Science.gov

Sample records for study leu-mo fuel

  1. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  2. Amtrak fuel consumption study

    SciTech Connect

    Hitz, J.

    1981-02-01

    This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

  3. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  4. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  5. Fuels research studies at NASA Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Fuels research studies carried out in a variety of areas related to aviation propulsion, ground transportation, and stationary power generation systems are discussed. The major efforts are directed to studies on fuels for jet aircraft. These studies involve fuels preparation, fuels analysis, and fuel quality evaluations. The scope and direction of research activities in these areas is discussed, descriptions of Lewis capabilities and facilities given, and results of recent research efforts reported.

  6. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  7. Spent fuel receipt scenarios study

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.B.; Montan, D.N.; Revelli, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during the fall of 1988. Subsequently, the scope of work was expanded and additional analyses were conducted in 1989. This report combines the results of the two phases of the activity. This study is a part of a broader effort to investigate the options available to the DOE and the nuclear utilities for selection of spent fuel for acceptance into the Federal Waste Management System for disposal. Each major element of the system has evaluated the effects of various options on its own operations, with the objective of providing the basis for performing system-wide trade-offs and determining an optimum acceptance scenario. Therefore, this study considers different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel by the repository only from the narrow perspective of their effect on the very-near-field temperatures in the repository following permanent closure. This report is organized into three main sections. The balance of this section is devoted to a statement of the study objective, a summary of the assumptions. The second section of the report contains a discussion of the major elements of the study. The third section summarizes the results of the study and draws some conclusions from them. The appendices include copies of the waste acceptance schedule and the existing and projected spent fuel inventory that were used in the study. 10 refs., 27 figs.

  8. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  9. Laser diagnostics for NTP fuel corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wantuck, Paul J.; Butt, D. P.; Sappey, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs and explanations on laser diagnostics for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) fuel corrosion studies are presented. Topics covered include: NTP fuels; U-Zr-C system corrosion products; planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF); utilization of PLIF for corrosion product characterization of nuclear thermal rocket fuel elements under test; ZrC emission spectrum; and PLIF imaging of ZrC plume.

  10. Study Of Fuels For Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, Leon D.; Ray, Robert L.; Anderson, Floyd A.; Cohen, Norman S.

    1994-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of combustion and rates of regression of selected fuels for hybrid rocket engines. Part of continuing effort to develop fuels with greater rates of regression and lesser dependence on shapes of fuel grains and to maximize potential specific impulse at low cost.

  11. Review of Transmutation Fuel Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2008-01-01

    The technology demonstration element of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is aimed at demonstrating the closure of the fuel cycle by destroying the transuranic (TRU) elements separated from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Multiple recycle through fast reactors is used for burning the TRU initially separated from light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. For the initial technology demonstration, the preferred option to demonstrate the closed fuel cycle destruction of TRU materials is a sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR) used as burner reactor. The sodium-cooled fast reactor represents the most mature sodium reactor technology available today. This report provides a review of the current state of development of fuel systems relevant to the sodium-cooled fast reactor. This report also provides a review of research and development of TRU-metal alloy and TRU-oxide composition fuels. Experiments providing data supporting the understanding of minor actinide (MA)-bearing fuel systems are summarized and referenced.

  12. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 3: Fuel upgrading studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Bruggink, P.; Sinnett, C.

    1981-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the refinery selling prices for the turbine fuels of low quality are described. Detailed descriptions and economics of the upgrading schemes are included. These descriptions include flow diagrams showing the interconnection between processes and the stream flows involved. Each scheme is in a complete, integrated, stand alone facility. Except for the purchase of electricity and water, each scheme provides its own fuel and manufactures, when appropriate, its own hydrogen.

  13. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-04-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  14. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  15. High-freezing-point fuel studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolle, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress in developing the experimental and analytical techniques needed to design airplanes to accommodate fuels with less stringent low temperature specifications is reported. A computer technique for calculating fuel temperature profiles in full tanks was developed. The computer program is being extended to include the case of partially empty tanks. Ultimately, the completed package is to be incorporated into an aircraft fuel tank thermal analyser code to permit the designer to fly various thermal exposure patterns, study fuel temperatures versus time, and determine holdup.

  16. PEM fuel cell durability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Ofstad, Axel B; Xu, Hui

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization for stationary and transportation power applications. For transportation applications, the durability target for fuel cell power systems is a 5,000 hour lifespan and able to function over a range of vehicle operating conditions (-40{sup o} to +40{sup o}C). However, durability is difficult to quantify and improve because of the quantity and duration of testing required, and also because the fuel cell stack contains many components, for which the degradation mechanisms, component interactions and effects of operating conditions are not fully understood. These requirements have led to the development of accelerated testing protocols for PEM fuel cells. The need for accelerated testing methodology is exemplified by the times required for standard testing to reach their required targets: automotive 5,000 hrs = {approx} 7 months; stationary systems 40,000 hrs = {approx} 4.6 years. As new materials continue to be developed, the need for relevant accelerated testing increases. In this investigation, we examine the durability of various cell components, examine the effect of transportation operating conditions (potential cycling, variable RH, shut-down/start-up, freeze/thaw) and evaluate durability by accelerated durability protocols. PEM fuel cell durability testing is performed on single cells, with tests being conducted with steady-state conditions and with dynamic conditions using power cycling to simulate a vehicle drive cycle. Component and single-cell characterization during and after testing was conducted to identify changes in material properties and related failure mechanisms. Accelerated-testing experiments were applied to further examine material degradation.

  17. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  18. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project. Fiscal Year 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Slonecker, Bruce D.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2015-03-15

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium–molybdenum (LEU-Mo) fuel plate samples and perform analysis in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. The primary research scope was to determine the thermo-physical properties as a function of temperature and burnup. Work conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 complemented measurements performed in FY 2013 on four additional irradiated LEU-Mo fuel plate samples. Specifically, the work in FY 2014 investigated the influence of different processing methods on thermal property behavior, the absence of aluminum alloy cladding on thermal property behavior for additional model validation, and the influence of higher operating surface heat flux / more aggressive irradiation conditions on thermal property behavior. The model developed in FY 2013 and refined in FY 2014 to extract thermal properties of the U-Mo alloy from the measurements conducted on an integral fuel plate sample (i.e., U-Mo alloy with a thin Zr coating and clad in AA6061) continues to perform very well. Measurements conducted in FY 2014 on samples irradiated under similar conditions compare well to measurements performed in FY 2013. In general, there is no gross influence of fabrication method on thermal property behavior, although the difference in LEU-Mo foil microstructure does have a noticeable influence on recrystallization of grains during irradiation. Samples irradiated under more aggressive irradiation conditions, e.g., higher surface heat flux, revealed lower thermal conductivity when compared to samples irradiated at moderate surface heat fluxes, with the exception of one sample. This report documents thermal

  19. Fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of /sup 235/U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors.

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport Reliability Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This conference paper was orignated and shorten from the following publisehd PTS documents: 1. Jy-An Wang, Hao Jiang, and Hong Wang, Dynamic Deformation Simulation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly and CIRFT Deformation Sensor Stability Investigation, ORNL/SPR-2015/662, November 2015. 2. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High-Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications, NUREG/CR-7198, ORNL/TM-2014/214, May 2015. 3. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Hao Jiang, Yong Yan, Bruce Bevard, Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study 16332, WM2016 Conference, March 6 10, 2016, Phoenix, Arizona.

  1. External fuel vaporization study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variations in fuel properties on the design of an external fuel vaporizaton system. The fuel properties that were considered included thermal stability, critical temperature, enthalpy a critical conditions, volatility, and viscosity. The design parameters that were evaluated included vaporizer weight and the impact on engine requirement such as maintenance, transient response, performance, and altitude relight. The baseline fuel properties were those of Jet A. The variation in thermal stability was taken as the thermal stability variation for Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel. The results of the analysis indicate that a change in thermal stability equivalent to that of ERBS would increase the vaporization system weight by 20 percent, decrease oprating time between cleaning by 40 percent and make altitude relight more difficult. An increase in fuel critical temperature of 39 K would require a 40 percent increase in vaporization system weight. The assumed increase in enthalpy and volatility would also increase vaporizer weight by 40 percent and make altitude relight extremely difficult. The variation in fuel viscosity would have a negligible effect on the design parameters.

  2. Electrocatalytic and fuel processing studies for portable fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Paul H.

    In the field of catalysis, the development of alternative catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathodes has been an ongoing task for researchers over the past two decades. PEM fuel cells are considered to be potential replacements for internal combustion engines in automobiles, and their reduced emissions and better efficiency would have huge payoffs for our environment, and in reducing our nation's dependence on foreign oil. To date, PEMFC cathode over-potentials are still significant, and the only materials discovered to be highly active and stable catalysts in an acidic environment are platinum-based. Despite several major advances in recent years in reducing platinum loading in fuel cell electrodes, the high expense and low availability of platinum will hinder the large-scale commercialization of PEM fuel cells. The most hopeful advances being made in replacing platinum are related to pyrolyzed organic macrocycles with transition metal centers (such as Fe or Co porphyrins and phthalocyanines). Encouragingly, it has recently been discovered that active electrodes could be prepared by heat-treating metal and nitrogen precursors (not necessarily organic macrocycles) together in the presence of a carbon support. In the first study of this dissertation, catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) were prepared by the pyrolysis of acetonitrile over various supports. The supports used included Vulcan Carbon, high purity alumina, silica, magnesia, and these same supports impregnated with Fe, Co, or Ni in the form of acetate salt. The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area analysis, BJH Pore Size Distribution (PSD), conductivity testing, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Temperature Programmed Oxidation (TPO), Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS), Mossbauer Spectroscopy, Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) half cell testing, and

  3. External fuel vaporization study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to devise and evaluate techniques for the external vaporization of fuel for use in an aircraft gas turbine with characteristics similar to the Energy Efficient Engine (E(3)). Three vaporizer concepts were selected and they were analyzed from the standpoint of fuel thermal stability, integration of the vaporizer system into the aircraft engine, engine and vaporizer dynamic response, startup and altitude restart, engine performance, control requirements, safety, and maintenance. One of the concepts was found to improve the performance of the baseline E(3) engine without seriously compromising engine startup and power change response. Increased maintenance is required because of the need for frequent pyrolytic cleaning of the surfaces in contact with hot fuel.

  4. Accountability study for TMI-2 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Goris, P; Scott, D D

    1981-05-01

    The TMI-2 accountability study considers problems of identifying, measuring, and accounting for TMI-2 fuel in the resident condition, as it is removed from the reactor, during subsequent cleanup, and during post-removal examinations. The goal is to identify methods and procedures which will provide a verifiable material balance equating to the pre-accident balance.

  5. Fueling studies on the lithium tokamak experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, Daniel Patrick

    Lithium plasma facing components reduce the flux of "recycled" particles entering the plasma edge from the plasma facing components. This results in increased external fueling requirements and provides the opportunity to control the magnitude and distribution of the incoming particle flux. It has been predicted that the plasma density profile will then be determined by the deposition profile of the external fueling, rather than dominated by the recycled particle flux. A series of experiments on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment demonstrate that lithium wall coatings facilitate control of the neutral and plasma particle inventories. With fresh lithium coatings and careful gas injection programming, over 90% of the injected particle inventory can be absorbed in the lithium wall during a discharge. Furthermore, dramatic changes in the fueling requirements and plasma parameters were observed when lithium coatings were applied. This is largely due to the elimination of water as an impurity on the plasma facing components. A Molecular Cluster Injector (MCI) was developed for the fueling of LTX plasmas. The MCI uses a supersonic nozzle, cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures, to create the conditions necessary for molecular cluster formation. It has been predicted that molecular clusters will penetrate deeper into plasmas than gas-phase molecules via a reduced ionization cross-section and by improving the collimation of the neutral jet. Using an electron beam diagnostic, the densities of the cryogenic MCI are measured to be an order of magnitude higher than in the room-temperature jets formed with the same valve pressure. This indicates increased collimation relative to what would be expected from ideal gas dynamics alone. A systematic study of the fueling efficiencies achieved with the LTX fueling systems is presented. The fueling efficiency of the Supersonic Gas Injector (SGI) is demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the distance between the nozzle and plasma edge. The

  6. Studies and research concerning BNFP: spent fuel dry storage studies at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kenneth J.

    1980-09-01

    Conceptual designs are presented utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant for the dry interim storage of spent light water reactor fuel. Studies were conducted to determine feasible approaches to storing spent fuel by methods other than wet pool storage. Fuel that has had an opportunity to cool for several years, or more, after discharge from a reactor is especially adaptable to dry storage since its thermal load is greatly reduced compared to the thermal load immediately following discharge. A thermal analysis was performed to help in determining the feasibility of various spent fuel dry storage concepts. Methods to reject the heat from dry storage are briefly discussed, which include both active and passive cooling systems. The storage modes reviewed include above and below ground caisson-type storage facilities and numerous variations of vault, or hot cell-type, storage facilities.

  7. Experimental study of fuel cloud formation inside aircraft fuel tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putthawong, Panu

    The design of fuel tank flammability has relied on the flammability envelope of a homogeneous mixture. There are researches indicated that the presence of droplets could cause such mixture to be flammable even the fuel-to-air ratio was below the Lower Flammability Limit. This research aims to investigate the formation of fuel cloud/droplets by a condensation process and its effect on tank flammability. The center-wing tank is the main interest because the fuel vapor in the ullage space can condense when its temperature and pressure are changed. The Fuel Tank Test Facility has proven that a cloud or group of droplets is produced under normal operating condition of the center-wing tank. Results from the experiments show the number densities of droplets on the order of 103--105 and the maximum drop size being recorded is 18 mum. The experiments also indicate that Jet A vapor and droplets must have different properties from its liquid form because of the volatility difference among species in fuel. The new parameter for droplets flammability, i.e., non-dimensional droplet spacing, suggested by Hayashi et al. (1984) is employed for a flammability assessment. The non-dimensional droplet spacings from the experiments have found to be in the vicinity of the critical value. It points toward the high possibility of having flammable center-wing tank. The explosion strength calculation of droplets-vapor-air mixture implies the sufficient explosive condition if an ignition source is introduced.

  8. Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

    2004-01-31

    This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  9. Nuclear criticality safety studies applicable to spent fuel shipping cask designs and spent fuel storage

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.

    1980-11-01

    Criticality analyses of water-moderated and reflected arrays of LWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies were carried out in this study. The calculated results indicate that using the assumption of fresh fuel loading in spent fuel shipping cask design leads to assembly spacings which are about twice the spacings of spent fuel loadings. Some shipping cask walls of composite lead and water are more effective neutron reflectors than water of 30.48 cm (12 in).

  10. Study of the combustion of various alternate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Barfield, B.F.; Acker, G.J. Jr.; Lindsay, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    This research project used two methods for studying the problems facing alternate fuels. The first method studied the use of chemicals to improve fuel characteristics without changing the basic engine design. The second method was to make engine modifications to suit characteristics of the alternate fuel. The result of the two methods studied is a two-part report. Alcohols, solvent-refined coal (SRC-II), vegetable oils, and mixtures of these with diesel fuels and with each other are the alternative fuels discussed and tested. 21 references, 4 figures, 10 tables.

  11. A Study of Fast Reactor Fuel Transmutation in a Candidate Dispersion Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Mark DeHart; Hongbin Zhang; Eric Shaber; Matthew Jesse

    2010-11-01

    Dispersion fuels represent a significant departure from typical ceramic fuels to address swelling and radiation damage in high burnup fuel. Such fuels use a manufacturing process in which fuel particles are encapsulated within a non-fuel matrix. Dispersion fuels have been studied since 1997 as part of an international effort to develop and test very high density fuel types for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program.[1] The Idaho National Laboratory is performing research in the development of an innovative dispersion fuel concept that will meet the challenges of transuranic (TRU) transmutation by providing an integral fission gas plenum within the fuel itself, to eliminate the swelling that accompanies the irradiation of TRU. In this process, a metal TRU vector produced in a separations process is atomized into solid microspheres. The dispersion fuel process overcoats the microspheres with a mixture of resin and hollow carbon microspheres to create a TRUC. The foam may then be heated and mixed with a metal power (e.g., Zr, Ti, or Si) and resin to form a matrix metal carbide, that may be compacted and extruded into fuel elements. In this paper, we perform reactor physics calculations for a core loaded with the conceptual fuel design. We will assume a “typical” TRU vector and a reference matrix density. We will employ a fuel and core design based on the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design.[2] Using the CSAS6 and TRITON modules of the SCALE system [3] for preliminary scoping studies, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reactor operations. This paper will describe the results of these analyses.

  12. Preliminary studies of combustor sensitivity to alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humenik, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Combustion problems associated with using alternative fuels ground power and aeropropulsion applications were studied. Rectangular sections designed to simulate large annular combustor test conditions were examined. The effects of using alternative fuels with reduced hydrogen content, increased aromatic content, and a broad variation in fuel property characteristics were also studied. Data of special interest were collected which include: flame radiation characteristics in the various combustor zones; the correponding increase in liner temperature from increased radiant heat flux; the effect of fuel bound nitrogen on oxides of nitrogen (NO sub x) emissions; and the overall total effect of fuel variations on exhaust emissions.

  13. Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W.; Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

  14. Detailed studies of aviation fuel flowability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, H. K.; Armstrong, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Six Jet A fuels, with varying compositions, were tested for low temperature flowability in a 190-liter simulator tank that modeled a section of a wing tank of a wide-body commercial airplane. The insulated tank was chilled by circulating coolant through the upper and lower surfaces. Flow-ability was determined as a function of fuel temperature by holdup, the fraction of unflowable fuel remaining in the tank after otherwise complete withdrawal. In static tests with subfreezing tank conditions, hold up varied with temperature and fuel composition. However, a general correlation of two or three classes of fuel type was obtained by plotting holdup as a function of the difference between freezing point and boundary-layer temperature, measured 0.6 cm above the bottom tank surface. Dynamic conditions of vibrations and slosh or rate of fuel withdrawal had very minor effects on holdup. Tests with cooling schedules to represent extreme, cold-day flights showed, at most, slight holdup for any combination of fuel type or dynamic conditions. Tests that superimposed external fuel heating and recirculation during the cooldown period indicates reduced hold up by modification of the low-temperature boundary layer. Fuel heating was just as effective when initiated during the later times of the tests as when applied continuously.

  15. Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C.

    2012-07-30

    Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the

  16. Stability Study of the RERTR Fuel Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Dennis Keiser; Brandon Miller; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    The irradiation stability of the interaction phases at the interface of fuel and Al alloy matrix as well as the stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice is believed to be very important to the U-Mo fuel performance. In this paper the recent result from TEM characterization of Kr ion irradiated U-10Mo-5Zr alloy will be discussed. The focus will be on the phase stability of Mo2-Zr, a dominated second phase developed at the interface of U-10Mo and the Zr barrier in a monolithic fuel plate from fuel fabrication. The Kr ion irradiations were conducted at a temperature of 200 degrees C to an ion fluence of 2.0E+16 ions/cm2. To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated dispersion U-7Mo fuel and monolithic U-10Mo fuel, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel (3.53E+21 fission/cm3) was used for a TEM in-situ heating experiment. The preliminary result showed extraordinary thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of the TEM observation from these two experiments on the fuel microstructural evolution under irradiation will be discussed.

