Special emphasis is given to respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease. Finally, some recommendations for focused health surveillance and preventive efforts in this population are made. PMID:11107224

  11. Draugen HSE-case - occupational health risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, J.J.P.; Kjaer, E.

    1996-12-31

    The Draugen HSE-Case serves as a risk management tool. Originally, risk management included only major safety hazards to personnel, environment and assets. Work Environment risks such as ergonomics, psycho-social factors and exposure to chemicals and noise, was not given the same attention. The Draugen HSE-Case addresses this weakness and extends all work environment risks. In order to promote line responsibility and commitment, relevant personnel is involved in the Case development. {open_quotes}THESIS{degrees}, a software application, is used to systematize input and to generate reports. The Draugen HSE-case encompasses: HSE risk analyses related to specific activities; Control of risk related to work environment; Established tolerability criteria; Risk reducing measures; Emergency contingency measures; and Requirements for Competence and Follow-up. The development of Draugen HSE-Case is a continuous process. It will serve to minimize the potential of occupational illnesses, raise general awareness, and make occupational health management more cost-effective.

  12. Occupational Health Hazards among Healthcare Workers in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhong; Buregyeya, Esther; Musoke, David; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Halage, Abdullah Ali; Whalen, Christopher; Bazeyo, William; Williams, Phillip; Ssempebwa, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the occupational health hazards faced by healthcare workers and the mitigation measures. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study utilizing quantitative data collection methods among 200 respondents who worked in 8 major health facilities in Kampala. Results. Overall, 50.0% of respondents reported experiencing an occupational health hazard. Among these, 39.5% experienced biological hazards while 31.5% experienced nonbiological hazards. Predictors for experiencing hazards included not wearing the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE), working overtime, job related pressures, and working in multiple health facilities. Control measures to mitigate hazards were availing separate areas and containers to store medical waste and provision of safety tools and equipment. Conclusion. Healthcare workers in this setting experience several hazards in their workplaces. Associated factors include not wearing all necessary protective equipment, working overtime, experiencing work related pressures, and working in multiple facilities. Interventions should be instituted to mitigate the hazards. Specifically PPE supply gaps, job related pressures, and complacence in adhering to mitigation measures should be addressed. PMID:25802531

  13. Gathering Occupational Health Data from Informal Workers: The Brazilian Experience.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vilma Sousa; Ferrite, Silvia; Galdino, Adriana; Peres Moura, Maria Cláudia; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet

    2016-08-01

    This study describes how occupational health data have been gathered by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) to provide morbidity and mortality estimates for formal and informal workers. In 2007, data on work-related diseases and injuries was incorporated into the compulsory notification system (SINAN) and analyzed by the SUS occupational health service network, which covers all Brazilian states. However, this work has not been fully implemented, resulting in the large-scale undercounting and underreporting of cases, particularly in relation to informal workers. This is suggestive of barriers that prevent access to services and good quality health care. The inclusion of work-related diseases and injuries in SINANs appears to be a feasible strategy for the collection of useful data for the surveillance of the entire universe of workers, particularly in countries where informal workers prevail within the labor force. Attention needs to be paid to the disparities in access and quality that affect low-paid, informal workers. PMID:27235998

  14. The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities. PMID:25558383

  15. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... health services. 101-5.304 Section 101-5.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  16. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... health services. 101-5.304 Section 101-5.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  17. 78 FR 11651 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...; Implementation of the National Academies Program Recommendations for Construction Safety and Health, Respiratory... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the... demonstrations relating to occupational safety and health and to mine health. The Board of Scientific...

