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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

HOSA Competitive Event Guidelines. Health Occupations Students of America. Students with Special Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for use by instructors and advisors of handicapped students, this guide presents guidelines for judging the performance of special needs students in Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) competetive events in eight allied health occupations education areas. These areas are dietetics, first aid, hospitality, housekeeping, job…

Candelori, Elaine M.; And Others

2

Health Occupations Students of America Handbooks and Procedures Manuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet includes a Chapter handbook, an officer's handbook, and a policies and procedures manual for Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) members. The Chapter handbook is a resource guide for management and leadership development for the Florida Chapter known as the Florida Association, HOSA. The handbook's six chapters provide…

Sandiford, Janice R., Ed.

3

Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements.  

PubMed

Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study. Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions. PMID:20225748

Maja, T M M; Motshudi, M J

2009-03-01

4

Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

2002-01-01

5

Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)|

Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

2002-01-01

6

Health Occupations Cluster Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

7

Occupational Health  

MedlinePLUS

Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

8

Occupational Orientation: Health Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These experimental curriculum materials for one of five clusters developed for the occupational program in Illinois include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the health occupations field. The 28 LAPs, each with a different occupation focus, are…

Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

9

Perceptions of General Education on Occupational Health and Safety Among College Students in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Undergraduate students were surveyed to assess their awareness of and interest in health and safety education. Out of 5258 questionnaires distributed among 66 colleges and universities in Taiwan, 4474 questionnaires were returned. The respondents were asked to provide demographic information and to respond to questions about a proposed college course in general occupational health and safety (OHS) and questions about

Yu-Huei Tong; Yu-Wen Lin; Chih-Chieh Chen; Jia-Ming Lin

2009-01-01

10

Allied Health Occupations II. Physical Therapy Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by physical therapists and physical therapy assistants. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the health team for…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

11

Allied Health Occupations II. Physical Therapy Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by physical therapists and physical therapy assistants. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the health team for…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

12

Health Occupations--Operating Room Technician. Kit No. 63. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the operating room technician are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

Jackson, Janette

13

Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

14

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Four.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The manual is the fourth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 8-11 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 8…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

15

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Four.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is the fourth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 8-11 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 8 discusses…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

16

Health Occupations--Thermometer. Kit No. 2. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the oral thermometer are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

Jackson, Janette

17

Vital Signs. Kit No. 301. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. [Revised.] Health Occupations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructor's manual and student learning guide for a secondary-level health occupations program cover four activities that deal with measurement of vital signs. The four activities concern temperature, pulse and respiration, blood pressure, and height and weight. For each activity, the instructor's manual provides this information: the course…

Jackson, Janette; Edwards, Gloria

18

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Six.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is the sixth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 12 and 13 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 12…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

19

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Five.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is the fifth of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 14 and 15 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 14…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

20

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet Two.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is the second of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 4 and 5 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. (Lesson 4…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

21

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Student Manual: Booklet One.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual is the first of six student manuals for use in a course on occupational health and safety for supervisory personnel. The manual contains lessons 1-3 of the 15 consecutively-numbered lessons, each of which contains study questions (and answers) interwoven with the text and review questions at the end of each section. Lesson 1 (three…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

22

Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

23

Infection Control Protocol for Student Clinical Experiences. A Protocol Document for Health Occupations Education Programs in Missouri.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developed especially for high school health occupations education programs in Missouri, this guide uses U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules as a base for guidelines for student participation in health care. The document informs administrators and teachers about special circumstances that must be considered in the…

Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

24

Perceptions of general education on occupational health and safety among college students in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Undergraduate students were surveyed to assess their awareness of and interest in health and safety education. Out of 5258 questionnaires distributed among 66 colleges and universities in Taiwan, 4474 questionnaires were returned. The respondents were asked to provide demographic information and to respond to questions about a proposed college course in general occupational health and safety (OHS) and questions about 30 OHS topics. Their awareness and learning interest about each topic were evaluated on a 4-point scale. Statistical analysis of variance and logistic linear regression were performed. Only 13% of respondents had previously taken health and safety courses. More than 39% of respondents indicated that they would take general OHS courses if the courses were offered by their colleges. Student motivation to take OHS courses was apparently related to their experience in OHS coursework, their academic background, and their current learning interest in the 30 OHS topics. Students with natural science or engineering backgrounds tended to express strong interest in OHS topics and courses. In conclusion, implementing general health and safety education in college is recommended. In addition, developing an OHS course module system would meet student expectations, as courses would consider the learning interests and needs of students with different college majors. PMID:19412863

Tong, Yu-Huei; Lin, Yu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Jia-Ming

2009-08-01

25

Health Occupations  

MedlinePLUS

... around the clock, people who work in the health care industry provide care for millions of people, ... newborns to the very ill. In fact, the health care industry is one of largest providers of ...

26

Teaching Occupational Health to Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A comprehensive training program is described that prepares students to identify and prevent occupational disease, emphasizing public health. Content areas include epidemiology and biostatistics, toxicology, industrial hygiene, safety and ergonomics, policy issues, administration, and clinical aspects. (Author/LBH)|

Wegman, David H.; And Others

1978-01-01

27

International occupational health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health.

Joseph LaDou

2003-01-01

28

International occupational health.  

PubMed

Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety should be brought to industrializing countries by a comprehensive consultative program sponsored by the United States and other countries that are willing to share the burden. Occupational health and safety program development is tied to the economic success of the industrializing country and its industries. Only after the development of a successful legal and economic system in an industrializing country is it possible to incorporate a successful program of occupational health and safety. PMID:12971685

LaDou, Joseph

2003-08-01

29

Occupational health in Brazil.  

PubMed

Brazil is a recently industrialised country with marked contrasts in social and economic development. The availability of public/private services in its different regions also varies. Health indicators follow these trends. Occupational health is a vast new field, as in other developing countries. Occupational medicine is a required subject in graduation courses for physicians. Specialisation courses for university graduated professionals have more than 700 hours of lectures and train occupational health physicians, safety engineers and nursing staff. At the technical level, there are courses with up to 1300 hours for the training of safety inspectors. Until 1986 about 19,000 occupational health physicians, 18,000 safety engineers and 51,000 safety inspectors had been officially registered. Although in its infancy, postgraduation has attracted professionals at university level, through residence programmes as well as masters and doctors degrees, whereby at least a hundred good-quality research studies have been produced so far. Occupational health activities are controlled by law. Undertakings with higher risks and larger number of employees are required to hire specialised technical staff. In 1995 the Ministry of Labour demanded programmes of medical control of occupational health (PCMSO) for every worker as well as a programme of prevention of environmental hazards (PPRA). This was considered as a positive measure for the improvement of working conditions and health at work. Physicians specialising in occupational medicine are the professionals more often hired by the enterprises. Reference centres (CRSTs) for workers' health are connected to the State or City Health Secretariat primary health care units. They exist in more populated areas and are accepted by workers as the best way to accomplish the diagnosis of occupational diseases. There is important participation by the trade unions in the management of these reference centres. For 30 years now employers organisations have also kept specialised services for safety and occupational health. Although they are better equipped they are less well used by the workers than the CRSTs. At the federal level, activities concerned with occupational health are connected to three ministries: Labour, Health and Social Security. The Ministry of Labour enacts legislation on hygiene, safety and occupational medicine, performs inspections through its regional units and runs a number of research projects. The Ministry of Health provides medical care for workers injured or affected by occupational diseases and also has surveillance programmes for certain occupational diseases. The Ministry of Social Security provides rehabilitation and compensation for registered workers. In spite of a decrease in the number of accidents at work during the past 25 years, working conditions have not improved. Changes in the laws of social security in the 1970s discouraged registration and reporting of occupational injuries and diseases. In consequence death rates due to accidents increased. With the implementation of the CRSTs, the recorded incidence of occupational diseases has risen, not only because of improved diagnosis, but also because of stronger pressure from the unions and better organisation of public services and enterprises. PMID:9342620

Bedrikow, B; Algranti, E; Buschinelli, J T; Morrone, L C

1997-01-01

30

Environmental justice: implications for occupational health nurses.  

PubMed

Through the use of innovative tools, such as clinical mnemonics, exercises in risk and asset mapping, and strategic program development, occupational health nurses can incorporate dimensions of environmental justice (EJ) into the workplace. Occupational health nurses who also take on educational roles can use case studies and network with labor and EJ groups to provide clinical experiences for occupational and environmental health nursing students, thereby integrating EJ into occupational and environmental health nursing practice. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to serve as technical experts within community-based participatory research projects. Occupational health nurses must share their knowledge and experience as members of coalitions that represent workers in their fight for worker health and safety. PMID:17124967

Postma, Julie

2006-11-01

31

Stimulating Occupational Health and Safety Concerns.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Classroom activities promoting occupational health and safety are outlined to create awareness among students of the nature and magnitude of job-related hazards and illnesses and to promote student attitudes conducive to placing a high value on protecting their health and safety at work. (JMF)|

Finn, Peter

1979-01-01

32

Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers  

MedlinePLUS

... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

33

Occupational health and radiation hazards  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors discuss occupational health hazards for personnel due to laser, infrared, ultraviolet, and microwave radiations. Dose-response relationships and medical surveillance of occupational diseases are also discussed.

Michaelson

1979-01-01

34

Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)|

Science Teacher, 1974

1974-01-01

35

Promoting Occupational Health Nursing Training  

PubMed Central

In 2009, occupational health nursing faculty and professionals at the University of Washington developed an innovative continuing nursing education offering, the OHN Institute. The OHN Institute was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) extend basic occupational health nursing training to non-occupational health nurses in Federal Region X, (2) target new occupational health nurses or those who possessed little or no advanced education in occupational health nursing, and (3) offer a hybrid continuing nursing education program consisting of on-site and distance learning modalities. Evaluation findings suggested that the various continuing nursing education modalities and formats (e.g., asynchronous vs. synchronous, online modules vs. live modules) were essentially comparable in terms of effectiveness. Perhaps most importantly, the OHN Institute evaluation demonstrated that quality continuing nursing education outcomes for occupational health nurses depended largely on knowledgeable and engaging faculty and a compelling vision of desired outcomes, including the application of learned content to professional practice.

Ward, Julie A.; Beaton, Randal D.; Bruck, Annie M.; de Castro, A. B.

2012-01-01

36

Occupational health Blood mercury levels of dental students and dentists at a dental school  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the blood mercury levels in dental students and clinical teaching staff in a dental school using amalgam as a restorative material.Setting A dental school in Ege University, Turkey surveyed during one academic year.Subjects and methods Cross-sectional study of groups of dental students (n=92) in years I to V, clinical teachers in restorative dentistry (n=16) and controls (n=14).

H Tezel; F Ozata; C Erakin; A Kayali; O S Ertas

2001-01-01

37

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise

D. G. Sarvadi

1999-01-01

38

Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

39

Privacy and occupational health services.  

PubMed

Privacy is a key ethical principle in occupational health services. Its importance is emphasised in several laws, in ethical codes of conduct as well as in the literature, yet there is only very limited empirical research on privacy in the occupational health context. Conceptual questions on privacy in the occupational health context are discussed. The baseline assumption is that, in this context, privacy cannot be approached and examined only from the employee's (an individual) vantage point but the employer's (a group) point of view must also be taken into account, and that the concept has several dimensions (physical, social, informational and psychological). Even though privacy is a basic human need, there is no universally accepted definition of the concept and no consensus on whether an organisation can have privacy in the same way as people do. Many of the challenges surrounding privacy in the context of occupational health seem to be associated with the dual loyalties of occupational health professionals towards the employee and employer and with their simultaneous duties of disseminating and protecting information (informational privacy). Privacy is thus not an absolute value, but more research is needed to understand its multidimensional nature in the context of occupational health. PMID:16943333

Heikkinen, A; Launis, V; Wainwright, P; Leino-Kilpi, H

2006-09-01

40

Privacy and occupational health services  

PubMed Central

Privacy is a key ethical principle in occupational health services. Its importance is emphasised in several laws, in ethical codes of conduct as well as in the literature, yet there is only very limited empirical research on privacy in the occupational health context. Conceptual questions on privacy in the occupational health context are discussed. The baseline assumption is that, in this context, privacy cannot be approached and examined only from the employee's (an individual) vantage point but the employer's (a group) point of view must also be taken into account, and that the concept has several dimensions (physical, social, informational and psychological). Even though privacy is a basic human need, there is no universally accepted definition of the concept and no consensus on whether an organisation can have privacy in the same way as people do. Many of the challenges surrounding privacy in the context of occupational health seem to be associated with the dual loyalties of occupational health professionals towards the employee and employer and with their simultaneous duties of disseminating and protecting information (informational privacy). Privacy is thus not an absolute value, but more research is needed to understand its multidimensional nature in the context of occupational health.

Heikkinen, A; Launis, V; Wainwright, P; Leino-Kilpi, H

2006-01-01

41

Allied Health Occupations. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A curriculum is provided for a full-year course that offers a practical and career-oriented exploratory program dealing with allied health careers. Targeted for high school juniors and seniors with little or no life science background and an interest in health occupations, the course is designed to be a hands-on, experience-oriented practical…

Farmington Public Schools, CT.

42

The Ocean and Occupational Health  

PubMed Central

With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. Imagesp1137-a

Prossin, Albert

1983-01-01

43

Allied Health Occupations I (Health Assistant). Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume outlines the requirements and content of a first-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in such allied health occupations as nurse's aide and health assistant. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: health worker…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

44

Innovative Approaches to Health Occupations Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To improve communications between health occupations educators and health professionals about developments in health occupations education, a compilation of 21 approaches used in health occupations education is presented. Outlines of the 21 different courses are presented, grouped in eight areas: (1) career mobility--modified LPN program for…

Gurney, Elizabeth, Comp.; Kintgen, Jean, Comp.

45

Occupational Safety and Health Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The growing concern for safety in both the workplace and in consumer products will create many new jobs through the mid-1980's--especially in private industry. The largest number of safety professionals are safety engineers; others include fire protection engineers, industrial hygienists, loss control and occupational health consultants, and…

Wash, Pat

1975-01-01

46

Using Hospital Site Visits for Teaching Occupational Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tel Aviv University uses its associated teaching hospitals for "factory" site visits in occupational health instruction. Medical students visit various departments to observe and evaluate the work environment, later discussing health implications. The visits are well-accepted by students, save time, and contribute to awareness of the hospital…

Ben-David, Amnon; Notzer, Netta

1989-01-01

47

Resource Manual for Health Occupations Education Instructors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This resource manual is designed to assist secondary health occupations instructors in implementing their health occupations programs. It contains two types of materials: informational topics and sample forms, letters, memos, and other materials. The manual begins with an overview of the health occupations education program, followed by these…

Feilner, Veronica, Ed.; Robling, Jeannine, Ed.

48

Standards and guidelines for occupational health recordkeeping.  

PubMed

Several associations have developed guidelines and standards for the occupational health record. Generally, these guidelines and standards reflect health record content and formats found in other health delivery settings. Overall, the guidelines and standards offer only a minimal introduction to occupational health records. They provide some insight into a health record system that has not been explored, as of yet, to any great depth. A more comprehensive investigation into the state of the art of occupational health records is long overdue. PMID:10275516

Lynch, J J

1986-02-01

49

Occupational health in Central America.  

PubMed

The 12.4 million economically active population (EAP) of the seven Central American countries includes a large informal sector. Social security covers only 14-60%. No surveillance of occupational safety and health (OSH) hazards or accidents exists. Extrapolating the incidence of occupational accidents among insured Costa Rican workers to the Central American EAP yields two million accidents yearly, still a gross underestimate. Occupational diseases are underreported, misdiagnosed, and not recognized as such. A number of regional OSH programs aim at modernization of the labor administrations and address the formal sector, in particular textile maquila, in connection with free trade agreements. The weak role of the ministries of health is expected to strengthen under the Pan American Health Organization OSH program. Employers largely influence new policies. Workers' influence on OSH policies has been weak, with only about 10% unionization rate and scarce resources and OSH knowledge. Informal workers, however, are getting organized. OSH research is underdeveloped and not linked to policy making. Construction, agriculture, and general un/underemployment are considered priorities for intervention. The informal sector needs to be included in national and regional OSH policies. Regional collaboration and international development support are of strategic importance to achieve sustainable improvement in OSH. PMID:12019679

Wesseling, Catharina; Aragón, Aurora; Morgado, Hugo; Elgstrand, Kaj; Hogstedt, Christer; Partanen, Timo

50

Occupational Health Problems of Musicians  

PubMed Central

Musicians, as well as other performing artists, may have their careers interrupted by, interfered with, or terminated by occupational health problems involving the neuro-musculoskeletal system. Adverse working conditions, organization, and activity may affect the health of musicians in all age groups and at all levels of performing ability. Instrument-specific health problems are related to excessive force, static loading, repetitive movement, and duration of musical performance. Important risk factors are 1) change in technique or instrument; 2) intense preparation for a performance; 3) preparation of a new and difficult repertoire; and 4) prolonged periods of performance without rest. Treatment protocols and health promotion or disease prevention programs are being developed in collaboration with the performing arts community. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

Chong, John; Lynden, Melody; Harvey, David; Peebles, Marie

1989-01-01

51

Occupational Safety and Health. A Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication consists of an annotated bibliography of published sources treating occupational safety and health both generally and specifically. The literature included deals primarily with causes, and possible prevention, of occupational injury and di...

1974-01-01

52

Occupational Incidence Rates of Mental Health Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study attempted to provide occupational health professionals with an empirical basis for identifying and selecting specific occupations for further research into the relationship between job stress and worker health. Specifically, this involved an examination of the admission records of community mental health centers throughout one state (Tennessee) to determine the incidence rate of diagnosed mental health disorders for 130

Michael J. Colligan; Michael J. Smith; Joseph J. Hurrell Jr

1977-01-01

53

Agricultural Occupational Health Nurse Training and Certification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1989 report “Agriculture at Risk: A Report to the Nation'' called for more trained health professionals to meet the manpower needs for control of occupational health and safety in farming communities. This report indicated the need for 8,000 occupational health nurses in agriculture when there were few trained professionals in this area. Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health

Kelley J. Donham; Julia K. Venzke

1997-01-01

54

Occupational health in the Philippines.  

PubMed

The practice of occupational health and safety (OHS) in the Philippines is shaped by both success and failures. Government initiatives have achieved specific goals, particularly in providing better access by local industries to technical services and manpower development. However, the ability to sustain these achievements has been constrained by lack of adequate resources, both financial and human. Large-scale industrial establishments have better success in the implementation of OHS programs in their organizations. Small- and medium-scale enterprises suffer from limited resources to invest in measures for the health and safety of workers. Similarly, the government has little influence on the health and safety conditions migrant workers experience in another nation. The informal sector is the most deprived in terms of access to OHS measures. The deprivation may be alleviated by economic solutions, as their existence is a result of economic situations. Occupational health development in the Philippines is progressing and will be strengthened by better regulation, by increasing awareness among all sector workers of the importance of OHS, and by adequately building up the capacity of government and vital human resources. PMID:12028954

Torres, Elma B; Greaves, Ian A; Gapas, Joselito L; Ong, Teresita T

55

Evaluation and Control of Occupational Accident Potential (513). Student Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A student manual considering evaluation and control of workplace accident potential is presented. The plan consists of a 5 day 40 contact hour course in the workshop format for professional occupational safety and health workers. It was prepared for the N...

1980-01-01

56

Information literacy and library attitudes of occupational therapy students.  

PubMed

Information literacy, often described as a person's ability to effectively find and evaluate answers to questions using a variety of information resources, is of particular importance to health care workers. This paper presents the results of an information literacy survey presented to occupational therapy (OT) students at Thomas Jefferson University during a series of required class activities. Also described are the authors' activities with the faculty and courses at Jefferson. The survey was made available to first-, second-, third-, and fourth-year occupational therapy students along with nursing students and pharmacy students. The survey is designed to identify research habits, skills, and preferences. Results confirm some commonly held perceptions about searching skills of young adults and an interesting dichotomy in students' learning habits. The paper concludes with a discussion of recommendations to OT faculty and librarians on how to improve information literacy education. The survey can be obtained by contacting the authors. PMID:17135148

Kipnis, Daniel G; Frisby, Anthony J

2006-01-01

57

Online resources for occupational health physicians  

PubMed Central

Periodic retraining ensures that experts are updated in the advances in the science and methods of their profession. Such periodic retraining is sparsely accessible to Indian occupational health physicians and researchers. However, there is significant material that is available online in occupational health and related fields. This information is open-source and is freely available. It does not require any special subscription on the client's part. This information can supplement the efforts of motivated occupational health practitioners in India.

Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Negandhi, Himanshu N.; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.

2011-01-01

58

Consulting in occupational health nursing: an overview.  

PubMed

Occupational health nurses work in a variety of settings and some have chosen to practice the profession as consultants. The process of consulting is similar to that of other disciplines but only two small descriptive studies offer functions and roles specific to occupational health nurse consultants. This article provides an overview of consulting practice, the process, the functions, and the roles of occupational health nurse consultants, and presents some common characteristics of successful consultants. PMID:23268879

Roy, Deborah R

2012-12-26

59

Occupational Safety and Health Training Grant (Purdue University School of Health Sciences). Final Performance Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

With support from NIOSH, the Purdue University Graduate Program in Industrial Hygiene expanded and developed during the grant period. The program prepares students for advanced careers in Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety and Health, and contribu...

1997-01-01

60

Italian occupational health: concepts, conflicts, implications.  

PubMed Central

This paper examines Italy's worker-based model for occupational health, especially its key concepts and its relation to social conflict. It briefly reviews the history of three approaches to occupational health in Italy: university-based, industry-based, and government-based. It then analyzes the worker-based approach, which emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s as worker groups and trade unions mobilized around new concepts of occupational health. Five key concepts are discussed: the workers' homogeneous group; workers' subjectivity; the use of contract language; the development of local occupational health institutions; and the use of occupational hazard risk maps. The analysis illustrates how the social processes of mobilization and institutionalization affected the ideas and structures of Italian occupational health. Worker mobilization in Italy produced ideological changes in the nation's occupational health system, institutional changes in universities and governments, and legislative changes at national and local levels. The institutionalization of reforms, however, created new conflicts and problems and tended to restrict worker participation and promote expert intervention. The paper concludes with a brief outline of the history of occupational health approaches in the United States and then discusses the implications of the five Italian concepts for US occupational health policy.

Reich, M R; Goldman, R H

1984-01-01

61

Health Occupations Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary health occupations education programs in Georgia. It provides a model for organizing vocational instructional content in health occupations, such as nurse, dental assistant, medical lab technician, radiologic technician, emergency medical technician, respiratory therapy assistant, medical…

Simpson, Bruce; And Others

62

Health Occupations Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary health occupations education programs in Georgia. It provides a model for organizing vocational instructional content in health occupations, such as nurse, dental assistant, medical lab technician, radiologic technician, emergency medical technician, respiratory therapy assistant, medical…

Simpson, Bruce; And Others

63

Occupational Safety and Health Curriculum Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the need for manpower development in the field of industrial safety and hygiene has resulted in the development of a broad based program in Occupational Safety and Health. The manual provides information to administrators and instructors on a program of study in this field for…

Gourley, Frank A., Jr., Comp.

64

Occupational Safety and Health Curriculum Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the need for manpower development in the field of industrial safety and hygiene has resulted in the development of a broad based program in Occupational Safety and Health. The manual provides information to administrators and instructors on a program of study in this field for…

Gourley, Frank A., Jr., Comp.

65

Occupational health: A discipline out of focus  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article first examines three areas of occupational health: the work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the work on chemicals of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), and the International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention and Recommendation on Occupational Health Services. All three areas are criticized, using the notion of a scientific strategy which is the

2009-01-01

66

Undergraduate Training in Occupational Health at Kocaeli University Medical School: A Turkish Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Processes and conditions of production may produce unhealthy effects. Both must therefore be included in the education of health care personnel. Vocational training in occupational health at Kocaeli University Medical School, Turkey aims to demonstrate students that occupational health is a specific and important area of work within the context of primary health care. This research is a cross-sectional study.

Onur HAMZAOGLU; Cavit I. YAVUZ; Cigdem CAGLAYAN; M. Sarper ERDOGAN; Nilay ETILER

2005-01-01

67

75 FR 44967 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Designation of a Class...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 4676...

2010-07-30

68

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01

69

Work, Obesity, and Occupational Safety and Health  

PubMed Central

There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co–risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker’s response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity’s role in occupational health and safety.

Schulte, Paul A.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Ostry, Aleck; Blanciforti, Laura A.; Cutlip, Robert G.; Krajnak, Kristine M.; Luster, Michael; Munson, Albert E.; O'Callaghan, James P.; Parks, Christine G.; Simeonova, Petia P.; Miller, Diane B.

2007-01-01

70

Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

2013-02-01

71

Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations (HO) education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

72

Diversified Cooperative Training. Diversified Cooperative Health Occupations. Manual of Operation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is designed to assist school personnel, employers, parents/guardians, and students in understanding the policies and procedures required to operate effective diversified cooperative training (DCT) and diversified cooperative health occupations (DCHO) programs. Chapter I describes DCT/DCHO programs, their structure, types of program…

Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

73

Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations (HO) education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

74

Health Occupations Trends and Issues: Issue Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to identify the trends occurring within the health service industry and their impact on the providers of health care; determine shifts or emerging occupational areas within health services; and assess local health service providers' staffing patterns and anticipated needs. The study involved meetings with local hospital…

Covelli, Nicholas J.; And Others

75

Incorporation of Project-based Learning into an Occupational Health Course.  

PubMed

Objective: Use of an appropriate teaching approach is a major concern for faculty members who are involved in occupational health and safety academic education. The challenge is to explore teaching tools to equip students with knowledge and skills to prepare them for their practices, in which they will encounter occupational health and safety issues in various occupational settings. The current study presents the design and implementation of a team project-based learning approach for undergraduate occupational health students to examine the appropriateness and perceptions of students and educators with regard to such a learning experience. Methodology: Steps were taken to guide the educators and students through the learning process based on projects completed in teams. The research tools for collecting data were a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews with participants. Results: The results illustrated that use of the proposed teaching approach as part of occupational health education may have the potential to motivate and enhance the active roles of educators and students in the learning process, and improve students' technical and social skills that are crucial for practice in the occupational health field. Conclusions: The study findings showed that project-based learning may provide a promising teaching strategy in the education and training of occupational health students. In addition, academic institutions should encourage educators to plan, introduce and evaluate the effectiveness of project-based learning.(J Occup Health 2013; 55: 125-131). PMID:23327885

Dehdashti, Alireza; Mehralizadeh, Semira; Kashani, Masoud Motalebi

2013-01-18

76

Health Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Health Occupations." It is divided into four units: the hospital, preventive medicine, drug use and abuse, and alcohol and tobacco. Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the unit's purpose, main ideas, quests, and a list of career opportunities…

Calhoun, Olivia H.

77

DEChealth: A Comprehensive Occupational Health Information System  

PubMed Central

Today, corporations are faced with the responsibility of protecting the health of their employees and the health of the general public through control of the industrial environment. DEChealth, the DEOmed Occupational Health System, developed by an inter-disciplinary team of occupational health professionals and computer engineers, is designed to provide an information management tool in the industrial setting. The DEChealth system enables management to comply with governmental regulations and to meet the increasing demands of employees for information on potential health risks associated with their job. As a comprehensive occupational health surveillance system, employees, agents, and areas are tracked over time and integrated with industrial hygiene data and medical data. In addressing the complex issues of employee health and safety, the DEChealth product offers unique advantages.

Reed, Linda J.; Solomon, Martin E.

1982-01-01

78

Evaluation of Secondary School Programs to Prepare Students for Wage Earning in Health Care Occupations Related to Home Economics. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To evaluate course effectiveness, determine relationship to selected characteristics of success in the course and on the job, and provide answers to a number of educational questions, 16 occupational home economics classes providing training for dietary aides, nurses aides, and health careers were selected for study. Course effectiveness was…

Nelson, Helen Y.; Jacoby, Gertrude P.

79

[Occupational diseases of health care workers].  