  17. Experimental study of external fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel properties used in the design of a flash vaporization system for aircraft gas turbine engines were evaluated in experiments using a flowing system to determine critical temperature and pressure, boiling points, dew points, heat transfer coefficients, deposit formation rates, and deposit removal. Three fuels were included in the experiments: Jet-A, an experimental referree broad specification fuel, and a premium No. 2 diesel fuel. Engine conditions representing a NASA Energy Efficient Engine at sea-level take-off, cruise, and idle were simulated in the vaporization system and it was found that single phase flow was maintained in the heat exchanger and downstream of the throttle. Deposits encountered in the heat exchanger represented a thermal resistance as high as 1300 sq M K/watt and a deposit formation rate over 1000 gC/sq cm hr.

  18. Experimental study of burnout in channels with twisted fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shakov, V. V.; Bashkirtsev, S. M.; Kobzar', L. L.; Morozov, A. G.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental studies of pressure drop and critical heat flux in the models of fuel assemblies (FAs) with fuel rod simulators twisted relative to the longitudinal axis and a three-ray cross section are considered. The experimental data are compared to the results obtained with the use of techniques adopted for design calculations with fuel rod bundles of type-VVER reactors.

  19. ECAS Phase I fuel cell results. [Energy Conservation Alternatives Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses the fuel cell system results of Phase I of the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS). Ten advanced electric powerplant systems for central-station baseload generation using coal were studied by NASA in ECAS. Three types of low-temperature fuel cells (solid polymer electrolyte, SPE, aqueous alkaline, and phosphoric acid) and two types of high-temperature fuel cells (molten carbonate, MC, and zirconia solid electrolyte, SE) were studied. The results indicate that (1) overall efficiency increases with fuel cell temperature, and (2) scale-up in powerplant size can produce a significant reduction in cost of electricity (COE) only when it is accompanied by utilization of waste fuel cell heat through a steam bottoming cycle and/or integration with a gasifier. For low-temperature fuel cell systems, the use of hydrogen results in the highest efficiency and lowest COE. In spite of higher efficiencies, because of higher fuel cell replacement costs integrated SE systems have higher projected COEs than do integrated MC systems. Present data indicate that life can be projected to over 30,000 hr for MC fuel cells, but data are not yet sufficient for similarly projecting SE fuel cell life expectancy.

  20. Micro-structural study and Rietveld analysis of fast reactor fuels: U-Mo fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Choudhuri, G.; Banerjee, J.; Agarwal, Renu; Khan, K. B.; Kumar, Arun

    2015-12-01

    U-Mo alloys are the candidate fuels for both research reactors and fast breeder reactors. In-reactor performance of the fuel depends on the microstructural stability and thermal properties of the fuel. To improve the fuel performance, alloying elements viz. Zr, Mo, Nb, Ti and fissium are added in the fuel. The first reactor fuels are normally prepared by injection casting. The objective of this work is to compare microstructure, phase-fields and hardness of as-cast four different U-Mo alloy (2, 5, 10 and 33 at.% Mo) fuels with the equilibrium microstructure of the alloys. Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer and optical microscope have been used to characterize the morphology of the as-cast and annealed alloys. The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. A comparison of metallographic and Rietveld analysis of as-cast (dendritic microstructure) and annealed U-33 at.% Mo alloy, corresponding to intermetallic compound, has been reported here for the first time. This study will provide in depth understanding of microstructural and phase evolution of U-Mo alloys as fast reactor fuel.

  1. Can fuel cells compete? A study of the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Hooie, D.T.; Parsons, E.L.

    1996-12-31

    As fuel cells enter the early stages of commercialization, other manufacturers and packages of power generation equipment are beginning see fuel cells as potential competition as well as an opportunity to collaborate to increase market share. Most fuel cell market studies, however, portray fuel cells as being able to compete {open_quotes}because the market opportunity is so large.{close_quotes} This paper addresses what the competition for fuel cells will be in the power generation/cogeneration market segments, how they can collaborate, as well as some of the advantages and disadvantages of each for capturing significant market share. In particular, the advanced gas turbine and tandem cycles will be compared to phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. Parametric Design Studies on a Direct Liquid Feed Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Nakamura, B.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric design studies were carried out on a direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell employing 1 M MeOH fuel, air and oxygen as oxidant in a 2 inch x 2 inch cell employing polymeric electrolyte membranes. Measurements include voltage-current output parameters, methanol crossover rate, and impedance as a function of several design and operational variables. Design variables are described.

  3. Study questions environmental impact of fuel-cell vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Ned

    2015-09-01

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles are seen by many as an environmentally friendly technology that can reduce greenhousegas emissions by producing no harmful emissions. But a new study has found that overall a fuel cell electric vehicle has about the same negative environmental impact as a luxury sports car.

  4. Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically.

  5. Filling Knowledge Gaps with Five Fuel Cycle Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Jess Gehin; William Halsey; Temitope Taiwo

    2010-11-01

    During FY 2010, five studies were conducted of technology families’ applicability to various fuel cycle strategies to fill in knowledge gaps in option space and to better understand trends and patterns. Here, a “technology family” is considered to be defined by a type of reactor and by selection of which actinides provide fuel. This report summarizes the higher-level findings; the detailed analyses and results are documented in five individual reports, as follows: • Advanced once through with uranium fuel in fast reactors (SFR), • Advanced once through (uranium fuel) or single recycle (TRU fuel) in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), • Sustained recycle with Th/U-233 in light water reactors (LWRs), • Sustained recycle with Th/U-233 in molten salt reactors (MSR), and • Several fuel cycle missions with Fusion-Fission Hybrid (FFH). Each study examined how the designated technology family could serve one or more designated fuel cycle missions, filling in gaps in overall option space. Each study contains one or more illustrative cases that show how the technology family could be used to meet a fuel cycle mission, as well as broader information on the technology family such as other potential fuel cycle missions for which insufficient information was available to include with an illustrative case. None of the illustrative cases can be considered as a reference, baseline, or nominal set of parameters for judging performance; the assessments were designed to assess areas of option space and were not meant to be optimized. There is no implication that any of the cases or technology families are necessarily the best way to meet a given fuel cycle mission. The studies provide five examples of 1-year fuel cycle assessments of technology families. There is reasonable coverage in the five studies of the performance areas of waste management and uranium utilization. The coverage of economics, safety, and proliferation resistance and physical protection in

  6. Shipping Cask Studies with MOX Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-05-17

    Tasks of nuclear safety assurance for storage and transport of fresh mixed uranium-plutonium fuel of the VVER-1000 reactor are considered in the view of 3 MOX LTAs introduction into the core. The precise code MCU that realizes the Monte Carlo method is used for calculations.

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao; Yan, Yong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to collect dynamic experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), the hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The collected CIRFT data will be utilized to support ongoing spent fuel modeling activities, and support SNF transportation related licensing issues. Recent testing to understand the effects of hydride reorientation on SNF vibration integrity is also being evaluated. CIRFT results have provided insight into the fuel/clad system response to transportation related loads. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance, Fuel structure contributes to the SNF system stiffness, There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interaction, and SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous. Because of the non-homogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, finite element analyses (FEA) are needed to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles. The detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained directly from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, detailed FEA is used to understand the global test response, and that data will also be presented.

  8. Hybrid rocket fuel combustion and regression rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Anderson, F. A.; Cohen, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop hybrid fuels (1) with higher regression rates and reduced dependence on fuel grain geometry and (2) that maximize potential specific impulse using low-cost materials. A hybrid slab window motor system was developed to screen candidate fuels - their combustion behavior and regression rate. Combustion behavior diagnostics consisted of video and high speed motion pictures coverage. The mean fuel regression rates were determined by before and after measurements of the fuel slabs. The fuel for this initial investigation consisted of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder with coal and aluminum fillers. At low oxidizer flux levels (and corresponding fuel regression rates) the filled-binder fuels burn in a layered fashion, forming an aluminum containing binder/coal surface melt that, in turn, forms into filigrees or flakes that are stripped off by the crossflow. This melt process appears to diminish with increasing oxidizer flux level. Heat transfer by radiation is a significant contributor, producing the desired increase in magnitude and reduction in flow dependency (power law exponent) of the fuel regression rate.

  9. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 4: On site processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Cutrone, M.; Doering, H.; Hickey, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel treated at the turbine and the turbine exhaust gas processed at the turbine site are studied. Fuel treatments protect the turbine from contaminants or impurities either in the upgrading fuel as produced or picked up by the fuel during normal transportation. Exhaust gas treatments provide for the reduction of NOx and SOx to environmentally acceptable levels. The impact of fuel quality upon turbine maintenance and deterioration is considered. On site costs include not only the fuel treatment costs as such, but also incremental costs incurred by the turbine operator if a turbine fuel of low quality is not acceptably upgraded.

  10. Study of advanced fuel system concepts for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical study was performed in order to assess relative performance and economic factors involved with alternative advanced fuel systems for future commercial aircraft operating with broadened property fuels. The DC-10-30 wide-body tri-jet aircraft and the CF6-8OX engine were used as a baseline design for the study. Three advanced systems were considered and were specifically aimed at addressing freezing point, thermal stability and lubricity fuel properties. Actual DC-10-30 routes and flight profiles were simulated by computer modeling and resulted in prediction of aircraft and engine fuel system temperatures during a nominal flight and during statistical one-day-per-year cold and hot flights. Emergency conditions were also evaluated. Fuel consumption and weight and power extraction results were obtained. An economic analysis was performed for new aircraft and systems. Advanced system means for fuel tank heating included fuel recirculation loops using engine lube heat and generator heat. Environmental control system bleed air heat was used for tank heating in a water recirculation loop. The results showed that fundamentally all of the three advanced systems are feasible but vary in their degree of compatibility with broadened-property fuel.

  11. Bioethanol Fuel Production Concept Study: Topline Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marketing Horizons, Inc.

    2001-11-19

    The DOE is in the process of developing technologies for converting plant matter other than feed stock, e.g., corn stover, into biofuels. The goal of this research project was to determine what the farming community thinks of ethanol as a fuel source, and specifically what they think of bioethanol produced from corn stover. This project also assessed the image of the DOE and the biofuels program and determined the perceived barriers to ethanol-from-stover production.

  12. Studies of oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borman, G. L.; Myers, P. S.; Uyehara, O. A.

    1972-01-01

    Research projects involving oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization are reported. Comparisons of experimental and theoretical droplet vaporization histories under ambient conditions such that the droplet may approach its thermodynamic critical point are presented. Experimental data on instantaneous heat transfer from a gas to a solid surface under conditions of oscillatory pressure with comparisons to an unsteady one-dimensional model are analyzed. Droplet size and velocity distribution in a spray as obtained by use of a double flash fluorescent method were investigated.

  13. Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Wotzak; Chellappa Balan; Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01

    The pre-baseline configuration for an Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) system has been developed. This case uses current gasification, clean-up, gas turbine, and bottoming cycle technologies together with projected large planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology. This pre-baseline case will be used as a basis for identifying the critical factors impacting system performance and the major technical challenges in implementing such systems. Top-level system requirements were used as the criteria to evaluate and down select alternative sub-systems. The top choice subsystems were subsequently integrated to form the pre-baseline case. The down-selected pre-baseline case includes a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasification and cleanup sub-system integrated with a GE Power Systems 6FA+e gas turbine and the Hybrid Power Generation Systems planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) sub-system. The overall efficiency of this system is estimated to be 43.0%. The system efficiency of the pre-baseline system provides a benchmark level for further optimization efforts in this program.

  14. Study of fuel cell powerplant with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. M.; Grasso, A. P.; Clausi, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    It was shown that heat can be recovered from fuel cell power plants by replacing the air-cooled heat exchangers in present designs with units which transfer the heat to the integrated utility system. Energy availability for a 40-kW power plant was studied and showed that the total usable energy at rated power represents 84 percent of the fuel lower heating value. The effects of design variables on heat availability proved to be small. Design requirements were established for the heat recovery heat exchangers, including measurement of the characteristics of two candidate fuel cell coolants after exposure to fuel cell operating conditions. A heat exchanger test program was defined to assess fouling and other characteristics of fuel cell heat exchangers needed to confirm heat exchanger designs for heat recovery.

  15. Microfluidic platforms and fundamental electrocatalysis studies for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jamie Lee

    The fabrication and testing of a planar membraneless microchannel fuel cell, based on a silicon microchannel, is described in detail. Laminar flow of fuel and oxidant streams, one on top of the other, prevents fuel crossover while allowing ionic transport at the interface between the two solutions. By employing laminar flow, the useful functions of a membrane are retained, while bypassing its inherent limitations. The planar design maximizes the anode and cathode areas, and elimination of the membrane affords broad flexibility in the choice of fuel and oxidant. Fuels including formic acid, methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and hydrogen were tested along with oxidants such as oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate. Steps taken to improve voltage, current density, and overall power output have been addressed, including the testing of a dual electrolyte system and the use of micro-patterned electrode surfaces to enhance fuel utilization. As the complexity of the fuels studied in the microchannel fuel cell increased, it was imperative to characterize these fuels using electrochemical techniques prior to utilization in the fuel cell. The oxidation pathway of the liquid fuel methanol was studied rigorously because of its importance for micro-fuel cell applications. Activation energies for methanol oxidation at a Ptpoly surface were determined using electrochemical techniques, providing a benchmark for the comparison of activation energies of other Pt-based electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation at a given potential. A protocol to obtain Ea values was established in three different electrolytes and experimental parameters that influence the magnitude of these values are discussed in detail. The oxidation pathways of sodium borohydride were also examined at Au, Pt, and Pd surfaces using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. In addition to studies on bulk Ptpoly surfaces, new bulk intermetallic catalysts were

  16. A study of M85 fuel quality issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbach, C.D.; Browning, L.; Laubenheimer, L.; Trujillo, M.; McCormack, M.

    1995-12-31

    Data from fuel quality inspections conducted by the California Energy Commission at M85 dispensing stations indicated that significant contamination of M85 fuel may be arising from the station fuel dispensing equipment. Repeated testing revealed that high conductivity and high color occurred in the first liter of fuel drawn from a dispenser after not being used for more than 6 hours. As the dispenser hose was the most likely culprit for causing the dark color noted in the first liter of fuel, a study was conducted to ascertain the impact of dispenser hoses on M85 fuel quality. Three types of M85 dispenser hose were tested: the standard M85 dispenser hose (Goodyear Maxxim M85), and two experimental Goodyear hoses with nylon inner liners (Nylon Veneer 66 and Nylon Veneer 11). The results indicated that the standard M85 hose contributed significant amounts of plasticizer (phthalates) and filler (zinc oxide) to the M85 fuel, and that this contamination could contribute to fuel filter clogging problems. It was also found that at least one of the experimental hoses (Nylon Veneer 11) demonstrated significantly less contamination potential than the other two. In addition, analyses of FFV sock and in-line fuel filters showed build-up of metal organic salts possibly resulting from fuel additives, metal corrosion and hose plasticizer acting in concert to form filter clogging material. Some additives act as chelating agents for dissolved metals, while plasticizers can create organic acids that together may form metal organic salts. The combination of amines (from additives), organic acids (from dispenser hoses) and metals (from corrosion) seen on clogged filters show strong circumstantial evidence that the synergism between additives, plasticizers and corroded metal ions form filter clogging material.

  17. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration which was then studied in greater detail. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  18. Study of fueling requirements for the Engineering Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-10-16

    An assessment of the fueling requirement for the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor is studied. The neutral shielding pellet ablation model with the inclusion of the effects of the alpha particles is used for our study. The high electron temperature in a reactor-grade plasma makes pellet penetration very difficult. The launch length has to be very large (several tens of meters) in order to avoid pellet breakage due to the low inertial strength of DT ''ice.'' The minimum repetition rate corresponding to the largest allowable pellet, is found to be about 1 Hz. A brief survey is done on the various operational and conceptual pellet injection schemes for plasma fueling. The underlying conclusion is that an alternative fueling scheme of coaxial compact-toroid plasma gun is very likely needed for effective central fueling of reactor-grade plasmas. 16 refs.

  19. Fuel cell/gas turbine system performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Because of the synergistic effects (higher efficiencies, lower emissions) of combining a fuel cell and a gas turbine into a power generation system, many potential system configurations were studied. This work is focused on novel power plant systems by combining gas turbines, solid oxide fuel cells, and a high-temperature heat exchanger; these systems are ideal for the distributed power and on- site markets in the 1-5 MW size range.

  20. Study of costs associated with alternative fuels development: A case study. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lede, N.W.

    1995-07-01

    The primary objective of the study was to conduct a case study of large-scale fuel conversion project to assess selected costs and related issues. An inventory of public transit agencies engaged in demonstration projects involving alternative fuels as conducted with representative sample of large public transit systems in the nation. Included in the survey were questions pertaining to fuel supply arrangements, fuel reserve storage requirements and/or deficiencies; future plans for managing energy resources and costs associated with fuel conversion/alternative fuels use -- whether planned or currently in operation. The case study approach was used to document the methodological and logistical problems encountered during the course of projects involving alternative fuels use compared with a control sample using diesel fuel. Monthly status reports on the alternative fuel project included data on accumulated mileage, road calls/unscheduled maintenance, fuel consumption, fuel cost per mile, alternative fuel purchases, schedule of activities, personnel, safety , and diesel emission test results. The data collected indicate several conclusions and future implications about technical and safety issues associated with the testing and use of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

  1. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  2. Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sharon

    2000-08-20

    Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

  3. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  4. Spent nuclear fuel project design basis capacity study

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, K.J.

    1996-09-09

    A parametric study of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project system capacity is presented. The study was completed using a commercially available software package to develop a summary level model of the major project systems. Alternative configurations, sub-system cycle times, and operating scenarios were tested to identify their impact on total project duration and equipment requirements.

  5. Spent fuel dissolution studies FY 1991 to 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Wilson, C.N.

    1995-12-01

    Dissolution and transport as a result of groundwater flow are generally accepted as the primary mechanisms by which radionuclides from spent fuel placed in a geologic repository could be released to the biosphere. To help provide a source term for performance assessment calculations, dissolution studies on spent fuel and unirradiated uranium oxides have been conducted over the past few years at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. This report describes work for fiscal years 1991 through 1994. The objectives of these studies and the associated conclusions, which were based on the limited number of tests conducted so far, are described in the following subsections.

  6. Regenerative fuel cell study for satellites in GEO orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Alexander; Vandine, Leslie L.; Stedman, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Summarized are the results of a 12-month study to identify high performance regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell concepts for geosynchronous satellite application. Emphasis was placed on concepts with the potential for high energy density (W-hr/lb) and passive means for water and heat management to maximize system reliability. Both polymer membrane and alkaline electrolyte fuel cells were considered, with emphasis on the alkaline cell because of its high performance, advanced state of development, and proven ability to operate in a launch and space environment. Three alkaline system concepts were studied. The first, the integrated design, utilized a configuration in which the fuel cell and electrolysis cells are alternately stacked inside a pressure vessel. Product water is transferred by diffusion during electrolysis and waste heat is conducted through the pressure wall, thus using completely passive means for transfer and control. The second alkaline system, the dedicated design, uses a separate fuel cell and electrolysis stack so that each unit can be optimized in size and weight based on its orbital operating period. The third design was a dual function stack configuration, in which each cell can operate in both fuel cell and electrolysis mode, thus eliminating the need for two separate stacks and associated equipment. Results indicate that using near term technology energy densities between 46 and 52 W-hr/lb can be achieved at efficiencies of 55 percent. System densities of 115 W-hr/lb are contemplated.