  18. Assessing the reproductive health of men with occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Steven M; Marlow, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    The earliest report linking environmental (occupational) exposure to adverse human male reproductive effects dates back to1775 when an English physician, Percival Pott, reported a high incidence of scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps. This observation led to safety regulations in the form of bathing requirements for these workers. The fact that male-mediated reproductive harm in humans may be a result of toxicant exposures did not become firmly established until relatively recently, when Lancranjan studied lead-exposed workers in Romania in 1975, and later in 1977, when Whorton examined the effects of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) on male workers in California. Since these discoveries, several additional human reproductive toxicants have been identified through the convergence of laboratory and observational findings. Many research gaps remain, as the pool of potential human exposures with undetermined effects on male reproduction is vast. This review provides an overview of methods used to study the effects of exposures on male reproduction and their reproductive health, with a primary emphasis on the implementation and interpretation of human studies. Emphasis will be on occupational exposures, although much of the information is also useful in assessing environmental studies, occupational exposures are usually much higher and better defined. PMID:24369130

  19. Workplace violence in long haul trucking: occupational health nursing update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Debra Gay

    2004-01-01

    Almost 2 million workdays and millions of dollars are lost annually because of non-fatal assaults suffered at the workplace (NIOSH, 1996). Twenty workers, on average, are murdered each week in the United States and an estimated 18,000 workers per week are victims of non-fatal assault (NIOSH, 2001). Violence and stress are two interrelated issues that affect the work force. In-depth studies of these issues have not been conducted with long haul truckers in general, or with women in non-traditional, male dominated fields such as the long haul trucking industry. Epidemiological data related to violence and stress experienced by these under-studied populations are needed to plan effective interventions to reduce occupational risks. Studies employing both qualitative and quantitative methods are needed to articulate risk and protective factors related to violence against workers (Runyan, 2001). Occupational health nurses are qualified to participate in the development and implementation of research and intervention studies to improve worker safety related to violence at the workplace for men and women in both traditional and non-traditional occupational roles. PMID:14740866

  20. Possible Health Benefits From Reducing Occupational Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Joseph D.; Ray, Tapas K.; Park, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic fields (MF) from AC electricity are a Possible Human Carcinogen, based on limited epidemiologic evidence from exposures far below occupational health limits. Methods To help formulate government guidance on occupational MF, the cancer cases prevented and the monetary benefits accruing to society by reducing workplace exposures were determined. Life-table methods produced Disability Adjusted Life Years, which were converted to monetary values. Results Adjusted for probabilities of causality, the expected increase in a worker’s disability-free life are 0.04 year (2 weeks) from a 1 microtesla (μT) MF reduction in average worklife exposure, which is equivalent to $5,100/worker/μT in year 2010 U.S. dollars (95% confidence interval $1,000–$9,000/worker/μT). Where nine electrosteel workers had 13.8 μT exposures, for example, moving them to ambient MFs would provide $600,000 in benefits to society (uncertainty interval $0–$1,000,000). Conclusions When combined with the costs of controls, this analysis provides guidance for precautionary recommendations for managing occupational MF exposures. PMID:23129537

  1. Occupational health needs of universities: a review with an emphasis on the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K M; Allender, S

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the needs of universities in relation to planning the provision of occupational health services, by detailing their occupational hazards and risks and other relevant factors. The paper presents the results of (1) an enquiry into publicly available data relevant to occupational health in the university sector in the United Kingdom, (2) a literature review on occupational health provision in universities, and (3) selected results from a survey of university occupational health services in the UK. Although the enquiry and survey, but not the literature review, were restricted to the UK, the authors consider that the results are relevant to other countries because of the broad similarities of the university sector between countries. These three approaches showed that the university sector is large, with a notably wide range of occupational hazards, and other significant factors which must be considered in planning occupational health provision for individual universities or for the sector as a whole. PMID:16497856

  2. Creating a Community Capacity Assessment to Identify Agency Outcomes Related to Occupational Therapy Student Community Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kramlinger, Anne; Strecker Neufeld, Peggy; Berg, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Service-learning experiences immerse students in authentic situations and build partnerships with community agencies to support the health of those we serve in practice. Most occupational therapy curriculum evaluations do not systematically capture community agency benefits. Through the use of qualitative interviews and Q Methodology, the Community Agency Capacity Questionnaire (CACQ) was developed to capture the agency experience in these partnerships. This paper describes the iterative analytic process that resulted in the CACQ with 29 statements covering 6 domains: programming, evaluation, partnership, staff, funding, and marketing. The CACQ offers a means to identify outcomes from the service-learning partners' perspective. PMID:27044639