PubMed

During the past years in Czechoslovakia some 5000 occupational diseases, intoxications and other occupational health damage was recorded. Per year about one fifth of the affected people were health workers. The authors made an analysis of occupational diseases in the South Moravian region in 1975 to 1990. A total of 1726 occupational diseases of health professionals were recorded. In 91.8% contagious diseases were involved, in 7.4% dermatoses--where the most frequent condition was contact eczema. In 0.5% other occupational diseases were involved such as asthma bronchiale, damage to haematopoiesis by ionizing radiation, damage of the nerves of the upper extremities by locally transmitted vibrations, epicondylitis of the humerus and dysphonia in a teacher in a school for health workers. Other health damage was found only in 0.3%. In three instances serious malignancies of the urinary system were found in oncologists who had been administering cytostatics for prolonged periods. The most frequent occupational disease of health workers was in 65.4% viral hepatitis, in recent years with a steadily declining trend. The paper indicates that health professions were during the past period, as compared with traditional ideas, associated with a considerable risk. PMID:1559248

Brhel, P; Dastychová, E; Prívorová, A; Augustinová, B; Sedlácková, D

1992-01-31

80

Medical recordkeeping in an occupational health setting.  

PubMed

Managing the complexity of medical recordkeeping in an occupational health setting has been compared to navigating a shadowy maze. Successful navigation requires knowledge-based clarity and direction. This article provides an overview of regulatory requirements related to medical recordkeeping in occupational health settings and highlights key medical record legislation and relevant practice standards. It discusses the importance of facility policies and procedures to recordkeeping compliance and identifies critical elements of these policies and procedures. The article identifies the range of documents included in medical recordkeeping in an occupational health setting, the primary determinants of the content, maintenance, and retention of medical records, and the medical recordkeeping tools and resources available to occupational health nurses. It provides answers to many frequently asked questions regarding recordkeeping. PMID:21117530

Thompson, Margaret C

2010-12-01

81

Report on Occupational Safety and Health Inspections.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The focus of this report is emergency preparedness. Several Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) standards bear directly on this issue. This Report describes those standards and the state of compliance by the Legislative Branch. We have found signifi...

2002-01-01

82

Leisure Behavior and Occupational Identity in University Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines relationships between leisure behavior and occupational identity in college students (N=109). Results indicate significant relationships among thinking and contemplating, ethical leisure behavior, and occupational identity. Students more involved in intellectual and creative leisure activities were more advanced in occupational identity…

Munson, Wayne W.; Widmer, Mark A.

1997-01-01

83

Exploring Manufacturing Occupations. Student's Manual. The Manufacturing Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This student manual and the accompanying instructor's guide (CE 010 376) are directed toward exploring manufacturing occupations. It is designed to help the student explore the various career, occupational, and job related fields found within the manufacturing occupations. Four sections are included. An overview of career education and…

Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., Rutherford, NJ.

84

[Computer-aided occupational health education for post-graduates].  

PubMed

Nowadays, it's inevitable that occupational physicians enhance the activities in the field of occupational health through the use of the computer. Moreover, computer-aided self-education programs are one of the most useful tools for occupational physicians because they must learn a large volume of multidiscipline expertise for occupational health. Thus, we tried to apply a practical training program using the software of our own making in the post-graduate training course of fundamental occupational health. One is a self-education software for the study of electrocardiograms, and the other is a simple system to manage the serial data of a medical checkup and the reports of an inspection tour in the workplace. By this system one is also able to receive information such as a chest X-ray via the internet. Twenty-three students appraised our programs as for the contents (easily understandable, adequate volume); teacher's attitudes (enthusiastic approach to the training, enough time for questions, attention to the reaction of the class) and free comments. Because 4.3 points (at most 5.0) on an average was obtained, we are encouraged to make multimedia instructional materials on occupational health. PMID:9431584

Oda, S; Yahata, K; Higashi, T; Funatani, F

1997-12-01

85

[Occupational health problems in epileptics].  

PubMed

From the point of view of occupational medicine some questions are important for epileptics; amongst others: falling, behavior during the paroxysm, shift work dependence of attack, behaviour after an epileptic episode. Occupational capacity depends on the process of epileptic episodes and their frequency. The development of neurology has rendered numerous cures from epilepsy, but the the occupational stigma is difficult in many professions--electrical engineering, working with machinery, milling machines and others. In some professions a care must be taken when hiring epileptics--for instance professions with a fall hazard, jobs connected with public transport or involving crane or excavator operation. PMID:16498976

Romankow, Jacek

86

Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

Walters, Norma J.

87

Occupational Health and Safety Technicians  

MedlinePLUS

... 6 Management, scientific, and technical consulting services 6 Waste management and remediation services 5 Other employers of occupational ... extraction; management, scientific and technical consulting services; and waste management and remediation services. Most private companies either employ ...

88

Occupational Health and Safety Symposia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report consists of papers presented at a symposium to assist physicians with part-time occupational medicine responsibilities. Topics discussed include: epidemiology concepts and methods; identification and rehabilitation of the problem drinker; poten...

1976-01-01

89

Union Participation in Occupational Health and Safety in Western Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent Australian legislation has established a consultaive-participatory ap proach at the workplace and a tripartite policy-making process at state and national levels for occupational health and safety. This paper presents the findings of a survey of union officials on unions' participation in occupational health and safety matters. Data are presented on: occupational health and safety resources and activities; occupational health

P. Warren-Langford; D. R. Biggins; M. Phillips

1993-01-01

90

The Socio-Occupational Background of Migrant Students Entering University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

First-year students entering Macquarie University in 1971 were sampled according to fathers' birthplace. The distribution of fathers' occupations was compared with the occupational distribution of the Australian male workforce. (Editor)

Mitchell, Janet B.

1976-01-01

91

Occupational Therapy Students in the Process of Interprofessional Collaborative Learning: A Grounded Theory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this grounded theory study was to generate a theory of the interprofessional collaborative learning process of occupational therapy (OT) students who were engaged in a collaborative learning experience with students from other allied health disciplines. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews with nine OT students from four different interprofessional collaborative learning experiences at three universities. The emergent theory

Dana M. Howell

2009-01-01

92

Occupational health in the Russian Federation.  

PubMed

Occupational health and safety in Russia has a long history, starting in 1866. Preventive and curative services are offered all over the country. Due to rapid, intense, and deep political changes, social and economic reforms led to democracy and a market economy. During this transition in the 1990s, the rate of industrial growth was negative, and the overall health of the working population decreased significantly. Although the economy began to recover, many workers are still exposed to occupational hazards at levels that exceed strict hygienic standards. Occupational health and safety practice has been adjusted to the new social economic system, but to be efficient, it needs essential restructuring, with special attention to health protection, health promotion, and prevention of injuries and diseases. PMID:12028955

Mikheev, Mikhail; Shlyakhetsky, Nicolay; Retnev, Vladimir

93

PATHWAYS TO HEALTH CAREERS, EXPLORING HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

CAREERS IN THE AREAS OF DENTISTRY, DIETETICS, MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARY SCIENCE, MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK, MEDICINE, NURSING, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, PODIATRY, PUBLIC HEALTH, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, VETERINARY MEDICINE, HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION, AND OTHER HEALTH OCCUPATIONS ARE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE…

Health Careers Council of Illinois, Chicago.

94

Perceived stress in occupational therapy students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine perceived stress of entry-level master's occupational therapy (OT) students enrolled at a Texas university. A total of 29 students including nine men and 20 women participated in the study. Questionnaires and interviews were used for data collection. The participants were interviewed during the end of the first and second year of the entry-level master's programme in OT. Questionnaires, given at the same time, contained demographic data, open-end questions and force choice questions rated on a Likert scale. The results indicated that the majority of students (66.4%) rated their current level of stress as above average or the highest in their lives. The students expressed feelings of being overwhelmed, confused regarding course expectations and wanted more hands-on experience. When responding to how they managed stress, more than half of the students in the study took an active approach by utilizing exercise. Limitations of the study include using a non-standardized questionnaire, a small number of participants, and that the participants did not represent diversity and were for the most part Hispanic. It is recommended that future research address the cultural and generational issues that may affect perceptions of stress and how students cope with stress. PMID:18798169

Pfeifer, Teresa A; Kranz, Peter L; Scoggin, Angela E

2008-01-01

95

Introduction to Health Occupations Education II. Module No. I. Health Occupations Education II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This package of seven modules that introduce health occupations II is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning…

Day, Nancy; And Others

96

Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

97

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: progress report of the Multispecialty Occupational Health Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Multispecialty Occupational Health Group (MSOHG), formed in 2005, is an informal coalition of societies representing professionals who work in or are concerned with interventional fluoroscopy. The group's long term goals are to improve occupational health and operator and staff safety in the interventional laboratory while maintaining quality patient care and optimal use of the laboratory. MSOHG has conducted a

Donald L Miller; Lloyd W Klein; Stephen Balter; Alexander Norbash; David Haines; Lynne Fairobent; James A Goldstein

2010-01-01

98

Safety Guide for Health Occupations Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The handbook is intended to be utilized by health occupations teachers as supplementary instructional materials for a unit on safety. The document contains general safety rules applicable to hospitals and other health care institutions. Outlined are general rules for fire safety and office and clerical safety and more specific rules for the…

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

99

Annual Review, 1991-1995: Occupational Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This literature review of 1991-95 occupational health research is classified by key constructs: environmental characteristics, individual characteristics, cognitive appraisal, coping, and health outcomes. Research problems are identified: 77% of studies use a cross-sectional design, 59% use shortened ad hoc scales, and 68% use self-report for…

Kinicki, Angelo J.; McKee, Frances M.

1996-01-01

100

Overview of Health Occupations Education in Iowa.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Health occupations education in Iowa is examined from the point of view of the programs currently offered and the need for expansion within the State. Among the 50 States, Iowa is unique in its organizational structure's capacity to serve health occupatio...

E. E. Kerr R. E. Gamel L. D. Holloway D. F. Peterson M. E. Rosendahl

1971-01-01

101

Safety Guide for Health Occupations Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The handbook is intended to be utilized by health occupations teachers as supplementary instructional materials for a unit on safety. The document contains general safety rules applicable to hospitals and other health care institutions. Outlined are general rules for fire safety and office and clerical safety and more specific rules for the…

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

102

Occupational Health--Its Role in Environmental Health Programs  

PubMed Central

An important part of the practice of occupational medicine is directed toward the control of the industrial, physical, chemical and biological environments which may adversely affect health. This concern with the effect of environment on health has moved out of industry and has become a major area of public health practice, as evidenced by interest in pesticides, air pollution and radioactive fallout. The discipline of occupational health is a natural resource and springboard for the development of the skills necessary to control these environmental hazards. Occupational health is supplying trained and experienced personnel in the applied technical and administrative phases. It also can provide a basis for graduate teaching and research programs in environmental health. At the University of California's School of Public Health in Berkeley, curricula are being developed for educating teachers and research personnel in the environmental health sciences.

Tabershaw, Irving R.

1964-01-01

103

Occupational therapy students' attitudes towards inclusion education in Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan.  

PubMed

This international, cross-cultural study investigated the attitudes of occupational therapy students from Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan towards inclusive education for students with disabilities. The possible impact of professional education on students' attitudes was also explored. A total of 485 students from 11 entry-level occupational therapy education programmes from Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and Taiwan participated in the study. Among them, 264 were freshmen (first-year students) and 221 were seniors (final-year students). Data collected from a custom-designed questionnaire were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. In general, the occupational therapy students reported having positive attitudes towards inclusion. Considerable differences, however, existed among the student groups from the four countries. Professional education appeared to have a significant impact on students' attitudes towards inclusion from first year to senior year. Although students were in favour of inclusion, they also cautioned that their support for inclusive practices depended on various factors such as adequate preparation, support and assistance to students with disabilities. Limitations of the study included the small, convenience sample and different degree structures of the participating programmes. Future research studies need to compare occupational therapy students' attitudes with students from other health care professions. A longitudinal study on the impact of the professional education programme on students' attitudes towards inclusive education is warranted. PMID:19701921

Mu, Keli; Brown, Ted; Peyton, Claudia G; Rodger, Sylvia; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Chin-Yu; Watson, Callie; Stagnitti, Karen; Hutton, Eve; Casey, Jackie; Hong, Chia Swee

2010-03-01

104

Student Health Clinics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses important issues concerning the design of student health clinics, including convenient access, privacy and security, showers and sinks, durability and safety, and special considerations. (EV)|

Jelliffe, James H.; Schipp, Michael K.

2002-01-01

105

Student Health Clinics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses important issues concerning the design of student health clinics, including convenient access, privacy and security, showers and sinks, durability and safety, and special considerations. (EV)

Jelliffe, James H.; Schipp, Michael K.

2002-01-01

106

Health Care for College Students  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Care for College Students Ages & Stages Listen Health Care for College Students Article Body I'll be ... student health service before starting an exercise program. Health care on campus If you are going to live ...

107

76 FR 39902 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2011-0116] Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...

2011-07-07

108

29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2010-07-01

109

29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2010-07-01

110

29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION ...Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review...

2013-07-01

111

29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2009-07-01

112

29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2009-07-01

113

29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2010-07-01

114

29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2009-07-01

115

29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2010-07-01

116

29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2009-07-01

117

Health risk assessment in occupational EMF exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

In our study we tried to evaluate the health estate of physiotherapists in relationship with occupational exposure. EMF measurements were made in workplaces, we applied special questionnaires, performed micronucleus test from lymfocytes, and urinary thioethers assay. The results were compared to those of a control group by statistical analytical methods like logistic regression. We found an overexposure of this profession

D. C. Dabala; Didi Surcel; Csaba Szanto

2009-01-01

118

Health Service Occupations. Florida Vocational Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This vocational program guide is intended to assist in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a program in health services occupations in school districts, area vocational centers, and community colleges. The following topics are covered: program content (job duties of physical therapy aides and orderlies and curriculum framework and…

Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

119

Conceptual Framework for Occupational Health Surveillance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document explores the current state of the art in occupational health surveillance. A flow diagram is presented which shows how various sources of data can be combined to facilitate the flow of information necessary for a better understanding of occu...

R. Spirtas D. Sundin J. Sestito V. Behrens J. French

1978-01-01

120

Occupational safety and health in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational Health and Safety in Spain has improved considerably over the last decade, most likely due to a new concept where an overall concept of safety culture is defined. Important changes in industrial safety, hygiene, and psychosocial factors present an optimistic panorama for the future of Spain. Despite this general improvement, according to the European Convergence Program, Spanish statistics still

Albert Sesé; Alfonso L. Palmer; Berta Cajal; Juan J. Montaño; Rafael Jiménez; Noelia Llorens

2002-01-01

121

Occupational safety and health in Poland  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system of occupational safety and health (OSH) in Poland was first created after the First World War. Since its onset, it has been subjected to various changes related to the state's political and economic systems. Currently, two decisive processes have impact on OSH: (a) socioeconomic transformation and (b) Poland's planned accession to the European Union (EU). The former results

Danuta Koradecka; Helena Dryzek

2001-01-01

122

Measuring Student Growth: Techniques and Procedures for Occupational Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for current and future occupational instructors, counselors, and administrators, the comprehensive measurement text is directed toward all subject areas in occupational education--industrial, business/distributive, home economics, agriculture, health occupations, and personal/public services. It offers necessary guidelines to select,…

Erickson, Richard C.; Wentling, Tim L.

123

32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section 989...DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS...989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and...

2013-07-01

124

Occupational Health Nurse (OHN) and the Implications for Nursing Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The educational preparation of the occupational health nurse is fragmented at best. This poor educational foundation has a direct effect on the ability of occupational health nurses to carry out assigned responsibilities, as well as research in the field....

D. M. Proctor

1992-01-01

125

Occupational HIV Transmission and Prevention among Health Care Workers  

MedlinePLUS

... Google Bookmarks Occupational HIV Transmission and Prevention Among Health Care Workers Fast Facts Occupational transmission of HIV to ... every hour counts. Building Better Prevention Programs for Health Care Workers Continued diligence in the following areas is ...

126

[Psychosocial risks at work and occupational health].  

PubMed

The changes on work processes and job design in recent decades are focused in the demographic, economic, political, and technological aspects. These changes have created new psychosocial risks at work that affect the health and quality of workplace, increasing stress levels among workers. The aim of this study is to present such risks, their consequences, and some recommendations to promote health at the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population. The study is divided into five points in which: (1) introduces the concept of risk factors and psychosocial work, (2) describes the main emerging psychosocial risks labor, (3) provides some information on the prevalence of psychosocial risks at work in Europe and its consequences, (4) recommendations for health promotion in the workplace, and (5) describes the objective of Occupational Health Psychology and concludes with the recommendations to promote psychosocial health in the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population. PMID:22858772

Gil-Monte, Pedro R

2012-06-01

127

Knowledge infrastructure needed for occupational health.  

PubMed

Expertise on work and health topics is the foundation for the added value of occupational health (OH) professionals to the health of the working population. Professionals should therefore practice in accordance with high quality standards and latest evidence. As adequate knowledge management and a supportive knowledge infrastructure is needed, OH professionals can discuss opportunities to strengthen both. Occupational health services ought to offer ICT facilities, stimulate organizational conditions and human resource development to implement evidence-based practice. On national level a portal including a virtual library, tailor-made for occupational health, providing access to high quality websites, abstracts and full text articles and books, is a backbone for further developments. Expert groups on various topics can function as a top reference level for new or complicated questions and issues. As an example of an initiative to foster progress, the Dutch Knowledge Infra Structure program for OH professionals (2004-2006) is introduced. This program included efforts to develop the infrastructure itself and projects to develop concrete tools and instruments. PMID:17284868

Hugenholtz, Nathalie I R; Schreinemakers, Jos F; A-Tjak, Marielle A; van Dijk, Frank J H

2007-01-01

128

The Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health  

PubMed Central

The Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, established at the University of Utah in 1977, has developed innovative training programs in occupational and environmental health, and an administrative structure that may assist other universities as they develop multidisciplinary programs in the field of occupational health and safety.

Rom, William N.

1980-01-01

129

Recent Cases: Administrative Law--Occupational Safety and Health Act  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 are described in two cases: Brennan v. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (Underhill Construction Corp.), and Anning-Johnson Co. v. United States Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. (LBH)|

Harvard Law Review, 1976

1976-01-01

130

Occupational history collection by third-year medical students during internal medicine and surgery inpatient clerkships.  

PubMed

Occupational history is fundamental for the evaluation of possible workplace influences on health. We reviewed 2,922 initial history-and-physical reports from 137 third-year medical students to examine occupational history collection. Overall reporting frequencies were recorded as the following: industry, 55.8%; occupation, 70.0%; specific occupational exposure, 8.4%; smoking status, 91.4%. Patients younger than 40 years of age and women were significantly less likely than other older patients and men to have notations of occupation and industry. Surgery students were less likely than internal medicine students to collect data for industry (41.6% vs 66.6%, P < 0.001), occupation (57.4% vs 79.7%, P < 0.001), and smoking (88.1% vs 94.0%, P < 0.001). The highest frequencies of notation were those for circulatory and respiratory conditions. No significant differences were noted for student gender, academic quarter, or week of clerkship. Clinical occupational medicine teaching should emphasize the need to collect occupational information from all patients, including women and young persons. PMID:9729750

McCurdy, S A; Morrin, L A; Memmott, M M

1998-08-01

131

Environmental and occupational exposures in immigrant health.  

PubMed

Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation's health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status. PMID:21572847

Eamranond, Pracha P; Hu, Howard

2008-09-23

132

Environmental and Occupational Exposures in Immigrant Health  

PubMed Central

Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation’s health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status.

Eamranond, Pracha P.; Hu, Howard

2008-01-01

133

Ergonomics work assessment in rural industrial settings: a student occupational therapy project.  

PubMed

This case study describes a student occupational therapy (OT) program, the creation of a worksite assessment project as a part of a Community Connections: Partners for Learning and Service grant funded by Health Resources and Services Administration. The primary goals were to design occupation-based community learning experiences in a variety of rural community settings, so that students might benefit from participating in the community based learning and: based on the results, embed occupation-based learning into existing occupational therapy curriculum. The components of the project and the ergonomics content of the OT education program are described; details of the work assessment are presented with analysis of data from the student evaluation of this project. PMID:22927584

Bowman, Peter J

2012-01-01

134

Health professions students' use of social media.  

PubMed

The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career. PMID:21695367

Giordano, Carolyn; Giordano, Christine

2011-01-01

135

Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Automotive Maintenance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum resource guide on automotive maintenance is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

136

Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Packaging.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This curriculum resource guide on packaging is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach job-required…

Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

137

Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Body & Fender Repair.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum resource guide on body and fender repair is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education for the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

138

A Qualitative Understanding of Occupational Engagement in College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study is to examine the transition experiences of college students nearing graduation through the lens of occupational engagement. The construct of occupational engagement is defined as "...taking part in behaviors that contribute to the decision-maker's fund of information and experience of the larger world, not just…

Bjornsen, Abby L.

2011-01-01

139

Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

Weis, William J., III; And Others

140

Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned

Kneessy

1981-01-01

141

Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

Weis, William J., III; And Others

142

Occupational health and safety in Brazil.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Brazil is the world's fifth largest and sixth most populous nation. Its economy is varied, with strong manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and service sectors. Therefore, a wide variety of workplace hazards confronts its work force. This paper describes Brazil's occupational safety and health regulatory scheme, workers' compensation system, plant-level practices, training, and data collection. METHODS. We reviewed and analyzed Brazilian regulatory legislation and government and non-governmental organization (NGO) activity in occupational safety and health, as well as the structure and function of the workers' compensation system. We also reviewed available data on injuries and diseases from major sources, including the now-defunct Instituto Nacional do Previdencia Social (INPS) and the workers' compensation scheme, Seguro de Acidente de Trabalho (SAT). RESULTS. The incidence of workplace injuries has decreased in recent years and is now reported to be about 5 per 100 workers per year. The case fatality rate has been constant at about 5 fatalities per 1000 injuries. Less than 6% of reported injuries are classified as "diseases." Brazil's rates are comparable to those of Mexico and Zimbabwe, and two to four times higher than in most industrialized countries. CONCLUSIONS. Brazil has a high incidence of occupational injuries and diseases; these injuries and diseases are underreported; there is a large informal sector at special risk; and Brazil illustrates the disparity that exists in many countries between legislation on the books and legislation that is actually implemented.

Frumkin, H; Camara, V de M

1991-01-01

143

The current status of occupational health in China  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to summarize the major health problems among Chinese workers, the strategies and measures for occupational hazards control, the network and organizations of occupational health administration, and the achievements and current challenges of occupational health in China. Results The situation of occupational health was found to be still serious in China. Enterprises with occupational hazards were widely distributed, the exposed population and cases of occupational diseases were numerous, and occupational risks were being transferred from the city to the countryside and from developed areas to developing ones. New emerging problems coexisted with traditional occupational hazards. Besides, a lack of occupational health services for migrant workers could be a major problem for a long time. Conclusions It is necessary to improve the fields related to occupational health, such as the supervision and administration of small- and medium-scale enterprises, research into key techniques for the prevention and control of occupational hazards, systems for the diagnosis and reporting of occupational diseases, and the training of health professionals.

Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Tao

2010-01-01

144

Occupational Wellbeing in a School Community--Staff's and Occupational Health Nurses' Evaluations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study is part of an action research project titled "Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Wellbeing in Co-operation with Occupational Health Nurses" (2001-04), which aims to promote occupational wellbeing by actions that maintain the staff's ability to work in 12 school communities in Eastern Finland. This paper describes…

Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Vertio, Harri

2006-01-01

145

Occupational health and safety in small enterprises.  

PubMed

Health and work are two central components of sustainable development. A total of 2.6 billion people constitute the global labour force, 80% of which is in the developing world. A significant part of the working population in both developed and developing countries is employed in so-called small-scale enterprises (SSEs). This is the under-served working population which does not fully benefit from available knowledge and experience related to health and safety at work. The focus of this paper includes common features of SSEs, with some key WHO documents and publications on chemical hazards, safety, and emergency measures, as well as the WHO concept on Occupational Health for All, and the WHO Global Strategy. PMID:9827870

Mikheev, M I

1998-09-01

146

Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research  

SciTech Connect

Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures.

Turner, J.E.

1984-01-01

147

Biennial National Health Occupations Education Research Conference (4th, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, October 9-11, 1991). Proceedings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These proceedings contain 11 presentations: "The Impact of Multiskilled Practice upon Medical Laboratory Personnel's Job Satisfaction" (Akroyd et al.); "Health Occupations Students of America--A Profile" (Sandiford); "Competencies for Teaching and Need for Update: Perceptions of Secondary Health Occupations Teachers" (Southern et al.); "The…

Sandiford, Janice R., Ed.

148

The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational

Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

2011-01-01

149

The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational

Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

2011-01-01

150

A Pilot Program, Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the Occupational Conditioning Center Program, a vocational education program in which moderately to severely retarded persons are taught proper work attitudes and basic industrial skills. Program goals are said to include: exposing students to simulated work situations, giving students an opportunity to work in cooperation with…

Beliveau, Joseph E.

151

Self-Acceptance Among Transfer and Occupational Community College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In order to investigate the levels of self-acceptance of occupational and transfer students, a sample of 1,190 students enrolled in four Illinois community colleges were administered a personal data sheet and the Berger Self-Acceptance Scale (SAS). The data sheet recorded age (below 20, 21-25, and over 25), marital status (married or single), and…

Ortman, Richard E.; Frerichs, Allen H.

152

Rural-origin health science students at South African universities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To determine the proportion of rural-origin students at all medical schools in South Africa. Design. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in 2003. Lists of undergraduate students admitted from 1999 to 2002 for medicine, dentistry, physiotherapy and occupational therapy were obtained from 9 health science faculties. Origins of students were classified as city, town and rural by means of

J M Tumbo; I D Couper; J F M Hugo

2009-01-01

153

Environmental and occupational health and human rights.  

PubMed

Modern environmental- and occupational-related morbidities and mortality are determined by the power relations inherent in our existing capitalist systems of production and consumption. These systems thwart human public health rights because of the priority to maximize profit for the systems' owners rather than to establish ecologically sound and socially just development for all. The international public health community must return to its primary prevention roots and take action to eliminate the potential for population morbidities that result from hazardous substance exposures in work and community environments. The 1988 Adelaide Recommendations on Healthy Public Policy provide us with guidelines that incorporate a human rights approach and build on several decades of international public health declarations and charters. To succeed, public health must work with the labor movement. A human rights approach to environmental public health can help us make a transition to sustainable modes of production and consumption. The environmental justice movement's strategy for an economic greening that sets as a priority "pathways out of poverty" can help to advance environmental public health rights. PMID:21733799

Slatin, Craig

2011-01-01

154

Implementation of virtual patients in the training for occupational health in Latin America.  

PubMed

Health professionals trained in occupational health are essential to reduce the burden of occupational accidents and diseases. However, training resources are limited globally. We aimed to promote occupational health and safety (OHS) using virtual patients (VPs) in Brazil, Chile, and Germany. Virtual patients were created in three Latin-American health centers. So-called "partner VPs" comparing the distinct health care systems were designed. Translation, adaptation to different medical and legal systems, expert review, implementation into under- and postgraduate teaching, and user evaluation were performed. Twelve VPs covering traditional and contemporary OHS issues are available in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Overall, 2371 students used the VPs. The number of Latin American users who evaluated VP content and relevance for their professional career was statistically significantly higher than the number of German students. VPs are a feasible learning method for OHS in middle-income countries. Partner VPs seem to be useful for teaching global aspects. PMID:21344821

Radon, Katja; Carvalho, Denise; Calvo, Maria Julia; Struempell, Stephanie; Herrera, Veronica; Wengenroth, Laura; Kausel, Gudrun; Marchetti, Nella; Rojas, Daniel Segura; Russ, Paul; Hege, Inga

155

Occupational Health Program Guide for North Carolina Employers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A guide is presented for use by North Carolina employers in establishing effective occupational health programs in compliance with safety and health standards set forth in the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970. The guide defines the b...