  7. Regenerative fuel cell study for satellites in GEO orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Alexander; Vandine, Leslie L.; Stedman, James K.

    1987-07-01

    Summarized are the results of a 12-month study to identify high performance regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell concepts for geosynchronous satellite application. Emphasis was placed on concepts with the potential for high energy density (W-hr/lb) and passive means for water and heat management to maximize system reliability. Both polymer membrane and alkaline electrolyte fuel cells were considered, with emphasis on the alkaline cell because of its high performance, advanced state of development, and proven ability to operate in a launch and space environment. Three alkaline system concepts were studied. The first, the integrated design, utilized a configuration in which the fuel cell and electrolysis cells are alternately stacked inside a pressure vessel. Product water is transferred by diffusion during electrolysis and waste heat is conducted through the pressure wall, thus using completely passive means for transfer and control. The second alkaline system, the dedicated design, uses a separate fuel cell and electrolysis stack so that each unit can be optimized in size and weight based on its orbital operating period. The third design was a dual function stack configuration, in which each cell can operate in both fuel cell and electrolysis mode, thus eliminating the need for two separate stacks and associated equipment. Results indicate that using near term technology energy densities between 46 and 52 W-hr/lb can be achieved at efficiencies of 55 percent. System densities of 115 W-hr/lb are contemplated.

  8. In situ studies of fuel oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pomfret, Michael B; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C; Walker, Robert A

    2007-03-15

    Existing electrochemical experiments and models of fuel oxidation postulate about the importance of different oxidation pathways and relative fuel conversion efficiencies, but specific information is often lacking. Experiments described below present the first direct, in situ measurements of relevant chemical species formed on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes operating with both butane and CO fuel feeds. Raman spectroscopy is used to acquire vibrational spectra from SOFC anodes at 715 degrees C during operation. Both C4H10 and CO form graphitic intermediates. In the limit of a large oxide flux, excess butane forms ordered graphite but only transiently. At higher cell potentials (e.g., less current being drawn) ordered and disordered graphite form on the Ni cermet anode following exposure to butane, and under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions the graphite persists indefinitely. The chemistry of CO oxidation is such that ordered graphite and a Ni-COO intermediate form only at intermediate cell potentials. Concurrent voltammetry studies show that the formation of graphite with butane at OCV leads first to decreased cell performance after exposure to 25 cm3 butane, then recovered performance after 75 cm3. CO voltammetry data show that at lower potentials the oxide flux through the YSZ electrolyte is sufficient to oxidize the Ni in the anode especially near the interface with the electrolyte. PMID:17295449

  9. System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-09-01

    This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was “the number of nines” – how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum “losses” of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of “losses” itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred – asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a

  10. Fuel salt and container material studies for MOSART transforming system

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, V.; Feynberg, O.; Merzlyakov, A.; Surenkov, A.; Zagnitko, A.; Afonichkin, V.; Bovet, A.; Khokhlov, V.; Subbotin, V.; Gordeev, M.; Panov, A.; Toropov, A.

    2013-07-01

    A study is under progress to examine the feasibility of single stream Molten Salt Actinide Recycling and Transmuting system without and with Th support (MOSART) fuelled with different compositions of actinide tri-fluorides (AnF{sub 3}) from used LWR fuel. New fast-spectrum design options with homogeneous core and fuel salts with high enough solubility for AnF{sub 3} are being examined because of new goals. The flexibility of single fluid MOSART concept with Th support is underlined, particularly, possibility of its operation in self-sustainable mode (Conversion Ratio: CR=1) using different loadings and make up. The paper summarizes the most current status of fuel salt and container material data for the MOSART concept received within ISTC-3749 and ROSATOM-MARS projects. Key physical and chemical properties of various fluoride fuel salts are reported. The issues like salt purification, the electroreduction of U(IV) to U(III) in LiF-ThF{sub 4} and the electroreduction of Yb(III) to Yb(II) in LiF-NaF are detailed.

  11. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Xu, Hui; Brawn, Shelly

    2014-07-30

    This project’s aim was to develop fuel cell components (i.e. membranes, gas-diffusion media (GDM), bipolar plates and flow fields) that possess specific properties (i.e. water transport and conductivity). A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to elucidate the effect of certain parameters on these specific properties. Ultimately, the model will be used to determine sensitivity of fuel cell performance to component properties to determine limiting components and to guide research. We have successfully reached our objectives and achieved most of the milestones of this project. We have designed and synthesized a variety of hydrocarbon block polymer membranes with lower equivalent weight, structure, chemistry, phase separation and process conditions. These membranes provide a broad selection with optimized water transport properties. We have also designed and constructed a variety of devices that are capable of accurately measuring the water transport properties (water uptake, water diffusivity and electro-osmatic drag) of these membranes. These transport properties are correlated to the membranes’ structures derived from X-ray and microscopy techniques to determine the structure-property relationship. We successfully integrated hydrocarbon membrane MEAs with a current distribution board (CBD) to study the impact of hydrocarbon membrane on water transport in fuel cells. We have designed and fabricated various GDM with varying substrate, diffusivity and micro-porous layers (MPL) and characterized their pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity. We have derived a universal chart (MacMullin number as function of wet proofing and porosity) that can be used to characterize various GDM. The abovementioned GDMs have been evaluated in operating fuel cells; their performance is correlated to various pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity of the GDM. Unfortunately, determining a universal relationship between the MacMullin number and these properties

  12. Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Germina; Primm, Trent

    2009-11-01

    An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

  13. Studies and research concerning BNFP. Spent fuel disassembly and canning program at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) preliminary process assessment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tepp, H.G.

    1980-10-01

    Studies being performed to assess nuclear fuel disassembly and encapsulation to enhance spent fuel storage have not revealed any conditions which unfavorably impact the feasibility of the concept. The studies are aimed at evaluating various issues warranting resolution preliminary to licensing a facility for this spent fuel management concept. The areas assessed are potential accidents and their results; maximum temperature level of canned fuel rods; radiation exposure to personnel during operation and fuel storage; criticality risks during storage and as a result of abnormal incidents; physical security requirements and material accountability measures; the impact of safeguards on economics; and a license schedule projection.

  14. Ablation study of tungsten-based nuclear thermal rocket fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tabitha Elizabeth Rose

    The research described in this thesis has been performed in order to support the materials research and development efforts of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), of Tungsten-based Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) fuel. The NTR was developed to a point of flight readiness nearly six decades ago and has been undergoing gradual modification and upgrading since then. Due to the simplicity in design of the NTR, and also in the modernization of the materials fabrication processes of nuclear fuel since the 1960's, the fuel of the NTR has been upgraded continuously. Tungsten-based fuel is of great interest to the NTR community, seeking to determine its advantages over the Carbide-based fuel of the previous NTR programs. The materials development and fabrication process contains failure testing, which is currently being conducted at MSFC in the form of heating the material externally and internally to replicate operation within the nuclear reactor of the NTR, such as with hot gas and RF coils. In order to expand on these efforts, experiments and computational studies of Tungsten and a Tungsten Zirconium Oxide sample provided by NASA have been conducted for this dissertation within a plasma arc-jet, meant to induce ablation on the material. Mathematical analysis was also conducted, for purposes of verifying experiments and making predictions. The computational method utilizes Anisimov's kinetic method of plasma ablation, including a thermal conduction parameter from the Chapman Enskog expansion of the Maxwell Boltzmann equations, and has been modified to include a tangential velocity component. Experimental data matches that of the computational data, in which plasma ablation at an angle shows nearly half the ablation of plasma ablation at no angle. Fuel failure analysis of two NASA samples post-testing was conducted, and suggestions have been made for future materials fabrication processes. These studies, including the computational kinetic model at an angle and the

  15. Studies of the mechanisms of turbine fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of insoluble deposits in a Jet A, a Diesel, and a model fuel (1/10 v/v tetralin/dodecane) was studied. Experiments were conducted using glass containers at 394 K with an air/fuel ratio of 14/1. The effects of addition of ppm levels of various compounds on deposit formation were evaluated. Nitrogen heterocycles were shown to produce a basicity dependent acceleration of deposition. Thiols and thiophene were shown to increase deposition while sulfides and disulfides act as inhibitors. Copper metal and its salts also promote deposition. Results of various instrumental analyses of deposits and development of a high performance liquid chromatographic method for monitoring deposit precursors are discussed.

  16. A Study of Transport Airplane Crash-Resistant Fuel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor); Robertson, S. H.; Johnson, N. B.; Hall, D. S.; Rimson, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), of transport airplane crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS). The report covers the historical studies related to aircraft crash fires and fuel containment concepts undertaken by the FAA, NASA, and the U.S. Army, which ultimately led to the current state of the art in CRFS technology. It describes the basic research, testing, field investigations and production efforts which have led to the highly successful military CRFS, which has saved many lives and reduced costs of accidents. Current CRFS technology used in transport category airplanes is defined and compared to the available state-of-the-art technology. The report provides information to the FAA and other government organizations which can help them plan their efforts to improve the state of crash fire protection in the transport airplane fleet. The report provides guidance to designers looking for information about CRFS design problems, analysis tools to use for product improvement, and a summary of current and proposed regulations for transport category airplane fuel systems.

  17. Economic study of future aircraft fuels (1970-2000)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, A. D., III

    1972-01-01

    Future aircraft fuels are evaluated in terms of fuel resource availability and pricing, processing methods, and economic projections over the period 1970-2000. Liquefied hydrogen, methane and propane are examined as potential turbine engine aircraft fuels relative to current JP fuel.

  18. Study of advanced fuel system concepts for commercial aircraft and engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Versaw, E. F.; Brewer, G. D.; Byers, W. D.; Fogg, H. W.; Hanks, D. E.; Chirivella, J.

    1983-01-01

    The impact on a commercial transport aircraft of using fuels which have relaxed property limits relative to current commercial jet fuel was assessed. The methodology of the study is outlined, fuel properties are discussed, and the effect of the relaxation of fuel properties analyzed. Advanced fuel system component designs that permit the satisfactory use of fuel with the candidate relaxed properties in the subject aircraft are described. The two fuel properties considered in detail are freezing point and thermal stability. Three candidate fuel system concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of performance, cost, weight, safety, and maintainability. A fuel system that incorporates insulation and electrical heating elements on fuel tank lower surfaces was found to be most cost effective for the long term.

  19. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of fuel cell reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Minhua

    Fuel cells, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are expected soon to become a major source of clean energy. However, the sluggish kinetics of the fuel cell reactions, i.e., the fuel oxidation and oxygen reduction, hinders the wide-spread application of PEMFCs. These problems prompted our studies to focus on elucidating the nature of the reaction intermediates during the oxidation of fuels and the reduction of oxygen on electrocatalysts, and understanding the mechanisms of these reactions. The results from these studies will provide basic information for designing new electrocatalysts. In this dissertation, the oxidation reactions of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt were investigated by the surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-SEIRAS). Various reaction intermediates were detected and their electrochemical behaviors were studied. We also benefited from advantages of the ATR-SEIRAS technique and observed superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide anion (H2-) as the intermediates in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt and Au electrodes for the first time. The other main goal of this study is design of new electrocatalysts for ORR with low cost and high activity. Two novel electrocatalysts were developed. One is Pt monolayer electrocatalysts consisting of a Pt monolayer formed by a red-ox replacement of the Cu monolayer by Pt atoms on non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles. In such catalyst, the total noble mass activity of the catalyst was 2--6 times larger that of commercial Pt catalyst. Another way of lowering the cost of catalysts and enhancing the ORR activity involves alloying less expensive noble metals with other non-noble elements. In this dissertation, the nano-structured Pd based alloy electrocatalysts have been explored. The results showed that their ORR activities surpass that of commercial Pt. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations

  20. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  1. Engineering model system study for a regenerative fuel cell: Study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Kovach, A. J.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Key design issues of the regenerative fuel cell system concept were studied and a design definition of an alkaline electrolyte based engineering model system or low Earth orbit missions was completed. Definition of key design issues for a regenerative fuel cell system include gaseous reactant storage, shared heat exchangers and high pressure pumps. A power flow diagram for the 75 kW initial space station and the impact of different regenerative fuel cell modular sizes on the total 5 year to orbit weight and volume are determined. System characteristics, an isometric drawing, component sizes and mass and energy balances are determined for the 10 kW engineering model system. An open loop regenerative fuel cell concept is considered for integration of the energy storage system with the life support system of the space station. Technical problems and their solutions, pacing technologies and required developments and demonstrations for the regenerative fuel cell system are defined.

  2. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    typical solid oxide electrolyte, with patterned (octadecyltrichlorosilane) ODTS self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), Pt thin films were grown selectively on the SAM-free surface regions. Features with sizes as small as 2 mum were deposited by this combined ALD-muCP method. The micro-patterned Pt structure deposited by area selective ALD was applied to SOFCs as a current collector grid/patterned catalyst. An improvement in the fuel cell performance by a factor of 10 was observed using the Pt current collector grids/patterned catalyst integrated onto cathodic La0.6Sr 0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-delta. For possible catalytic anodes in DMFCs employing a 1:1 stoichiometric methanol-water reforming mixture, two strategies were employed in this thesis. One approach is to fabricate skin catalysts, where ALD Pt films of various thicknesses were used to coat sputtered Ru films forming Pt skin catalysts for study of methanol oxidation. Another strategy is to replace or alloy Pt with Ru; for this effort, both dc-sputtering and atomic layer deposition were employed to fabricate Pt-Ru catalysts of various Ru contents. The electrochemical behavior of all of the Pt skin catalysts, the DC co-sputtered Pt-Ru catalysts and the ALD co-deposited Pt-Ru catalysts were evaluated at room temperature for methanol oxidation using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry in highly concentrated 16.6 M MeOH, which corresponds to the stoichiometric fuel that will be employed in next generation DMFCs that are designed to minimize or eliminate methanol crossover. The catalytic activity of sputtered Ru catalysts toward methanol oxidation is strongly enhanced by the ALD Pt overlayer, with such skin layer catalysts displaying superior catalytic activity over pure Pt. For both the DC co-sputtered catalysts and ALD co-deposited catalysts, the electrochemical studies illustrate that the optimal stoichiometry ratio for Pt to Ru is approximately 1:1, which is in good agreement with most literature.

  3. Architecture Study for a Fuel Depot Supplied from Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Heretofore, discussions of space fuel depots assumed the depots would be supplied from Earth. However, the confirmation of deposits of water ice at the lunar poles in 2009 suggests the possibility of supplying a space depot with liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen produced from lunar ice. This architecture study sought to determine the optimum architecture for a fuel depot supplied from lunar resources. Four factors - the location of propellant processing (on the Moon or on the depot), the location of the depot (on the Moon or in cislunar space), and if in cislunar space, where (LEO, GEO, or Earth-Moon L1), and the method of propellant transfer (bulk fuel or canister exchange) were combined to identify 18 potential architectures. Two design reference missions (DRMs) - a satellite servicing mission and a cargo mission to Mars - were used to create demand for propellants, while a third DRM - a propellant delivery mission - was used to examine supply issues. The architectures were depicted graphically in a network diagram with individual segments representing the movement of propellant from the Moon to the depot, and from the depot to the customer

  4. Fuel-cell-propelled submarine-tanker-system study

    SciTech Connect

    Court, K E; Kumm, W H; O'Callaghan, J E

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a systems analysis of a commercial Arctic Ocean submarine tanker system to carry fossil energy to markets. The submarine is to be propelled by a modular Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell system. The power level is 20 Megawatts. The DOE developed electric utility type fuel cell will be fueled with methanol. Oxidant will be provided from a liquid oxygen tank carried onboard. The twin screw submarine tanker design is sized at 165,000 deadweight tons and the study includes costs and an economic analysis of the transport system of 6 ships. The route will be under the polar icecap from a loading terminal located off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to a transshipment facility postulated to be in a Norwegian fjord. The system throughput of the gas-fed methanol cargo will be 450,000 barrels per day. The total delivered cost of the methanol including well head purchase price of natural gas, methanol production, and shipping would be $25/bbl from Alaska to the US East Coast. Of this, the shipping cost is $6.80/bbl. All costs in 1981 dollars.

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cell power plant systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1990-06-01

    The goal of the DOE and IFC Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Program is to develop a MCFC technology base capable of providing clean electrical energy at competitive cost when integrated with coal gasification systems. To be successful, a coal-fueled MCFC system must provide cost of electricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long range electric generating systems. The strategy for the study was to initially evaluate the status of non-fuel cell systems to establish the basis for a competitive CG/MCFC power plant and the corresponding MCFC subsystem goals. Secondly, an iterative and comparative analysis of potential CG/MCFC systems was conducted. This analysis included a detailed examination of MCFC integration with gasifier technology in which the technical basis for MCFC compatibility with a broad range of gasifiers was established. Lastly, a detailed conceptual design was prepared for the most desirable CG/MCFC system. The design established the potential of the CG/MCFC power plant to meet the goals and provide a competitive cost of electricity at very high efficiency and significantly reduced emissions. The design also provided focus for the technical issues still outstanding and required for commercialization of the CG/MCFC technology. 27 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Humidification studies on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, P.; Perumal, Ramkumar; Rajalakshmi, N.; Raja, M.; Dhathathreyan, K. S.

    Two methods of humidifying the anode gas, namely, external and membrane humidification, for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel (PEMFC) cell are explained. It is found that the water of solvation of protons decreases with increase in the current density and the electrode area. This is due to insufficient external humidification. In a membrane-based humidification, an optimum set of parameters, such as gas flow rate, area and type of the membrane, must be chosen to achieve effective humidification. The present study examines the dependence of water pick-up by hydrogen on the temperature, area and thickness of the membrane in membrane humidification. Since the performance of the fuel cell is dependent more on hydrogen humidification than on oxygen humidification, the scope of the work is restricted to the humidification of hydrogen using Nafion ® membrane. An examination is made on the dependence of water pick-up by hydrogen in membrane humidification on the temperature, area and thickness of the membrane. The dependence of fuel cell performance on membrane humidification and external humidification in the anode gas is also considered.

  7. Feasibility study of application of ductless fuel assembly to FBR

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.; Shibahara, I.

    1996-07-01

    Feasibility studies on an application of the ductless fuel concept to an FBR core have been carried out in order to evaluate the basic features of the ductless core, especially in the fields of the thermal-hydraulic aspects and the mechanical behaviors. Regarding thermal-hydraulic aspects, analyses were performed by using a whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis code by making some modification for this study on the PWR code THINC. A small scaled ductless core model was prepared and a hydraulic experiment was carried out to study basic hydraulic characteristics of a ductless core. Core mechanical behaviors were analyzed focusing on the core irradiation bowing aspects and the seismic behaviors. Following features are revealed on the core structural behaviors: (1) the bowing stiffness of the ductless assembly is around 1/5 to 1/10 of that of the duct type assembly; (2) the contact loads between assemblies by the bowing effects are small through core cycles; (3) the damping of the ductless assemblies are so large that the seismic responses are small and the loads between assemblies are small due to occurring many contact points. Through this study it is expected that the concept of the ductless fuel can be applicable to FBR cores from the design view points of thermal-hydraulic and core mechanical behaviors.