  3. Occupational and environmental health hazards in the plastics industry.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, R E

    1976-01-01

    A brief description of the potential occupational health hazards encountered in the manufacture of plastics (polymers) is given. In general, these hazards are due to the monomers used to make the various plastics, to unreacted monomer contained within the finished products, and to the fillers, stabilizers, pigments, inhibitors, and initiators used in fabricating the finished products. They run the gamut from angiosarcomas of the liver due to vinyl chloride, to dermatitis and asthma-like reactions due to the initiators used with epoxy resins. PMID:140799

  4. Health Occupations. Medical Technologists, Technicians, and Assistants; Dispensing Opticians; Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians; Medical Record Personnel. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dispensing opticians, electrocardiograph…

  5. Perceptions of Occupational Prestige: Differences between African American and White College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Terrance L.; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined perceptions of occupational prestige among university students. One hundred and twenty-four African American and 174 White students rated the prestige levels of 36 occupations evenly sampled from the six RIASEC types and three levels of prestige. Results indicated that there was a significant difference in perception of…

  6. Structuring Opportunity: The Role of School Context in Shaping High School Students' Occupational Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan-Kenyon, Heather T.; Perna, Laura W.; Swan, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the occupational aspirations of high school students planning to attend college by drawing on a multilayered model of college enrollment, social cognitive career theory, and multiple descriptive case studies of 15 high schools. Students' occupational aspirations and their understanding of the education required to achieve these…

  7. Korean Secondary School Students' Occupational Preferences across School Types: Specificity Versus Broad Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the specificity of 3,136 Korean students' occupational preferences during secondary school and examines whether the types of high school are related to the crystallization in occupational preferences by applying binary growth models. Based on Super's developmental stage, this study shows that students largely formulate solid…

  8. Occupational Engagement among University Students in Jordan: Adaptation to Careers in the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the level of occupational engagement among university students in one Jordanian university. The instrument used to collect data in this study was the occupational engagement scale-student (OES-S-14 items) developed by Cox (2008). The OES-S went through rigorous cross-cultural translation process to…

  9. Sentinel Health Events (occupational): a basis for physician recognition and public health surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, D D; Mullan, R J; Frazier, T M; Halperin, W E; Melius, J M; Sestito, J P

    1983-01-01

    A Sentinel Health Event (SHE) is a preventable disease, disability, or untimely death whose occurrence serves as a warning signal that the quality of preventive and/or therapeutic medical care may need to be improved. A SHE (Occupational) is a disease, disability, or untimely death which is occupationally related and whose occurrence may: 1) provide the impetus for epidemiologic or industrial hygiene studies; or 2) serve as a warning signal that materials substitution, engineering control, personal protection, or medical care may be required. The present SHE(O) list encompasses 50 disease conditions that are linked to the workplace. Only those conditions are included for which objective documentation of an associated agent, industry, and occupation exists in the scientific literature. The list will serve as a framework for developing a national system for occupational health surveillance that may be applied at the state and local level, and as a guide for practicing physicians caring for patients with occupational illnesses. We expect to update the list periodically to accommodate new occupational disease events which meet the criteria for inclusion. PMID:6881402

  10. Health effects of occupational exposures to vehicle emissions in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Yuan, D; Ye, S; Qi, P; Fu, C; Christiani, D C