1973-01-01

156

Expert Advisory Panel on Occupational Health and Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project developed a set of recommendations to improve occupational health and safety in Ontario, Canada. The project addressed the roles and responsibilities of the occupational health and safety system partners and the role of the joint health and safety committees. It evaluated the information and data collection and exchange, the use of technology, and incentives in the system. Supply

Hunt H. Allan

2010-01-01

157

Health Occupations Education I. Module No. I-A to I-G.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of 7 modules on medical and surgical asepsis is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

158

Health Occupations Education I. Module No. XI-A to XI-D.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This set of 4 modules on pre- and postoperative care is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

159

Health Occupations Education I. Module No. VI-A to VI-F.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of 6 modules on personal care is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module…

Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

160

Health Occupations Education I. Module No. II-A to II-D.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of 4 modules on vital signs is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students, through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module may…

Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

161

Health Occupations Education I. Module No. VI-A to VI-F.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This set of 6 modules on personal care is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module…

Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

162

The Musculoskeletal System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Musculoskeletal System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This module on the musculoskeletal system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to…

National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

163

The Genitourinary System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Genitourinary System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This module on the genitourinary system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit miniseries on anatomy and physiology within the series of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use…

National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

164

Factors affecting the work of an occupational health nurse.  

PubMed

Society, economies, work-life and work are undergoing changes that will have global impact on occupational health services (OHS) and the work of occupational health nurses (OHNs) during the next 5-10 years. These changes will bring new challenges to both occupational health services and representatives of specialist groups within those services. The changes will require new ways of working, work methods, performance monitoring, and evaluation of impacts. These developments will also call for changes in the education of occupational health nurses. PMID:10975137

Rossi, K; Heinonen, K; Heikkinen, M R

2000-07-01

165

Emerging issues in occupational safety and health.  

PubMed

In developed countries, changes in the nature of work and the workforce may necessitate recalibrating the vision of occupational safety and health (OSH) researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to increase the focus on the most important issues. New methods of organizing the workplace, extensive labor contracting, expansion of service and knowledge sectors, increase in small business, aging and immigrant workers, and the continued existence of traditional hazards in high-risk sectors such as construction, mining, agriculture, health care, and transportation support the need to address: 1) broader consideration of the role and impact of work, 2) relationship between work and psychological dysfunction, 3) increased surveillance basis for research and intervention, 4) overcoming barriers to the conduct and use of epidemiologic research, 5) information and knowledge transfer and application, 6) economic issues in prevention, and 7) the global interconnectedness of OSH. These issues are offered to spur thinking as new national research agendas for OSH are considered for developed countries. PMID:16967836

Schulte, Paul A

166

The teaching of occupational health in US medical schools: little improvement in 9 years.  

PubMed Central

A questionnaire survey of the 127 US medical schools was undertaken to assess the present status of occupational health teaching as a follow-up to two prior similar studies. The present study revealed that 78 (68%) of the 115 responding schools specifically taught occupational health during the 1991/92 academic year, in comparison with 50% in the 1977/78 and 66% in the 1982/83 academic years. The median required curriculum time was 6 hours in 1991/92, as compared with 4 hours in both previous surveys. Despite the increasing recognition of occupational health and growth of information in this field of medicine, occupational health teaching to medical students has not progressed proportionately.

Burstein, J M; Levy, B S

1994-01-01

167

Integrating occupational health into the medicine clerkship using problem-based learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To improve medical students’ ability and willingness to obtain occupational histories from their patients.\\u000a \\u000a Participants:General medicine faculty and internal medicine teaching residents, who participated as instructors, and medical students during\\u000a their required internal medicine clerkships.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Setting:The primary teaching hospitals of two medical schools.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design:During alternate months, students participated in problem-based sessions that included occupational health objectives (intervention)\\u000a or attended the

Rosemary K. Sokas; Deborah Diserens; Mary Anne Johnston

1991-01-01

168

The effect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the effect of work choices on mental health and looks at whether this differs across occupations. This requires a model that can deal with the endogeneity in the relationship between health, occupation and work choices. We specify such a model and estimate it on a unique UK panel survey. The survey, called the National Child development Survey

Ana Llena-Nozal; Maarten Lindeboom

2004-01-01

169

Occupational Health Psychology: Historical Roots and Future Directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational health psychology (OHP) is a term first coined by Jonathan Raymond in 1990, yet OHP has historical, international roots dating at least to the early decades of the twentieth century. It involves research and practice to create healthy workplaces. This article has 4 sections. The 1st section discusses psychology's long history of concern for occupational health in industrial organizations,

James Campbell Quick

1999-01-01

170

Small enterprises – Accountants as occupational health and safety intermediaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small enterprises face serious occupational health and safety challenges. The occupational risks are high and resources to control the risks are low. There is an ongoing search for ways that authorities and professional bodies can efficiently reach out to small enterprises with preventive measures. It has been suggested in the literature that accountants could act as intermediaries on health and

Peter Hasle; Bo Bager; Lise Granerud

2010-01-01

171

Qualifying the consultative skills of the occupational health service staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different professional strategies within the Danish Occupational Health Service (OHS) have emerged during the last two decades, all aiming to comply with the prevention objective of the OHS. This development can be described by four successive approaches to professional occupational health and safety work: the medical approach, the technical prevention approach, the change agent approach, and the management strategy approach.For

Hans Jørgen Limborg

1995-01-01

172

Occupational Health of Women Construction Workers in the Unorganised Sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to assess the occupational health status of women workers in the construction industry by evaluating incidences of occupational health disorders. One thousand and fifty-two workers were selected by stratified random sampling, medically examined and subject to relevant interviews, examinations and investigations. Over three-fourths of the women and almost all men reported working for 10 to 12

Ram Lakhani

2004-01-01

173

Occupational Safety and Health Systems: A Three-Country Comparison.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article compares the occupational safety and health systems of Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, looking at the origins of their legislation and its effects on occupational safety and health, with a view to determining what lessons may emerge, particularly for developing countries. (Author/SSH)|

Singleton, W. T.

1983-01-01

174

Stepping Up Occupational Safety and Health Through Employee Participation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The effectiveness of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 is examined, and it is suggested that employee participation could help improve occupational safety and health in the future, through safety committees, safety circles, safety teams, and individual participation. (MSE)|

Vaughan, Gary R.

1986-01-01

175

Occupational Safety and Health Programs in Career Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource guide was developed in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and is intended to assist teachers in implementing courses in occupational safety and health as part of a career education program. The material is a synthesis of films, programed instruction, slides and narration, case studies, safety pamphlets,…

DiCarlo, Robert D.; And Others

176

Recent Advances in Occupational Health Research in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Korea has a short history in research on occupational health like as short history of industrialization. During last four decades, however, Korea has experienced what developed countries have experienced for more than a hundred year. Research on occupational health in Korea has also drastically developed. Since industrialization in 1970s, many workers were exposed to hazardous working environment and suffered from

Seong-Kyu KANG; Yeon-Soon AHN; Kwang-Jong KIM

2004-01-01

177

Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations  

MedlinePLUS

... About CDC.gov . NIOSH Home Workplace Safety & Health Topics NIOSH NIOSH A-Z Index What's New on ... New Archive 1996-1997 Workplace Safety and Health Topics Industries & Occupations Hazards & Exposures Diseases & Injuries Safety & Prevention ...

178

A Bibliographic Guide to Occupational Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Lists government publications, periodicals, loose-leaf services, reports, and reference materials dealing with health and safety in the work environment. Addresses for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regional offices are provided. (FM)|

Pease, Sue

1981-01-01

179

Training of occupational physicians in The Netherlands with regard to occupational health services delivered to the population.  

PubMed

In the Netherlands, the need for a basically new approach to education and training in occupational medicine was felt by professionals, students, schools and occupational health services (OHS) in the early 1990s. After an inventory of the problems and shortcomings of the traditional curriculum, the Netherlands School of Occupational Health defined the framework for a new curriculum. In this article the background, principles and structure of the new curriculum are described. Three principles shape the curriculum: the needs of OHS; professional standards; and the state-of-the-art. The characteristics of the new curriculum are: interaction between theory and practice; students' self-management of the learning process; co-makership with OHS; and multidisciplinarity. The curriculum consists of a course/theory and a practical part. Most of the theoretical part is presented to so called core group of 12 students, which is to be maintained during the full course period of 4 years. The adage for the practical part to be spent in a certified OHS institution is: "the best teaching OHS are learning OHS". In 1999, the first group of students entered the renewed curriculum. First impressions of the experience gained are presented. PMID:11428258

Weel, A N

2001-01-01

180

Perceptions of Environmental and Occupational Health Hazards Among Agricultural Workers in Washington State  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues among agricultural workers. Interviews were conducted with 389 agricultural workers in the Yakima Valley in central Washington State in the summers of 2004 and 2005. Undergraduate students from the community conducted interviews in Spanish or English. Environmental and occupational health issues were ranked by frequency of concern, and differences by demographic characteristics were evaluated using multivariate analyses. In both 2004 and 2005, agricultural workers expressed high levels of concern about working in hot weather, agricultural injuries, pesticides, and pediatric asthma. Perceptions of environmental and occupational health issues among agricultural workers differed by certain demographic characteristics, particularly age and ethnicity. Consideration should be given to these issues when designing research studies, creating educational materials, and developing interventions related to environmental and occupational hazards among agricultural workers.

Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Crowe, Jennifer; Postma, Julie; Ybarra, Vickie; Keifer, Matthew C.

2010-01-01

181

Occupational Health Training of Local Health Department Personnel: A Curriculum Model and Implications of Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines an industrial hygiene training program which emphasizes: (1) trends in occupational health; (2) organization and administration of occupational safety and health services; (3) methods of recognizing, evaluating, and controlling occupational hazards; and (4) application of epidemiological investigation planning, and health education to…

El-Ahraf, Amer; And Others

1982-01-01

182

29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960...Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED...

2013-07-01

183

29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The...

2013-07-01

184

29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2009-07-01

185

29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section...Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND...

2010-07-01

186

75 FR 42455 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section: Notice of Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section: Notice of...1972, that the Safety and Occupational Health Study Section, Centers for...Executive Secretary, Safety and Occupational Health Study Section,...

2010-07-21

187

29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 ...Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION...National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a)...

2010-07-01

188

29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 ...Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION...National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a)...

2009-07-01

189

29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS...

2013-07-01

190

29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of the...

2013-07-01

191

29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS...

2013-07-01

192

29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS...

2013-07-01

193

29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS...

2013-07-01

194

29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor...Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS...

2013-07-01

195

78 FR 47180 - Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1960 [Docket...Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; Subpart...Requirements AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor....

2013-08-05

196

Changes in Beliefs Held by Occupational Therapy Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study was based on the hypothesis that no significant change in beliefs of occupational therapy students would occur as a result of the first field experi ence, since they had early introduction to theory and practice. Test situations supported this hypothesis. (JS)|

Greenstein, Lillian R.

1975-01-01

197

Ergonomics and the occupational health nurse. Instituting a workplace program.  

PubMed

The science of ergonomics is fairly new to industry. It encompasses the total physiological and psychological demands of the job on the employee. Through observations and recordkeeping, the occupational health nurse can note trends in range of motion illnesses related to specific job functions and specific employees. Ergonomic approaches are the same as with other hazardous situations: engineering, administrative controls, and employee training. As a member of the occupational safety and health team, the occupational health nurse plays a vital role in preventing mental and physical fatigue and promoting worker health. PMID:2001273

Jackson, L C

1991-03-01

198

Examination of the Occupational Health and Safety Initiatives Available within the Chemistry Departments of Australian Universities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the findings of a survey that was conducted in 1996 of all Australian university chemistry departments. Thirty-one of the 33 chemistry departments provided input to the project. The aims were twofold: first, to ascertain how different departments approach the task of occupational health and safety (OHS) education and training for students and staff; and second, to produce

Veronica Goodwin; Deirdre Cobbin; Peter Logan

1999-01-01

199

Consumer satisfaction with occupational health services: should it be measured?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To find answers in the literature to the questions if, why, and how consumer satisfaction with occupational health services (OHSs) should be measured.?METHODS—Publications about the concept of consumer satisfaction with health care and surveys of consumer satisfaction with occupational health care were reviewed.?RESULTS—For care providers, surveys of consumer satisfaction can be useful to improve quality or as indicators of non-compliant behaviour among patients. For clients, satisfaction surveys can be helpful for choosing between healthcare providers. Satisfaction is made up of an affective component of evaluation and a cognitive component of expectations. Also, in occupational health care, patient satisfaction is measured by dimensions such as the humanness and competence of the care provider similar to health care in general. However, there are dimensions that are specific to occupational health—such as the perceived independence of the physician, unclear reasons for visiting an OHS, and the perceived extent of knowledge of OHS professionals about the patient's working conditions. Dimensions of client satisfaction are mostly similar to patient satisfaction but include more businesslike aspects. They are different for the two groups of client, employers and employees. To measure consumer satisfaction in occupational healthcare specific questionnaires must be constructed. To achieve the highest possible reader satisfaction guidelines are provided for construction of a questionnaire.?CONCLUSIONS—Consumer satisfaction is a complex theoretical concept, but it is relatively easy to measure in practice and can be a valuable tool for quality improvement. Consumers' evaluations of occupational health services will become increasingly important due to changes in the organisation of occupational health care. Occupational healthcare providers are encouraged to measure the consumer satisfaction of their services.???Keywords: consumer satisfaction; occupational health services

Verbeek, J; van Dijk, F; Rasanen, K; Piirainen, H; Kankaanpaa, E; Hulshof, C

2001-01-01

200

Smoking and occupation from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey  

PubMed Central

Background: Smoking is among the most important personal and modifiable risk factors for adverse health outcomes. The workplace offers a potentially effective venue for tobacco prevention programmes; identifying occupational groups with high smoking prevalence may assist in targeting such programmes. Aims: To examine smoking prevalence among occupational groups in the European Union. Methods: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), a cross sectional health survey conducted in 1992–93, was used to examine smoking prevalence by occupation among 14 565 subjects from 30 centres in 14 participating countries. Results: There was an approximately twofold range in smoking prevalence by occupation. For occupational groups with at least 50 subjects, the highest smoking prevalence was seen in metal making and treating for men (54.3%) and cleaners for women (50.7%). Increased smoking prevalence by occupation persisted after adjustment for age, country, and age at completion of education. Smoking was also increased among occupations with high exposure to mineral dust and gas or fumes. Conclusions: Smoking rates vary significantly by occupation. Prevention efforts in the workplace should focus on occupations with high smoking prevalence and large employment bases.

McCurdy, S; Sunyer, J; Zock, J; Anto, J; Kogevinas, M; European, C

2003-01-01

201

Health and safety implications of occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials.  

PubMed

The rapid growth and commercialization of nanotechnology are currently outpacing health and safety recommendations for engineered nanomaterials. As the production and use of nanomaterials increase, so does the possibility that there will be exposure of workers and the public to these materials. This review provides a summary of current research and regulatory efforts related to occupational exposure and medical surveillance for the nanotechnology workforce, focusing on the most prevalent industrial nanomaterials currently moving through the research, development, and manufacturing pipelines. Their applications and usage precedes a discussion of occupational health and safety efforts, including exposure assessment, occupational health surveillance, and regulatory considerations for these nanomaterials. PMID:22131295

Stebounova, Larissa V; Morgan, Hallie; Grassian, Vicki H; Brenner, Sara

2011-11-30

202

Role of occupational health services in workplace drug testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Finland, workplace drug testing is mainly performed in accordance with the Act on the Protection of Privacy in Working Life (759\\/2004), (http:\\/\\/www.finlex.fi\\/en\\/laki\\/kaannokset\\/2004\\/20040759) [1], the Occupational Health Care Act (1383\\/2001), (http:\\/\\/www.finlex.fi\\/en\\/laki\\/kaannokset\\/2001\\/20011383) [2] and the Decree on Workplace Drug Testing (218\\/2005) [3]. The role of occupational health services is stated in the Occupational Health Care Act. All workplace drug tests are

Pirjo Lillsunde; Kristiina Mukala; Ritva Partinen; Matti Lamberg

2008-01-01

203

Mapping 'Occupational Health' courses in India: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

The occupational health scenario is undergoing a paradigm shift in developing countries with rapid industrialization. Inadequate human resource is, however, a concern. The creation of Basic Occupational Health Services will demand a further increase in specialist manpower. The current training capacity of occupational health specialists has been mapped by a systematic review in India. Twenty-one institutes have been identified all across the country. They have an existing capacity for training about 460 specialists. This number is inadequate considering the population of India's working class. A mixture of strategies must be urgently planned for addressing this issue.

Zodpey, S. P.; Negandhi, Himanshu; Tiwari, R. R.

2009-01-01

204

Developing an Occupational Health Program: The Team Approach  

PubMed Central

Occupational health and safety programs involve professionals in occupational medicine and nursing, industrial hygiene, safety and accident prevention, psychology, sociology and health physics. Occupational health programs should allow regular health evaluations of workers, and the recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental hazards. When designing in-plant medical facilities, accommodation should be made for possible future expansion, disabled people, and an access route for an ambulance. Treatment and prevention facilities should be separate. Patients' records must be complete and kept confidential. The occupational health program must also be evaluated regularly. Education of management and the work force is necessary to ensure that the environment is safe and to prevent accidents. Special programs may be introduced, based on the particular risks, toxicants, and problems in different industries. Imagesp1912-a

Prossin, Albert

1985-01-01

205

Occupational health services in the UK--challenges and opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the challenges currently facing occupational medicine and how we can improve access to occupational health services (OHS). It aims to highlight some of the diverse internal and external factors that restrict the UK's ability to provide all workers access to OHS. Method A literature review was carried out and combined with awareness of current trends in business

P. J. Nicholson

2004-01-01

206

Occupational Health and Safety Situation and Research Priority in Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of this article are to review the situation of occupational health and safety and to describe research priority in this field in Thailand. Thailand is one of newly industrialized countries in Southeast Asia. Approximately half of the working population is still in agriculture. The data from Thai Workmen's Compensation Fund showed that incidence rate of occupational injuries and

Somkiat SIRIRUTTANAPRUK; Pensri ANANTAGULNATHI

2004-01-01

207

Health-based recommended occupational exposure limits for halothane  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit (HBR-OEL) for halothane of 0.41 mg\\/m3 (0.05 ppm) as an eight-hour time-weighted average concentration.

M. A. Maclaine Pont

2002-01-01

208

Occupational Stress among Rural Health Workers in Mashhad District, Northeast Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study explores the level of Occupational Stress and main sources of occupational and personal stress among Rural Health Workers (RHW) of the health network of Mashhad district. Method: The first part of the Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) (called the Occupational Roles Ques- tionnaire (ORQ)) was used to measure the Rural Health Workers occupational stress (N=172). A num- ber

Raeissi P

209

Legal regulations on occupational health system in Poland.  

PubMed

Occupational health care has a long tradition in Poland. It has evolved from the industrial health care system established in the post-war period to a modern system defined in the Occupational Health Services Act of 1997. When the process of political and economic transformation began in Poland in 1989, the reforms of the workers' health care became inevitable. The process of introducing and implementing new legal regulations comprised three phases: 1. Introduction of amendments to the Polish Labor Code, according to which employers are now committed to provide their workers with occupational health services (OHS) appropriate to given working conditions. 2. Incorporation into the 1991 Health Care Institutions Act the provisions which allow for the establishment of alternative non-public structures responsible for the health care of the working population. 3. Adoption of the Occupational Health Services Act in 1997, the most important law providing grounds for establishing a most comprehensive system of occupational health services. The Occupational Health Services Act introduces, for the first time, the concept of the OHS system that encompasses the whole working population. The Act outlines a broad range of OHS competences; defines individual tasks; and provides the up-to-date definition of the OHS structure with its two organizational levels, consisting of primary and regional occupational health centers. In addition, the Act specifies the sources of finance for the accomplishment of the defined tasks. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act, OHS units co-operate with employers and employees, bodies supervising working conditions and other organizations involved in occupational health that become their partners in activities aimed at protecting and promoting health of workers. In order to further develop the workers' health care system its constant adaptation to changing conditions is absolutely necessary through: developing modern training for specialists in the field of occupational medicine; establishing an efficient system for controlling the quality of services provided by the occupational health care centers; and implementing more effective forms of health protection and promotion at workplace, especially for those self-employed. PMID:11428255

Dawydzik, L T

2001-01-01

210

Technology enhanced learning for occupational and environmental health nursing: a global imperative.  

PubMed

One strategy for decreasing the barriers to higher education and for increasing the competency and performance of the occupational and environmental health nurse in the information age is technology enhanced learning. Technology enhanced learning encompasses a variety of technologies employed in teaching and learning activities of presentation, interaction, and transmission to on campus and distant students. Web based learning is growing faster than any other instructional technology, offering students convenience and a wealth of information. PMID:11111417

Olson, D K; Cohn, S; Carlson, V

2000-04-01

211

Mental Health of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A random sample of college sophomores was studied regarding their mental health status, mental health service use, and attitudes toward mental health professionals. Data were collected through home interviews and a search of the students' service records at the university. Mental health status was measured by the 22-item Midtown Mental Health Scale.Religious affiliation and performance satisfaction were both found to

Jeffrey O. Whitley

1979-01-01

212

Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health, 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Occupational safety and health academic programs offered in United States educational institutions, including 12 NIOSH sponsored Educational Resource Centers (ERCs), are described. The 201 programs described are categorized into five core disciplines (occ...

W. J. Weis T. C. Purcell M. H. Street P. A. Kendrick

1979-01-01

213

Preventive Effects an Low Back Pain and Occupational Injuries by Providing the Participatory Occupational Safety and Health Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Preventive Effects on Low Back Pain and Occupational,Injuries by Providing ,the Participatory Occupational Safety and Health Program: Shigeki KODA, et al.Department of Public Health, Kochi Medical School—The goal of the study was,to estimate ,the effects of a ,participatory occupational safety and health (OSH) program on the incidence of low,back pain (LBP) and occupational injuries (OIs). This participatory OSH program,was

Shigeki KODA; Hiroshi OHARA

1999-01-01

214

Health education and communication in Occupational Health Services in Finland.  

PubMed

This article discusses health education and communication in Occupational Health Services (OHS) based on a questionnaire study conducted in Finnish OHS in 2005. The study focused on educational activities carried out by OH professionals and directed at individual employees, work communities and groups, and representatives of client organisations. The questionnaire was sent to 1132 OH professionals--physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and psychologists--working in 130 OHS units, and representing different OHS providers in Finland. 635 respondents (162 physicians, 342 nurses, 96 physiotherapists, 35 psychologists) returned the questionnaire. The overall response rate was 58%. There were statistically significant differences in educational activities by different professional groups; differences were also related to the length of working experience in OHS. For all OH professionals, individual employees were the primary clients of health education and communication. Education was less often directed at work communities and representatives of client organisations. However, many issues related to health and well-being at work are not within the reach of individual employees. The impact of health education would be more evident if it also reached those organisational stakeholders with discretion in decision-making. Furthermore, OH personnel should pay attention to the social aspect of learning and work more with groups and work communities. PMID:18796384

Palmgren, Helena; Jalonen, Päivi; Kaleva, Simo

2008-09-01

215

Occupational health in the Negev: A model for regional planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Negev region of Israel, I tested a model approach to occupational health planning. This model included components assessing exposures, measuring adverse health outcomes, and evaluating health services. I analyzed employment survey data, compiled an exposure data base, and carried out site visits covering 10,707 employees (over 50% of the regional industrial work force). Site visits identified exposure hazards

Paul D. Blanc

1989-01-01

216

[Work: disease and health. The role of occupational medicine].  

PubMed

To assess the role of Occupational Medicine in the promotion of workers'health over the last forty years, the author studied the evolution of this discipline from a clinical-diagnostic approach to the current emphasis on prevention. However, it is stressed that in Occupational Medicine even preventive measures are based on clinical methodology, as for example in health surveillance, where the main tasks are the identification of individual hyper-susceptibility and the assessment of early and reversible health effects due to occupational risks. Moreover, the traditional clinical-diagnostic approach is still of utmost importance. In fact, the classical occupational diseases do not present with the specific clinical features of the recent past. Instead, today it is necessary to evaluate whether occupational risk factors play a concomitant role in the origin of diseases that affect the general population. Moreover, new occupational diseases are emerging, due to the continuous changes in manufacturing processes and work organization. To assess the role that Occupational Medicine has played in the binomial expression "disease-health", topics which particularly suit the Author's cultural background are considered and are used as "indicators" of the various scientific, cultural, social, economic, and legislative aspects that contribute to the professional development of Occupational Physicians. Important results have been achieved over the last 40 years, however Occupational Physicians face new problems that impose a continuous updating process, not only on medical topics but also on the development of technological processes. The laws and the recommendations of the most prestigious national and international organizations and the principles of the ICOH Code of Ethics should guide Occupational Physicians in their profession and their actions must imply full professional independence. They must acquire and maintain the necessary competence for their duties and adequate conditions to carry out their tasks according to good practice and professional ethics. PMID:21298869

Alessio, L

2010-01-01

217

A national survey of occupational therapy students' and physiotherapy students' attitudes to disabled people  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective : To investigate the possible influence of curricular and non-curricular activities on the attitudes of occupational therapy and physiotherapy students towards disabled people at the beginning and end of their pre-registration education. Design : A cross-sectional survey. Setting : United Kingdom. Participants : Two thousand two hundred and ninety-nine students. Main outcome measures : Interaction with Disabled Persons' Scale.

Kay Stachura; Frances Garven

2007-01-01

218

The educational outcomes of occupational sub-baccalaureate students: evidence from the 1990s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational students constitute the majority of enrollments at community colleges. Moreover, over the last 15 years, the “vocationalization” of the community college has been one of the most controversial trends in higher education. However, little is known about how the educational experiences of occupational students compare to those of academic students. This paper uses two Beginning Postsecondary Student Longitudinal studies

Mariana Alfonso; Thomas R. Bailey; Marc Scott

2005-01-01

219

The sociologic context of occupational health in South Africa.  

PubMed Central

The early history of the occupational health system in South Africa is outlined up to the early 1970s which mark a political and social transition in the society. Relevant demographic and social data are provided, and the roles and mutual relations of capital, labor, state, and academic sectors are discussed. During the past 15 years there has been heightened occupational health activity. Major legislative activity has included several commissions, the promulgation of new laws and regulations governing the workplace, and deregulatory measures in a contradictory mix. Conflictual relations between social forces are illustrated by two examples involving the introduction of safety representatives in the workplace, and compensation for occupational lung disease. The implications of wider political and economic realities are analyzed, and current and probable future trends in the evolution of the occupational health system are identified. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2

Myers, J E; Macun, I

1989-01-01

220

Hospital violence and the role of the occupational health nurse.  

PubMed

Between 1993 and 1999, an average of 1.7 million violent workplace incidents were recorded per year. Of the nonfatal injuries and lost days due to occupational violence, 32% occur in the health care setting. The annual incidence rate for violence against nurses is 22 incidents per 1,000 nurses. When an occupational health professional analyzes an exposure, engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment policies are drafted to ensure the future safety of employees. This literature review identifies best practice controls used to protect health care workers from violence in the workplace. [Workplace Health Saf 2013;61(11):475-478.]. PMID:24169954

Brown, Bethany G; Burns, Candace

2013-11-01

221

Technology-enhanced learning/distance education: market survey of occupational health and safety professionals.  

PubMed

A market survey of occupational health and safety professionals was performed to assess their interest in course work offered through distance education, using technology-enhanced learning methods such as the Internet or CD-ROM. A random sample of 800 active and student members of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, and the American Society of Safety Engineers from the eight-state Midwest region were queried through a mail survey. Respondents expressed a high likeliness (87.4%) to participate in distance education opportunities for the purposes of continuing education and academic degree. The areas of study interest selected most often were occupational health (73%), injury prevention and control (60%), and industrial hygiene (53%). More than three-quarters of respondents (79%) said that an on-campus component was not important to their learning experience. The majority of respondents (68%) indicated that they were reimbursed for the cost of education with significant differences identified by association. Occupational health and safety professionals are interested in distance education using technology-enhanced learning (TEL) methodologies for meeting their educational needs. TEL/distance education, built on a tested educational approach, should be implemented and outcomes shared to increase the body of knowledge regarding these teaching strategies as they pertain to occupational health and safety professionals. PMID:11434441

Carlson, V; Olson, D K

222

Model development for health promotion and control of agricultural occupational health hazards and accidents in Pathumthani, Thailand.  