  8. A fuel conservation study for transport aircraft utilizing advanced technology and hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W.; Calleson, R.; Espil, J.; Quartero, C.; Swanson, E.

    1972-01-01

    The conservation of fossil fuels in commercial aviation was investigated. Four categories of aircraft were selected for investigation: (1) conventional, medium range, low take-off gross weight; (2) conventional, long range, high take-off gross weights; (3) large take-off gross weight aircraft that might find future applications using both conventional and advanced technology; and (4) advanced technology aircraft of the future powered with liquid hydrogen fuel. It is concluded that the hydrogen fueled aircraft can perform at reduced size and gross weight the same payload/range mission as conventionally fueled aircraft.

  9. Clean Cities Case Study: UPS delivers with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Frailey, M.

    1999-08-30

    In the fall of 1994, the UPS fleet in Landover, Maryland, began operating 20 vehicles on CNG. UPS selected CNG because natural gas is an abundant domestic resource that is available in almost every city in the US, and it also generally costs less than other fuels. The UPS project, funded by DOE through NREL and managed by TRI, was designed to test the feasibility of using CNG in a medium-duty pick-up and delivery fleet. This study is intended only to illustrate approaches that organizations could use in adopting AFVs into their fleets.

  10. Neutronic study on conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU silicide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, G.; Pond, R.; Hanan, N.; Matos, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper marks the initial study into the technical and economic feasibility of converting the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa to LEU silicide fuel. Several MTR assembly geometries and LEU uranium densities have been studied and compared with MEU and HEU fuels. Two factors of primary importance for conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU fuel are the economy of the fuel cycle and the performance of the incore and excore irradiation positions.

  11. Fundamental combustion studies of emulsified fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built in order to study the combustion of free, isolated fuel droplets at low Reynolds number conditions. Studies were conducted into the disruptive combustion behavior of n-paraffin/water emulsions and binary solutions of n-paraffins. A lower limiting paraffin boiling point was determined so that nucleation of water in emulsions was achieved. Solutions exhibited a limited range of composition for which disruption of the droplets was observed. A minimum difference in boiling points of the components was necessary to achieve disruption. Analysis of vapor bubble growth indicated fundamental differences between the behavior of emulsions and solutions. The work on binary paraffin solutions was extended to alcohol/paraffin solutions which also exhibited disruptive activity within a range of composition. Studies of emulsified No. 2 oil and ethanol/No. 2 oil solutions indicated the existence of microexplosions wih the combustion of these fuel blends. Finally, a full scale boiler test was conducted to determine the impact of heavy oil/water emulsification on boiler operating characteristics. The most significant effect was the reduction of large carbon particulate emissions.

  12. Drying studies for corroded DOE aluminum plate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E.; Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W.

    1996-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) currently stores a wide variety of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel was originally intended to be stored underwater for a short period of thermal cooling, then removed and reprocessed. However, it has been stored underwater for much longer thank originally anticipated. During this time dust and airborne desert soil have entered the oldest INEL pool, accumulating on the fuel. Also, the aluminum fuel cladding has corroded compromising the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Plans are now underway to move some the the more vulnerable aluminum plate type fuels into dry storage in an existing vented and filtered fuel storage facility. In preparation for dry storage of the fuel a drying and canning station is being built at the INEL. The two primary objectives of this facility are to determine the influence of corrosion products on the drying process and to establish temperature distribution inside the canister during heating.

  13. Study on the ignition of a fuel droplet in high temperature stagnant gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizawa, Y.; Tomita, M.; Kawada, H.

    1981-07-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effects of the fuel vapor, which had evaporated in advance and formed combustible mixture around the condensed phase, on the ignition of a fuel droplet under the gas dynamic compression. A soap bubble was utilized to make a heterogeneously distributed fuel vapor pocket in oxidizer gas which offered a model of the vapor cloud around the fuel droplet. Induction periods for the onset of strong emission were measured for fuel droplets, and the models and their ignition processes were examined precisely by means of the interferometric measurement of the fuel concentration field.

  14. Fuel economy screening study of advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel economy potentials were calculated and compared among ten turbomachinery configurations. All gas turbine engines were evaluated with a continuously variable transmission in a 1978 compact car. A reference fuel economy was calculated for the car with its conventional spark ignition piston engine and three speed automatic transmission. Two promising engine/transmission combinations, using gasoline, had 55 to 60 percent gains over the reference fuel economy. Fuel economy sensitivities to engine design parameter changes were also calculated for these two combinations.

  15. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc., Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains a summary of the environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic factors involved in the siting, construction and operation of the plant.

  16. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc. , Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from a budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains process flowsheets and maps of the proposed site.

  17. Study of fuel systems for LH2-fueled subsonic transport aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Riple, J. C.; Baerst, C. F.; Garmong, G.

    1978-01-01

    Several engine concepts examined to determine a preferred design which most effectively exploits the characteristics of hydrogen fuel in aircraft tanks received major emphasis. Many candidate designs of tank structure and cryogenic insulation systems were evaluated. Designs of all major elements of the aircraft fuel system including pumps, lines, valves, regulators, and heat exchangers received attention. Selected designs of boost pumps to be mounted in the LH2 tanks, and of a high pressure pump to be mounted on the engine were defined. A final design of LH2-fueled transport aircraft was established which incorporates a preferred design of fuel system. That aircraft was then compared with a conventionally fueled counterpart designed to equivalent technology standards.

  18. Small gas-turbine combustor study: Fuel injector evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort at the Lewis Research Center to improve performance, emissions, and reliability of turbine machinery, an investigation of fuel injection technique and effect of fuel type on small gas turbine combustors was undertaken. Performance and pollutant emission levels are documented over a range of simulated flight conditions for a reverse flow combustor configuration using simplex pressure-atomizing, spill-flow return, and splash cone airblast injectors. A parametric evaluation of the effect of increased combustor loading with each of the fuel injector types was obtained. Jet A and an experimental referee broad specification fuel were used to determine the effect of fuel type.

  19. Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options.

  20. Viability study of automobile shredder residue as fuel.

    PubMed

    Edo, Mar; Aracil, Ignacio; Font, Rafael; Anzano, Manuela; Fullana, Andrés; Collina, Elena

    2013-09-15

    Car Fluff samples collected from a shredding plant in Italy were classified based on particle size, and three different size fractions were obtained in this way. A comparison between these size fractions and the original light fluff was made from two different points of view: (i) the properties of each size fraction as a fuel were evaluated and (ii) the pollutants evolved when each size fraction was subjected to combustion were studied. The aim was to establish which size fraction would be the most suitable for the purposes of energy recovery. The light fluff analyzed contained up to 50 wt.% fines (particle size<20 mm). However, its low calorific value and high emissions of polychlorinated dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), generated during combustion, make the fines fraction inappropriate for energy recovery, and therefore, landfilling would be the best option. The 50-100 mm fraction exhibited a high calorific value and low PCDD/F emissions were generated when the sample was combusted, making it the most suitable fraction for use as refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Results obtained suggest that removing fines from the original ASR sample would lead to a material product that is more suitable for use as RDF. PMID:23856312

  1. Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST) LMFBR fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P. J.; Kroc, T. K.

    1980-06-01

    This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

  2. Experimental Study of Unsupported Nonane fuel Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, B. J.; Avedisian, C. T.; Hertzog, D. E.; Berkery, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Soot formation in droplet flames is the basic component of the particulate emission process that occurs in spray combustion. The complexity of soot formation motivates a one-dimensional transport condition which has obvious advantages in modeling. Recent models of spherically symmetric droplet combustion have made this assumption when incorporating such aspects as detailed chemistry and radiation. Interestingly, spherical symmetry does not necessarily restrict the results because it has been observed that the properties of carbon formed in flames are not strongly affected by the nature of the fuel or flaming configuration. What is affected, however, are the forces acting on the soot aggregates and where they are trapped by a balance of drag and thermophoretic forces. The distribution of these forces depends on the transport conditions of the flame. Prior studies of spherical droplet flames have examined the droplet burning history of alkanes, alcohols and aromatics. Data are typically the evolution of droplet, flame, extinction, and soot shell diameters. These data are only now just beginning to find their way into comprehensive numerical models of droplet combustion to test proposed oxidation schemes for fuels such as methanol and heptane. In the present study, we report new measurements on the burning history of unsupported nonane droplets in a convection-free environment to promote spherical symmetry. The far-field gas is atmospheric pressure air at room temperature. The evolution of droplet diameter was measured using high speed cine photography of a spark-ignited, droplet within a confined volume in a drop tower. The initial droplet diameters varied between 0.5 mm and 0.6 mm. The challenge of unsupported droplets is to form, deploy and ignite them with minimal disturbance, and then to keep them in the camera field of view. Because of the difficulty of this undertaking, more sophisticated diagnostics for studying soot than photographic were not used. Supporting

  3. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  4. Biomass Fuel Smoke and Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Barman, N; Islam, M T; Mannan, M; Khan, M H; Karim, M R; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    This case control study was done to ascertain the association between exposures to biomass cooking fuel smoke and pulmonary tuberculosis. Cases were all newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, randomly collected from the Hospital (DOTS centers) Registry from January 2012 to June 2012 from two Upazillas of Sirajganj district, Bangladesh. A home visitation program was done subsequently. Healthy controls were recruited from the neighbourhood of each case through a predefined procedure. Total 276 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases and 276 neighbourhood controls were enrolled. A semi-structured questionnaire containing demographic information, smoking habits, cooking place, kitchen condition, use of biomass fuel for cooking was used for interview. Crude (unadjusted) odd ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence limits for independent variables were determined by binary logistic regression. All significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model and a final fitted model was determined by backward elimination methods. In univariate analysis, member of a nuclear family {Unadjusted odd ratio (Unadj. OR) 1.570, 95% CI 1.008-2.44)}, having non-formal education (Unadj. OR 2.739, 95% CI 1.219, 6.153) or primary (Unadj. OR 3.407, 95% CI 1.492, 7.782) to secondary level (Unadj. OR 2.392, 95% CI 1.032, 5.544) education, using cow dung (Unadj. OR 3.961, 95% CI 1.267, 12.376) and biomass fuel i.e. plant origin (Unadj. OR 3.382, 95% CI 1.087, 10.518) for cooking, past smoker (Unadj. OR 2.504, 95% CI 1.061, 5.910), using open oven (Unadj. OR 3.109, 95% CI 0.995, 9.716), having small kitchen area (Unadj. OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.989, 0.999) all were significantly associated with tuberculosis. When all significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model nuclear family {Adjusted odd ratio (Adj OR) 1.808, 95% CI 1.127, 2.9)}, primary level education (Adj OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.23, 6.647) and non formal

  5. Light water reactor fuel reprocessing: dissolution studies of voloxidized and nonvoloxidized fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Stone, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    Small-scale tests with irradiated Zircaloy-clad fuels from Robinson, Oconee, Saxton, and Point Beach reactors with burnups from about 200 to 28,000 MWD/MTHM have been made to determine the dissolution behavior of both voloxidized (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and nonvoloxidized (UO{sub 2}) fuel. No significant technical problems were encountered in batch-dissolving of either form. Dissolution rates were well-controlled in all tests. Significant characteristics of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} dissolution that differed from UO{sub 2} dissolution included: (1) reduced tritium and ruthenium ({sup 106}Ru) concentrations in product solutions, (2) increased insoluble noble metal fission product residue (about 2.2X greater), and (3) increased insoluble plutonium in the fission product residue. The insoluble plutonium is easily leached from the residue by 10M HNO{sub 3}. The weight of the fission product residue collected from both U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and UO{sub 2} fuels increased aproximately linearly with fuel burnup. A major fraction (>83%) of the {sup 85}Kr was evolved from U{sub 3}O{sub 8} fuel during dissolution rather than voloxidation. The {sup 85}Kr evolution rate was an appropriate monitor of fuel dissolution rate. Virtually all of the {sup 129}I was evolved by air sparging of the dissolver solution during dissolution. 30 tables, 18 figures.

  6. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Combustion Characteristics of Conventional and Alternative Jet Fuels. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Ellen; Naik, Chitral V.; Puduppakkam, Karthik V.; Modak, Abhijit; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Tsotsis, Theo; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this project have been to develop a comprehensive set of fundamental data regarding the combustion behavior of jet fuels and appropriately associated model fuels. Based on the fundamental study results, an auxiliary objective was to identify differentiating characteristics of molecular fuel components that can be used to explain different fuel behavior and that may ultimately be used in the planning and design of optimal fuel-production processes. The fuels studied in this project were Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels and biomass-derived jet fuels that meet certain specifications of currently used jet propulsion applications. Prior to this project, there were no systematic experimental flame data available for such fuels. One of the key goals has been to generate such data, and to use this data in developing and verifying effective kinetic models. The models have then been reduced through automated means to enable multidimensional simulation of the combustion characteristics of such fuels in real combustors. Such reliable kinetic models, validated against fundamental data derived from laminar flames using idealized flow models, are key to the development and design of optimal combustors and fuels. The models provide direct information about the relative contribution of different molecular constituents to the fuel performance and can be used to assess both combustion and emissions characteristics.

  7. Study of UO/sub 2/ wafer fuel for very high-power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, T.C.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.; Billone, M.C.

    1980-11-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is aimed at reducing fuel enrichment to < 20% in those research and test reactors presently using highly enriched uranium fuel. UO/sub 2/ caramel fuel is one of the most promising new types of reduced-enrichment fuel for use in research reactors with very high power density. Parametric studies have been carried out to determine the maximum specific power attainable without significant fission-gas release for UO/sub 2/ wafers ranging from 0.75 to 1.50 mm in thickness. The results indicate that (1) all the fuel designs considered in this study are predicted not to fail under full-power operation up to a burnup of 1.09 x 10/sup 21/ fis/cm/sup 3/; (2) for all fuel designs, failure is predicted at approximately the same fuel centerline temperature for a given burnup; (3) the thinner the wafer, and wider the margin for fuel specific power between normal operation and increased-power operation leading to fuel failure; (4) increasing the coolant pressure in the reactor core could improve fuel performance by maintaining the fuel at a higher power level without failure for a given burnup; and (5) for a given power level, fuel failure will occur earlier at a higher cladding surface temperature and/or under power-cycling conditions. 12 figures, 7 tables.

  8. ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, S.H.

    1980-04-01

    In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated.

  9. Study of methane fuel for subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, L. K.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Daniels, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The cost and performance were defined for commercial transport using liquid methane including its fuel system and the ground facility complex required for the processing and storage of methane. A cost and performance comparison was made with Jet A and hydrogen powered aircraft of the same payload and range capability. Extensive design work was done on cryogenic fuel tanks, insulation systems as well as the fuel system itself. Three candidate fuel tank locations were evaluated, i.e., fuselage tanks, wing tanks or external pylon tanks.

  10. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  11. Study of Rapid-Regression Liquefying Hybrid Rocket Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; DeZilwa, Shane; Karabeyoglu, M. Arif; Cantwell, Brian J.; Castellucci, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments directed toward the development of paraffin-based hybrid rocket fuels that burn at regression rates greater than those of conventional hybrid rocket fuels like hydroxyl-terminated butadiene. The basic approach followed in this development is to use materials such that a hydrodynamically unstable liquid layer forms on the melting surface of a burning fuel body. Entrainment of droplets from the liquid/gas interface can substantially increase the rate of fuel mass transfer, leading to surface regression faster than can be achieved using conventional fuels. The higher regression rate eliminates the need for the complex multi-port grain structures of conventional solid rocket fuels, making it possible to obtain acceptable performance from single-port structures. The high-regression-rate fuels contain no toxic or otherwise hazardous components and can be shipped commercially as non-hazardous commodities. Among the experiments performed on these fuels were scale-up tests using gaseous oxygen. The data from these tests were found to agree with data from small-scale, low-pressure and low-mass-flux laboratory tests and to confirm the expectation that these fuels would burn at high regression rates, chamber pressures, and mass fluxes representative of full-scale rocket motors.

  12. An experimental study on thermal stability of biodiesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiying

    Biodiesel fuel, as renewable energy, has been used in conventional diesel engines in pure form or as biodiesel/diesel blends for many years. However, thermal stability of biodiesel and biodiesel/diesel blends has been minimally explored. Aimed to shorten this gap, thermal stability of biodiesel is investigated at high temperatures. In this study, batch thermal stressing experiments of biodiesel fuel were performed in stainless steel coils at specific temperature and residence time range from 250 to 425 °C and 3 to 63 minutes, respectively. Evidence of different pathways of biodiesel fuel degradation is demonstrated chromatographically. It was found that biodiesel was stable at 275 °C for a residence time of 8 minutes or below, but the cis-trans isomerization reaction was observed at 28 minutes. Along with isomerization, polymerization also took place at 300 °C at 63 minutes. Small molecular weight products were detected at 350 °C at 33 minutes resulting from pyrolysis reactions and at 360 °C for 33 minutes or above, gaseous products were produced. The formed isomers and dimers were not stable, further decomposition of these compounds was observed at high temperatures. These three main reactions and the temperature ranges in which they occurred are: isomerization, 275--400 °C; polymerization (Diels-Alder reaction), 300--425 °C; pyrolysis reaction, ≥350 °C. The longer residence time and higher temperature resulted in greater decomposition. As the temperature increased to 425 °C, the colorless biodiesel became brownish. After 8 minutes, almost 84% of the original fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) disappeared, indicating significant fuel decomposition. A kinetic study was also carried out subsequently to gain better insight into the biodiesel thermal decomposition. A three-lump model was proposed to describe the decomposition mechanism. Based on this mechanism, a reversible first-order reaction kinetic model for the global biodiesel decomposition was shown to

  13. Fuel quality-processing study. Volume 1: Overview and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The methods whereby the intermediate results were obtained are outlined, and the evaluation of the feasible paths from liquid fossil fuel sources to generated electricity is presented. The segments from which these paths were built are the results from the fuel upgrading schemes, on-site treatments, and exhaust gas treatments detailed in the subsequent volumes. The salient cost and quality parameters are included.

  14. Fuel quality-processing study. Volume 2: Literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Amero, R.; Murthy, B.; Cutrone, M.

    1981-01-01

    The validity of initial assumptions about raw materials choices and relevant upgrading processing options was confirmed. The literature survey also served to define the on-site (at the turbine location) options for fuel treatment and exhaust gas treatment. The literature survey also contains a substantial compilation of specification and physical property information about liquid fuel products relevant to industrial gas turbines.

  15. Options Study Documenting the Fast Reactor Fuels Innovative Design Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

    2010-07-01

    This document provides presentation and general analysis of innovative design concepts submitted to the FCRD Advanced Fuels Campaign by nine national laboratory teams as part of the Innovative Transmutation Fuels Concepts Call for Proposals issued on October 15, 2009 (Appendix A). Twenty one whitepapers were received and evaluated by an independent technical review committee.