    2001-01-01

    The authors investigated the health effects of occupational exposures to vehicle emissions in 745 bus drivers, conductors, and taxi drivers, compared with 532 unexposed controls, in Shanghai. Logistic regression and general linear models were used to examine the relationship between exposure and respiratory illness. Results showed that the prevalences of some respiratory symptoms and chronic respiratory diseases were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the exposed group than in the controls. The adjusted odds ratios for throat pain, phlegm, chronic rhinitis, and chronic pharyngitis were 1.95 (95% CI 1.55-2.46), 3.90 (95% CI 2.61-5.81), 1.96 (95% CI 1.11-3.46), and 4.19 (95% CI 2.49-7.06), respectively. Also, there were exposure time response relationships for the prevalences of phlegm and chronic respiratory disease. Pulmonary function and blood lead levels were not significantly correlated with exposure status. The results suggest that occupational exposure to vehicle emissions may induce detectable adverse health effects. PMID:11210009

  11. Occupational safety and health criteria for responsible development of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Geraci, C L; Murashov, V; Kuempel, E D; Zumwalde, R D; Castranova, V; Hoover, M D; Hodson, L; Martinez, K F

    2014-01-01

    Organizations around the world have called for the responsible development of nanotechnology. The goals of this approach are to emphasize the importance of considering and controlling the potential adverse impacts of nanotechnology in order to develop its capabilities and benefits. A primary area of concern is the potential adverse impact on workers, since they are the first people in society who are exposed to the potential hazards of nanotechnology. Occupational safety and health criteria for defining what constitutes responsible development of nanotechnology are needed. This article presents five criterion actions that should be practiced by decision-makers at the business and societal levels-if nanotechnology is to be developed responsibly. These include (1) anticipate, identify, and track potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the workplace; (2) assess workers' exposures to nanomaterials; (3) assess and communicate hazards and risks to workers; (4) manage occupational safety and health risks; and (5) foster the safe development of nanotechnology and realization of its societal and commercial benefits. All these criteria are necessary for responsible development to occur. Since it is early in the commercialization of nanotechnology, there are still many unknowns and concerns about nanomaterials. Therefore, it is prudent to treat them as potentially hazardous until sufficient toxicology, and exposure data are gathered for nanomaterial-specific hazard and risk assessments. In this emergent period, it is necessary to be clear about the extent of uncertainty and the need for prudent actions. PMID:24482607

  12. Ethical concerns in international occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    London, Leslie; Kisting, Sophia

    2002-01-01

    The number of preventable occupational health and safety (OHS) tragedies that occur yearly requires a deeper examination of the ethics that inform health and safety policies and practices. This article selects a few industrial sectors for closer examination to illustrate challenges and opportunities. Topics addressed include: equitable distribution of resources, ethically acceptable global standards for OHS for all workers, and international use of pesticides and the export of banned chemicals. The authors focus on the relationship between less developed and developed countries and attempt to identify areas of collaboration and potentially positive channels for addressing shortcomings. The agricultural sector is examined in particular because of the major role this sector plays in developing countries. Finally, the authors examine the impact of globalization on the international ethical practice of OHS, especially in relation to vulnerable and marginalized groups such as women, children, and informal sector workers, and conclude with recommendations for working towards more equitable global ethical standards in international OHS. PMID:12225928

  13. Longitudinal Study of Occupational Therapy Students' Beliefs About Knowledge and Knowing.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita Witt

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated the importance of beliefs about knowledge and knowing, or epistemic and ontological cognition (EOC), to learning and achievement; however, little research has examined occupational therapy students' EOC or determined whether occupational therapy programs promote its development. This study examined changes in EOC over 18 mo of didactic coursework in an occupational therapy program. Thirty-one students completed the Epistemic Beliefs Inventory at the beginning, middle, and end of 18 mo of didactic coursework. Results indicated no difference in ontological cognition. However, change occurred in epistemic cognition, with students demonstrating statistically significantly weaker beliefs in justification of knowledge by an omniscient authority by the end of the didactic portion of the program. Although causal inferences cannot be made from this small study of one cohort of occupational therapy students, it is possible that intensive study in the discipline of occupational therapy contributed to change in these students' epistemic cognition. PMID:26122680