PubMed

In Thailand, agriculture is one of the major occupations; however, there is no comprehensive agricultural occupational health promotion and disease prevention model available. Objectives of this study were to empower farmers to study occupational health and safety situation in rice farming and to develop model to promote their health and prevent occupational health hazards among them. This participatory action research was performed in Tambol Klong 7, Klongluang district, Pathumthani, Thailand. The 24 rice farmers from 9 villages were voluntarily recruited as members of research team called farmer-leader research group. This group had a monthly meeting to discuss issues of agricultural occupational health and safety during 3 yr study period. At first stage, farmer-leader research group analyzed occupational health and safety during rice farming process. After we had results from situation analysis, farmer-leader research group decided which problems would be solved first. We developed model to solve those problems during the second stage. Finally, model was implemented to farmers in the study area. During first stage, results of questionnaires showed that there were 3 major occupational health and safety problems among these farmers; symptoms from pesticide exposure (65% of respondents), musculoskeletal problems during various process (16.6%-75.9%), and injuries during various process (1.1%-83.2%). From these results, farmer-leader research group decided to deal with pesticide problem. There was an experiment comparing using biofertilizers and bio pest-control with using chemical fertilizers and pesticides in the rice paddy. Results showed that the biological field produced the same amount of rice as the chemical field but cost less money than the chemical one. Benefits from using biofertilizers and bio pest-control were having higher profit, less exposure to chemicals, and good mental health from higher profit. After this experiment, biofertilizers and bio pest-control were disseminated to rice-farmers and students and teachers in local schools. At the end of study, we found that there were networks of farmers and networks of students-teachers using biological methods. This study showed that participation with farmers could create a real sustainable model to promote farmers' health and prevent them from occupational health hazards. PMID:16294922

Buranatrevedh, Surasak; Sweatsriskul, Peeungjun

2005-10-01

223

Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

2010-01-01

224

Linking Up with Local Health Care Facilities to Provide Clinical Updating for Health Occupations Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When health occupations teachers are not able to leave their teaching jobs to obtain much needed clinical updating, alternatives must be found. The method of linking with local health care facilities to provide clinical updating for health occupations teachers is not perfect and has not been rated as the most effective. Clinical updating workshops…

Sandiford, Janice R.

225

Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations.…

Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

2005-01-01

226

AN ATTITUDINAL INTERVENTION WITH OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY STUDENTS: 9 YEARS LATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consideration of students’ perceptions of and attitudes toward older people deserves attention in the professional curricula of the various health care disciplines. Students’ perceptions can be influenced through their observations of and work with clinicians who, as role models, demonstrate positive or negative perceptions of older people. The hypothesis for this attitudinal survey stated that a values?oriented educational approach could

Davis L. Gardner

1994-01-01

227

Occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers.  

PubMed Central

Migrant and seasonal farm workers are one of the most underserved and understudied populations in the United States. The total US population of such farm workers has been estimated at 5 million, of whom about 20% live or work in California. Farm workers perform strenuous tasks and are exposed to a wide variety of occupational risks and hazards. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to health care also contribute to existing health problems in this population. Potential farm work-related health problems include accidents, pesticide-related illnesses, musculoskeletal and soft-tissue disorders, dermatitis, noninfectious respiratory conditions, reproductive health problems, health problems of children of farm workers, climate-caused illnesses, communicable diseases, bladder and kidney disorders, and eye and ear problems. Few epidemiologic studies exist of these occupational health problems. No comprehensive epidemiologic studies have assessed the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers and their dependents. Although the migratory nature of this population makes long-term studies difficult, the development of standardized data collection instruments for health consequences and scientific assessment of farm work exposures and working conditions are vital to characterize and reduce the occupational health risks in farm workers.

Mobed, K; Gold, E B; Schenker, M B

1992-01-01

228

Occupational health nursing and the quest for professional authority.  

PubMed

Occupational health nurses provide most of the in-plant health care services in U.S. industry but have dubious credentials to provide care for many of the injuries and illnesses they encounter. The nurses work directly for the employer in an atmosphere designed to control employer costs and employee benefits. Their loyalty to the company and limited autonomy make it unlikely that they will represent the workers' interests. They generally embrace any expansion of their roles within the company. However, employers and government have made no serious effort to determine whether nurses can adequately take on these new functions and advance occupational health. A nurse-directed model carries the risk that nurses who are not knowledgeable enough about the law, or are overly committed to reducing costs, may overdelegate responsibilities, thereby aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of nursing. This overreaching is part of an ill-conceived effort to establish nursing as a profession with the greater independence, expertise, and control over training that longstanding professions such as medicine and law have achieved. An extensive literature devoted to the approval and acceptance of occupational health nursing exists, yet constructive criticism of occupational health nursing is almost nonexistent. Occupational health and safety is much too important to be largely relegated to an inadequately defined semi-profession, striving to attain higher professional status and control while lacking the expertise, power, professional standards, and autonomy required of a profession. PMID:21411426

Draper, Elaine; Ladou, Joseph; Tennenhouse, Dan J

2011-01-01

229

The Development of Occupations in Health Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study examined the general question of how the place of an occupation in the economic division of labor becomes shaped and defined. The shaping was seen as basically a political process, a utilization of power in various forms by interested parties acting with the conscious intention of gaining control over the economic activity of themselves…

Brown, Carol Anderson

230

Nursing III. A Course of Study. Health Occupations Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This curriculum guide for instructors provides a course of study (Nursing III) requisite for the third and concluding portion of a 1-year practical nursing curriculum designed to continue opportunities for career mobility in the health occupations. Content is in three sections: (1) Medical Surgical Nursing II, (2) Mental Health Nursing, and (3)…

Rogers, Helen V.

231

Integrating Occupational Health and Safety into TAFE Courses: Curriculum Topics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide is designed to help technical and further education (TAFE) curriculum writers in Australia integrate safety education into vocational education courses. It provides a general overview of occupational health and safety from the perspective of TAFE trade training and a brief summary of the major health and safety issues that might be…

Hall, Bob; Mageean, Pauline

232

Demystifying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Inspection Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

•BEING PREPARED FOR an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection can save a facility money, as well as potentially protect employees from serious illness or injury.•THIS ARTICLE EXPLAINS the OSHA inspection process, types of violations that may be cited, and the appeals process for employers and employees.•ACTUAL CITATIONS GIVEN in four recent OSHA health care facility inspections are discussed

Lowell L. Price; Terri Goodman

2006-01-01

233

Demystifying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspection process  

Microsoft Academic Search

•BEING PREPARED FOR an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection can save a facility money, as well as potentially protect employees from serious illness or injury.•THIS ARTICLE EXPLAINS the OSHA inspection process, types of violations that may be cited, and the appeals process for employers and employees.•ACTUAL CITATIONS GIVEN in four recent OSHA health care facility inspections are discussed

Lowell L. Price; Terri Goodman

2006-01-01

234

Occupational health and safety impacts of renewable energy sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many renewable sources of energy have little direct public health impact because their normal operation produces no pollutants. Nevertheless, these technologies tend to be materials and labor intensive not only in the direct fabrication, construction, and operation of the devices, themselves, but also in the materials supply sectors required to support them. Their occupational health risks can therefore be greater

M. D. Rowe; P. J. Groncki

1980-01-01

235

Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Administrator's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual guides an instructor in conducting a training course for first-line supervisors to familiarize them with six aspects relating to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970: (1) requirements of the Act, (2) compliance with its standards, (3) identification of health and safety hazards, (4) correction of adverse conditions, (5) record…

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

236

Achieving Efficiency and Accountability in Occupational Health and Safety and Workplace Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the relationship between workplace reform and occupational health and safety. Since the early 1980s major changes have occured to both industrial relations and occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation. Legislative changes and policy initiatives have created both problems and opportunities in terms of improving occupational health and safety. The paper identifies reasons for involving workers in occupational

Michael Quinlan

1995-01-01

237

Roadmap to HIPAA: keeping occupational health nurses on track.  

PubMed

So what does HIPAA require most covered entities to do? At this point, the Privacy Rule compliance date has already passed for all covered entities except small health plans. Most of the requirements under the Privacy Rule dictate the development of appropriate policies and procedures, a notice of privacy practices and other forms, implementation of measures to secure the privacy of PHI, contracting with Business Associates, and training of all involved. For covered entities, testing of the electronic standard transactions to exchange data between participating parties should have begun by April 16, 2003. Although full implementation of the electronic transactions should have taken place by October 16, 2003, the government has allowed covered entities that are still actively working toward compliance to operate under contingency plans. It remains unclear when the use of such plans will be disallowed. After standards are published for claim attachments and first report of injury, these electronic standard transactions will be incorporated by the designated compliance date. Appropriate use of national identifiers will be implemented after final rules and standards are published. For the occupational health nurse who is not a covered entity, the most critical implementation factor is a HIPAA compliant authorization form so the occupational health nurse can continue to obtain necessary PHI. This is essential when attempting to obtain medical information, even for workers' compensation or disability case management. Although these plans are not considered health plans under HIPAA and, therefore, would not require the designation of covered entity, the occupational health nurse frequently needs to obtain PHI to manage these cases. Most providers in the health care community will be covered entities under HIPAA and will not be able to release PHI without a signed HIPAA compliant authorization form. In addition, providers will want a HIPAA compliant authorization form signed when requesting health information from the occupational health nurse. The HIPAA's privacy regulations are considered "the floor" or minimum standard for the protection of PHI. As such, it is likely that these privacy regulations will become the "industry standard" to which all health care professionals will be held. Even though the occupational health nurse may not be a covered entity, implementing appropriate HIPAA procedures is recommended. Knowing that most of HIPAA's privacy rule contains requirements already in place and in practice for most occupational health nurses can take some of the worry out of this complex regulation. Additionally, the nurse interacts with the health care system in a variety of roles. As a health care consumer, occupational health nurses can assert their own patient rights when interacting with covered entities. As the trusted advisor and consultant to many employees, the occupational health nurse can play a vital role in educating employees about HIPAA and assisting employees with navigating an ever-complex health care system. As a health care professional, the occupational health nurse continues to protect and safeguard all PHI while respecting employees' rights and delivering quality care. Staying knowledgeable and up-to-date on the HIPAA regulations as they continue to evolve and change allows occupational health nurses to stay on the right course while mapping their way toward regulatory compliance (see Sidebar for recommended resources). PMID:15119817

Lucas, Barbara; Adams, Sandra; Wachs, Joy E

2004-04-01

238

Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry…

Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

239

Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

240

Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Health Occupations. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An analysis of competencies practiced by seventeen health occupation groups was conducted to determine the extent to which commonality existed in job activities. (The groups include accredited records technician, aide/orderly, dental assistant, dental hygienist, dental lab technician, dietetic technician, licensed practical nurse, medical…

McClurg, Ronald B.

241

Programmed health surveillance and detection of emerging diseases in occupational health: contribution of the French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network (RNV3P)  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network (RNV3P) includes the 30 occupational disease consultation centres in university hospitals to which patients are referred for potentially work-related diseases, and an occupational health service. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the contribution of RNV3P to national health surveillance.MethodsData from consultations are recorded in standardised occupational health reports and

Vincent Bonneterre; Laurie Faisandier; Dominique Bicout; Cyril Bernardet; Jacques Piollat; Jacques Ameille; Caroline de Clavière; Michel Aptel; Gérard Lasfargues; Régis de Gaudemaris

2009-01-01

242

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1991 projects  

SciTech Connect

The report presents information on projects conducted by NIOSH in 1991 aimed at improving working conditions and worker health. The planning format for 1991 was depicted using a flow chart. Each division of NIOSH was listed along with phone numbers and brief descriptions of the projects conducted by the division. Summaries were included of national prevention strategies for occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, occupational cardiovascular diseases, disorders of reproduction, neurotoxic disorders, noise induced hearing loss, dermatological conditions, and psychological disorders. The purpose of each NIOSH project was described, and projects were categorized by program areas. These programs areas included the subjects of the national prevention strategies, agriculture related projects, construction related projects, assistance requests, and administration.

Not Available

1991-08-01

243

Occupational Safety and Health Interventions to Reduce Musculoskeletal Symptoms in the Health Care Sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction Health care work is dangerous and multiple interventions have been tested to reduce the occupational hazards. Methods A systematic review of the literature used a best evidence synthesis approach to address the general question “Do occupational\\u000a safety and health interventions in health care settings have an effect on musculoskeletal health status?” This was followed\\u000a by an evaluation of the

Jessica M. Tullar; Shelley Brewer; Benjamin C. Amick; Emma Irvin; Quenby Mahood; Lisa A. Pompeii; Anna Wang; Dwayne Van Eerd; David Gimeno; Bradley Evanoff

2010-01-01

244

Occupational health psychology: historical roots and future directions.  

PubMed

Occupational health psychology (OHP) is a term first coined by Jonathan Raymond in 1990, yet OHP has historical, international roots dating at least to the early decades of the twentieth century. It involves research and practice to create healthy workplaces. This article has 4 sections. The 1st section discusses psychology's long history of concern for occupational health in industrial organizations, beginning with Hugo Münsterberg's study of industrial accidents and human safety in the late 1800s. The 2nd section focuses on OHP's movement from the convergence of public health and preventive medicine with health and clinical psychology in an industrial/organizational context. The 3rd section addresses the central issues of organizational and individual health through the framework of preventive management. The article concludes with OHP case examples drawn from the Chaparral Steel Company, the U.S. Air Force, and Johnson & Johnson. PMID:9925049

Quick, J C

1999-01-01

245

Occupational exposure limits based on biological monitoring: the Japan Society for Occupational Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Japan Society for Occupational Health started to recommend an occupational exposure limit based on biological monitoring\\u000a (OEL-B) in 1993. Up to 1998, OEL-Bs for mercury, lead, hexane and 3,3?-dichloro-4,4?-diaminodiphenylmethane had been adopted\\u000a and those for 17 chemical substances (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, acetone, methanol, benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene,\\u000a tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, N,N-dimethylacetoamide, N,N-dimethylformamide,carbon disulfide, carbon monoxide, and organophospate insecticides) are

K. Omae; T. Takebayashi; H. Sakurai

1999-01-01

246

Occupational stress and mental health of cardiac and noncardiac patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Much of the research studies have shown that occupational stress is one of the strong determinant factors of coronary heart diseases among people in general. However, exploring the extent to which the type or nature of ailments and its subsequent risk factors have an effect on the onset of mental health will help evolve suitable preventive measures. The present study attempts to explore the status of mental health and occupational stress with respect to 2 categories of patients: Those who are suffering from cardiac problems and those suffering from noncardiac health problems. Materials and Methods: Occupational Stress Questionnaire and Mental Health Questionnaire were administered to both cardiac and noncardiac patients. The cardiac group consisted of 40 patients who were being treated at the cardiology department of a reputed hospital, and noncardiac group (40 patients) consisted of outpatients of the same hospital being treated for noncardiac problems like knee pain, headache, etc. Responses to these self-reported questionnaires were subjected to statistical analysis to find out the difference between cardiac and noncardiac groups. Results: The results revealed that cardiac patients tend to have lower levels of mental health than noncardiac patients. Similarly, cardiac patients were reported to have higher levels of stress due to role ambiguity, powerlessness, intrinsic impoverishment and unprofitability. Conclusions: The implications of the study were implementation of interventions to improve the internal strength of cardiac patients to overcome various aspects of occupational stress.

Subramanian, S.; Nithyanandan, D. V.

2009-01-01

247

Occupational health and health care in Russia and Russian Arctic: 1980-2010  

PubMed Central

Background There is a paradox in Russia and its Arctic regions which reports extremely low rates of occupational diseases (ODs), far below those of other socially and economically advanced circumpolar countries. Yet, there is widespread disregard for occupational health regulations and neglect of basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises. Study design and methods This review article presents official statistics and summarises the results of a search of peer-reviewed scientific literature published in Russia on ODs and occupational health care in Russia and the Russian Arctic, within the period 1980–2010. Results Worsening of the economic situation, layoff of workers, threat of unemployment and increased work load happened during the “wild market” industrial restructuring in 1990–2000, when the health and safety of workers were of little concern. Russian employers are not legally held accountable for neglecting safety rules and for underreporting of ODs. Almost 80% of all Russian industrial enterprises are considered dangerous or hazardous for health. Hygienic control of working conditions was minimised or excluded in the majority of enterprises, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. There is direct evidence of general degradation of the occupational health care system in Russia. The real levels of ODs in Russia are estimated to be at least 10–100 times higher than reported by official statistics. The low official rates are the result of deliberate hiding of ODs, lack of coverage of working personnel by properly conducted medical examinations, incompetent management and the poor quality of staff, facilities and equipment. Conclusions Reform of the Russian occupational health care system is urgently needed, including the passing of strong occupational health legislation and their enforcement, the maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers, improved training of occupational health personnel, protection of sanitary-hygienic laboratories in industrial enterprises, and support for research assessing occupational risk and the effectiveness of interventions.

Dudarev, Alexey A.; Odland, Jon ?yvind

2013-01-01

248

Occupational health education in Poland: new needs, new requirements, new programmes.  

PubMed

The conditions of modern work environment in Poland generate new problems, new needs and new expectations in the area of occupational health. They are associated not only with the rapidly changing technologies and new professions but also with the psychosocial factors pertaining to extensive transformations of the political and economic systems. New needs and expectations determine a new approach: firstly, to the responsibilities of the occupational health specialists; secondly, to the organisation and management of the workers health care; and thirdly, to the general principles of the occupational health, including in particular relevant legislation. The new requirements concerning the operation of the occupational health system in all the three dimensions must be addressed in the design of the new training programmes in occupational health whether under- or postgraduate. Subjects to updating and modification should be not only the content of the training but also its forms and methodology. Competence-based learning should be accompanied by the modern methods of problem solving, distant learning, organised self-education and self-assessment. The growing interest in the quality of the training should be expressed, first of all, in the activities aiming at the development of procedures to assess the effectiveness of the training. It seems also necessary to adopt the active learning approach intensifying acquisition and verification of the knowledge and skills. This approach would also lead to deeper changes in the students' mentality and behaviour, e.g. to make them able to estimate their own and others' level of professional competence or shape the personal system of professional values under the conditions of the free-market economy in the health care which entails quality requirements for the services and the competition among its providers. PMID:10360080

Indulski, J A; Boczkowski, A

1999-01-01

249

American Association of Occupational Health Nurses  

MedlinePLUS

... highlights the critical roles nurses will play in health care reform and information resources you can use to learn more about the Marketplace. (September 25, 2013) AAOHN has signed a letter calling upon Dept. of Health & Human Services Secretary Sebelius to ensure that the ...

250

Occupational health and gorilla conservation in Rwanda.  

PubMed

The design and implementation of an employee health program for people who work with mountain gorillas in Rwanda is described. This program aims to improve worker health and to reduce human-to-gorilla transmission of infectious disease. The program covered approximately 111 workers, generally healthy men and women 25-45 years old, including essentially all people in Rwanda who have regular contact with gorillas. Initial assessment included a questionnaire, medical examination, and local tests. U.S. laboratory facilities were utilized to confirm some results and for serologic testing for zoonotic (simian) viruses. Initial interventions included STD/HIV prevention health education, tetanus immunization, and anthelminthic treatment. Local physicians continue to provide health services, including follow-up testing and treatment. Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project (MGVP) veterinarians assist in planning and implementing continuing program components in collaboration with local health authorities and the other employing organizations. PMID:15473088

Ali, Robbie; Cranfield, Mike; Gaffikin, Lynne; Mudakikwa, Tony; Ngeruka, Leon; Whittier, Chris

251

Occupational mercury exposure and male reproductive health  

SciTech Connect

This retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship of male occupational exposure to elemental mercury and several reproductive outcomes. All subjects worked at least 4 months between 1953 and 1966 at a plant that used elemental mercury; 247 white male employees who had the highest exposures were compared to 255 matched nonexposed employees. Individual exposure to mercury was estimated from urinary mercury measurement records. Information on reproductive history and potential confounding variables was obtained through personal interview with each of the employees and with a subset of their wives. No associations were demonstrated between mercury exposure and decreased fertility or increased rates of major malformations or serious childhood illnesses. After controlling for previous miscarriage history, mercury exposure was not a significant risk factor for miscarriage. Because of this study's potential problems with long-term recall, further studies of the effect of mercury on pregnancy outcome are warranted in other populations.

Alcser, K.H.; Brix, K.A.; Fine, L.J.; Kallenbach, L.R.; Wolfe, R.A.

1989-01-01

252

Identifying English for the Job: Examples from Health Care Occupations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes one approach to discovering what language is needed for entry-level jobs. By observing language use in two health care occupations, it was found that seeking clarification, reporting problems, understanding imperatives and numbers, and being able to socialize are fundamental to most entry-level jobs. (SED)|

Svendsen, Carol; Krebs, Katharine

1984-01-01

253

Resource Guide to Competency-Based Vocational Education: Health Occupations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This resource guide for classroom teachers contains annotations of resources representing recent instructional development in competency-based education for health occupations. It is also intended to assist curriculum specialists, administrators, and supervisors in development of performance-based instructional programs. The guide is divided into…

Foster, Phillip R., Comp.

254

An Evaluation of an Occupational Health Advice Service  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The objective of this article is to identify the profile of service users of an occupational health (OH) support service and establish areas of need, and to gather client feedback on the experience of participating in the support service and perceived outcomes and the impact of the advice received. Design and Setting: We carried out…

Shearn, P.; Ford, Norma J.; Murphy, R. G.

2010-01-01

255

Occupational health and safety and environmental management systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integration of occupational health and safety matters into environmental management systems can bring many benefits to industrial companies. They can avoid duplicated measures and find optimal solutions, because the principles of prevention are similar in environmental protection and safety management. However, the methods currently used in environmental management and engineering such as life-cycle assessments, best available technology reports, and the

Antero Honkasalo

2000-01-01

256

Occupational Health and Safety Programs in Ontario Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a study carried out to obtain information about occupational health and safety programs in Ontario hospitals. This information will then be used to plan further research studies. The questionnaire collected information about staffing, reporting structure, program components, and benchmarks used for evaluation. The questionnaire was mailed to 58 hospitals across the province and 81 percent (47 hospitals)

Kathryn A. Nichol; D. Linn Holness

1998-01-01

257

Cluster Matrices for Health Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These cluster matrices provide duties and tasks that form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult training programs for health occupations. The eight clusters (and the job titles included in each cluster) are as follows: (1) dental assisting (dental assistant); (2) dental laboratory technology (dental laboratory…

Lathrop, Janice

258

[Evaluating occupational health risk in titanium alloys production workers].  

PubMed

The authors present data on evaluation of personified and non-personified occupational risk of health disorders in titanium alloys production workers, concerning hygienic, medical and biologic, social and psychologic criteria. One-digit assessment of the work conditions is suggested. PMID:17494305

Bazarova, E L

2007-01-01

259

Occupational Health Problems in Modern Dentistry: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite numerous technical advances in recent years, many occupational health problems still persist in modern dentistry. These include percutaneous exposure incidents (PEI); exposure to infectious diseases (including bioaerosols), radiation, dental materials, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; dermatitis and respiratory disorders; eye injuries; and psychological problems. PEI remain a particular concern, as there is an almost constant risk of exposure to serious

Peter A. LEGGAT; Ureporn KEDJARUNE; Derek R. SMITH

2007-01-01

260

Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains vocational education program course standards for health occupations programs in Florida. Standards are provided for a total of 71 exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary or postsecondary level. Each program courses standard consists of a curriculum framework and…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

261

Unintentional Learning and the Occupational Health and Safety Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Evidence from the occupational safety and health field suggests that much unintentional learning takes place in the workplace that is not a result of conscious decisions and lacks critical reflection. Such learning may have negative consequences. Action can be taken to identify and mitigate the effects of unintentional learning. (SK)|

Dodge, R. Bruce

1998-01-01

262

Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management in Complex Industrial Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a model of systematic occupational health and safety management of a company with focus on three feedback loops where exposed hazards and risk are channelled through a regulatory regime, market stakeholders and the industrial system. The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of how an enterprise, as part of an industrial context, develops barriers

P. H. Lindøe; O. E. Olsen; T. Lie

263

Development of a Health Occupations Continuing Education Center. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Implementation and expansion of class offerings was the primary focus of the second year of a project (in Evansville, Indiana) to determine the feasibility of establishing a center for continuing education for vocational level health occupations workers within the department of vocational education of a metropolitan school corporation. (The first…

Stevens, Joyce; Freeman, Patricia

264

Cluster Matrices for Health Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These cluster matrices provide duties and tasks that form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult training programs for health occupations. The eight clusters (and the job titles included in each cluster) are as follows: (1) dental assisting (dental assistant); (2) dental laboratory technology (dental laboratory…

Lathrop, Janice

265

Unintentional learning and the occupational health and safety experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to explore unintentional learning through an examination of the practical implications of it as experienced in the field of occupational health and safety, and the role of government in addressing those implications by way of learning at the level of culture change. The paper examines various learning models and assumptions and challenges the application

R. Bruce Dodge

1998-01-01

266

Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains vocational education program course standards for health occupations programs in Florida. Standards are provided for a total of 71 exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary or postsecondary level. Each program courses standard consists of a curriculum framework and…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

267

Occupational health impacts: offshore crane lifts in life cycle assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, Aim, and Scope  The identification and assessment of environmental tradeoffs is a strongpoint of life cycle assessment (LCA). A tradeoff made\\u000a in many product systems is the exchange of potential for occupational accidents with the additional use of energy and materials.\\u000a Net benefits of safety measures with respect to human health are best illustrated if the consequences avoided and health

Johan Pettersen; Edgar G. Hertwich

2008-01-01

268

Occupational Analysis: Safety and Health Coordinator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) has provided this document which includes an overview of general required competencies for safety and health coordinators in the workplace. General areas of competence such as monitoring health and physical hazards in the work environment, conducting audits and providing information are included, as well as specific tasks in each category. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

2011-03-09

269

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center occupational safety and health program manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual sets forth the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) policy regarding the health and safety of its workers and provides for the implementation of the PETC occupational health and safety program. It is to be used in conjunction with the PETC Safety and Health Technical Directives, which provide detailed health and safety instructions to employees for specific operations, to create a complete occupational health and safety program. The manual was developed from guidelines contained in 29 CFR 1960, DOE Order 3790.1, and DOE Order 5480.1, and defines programs that meet both the intent and the specific requirements of those documents. Specific chemical and physical hazards associated with coal liquefaction processes may affect the skin, eyes, liver, kidneys, respiratory system, and central nervous system. Fire and explosion are also significant hazards. Other hazards include silica and coal dusts; noise; radiation; asphyxiating or highly toxic gases, particularly hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide; acids and caustics; peroxides; and corrosive materials. This manual is organized into five sections covering the areas of general information, hazard recognition and abatement, preventive programs, reports and recordkeeping, and planning and budgeting occupational safety and health (OSH) program activities.

Not Available

1982-02-26

270

48 CFR 1352.271-82 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair... Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair... Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Ship...

2012-10-01

271

48 CFR 1352.271-82 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1352.271-82 Section 1352...occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371...Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Ship Repair (APR 2010) The...

2011-10-01

272

Occupational Health Educational Resource Center, Johns Hopkins University, Final Performance Report, September 29, 1997.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Johns Hopkins University Education Resource Center (ERC) in Occupational Safety and Health completed its twentieth year of effort in 1997. The Center supports professional degree programs in Industrial Hygiene, Occupational Health Nursing, Occupationa...

1997-01-01

273

Development of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Programs for Occupational Safety and Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Associate and baccalaureate degree programs in occupational safety and health were developed. Suggested courses and programs were devised from recommendations provided by occupational safety and health practitioners and junior and senior college level edu...

R. J. Vernon

1972-01-01

274

Discretionary Review by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission: Is It Necessary?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Deficiencies in the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (OSAHRC), a court system created to carry out adjudicatory functions under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, are exposed and alternative solutions offered. (JT)|

Moran, Robert D.