  16. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for MOX Fuel Based on the IFA-597 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippe, Aaron M; Clarno, Kevin T; Banfield, James E; Ott, Larry J; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The IFA-597 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the thermal behavior of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and the effects of an annulus on fission gas release in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for MOX fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the first 20 time steps ( 6 GWd/MT(iHM)) for explicit comparison between the codes. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole, dish, and chamfer. The analysis demonstrated relative agreement for both solid (rod 1) and annular (rod 2) fuel in the experiment, demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for MOX fuel, while also revealing a small energy loss artifact in how gap conductance is currently handled in Exnihilo for chamfered fuel pellets. The within-pellet power shape was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for MOX fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  17. Parametric Studies on Plutonium Transmutation Using Uranium-Free Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, Afroza; Akie, Hiroshi; Takano, Hideki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2000-08-15

    To compare the once-through use of U-free fuels for plutonium burnup in light water reactors (LWRs), plutonium transmutation, minor actinide (MA) and long-life fission product (LLFP) buildup and radiotoxicity hazards were compared for PuO{sub 2} + ZrO{sub 2} (rock-like oxide: ROX) and PuO{sub 2} + ThO{sub 2} (thorium oxide: TOX) fuels, loaded in a soft-to-hard neutron spectrum LWR core (a moderator-to-fuel volume ratio V{sub m}/V{sub f} is from 0.5 to 3.0). For better understanding and proper improvement of the reactivity coefficient problem of ROX, the fuel temperature coefficient, the void coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were also studied. A mixed-oxide (MOX)-fueled LWR was considered for reference purposes.From the result of the cell burnup calculation, ROX fuel transmutes 90% of net initially loaded weapons-grade Pu, and 2.5% of initially loaded Pu is converted to MAs when V{sub m}/V{sub f} is 2.0 and discharge burnup in effective full-power days is equivalent to that of 33 GWd/t in MOX fuel. Reactor-grade Pu-based ROX fuel transmutes 80% of net initially loaded Pu, and 6.7% of initially loaded Pu converts to MAs with the same condition as the weapons-grade Pu ROX fuel. TOX fuel also has a good Pu transmutation capability, but the {sup 233}U production amount is approximately a half of the fissile Pu transmutation amount. The MA production amount in TOX fuel is lower than that in MOX and ROX fuels. The LLFP production amount in ROX fuel is lower than that in MOX and TOX fuels. The radiotoxicity hazard of ROX spent fuel is lower compared to that in TOX and MOX spent fuels.The thermal neutron energy region is important in ROX fuel for fuel temperature coefficient and void coefficient problems. From these calculations, 15 to 20% {sup 232}Th-added ROX fuel seems the best to use as a once-through Pu-burning fuel compared to TOX and MOX fuels in conventional LWRs, because of its higher Pu transmutation, lower radiotoxicity hazard.

  18. Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

    1982-08-01

    The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

  19. BIOFEAT: Biodiesel fuel processor for a vehicle fuel cell auxiliary power unit. Study of the feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgroi, M.; Bollito, G.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, S.

    An integrated auxiliary power unit (APU) based on a 10 kW e integrated biodiesel fuel processor has been designed and is being developed. Auto-thermal reforming (ATR) and thermal cracking (TC) were considered for converting the fuel into a hydrogen-rich gas suitable for PEM fuel cells. The fuel processor includes also a gas clean-up system that will reduce the carbon monoxide in the primary processor exit gas to below 10 ppm via a new heat-integrated CO clean-up unit, based on the assembly of catalytic heat exchange plates, so as to meet the operational requirements of a PEMFC stack. This article is devoted to the study and selection of the proper feed strategy for the primary fuel processor. Different pre-treatment and feed alternatives (e.g. based on nozzles or simple coils) were devised and tested for the ATR processors, which turned out to be the preferred primary processing route. A nozzle-based strategy was finally selected along with special recommendations about the constituent materials and the operating procedures to be adopted to avoid coking and nozzle corrosion as well as to allow a wide turn down ratio.

  20. Lifetime studies in H2/Br2 fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, G. G.; Frank, S. N.; Teherani, T. H.; Weedon, L. D.

    1984-09-01

    A fully computerized system has been set up for the life testing of H2 electrodes in 48 percent HBr, and of H2/Br2 fuel cells. Given a fuel cell design with dry H2 and no anolyte loop, the prime parameters influencing the operating lifetime are the hydrophobicity of the anode and the electrolyte transport property of the membrane. A systematic optimization of all the parameters has generated fuel cells that have operated for 10,000h at 2 A/sq in., with no significant degradation.

  1. Experimental study of rocket engine model with gaseous polyethylene fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V. V.

    Experimental results for liquid rocket engine models with gaseous polyethylene fuel that is hard before its consumption are considered. The possibility of hard design element combustion in a liquid rocket engine is demonstrated.

  2. Hydrogen production econometric studies. [hydrogen and fossil fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. R.; Bannerot, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The current assessments of fossil fuel resources in the United States were examined, and predictions of the maximum and minimum lifetimes of recoverable resources according to these assessments are presented. In addition, current rates of production in quads/year for the fossil fuels were determined from the literature. Where possible, costs of energy, location of reserves, and remaining time before these reserves are exhausted are given. Limitations that appear to hinder complete development of each energy source are outlined.

  3. Study of technical and economic feasibility of fuel cell cogeneration applications by electric utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, W. S.; Wakefield, R. A.

    1981-10-01

    A previous EPRI study showed significant potential penetrations of fuel cells into the future generation mixes of U.S. electric utilities. A new EPRI-sponsored study was conducted to investigate the possible additional benefits of operating these utility-owned fuel cells as cogeneration facilities. Three classes of applications were evaluated: residential and commercial buildings, industrial processes and utility power plants. Incremental breakeven capital costs between cogenerating and electric-only fuel cells were determined with respect to conventional thermal energy supply alternatives. The results showed that there are sufficient economic incentives for fuel cell cogeneration in all three classes of applications.

  4. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  5. Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin

    2014-09-01

    This document was prepared to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M3FT-14IN0304022, “Perform Thermodynamics Measurements on Fuel Cycle Case Study Systems.” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. This document reports preliminary work in support of determining the thermodynamic parameters for the ALSEP process. The ALSEP process is a mixed extractant system comprised of a cation exchanger 2-ethylhexyl-phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) and a neutral solvating extractant N,N,N’,N’-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA). The extractant combination produces complex organic phase chemistry that is challenging for traditional measurement techniques. To neutralize the complexity, temperature dependent solvent extraction experiments were conducted with neat TODGA and scaled down concentrations of the ALSEP formulation to determine the enthalpies of extraction for the two conditions. A full set of thermodynamic data for Eu, Am, and Cm extraction by TODGA from 3.0 M HNO3 is reported. These data are compared to previous extraction results from a 1.0 M HNO3 aqueous medium, and a short discussion of the mixed HEH[EHP]/TODGA system results is offered.

  6. Experimental studies on methane-fuel laboratory scale ram combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Y.; Kitajima, J.; Seki, Y.; Tatara, A.

    1995-07-01

    The laboratory scale ram combustor test program has been investigating fundamental combustion characteristics of a ram combustor, which operates from Mach 2.5 to 5 for the super/hypersonic transport propulsion system. In the previous study, combustion efficiency had been found poor, less than 70 percent, due to a low inlet air temperature and a high velocity at Mach 3 condition. To improve the low combustion efficiency, a fuel zoning combustion concept was investigated by using a subscale combustor model first. Combustion efficiency more than 90 percent was achieved and the concept was found very effective. Then a laboratory scale ram combustor was fabricated and combustion tests were carried out mainly at the simulated condition of Mach 5. A vitiation technique wa used to simulate a high temperature of 1,263 K. The test results indicate that ignition, flame stability, and combustion efficiency were not significant, but the NO{sub x} emissions are a critical problem for the ram combustor at Mach 5 condition.

  7. Experimental Study of the Stability of Aircraft Fuels at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of fuel stability was conducted in an apparatus which simulated an aircraft gas turbine fuel system. Two fuels were tested: Jet A and Number 2 Home Heating oil. Jet A is an aircraft gas turbine fuel currently in wide use. No. 2HH was selected to represent the properties of future turbine fuels, particularly experimental Reference Broad Specification, which, under NASA sponsorship, was considered as a possible next-generation fuel. Tests were conducted with varying fuel flow rates, delivery pressures and fuel pretreatments (including preheating and deoxygenation). Simulator wall temperatures were varied between 422K and 672K at fuel flows of 0.022 to 0.22 Kg/sec. Coking rate was determined at four equally-spaced locations along the length of the simulator. Fuel samples were collected for infrared analysis. The dependence of coking rate in Jet A may be correlated with surface temperature via an activation energy of 9 to 10 kcal/mole, although the results indicate that both bulk fluid and surface temperature affect the rate of decomposition. As a consequence, flow rate, which controls bulk temperature, must also be considered. Taken together, these results suggest that the decomposition reactions are initiated on the surface and continue in the bulk fluid. The coking rate data for No. 2 HH oil are very highly temperature dependent above approximately 533K. This suggests that bulk phase reactions can become controlling in the formation of coke.

  8. Experimental study of the thermal stability of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marteney, P. J.; Colket, M. B.; Vranos, A.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal stability of two hydrocarbon fuels (premium diesel and regular diesel) was determined in a flow reactor under conditions representing operation of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Temperature was varied from 300 to 750 F (422 to 672 K) for fuel flows of 2.84 to 56.8 liters/hr (corresponding to 6.84 x 0.00010 to 1.63 x 0.010 kg/sec for regular diesel fuel and 6.55 x 0.00010 to 1.37 x 0.010 kg/sec for premium diesel fuel); test times varied between 1 and 8 hr. The rate of deposition was obtained through measurement of weight gained by metal discs fixed along the channel wall. The rate of deposit formation is best correlated by an Arrhenius expression. The sample discs in the flow reactor were varied among stainless steel, aluminum and brass; fuels were doped with quinoline, indole, and benzoyl perioxide to yield nitrogen or oxygen concentrations of approximately 1000 ppm. The most substantial change in rate was an increase in deposits for brass discs; other disc materials or the additives caused only small perturbations. Tests were also conducted in a static reactor at temperatures of 300 to 800 F for times of 30 min to 2 1/2 hr. Much smaller deposition was found, indicating the importance of fluid transport in the mechanism.

  9. Feasibility study of utilization of degummed soybean oil as a substitute for diesel fuel. Biomass alternative fuels program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the economic and technological feasibility of producing a diesel oil substitute or extender from soybean oil. Existing technology was reviewed, to determine the minimum modification necessary for production of an acceptable fuel product. The information developed indicated that the degummed soybean oil produced by existing processing plants is theoretically suitable for use as a diesel fuel extender. This situation is very favorable to early commercialization of degummed soybean oil as a diesel fuel extender during the 1980's. Moreover, a large energy gain is realized when the soybean oil is utilized as fuel. Its heat of combustion is reported as 16,920 Btu per pound, or 130,000 Btu per gallon. Production of soybean oil consumes between 3000 and 5000 Btu per pound or 23,000 and 39,000 Btu per gallon. A resource availability study disclosed that the southeastern region of the United States produces approximately 260 million bushels of soybeans per year. In the same general area, fourteen extraction plants are operating, with a combined annual capacity of approximately 200 million bushels. Thus, regional production is sufficient to support the extraction capacity. Using an average figure of 1.5 gallons of oil per bushel of soybeans gives annual regional oil production of approximately 300 million gallons. An engine test plan was developed and implemented in this project. Data provide a preliminary indication that the blend containing one-third degummed soybean oil and two-thirds No. 2 diesel oil performed satisfactorily. Long term operation on the 50-50 blend is questionable. Detailed data and observations appear in the body of the report. The study also presents detailed engineering, financial, marketing, management and implementation plans for production of the proposed fuel blend, as well as a complete analysis of impacts. 4 references, 55 figures, 56 tables.

  10. Experimental study of bioelectrochemical fuel cell using bacteria from baltic sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halme, A.; Zhang, X.

    1995-02-01

    A bioelectrochemical fuel cell using bacteria as catalyst was investigated in this paper. The bacteria were obtained from the bottom sediment of Baltic Sea, and then cultivated in a 1 liter bioreactor. Raw material for fermentation were glucose first and then fish meat or plankton biomass. After certain fermentation time, broth was used as fuel for the fuel cell. A steady power output (200 microW/ml anodic volume) was obtained by using stainless steel net packing with graphite particles as the anode electrode. Different fermentation conditions were tested for maximum electroactive substance output. The experimental study of the fuel cell were carried out as follows: (1) characteristics of the fuel cell; (2) mediator effect on the current output; and (3) mode of the fuel flow.

  11. Parametric study on the fuel film breakup of a cold start PFI engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-P.; Wilkinson, G. B.; Drallmeier, J. A.

    In order to provide more insight on improving the cold start fuel atomization for reducing unburned hydrocarbon emissions, the liquid fuel film breakup phenomenon in the intake valve/port region was investigated in depth for port-fuel-injected engines. Experiments were conducted using high-speed high-resolution imaging techniques to visualize the liquid film atomization and airflow patterns in an axisymmetric steady flow apparatus. The impact of valve/port seat geometry, surface roughness, and fuel properties on airflow separation and fuel film breakup were determined through a parametric study. CFD simulations were also performed with FLUENT to help understand the airflow behavior inside the intake port and valve gap region and its potential impact on fuel film atomization.

  12. a Study on Fuel Estimation Algorithms for a Geostationary Communication & Broadcasting Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Jong-Won

    2000-12-01

    It has been developed to calculate fuel budget for a geostationary communication and broadcasting satellite. It is quite essential that the pre-launch fuel budget estimation must account for the deterministic transfer and drift orbit maneuver requirements. After on-station, the calculation of satellite lifetime should be based on the estimation of remaining fuel and assessment of actual performance. These estimations step from the proper algorithms to produce the prediction of satellite lifetime. This paper concentrates on the fuel estimation method that was studied for calculation of the propellant budget by using the given algorithms. Applications of this method are discussed for a communication and broadcasting satellite.

  13. A Comparison Study of Various Nuclear Fuel Cycle Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Eun-ha; Ko, Won-il

    2007-07-01

    As a nation develops its nuclear strategies, it must consider various aspects of nuclear energy such as sustainability, environmental-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics, technologies, and so on. Like all the policy decision, however, a nuclear fuel cycle option can not be superior in all aspects; the nation must identify its top priority and accordingly evaluate all the possible nuclear fuel cycle options. For such a purpose, this paper takes four different fuel cycle options that are likely adopted by the Korean government, considering the current status of nuclear power generation and the 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (CNEPP) - Once-through Cycle, DUPIC Recycle, Thermal Recycle and GEN-IV Recycle. The paper then evaluates each option in terms of resource utilization and waste generation. The analysis shows that the GEN-IV Recycle appears to be most competitive from these aspects. (authors)

  14. Fuel for the Future: Biodiesel - A Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutterbach, Márcia T. S.; Galvão, Mariana M.

    High crude oil prices, concern over depletion of world reserves, and growing apprehension about the environment, encouraged the search for alternative energy sources that use renewable natural resources to reduce or replace traditional fossil fuels such as diesel and gasoline (Hill et al., 2006). Among renewable fuels, biodiesel has been attracting great interest, especially in Europe and the United States. Biodiesel is defined by the World Customs Organization (WCO) as 'a mixture of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain [C16-C18] fatty acids derived from vegetable oils or animal fats, which is a domestic renewable fuel for diesel engines and which meets the US specifications of ASTM D 6751'. Biodiesel is biodegradable and non toxic, produces 93% more energy than the fossil energy required for its production, reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 40% compared to fossil diesel (Peterson and Hustrulid, 1998; Hill et al., 2006) and stimulates agriculture.

  15. Comparative Study of the Thermal Conductivity of Solid Biomass Fuels

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid biomass fuels is useful information in the investigation of biomass combustion behavior and the development of modeling especially in the context of large scale power generation. There are little published data on the thermal conductivity of certain types of biomass such as wheat straw, miscanthus, and torrefied woods. Much published data on wood is in the context of bulk materials. A method for determining the thermal conductivities of small particles of biomass fuels has been developed using a custom built test apparatus. Fourteen different samples of various solid biomass fuel were processed to form a homogenized pellet for analysis. The thermal conductivities of the pelletized materials were determined and compared against each other and to existing data. PMID:27041819

  16. Neutronics Studies of Uranium-bearing Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated Fuel for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    George, Nathan M.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Terrani, Kurt A.; Godfrey, Andrew T.; Gehin, Jess C.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2014-12-01

    Our study evaluated the neutronics and some of the fuel cycle characteristics of using uranium-based fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR lattice designs with FCM fuel have been developed that are expected to achieve higher specific burnup levels in the fuel while also increasing the tolerance to reactor accidents. The SCALE software system was the primary analysis tool used to model the lattice designs. A parametric study was performed by varying tristructural isotropic particle design features (e.g., kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fraction) to understand the impact on reactivity and resulting operating cycle length. Moreover, to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle, the FCM particle fuel design required roughly 10% additional fissile material at beginning of life compared with that of a standard uranium dioxide (UO2) rod. Uranium mononitride proved to be a favorable fuel for the fuel kernel due to its higher heavy metal loading density compared with UO2. The FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable neutronics design features for fuel lifetime, lattice peaking factors, and nonproliferation figure of merit.

  17. Neutronics Studies of Uranium-bearing Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated Fuel for PWRs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    George, Nathan M.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Terrani, Kurt A.; Godfrey, Andrew T.; Gehin, Jess C.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2014-12-01

    Our study evaluated the neutronics and some of the fuel cycle characteristics of using uranium-based fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR lattice designs with FCM fuel have been developed that are expected to achieve higher specific burnup levels in the fuel while also increasing the tolerance to reactor accidents. The SCALE software system was the primary analysis tool used to model the lattice designs. A parametric study was performed by varying tristructural isotropic particle design features (e.g., kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fraction) to understand the impact on reactivity and resultingmore » operating cycle length. Moreover, to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle, the FCM particle fuel design required roughly 10% additional fissile material at beginning of life compared with that of a standard uranium dioxide (UO2) rod. Uranium mononitride proved to be a favorable fuel for the fuel kernel due to its higher heavy metal loading density compared with UO2. The FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable neutronics design features for fuel lifetime, lattice peaking factors, and nonproliferation figure of merit.« less

  18. Polyoxymetalate liquid-catalyzed polyol fuel cell and the related photoelectrochemical reaction mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weibing; Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2016-06-01

    A novel design of liquid catalyzed fuel cell (LCFC), which uses polyoxometalates (POMs) as the photocatalyst and charge carrier has been reported previously. In this paper, the adaptability of biomass fuels (e.g., glycerol and glucose) to the LCFC and corresponding cell performance were studied in detail here. An interesting finding that greatly differs from conventional fuel cell is that high molecular weight fuels rather than small molecule fuels (e.g., methanol and ethylene glycol) are favored by the novel LCFC with respect to the power densities. The power output of LCFC strongly depends on the number and structure of hydroxyl groups in the biomass fuels. The evidence of UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectra shows that the preassociation between POM and alcohol fuels, which determines the photoelectrochemical reaction pathway of POM, is enhanced as the number of hydroxyl increases. Experimental results also demonstrate that more hydroxyl groups in the molecules lead to faster photoelectrochemical reaction between POM and fuels, higher reduction degree of POM, and further higher power output of LCFC. Our study reveals that biomass-based polyhydroxyl compounds such as starch, hemicellulose and cellulose are potential high-performance fuels for LCFC.