  14. A model teacher education program in health occupations at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA.

    PubMed

    Vittetoe, M C

    1977-01-01

    The Health Occupations Teacher Education Program at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, U.S.A. has been shown to be a viable and productive model for the preparation of health occupations teacher for both traditional and non-traditional educational settings. Since 1971 the undergraduate program has grown from twelve students to 30 students on-campus, with more than two hundred students in the extramural and part-time programs. Recruitment has been accomplished through professional association meetings, journals and personal contacts. More recently, persons have heard of the program through extramural classes and from students, graduates or University personnel who have become familiar with the program. Program development has been effected through the "capstone" concept, which allows for transfer of technical credit in one's specialty, capped by teacher education courses and concentrated courses to enhance one's expertise in the teaching role. Courses developed by the HOTEP faculty are based on perceived student needs, and were designed as both integrative and collaborative courses to be taken with other health care practitioners and teachers. Evaluation procedures have shown the health occupations teacher education program to be effective in preparing graduates for their predicted roles. The numbers of new students, kinds of health practitioners, and numbers of graduates have increased steadily. Implementation of courses into the Health Occupations Teacher Education Program curriculum has been gradual, so that the undergraduate core of courses is now considered to be nearly complete. Much curriculum planning has already been completed on the master's program, from which some students have already graduated. A doctoral program is also open to those ready for this level of preparation. More time and effort needs to be and will be expended on courses for the master's and doctoral level programs being developed. This health occupations teacher education has

  15. Perceptions among occupational and physical therapy students of a nontraditional methodology for teaching laboratory gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K Jackson; Denham, Bryan E; Dinolfo, John D

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the perceptions of physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) students regarding the use of computer-assisted pedagogy and prosection-oriented communications in the laboratory component of a human anatomy course at a comprehensive health sciences university in the southeastern United States. The goal was to determine whether student perceptions changed over the course of a summer session regarding verbal, visual, tactile, and web-based teaching methodologies. Pretest and post-test surveys were distributed online to students who volunteered to participate in the pilot study. Despite the relatively small sample size, statistically significant results indicated that PT and OT students who participated in this study perceived an improved ability to name major anatomical structures from memory, to draw major anatomical structures from memory, and to explain major anatomical relationships from memory. Students differed in their preferred learning styles. This study demonstrates that the combination of small group learning and digital web-based learning seems to increase PT and OT students' confidence in their anatomical knowledge. Further research is needed to determine which forms of integrated instruction lead to improved student performance in the human gross anatomy laboratory. PMID:21387566

  16. Health Practitioners. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health practitioners, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include physicians, podiatrists, veterinarians,…

  17. Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

  18. Prestige of Allied Health Professions: Perceptions of Occupational and Physical Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Harry J.; Chan, Fong

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-six occupational therapists and 48 physical therapists were surveyed to determine how they rate various allied health occupations in terms of social status. Findings indicate that both groups rate status similarly, although they rate occupational therapy lower than physical therapy, pointing to the need for image enhancement. (CH)

  19. 77 FR 43090 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... October 6, 1972, that the Safety and Occupational Health Study Section, Centers for Disease Control...

  20. 75 FR 42455 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... October 6, 1972, that the Safety and Occupational Health Study Section, Centers for Disease Control...

  1. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  2. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  3. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  4. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  5. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  6. 76 FR 28790 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...; Personal Protective Technologies; Health Hazard Evaluations; Construction Safety and Health; Traumatic... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BSC, NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... grants or contracts, research, experiments, and demonstrations relating to occupational safety and...