1974-01-01

275

Amotivation and the occupational decision: an investigation of Australian senior high school students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study investigated the occupational decision-related processes of senior high school students, in terms of the extent to which they may be amotivated in choosing a future occupation. Data were gathered using a newly developed questionnaire, which was largely adapted from a number of psychometrically proven instruments, and administered to 492 Grade 11 students attending a stratified random sample

Jae Yup Jung; John McCormick

2010-01-01

276

Occupational Engagement among University Students in Jordan: Adaptation to Careers in the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The main purpose of this study was to determine the level of occupational engagement among university students in one Jordanian university. The instrument used to collect data in this study was the occupational engagement scale-student (OES-S-14 items) developed by Cox (2008). The OES-S went through rigorous cross-cultural translation process to…

Khasawneh, Samer

2011-01-01

277

Critical thinking skills and learning styles of first-year students in weekend occupational therapy programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight college curricula in which all course work for a degree in occupational therapy is scheduled on weekends, have been accredited since 1984. Weekend occupational therapy programs recruit working adult students from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which variability in the critical thinking skills and learning styles of first-year students in these

Cynthia Louise Creighton

1999-01-01

278

In vitro assessment of equivalence of occupational health risk: welders.  

PubMed

The possibility of using in vitro testing to determine the equivalence of risk for various occupational groups is discussed. In the absence of epidemiological evidence or relevant animal in vivo bioassays on which to determine the health effects of specific occupational exposures, it is proposed to use similarities in the in vitro response to substances with known (or strongly suspected) and unknown risk to demonstrate their risk equivalence. Identification and evaluation of a high risk "hot spot" due to exposure to Cr(VI) for stainless steel welders is discussed in terms of recent developments in collection, analysis and bioassay of welding fumes. PMID:6641655

Stern, R M

1983-09-01

279

Advances and Current Themes in Occupational Health and Environmental Public Health Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essential purpose of public health surveillance is to monitor important health outcomes and risk factors and provide actionable information to practitioners, policy makers, researchers, and the public to prevent or ameliorate exposure, disease, and death. Although separate 1970s-era acts of Congress made possible the creation of modern occupational health and environmental public health surveillance, these acts also led to

Jeffrey D. Shire; Gary M. Marsh; Evelyn O. Talbott; Ravi K. Sharma

280

76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 144 and...CMS-9981-P] RIN 0950-AA20 Student Health Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Centers for...that would establish rules for student health insurance coverage under the Public...

2011-02-11

281

77 FR 16453 - Student Health Insurance Coverage  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 144...CMS-9981-F RIN 0938-AQ95 Student Health Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Centers for...rule establishes requirements for student health insurance coverage under the Public...

2012-03-21

282

Agents and trends in health care workers' occupational asthma.  

PubMed

Background There is a disproportionately high number of cases of work-related asthma occurring in health care occupations due to agents such as glutaraldehyde, latex and cleaning products. Aims To understand the causes and measure trends over time of occupational asthma (OA) in health care workers (HCWs). Methods We reviewed OA notifications from the Midland Thoracic Society's Surveillance Scheme of Occupational Asthma (SHIELD) database in the West Midlands, UK, from 1991 to 2011 and gathered data on occupation, causative agent and annual number of notifications. Results There were 182 cases of OA in HCWs (median annual notifications = 7; interquartile range [IQR] = 5-11), representing 5-19% of annual SHIELD notifications. The modal annual notification was 20 (in 1996); notifications have declined since then, in line with total SHIELD notifications. The majority of cases (136; 75%) occurred in nursing, operating theatre, endoscopy and radiology staff. The most frequently implicated agents were glutaraldehyde (n = 69), latex (n = 47) and cleaning products (n = 27), accounting for 79% of the 182 cases. Cleaning product-related OA was an emerging cause with 22 cases after 2001 and only 5 cases between 1991 and 2000. Conclusions Control measures within the UK National Health Service have seen a decline in OA in HCWs due to latex and glutaraldehyde, though OA remains a problem amongst HCWs exposed to cleaning products. Continuing efforts are required to limit the number of cases in this employment sector. PMID:23933593

Walters, G I; Moore, V C; McGrath, E E; Burge, P S; Henneberger, P K

2013-08-09

283

Organizational Injustice as an Occupational Health Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Content to conceive of inequity distress as a hypothetical construct instead of an intervening variable, a half century of research inspired by equity theory has paid little attention to measuring inequity distress. At the turn of the twenty?first century, however, European epidemiologists, interested in determinants of ill health, found that injustice is a source of adverse emotional reactions that put

Jerald Greenberg

2010-01-01

284

Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an

1984-01-01

285

Medical Physicists and Health Physicists: Radiation Occupations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Physics is the study of matter and energy and the ways in which the two interact. Some physicists use their expertise in physics to focus on radiation. These specialists, called medical physicists and health physicists, work to help people or protect the environment. Medical physicists work with physicians, assisting patients who need imaging…

LaPointe, Jeffrey

2011-01-01

286

Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines  

PubMed Central

Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety.

de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

2009-01-01

287

Health Occupations and Careers. Subject Matters Volume 3, No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Under Pressure!" reports on the effect of aging population and new technologies on the demand for health care professionals and describes growing health care careers. "Meeting a Challenge Head on" and "Exploring the Medical Frontier" explain how schools in Delaware and Pennsylvania are attracting and retaining students in their health sciences…

Shure, Jennifer L.

2001-01-01

288

NIOH and NIOSH basis for an occupational health standard: Chlorobenzene  

SciTech Connect

Information relevant for assessing potential adverse health effects from occupational exposure to chlorobenzene was reviewed and summarized. Topics included physical properties, chemical properties, production levels, industrial uses, occupational exposure levels, toxicokinetics, acute and chronic toxicity, organ system toxicity, immunotoxicity, allergy, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, reproductive toxicity, dose/response relationships, and research needs. Studies have indicated that chlorobenzene is absorbed via respiratory and dermal routes and has resulted in headaches, dizziness, somnolence, and dyspeptic disorders in humans chronically exposed. There were no case reports or epidemiological studies available concerned with the potential carcinogenicity of chlorobenzene in humans. There was some limited evidence indicating that the compound is genotoxic and that it may induce hematopoietic toxicity at relatively moderate doses. The author concludes that the central nervous system effects and the hepatotoxic effects should be considered in setting occupational exposure limits.

Hellman, B.

1993-01-01

289

Examination of the Health Occupations Education Curriculum from a Futurist Perspective: I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project examined the curriculum in the health occupations program to determine what curriculum changes will be necessary to keep pace with and anticipate advances in health occupations. A statewide Texas health occupations education review committee composed of employers, graduates, educators, a union representative, and representatives from…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Occupational and Continuing Education.

290

Boundaries and Bridges to Adult Mental Health: Critical Occupational and Capabilities Perspectives of Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is general agreement that mental health is a foundation for living well. Unfortunately, approximately 20% of people around the world will experience a mental health issue at some point. Although bridges to adult mental health, such as community programming, exist in some settings, one routine boundary is exclusion from everyday occupations, using the occupational science and occupational therapy definition

Elizabeth A. Townsend

2012-01-01

291

Occupational Safety and Health Directory: NIOSH, OSHA, Review Commission, State Agencies, Local Agencies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the 37th annual issue of the 'Occupational Safety and Health Directory' compiled and published by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 resulted in the establishment of three majo...

1978-01-01

292

Airborne Nanostructured Particles and Occupational Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology is leading to the development in many field, of new materials and devices in many fields that demonstrate nanostructure-dependent\\u000a properties. However, concern has been expressed that these same properties may present unique challenges to addressing potential\\u000a health impact. Airborne particles associated with engineered nanomaterials are of particular concern, as they can readily\\u000a enter the body through inhalation. Research into

Andrew D. Maynard; Eileen D. Kuempel

2005-01-01

293

STUDENT HEALTH: CHALLENGES FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little has been written in the academic literature about community college student health services. Perhaps community college student health services have been overlooked because some leaders, such as presidents, trustees, and policy makers, are simply uninformed about the direct relevance of student health to the community college mission of student success. This article describes community colleges--historically, philosophically, and demographically--and makes

Deborah L. Floyd

2003-01-01

294

Relevance of mental health issues in university student dropouts.  

PubMed

Background A significant proportion of university students drop out of their courses, representing a significant loss of resources in terms of funds invested in them, as well as loss of revenue to universities. Aims To determine whether a history of recent or current mental health problems affected the likelihood of university students dropping out of their studies and, if so, whether additional supportive measures are needed. Methods We scrutinized the occupational health records of a cohort of students enrolled in 2005 to identify whether they had evidence of mental health problems at that time. Additionally, we identified all cohort members who had dropped out of their courses by 2011, thereby identifying students with a history of mental health problems among all those who dropped out. The dates in question were chosen to ensure that the permissible time limit for completing their studies had elapsed at the end of the follow-up period. Results In total, 1319 student records were surveyed. Of these, 181 students (14%) did not complete their studies. Further, 278 (21%) had evidence of mental health problems at enrolment but students dropping out of courses were not more likely to have had a recent or current mental health problem at the time of enrolling. Conclusions The presence of mental health problems at the time of course enrolment was not a predictor for subsequently dropping out of the course in question. The findings suggest that existing supportive measures for this group may be adequate. PMID:23771886

Tamin, S K

2013-06-15

295

Evaluation of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Training Grant Program. Volume I. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study deals with determining the extent to which NIOSH-assisted students have chosen occupational safety and health field for employment, the activities they are engaged in, and their perceptions of the impact of these activities in contributing to th...

H. C. Olson C. C. Humpstone V. Jackson

1975-01-01

296

Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience  

PubMed Central

In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993), efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997), a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present), a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes.

2011-01-01

297

The relationships between housing quality and occupant health in Uganda.  

PubMed

The Government of Uganda created in 2010 a strategic plan to invest in public health as part of its broader national development goals. The health plan recognizes housing and urbanization as a determinant of health, but has not yet formulated policy to address the relationship. This study can help guide health policy development as it relates to housing. It estimates relationships between housing quality and occupant health using "count outcome" regression models. An economic model of optimal household labor allocation in poor countries provides the foundation for the regression modeling. The data used to estimate the regressions are a stratified random sample of 7096 households surveyed in the 2005-06 Uganda National Household Survey. They provide, among other things, detailed information on physical housing attributes as well as the health status of its occupants. Consistent with the economic model and other empirical work, the results show that exposure to burning of biomass for cooking has the largest adverse health effect. Different definitions of illness yield results consistent with expectations, and a separate specification test suggests that the findings are reasonably robust. PMID:23313496

Herrin, William E; Amaral, Michelle M; Balihuta, Arsene M

2012-12-25

298

[Occupational risks and health disorders in transport drivers].  

PubMed

This paper presents a review of occupational risks and health disorders in professional drivers employed in public and private transport. Epidemiological studies suggest an excess risk for cardiovascular diseases and musculoskeletal disorders in several categories of professional drivers, such as bus drivers, taxi drivers, truck drivers and forklift truck drivers. Although cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders are of multifactorial origin, some characteristics of occupational exposure in transport drivers (stress, workshift, traffic pollutants, awkward postures, exposure to noise and whole body vibration) may exert at least a concausal role for the onset and the development of these disorders. The predominant role of some confounding factors (inappropriate diet, drinking and smoking habits) makes it more difficult to establish causal associations between professional driving and other adverse health effects (respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genito-urinary disorders, and neoplastic diseases). PMID:23213815

Ronchese, F; Bovenzi, M

299

Occupational health in the USA in the 21st century.  

PubMed

Comparable to the confusion encountered in the birth of the machine age is the perplexing reconfiguration of the United States' health care system. Paralleling the advances in medicine have been the divesting mergers and downsizing of industry, coupled with globalization, which have released millions of long-time workers. The labour contingent is changing, with the addition of great numbers of women and immigrant workers, and the manufacturing economy has become one of service and information. Serving the occupational health (OH) needs of such a force have been the professional societies of physicians, nurses, and industrial hygienists, with their members providing care in a broad variety of facilities. It is possible that a national organization, including all these disciplines, would have a greater voice in the protection of workers' health. Immediate leadership of an occupational health service (OHS) can be rotated among the disciplines, so that competition for primacy among the professionals would end. The new workforce demands culture sensitivity among OH personnel and polylingual capabilities may be demanded in the future. Management skills will be required of all in OH, and greater participation of employees in OH policy will characterize the decades ahead. Nearly neglected up to now, occupational mental health programming will be required to meet the real needs of workers, and to counter the move to outsource OH services, where little patient contact results. Behavioural safety, total quality management, and application of the rapidly developing technologies in health care will define the 21st century efforts in OH. Remaining issues, such as violence, telecommuting injuries, the inclusion of alternative medicine, and women's health, among others, will see carry-over for resolution into the year 2000. PMID:11198679

Felton, J S

2000-09-01

300

Health Literacy in College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the health literacy levels, and the potential importance of healthy literacy, of college students. Participants: Courses were randomly selected from all upper level undergraduate courses at a large Research I university to obtain a sample size of N = 399. Methods: During the 2007-2008 school…

Ickes, Melinda J.; Cottrell, Randall

2010-01-01

301

Health Literacy in College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the health literacy levels, and the potential importance of healthy literacy, of college students. Participants: Courses were randomly selected from all upper level undergraduate courses at a large Research I university to obtain a sample size of N = 399. Methods: During the 2007-2008 school year,…

Ickes, Melinda J.; Cottrell, Randall

2010-01-01

302

The Integrated Model: Implications for Worksite Health Promotion and Occupational Health and Safety Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within a single firm it is common to find both occupational safety and health and worksite health promotion interventions operating in isolation from one another, with different intervention targets, methods, and personnel. Overcoming the segmentation of the two fields will require, among other things, the promulgation of an overarching model of work and health. The purpose of this article is

Elizabeth Baker; Barbara A. Israel; Susan Schurman

1996-01-01

303

Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations for the physician's office.  

PubMed

Mandatory reporting and recordkeeping on job safety were established for all employers by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Act of 1970. Physician interest in OSHA regulations recently increased with the publication of the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. This review examines general employer communication to employees about new standards as well as reporting requirements for physician offices, including special OSHA forms needed to comply with illness and injury reporting. PMID:8482939

Zuber, T J; Geddie, J E

1993-05-01

304

Disabler: a game occupational health nurses cannot afford to play.  

PubMed

The dynamics of the Disabler game are complex, not always recognizable, and less than easily manageable. Awareness of the game and a willingness to avoid direct participation can enhance injured worker rehabilitation and decrease costs associated with lost time and productivity. Not playing the Disabler game can make the role of the occupational health nurse more rewarding. The game requires the field upon which to play, and effectively supported DMPs can help eliminate those playing fields. PMID:14596381

Walker, Jasen M

2003-10-01

305

Occupational health and safety among commercial sex workers.  

PubMed

The concept of occupational health and safety (OHS) for commercial sex workers has rarely been investigated, perhaps because of the often informal nature of the workplace, the associated stigma, and the frequently illegal nature of the activity. We reviewed the literature on health, occupational risks, and safety among commercial sex workers. Cultural and local variations and commonalities were identified. Dimensions of OHS that emerged included legal and policing risks, risks associated with particular business settings such as streets and brothels, violence from clients, mental health risks and protective factors, alcohol and drug use, repetitive strain injuries, sexually transmissible infections, risks associated with particular classes of clients, issues associated with male and transgender commercial sex workers, and issues of risk reduction that in many cases are associated with lack of agency or control, stigma, and legal barriers. We further discuss the impact and potential of OHS interventions for commercial sex workers. The OHS of commercial sex workers covers a range of domains, some potentially modifiable by OHS programs and workplace safety interventions targeted at this population. We argue that commercial sex work should be considered as an occupation overdue for interventions to reduce workplace risks and enhance worker safety. PMID:21808944

Ross, Michael W; Crisp, Beth R; Månsson, Sven-Axel; Hawkes, Sarah

2011-08-01

306

The attitudes of occupational health personnel to smoking at work.  

PubMed

Attitudes of occupational health care professionals toward smoking and their activity to address smoking issues were investigated by a questionnaire survey. Data were also collected on employees' exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and on smoking policies that existed in workplaces. Questionnaires were mailed to all occupational health care centers (n = 1,004) in Finland. The prevalence of daily smokers was 9.6% among physicians and 3.6% among nurses; 15% and 11%, respectively smoked occasionally. Smoking restrictions were enforced in more than 70% of all workplaces, but only 3.6% of them had a total smoking ban. Nonsmoking professionals were in favor of smoke-fee workplaces and smoking restrictions significantly more often than their smoking colleagues. Nonsmokers also regarded smoking as a serious problem to the organizational climate of workplaces. Almost half of nonsmoking respondents, but only 11% of daily smokers, would totally ban smoking in workplaces. Although the personal smoking status of the respondent had a strong effect on attitudes to smoking regulations, it did not have a clear influence on interest in discussing smoking issues when seeing patients. Nurses were more active in addressing smoking issues than physicians. Occupational health professionals of large companies reported stricter smoking policies at work than those who represented small enterprises PMID:9617390

Heloma, A; Reijula, K; Tikkanen, J; Nykyri, E

1998-07-01

307

HEALTH PROMOTION AND HEALTH EDUCATION: NURSING STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine student nurses’ perceptions of (1) the role of the nurse in health promotion, and (2) how the concept of health promotion is presented in nursing curricula. Research questions for this study included the following: 1) Can nursing students explain the difference between health education and health promotion? 2) What have nursing students

Kathleen Ann Halcomb

2010-01-01

308

Occupational Health and the Family Physician Part 2: History-taking--How Not to Miss an Occupationally-Related Disease  

PubMed Central

In the first part of this article, occupational health was defined as part of the family physician's total care for his or her patient. This part deals with the components of the occupationally related history, the role of stress in the workplace, and knowledge of the work structure in the community.

Cappon, Ian; Cappon, Paul

1982-01-01

309

Occupational health nurses--the solution to absence management?  

PubMed

Business and industry are currently focused on increasing employee productivity, reducing employee injuries and lost work time, and minimizing costs. Absence from work due to either injury or health-related leave negatively affects both direct and indirect costs. Absenteeism, regardless of reason, negatively impacts company profit. To decrease the multiple costs of unplanned absences, the occupational health nurse can collaborate with Human Resources professionals and management to create cost-saving short- and long-term disability programs, manage Family and Medical Leave Act programs, and case manage the care of all employees with workers' compensation claims. PMID:19338262

Wallace, Myra A

2009-03-01

310

Minorities and Women in the Health Fields: Applicants, Students and Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report presents a compilation of selected available data on the representation of racial/ethnic minority groups and women in health fields. It includes the most recent data available on health school applicants and students as well as on workers in health occupations. The report is divided into two parts. The first contains a series of 10…

Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Resources Development.

311

Occupational health surveillance: a means to identify work-related risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lack of successful disease surveillance methods has resulted in few reliable estimates of workplace-related disease. Hazard surveillance - the ongoing assessment of chemical use and worked exposure to the chemicals - is presented as a way to supplement occupational disease surveillance. Existing OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Health) data systems are adapted

J. R. Froines; C. A. Dellenbaugh; D. H. Wegman

1986-01-01

312

Occupational safety and health implications of increased coal utilization.  

PubMed Central

An area of major concern in considering increased coal production and utilization is the health and safety of increased numbers of workers who mine, process, or utilize coal. Hazards related to mining activities in the past have been especially serious, resulting in many mine related accidental deaths, disabling injuries, and disability and death from chronic lung disease. Underground coal mines are clearly less safe than surface mines. Over one-third of currently employed underground miners experience chronic lung disease. Other stresses include noise and extremes of heat and cold. Newly emphasized technologies of the use of diesel powered mining equipment and the use of longwall mining techniques may be associated with serious health effects. Workers at coal-fired power plants are also potentially at risk of occupational diseases. Occupational safety and health aspects of coal mining are understood well enough today to justify implementing necessary and technically feasible and available control measures to minimize potential problems associated with increased coal production and use in the future. Increased emphasis on safety and health training for inexperienced coal miners expected to enter the work force is clearly needed. The recently enacted Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 will provide impetus for increased control over hazards in coal mining.

Bridbord, K; Costello, J; Gamble, J; Groce, D; Hutchison, M; Jones, W; Merchant, J; Ortmeyer, C; Reger, R; Wagner, W L

1979-01-01

313

Occupational safety and health implications of increased coal utilization.  

PubMed

An area of major concern in considering increased coal production and utilization is the health and safety of increased numbers of workers who mine, process, or utilize coal. Hazards related to mining activities in the past have been especially serious, resulting in many mine related accidental deaths, disabling injuries, and disability and death from chronic lung disease. Underground coal mines are clearly less safe than surface mines. Over one-third of currently employed underground miners experience chronic lung disease. Other stresses include noise and extremes of heat and cold. Newly emphasized technologies of the use of diesel powered mining equipment and the use of longwall mining techniques may be associated with serious health effects. Workers at coal-fired power plants are also potentially at risk of occupational diseases. Occupational safety and health aspects of coal mining are understood well enough today to justify implementing necessary and technically feasible and available control measures to minimize potential problems associated with increased coal production and use in the future. Increased emphasis on safety and health training for inexperienced coal miners expected to enter the work force is clearly needed. The recently enacted Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 will provide impetus for increased control over hazards in coal mining. PMID:540621

Bridbord, K; Costello, J; Gamble, J; Groce, D; Hutchison, M; Jones, W; Merchant, J; Ortmeyer, C; Reger, R; Wagner, W L

1979-12-01

314

Effectiveness of an occupational and environmental medicine curriculum as indicated by evaluation of medical student performance on an objective structured clinical examination.  

PubMed

Medical students must learn to recognize occupational and environmental-related illness. An occupational and environmental medicine curriculum can achieve this goal. The curriculum must be evaluated to ensure that medical students are learning to recognize exposure-related health conditions and to evaluate if this ability correlates with medical interviewing skills. A case, formatted for an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), was developed to evaluate student performance on an exposure-related clinical problem. The OSCE results were analyzed to identify the areas that differentiated the students who recognized an exposure-related medical condition from those who did not. We conclude that an OSCE is an effective curriculum evaluation tool to assess whether a core occupational and environmental-related curriculum is contributing to student learning in exposure history-taking and associated clinical reasoning skills. PMID:10570500

Schenk, M; Popp, S; Bridge, P; Gallagher, R; Petrusa, E R; Frank, R R

1999-11-01

315

Occupational health and safety risks and potential health consequences perceived by U.S. workers, 1985.  

PubMed Central

Data from the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Questionnaire, part of the 1985 National Health Interview Survey, were used to report workers' perceptions of occupational risk in their present jobs. This information will be used to monitor progress between 1985 and 1990 toward achieving broad goals in health promotion and disease prevention. The proportions of currently employed persons who perceived exposure to health-endangering substances, work conditions, or risks of injuries were reported for age, race, sex, and occupation groups. Occupational groups were further characterized by the proportion of men and women who reported specific exposures (such as exposure to chemicals or to loud noise) and specific health consequences of exposure (such as risk of developing cancer or hearing impairment). Greater proportions of men than women reported perceived risk from exposure to health-endangering substances, work conditions, and injuries in their present job. Also, a greater proportion of workers perceived risk of injury in their present job than other occupational risk categories. The greatest proportions of perceived exposure to occupational risk were reported by farm operators and managers, police and firefighters, and by workers in forestry and fishing occupations. Among workers reporting perceived exposures, chemicals, noise, and risk of injuries from vehicles were cited by the greatest proportion of workers, as were such health consequences as lung and respiratory problems and hearing impairment. Data from this study may be used to target employment groups for health promotion or education and to develop indepth studies of specific occupational groups to reduce or prevent risk at the worksite.

Shilling, S; Brackbill, R M

1987-01-01

316

Preparing health professions students for terrorism, disaster, and public health emergencies: core competencies.  

PubMed

The recent increased threat of terrorism, coupled with the ever-present dangers posed by natural disasters and public health emergencies, clearly support the need to incorporate bioterrorism preparedness and emergency response material into the curricula of every health professions school in the nation. A main barrier to health care preparedness in this country is a lack of coordination across the spectrum of public health and health care communities and disciplines. Ensuring a unified and coordinated approach to preparedness requires that benchmarks and standards be consistent across health care disciplines and public health, with the most basic level being education of health professions students. Educational competencies establish the foundation that enables graduates to meet occupational competencies. However, educational needs for students differ from the needs of practitioners. In addition, there must be a clear connection between departments of public health and all other health care entities to ensure proper preparedness. The authors describe both a process and a list of core competencies for teaching emergency preparedness to students in the health care professions, developed in 2003 and 2004 by a team of experts from the four health professions schools of Columbia University in New York City. These competencies are directly applicable to medical, dental, nursing, and public health students. They can also easily be adapted to other health care disciplines, so long as differences in levels of proficiency and the need for clinical competency are taken into consideration. PMID:15917353

Markenson, David; DiMaggio, Charles; Redlener, Irwin

2005-06-01

317

[Clinical approach to workers occupationally exposed to negative stress by the occupational health physician].  

PubMed

Following the activation of new norms requiring that all occupational risks including psychosocial risks be evaluated and prevention programs activated, the occupational physician is now faced with new tasks and is expected to modify his role and function. Care and monitoring of stressed workers demand a higher participation in and an adaptation to the different ways in which stress shows up and has consequences on workers health and wellbeing. A subjects suffering of a stress-related disorder asks for a prompt solution be it medical or a job reorganization intervention in order to guarantee the prosecution of his job while the burnout affected subject rather points to leave the situation, to move to another responsibility or no responsibility even when this means abandoning a life choice. The subject suffering for a mobbing situation asks for justice, an intervention to stop the devastating mechanism and the recognition of the actors of his suffering. The three situations ask for differentiated interventions on the part of the occupational physician but all three require attention, participation, time and change from only medical assistance to a caring attitude and an active participation lasting in time. PMID:19943438

Cassitto, M G

318

Systematic review of occupational engagement and health outcomes among community-dwelling older adults.  

PubMed

We conducted this systematic review, one of four related to productive aging, to explore the existing evidence for the health benefits of engagement in occupations and activities among older adults. The review incorporates the breadth of areas of occupation in which older adults engage and the range of health benefits derived from that engagement. The results of this review demonstrate the multidisciplinary appreciation for occupational engagement and associated well-being and elucidate the health effects of engagement in a wide variety of occupations and activities. Additionally, the results of this systematic review support occupational therapy's historical ideologies and core philosophies linking occupational engagement to improved health and well-being. The findings suggest an increasing role for occupational therapy service delivery in community-based health promotion and prevention efforts to meet the everyday activity and health needs of the growing older adult population. PMID:22549595

Stav, Wendy B; Hallenen, Theresa; Lane, Jennifer; Arbesman, Marian

319

Improving occupational health care for construction workers: a process evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate the process of a job-specific workers’ health surveillance (WHS) in improving occupational health care for construction workers. Methods From January to July 2012 were 899 bricklayers and supervisors invited for the job-specific WHS at three locations of one occupational health service throughout the Netherlands. The intervention aimed at detecting signs of work-related health problems, reduced work capacity and/or reduced work functioning. Measurements were obtained using a recruitment record and questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. The process evaluation included the following: reach (attendance rate), intervention dose delivered (provision of written recommendations and follow-up appointments), intervention dose received (intention to follow-up on advice directly after WHS and remembrance of advice three months later), and fidelity (protocol adherence). The workers scored their increase in knowledge from 0–10 with regard to health status and work ability, their satisfaction with the intervention and the perceived (future) effect of such an intervention. Program implementation was defined as the mean score of reach, fidelity, and intervention dose delivered and received. Results Reach was 9% (77 workers participated), fidelity was 67%, the intervention dose delivered was 92 and 63%, and the intervention dose received was 68 and 49%. The total programme implementation was 58%. The increases in knowledge regarding the health status and work ability of the workers after the WHS were graded as 7.0 and 5.9, respectively. The satisfaction of the workers with the entire intervention was graded as 7.5. The perceived (future) effects on health status were graded as 6.3, and the effects on work ability were graded with a 5.2. The economic recession affected the workers as well as the occupational health service that enacted the implementation. Conclusions Programme implementation was acceptable. Low reach, limited protocol adherence and modest engagement of the workers with respect to the intervention were the most prominent aspects that influenced the intervention process. The increase in the workers’ knowledge about their health status and work ability was substantial, and the workers’ satisfaction with the intervention was good. The perceived effect of the advised preventive actions on health status was sufficient. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register: http://NTR3012

2013-01-01

320

Employment Laws. Cooperative Occupational Education, Unit 15. Instructor Material and Student Material.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit, one in a series of packets of teacher and student materials for cooperative occupational education (COE) designed for special needs students, presents students with a brief introduction to federal laws that protect workers' rights. Emphasis is placed on the Fair Labor Standards Act, the National Labor Relations Act, and the Civil Rights…

Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

321

The Frequency and Causes of Occupational Injuries Among Nursing Students in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to determine the number and causes of occupational incidents that occurred in nursing students. This study was a descriptive, cross-sectional study performed at a military nursing school in Turkey in June 2009 with 218 nursing students as subjects. A data collection form for identifying the characteristics of the students and their exposure to incidents

Vesile Unver; Sevinc Tastan; Halise Coskun

2012-01-01

322

An overview of occupational health and safety in Australia.  