  19. Department of Energy study on spent nuclear fuel storage

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    This report defines the needs for storage facilities and identifies possible sites in three regions of the US where such facilities could be located. The three sites are: Barnwell, South Carolina; Morris, Illinois; and West Valley, New York. This report includes consideration of the technical, economic, and regulatory factors associated with providing spent fuel storage in existing or potential at-reactor storage pools, and in AFR storage pools. This determination was based on specific data regarding the storage capacity needed to accommodate spent fuel from reactor pools by January 1, 1985, that the utilities would be unable to provide for themselves.

  20. Study of LH2 fueled subsonic passenger transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in subsonic transport aircraft was investigated to explore an expanded matrix of passenger aircraft sizes. Aircraft capable of carrying 130 passengers 2,780 km (1500 n.mi.); 200 passengers 5,560 km (3000 n.mi.); and 400 passengers on a 9,265 km (5000 n.mi.) radius mission, were designed parametrically. Both liquid hydrogen and conventionally fueled versions were generated for each payload/range in order that comparisons could be made. Aircraft in each mission category were compared on the basis of weight, size, cost, energy utilization, and noise.

  1. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : A Study of the Kinetics of Composite Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1929-01-01

    This report deals with the results of a series of studies of the kinetics of gaseous explosive reactions where the fuel under observation, instead of being a simple gas, is a known mixture of simple gases. In the practical application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the gas engine, the fuels employed are composite, with characteristics that are apt to be due to the characteristics of their components and hence may be somewhat complex. The simplest problem that could be proposed in an investigation either of the thermodynamics or kinetics of the gaseous explosive reaction of a composite fuel would seem to be a separate study of the reaction characteristics of each component of the fuel and then a study of the reaction characteristics of the various known mixtures of those components forming composite fuels more and more complex. (author)

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  3. Study of the feasibility and desirability of using motor fuel dyes and markers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-27

    This study includes a review of experience with the use of dyes and markers, an assessment of the benefits and costs associated with implementing a nationwide standard of motor fuel dyes and markers, and an evaluation of alternative means to achieve similar benefits in consumer fraud prevention and motor fuel tax enforcement.

  4. BREATH MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL BODY BURDEN OF JP-8 JET FUEL FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A complex epidemiological investigation of the effects of acute exposure to JP-8 jet fuel in the U.S. Air Force was performed through the study of about 350 human subjects across six Air Force bases. The focus was on fuels system maintenance personnel as the "exposed"...

  5. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES IN MICE TREATED WITH THE JET FUELS, JET-A AND JP-8

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytogenetic studies in mice treated with the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8
    Abstract
    The genotoxic potential of the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8, were examined in mice treated on the skin with a single dose of 240 ug/mouse. Peripheral blood smears were prepared at the start of the ...

  6. IGNITION AND COMBUSTION OF LIQUID FUEL DROPLETS. PART 2: IGNITION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the ignition process of liquid fuel droplets. A laboratory flame maintained by a vertical, monosized liquid fuel droplet array surrounded by a laminar flow of a mixture of helium and oxygen represents the system investigated. A system of part...

  7. A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-11

    Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

  8. A study of ethanol low grade as an alternative fuel for small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiarto, Bambang; Darsono, Dody; Nurhuda, M.; Wardhana, Ing

    2012-06-01

    The availability of non renewable petroleum fuels insists people to make use of alternative energy sources. Currently petroleum dominates the main source of fuel for combustion. Renewable energy is a solution to deal with this issue. One source of renewable energy is bio ethanol. The previous study conducted distillator compact design by utilizing exhaust gases from motor fuels as a primary means of ethanol processing. The goal is to produce viable products into fuel ethanol of which levels above 90%. In this study, it is conducted at the evaporator temperature control with a load of 300 Watt which this conclusions obtained in previous studies on the load 300 Watts has maximum results obtained to be able of consumption needs of fuel on the genset. At 90°C temperature-controlled at the evaporator produces maximum that is able to meet the fuel consumption for the genset. At 85°C temperature-controlled at the evaporator produces high concentric of alcohol but did not meet of fuel consumption. At temperatures of 90°C can be concluded get the most out due to meet the fuel consumption and also has high concentric of alcohol. Gas have low levels of CO (± 1.2% Vol.), low HC (± 150 ppm Vol.).

  9. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for UO2 Fuel Based on the IFA-432 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippe, Aaron M; Clarno, Kevin T; Banfield, James E; Ott, Larry J; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    The IFA-432 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the effects of gap size, fuel density, and fuel densification on fuel centerline temperature in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for uranium dioxide (UO$_2$) fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the densification stage (2.2 \\unitfrac{GWd}{MT(UO$_{2}$)}). In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole. The analysis demonstrated excellent agreement for rods 1, 2, 3, and 5 (varying gap thicknesses and density with traditional fuel), demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for traditional fuel. For rod 6, which contained unstable fuel that densified an order of magnitude more than traditional, stable fuel, the magnitude of densification was over-predicted and the temperatures were outside of the experimental uncertainty. The radial power shape within the fuel was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures, whereas modeling the fuel at the thermocouple location as either annular or solid was relatively negligible. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for UO$_2$ fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  10. Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Study Volume 1: RASER Task Order 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mak, Audie; Meier, John

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit (APU) and the impact in a 90-passenger More-Electric Regional Jet application. The study established realistic hybrid SOFC APU system weight and system efficiencies, and evaluated the impact on the aircraft total weight, fuel burn, and emissions from the main engine and the APU during cruise, landing and take-off (LTO) cycle, and at the gate. Although the SOFC APU may be heavier than the current conventional APU, its weight disadvantage can be offset by fuel savings in the higher SOFC APU system efficiencies against the main engine bleed and extraction during cruise. The higher SOFC APU system efficiency compared to the conventional APU on the ground can also provide considerable fuel saving and emissions reduction, particularly at the gate, but is limited by the fuel cell stack thermal fatigue characteristic.

  11. Fuel flexibility study of an integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaofan; Rao, Ashok D.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    The operation of solid oxide fuel cells on various fuels, such as natural gas, biogas and gases derived from biomass or coal gasification and distillate fuel reforming has been an active area of SOFC research in recent years. In this study, we develop a theoretical understanding and thermodynamic simulation capability for investigation of an integrated SOFC reformer system operating on various fuels. The theoretical understanding and simulation results suggest that significant thermal management challenges may result from the use of different types of fuels in the same integrated fuel cell reformer system. Syngas derived from coal is simulated according to specifications from high-temperature entrained bed coal gasifiers. Diesel syngas is approximated from data obtained in a previous NFCRC study of JP-8 and diesel operation of the integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system. The syngas streams consist of mixtures of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen. Although the SOFC can tolerate a wide variety in fuel composition, the current analyses suggest that performance of integrated SOFC reformer systems may require significant operating condition changes and/or system design changes in order to operate well on this variety of fuels.

  12. Studies of new perfluoroether elastomeric sealants. [for aircraft fuel tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, D. I.; Salisbury, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Channel and filleting sealants were developed successfully from cyano and diamidoxime terminated perfluoro alkylene ether prepolymers. The prepolymers were polymerized, formulated and tested. The polymers and/or formulations therefrom were evaluated as to their physical, mechanical and chemical properties (i.e., specific gravity, hardness, nonvolatile content, corrosion resistance, stress corrosion, pressure rupture resistance, low temperature flexibility, gap sealing efficiency, tensile strength and elongation, dynamic mechanical behavior, compression set, fuel resistance, thermal properties and processability). Other applications of the formulated polymrs and incorporation of the basic prepolymers into other polymeric systems were investigated. A cyano terminated perfluoro alkylene oxide triazine was formulated and partially evaluated. The channel sealant in its present formulation has excellent pressure rupture resistance and surpasses present MIL specifications before and after fuel and heat aging.

  13. Studies of Flexible MOX/LEU Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.; Alonso-Vargas, G.

    1999-03-01

    This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and North Carolina State University as well as Texas A and M University. The background, briefly, is that the US is planning to use some of its excess weapons Plutonium (Pu) to make mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for existing light-water reactors (LWRs). Considerable effort has already gone into designing fuel assemblies and core loading patterns for the transition from full-uranium cores to partial-MOX and full-MOX cores. However, these designs have assumed that any time a reactor needs MOX assemblies, these assemblies will be supplied. In reality there are many possible scenarios under which this supply could be disrupted. It therefore seems prudent to verify that a reactor-based Pu-disposition program could tolerate such interruptions in an acceptable manner. Such verification was the overall aim of this project. The task assigned to the Texas A and M team was to use the HELIOS code to develop libraries of two-group homogenized cross sections for the various assembly designs that might be used in a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that is burning weapons-grade MOX fuel. The NCSU team used these cross sections to develop optimized loading patterns under several assumed scenarios. Their results are documented in a companion report.

  14. Study of new proton conducting glasses for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiple, S. R.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    The glasses in the series (35-x) BaO:65 P2O5:x (NH4)2SO4 are synthesized and characterized by Tg, CTE, density and electrical conductivity measurements. The decrease in density and Tg is observed with addition of (NH4)2SO4. The increase in CTE compliments the observed variation in Tg. The protonic conductivity increases with addition of (NH4)2SO4 up to 7.5 mol% and decreases beyond this composition. The increase in the ratio of O/P, which in turn, creates more non-bridging oxygens, enhances the conductivity. Further, sulfur is mainly incorporated in sulfophosphate glasses as isolated SO42- group which also results in increase in conductivity. The glass with maximum conductivity [7.5(NH4)2SO4:27.5BaO:65 P2O5] is used to fabricate a fuel cell. It gives the power density of 12.43 μW/cm2. The power density of the fuel cell in the present work at room temperature is higher than that reported in literature at 473 K. The fuel cell has a potential of giving higher power density at higher temperature of 423 K.

  15. Conceptual study of measures against heat generation for TRU fuel fabrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Koichi; Namekawa, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    To lower the reprocessing cost and the environmental burden, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed low decontamination TRU fuel fabrication system. TRU fuel contains MA of 1.2 to 5 wt% and its decay heat is estimated a few tens W/kg-HM. As the heat affects fuel quality through oxidation of fuel material and members, it is necessary to remove decay heat. In this work, authors designed concepts of the measures against heat generation at typical equipments using with the thermal hydraulics analysis technique. As a result, it is shown that it is possible to cool fuel materials with specific heat generation up to 20 W/kg-HM enough, though more detailed study is required for comprehensive equipments. (authors)

  16. Feasibility study: Fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschenhofer, J. H.; Baillieul, D. B.; Barton, L. M.; Brumberg, R. J.; Hannan, C. E.; Fiedler, H. H.; Kile, M. G.; Klett, M. G.; Malone, G. A.; Milliron, H. P.

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility.

  17. Numerical and experimental studies of the hybrid rocket motor with multi-port fuel grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Li, Xintian; Zeng, Peng; Yu, Nanjia; Cai, Guobiao

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional numerical simulations and experimental studies of the hybrid rocket motor with multi-port fuel grain. The numerical model is established based on the Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence, chemical reactions, fuel pyrolysis, and solid-gas boundary interactions. The simulation is performed based on the 98% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant combination. The results indicate that the flow field and fuel regression rate distributions present apparent three-dimensional characteristics. The fuel regression rates decrease first and then gradually increase with the axial location increasing. At a certain cross section, the fuel regression rates are lower in the points on arcs with smaller radius of curvature when the fuel port is a derivable convex figure. Two experiments are carried out on a full scale motor with the simulation one. The working process of the motor is steady and no evident oscillatory combustion is observed. The fuel port profiles before and after tests indicate that the fuel regression rate distributions at the cross section match well with the numerical simulation results.

  18. Applications of photoacoustic techniques to the study of jet fuel residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    It has been known for many years that fuels for jet aircraft engines demonstrate thermal instability. One manifestation of this thermal instability is the formation of deleterious fuel-derived thermally-induced deposits on surfaces of the aircraft's fuel-handling system. The results of an investigation of the feasibility of applying photoacoustic techniques to the study of the physical properties of these thermal deposits are presented. Both phase imaging and magnitude imaging and spectroscopy were investigated. It is concluded that the use of photoacoustic techniques in the study of films of the type encountered in this investigation is not practical.

  19. Hazard & Operability Study for Removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the 324 Building

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KEUREN, J.C.

    2002-05-07

    A hazard and operability (HAZOP) study was conducted to examine the hazards associated with the removal of the spent nuclear fuel from the 324 Building. Fifty-nine potentially hazardous conditions were identified.

  20. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J A; White, R R; Berry, W E; Griess, J C

    1982-04-01

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO/sub 3/ had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/.

  1. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) porous electrode and kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R. )

    1992-10-01

    This report sumarizes a research project undertaken to improve the performance and understand the limitations of porous electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Using a novel MCFC rotating-disk'' electrode, the electrode kinetic and mass transfer properties of commonly used electrode materials were determined, and a practical performance model for MCFC electrodes was developed. The report also outlines a general strategy for designing a high-performance MCFC electrode, assesses the current understanding of porous electrode operation, and discusses some of the unresolved questions of the field. An appendix gives a complete list of the many theses, journal articles, and symposium contributions based on this research.

  2. Investigations into the low temperature behavior of jet fuels: Visualization, modeling, and viscosity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Daniel L.

    Aircraft operation in arctic regions or at high altitudes exposes jet fuel to temperatures below freeze point temperature specifications. Fuel constituents may solidify and remain within tanks or block fuel system components. Military and scientific requirements have been met with costly, low freeze point specialty jet fuels. Commercial airline interest in polar routes and the use of high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has spurred interest in the effects of low temperatures and low-temperature additives on jet fuel. The solidification of jet fuel due to freezing is not well understood and limited visualization of fuel freezing existed prior to the research presented in this dissertation. Consequently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling that simulates jet fuel freezing and model validation were incomplete prior to the present work. The ability to simulate jet fuel freezing is a necessary tool for fuel system designers. An additional impediment to the understanding and simulation of jet fuel freezing has been the absence of published low-temperature thermo-physical properties, including viscosity, which the present work addresses. The dissertation is subdivided into three major segments covering visualization, modeling and validation, and viscosity studies. In the first segment samples of jet fuel, JPTS, kerosene, Jet A and Jet A containing additives, were cooled below their freeze point temperatures in a rectangular, optical cell. Images and temperature data recorded during the solidification process provided information on crystal habit, crystallization behavior, and the influence of the buoyancy-driven flow on freezing. N-alkane composition of the samples was determined. The Jet A sample contained the least n-alkane mass. The cooling of JPTS resulted in the least wax formation while the cooling of kerosene yielded the greatest wax formation. The JPTS and kerosene samples exhibited similar crystallization behavior and crystal habits during

  3. Microbial studies in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program.

    PubMed

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S; West, J M

    1997-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for permanent geological disposal of used nuclear fuel in Canada. This concept, based on a multibarrier system, would involve disposal of nuclear fuel waste in titanium or copper containers, surrounded by compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials, in a vault 500-1000 m deep in granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. Subsurface environments will not be sterile and an experimental program was initiated in 1991 by AECL to address and quantify the potential effects of microbial action on the integrity of the disposal vault. This microbial program focuses on answering specific questions in areas such as the survival of bacteria in compacted clay-based buffer materials under relevant radiation, temperature and desiccation conditions; mobility of microbes in compacted buffer materials; the potential for microbially influenced corrosion of containers; microbial gas production in backfill material; introduction of nutrients as a result of vault excavation and operation; the presence and activity of microbes in deep granitic groundwaters; and the effects of biofilms on radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This paper summarizes the results to date from the research activities at AECL. PMID:9299719

  4. Fuel-Neutral Studies of PM Transportation Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Mark L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Howden, Ken

    2012-11-15

    New gasoline engine technologies such as Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI), Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI), and Reaction Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) offer the possibility of dramatically increasing the fuel efficiency of future vehicles. One drawback to these advanced engines is that they have the potential to produce higher levels of exhaust particulates than current Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. Regulation of engine particulate emissions in Europe is moving from mass-based standards toward number-based standards. Due to growing health concerns surrounding nano-aerosols, it is likely that similar standards will eventually be applied in the United States. This would place more emphasis on the reliable removal of smaller particles, which make up the vast majority of the particulates generated on a number basis. While Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) have become standard, different filter systems would likely be required for advanced gasoline vehicles, due to factors such as differing particulate properties and higher exhaust temperatures. High exhaust temperatures can limit the accumulation of a soot cake, which performs most of the actual filtration in a typical DPF system.

  5. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Scaglione, John M

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  6. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility, practicability, and potential advantages/disadvantages of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in long range, subsonic transport aircraft of advanced design were studied. Both passenger and cargo-type aircraft were investigated. To provide a valid basis for comparison, conventional hydrocarbon (Jet A) fueled aircraft were designed to perform identical missions using the same advanced technology and meeting the same operational constraints. The liquid hydrogen and Jet A fueled aircraft were compared on the basis of weight, size, energy utilization, cost, noise, emissions, safety, and operational characteristics. A program of technology development was formulated.

  7. Study of effects of injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Roach, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference method has been developed for computing the flow in the near field of a fuel injector as part of a broader study of the effects of fuel injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion. Detailed numerical results have been obtained for cases of laminar and turbulent flow without base injection, corresponding to the supersonic base flow problem. These numerical results indicated that the method is stable and convergent, and that significant savings in computer time can be achieved, compared with explicit methods.

  8. NEUTRONICS STUDIES OF URANIUM-BASED FULLY CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL FOR PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    George, Nathan M; Maldonado, G Ivan; Terrani, Kurt A; Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature

  9. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  10. Progress made on the University of Missouri research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J. Charles; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P.

    2008-07-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the highest-powered University-owned research reactor in the U.S. designed to operate at a maximum steady-state power level of 10 MW{sub th}, is one of five U.S. high performance research reactors that use HEU fuel that is actively th collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy to find a suitable LEU fuel replacement. A conversion feasibility study, using U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel, is currently being performed at MURR. At first, broad scoping studies where conducted using the transport code MCNP, where the core water-to-metal ratio was varied by altering the thickness or width of the plate cladding, fuel meat, and coolant channel gaps, and varying the number of fuel plates. From these studies, an optimal LEU core design was chosen based on the following calculated parameters: power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and the fast and thermal fluxes available to the experimental facilities. Fuel burnup calculations are now being performed using the 3-D diffusion theory code REBUS. Also included in this paper are some preliminary safety analyses, including parametric studies using the reactivity transient code PARET-ANL and hydraulic calculations using the light- and heavy-water thermal-hydraulic transient code RELAP5/MOD3.3. (author)

  11. The study of integrated coal-gasifier molten carbonate fuel cell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A novel integration concept for a coal-fueled coal gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell power plant was studied. Effort focused on determining the efficiency potential of the concept, design, and development requirements of the processes in order to achieve the efficiency. The concept incorporates a methane producing catalytic gasifier of the type previously under development by Exxon Research and Development Corp., a reforming molten carbonate fuel cell power section of the type currently under development by United Technologies Corp., and a gasifier-fuel cell recycle loop. The concept utilizes the fuel cell waste heat, in the form of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, to generate additional fuel in the coal gasifier, thereby eliminating the use of both an O2 plant and a stream bottoming cycle from the power plant. The concept has the potential for achieving coal-pile-to-busbar efficiencies of 50-59%, depending on the process configuration and degree of process configuration and degree of process development requirements. This is significantly higher than any previously reported gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell system.