  7. The skinny on weight-loss surgery: what occupational health nurses need to know.

    PubMed

    Firment, Lynda; Morrison, Sarah

    2006-09-01

    Occupational health nurses are in a position to follow individuals undergoing bariatric surgery before and after the procedure. By fully understanding the health problems caused by obesity, occupational health nurses can effectively communicate the importance of diet and exercise. PMID:17001839

  8. [Tasks and responsibilities of the occupational health physician employed in health services].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, F

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes and comments on the juridical rôle and duties of the occupational health physician operating in Local Health Units, drawing attention to the peculiar and complex structure of the health measures taken in the workplace, which must often be extended from strictly medical and preventive aims to regulations and sanctions in respect of the enterprise and obligation of notification to the legal authorities. In order to fulfill these duties of public administrator and legal inspector, the occupational health physician requires a specific and integrated cultural background, i.e., in clinical medicine and biological science, jurisprudence and forensic medicine. Such cultural background is indispensable to ensure a correct "modus operandi", where the safeguarding of health in the interests of both the individual and the community is inextricably bound up with fundamental juridical and regulatory requirements. PMID:3509162

  9. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program: Facilitators and Barriers Observed in Three Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers' and employees' perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(6), 34-42.]. PMID:26977705

  10. Report on occupational safety and health to the Secretary of Labor for CY 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Summary and evaluation of NASA occupational safety and health activities focus on: policy; personnel; funding. Training activities, inspection, record-keeping, and interagency activities are included.

  11. [A non-traditional occupational health unit. Evaluation after a year's activity].

    PubMed

    Moen, B E; Torp, S; Hollund, B E

    1995-01-20

    An Occupational Health Care Unit has been established for 23 car repair workshops. The unit consists of a central unit connected to an Institute of Occupational Medicine, consisting of a coordinating occupational physician, a physiotherapist and an occupational hygienist. This unit cooperates with 11 general practitioners in the district. The unit was evaluated by the employer and one employee in each car repair shop after one year. In general, they were satisfied with their occupational health care, and several improvements to the working environment had been carried out. PMID:7855820

  12. Occupational safety and health protections against Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Ringen, Knut; Landrigan, Philip J; Stull, Jeffrey O; Duffy, Richard; Melius, James; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2015-07-01

    Even as the Ebola epidemic is finally showing signs of remitting, controversy continues regarding the modes of disease transmission, the understanding of which necessarily dictates methods of prevention. The initial public health response to the epidemic was based on assumptions formed during previous outbreaks, and in the belief that transmission was restricted to direct "contact" with other infected patients. However, the current Ebola outbreak differed from previous experiences in its intensity of transmission, speed of spread, and fatality rate and was also particularly unforgiving on health workers occupationally infected. Even with these differences, however, other modes of transmission were not considered by public health authorities, thus denying both the hard-hit health worker populations and the wider public more protective guidance. International Labor Conventions require employers to provide a comprehensive safety program that anticipates work-related risks and specifies strategies for protection against them. Such a precautionary approach is recommended in future epidemic planning, especially where evidence regarding transmission is incomplete. PMID:25950864

  13. Physics for Allied Health Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldick, Howard

    2000-04-01

    In this paper I will describe two courses that I have been teaching for the past 6 years to physical therapy and occupational therapy students Emphasis will be paced on those points that distinguish these courses from others with which I am familiar. I will discuss the syllabus: homework, exams, labs and the final grade. I will also present a topic outline of the courses showing how examples are drawn from the human body to illustrate the physics concept under discussion and to stimulate the students's interest in the material. The following basic concepts of physics will be covered (each with human body examples): vectors, components, statics, conservation of energy, efficiency, change of state, heat transfer, electric charge, electric field, voltage and capacitance.

  14. The effect of public controversy on occupational health problems: byssinosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, J M

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the byssinosis controversy on surveillance programs in the cotton textile industry is reviewed. The federally regulated format for industry medical surveillance guarantees neither automatic reduction of cotton dust exposure for high-risk workers nor wage rate retention for workers who are transferred to less dusty job sites. The absence of universal guidelines for worker management, combined with doubt over the severity and prevalence of byssinosis, encourages employers to evaluate medical surveillance programs primarily on the basis of their economic impact. When employers use the programs to control their losses, the potential costs of worker participation are increased. Comparisons with medical surveillance programs in the coal industry suggest that health benefits to workers can be guaranteed in the context of disputes over occupational diseases if industry, labor, and government agencies all participate in program design and operation. PMID:6236698