PubMed

Australia is a developed country with a high standard of living, small population and large land area. Manufacturing is currently the largest economic contributor, although mining and agriculture are also significant industries. There are around 10 million employees in total, with retail trade and manufacturing being the largest employers. Manufacturing currently has the highest incidence of workplace injury, although around 5% of all Australian workers suffer from some kind of occupational disease or injury every year. Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) legislation is individually managed and enforced by the 8 states and territories. Training and registration for OHS professionals varies between the speciaities and usually requires a combination of academic qualifications and workplace experience. Non-medical personnel constitute a large proportion of OHS professionals in Australia. PMID:11915233

Smith, Derek Richard; Yamagata, Zentaro

2002-03-01

323

Current approaches to neurobehavioural testing in occupational health.  

PubMed Central

In recent years neurobehavioural tests have been used increasingly in occupational settings to identify changes in cognitive function associated with exposure to neurotoxicants. Potential applications of these methods in occupational health include research, diagnosis, and screening. Applications in cross sectional research studies, involving the comparison of the performance of exposed and control groups, are well established. However, the use of such methods requires attention to factors other than exposure which may influence test performance. The validity of adapting existing test batteries for diagnosis or screening is questionable. Well developed techniques exist for diagnosis but this requires lengthy and skilled test administration and interpretation and cannot be accomplished with research batteries. The application of neurobehavioural methods for screening currently presents several difficulties. Current problems and future directions in this field are discussed.

Spurgeon, A

1996-01-01

324

(Health risk assessment on environmental, occupational, and life style hazards)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler was invited to visit NIHS, Tokyo, Japan, to give a lecture to the NIHS staff; traveler then participated in the Symposium on Health Risk Assessment on Environmental, Occupational, and Life Style Hazards, Taipei, Taiwan. Recommendations of the symposium were summarized as: to establish a research institution for risk assessment on environmental, occupational, and life style hazards; to establish a comprehensive data base for risk assessment associated with the above discipline for further information analysis; to establish public confidence through the risk assessment practice advisory committee to ensure scientific technical expertise; and to communicate the results of risk assessments through mass media and enhance public awareness of environmental contamination and associated social and economic impacts.

Lu, Po-Yung.

1989-01-10

325

Hispanic College Students’ Perceptions of Members of Business Occupations: An Exploratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors explored freshmen Hispanic and non-Hispanic White student perceptions of the members of three different business occupations: bankers, accountants, and marketing managers. Using t tests, some differences were found between the two ethnic groups regarding perceived individual characteristics of members of the occupations, but the application of a supervised learning technique to identify the ethnicity of respondents, based on

Suzanne N. Cory; Ellen Wall Mullen; Thomas Edward Reeves

2009-01-01

326

Hispanic College Students' Perceptions of Members of Business Occupations: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors explored freshmen Hispanic and non-Hispanic White student perceptions of the members of three different business occupations: bankers, accountants, and marketing managers. Using "t" tests, some differences were found between the two ethnic groups regarding perceived individual characteristics of members of the occupations, but the…

Cory, Suzanne N.; Mullen, Ellen Wall; Reeves, Thomas Edward

2010-01-01

327

Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Plastics Manufacturing and Assembling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum resource guide on plastics manufacturing and assembling is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed…

Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

328

Amotivation and the Occupational Decision: An Investigation of Australian Senior High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study investigated the occupational decision-related processes of senior high school students, in terms of the extent to which they may be amotivated in choosing a future occupation. Data were gathered using a newly developed questionnaire, which was largely adapted from a number of psychometrically proven instruments, and…

Jung, Jae Yup; McCormick, John

2010-01-01

329

Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Plastics Manufacturing and Assembling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This curriculum resource guide on plastics manufacturing and assembling is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed…

Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

330

Health, employment, and financial outcomes in workers with occupational asthma.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To study the health, employment, and financial outcome of occupational asthma. DESIGN--A follow study of workers with confirmed occupational asthma. SETTING--A specialist occupational lung disease clinic. SUBJECTS--All workers had a diagnosis of occupational asthma made at least one year earlier. Diagnosis was confirmed by serial peak expiratory flow measurement, specific bronchial provocation testing, or specific immunology. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Respiratory symptoms, medication, pulmonary function, employment state, and financial position. RESULTS--112 of a total of 140 eligible workers were followed up. 32% of patients remained exposed to the causative agent. These workers had more symptoms at follow up than those removed and a greater number were taking inhaled steroids. Continued exposure was also associated with a fall in % predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 3% compared with that at presentation. Their median loss of annual income due to occupational asthma was 35%. Those removed from exposure were worse off financially (median loss 54% of annual income), had fewer respiratory symptoms than the group who remained exposed, and their % predicted FEV1 had improved by 4.6%. Statutory compensation and that obtained by common law suits did not match the loss of earnings due to the development of occupational asthma. Of the workers removed from exposure, those who no longer complained of breathlessness had been diagnosed significantly earlier after the onset of their first symptom (48 v 66 months, p = 0.001) and had a significantly higher FEV1 at presentation (90% v 73% predicted, p = 0.008) compared with those who were still breathless. They had developed symptoms earlier after first exposure (48 v 66 months, p > 0.05) and had been removed from exposure sooner (eight v 12 months, p > 0.05). CONCLUSION--Removal from exposure after diagnosis of occupational asthma is beneficial in terms of symptoms and lung function, but is associated with a loss of income. Early diagnosis is important for symptomatic improvement after removal from exposure. Inadequate compensation may contribute to the workers' decision to remain exposed after diagnosis.

Gannon, P F; Weir, D C; Robertson, A S; Burge, P S

1993-01-01

331

EPA`s occupational radiation safety and health protection program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe EPA`s Occupational Radiation, Safety, and Health Protection Program ({open_quotes}Program{close_quotes}), from its inception to the present day, emphasizing problems encountered and solutions derived in developing and implementing a centrally administered national health physics program. The Program uses written policies, guidance, practices, and methods, as well as a Radiation Safety Information Management System (RADSIMS) to manage and oversee individual Program components and trends. These components include (1) training and education, (2) monitoring and dosimetry, (3) medical/health physics guidance, and (4) quality assurance/control/improvement. The Program, which is currently operational in all ten EPA Regions, is unique in that it incorporates a national database (consistent among all Regions), tied by telecommunications into a VAX computer at Headquarters, into a health physics monitoring system for the purpose of ensuring that EPA workers occupational exposure to ionizing radiation is maintained at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Development and implementation of the Program has evolved into four distinct phases starting in FY92: (1) EPA Region IV developed a pilot-program with Headquarters, and quality action teams were formed to develop Program components and policies; phases (2) and (3) the Program was expanded into EPA Regions V, VII, and VIII (FY93) and then the remaining six regions (FY94). Phase (4) continued the implementation of the Program as needed agency-wide so as to include EPA applicable program offices and possibly some laboratories during FY96.

Colwell, S.C.; Matusewicz, N.M. [SC& A, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Boyd, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01

332

New Occupations Demonstration Project - New Health Occupation Program. Outline of Training Curriculum for Social Health Technicians.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this program was to: (1) work in cooperation with the Gouverneur Health Services Program of Beth Israel Medical Center in an effort to restructure the Center's health services delivery system by establishing a new entry level subprofessiona...

1967-01-01

333

Occupational health policies on risk assessment in Japan.  

PubMed

Industrial Safety and Health Law (ISH Law) of Japan requires abnormalities identified in evaluations of worker health and working environments are reported to occupational physicians, and employers are advised of measures to ensure appropriate accommodations in working environments and work procedures. Since the 1980s, notions of a risk assessment and occupational safety and health management system were expected to further prevent industrial accidents. In 2005, ISH Law stipulated workplace risk assessment using the wording "employers shall endeavor." Following the amendment, multiple documents and guidelines for risk assessment for different work procedures were developed. They require ISH Laws to be implemented fully and workplaces to plan and execute measures to reduce risks, ranking them from those addressing potential hazards to those requiring workers to wear protective articles. A governmental survey in 2005 found the performance of risk assessment was 20.4% and common reasons for not implementing risk assessments were lack of adequate personnel or knowledge. ISH Law specifies criminal penalties for both individuals and organizations. Moreover, under the Labor Contract Law promulgated in 2007, employers are obliged to make reasonable efforts to ensure employee health for foreseeable and avoidable risks. Therefore, enterprises neglecting even the non-binding provisions of guidelines are likely to suffer significant business impact if judged to be responsible for industrial accidents or occupational disease. To promote risk assessment, we must strengthen technical, financial, and physical support from public-service organizations, encourage the dissemination of good practices to reduce risks, and consider additional employer incentives, including relaxed mandatory regulations. PMID:22953159

Horie, Seichi

2010-09-30

334

The Significant Contribution of Student Health Services to Student Success.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document, put together by the Director of Santa Barbara City College Student Health Service, discusses how in the 108 community colleges in California the student health centers are in danger as administrators ponder budget cuts. To clarify the gravity of the situation, the report focuses on the Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) Student

Broderick, Susan

335

Occupational health and environment research 1984: Health, Safety, and environmental Division. Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. Two supplied-air suits tested for their functional protection were considered to be unacceptable because of low fit factors. Respiratory protective equipment testing for the uS Air Force, Navy, and Army was performed during 1984. The

Voelz

1986-01-01

336

Planning for Occupational Health Needs in a Health Service Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The monograph addresses issues with which a Health Systems Agency (HSA), as a planning body, must deal to effect changes in the delivery of medical care as well as to influence significantly the health of working Americans. More specifically, this is a ha...

A. Garofalo D. H. Wegman A. Robbins J. Noren

1977-01-01

337

Student Delivery of Health Services to Students: A Longitudinal Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student health aide programs for college students have been instrumental in nutrition improvement, medication compliance, general preventive medicine, and in aiding in the mental health delivery system. In this study, headaches and upper respiratory infections constituted a significant percentage of the total visits to the health aide. (JN)

Martin, Gary L.; And Others

1981-01-01

338

Occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and health risk assessment.  

PubMed Central

This article addresses concepts of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure assessment relevant for health risk assessment based on human studies. We present issues that should be considered when selecting a method for ETS exposure assessment for the purposes of health risk assessment and review data on ETS exposure levels in the workplace and in home environments. Two types of estimates are needed for a quantitative risk assessment of the health effects resulting from occupational ETS exposure: (italic)a(/italic)) an unbiased estimate of the exposure-effect (or dose-response) relation between ETS and the health effect of interest, and (italic)b(/italic)) estimates of the distribution of ETS exposure in different workplaces. By combining the estimated exposure-effect relation with information on exposure distribution for a population of interest, we can calculate the proportions of disease cases attributable to occupational ETS exposure as well as the excess number of cases due to specified exposure conditions. Several dimensions of the exposure profile should be considered when assessing ETS exposure for estimating the exposure-effect relation, including the magnitude of exposure and the biologically relevant time specificity of exposure. The magnitude of exposure is determined by the ETS source strength, environmental factors modifying concentrations, and duration of exposure. Time specificity considerations include the latency period for each health outcome of interest, the time-exposure profile relevant for different disease mechanisms, and the sensitive age period with regard to health effects. The most appropriate indicator of ETS exposure depends on these factors and on the time period that can be assessed with different methods. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4

Jaakkola, M S; Samet, J M

1999-01-01

339

The occupational health status of hired farm workers.  

PubMed

The U.S. hired farm work force presently is two-thirds foreign-born: mostly young Mexican men with low educational attainment who neither read nor write English. Sixty percent earn so little that they and their families live in poverty. Four of ten migrate to find work, 33% are not authorized to work in the U.S., and 25% work for a labor market intermediary, usually a labor contractor. Few hired farm workers have health insurance of any kind and, despite low incomes, relatively few seek or receive government benefits. Government regulation of the workplace exempts agricultural employers from numerous provisions that apply to other industries; for example, agriculture is exempt from portions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, allowing children as young as age 12 to work in the fields, and employers with 10 or fewer employees are exempt from OSHA regulation. Only 12 states require farm employers to carry workers' compensation insurance. While hired farm workers face significant safety and health risks, there are major gaps in existing research covering this occupational group. An ad hoc task force convened by NIOSH developed a prioritized agenda for occupational safety research in this population: musculoskeletal disorders, pesticide-related conditions, traumatic injuries, respiratory conditions, dermatitis, infectious diseases, cancer, eye conditions, and mental health. PMID:10378979

Villarejo, D; Baron, S L

340

Occupational health hazards in sewage and sanitary workers  

PubMed Central

An estimated 1.2 million scavengers in the country are involved in the sanitation of our surroundings. The working conditions of these sanitary workers have remained virtually unchanged for over a century. Apart from the social atrocities that these workers face, they are exposed to certain health problems by virtue of their occupation. These health hazards include exposure to harmful gases such as methane and hydrogen sulfide, cardiovascular degeneration, musculoskeletal disorders like osteoarthritic changes and intervertebral disc herniation, infections like hepatitis, leptospirosis and helicobacter, skin problems, respiratory system problems and altered pulmonary function parameters. This can be prevented through engineering, medical and legislative measures. While the engineering measures will help in protecting against exposures, the medical measures will help in early detection of the effects of these exposures. This can be partly achieved by developing an effective occupational health service for this group of workers. Also, regular awareness programs should be conducted to impart education regarding safer work procedures and use of personal protective devices.

Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.

2008-01-01

341

Health Occupations. Medical Technologists, Technicians, and Assistants; Dispensing Opticians; Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians; Medical Record Personnel. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dispensing opticians, electrocardiograph…

Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

342

Workplace violence in long haul trucking: occupational health nursing update.  

PubMed

Almost 2 million workdays and millions of dollars are lost annually because of non-fatal assaults suffered at the workplace (NIOSH, 1996). Twenty workers, on average, are murdered each week in the United States and an estimated 18,000 workers per week are victims of non-fatal assault (NIOSH, 2001). Violence and stress are two interrelated issues that affect the work force. In-depth studies of these issues have not been conducted with long haul truckers in general, or with women in non-traditional, male dominated fields such as the long haul trucking industry. Epidemiological data related to violence and stress experienced by these under-studied populations are needed to plan effective interventions to reduce occupational risks. Studies employing both qualitative and quantitative methods are needed to articulate risk and protective factors related to violence against workers (Runyan, 2001). Occupational health nurses are qualified to participate in the development and implementation of research and intervention studies to improve worker safety related to violence at the workplace for men and women in both traditional and non-traditional occupational roles. PMID:14740866

Anderson, Debra Gay

2004-01-01

343

Getting Down to Business: Health Spa, Module 16. [Student Module]. Entrepreneurship Training Components.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module on owning and operating a health spa is one of 36 in a series on entrepreneurship. The introduction tells the student what topics will be covered and suggests other modules to read in related occupations. Each unit includes student goals, a case study, and a discussion of the unit subject matter. Learning activities are divided into…

Wolman, Jean

344

The Impact of Wireless Keypads in an Interprofessional Education Context with Health Science Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study was to identify if wireless keypads could facilitate interprofessional interaction among undergraduate paramedic, nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, health science, social work and midwifery students. Secondary research aims included the examination of students' perceptions of interprofessional education and how…

Williams, Brett; Lewis, Belinda; Boyle, Malcolm; Brown, Ted

2011-01-01

345

Determining the opinions of health sciences students and faculty regarding academic integrity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used Q method to understand the opinions of students and faculty in health sciences programs in physical therapy and occupational therapy regarding what they consider to be key aspects of academic integrity, viewing it from the perspectives of the individual, the academic program, practitioners, and society. Thirty-eight students and faculty sorted statements on academic integrity to represent their

Diane M Montgomery

346

Everyday Health Communication Experiences of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The authors examined college students' day-to-day health communication experiences. Participants: A convenience sample of 109 midwestern university students participated in the study. Methods: The participants completed health communication diaries for 2 weeks, generating 2,185 records. Frequent health topics included nutrition and diet, minor health concerns, risky health practices, and body fitness. Results: Approximately 27% of health communication experiences involved

Leslie A. Baxter; Nichole Egbert; Evelyn Ho

2008-01-01

347

Health Educator Believability and College Student Self-Rated Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) status among college students who reported receiving the majority of their health-related information from health educators. Participants: Students (n = 49,921) who completed the 2006 National College Health Association survey. Methods: Bivariate associations between SRH and the believability of…

Zullig, Keith J.; Reger-Nash, Bill; Valois, Robert F.

2012-01-01

348

Gender trends in occupancy rates in mental health beds in Northern Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on census material from 1926 to 1991, this study focuses on gender differences in occupancy rates in mental health beds in Northern Ireland. More specifically, using two sets of research literature — the relationships between war and mental health and gender and mental health respectively — it explores changing patterns in bed occupancy in terms of both gender and

Pauline M. Prior; Bernadette C. Hayes

2001-01-01

349

Research priorities in occupational safety and health: a review.  

PubMed

Changes in the world of work in the last few decades have markedly affected questions regarding occupational safety and health (OSH). Jobs in our economy continue to shift from manufacturing to services. Longer hours, shift work, reduced job security, temporary work are realities in the modern workplace, new chemicals, materials, processes are developed at an ever accelerating pace. The workforce is also changing. It will become older and more racially diverse and women are increasing. These changes present new challenges to protect worker safety and health and it was been indispensable to redefine priorities, by consulting all those involved in OSH. The present study therefore made a critical comparative analysis of the main published projects to identify research priorities in the OSH field, comparing methods, approaches and results. Comparison of the priority areas established in each of these studies is inherently difficult due to differences in socio-cultural backgrounds, in the methods employed to identify priority topics, and the many factors involved. However, it is clear that the Delphi technique is widely used as a reliable method, in that it covers a broad range of qualified witnesses, from a variety of backgrounds--such as trade union representatives and researchers--providing different viewpoints. It also takes account of the intrinsic features of OSH which--compared to other disciplines--involves multidisciplinary factors calling into play a range of scientific settings, such as toxicologists, molecular biologists, epidemiologists, occupational hygienists and occupational physicians. This analysis showed how important it is to reach consensus among all those operating in the OSH sector, in order to establish standard methods that can be applied in different contexts, and give results that can be validly compared. PMID:16610556

Iavicoli, Sergio; Rondinone, Bruna; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Fingerhut, Marilyn

2006-01-01

350

Student Health Insurance Program. Fall 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains data on current participation in and compliance with Massachusetts state regulations on health insurance coverage for college students. State regulations require that all full and three quarter time college students enrolled in the 121 public or independent institutions in the state participate in a qualifying student health

Massachusetts State Dept. of Medical Security, Boston.

351

Scaling Health Risk Behaviors of College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As an objective toward its mission of providing HIV-AIDS education, the Higher Education Consortium for AIDS Prevention surveyed students of Florida's State University System to determine their health risk behaviors. The instrument used, the "Health Risk Behavior Survey for University Students," was adapted for college students from one used by…

Moskal, Patsy D.; And Others

352

Occupational health guidelines for the management of low back pain: an international comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The enormous socioeconomic burden of low back pain emphasises the need for effective management of this problem, especially in an occupational context. To address this, occupational guidelines have been issued in various countries.Aims: To compare available international guidelines dealing with the management of low back pain in an occupational health care setting.Methods: The guidelines were compared regarding generally accepted

J B Staal; H Hlobil; M W van Tulder; G Waddell; A K Burton; B W Koes; W van Mechelen

2003-01-01

353

Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

2012-01-01

354

Why breastfeeding matters to occupational health nurses and employers.  

PubMed

Women with children are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. work force. Employers must comply with the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, requiring them to provide acceptable facilities for breastfeeding employees. This article discusses resources for examining the economic costs and benefits of becoming a breastfeeding-friendly organization, current legislation affecting breastfeeding women in the workplace, resources related to breastfeeding, and recommendations for initiating and managing a workplace lactation program. Research demonstrating the effects of lactation programs on health care and employee replacement costs (i.e., recruiting, hiring, and training staff) is reviewed. Implementation issues are discussed, including providing breastfeeding women with sufficient time, adequate space, and support from employers and coworkers. The role of occupational health nurses in initiating and coordinating workplace lactation programs is also discussed. PMID:21053795

Rietz, Melissa Foster; McCullagh, Marjorie C

2010-11-01

355

Collaborative field research and training in occupational health and ergonomics.  

PubMed

Networking collaborative research and training in Asian developing countries includes three types of joint activities: field studies of workplace potentials for better safety and health, intensive action training for improvement of working conditions in small enterprises, and action-oriented workshops on low-cost improvements for managers, workers, and farmers. These activities were aimed at identifying workable strategies for making locally adjusted improvements in occupational health and ergonomics. Many improvements have resulted as direct outcomes. Most these improvements were multifaceted, low-cost, and practicable using local skills. Three common features of these interactive processes seem important in facilitating realistic improvements: 1) voluntary approaches building on local achievements; 2) the use of practical methods for identifying multiple improvements; and 3) participatory steps for achieving low-cost results first. The effective use of group work tools is crucial. Stepwise training packages have thus proven useful for promoting local problem-solving interventions based on voluntary initiatives. PMID:10026480

Kogi, K

356

Competency Exams for Food Production-Related Occupations. Student and Instructor Manuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains 20 competency-based examinations with student and instructor manuals for food production-related occupations. For each of the examinations, the student manual contains the following: the competency, the performance objective, directions, the materials and equipment needed, a space to note time started and time finished, and…

Southworth, Julie; Kammerer, William R.

357

Competency Exams for Electronics/Instrumentation Occupations. Student and Instructor Manuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains 20 competency-based examinations with student and instructor manuals for electronics and instrumentation occupations. For each of the examinations, the student manual contains the following: the competency, the performance objective, directions, the materials and equipment needed, a space to note time started and time…

Matson, James; Stokes, Tad

358

[Studies of Occupational and Transfer Student Success at John Wood Community College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Four studies on occupational and transfer student success at John Wood Community College (JWCC), a "contractual" college, are included in this document. Study topics were: (1) the relationship between American College Test (ACT) scores and final grade point average (GPA) among students who transfer to other institutions to complete bachelor's…

Hayes, Daniel T.; Bradshaw, Steve

359

Changing Land Use: Peachtree Street, Atlanta. A Case Study in Sequent Occupance [And] Student Work Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A social studies unit and student workbook explore the historical geography of the area of Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. The unit deals with sequent occupance, a type of historical geography in which students study the same area, the changes in culture, and the changing land use in the area during certain time periods. For each period,…

Laws, Kevin

360

The Disadvantaged Student, Goal Blockage, and the Occupational Aspirations of Southern Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The paper served as a report on research in progress that attempted to evaluate the effects of group disparity on the occupational choice of southern high school students. It focused specifically on the aspiration choices of 8,802 tenth grade students in 4 southern states: Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The relative effects of…

Cosby, Arthur

361

The Relationship of Supervised Occupational Experience Program Scope to Student Achievement in Livestock Production.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study found that supervised occupational experience program scope, when measured by Productive Man Work Units, was not related to student achievement in livestock production, when achievement was measured by a multiple-choice test of technical knowledge in livestock production administered to 67 high school students in Florida. (JOW)|

Tylke, Roberta J.; Arrington, Larry R.

1988-01-01

362

An Experiment in Teaching Agricultural Occupations Information to High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To compare the educational effectiveness of three methods of teaching agricultural occupations information associated with land use and conservation to Grade 9 and 10 students of vocational agriculture, 424 students in 24 schools in western and central Pennsylvania were selected for an 18-hour instructional experiment. Eight schools were randomly…

Shontz, David Frank

363

Training Students in an Occupational Training Program to Self-Regulate Reading Comprehension.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A pilot study assessed the effects of training in self-awareness and self-regulation on the reading comprehension of students in a postsecondary occupational training program. Subjects, 11 students enrolled in a community college technical training program in welding, were given training sessions that provided practice in metacognitive methods…

Rush, R. Timothy; Milburn, James L.

364

Post-Secondary Developmental Studies Programs for Occupational Students: A Follow-up Study. Research Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The basic objective of this third research phase was to verify and further delineate factors that are constant and valid contributors to the success of postsecondary occupational students enrolled in developmental programs. Follow-up research on a longitudinal basis was conducted on nontraditional students at six New York colleges. Of…

State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. Coll. of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell Univ.

365

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF OCCUPATIONAL-TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS: ASSESSING STUDENT CAREER GOALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A traditional way of assessing program effectiveness of academic programs has been by determining the percentage of students who complete programs and receive degrees or some other acknowledgment of completion. This method of assessment is particularly problematic for community colleges because only 4% of students who enroll in occupational-technical certificate programs do so with the intention of earning a certificate.

Elizabeth M. Lohman; Michael R. Dingerson

2005-01-01

366

Student Debt and Its Relation to Student Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper provides an analysis of the relationship between attitudes toward debt and mental health among university undergraduates. Data were collected from the same cohort of students across their three years of university, with responses from 2146, 1360 and 1391 first, second and third year students, respectively. Mental health was…

Cooke, Richard; Barkham, Michael; Audin, Kerry; Bradley, Margaret; Davy, John

2004-01-01

367

Segregation, ethnic labour market and the occupational expectations of Palestinian students in Israel.  

PubMed

Using data from a large national representative survey of Palestinian high school students in Israel, this study examines the effect of the local labour market and the internal ethnic/religious segregation between Muslims, Christians and Druze, on students' occupational expectations. The data, which were collected in spring 1997, consisted of two types, these being data regarding students, and data regarding schools. The findings show that despite the disadvantages of the Palestinian minority as a whole within Israeli society, students tend to develop high occupational expectations. While the general level of their expectations can be explained by their educational and residential segregation from the Jewish majority, the multi-level analyses suggests that the internal segregation facilitates differential access to socio-economic resources, which generate different levels of occupational expectations between students from various ethnic/religious groups. More specifically, the findings demonstrate that the social and economic differences between Muslims, Christians and Druze are playing a central role in determining students' expectations, acting as a mechanism to preserve social inequality. The gender dimension of the occupational expectations and the influence of die segregation between Palestinian and Jewish students, are also discussed. PMID:12945870

Khattab, Nabil

2003-06-01

368

Health Educator Believability and College Student Self-rated Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) status among college students who reported receiving the majority of their health-related information from Health Educators. Participants: Students (n = 49,921) who completed the 2006 National College Health Association survey. Methods: Bivariate associations between SRH and the believability of health information received were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression tested the relationship after covariate adjustment.

Keith J. Zullig; Bill Reger-Nash; Robert F. Valois

2012-01-01

369

Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles

Voelz

1985-01-01

370

Health Risk Behaviors among California College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health risk behaviors among students attending 4-year colleges in California were examined. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey for College Students was administered in a two-stage (29 universities, 5,652 students) random sample. All campuses and 3,810 (69%) students participated in the survey. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 36.7% of the students had binged at least once while drinking; 25.3%

Kevin Patrick; Jennifer R. Covin; Mark Fulop; Karen Calfas; Chris Lovato

1997-01-01

371

Relationships between satisfaction with occupational factors and health-related variables in schizophrenia outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between satisfaction with occupational factors, operationalized as\\u000a occupational status and the total daily occupational situation, and health-related variables among people with schizophrenia.\\u000a The health-related variables included quality of life, perceived control, sense of coherence, and psychopathology. Gender\\u000a differences in these relationships were explored as well. Methods: A sample of 74

M. Eklund; L. Hansson; U. Bejerholm

2001-01-01

372

Attitudes and knowledge of students in the allied health professions toward their future professional team members.  