  12. Cooking fuels and the push for cleaner alternatives: a case study from Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shelby; Sié, Ali; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Introduction More than 95% of the population in Burkina Faso uses some form of solid biomass fuel. When these fuels are burned in traditional, inefficient stoves, pollutant levels within and outside the home can be very high. This can have important consequences for both health and climate change. Thus, the push to switch to cleaner burning fuels is advantageous. However, there are several considerations that need to be taken into account when considering the use and promotion of different fuel types. Objective In the setting of the semi-urban area of Nouna, Burkina Faso, we examine the common fuel types used (wood, charcoal and liquid petroleum gas (LPG)) in terms of consumption, energy, availability, air pollution and climate change. Results and conclusion Although biomass solid fuel does offer some advantages over LPG, the disadvantages make this option much less desirable. Lower energy efficiencies, higher pollutant emission levels, the associated health consequences and climate change effects favour the choice of LPG over solid biomass fuel use. Further studies specific to Burkina Faso, which are lacking in this region, should also be undertaken in this area to better inform policy decisions. PMID:22778710

  13. The study of integrated coal-gasifier molten carbonate fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-07-01

    A novel integration concept for a coal-fueled coal gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell power plant was studied. Effort focused on determining the efficiency potential of the concept, design, and development requirements of the processes in order to achieve the efficiency. The concept incorporates a methane producing catalytic gasifier of the type previously under development by Exxon Research and Development Corp., a reforming molten carbonate fuel cell power section of the type currently under development by United Technologies Corp., and a gasifier-fuel cell recycle loop. The concept utilizes the fuel cell waste heat, in the form of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, to generate additional fuel in the coal gasifier, thereby eliminating the use of both an O2 plant and a stream bottoming cycle from the power plant. The concept has the potential for achieving coal-pile-to-busbar efficiencies of 50-59%, depending on the process configuration and degree of process configuration and degree of process development requirements. This is significantly higher than any previously reported gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell system.

  14. Study of integrated coal-gasifier molten carbonate fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    A novel integration concept for a coal-fueled coal gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell power plant was studied. Effort focused on determining the efficiency potential of the concept, design, and development requirements of the processes in order to achieve the efficiency. The concept incorporates a methane producing catalytic gasifier of the type previously under development by Exxon Research and Development Corp., a reforming molten carbonate fuel cell power section of the type currently under development by United Technologies Corp., and a gasifier-fuel cell recycle loop. The concept utilizes the fuel cell waste heat, in the form of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, to generate additional fuel in the coal gasifier, thereby eliminating the use of both an O2 plant and a stream bottoming cycle from the power plant. The concept has the potential for achieving coal-pile-to-busbar efficiencies of 50-59%, depending on the process configuration and degree of process configuration and degree of process development requirements. This is significantly higher than any previously reported gasifier-molten carbonate fuel cell system.

  15. Experimental study of the microbial fuel cell internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei-Yuan; Liu, Zhong-Liang

    The internal resistance, including activation loss internal resistance (AIR), ohmic loss internal resistance (OIR) and concentration loss internal resistance (CIR), is an important parameter that determines the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The experimental investigations were completed to estimate the contributions of these three components to the internal resistance. The internal resistance is found to vary with electric current, although it is almost a constant for the current is within a certain region. The largest component of the internal resistance is CIR except for small currents. The AIR decreases quickly for small current and reduces its decreasing rate as the current increases and approaches to a constant. The OIR is constant over the whole current range. The experiments also disclose that increasing the limiting current and reducing the concentration loss are both important for improving the MFC performance.

  16. Engineering study: 105KE to 105KW Basin fuel and sludge transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, R.G.

    1994-09-20

    In the last five years, there have been three periods at the 105KE fuel storage basin (KE Basin) where the reported drawdown test rates were in excess of 25 gph. Drawdown rates in excess of this amount have been used during past operations as the primary indicators of leaks in the basin. The latest leak occurred in March, 1993. The reported water loss from the KE Basin was estimated at 25 gph. This engineering study was performed to identify and recommend the most feasible and practical method of transferring canisters of irradiated fuel and basin sludge from the KE Basin to the 105KW fuel storage basin (KW Basin). Six alternatives were identified during the performance of this study as possible methods for transferring the fuel and sludge from the KE Basin to the KW Basin. These methods were then assessed with regard to operations, safety, radiation exposure, packaging, environmental concerns, waste management, cost, and schedule; and the most feasible and practical methods of transfer were identified. The methods examined in detail in this study were based on shipment without cooling water except where noted: Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system and water cooling; Transfer by rail using the previously used transfer system (without water cooling); Transfer by truck using the K Area fuel transfer cask (K Area cask); Transfer by truck using a DOE shipping cask; Transfer by truck using a commercial shipping cask; and Transfer by truck using a new fuel shipping cask.

  17. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  18. Masters Study in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Kanchan

    2014-12-08

    There are currently three key drivers for the US energy sector a) increasing energy demand and b) environmental stewardship in energy production for sustainability and c) general public and governmental desire for domestic resources. These drivers are also true for energy nation globally. As a result, this sector is rapidly diversifying to alternate sources that would supplement or replace fossil fuels. These changes have created a need for a highly trained workforce with a the understanding of both conventional and emerging energy resources and technology to lead and facilitate the reinvention of the US energy production, rational deployment of alternate energy technologies based on scientific and business criteria while invigorating the overall economy. In addition, the current trends focus on the the need of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate education to move beyond academia and be more responsive to the workforce needs of businesses and the industry. The SIUC PSM in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management (AEFM) program was developed in response to the industries stated need for employees who combine technical competencies and workforce skills similar to all PSM degree programs. The SIUC AEFM program was designed to provide the STEM graduates with advanced technical training in energy resources and technology while simultaneously equipping them with the business management skills required by professional employers in the energy sector. Technical training include core skills in energy resources, technology and management for both conventional and emerging energy technologies. Business skills training include financial, personnel and project management. A capstone internship is also built into the program to train students such that they are acclimatized to the real world scenarios in research laboratories, in energy companies and in government agencies. The current curriculum in the SIUC AEFM will help fill the need for training both recent

  19. Impacts of electric demand-side management programs on fuel choice: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.D.; Kavanaugh, D.C.; Sandahl, L.J.; Vinnard, A.B.

    1994-04-01

    Information, rebates, and technical assistance associated with utility demand-side management (DSM) programs can alter consumer behavior. Such programs may unintentionally affect consumer fuel choices. This study addresses fuel choice effects of a unique Pacific Northwest DSM program: (1) it is directed at new manufactured homes only, (2) it is an acquisition program -- utilities make $2,500 payments directly to manufacturers for each electrically heated, energy-efficient home built, (3) it has rapidly penetrated nearly 100% of the potential market, and (4) over 90% of the affected homes in the participating region have traditionally used electricity for space heating. Heating equipment data for all manufactured homes built in the region since 1987 were sampled and regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the DSM program and fuel shares. The quantitative data were supplemented with interview data to better understand the relationship between the program and fuel choice. The results should be useful for program design and evaluation.

  20. Reduction of Worldwide Plutonium Inventories Using Conventional Reactors and Advanced Fuels: A Systems Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A., Bathke, C.G.

    1997-12-31

    The potential for reducing plutonium inventories in the civilian nuclear fuel cycle through recycle in LWRs of a variety of mixed oxide forms is examined by means of a cost based plutonium flow systems model. This model emphasizes: (1) the minimization of separated plutonium; (2) the long term reduction of spent fuel plutonium; (3) the optimum utilization of uranium resources; and (4) the reduction of (relative) proliferation risks. This parametric systems study utilizes a globally aggregated, long term (approx. 100 years) nuclear energy model that interprets scenario consequences in terms of material inventories, energy costs, and relative proliferation risks associated with the civilian fuel cycle. The impact of introducing nonfertile fuels (NFF,e.g., plutonium oxide in an oxide matrix that contains no uranium) into conventional (LWR) reactors to reduce net plutonium generation, to increase plutonium burnup, and to reduce exo- reactor plutonium inventories also is examined.

  1. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

  2. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration at the Anheuser-Busch Los Angeles brewery

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, R.M.; Corea, V.A.; Sorensen, J.C.; Duncan, J.M.; Rudawitz, L.; Verdes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The results of a feasibility study undertaken in support of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) goal to develop fuel cell power plants for industrial cogeneration are described. Use of a single 4.5 MW fuel cell power plant like that manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and currently being constructed on the Consolidated Edison of New York System was examined. The technical feasibility of using such a plant in a cogeneration mode at the Anheuser-Busch, Los Angeles brewery was affirmed by the study. Break-even capital costs for UTC supplied equipment were calculated for various conditions. Based upon the assumption that UTC supplied equipment could be provided for the $350 to $400/kW projected for first generation fuel cells, the economic feasibility of fuel cell cogeneration was demonstrated for nearly all assumed conditions. The most economical case was found to be a municipal utility owned, base loaded power plant where economic credit is taken for reduced environmental emissions. Acceptable fuels were evaluated for their availability, and the fuels identified for use were natural gas with propane as a backup. Phosphoric acid is the selected electrolyte. The Demonstration Program Plan is described. (WHK)

  3. Feasibility study of wood biomass gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell power system—comparative characterization of fuel cell and gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, H.; Yoshiba, F.; Woudstra, N.; Hemmes, K.; Spliethoff, H.

    The conversion of biomass by means of gasification into a fuel suitable for a high-temperature fuel cell has recently received more attention as a potential substitute for fossil fuels in electric power production. However, combining biomass gasification with a high-temperature fuel cell raises many questions with regard to efficiency, feasibility and process requirements. In this study, a biomass gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system is modelled and compared with a relatively well-established biomass gasification/gas turbine (GT), in order to understand the peculiarities of biomass gasification/MCFC power systems and to develop a reference MCFC system as a future biomass gasification/MCFC power station.

  4. Spin Contrast Variation Study of Fuel-efficient Tire Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Takeji; Shamoto, Shin-ichi; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yuasa, Takeshi; Tominaga, Tetsuo; Sone, Takuo

    The scattering length of a proton against a polarized neutron depends strongly on the polarization of proton spins (PH). This dependence can be utilized for contrast variation in small angle neutron scattering (SANS). We applied this spin contrast variation technique to a silica-filled SBR rubber specimen, which is widely used for tread rubber of fuel-efficient tires. For realizing high PH, we used dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique, in which large polarization of electron spin at low temperature and high magnetic field is transferred to proton spin by microwave irradiation with a tuned frequency. As this electron spin source, we doped stable radical TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine 1-oxyl) into the rubber sample by use of a vapor sorption technique. For the TEMPO-doped rubber sample, SANS measurements were conducted at PH = -20%, 0%, and +13%, with almost fully polarized neutron beam %) with its wavelength of 6.5±0.6 Å. The SANS profile clearly changed as a function of PH, which can be explained by the PH dependence of the neutron scattering length densities of the main three components (SBR, silica and zinc oxide). By a linear transformation of the profiles obtained at the three different PH values, we successfully determined the partial scattering function of silica, which reflects the aggregation of silica particles.

  5. Theoretical studies of transient criticality of irradiated fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, F.; Bonhomme, C.; Hague, P.; Mather, D.J.; Shaw, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of transport flasks containing irradiated fuel is a common event, and their movements are strictly regulated by the national competent authority in order that an acceptable level of control of radiation hazards be maintained. Nonetheless it has been considered prudent to quantify the consequences of a particular hypothetical accident involving a transport package. The particular accident examined assumed that recriticality occurs during the refilling of a flask, and for the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) scenario, for which flasks are transported dry, the hypothetical accident occurs as the flask is slowly lowered into a storage pond. An alternative UK scenario assumes that the flask is being refilled, following breach, by a high-pressure hose. Thus, the consequences of such an accident were estimated by developing computer codes, Chateau by the CEA and Sartemp by the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). This and other results show that the hypothetical accident in which a transport flask is brought to critical by the reentry of water gives at most a relatively mild event. In view of the considerably unlikely circumstances and conservative aspects introduced, this result shows that such an accident can be safely contained.

  6. Surface compatibility studies of potassium perchlorate reaction with pyrotechnic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.S.; Moddeman, W.E.; Bowling, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES) were used to analyze surface changes in Fe/KClO/sub 4/, TiH/sub 0/ /sub 65//KClO/sub 4/ and Al foils in KClO/sub 4/ during accelerated aging at 60 and 120/sup 0/C. The result shows a 0.02% Cl/sup -/ formation per day in Fe/KClO/sub 4/ and TiH/sub 0/ /sub 65//KC 1O/sub 4/ powders aged at 120/sup 0/C for less than or equal to 145 days. No KClO/sub 4/ decomposition was observed under the similar aging conditions in KClO/sub 4/ samples without pyrotechnic fuels. Titanium oxide to KClO/sub 4/ signal ratio in a pressed disk of TiH/sub 0/ /sub 65//KClO/sub 4/ was found to be lower than that of the powdered samples. Carbon impurities were noted in all powders, especially strong in metal (or subhydride) containing specimens; carbon impurities were slightly removed from the subhydride during aging.

  7. US--EC fuel cycle study: Background document to the approach and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Robin; Lee, Russell

    1992-11-01

    In February 1991, DOE and the Commission of the European Communities (EC), signed a joint statement regarding the external costs of fuel cycles. This 18-month agreement committed their respective organizations to ``develop a comparative analytical methodology and to develop the best range of estimates of external costs from secondary sources`` for eight fuel cycles and four conservation options. In our study, a fuel cycle is defined as the series of physical and chemical processes and activities that are required to generate electricity from a specific fuel or resource. This foundation phase of the study is primarily limited to developing and demonstrating methods for estimating impacts and their monetized value, what we term ``damages`` or ``benefits,`` leaving aside the extent to which such damages have been internalized. However, Appendix C provides the conceptual framework for evaluating the extent of internalization. This report is a background document to introduce the study approach and to discuss the major conceptual and practical issues entailed by the incremental damage problem. As a background document, the report seeks to communicate an overview of the study and the important methodological choices that were made to conduct the research. In successive sections of the report, the methodological tools used in the study are discussed; the ecological and health impacts are reviewed using the coal fuel cycle as a reference case; and, in the final chapter, the methods for valuing impacts are detailed.

  8. US--EC fuel cycle study: Background document to the approach and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Robin; Russell, Lee; Krupnick, Alan; Smith, Hilary; Schaffhauser, Jr., A.; Barnthouse, Larry; Cada, Glen; Kroodsma, Roger; Turner, Robb; Easterly, Clay; Jones, Troyce; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Freeman, A. Myrick

    1992-11-01

    In February 1991, DOE and the Commission of the European Communities (EC), signed a joint statement regarding the external costs of fuel cycles. This 18-month agreement committed their respective organizations to develop a comparative analytical methodology and to develop the best range of estimates of external costs from secondary sources'' for eight fuel cycles and four conservation options. In our study, a fuel cycle is defined as the series of physical and chemical processes and activities that are required to generate electricity from a specific fuel or resource. This foundation phase of the study is primarily limited to developing and demonstrating methods for estimating impacts and their monetized value, what we term damages'' or benefits,'' leaving aside the extent to which such damages have been internalized. However, Appendix C provides the conceptual framework for evaluating the extent of internalization. This report is a background document to introduce the study approach and to discuss the major conceptual and practical issues entailed by the incremental damage problem. As a background document, the report seeks to communicate an overview of the study and the important methodological choices that were made to conduct the research. In successive sections of the report, the methodological tools used in the study are discussed; the ecological and health impacts are reviewed using the coal fuel cycle as a reference case; and, in the final chapter, the methods for valuing impacts are detailed.

  9. Ionic conductivity studies of solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes and theoretical modeling of an entire solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornprasertsuk, Rojana

    Because of the steep increase in oil prices, the global warming effect and the drive for energy independence, alternative energy research has been encouraged worldwide. The sustainable fuels such as hydrogen, biofuel, natural gas, and solar energy have attracted the attention of researchers. To convert these fuels into a useful energy source, an energy conversion device is required. Fuel cells are one of the energy conversion devices which convert chemical potentials into electricity. Due to their high efficiency, the ease to scale from 1 W range to megawatts range, no recharging requirement and the lack of CO2 and NOx emission (if H2 and air/O 2 are used), fuel cells have become a potential candidate for both stationary power generators and portable applications. This thesis has been focused primarily on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) studies due to its high efficiency, varieties of fuel choices, and no water management problem. At the present, however, practical applications of SOFCs are limited by high operating temperatures that are needed to create the necessary oxide-ion vacancy mobility in the electrolyte and to create sufficient electrode reactivities. This thesis introduces several experimental and theoretical approaches to lower losses both in the electrolyte and the electrodes. Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is commonly used as a solid electrolyte for SOFCs due to its high oxygen-ion conductivity. To improve the ionic conductivity for low temperature applications, an approach that involves dilating the structure by irradiation and introducing edge dislocations into the electrolyte was studied. Secondly, to understand the activation loss in SOFC, the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) technique was implemented to model the SOFC operation to determining the rate-limiting step due to the electrodes on different sizes of Pt catalysts. The isotope exchange depth profiling technique was employed to investigate the irradiation effect on the ionic transport in different

  10. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in advanced designs of long range, subsonic transport aircraft is assessed. Both passenger and cargo type aircraft are investigated. Comparisons of physical, performance, and economic parameters of the LH2 fueled designs with conventionally fueled aircraft are presented. Design studies are conducted to determine appropriate characteristics for the hydrogen related systems required on board the aircraft. These studies included consideration of material, structural, and thermodynamic requirements of the cryogenic fuel tanks and fuel systems with the structural support and thermal protection systems.

  11. A comparative study on the wear behaviors of cladding candidates for accident-tolerant fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Byun, Thak Sang

    2015-10-01

    Accident-tolerant fuels are expected to have considerably longer coping time to respond to the loss of active cooling under severe accidents and, at the same time, have comparable or improved fuel performance during normal operation. The wear resistance of accident tolerant fuels, therefore, needs to be examined to determine the applicability of these cladding candidates to the current operating PWRs because the most common failure of nuclear fuel claddings is still caused by grid-to-rod fretting during normal operations. In this study, reciprocating sliding wear tests on three kinds of cladding candidates for accident-tolerant fuels have been performed to investigate the tribological compatibilities of self-mated cladding candidates and to determine the direct applicability of conventional Zirconium-based alloys as supporting structural materials. The friction coefficients of the cladding candidates are strongly influenced by the test environments and coupled materials. The wear test results under water lubrication conditions indicate that the supporting structural materials for the cladding candidates of accident-tolerant fuels need to be replaced with the same cladding materials instead of using conventional Zirconium-based alloys.

  12. Study of operational parameters impacting helicopter fuel consumption. [using computer techniques (computer programs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Stevens, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    A computerized study of operational parameters affecting helicopter fuel consumption was conducted as an integral part of the NASA Civil Helicopter Technology Program. The study utilized the Helicopter Sizing and Performance Computer Program (HESCOMP) developed by the Boeing-Vertol Company and NASA Ames Research Center. An introduction to HESCOMP is incorporated in this report. The results presented were calculated using the NASA CH-53 civil helicopter research aircraft specifications. Plots from which optimum flight conditions for minimum fuel use that can be obtained are presented for this aircraft. The results of the study are considered to be generally indicative of trends for all helicopters.

  13. Disposal options for burner ash from spent graphite fuel. Final study report November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, A.P.