  15. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely. PMID:26240119

  16. Minimizing litigation risk. Documentation strategies in the occupational health setting.

    PubMed

    Baker, S K

    2000-02-01

    When advice is given by telephone, nurses are relying on employees' or clients' own assessments of situations. Nurses do not have the benefit of examination and objective findings. Therefore, every occupational health practice should have a system for keeping a record of telephone calls. Noncompliance should be documented so the nurse is reminded of the need to consider compliance when caring for the client in the future. Documentation of report tracking and follow up, consent, client education, and discharge information contributes to improved quality of care and reduced risk of litigation. Client records should never be altered (i.e., changed) so the original entry is no longer visible. The SLIDE (Single Line, Initials, Date, Explanation) rule should be used. PMID:10865552

  17. Information management. Computer resources for the occupational and environmental health nurse.

    PubMed

    Amann, M C

    1999-12-01

    Occupational and environmental health nurses are responsible for the management of large amounts of very complex information, ranging from individual employee health records to reports that insure corporate compliance. There are four primary tools available to the occupational health nurse to facilitate efficient management and use of health information--occupational health information systems, office support programs, communication systems, and the Internet and intranets. Selection and implementation of an integrated health information system requires the involvement of any organization that uses data processed by the system. A project management approach to implementation and maintenance of a system insures adherence to time lines and attention to details. The internet provides access to a vast amount of information useful to both the occupational health professional and the employee. Intranets are internal systems that may facilitate distribution of health information to employees, maintenance of current health related policies, and more efficient reporting procedures. PMID:10865545

  18. Occupational health hazards & efficacy of protective masks in threshing operation.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sudesh; Dilbaghi, M; Mehta, M; Pruthi, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted on 20 farm workers to identify the occupational health hazards in threshing operation. Four different protective masks were given and tested on various parameters. Respondents reported respiratory health problems which were mainly due to heat and organic dust in the surroundings. All respondents reported irritation in eyes and throat followed by nose (85.0%) and ears (75.0%). Musculo-skeletal problems were reported showing severe to very severe discomfort in lower arms (m.s. = 3.8), upper back (3.6) and upper arms (3.4). Overall discomfort score (ODS) was 7.6 depicting high level of discomfort. Peak expiratory flow rate was reduced by 6.6 % depicting reduced capacity of lungs after day long work in polluted environment. Hood mask was highly acceptable as it showed lowest breathing resistance. Leakage of dust from sides and rate of sweating was medium. Hence, use of hood mask would be helpful to achieve the ergonomics objective of reducing health problems and improving performance. PMID:22317492

  19. Demonstrating the economic value of occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Miller, P; Rossiter, P; Nuttall, D

    2002-12-01

    Many large companies operate some form of occupational health service (OHS). More companies now require specific evaluative information to justify the continued provision of an in-house OHS. This is in the face of increased pressure to control costs, combined with an awareness that the service itself can induce activity (supplier-induced demand) and could be substituted with health care provided or even funded outside the company. The lack of routinely collected data and the conceptual difficulty in defining and measuring the outcomes of an OHS provide challenges for economic evaluation. A purely human capital approach, where people are valued by their wage rates, is likely to be insufficient, since OHSs have multiple objectives. These objectives include fulfilling statutory obligations, contributing to the creation of a culture of partnership, reduction of potential costs to the company (sickness benefit, production loss, poor performance, litigation, insurance) and providing a suitable environment for the cost-effective reduction of the social and health service costs of illness at work. Evidence is needed to quantify some of these arguments and demonstrate to decision makers the value generated by OHSs. The aim of this paper is to consider the practicality of different economic evaluation methodologies, specifically cost models, contingent valuation (willingness-to-pay) and development of OHS-specific outcome measures. In considering different approaches, we present the results of our research in two UK companies. PMID:12488519

  20. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website. PMID:26667194