PubMed

The investigators wished to explore final-year allied health students' knowledge of their future colleagues. A survey developed by Felsher and Ross (1994) was adapted and administered to 35 occupational therapy (OT), 35 physical therapy (PT), and 35 speech-language pathology (SLP) students. Findings suggested that all students had a good understanding and knowledge of their own professions. Differences were found among the three groups of students regarding their understanding of other disciplines and the overlap in OT and SLP roles. Specifically, OT and SLP students perceived their own professions as the primary providers of cognitive treatment. Ways to foster student understanding and collaboration are suggested. PMID:17036668

Insalaco, Deborah; Ozkurt, Elcin; Santiago, Digna

2006-01-01

373

Self-Efficacy in Relation to Occupational Consideration and Academic Performance in High School Equivalency Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bandura's (1977, 1986) self-efficacy theory was tested in relation to occupational consideration and academic performance with 35 High School Equivalency Program students from seasonal farmworker backgrounds. Within-individual and aggregate analyses indicated a moderate to strong relationship between extent of consideration of occupational activities and self-efficacy, interests, and incentives. Individual differences in the strength of the relationship between self-efficacy and extent

Enrique Bores-Rangel; A. Timothy Church; Dottie Szendre; Carolyn Reeves

1990-01-01

374

Staff and student perceptions of a student health service  

PubMed Central

Results of a survey at one English university suggest that, of the various student personnel services provided by that institution, the Student Health Service was the best known and most used by the students. Both students and academic staff attributed greater importance to that particular service than to any other. Ways in which these two groups of university members justified such special provision are presented and discussed.

Pashley, B. W.; Shepherd, A. M.

1975-01-01

375

The effect of public controversy on occupational health problems: byssinosis.  

PubMed

The effect of the byssinosis controversy on surveillance programs in the cotton textile industry is reviewed. The federally regulated format for industry medical surveillance guarantees neither automatic reduction of cotton dust exposure for high-risk workers nor wage rate retention for workers who are transferred to less dusty job sites. The absence of universal guidelines for worker management, combined with doubt over the severity and prevalence of byssinosis, encourages employers to evaluate medical surveillance programs primarily on the basis of their economic impact. When employers use the programs to control their losses, the potential costs of worker participation are increased. Comparisons with medical surveillance programs in the coal industry suggest that health benefits to workers can be guaranteed in the context of disputes over occupational diseases if industry, labor, and government agencies all participate in program design and operation. PMID:6236698

Bronstein, J M

1984-10-01

376

The e¡ect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper considers the effect of work choices on mental health and looks at whether this differs across occupations. This requires a model that can deal with the endogeneity in the relationship between health, occupation and work choices. We specify such a model and estimate it on a unique UK panel survey. The survey, called the National Child development

Ana Llena-nozal; Maarten Lindeboom

377

An Approach to Occupational Health Risk Management for a Diversified International Corporation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A risk management program is presented which is effective in handling occupational health risks in a diversified multinational corporation. The three-step program of plant reviews involves initial assessment visits designed to determine the compliance status and degree of sophistication of the occupational health program. These assessments are followed by more formal assurance reviews which include consultation, training, and program support.

G. H. ANDERSEN; A. C. SMITH; L. T. DAIGLE

1989-01-01

378

Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

379

Midwest Center for Occupational Safety and Health, University of Minnesota, Final Performance Report, 1993.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS) was funded to serve education and training needs of occupational health and safety professionals in the midwestern part of the U.S. The MCOHS was located hierarchically in the Division of Envir...

I. A. Greaves

1993-01-01

380

How to select publications on occupational health: the usefulness of Medline and the impact factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESPublications in the field of occupational health appear in various journals, including those of other medical specialties. This complicates the follow up of literature for specialists in this field. On the basis of Medline and the impact factor, this diversity was assessed, and a cost effective method for selecting the most pertinent journals in the practice of occupational health was

J F Gehanno; B. Thirion

2000-01-01

381

Radiation safety as part of a comprehensive University Occupational Health and Safety Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rutgers University has developed an integrated occupational health and safety program incorporating the disciplines of radiation protection, chemical hygiene, industrial hygiene, occupational safety, hazardous substance disposal, and environmental control. The program was implemented by the Department of Radiation and Environmental Health and Safety which was organized in a nontraditional way to provide an interdisciplinary resource and service to a large

Edward A. Christman; Elan J. Gandsman

1994-01-01

382

Sex, gender and women's occupational health: The importance of considering mechanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of researchers have pointed out that less is known about occupational determinants of health in women than in men. The authors examine inventories of ongoing Canadian research and of recent scientific publications in order to identify trends in the approaches used to study women's occupational health (WOH). We also consider conceptual issues in the treatment of the sex

Karen Messing; Jeanne Mager Stellman

2006-01-01

383

Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the…

Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

384

Work Improvement and Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems: Common Features and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces

Kazutaka KOGI

2002-01-01

385

[Concomitant influence of occupational and social risk factors on health of workers engaged into powder metallurgy].  

PubMed

Results of health risk evaluation in workers engaged into powder metallurgy, using complex of hygienic, medical, epidemiologic and sociologic studies, enable to define priority occupational and social risk factors, to assess degree of their influence on the workers' health and to identify occupationally induced diseases. PMID:23461181

Shur, P Z; Za?tseva, N V; Kostarev, V G; Lebedeva-Nesevria, N A; Shliapnikov, D M

2012-01-01

386

Perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection: results of a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses.  

PubMed

In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses' educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection. PMID:23429638

Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

2013-02-25

387

Occupational health for an ageing workforce: do we need a geriatric perspective?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extending retirement ages and anti-age discrimination policies will increase the numbers of older workers in the future. Occupational health physicians may have to draw upon the principles and experience of geriatric medicine to manage these older workers. Examples of common geriatric syndromes that will have an impact on occupational health are mild cognitive impairment and falls at the workplace. Shifts

Gerald Choon-Huat Koh; David Koh

2006-01-01

388

Project Facts, 1992: The National Program for Occupational Safety and Health in Agriculture.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1990, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) initiated a program in agricultural safety and health. This program is dedicated to preventing Leading Work-Related Diseases and Injuries among Americans engaged in agricultural wo...

1992-01-01

389

Program Facts, 1993: The National Program for Occupational Safety and Health in Agriculture.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1990, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) initiated a program in agricultural safety and health. The program is dedicated to preventing Leading Work-Related Diseases and Injuries among Americans engaged in agricultural wor...

1993-01-01

390

Occupational Safety and Health: Improvement Needed in OSHA's Monitoring of Federal Agencies' Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We examined the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) monitoring of federal agencies' (1) safety and health programs and (2) implementation of the Hazard Communication Standard. This report reflects our additional work and provides upda...

1992-01-01

391

Occupational Safety and Health Training Grant, Colorado State University 1987-1992. Final Performance Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Occupational Safety and Health Training Grant program at Colorado State University is described. During the last 5 years, the goals of the grant program included improving the industrial hygiene educations in the baccalaureate environmental health pro...

R. M. Buchan

1993-01-01

392

Ethyl Methacrylate, n-butyl Methacrylate and Isobutyl Methacrylate: Health Based Recommended Occupational Exposure Limit.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Upon request by the Minister of Social Affairs and Employment the Health Council of the Netherlands recommends health-based occupational exposure limits for the concentration of toxic substances in air of the workplace. These recommendations are made by t...

1994-01-01

393

NIOSH Recommendations for Occupational Safety and Health Compendium of Policy Documents and Statements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This publication provides a comprehensive list of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) documents that contain recommendations for safety and health standards in the workplace. The document includes two major sections. Section A li...

1992-01-01

394

Occupational infections in health care workers: prevention and intervention.  

PubMed

Health care workers may be exposed to a variety of infections as they carry out their job responsibilities. Guidelines have been issued for prophylaxis following exposure to blood or body fluids known to be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Hepatitis B vaccine must be offered to all workers who may be exposed to blood and body fluids. Chemoprophylaxis is not available for workers exposed to hepatitis C. Health care facilities must conduct a tuberculosis risk assessment, provide skin testing at least yearly and develop isolation procedures for potentially infectious patients. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration currently mandates two-stage skin testing for all new employees at risk for tuberculosis exposure who have not had a skin test in the past year. Recent skin-test converters should be evaluated for isoniazid prophylaxis after a chest radiograph rules out active tuberculosis. Workers should be removed from the workplace from days 10 to 21 following exposure to varicella infection; vaccination of nonimmune workers should be considered. Because of possible side effects, the standard pertussis vaccine is not used in adults, but a new acellular pertussis vaccine has been effective in this group. PMID:9402814

Swinker, M

1997-12-01

395

Occupational health professionals' knowledge, understanding and use of work ability.  

PubMed

Background The concept of work ability (WA) has a 30-year history in Finland, where it has been used extensively in occupational health (OH) research and practice. The extent to which WA has been integrated into UK OH practice is unclear. Aims (i) To compare knowledge, understanding and use of WA among OH nurses and physicians in the UK and Finland and (ii) to identify factors that influence the use of WA in Finnish OH practice. Methods An online questionnaire administered to OH practitioners in the UK and Finland. Results A total of 436 UK and 97 Finnish OH practitioners completed the questionnaire. Though familiarity with the term 'work ability' was similar among Finnish and UK respondents, substantial differences were found in understanding of the term. Ninety-five per cent (Finland) and 7% (UK) of respondents reported using the Work Ability Index (WAI), a validated measure of WA, in their practice. Finnish respondents indicated that they used the WAI results primarily for individual case management, understanding population health trends, health promotion and determining WA across age groups. UK respondents primarily attributed failure to use the WAI to lack of training. Primary factors influencing use of WA in Finland included it being considered common practice and an effect ive system by which to conduct individual assessments. Conclusions There are large differences between Finland and the UK in the assessment of WA in OH practice. Differences may reflect contrasting OH legislative frameworks. PMID:23771875

Coomer, K; Houdmont, J

2013-06-14

396

Interprofessional clinical education for occupational therapy and psychology students: a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

An interprofessional clinical learning experience was developed for pre-licensure occupational therapy (OT) and psychology graduate students. Students worked in interprofessional teams to plan and implement a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The objectives were to provide a hands-on, student-led clinical experience; facilitate interprofessional collaborative learning through leadership partnerships and teach children with ASD to engage in appropriate social skill behaviors. Concurrently, faculty performed qualitative research to explore how the students worked together to provide intervention to the children. Data were collected via interview, direct observation of student planning sessions and student interprofessional interactions, and collection of posts from an online social network site used for session planning. There were six student participants and two faculty participants. Four themes emerged: learning who I am as a professional, learning to appreciate our professional differences, learning to communicate with each other and figuring it out, for the benefit of the kids. This interprofessional clinical learning experience and research helps ensure that students are adequately prepared to represent their profession as part of a diverse interprofessional health care team. PMID:22233368

Howell, Dana M; Wittman, Peggy; Bundy, Myra Beth

2012-01-01

397

Health care use by human immunodeficiency virus-infected students at a California student health service.  

PubMed Central

We report characteristics of 16 college students with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but without the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who received care at a student health center at a major university in California. Sociodemographic and clinical data and medical expenditures were obtained retrospectively from medical charts and computerized billing records. All 16 students were men who had sex with men, and 3 had also used intravenous drugs. Dermatologic conditions, upper respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal conditions, anemia, lymphadenopathy, sexually transmitted diseases, and ophthalmologic conditions were more frequent among HIV-infected students than among the general student population using the health center. On average, HIV-infected students visited the student health service about 3 times more often and incurred charges about 10 times higher than the general population of students visiting the health center. Student health centers, which have been at the forefront of developing strategies for HIV prevention, education, and counseling, must also develop treatment programs for HIV-infected students.

Bennett, C L; Chang, H; Shlian, D; Dawson, J A; Edlin, B R

1992-01-01

398

Personality type in occupational therapy students: implications for teaching and learning strategies.  

PubMed

SUMMARY In this descriptive study, 130 occupational therapy students completed a widely-used personality inventory (the MBTI-M) as part of coursework in their first semester. The majority of students evinced a preference for seven out of the 16 possible personality types; one type was not selected by anyone. These findings closely resembled data from the 1970s on practicing occupational therapists. Common characteristics, such as a high premium on personal connectedness and a dependable working environment, have important implications for faculty. Implications for findings relate to adjusting instructional delivery methods to best match type and learning preferences for this population. PMID:23944668

Jamison, Paula W; Dirette, Diane

2004-01-01

399

Mental health literacy among university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the mental health literacy of students. This study is part of the growing interest in mental health literacy among young people. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Over 400 university students indicated their knowledge of over 90 psychiatric illnesses labels derived from DSM:IV. They rated disorders on six questions concerning whether they had heard

Adrian Furnham; Richard Cook; Neil Martin; Mark Batey

2011-01-01

400

Counseling the Chronically Health Impaired Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The role of counselors in working with chronically health impaired students is examined, and illustrations of the Chronic Health Impaired/Sickle Cell Anemia Program in Baltimore (MD) are presented. The importance of setting goals with the student is underlined, as is the necessity for counselors to have proper flexibility and time to devote to…

Dale, Brian, Comp.; And Others

401

Health-Promoting Behaviours in Conservatoire Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study focuses on health-promoting behaviours in students from two conservatoires, the Royal Northern College of Music (RNCM, Manchester, UK; n =199) and the Royal College of Music (RCM, London, UK; n = 74). The research questions concern (a) the levels and types of health-promoting behaviours among performance students and (b) the…

Kreutz, Gunter; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

2009-01-01

402

Occupational safety and health: progress toward the 1990 objectives for the nation.  

PubMed Central

Occupational safety and health is 1 of 15 areas addressed in the Public Health Service's Objectives for the Nation. This area represents 104 million working men and women and the deaths, diseases, and injuries that result from exposures to hazards in their work environment. Characteristics of public health practice are compared with characteristics of occupational safety and health practice. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), created by the Occupational Safety and Health Act, is discussed. NIOSH has developed a list of 10 leading work-related diseases and injuries. The list is headed by occupational lung diseases. Twenty Objectives for the Nation in the area of occupational safety and health are reviewed, and the status of NIOSH efforts toward their attainment is discussed. Five categories of objectives are covered: (a) improved health status, (b) reduced risk factors, (c) improved public and professional awareness, (d) improved service and protection, and (e) improved surveillance and evaluation. The potential for achieving these objectives is discussed, with special attention given to the lack of a data base for monitoring progress. A major conclusion is that surveillance in occupational safety and health needs to be strengthened.

Millar, J D; Myers, M L

1983-01-01

403

Evaluation of a Student Health Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes the reaction of 53 medical students to their work experience in 3 poverty areas of California during the summer of 1967. They and 50 students from other professional schools were placed by The Student Health Organization in dental, community, and Planned Parenthood clinics, county hospitals, school districts, and Head Start programs. (WM)

Johnson, Patricia C.; and others

1969-01-01

404

College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

Hall, Lisa Anne

2010-01-01

405

College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

Hall, Lisa Anne

2010-01-01

406

Municipal occupational health services for small workplaces. Background and general methodology of the study.  

PubMed

This paper deals with the new Occupational Health Service Act of Finland, as well as the background, scope and general methodology of a walk-through survey. The study comprised 163 small places of work within two municipal health center areas, and the primary objective was to determine their need for actual occupational health services. The workplaces were surveyed for a comprehensive picture of their physical and chemical hazards, as well as for knowledge of first-aid preparedness, need for job-related health counseling, personnel facilities, personal protection, and the required ergonomic and safety activities at the workplaces within the community. This ad-hoc information was considered essential for the planning of a nationwide occupational health program, and, more specifically, an assessment could be made of the utility of health personnel in reducing and preventing occupational health and safety risks at small places of work. More specific details of the sample and methodology are reported in other communications. PMID:524084

Tolonen, M

1979-01-01

407

[Indoor air quality and occupational health, past and present].  

PubMed

The expression "indoor pollution" of residential, office and public buildings appeared for the first time in western societies toward the end of the '60s to indicate a complex phenomenon as important to public health as that of the "outdoor air pollution" or even more so. The demonstration of the toxic effects of passive smoking, radon, and other chemical and biological pollutants present in office and residential environments has prompted a wide spectrum of research into health risks, has led to position-taking by national and international authorities, and has given rise to a new scientific multi-disciplinary field of research, with respective international associations, scientific journals, and international conferences attended by thousands of participants. In Italy, since 1988, several scientific conferences have been organised and these have led to institutional initiatives such as the Commission set up in 1990 by the Italian Environment Ministry and the Commission set up in 1998 by the Italian Ministry of Health. The latter produced a Prevention Plan for Health Protection and Promotion in Indoor Environments which, for the first time, tackles indoor air pollution in a systematic way and provides an overall picture of the health and economic impact of the main illnesses related to indoor pollution on society. Decree 626/94 has also been affected, in some way, by these new scientific findings and in art. 33 has produced an update of the old art. 9 of the Decree 303/56. The attention to the subject of indoor air quality, in addition to that of offices and commercial buildings, has turned in more recent years to special environments such as schools and hospitals, resulting in the production of important publications. The modern frontier of research on indoor and outdoor air hazards is represented by fine air particulate matter. A large number of worldwide epidemiological studies have revealed that the daily variation in fine and ultra-fine particle air concentration in urban areas is associated with the simultaneous daily variation in the morbidity and mortality of the general population. The particle-linked increase in mortality has been attributed to respiratory and cardiovascular toxic effects, but the mechanisms by which urban air particles (indoor and outdoor) induce worsening of respiratory and cardio-vascular diseases are so far unknown and are the subject of intense investigation. Workers employed in the tertiary sector (offices, trade, banking, hospitals, schools, etc.) now account for 80% of the Italian labour force and the occupational physician is increasingly requested to assess the risk and monitor the health status of tertiary sector workers. These working environments are believed to be healthy and lacking in specific health risk factors, but such a belief is often only the result of the limited knowledge that employers, workers and the physicians themselves have about these environments and the results of international research studies over the last forty years. This issue is surely at the centre of the interest of our discipline and of public health throughout the developed western world and represents an ongoing challenge for the occupational physician, with new research topics and new problems to deal with. Recent issues include SARS and the defence of buildings and the air of working environments against terrorism attacks, such as the use of anthrax dust. PMID:15584445

Maroni, M

408

76 FR 72980 - Occupational Safety and Health State Plans; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2011-0197] Occupational Safety and...Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for public...SUMMARY: OSHA solicits public comments concerning...

2011-11-28

409

Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Teacher Self-Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This assessment instrument is intended to assist teachers in evaluating the relevance of the competencies included in the health occupations education curriculum they are teaching and in assessing their own continuing education needs. The profile lists the competencies required of persons working at the following sites: hospital departments…

Walters, Norma J.

410

The palm wine trade: occupational and health hazards.  

PubMed

The palm wine trade is an important economic activity for many tropical rural areas worldwide. In West Africa, palm wine holds high sociocultural and traditional values. Wine tappers often climb very tall trees with rudimentary equipment to harvest palm sap and risk severe injuries in the event of a fall. Furthermore, the wine quickly ferments beyond the desired taste and alcohol content, reducing the market power of these tappers. Therefore, to maximize benefits or to enhance shelf life, a variety of components are added to the palm tree sap, introducing the possibility of deadly contaminants. This paper highlights the public health implications of uncontrolled palm wine production and the relative neglect of the wine tapper. We draw from the limited published literature and use Cameroon as a case study. The palm wine trade can be more productive and safe if tappers work in cooperatives to improve their market power. Public health authorities need to monitor the quality of this cheap and common source of alcohol and enact regulations to protect wine tappers from the current level of occupational hazards. There are varying levels of progress to control quality and ensure safety in different parts of the world. Legislation and collaboration with traditional structures may offer a framework for change. PMID:23022866

Mbuagbaw, L; Noorduyn, S G

2012-10-01

411

Effects of social, economic, and labor policies on occupational health disparities.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: This article introduces some key labor, economic, and social policies that historically and currently impact occupational health disparities in the United States. METHODS: We conducted a broad review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature on the effects of social, economic, and labor policies on occupational health disparities. RESULTS: Many populations such as tipped workers, public employees, immigrant workers, and misclassified workers are not protected by current laws and policies, including worker's compensation or Occupational Safety and Health Administration enforcement of standards. Local and state initiatives, such as living wage laws and community benefit agreements, as well as multiagency law enforcement contribute to reducing occupational health disparities. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to build coalitions and collaborations to command the resources necessary to identify, and then reduce and eliminate occupational disparities by establishing healthy, safe, and just work for all. Am. J. Ind. Med. Published 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Am. J. Ind. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606055

Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo; Gaydos, Megan; Monforton, Celeste; Slatin, Craig; Borkowski, Liz; Dooley, Peter; Liebman, Amy; Rosenberg, Erica; Shor, Glenn; Keifer, Matthew

2013-04-18

412

The Roles of Occupational Knowledge and Vocational Self-Concept Crystallization in Students' School-to-Work Transition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined predictors of college students' school-to-work transition difficulty, level of occupational knowledge, and crystallization of vocational self-concept. Occupational knowledge predicted whether students received at least one job offer before graduation and the total number of offers. Self-concept crystallization predicted at least one…

Taylor, M. Susan

1985-01-01

413

Occupational health nurses' roles, credentials, and continuing education in Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

The role of the occupational health nurse is broad and includes health care provider, manager/coordinator, educator/advisor, and case manager and consultant, depending on the type of industry and the country in which the nurse practices. Regardless of the type of role, the occupational health nurse must participate in continuing nursing education (CNE) activities. This study describes the roles, credentials, and number of CNE activities undertaken by occupational health nurses working in Ontario, Canada. Using a nonexperimental descriptive design, a questionnaire was mailed to all practicing occupational health nurses who are members (n=900) of a local nursing association. Three hundred fifty-four questionnaires were returned. Nurses reported a variety of roles in the following categories: case management, health promotion, policy development, infection control/travel health, ergonomics, education, research, health and safety, direct care, consultation, disaster preparedness, and industrial hygiene. Sixty-five percent of nurses held an occupational health nurse credential, and 19% of nurses attended more than 100 hours of CNE annually. Occupational health nurses have multiple workplace roles. Many attend CNE activities and they often prepare for credentialing. PMID:19842614

Alleyne, Jergen; Bonner, Ann

2009-09-01

414

Trends and development of occupational health services in Norway.  

PubMed

Occupational Health Services (OHS) in Norway cover approximately 1.2 million employees, equivalent to 60% of the total work force. They employ nurses (800), physicians (500), physiotherapists (360), safety engineers (400), psychologists (30) and others (400), a total of 2500 full time employmancy. The average cost of the OHS amounts to 150 euros per employee, a total cost of 180 million euros per year. In 1998, the OHS in Norway were evaluated. The evaluation, initiated by the Ministry, revealed that although 80% of the enterprises are fairly satisfied with their OHS, there is still much to be improved, in particular quality development and customer focus. By 2000 the National Practice Guidelines. ("Good OHS") were developed as a joint effort of the professional OHS associations, representatives from the social partners and the NIOH. These guidelines have been evaluated and well accepted by the OHS. Last year the Ministry of Labour appointed an advisory group of experts on OHS. The group was asked to examine: the "branch provision" on obligatory OHS and the availability of health resources; the legislation on OHS tasks; the quality improvement of OHS; and the OHS in small enterprises The report was ready in May 2001 stating that the OHS may be a useful contributor to the improvement of the health, environment and safety in enterprises and included the following recommendations: to establish the OHS for all within 10 years and to ratify relevant ILO convention; to develop a certification system for the OHS; to ensure financial public support of the OHS for the small enterprises; and to expand the OH hospital departments as important supportive agents for the OHS. The report will be a background document for the revision process of the Work Environment Act to be soon put into force. PMID:12216773

Lie, Arve

2002-01-01

415

A Study of Factors Associated with the Vocational Development of High School Agricultural Occupations Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Among the most crucial problems facing young people today are decisions in the process of vocational development. This study was designed to determine if there are differences in certain aspects of vocational development among the groups of high school agriculture students who plan to enter on-farm agricultural occupations, those who plan to…

Byler, Bennie L.; Hemp, Paul E.

416

Hepatitis B and influenza vaccines: Important occupational vaccines differently perceived among medical students.  

PubMed

Healthcare personnel (HCP) are at risk from occupational exposure to airborne and bloodborne pathogens, and the risk of infection among HCP is greater than among the general population. The aim of the study was to characterize attitudes toward occupational recommended vaccines as well as the perception of risks of occupationally acquired infections. We surveyed 650 medical students to assess their perception of influenza and hepatitis B and their opinions and beliefs about influenza and hepatitis B vaccines. We found differences between pre-clinical and clinical students regarding the uptake of influenza and hepatitis B vaccines, about the chances of being occupationally infected with influenza or hepatitis B, and about the likelihood of suffering from severe side-effects following immunization. Interestingly, the risk perception varied drastically between the two vaccine-preventable diseases hepatitis B and influenza. Medical students rated the probability of contracting hepatitis B due to a work-related exposure and the severity of disease significantly higher than for influenza, and this may be an explanation for the greater acceptance of the hepatitis B vaccine. Furthermore, our findings suggest that medical students are frequently inaccurate in assessing their own risk level, and their specific knowledge about both diseases and the severity of these diseases proved to be unsatisfactory. PMID:24016807

Wicker, Sabine; Rabenau, Holger F; von Gierke, Laura; François, Guido; Hambach, Ramona; De Schryver, Antoon

2013-09-07

417

Marine Related Occupations: A Primer for High School Students. Insight 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication is divided into five parts. The first part provides the aims and objectives of the booklet. These include assisting high school students to discover the career opportunities in marine-related occupations and to prepare for some of the jobs listed in the booklet. Section two contains resource information: publications,…

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

418

A study of the occupational interests of high-school students in terms of grade placement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vocational preference inventory was given to 1,995 high school students. Between grades 9 and 12 there was little change in the rank order, for percentage chosen, of the most favored occupations; but among fields selected less often, there was a gain in the number of expressed preferences for nonprofessional work. This tendency, which was more marked among the boys

E. Roeber; S. Garfield

1943-01-01

419

The Use of Blended Learning to Facilitate Critical Thinking in Entry Level Occupational Therapy Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The popularity of using online instruction (both in blended and complete distance learning) in higher education settings is increasing (Appana, 2008; Newton, 2006; Oh, 2006). Occupational therapy educators are using blended learning methods under the assumption that this learning platform will facilitate in their students the required level of…

Rodriguez, Eva L.

2009-01-01

420

[It's Time for the Metamorphosis: Integrating Occupational and Physical Therapy into Programs for Students].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes efforts in Oregon to improve school services for students with orthopedic impairments. A state technical assistance team was created which worked with regional coordinators. The team established the following goals: providing physical and occupational therapy that is delivered by a team, is directly related to the child's…

Reed, Penny; And Others

421

Office Occupations--Accounting. Kit No. 8. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Activity Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An instructor's manual and student activity guide on accounting are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of office occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home economics,…

Conner, Connie

422

The Occupational Versatility Program: Student-Directed Learning in Industrial Arts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the Occupational Versatility program in industrial arts, involving a self-instructional school shop in which the learning system is student-managed, nongraded, upgraded, and team taught. This federally funded learning method has also been successfully applied to home economics and art education. Information sources for the teacher are…

Lavender, John

1978-01-01

423

Women's Occupational Health: A Critical Review and Discussion of Current Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Action to improve women's occupational health has been slowed by a notion that women's jobs are safe and that any health problems identified among women workers can be attributed to unfitness for the job or unnecessary complaining. With increasing numbers of women in the labor force, the effects of work on women's health have recently started to interest health care

Karen Messing

1997-01-01

424

The Occupational Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to provide a framework for a research agenda on migrant and seasonal farmworker health and to serve as a resource for all those concerned with farmworker health, this report examines farmworker health data gathered within the past 10-15 years. The document contains the following material: (1) an overview of the major occupational health

Wilk, Valerie A.

425

Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

Nichols, Don D.

426

Health Manpower Source Book. Manpower Supply and Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations: 1968. Public Health Service Publication Number 263, Section 20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a compilation of statistics on supply and education of health manpower in medicine and osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine, nursing, public health, and eight selected allied health occupations. The material is organized by occupations and the following information is presented for each…

National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Professions Education and Manpower Training.

427

An Outcome Survey of Mergers Between University Student Counseling Centers and Student Health Mental Health Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

An outcome survey was done of organizational mergers between university student counseling centers and student health mental health services. Comparison of outcome ratings were examined as were participant's narrative responses to survey questions regarding: (1) Quality of clinical services, (2) Ability to meet needs of students, (3) Staff morale of merged services, (4) University community's utilization of available services, (5)

Russ Federman; David Emmerling

1997-01-01

428

Spirituality and the Health of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between spirituality and health risks of college students.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Undergraduate students enrolled in Personal Health and Wellness classes at The University of Tennessee were selected to participate\\u000a in the study. Two-hundred twenty-one students were administered two instruments: The College Student Appraisal of Risks Survey\\u000a (The CARS) and the Spirituality Scale (SS).

Linda Wyatt Nelms; Edwin Hutchins; Dorothy Hutchins; Robert J. Pursley

2007-01-01

429

Implementation of occupational health service improvements through application of total quality management processes.  

PubMed

The occupational health services department for a manufacturing division of a high-technology firm was redesigned from an outsourced model, in which most services were provided by an outside clinic vendor, to an in-house service model, in which services were provided by an on-site nurse practitioner. The redesign and implementation, accomplished by a cross-functional team using Total Quality Management processes, resulted in a comprehensive occupational health services department that realized significant cost reduction, increased compliance with regulatory and company requirements, and improved employee satisfaction. Implications of this project for occupational health nurses are discussed. PMID:21598854

Thomas, Elizabeth Anne

2011-05-23

430

Mental health in Canada: are there any risky occupations and industries?  

PubMed

This study examined the role of occupations and industries in explaining differences among workers reporting poorer mental health in the Canadian workforce. It used data coming from a large representative sample of 77,377 workers engaged in 139 occupations and 95 industries. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify differences in the odds of reporting poorer mental health, adjusting for gender, age, education, marital status, and household income. Results identify ten occupations and nine industries at higher risk for workers reporting poorer mental health. The article concludes by highlighting implications for actors and policymakers and by specifying potential targets for intervention. PMID:17669492

Marchand, Alain

2007-07-31

431

Ergonomics and occupational safety and health: an ILO perspective.  

PubMed

The ILO has a mandate to protect workers against sickness, diseases and injuries due to workplace hazards and risks including ergonomic and work organization risk factors. One of the main functions for the ILO is to develop international standards related to labour and work. ILO standards have exerted considerable influence on the laws and regulations of member States. The ILO standards take the form of international Conventions and Recommendations. ILO Conventions and Recommendations relevant to protection of workers against ergonomic risk factors at the workplace include Convention No. 127 and Recommendation No.128 which specify the international requirements concerning the manual transport of a load. To help member States in applying the ILO standards, the ILO produces practical guides and training manuals on ergonomics at work and collects and analyses national practices and laws on ergonomics at the workplace. The ILO also conducts technical cooperation activities in many countries on ergonomics to support and strengthen the capacities of its tripartite constituents in dealing with workplace ergonomic and work organization risks. The ILO's technical cooperation activities give priorities on the promotion of voluntary, participatory and action-oriented actions to improve working conditions and work organizations of the small and medium sized enterprises. This paper reviews ILO's policies and activities on ergonomics in relation to occupational safety and health and prescribes ILO's considerations for its future work on ergonomics. PMID:20347066

Niu, Shengli

2010-03-27

432

Metabolic and health consequences of occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls.  

PubMed Central

In surveys of three groups of workers occupationally exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) serum PCB concentrations were quantitated as lower chlorinated biphenyls (L-PCBs) and higher chlorinated biphenyls (H-PCBs). Serum L-PCB and H-PCB concentrations were many times greater among workers employed in power capacitor manufacturing than exposed areas. Statistically significant positive correlations of symptoms suggestive of mucous membrane and skin irritation, of systemic malaise, and altered peripheral sensation were noted with increasing concentrations of serum PCB. No clinical abnormalities attributable to exposure to PCB were observed. Serum PCB concentrations were positively and significantly correlated with glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), and plasma triglyceride, and inversely correlated with plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol. These correlations were present across all study sites. These findings are indicative of PCBs' physiological effect on the liver, whose long-range health significance is unknown. Nevertheless, the consistent positive association of serum PCB with plasma triglyceride and negative association with plasma HDL-cholesterol may have long-term cardiovascular consequences.

Smith, A B; Schloemer, J; Lowry, L K; Smallwood, A W; Ligo, R N; Tanaka, S; Stringer, W; Jones, M; Hervin, R; Glueck, C J

1982-01-01

433

National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals  

SciTech Connect

Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

Womble, R.

2010-04-02

434

A survey of burnout among Australian mental health occupational therapists and social workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study investigated the extent to which occupational therapists and social workers employed in Australian mental health settings are affected by burnout. Method: Questionnaires were sent to occupational therapists and social workers who had indicated that they were interested in participating in the study. An overall response rate of 76.6% (n = 304) was achieved. The outcome measure was

Chris Lloyd; Robert King

2004-01-01

435

Occupational Stress, Mental Health Status and Stress Management Behaviors among Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design: Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory…

Leung, Sharron S. K.; Mak, Yim Wah; Chui, Ying Yu; Chiang, Vico C. L.; Lee, Angel C. K.

2009-01-01

436

Development of Occupational Wellbeing in the Finnish European Network of Health Promoting Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the baseline results of a school development project where the aim was to improve school community staff's occupational wellbeing in co-operation with occupational health nurses. Design/methodology/approach: The Wellbeing at Your Work index form for school staff developed for the study aimed to…

Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Naumanen, Paula

2006-01-01

437

Effectiveness of Experiential and Verbal Occupational Therapy Groups in a Community Mental Health Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effectiveness of occupation-based verbal therapy and occupation-based experiential therapy in the facilitation of money management skills in consumers of community mental health services. It was hypothesized that participants would demonstrate overall improvement and that the experiential group would demonstrate more improvement than the verbal group. Results indicated that although overall performance did improve, no significant difference

Mary Beth Bickes; Shelley N. Deloache; Julie R. Dicer; Stephanie C. Miller

2001-01-01

438

Occupational Health and Safety. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with occupational safety…

Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

439

Effects of Indoor Lighting on Occupants’ Visual Comfort and Eye Health in a Green Building  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effects of indoor lighting on occupants’ visual comfort and eye health and to contribute to the management and maintenance of buildings. The illuminance of the working plane and windows at Samsung Corporation Headquarters were measured, and 2744 healthy occupants of Samsung Corporation were surveyed regarding the indoor lighting environment via the company’s intranet for 1½ years.

Taeyon Hwang; Jeong Tai Kim

2011-01-01

440

[Actual conditions of occupational health activities in small-scale enterprises in Japan: system for occupational health, health management and demands by small-scale enterprises].  

PubMed

In order to clarify the real conditions of occupational health services (OHS) in small-scale enterprises (SSEs) in Japan, we analyzed questionnaires recovered from 765 SSEs in the area of a city neighboring Osaka City (recovery rate, 69.3%). The SSEs included 358 SSEs with 1 to 4 workers (46.8% of total SSEs), 203 with 5 to 9 (26.5%), 163 with 10 to 29 (21.3%) and 41 with 30 to 49 (5.4%). The main types of businesses were manufacturing (374, 48.9% of total SSEs), wholesale/retail trade/restaurants (153, 20.0%), community, social and personal services (132, 17.3%) and construction (72, 9.4%). Health examinations were performed in 47.7% of SSEs. The reason for the lack of examinations were "shortage of time" (33.3% of SSEs lacking health examination) and "employees do not want to be examined" (28.1%). Some health promotion measures were conducted in 29.2% of SSEs. Health examination (59.0% of SSEs), health promotion (36.5%), measure of mental health (25.9%) and information service for employers and employees (25.5%) were demanded by SSEs as OHS. Financial subsidies and economical incentives were demanded by 46.4% and 28.8% of SSEs, respectively. Regional occupational health center in this area was poorly known among SSEs (8.2%), but health examination (48.4%), information service (37.5%), assessment of work method and advice to improve (19.8%) and environment measurement (12.4%) are demanded of the center by SSEs. PMID:10637944

Hirata, M; Kumagai, S; Tabuchi, T; Tainaka, H; Andoh, K; Oda, H

1999-11-01

441

Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for

Nathalie IR Hugenholtz; Karen Nieuwenhuijsen; Judith K Sluiter; Frank JH van Dijk

2009-01-01

442

Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on EBM courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT\\\\BACKGROUND:Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM

N. I. R. Hugenholtz; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J. K. Sluiter; Dijk van F. J. H

2009-01-01

443

Learning Style of Students and Practitioners in Five Health Professions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An Israeli sample of 378 students and 251 practitioners in occupational therapy (OT), social work, nursing, physical therapy, and clinical psychology completed Kolb's Learning Style Inventory. Findings suggest greater variance in learning style among students. OT students were least abstract. Both OT students and practitioners were predominantly…

Katz, Noomi; Heimann, Nanci

1991-01-01

444

Occupational stress and self-perceived oral health in Brazilian adults: a Pro-Saude study.  

PubMed

The scope of this study is to investigate the association between occupational stress and self-perception of oral health. Data were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire filled out in a Pró-Saúde Study by 3253 administrative technical staff from Rio de Janeiro's State University. Occupational stress was measured by means of a questionnaire elaborated in 1970 by Karasek, duly shortened by Thorell in 1988. Ordinal logistic regression was used for data analysis, subsequently adjusted for three blocks of variables. Workers exposed to high occupational demands and little occupational control and to passive work had higher chances of self-perception of worse oral health, when compared with those exposed to low occupational demands, there being no association observed in those exposed to active work. However, in the multiple regression model the following estimates were reduced in magnitude and lost statistical significance, namely high occupational demands and passive work. Workers exposed to high occupational demands revealed worse self-reported oral health, which seems to be partly explained by health behavior patterns, the presence of oral health problems and seeking dental services at longer intervals than once per year. PMID:23827911

Scalco, Giovana Pereira da Cunha; Abegg, Claides; Celeste, Roger Keller; Hökerberg, Yara Hahr Marques; Faerstein, Eduardo

2013-07-01

445

The Occupation of City-Walking: Crossing the Invisible Line  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In this pilot study, occupational science students participated in a walk around a major Health Sciences Center Campus. The purpose of this action research project was to introduce students in occupational science to the inter-city community through the occupation of walking as an introductory method of being exposed to cultural variation. The overarching question was: In an inner-city setting,

RoyeenCharlotte; Cassini Teresa OTRL; BarneyKaren; Matin Royeen

2009-01-01

446

The Boston Safe Shops Model: An Integrated Approach to Community Environmental and Occupational Health  

PubMed Central

Small, immigrant-owned businesses, such as auto repair shops and nail salons, often face barriers to environmental and occupational health compliance and may be a source of neighborhood pollution complaints. The Boston Public Health Commission established the Safe Shops Project to improve safety and environmental practices in such businesses using a community partnership model that incorporates enforcement inspection findings, worker training, technical assistance, and referral to health care and business resources. This integrated technical assistance approach has led to improved occupational health and environmental conditions, adoption of pollution prevention technologies, novel problem-solving, and dozens of health screenings and insurance referrals for workers and their neighbors.

Shoemaker, Paul; Skogstrom, Tiffany; Acevedo, Persio; Kendrick, Jumaane; Nguyen, Nancie

2010-01-01

447

Educational Resource Center (Northwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety, University of Washington). Final Performance Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Center program is to provide trained professionals specializing in occupational health and safety fields for the Pacific Northwest (Region X), and to provide continuing education courses and outreach programs in the field to practicing...

1997-01-01

448

Occupational Safety and Health Training Program at ETCs. Interim Status Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preliminary studies reveal that serious deficiencies exist in occupational safety and health training programs within DOE's fossil fuel programs. The basic requirements of Executive Order 12196, 29 CFR 1960 (both earlier and current versions) and Chapter ...

A. F. Meyer M. Vaudreuil S. T. Wisniewski

1981-01-01

449

Assessing System-Wide Occupational Health and Safety Risks of Energy Technologies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Input-output modeling is now being used to assess systemwide occupational and public health and safety risks of energy technologies. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of this method are presented, and some of its important limitations discussed. It...

M. D. Rowe

1981-01-01

450

Prioritized schedule for review of industrial safety and occupational health programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document provides the rationale and criteria for developing a schedule for reviewing the Industrial Safety and Occupational Health programs for the Management and Operating Contractor (MOC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The reviews will evaluat...

1996-01-01

451

Proceedings from the 2001 NASA Occupational Health Conference: Risk Assessment and Management in 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Conference convened approximately 86 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Two days' Professional Dev...

2001-01-01

452

Occupational Medicine Graduate Training Program. University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NIOSH support for the Occupational Medicine Residency at the University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health remains instrmental in maintaining the strength of the program. These Training Grant funds have been used exclusively for trainee expen...

J. J. Schwerha

2006-01-01

453

48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113...

2011-10-01

454

48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal...DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113...

2012-10-01

455

How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report was based on a survey to determine how students in the health professions of medicine osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine financed their educations during the 1970-71 school year. The purpose of this nationwide survey was to provide information on patterns of student expenses and on the sources…

Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

456

Students' Mental Health: Personal and University Determinants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study was to examine the effects of personal and university bounded factors in students mental health in north of Fars province, Iran. The effects of these factors on university students' psychopathology within a survey design were investigated among 300 participants--94 males and 206 females, who were selected through random sampling…

Khodarahimi, Siamak; Rasti, Ali; Khajehie, Malihe; Sattar, Rea

2009-01-01

457

Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.  

PubMed

This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational Health and Education; (2) design feasible methods of monitoring patient outcomes and satisfaction with the centers and with the providers working with them in order to assess their effectiveness and value; (3) establish incentives for improved outcomes and worker and employer satisfaction through formal agreements with the centers and providers; and (4) develop quality indicators for the three targeted conditions (low back sprain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and fractures) that serve as the basis for both quality improvement processes and performance-based contracting. What lessons or insights does our experience offer thus far? The primary lesson is the importance of making effective partnerships and collaborations. Our policy and research activities have benefited significantly from the positive relationship the DLI established with the practice community through the Washington State Medical and Chiropractic Associations and from the DLI's close association with the Healthcare Subcommittee of the Workers' Compensation Advisory Committee. This committee is established by state regulation and serves as a forum for dialogue between the committee and the employer and labor communities. Our experience thus underscores the importance of establishing broad-based support for delivery system innovations. Our research activities have also benefited from the close collaboration between DLI program staff and UW health services researchers. The DLI staff brought important program and policy experience, along with an appreciation of the context and environment within which the research, policy, and R&D activities were conducted. The UW research team brought scientific rigor and methodological expertise to the design and implementation of the research and policy activities. In Washington State, the DLI represents a "single payer" for the purposes of workers' compensation. As discussed earlier, Washington State, along with five other states, has a state-fund system that requires all employers that are not self-insured to purchase workers' compensation insurance t

Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

2001-01-01

458

Occupations and attitudes of former student activists 10 years later  

Microsoft Academic Search

Respondents in a 1969 survey (N=400)of undergraduate men at the University of Michigan were resurveyed as alumni in 1979 (N=215).Of the 400 surveyed in 1969, 50 were active in political organizations (“organization activists”) and 57 had been in demonstrations. These were rank- and-file student activists in the 1960s, not leaders. The demonstration activists were the more extreme in attitudes in

Dean R. Hoge; Teresa L. Ankney

1982-01-01

459

Occupational Health Nurse and Employee Mental Health: A Programmed, Self-Instructional Course. Volume 2, Unit 5.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This self instructional course was designed to teach occupational nurses about employee mental health. This volume covered anxiety, neuroses, psychophysiological disorders, and alcoholism. Specific topics covered include anxiety and its effect on job perf...

1973-01-01

460

Development of a questionnaire to examine confidence of occupational therapy students during fieldwork experiences.  

PubMed

This paper describes the development of an instrument designed to examine the level of confidence of occupational therapy students during their fieldwork experiences. Confidence in this context refers to Bandura's concept of self-efficacy in Social Cognitive Theory. As this subject has received little formal study, no appropriate tool was found to measure confidence in students. The purpose of this study was to design a measure to provide students with an opportunity to self-assess their levels of confidence both within a placement and throughout their entire fieldwork experiences. The instrument was constructed in three phases: I--Instrument Development; II--Instrument Testing; 111--Instrument Implementation. In Phase III, the instrument was distributed to all students entering the first year of occupational therapy studies at the University of Alberta. Data was collected from these students during their four fieldwork placements to address the questions of whether confidence increases during a fieldwork placement regardless of placement level, whether confidence increases by placement level, and whether student or placement characteristics affect levels of confidence. Results of the study support the hypotheses that confidence levels increase both during a fieldwork placement and with successive placements. Reliability and validity analyses indicated that the measure may be a useful tool to assess confidence in students during fieldwork placements. PMID:11852690

Derdall, Michele; Olson, Peggy; Janzen, Wonita; Warren, Sharon

2002-02-01

461

Nursing students and Internet health information.  

PubMed

This study investigates use of the internet by nursing students to access health information and their evaluation practices in relation to this information. The research method was a retrospective descriptive postal survey. A questionnaire was sent to all undergraduate students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing programme at a New Zealand university in 2005. The response rate was 50% or 174 responses. Findings from the study included marked variations in respondents ability to successfully search for and evaluate relevant internet health and nursing information. Few respondents assessed patients use of the internet to gather health information or assisted patients with evaluation. As searching, evaluating and sharing online information is a core element of nursing practice, formal education to develop competency in the ability of all nursing students to retrieve and assess internet health information is essential. The integration of these skills into nursing practice is a vital step in developing new approaches to working with knowledgeable consumers of internet health information. PMID:18700178

Scott, Susan D; Gilmour, Jean; Fielden, Jann

2008-08-10

462

Occupational health and safety regulation in the coal mining industry: public health at the workplace.  

PubMed

The strategy for preventing occupational disease and injury in the coal mining industry employs several elements. Standards are set and enforced; technical assistance, research, and development are provided; and surveillance is conducted. Compensation for black lung is a vivid reminder of the consequences of failure to prevent disease. And, workers are represented by a union that encourages active participation in all aspects of this strategy. There are significant problems in each of these elements. Regulatory reform threatens to weaken many standards, there is a decline in government research budgets, surveillance is not well monitored, and compensation for black lung is significantly more difficult to obtain now than in the past. Moreover, the conservative governments of the past decade are not friendly towards unions. Nevertheless, the fundamental structure of disease and injury prevention remains intact and, more importantly, it has a historical record of success. The Mine Safety and Health Act provided for a wide array of basic public health measures to prevent occupational disease and injury in the mining industry. These measures have been effective in reducing both risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable coal mine dust. They are also associated with temporary declines in productivity. In recent years, however, productivity has increased, while risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable dust have declined. At individual mines, productivity with longwall mining methods appear to be associated with increases in exposure to respirable dust. These trends are not inconsistent with similar trends following implementation of regulations by OSHA. When OSHA promulgated regulations to control exposure to vinyl chloride monomer, enforcement of the standard promoted significant efficiencies in vinyl chloride production (5). Similarly, when OSHA promulgated its standard regulating exposure to cotton dust, this effort provoked modernization in the cotton textile industry (14). It is not inevitable that occupational health and safety regulations are associated with negative economic performance. On the contrary, in some instances, public health on the job and productivity are complementary. PMID:1828671

Weeks, J L

1991-01-01

463

Prevalence of Obesity and Abdominal Obesity in Swedish Primary Care and Occupational Health Clinics  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity in the Swedish primary and occupational health care setting. Patients and Methods: Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured in 1,583 consecutive patients, aged between 18–65 years (46.4 ± 12.7 years), in 39 primary care and occupational health practices in Sweden, in 2006.

Jan Pettersson; Kari Johansson; Stephan Rössner; Martin Neovius

2008-01-01

464

Job load and hazard analysis: a method for the analysis of workplace conditions for occupational health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

One requirement for successful occupational health care is reliable information on occupational hazards. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, standardised method for workplace investigations for use in occupational health care. The theoretical framework of the method comprises the stress-strain model, the hazard-danger model, and risk behaviour theory. The new method, termed job load and hazard analysis,

M K Mattila

1985-01-01

465

NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Testimony on the Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Occupational Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus by R. A. Lemon, January 26, 1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The testimony offered comments concerning occupational exposure to hepatitis-B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended that the coverage of a proposed Occupation...

1988-01-01

466

A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students  

PubMed Central

Introduction Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results All course participants (N=30) completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

Vora, Nirali; Chang, Mina; Pandya, Hemang; Hasham, Aliya; Lazarus, Cathy

2010-01-01

467

Updated recommendations for the management of health care personnel occupationally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus.  

PubMed

The U.S. Public Health Service has released new recommendations for the management of health care personnel who experience occupational exposures to blood or other body fluids that might contain human immunodeficiency virus. [Workplace Health Saf 2013;61(11):504.]. PMID:24169957

Chalupka, Stephanie

2013-11-01

468

The role of the occupational therapist in adolescent mental health: A critical review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are substantial bodies of literature focusing on mental health and the mental health of young people. There is also a growing body of knowledge relating to the professional role of the occupational therapists in mental health. However, there is a marked gap that brings these areas together. Adolescence is a time of heightened stress, with as many as one

Laura Hardaker; Elizabeth J. Halcomb; Rhonda Griffiths; Natalie Bolzan; Karen Arblaster

2007-01-01

469

New Directions in Occupational Health, Final Progress Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

West Virginia has one of the highest burdens of occupational disease and illness in the nation. The objective of the West Virginia University training program is therefore clear: To train skilled professionals who understand work places, recognize and tre...

A. M. Ducatman

2000-01-01

470

New Directions in Occupational Health. Final Performance Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of the West Virginia University residency in Preventive Medicine-Occupational Medicine is straightforward. West Virginia is the most work-disabled state in the nation. There is a tremendous local, state, and regional need for objective clini...

1997-01-01

471

Engaging Student Health Organizations in Reducing Health Disparities in Underserved Communities through Volunteerism: Developing a Student Health Corps  

PubMed Central

One underutilized method for reducing health disparities and training culturally competent health care workers is the engagement of undergraduate student health organizations in conducting health screenings, promotion, and health education outreach activities in in underserved racial/ethnic communities. We conducted a needs assessment of 14 predominantly racial/ethnic minority undergraduate student-run health organizations. The 14 organizations annually served approximately 12,425 people (67% Hispanic, 25% African American, 6.33% Asian Pacific Islander), predominantly at health fairs within Los Angeles County (averaging 138 attendees). Student organizations provided screenings on general health conditions and diseases, with less emphasis on behavioral risk factors (e.g., drinking, smoking). Organizations indicated a need for increased and affordable trainings in preventive health screenings and help in understanding target populations’ needs. Universities are in an excellent position to train, supervise, and organize volunteer health corps in order to engage students in reducing health disparities and to train culturally competent health care providers.

Mays, Vickie M.; Ly, Lichin; Allen, Erica; Young, Sophia

2013-01-01

472

A Comprehensive Careers Cluster Curriculum Model. Health Occupations Cluster Curriculum Project and Health-Care Aide Curriculum Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To prepare learning materials for health careers programs at the secondary level, the developmental phase of two curriculum projects--the Health Occupations Cluster Curriculum Project and Health-Care Aide Curriculum Project--utilized a model which incorporated a key factor analysis technique. Entitled "A Comprehensive Careers Cluster Curriculum…

Bortz, Richard F.

473

Current provision of rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Rheumatological conditions are common and all health professionals (HPs) therefore need sufficient knowledge and skills to manage patients safely and effectively. The aim of this study was to examine current undergraduate education in rheumatology for HPs in the UK. Methods. A questionnaire was sent to curriculum organizers and clinical placement officers for all undergraduate courses in adult nursing, occupational

C. Almeida; B. Clarke; A. O'Brien; A. Hammond; S. Ryan; L. Kay; S. Hewlett

2006-01-01

474

Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Medical Assisting. Occupation: Medical Assistant. Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Task analyses are provided for two duty areas for the occupation of medical assistant in the medical assisting cluster. Five tasks for the duty area "providing therapeutic measures" are as follows: assist with dressing change, apply clean dressing, apply elastic bandage, assist physician in therapeutic procedure, and apply topical ointment. The…

Lathrop, Janice

475

Engaging Student Health Organizations in Reducing Health Disparities in Underserved Communities through Volunteerism: Developing a Student Health Corps  

Microsoft Academic Search

One underutilized method for reducing health disparities and training culturally competent health care workers is the engagement of undergraduate student health organizations in conducting health screenings, promotion, and health education outreach activities in in underserved racial\\/ethnic communities. We conducted a needs assessment of 14 predominantly racial\\/ethnic minority undergraduate student-run health organizations. The 14 organizations annually served approximately 12,425 people (67%

MSPH Lichin Ly MPH E Vickie M. Mays; MPH Sophia Young

2009-01-01

476

Health effects following 9/11: implications for occupational health nurses.  

PubMed

The attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 resulted in hazardous environmental exposures of enormous magnitude, bringing about persistent respiratory and psychological problems among survivors. Approximately 40,000 men and women worked at Ground Zero, the former site of the World Trade Center in New York City, and at the Staten Island landfill, the main wreckage depository, in the days, weeks, and months following 9/11. First responders such as firefighters and police, construction workers, and utility and public sector workers were involved. These individuals were at high risk for injury, respiratory complications, and psychological distress from the traumatic event. This article highlights the controversy surrounding 9/11 research and reports, identifies populations at high risk for exposure, and examines the health effects. Occupational health nurses should not only be empowered to provide the best care for workers affiliated with 9/11, but also contribute to research to protect worker health in future disaster responses. PMID:18444404

Pak, Victoria M; O'Hara, MaryEllen; McCauley, Linda A

2008-04-01

477

The Health of Younger Students in Saratov  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the findings of a study determining the health of students in the gymnasium classes of primary school in Saratov as a function of the increase in their educational load. A monitoring was carried out from the 1993-1994 school year through the 1999-2000 school year. The social health of this group of children was determined as a…

Ragimova, O. A.

2004-01-01

478

The Health of Younger Students in Saratov  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reports the findings of a study determining the health of students in the gymnasium classes of primary school in Saratov as a function of the increase in their educational load. A monitoring was carried out from the 1993-1994 school year through the 1999-2000 school year. The social health of this group of children was determined as…

Ragimova, O. A.

2004-01-01

479

Measuring Environmental Health Perception among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One's knowledge, perception, and attitude are fundamental in determining how one behaves regarding environmental hazards. While science has made great strides in promoting environmental health, threats still exist, largely due to individual actions in response to potential health hazards. Undergraduate students (n = 395) enrolled in an…

Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Brown, Stephen L.; Middleton, Wendi K.; Wodika, Alicia B.

2011-01-01

480

Serving Students with Special Health Care Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These guidelines were developed to assist Connecticut school personnel to strengthen collaborative efforts among families, educators, and health professionals to provide effective programs for students with special health care needs. The guidelines assist in identifying appropriate services and service providers and in planning the support…

Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Education Support Services.

481

Student Health Insurance: Problems and Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Student health insurance experiences the same inflationary trends as employee benefits, but is rarely viewed as a significant direct cost to an institution, nor is the bill as high as the costs associated with employee health plans. Several long-term solutions and strategies that could help colleges to contain the ever-escalating cost of…

Wagner, Robin

2006-01-01

482

Serving Students with Special Health Care Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These guidelines were developed to assist Connecticut school personnel to strengthen collaborative efforts among families, educators, and health professionals to provide effective programs for students with special health care needs. The guidelines assist in identifying appropriate services and service providers and in planning the support…

Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Education Support Services.

483

Accuracy of Parents' Perceptions of Their College Student Children's Health and Health Risk Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors compared parents' perceptions of their college student children's health and health risk behaviors with the college students' own reports. One hundred sixty-four parent-college student child dyads completed questionnaires regarding the students' health, illne