    1994-08-01

    Three major disposal alternatives are being considered for Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSVR) and Peach Bottom Reactor (PBR) spent fuels: direct disposal of packaged, intact spent fuel elements; (2) removal of compacts to separate fuel into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW); and (3) physical/chemical processing to reduce waste volumes and produce stable waste forms. For the third alternative, combustion of fuel matrix graphite and fuel particle carbon coatings is a preferred technique for head-end processing as well as for volume reduction and chemical pretreatment prior to final fixation, packaging, and disposal of radioactive residuals (fissile and fertile materials together with fission and activation products) in a final repository. This report presents the results of a scoping study of alternate means for processing and/or disposal of fissile-bearing particles and ash remaining after combustion of FSVR and PBR spent graphite fuels. Candidate spent fuel ash (SFA) waste forms in decreasing order of estimated technical feasibility include glass-ceramics (GCs), polycrystalline ceramic assemblages (PCAs), and homogeneous amorphous glass. Candidate SFA waste form production processes in increasing order of estimated effort and cost for implementation are: low-density GCs via fuel grinding and simultaneous combustion and waste form production in a slagging cyclone combustor (SCC); glass or low-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by conventional melting of SFA and frit; PCAs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of SFA/frit mixtures; and high-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by HIPing of Calcine/Frit/SFA mixtures.

  14. Performance study of sugar-yeast-ethanol bio-hybrid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Justin P.; Mackie, David M.; Benyamin, Marcus; Ganguli, Rahul; Sumner, James J.

    2015-05-01

    Renewable alternatives to fossil hydrocarbons for energy generation are of general interest for a variety of political, economic, environmental, and practical reasons. In particular, energy from biomass has many advantages, including safety, sustainability, and the ability to be scavenged from native ecosystems or from waste streams. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can take advantage of microorganism metabolism to efficiently use sugar and other biomolecules as fuel, but are limited by low power densities. In contrast, direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) take advantage of proton exchange membranes (PEMs) to generate electricity from alcohols at much higher power densities. Here, we investigate a novel bio-hybrid fuel cell design prepared using commercial off-the-shelf DAFCs. In the bio-hybrid fuel cells, biomass such as sugar is fermented by yeast to ethanol, which can be used to fuel a DAFC. A separation membrane between the fermentation and the DAFC is used to purify the fermentate while avoiding any parasitic power losses. However, shifting the DAFCs from pure alcohol-water solutions to filtered fermented media introduces complications related to how the starting materials, fermentation byproducts, and DAFC waste products affect both the fermentation and the long-term DAFC performance. This study examines the impact of separation membrane pore size, fermentation/fuel cell byproducts, alcohol and salt concentrations, and load resistance on fuel cell performance. Under optimized conditions, the performance obtained is comparable to that of a similar DAFC run with a pure alcohol-water mixture. Additionally, the modified DAFC can provide useable amounts of power for weeks.

  15. Numerical Study on Influence of Cross Flow on Rewetting of AHWR Fuel Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mithilesh; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Ghosh, A. K.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Numerical study on AHWR fuel bundle has been carried out to assess influence of circumferential and cross flow rewetting on the conduction heat transfer. The AHWR fuel bundle quenching under accident condition is designed primarily with radial jets at several axial locations. A 3D (r, θ, z) transient conduction fuel pin model has been developed to carry out the study with a finite difference method (FDM) technique with alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme. The single pin has been considered to study effect of circumferential conduction and multipins have been considered to study the influence of cross flow. Both analyses are carried out with the same fluid temperature and heat transfer coefficients as boundary conditions. It has been found from the analyses that, for radial jet, the circumferential conduction is significant and due to influence of overall cross flow the reductions in fuel temperature in the same quench plane in different rings are different with same initial surface temperature. Influence of cross flow on rewetting is found to be very significant. Outer fuel pins rewetting time is higher than inner. PMID:24672341

  16. A parametric study of staged fuel injector configurations for scramjet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, E. H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric study of staged (multiple) perpendicular fuel injector configurations has been conducted using a computer code which solves the two-dimensional elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. The program computes the turbulent mixing and reaction of hydrogen fuel and air and allows the study of separated regions of the flow immediately preceding and following the injectors. The validity of the code is demonstrated in a cold flow helium injection study with a single injector. Results are presented that describe the flow field near opposing staged injectors over a range of parameters. Parameters that are varied include injector size, fuel split, and distance between injectors. Comparisons of the configurations are made to assess their mixing and potential flame-holding qualities.

  17. Feasibility study of a mini fuel cell to detect interference from a cellular phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. O.; Gan, Y. K.

    Fuel cells produce electricity without involving combustion processes. They generate no noise, vibration or air pollution and are therefore suitable for use in many vibration-free power-generating applications. In this study, a mini alkaline fuel cell signal detector system has been designed, constructed and tested. The initial results have shown the applicability of such system for used as an indicator of signal disturbance from cellular phones. A small disturbance even at 4 mV cm -1, corresponding to an amplitude of 12-18 mG in terms of electromagnetic field, can be well detected by such a device. Subsequently, a thermodynamics model has been developed to provide a parametric study by simulation to show the likely performance of the fuel cell alone in other environments. As such the model can provide many useful generic design data for alkaline fuel cells. Two general conclusions can be drawn from the present theoretical study: (i) fuel cell performance increases with temperature, pressure and correction factor, Cf; (ii) the temperature factor ( E/ T) increases with increasing temperature and with increasing pressure factor.

  18. Numerical study of solid fuel evaporation and auto-ignition in a dump combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahsini, A. M.; Farshchi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Evaporation of polymeric solid fuels in backward facing step geometry subject to an inlet oxidizer flow at elevated temperatures is considered and convective heating of the fuel surface by the hot oxidizing inlet flow and subsequent mixing of the evaporated fuel with the oxidizer flow and its combustion is numerically studied. The objective of this work is to gain insight into the auto-ignition of the fuel and its controlling parameters in this configuration. The system of governing equations is solved with a finite volume approach using a structured grid in which the AUSM + scheme is used to calculate the gas phase convective fluxes. The flowfield is turbulent and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is used in these simulations. Special attention is paid to the coupling of gas and solid phase to study the ignition process. Distinct intervals in ignition delay time are studied and evaporation time, mixing time, and reaction time are individually estimated. We have demonstrated that for inlet oxidizer streams with high initial oxygen concentration levels and high enough inlet temperatures a diffusion-controlled ignition mechanism controls the ignition time delay independent of the inlet velocity. This ignition time delay is directly related to the solid fuel evaporation time delay.

  19. Compatibility Study of Protective Relaying in a Grid-Connected Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-04-15

    A 200-kW fuel cell produced by International Fuel Cells (IFC), a United Technologies Company, began operation at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) in early June 2003. The NTRC is a joint Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and University of Tennessee research facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee. This research activity investigated the protective relaying functions of this fully commercialized fuel cell power plant, which uses ''synthesized'' protective relays. The project's goal is to characterize the compatibility between the fuel cell's interconnection protection system and the local distribution system or electric power system (EPS). ORNL, with assistance from the Electric Power Research Institute-Power Electronics Applications Center (EPRI-PEAC) in Knoxville, Tennessee, monitored and characterized the system compatibility over a period of 6 months. Distribution utility engineers are distrustful of or simply uncomfortable with the protective relaying and hardware provided as part of distributed generation (DG) plants. Part of this mistrust is due to the fact that utilities generally rely on hardware from certain manufacturers whose reliability is well established based on performance over many years or even decades. Another source of concern is the fact that fuel cells and other types of DG do not use conventional relays but, instead, the protective functions of conventional relays are simulated by digital circuits in the distributed generator's grid interface control unit. Furthermore, the testing and validation of internal protection circuits of DG are difficult to accomplish and can be changed by the vendor at any time. This study investigated and documented the safety and protective relaying present in the IFC fuel cell, collected data on the operation of the fuel cell, recorded event data during EPS disturbances, and assessed the compatibility of the synthesized protective circuits and the local distribution system. The project also

  20. CATCOM catalyst 5 atm 1000 hour aging study using No. 2 fuel oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgerby, I. T.; Olson, B. A.; Lee, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of the CATCOM catalyst for use in catalytically supported thermal combustion has been demonstrated at 5 atm, complementing a previous 1000 hour durability study at 1 atm. Both of these studies were conducted at about 640 K air preheat temperature at a reference velocity of about 14 m/s; the adiabatic flame temperature of the fuel/air mixture was about 1530 K. The catalyst proved to be capable of low emissions operations after 1000 hours of diesel fuel aging. However, more severe deactivation occurred in the 5 atm test; this was attributed to a loss in kinetic (ignition) activity.

  1. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  2. Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Mark R.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Gotthold, David W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    2013-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

  3. A comparative study of emission motorcycle with gasoline and CNG fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasongko, M. N.; Wijayanti, W.; Rahardja, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    A comparison of the exhaust emissions of the engine running gasoline and Compressed Natural Gas have been performed in this study. A gasoline engine 4 stroke single-cylinder with volume of 124.8 cc and compression ratio of 9.3:1 was converted to a CNG gaseous engine. The fuel injector was replaced with a solenoid valve system for injecting CNG gas to engine. The concentrations of CO, CO2, O2 and HC in the exhaust gas of engine were measured over the range of fuel flow rate from 25.32 mg/s to 70.22 mg/s and wide range of Air Fuel Ratio. The comparative analysis of this study showed that CNG engine has a lower HC, CO2 and CO emission at the stoichiometry mixture of fuel and air combustion. The emissions increased when the Air-Fuel ratio was switched from the stoichiometry condition. Moreover, CNG engine produced a lower HC and CO emission compared to the gasoline for difference air flow rate. The average of HC and CO emissions of the CNG was 92 % and 78 % lower than that of the gasoline

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India: A technical study for U.S.-India cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Taraknath Woddi Venkat

    The recent civil nuclear cooperation proposed by the Bush Administration and the Government of India has heightened the necessity of assessing India's nuclear fuel cycle inclusive of nuclear materials and facilities. This agreement proposes to change the long-standing U.S. policy of preventing the spread of nuclear weapons by denying nuclear technology transfer to non-NPT signatory states. The nuclear tests in 1998 have convinced the world community that India would never relinquish its nuclear arsenal. This has driven the desire to engage India through civilian nuclear cooperation. The cornerstone of any civilian nuclear technological support necessitates the separation of military and civilian facilities. A complete nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India emphasizes the entwinment of the military and civilian facilities and would aid in moving forward with the separation plan. To estimate the existing uranium reserves in India, a complete historical assessment of ore production, conversion, and processing capabilities was performed using open source information and compared to independent reports. Nuclear energy and plutonium production (reactor- and weapons-grade) was simulated using declared capacity factors and modern simulation tools. The three-stage nuclear power program entities and all the components of civilian and military significance were assembled into a flowsheet to allow for a macroscopic vision of the Indian fuel cycle. A detailed view of the nuclear fuel cycle opens avenues for technological collaboration. The fuel cycle that grows from this study exploits domestic thorium reserves with advanced international technology and optimized for the existing system. To utilize any appreciable fraction of the world's supply of thorium, nuclear breeding is necessary. The two known possibilities for production of more fissionable material in the reactor than is consumed as fuel are fast breeders or thermal breeders. This dissertation analyzes a thermal

  5. Study on Fuel Cell Network System Considering Reduction in Fuel Cell Capacity Using Load Leveling and Heat Release Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    Reduction in fuel cell capacity linked to a fuel cell network system is considered. When the power demand of the whole network is small, some of the electric power generated by the fuel cell is supplied to a water electrolysis device, and hydrogen and oxygen gases are generated. Both gases are compressed with each compressor and they are stored in cylinders. When the electric demand of the whole network is large, both gases are supplied to the network, and fuel cells are operated by these hydrogen and oxygen gases. Furthermore, an optimization plan is made to minimize the quantity of heat release of the hot water piping that connects each building. Such an energy network is analyzed assuming connection of individual houses, a hospital, a hotel, a convenience store, an office building, and a factory. Consequently, compared with the conventional system, a reduction of 46% of fuel cell capacity is expected.

  6. Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

  7. Study of Compton suppression for use in spent nuclear fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Sarah

    The focus of this study has been to assess Compton suppressed gamma-ray detection systems for the multivariate analysis of spent nuclear fuel. This objective has been achieved using direct measurement of samples of irradiated fuel elements in two geometrical configurations with Compton suppression systems. In order to address the objective to quantify the number of additionally resolvable photopeaks, direct Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel in two configurations were performed: as intact fuel elements and as dissolved feed solutions. These measurements directly assessed and quantified the differences in measured gamma-ray spectrum from the application of Compton suppression. Several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling time from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using three Compton suppression systems that utilized different primary detectors: HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl). The application of Compton suppression using a LaBr3 primary detector to the measurement of the current core fuel element, which presented the highest count rate, allowed four additional spectral features to be resolved. In comparison, the HPGe-CSS was able to resolve eight additional photopeaks as compared to the standalone HPGe measurement. Measurements with the NaI(Tl) primary detector were unable to resolve any additional peaks, due to its relatively low resolution. Samples of Approved Test Material (ATM) commercial fuel elements were obtained from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The samples had been processed using the beginning stages of the PUREX method and represented the unseparated feed solution from a reprocessing facility. Compton suppressed measurements of the ATM fuel samples were recorded inside the guard detector annulus, to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Photopeak losses were observed in the measurements of the dissolved ATM

  8. Mass spectrometric study of the release of volatile fission products from irradiated LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Steidl, D.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of these studies is to experimentally determine the chemical form and the rate of release of volatile fission product species from defected irradiated LWR reactor fuel pins. After release from the defected fuel pin the gaseous species immediately enters the ionizer of a quadrupole mass spectrometer thus ensuring that their chemical form is not likely to be changed prior to identification and measurement. These studies differ from prior studies in that: (1) the chemical form of the volatile fission products will be determined; and (2) the detection and measurement method does not depend on the radioactivity of the fission product element. Information on the chemical form of the released fission product species will enable a more accurate description of their transport and reaction in the primary system. These studies are also expected to yield information on the reaction of fission products after release from the fuel oxide with the zircaloy cladding. The results of these studies are expected to increase the understanding of the first step in the release of fission products by irradiated fuel and therefore help in the accurate prediction of source terms.

  9. Scoping studies of the alternative options for defueling, packaging, shipping, and disposing of the TMI-2 spent fuel core

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert T.

    1980-09-01

    A portion of this fuel will be shipped to nuclear facilities to perform detailed physical examinations. Removal of this fuel from the TMI-2 core is also a significant step in the eventual cleanup of this facility. The report presents a scoping study of the technical operations required for defueling and canning. The TMI fuel when canned could be stored in the spent fuel storage pool. After a period of on-site storage, it is expected that the bulk of the fuel will be shipped off-site for either storage or reprocessing. Evaluation is made of the technical, economic, and institutional factors associated with alternate approaches to disposition of this fuel. Recommendations are presented concerning future generic development tasks needed for the defueling, packaging, on-site shipping of this fuel.

  10. Fuel-Specific Effect of Exhaust Gas Residuals on HCCI Combustion: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P

    2008-01-01

    A modeling study was performed to investigate fuel-specific effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) components on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion at conditions relevant to the negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy using CHEMKIN-PRO. Four single-component fuels with well-established kinetic models were chosen: n-heptane, iso-octane, ethanol, and toluene. These fuels were chosen because they span a wide range of fuel chemistries, and produce a wide compositions range of complete stoichiometric products (CSP). The simulated engine conditions combined a typical spark ignition engine compression ratio (11.34) and high intake charge temperatures (500-550 K) that are relevant to NVO HCCI. It was found that over the conditions investigated, all the fuels had overlapping start of combustion (SOC) phasing, despite the wide range in octane number (RON = 0 to 120). The effect of the EGR components CO2 and H2O was to suppress the compression temperature because of their higher heat capacities, which retarded SOC. For a concentration of O2 higher than the stoichiometric amount, or excess O2, there was an effect of advancing SOC for n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, but SOC for ethanol was not advanced. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) for n-heptane was also found to be highly dependent on excess O2, and mild endothermic reaction was observed for cases when excess O2 was not present.

  11. Comparative study of two different powertrains for a fuel cell hybrid bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dawei; Jin, Zhenhua; Zhang, Junzhi; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao

    2016-07-01

    The powertrain plays an essential role in improving the tractive performance and the fuel consumption of fuel cell hybrid vehicles. This paper presents a comparative study of two different powertrains for fuel cell hybrid buses. The significant difference between the two powertrains lies in the types and arrangements of the electrical motor. One powertrain employs an induction motor to drive the vehicle, while the other powertrain adopts two permanent magnetic synchronous motors for near-wheel propulsion. Besides, the tiny difference between the proposed powertrain is the supply path of the fuel cell accessories, which can have an effect on the powertrain efficiency. The component parameters and energy management strategies for the two powertrain are determined. The fuel cell hybrid buses equipped with the two powertrains are developed, and some road tests are achieved, according to the chosen procedures or driving cycles. The paper focuses on the tractive performance and energy analysis of the powertrains based on the testing results. Finally, the paper summarizes the relative merits of the proposed powertrains.

  12. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  13. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. ); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. ); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. )

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  14. Fundamental combustion studies of emulsified fuels. Annual progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, I M

    1980-01-01

    A research program in the Fuels Research Laboratory at Princeton University has provided fundamental information on the combustion properties of emulsions and multi-component fuel mixtures. Particular attention has been given to understanding the phenomenon of micro-explosions and disruptive combustion. Earlier work which investigated the behavior of n-paraffin and water emulsions, binary mixtures of n-paraffins, and solutions of alcohol with n-paraffins has been completed and is now published in the open literature. This work has been extended during the current contract period to the study of the droplet combustion of a No. 2 fuel oil. Both emulsions with water and solutions of alcohols were investigated and very useful data were generated with regard to the optimization of the disruption phenomenon in terms of additive content. In addition, some preliminary work has been done with micro-emulsions. This indicated the importance of further work to elucidate the role of surfactant loading. Theoretical work on the growth of gaseous bubbles in fuel droplets has helped to define some of the controlling parameters in the disruption phenomenon. Finally the design of a new free droplet apparatus has been completed and a novel optical diagnostic technique for droplet sizing is near completion. This program has generated information which is of general interest in the field of droplet combustion and represents a considerable advance in our understanding of fuel related combustion phenomena.

  15. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    SciTech Connect

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  16. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

  17. Holographic studies of the vapor explosion of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Hess, C. F.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Holographic studies were performed which examined the fragmentation process during vapor explosion of a water-in-fuel (hexadecane/water) emulsion droplet. Holograms were taken at 700 to 1000 microseconds after the vapor explosion. Photographs of the reconstructed holograms reveal a wide range of fragment droplet sizes created during the explosion process. Fragment droplet diameters range from below 10 microns to over 100 microns. It is estimated that between ten thousand and a million fragment droplets can result from this extremely violent vapor explosion process. This enhanced atomization is thus expected to have a pronounced effect on vaporization processes which are present during combustion of emulsified fuels.

  18. Technical Approach and Results from the Fuels Pathway on an Alternative Selection Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Youngblood; Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    The report presents a detailed plan for conducting case studies to characterize probabilistic safety margins associated with different fuel cladding types in a way that supports a valid comparison of different fuels' performance. Recent work performed in other programs is described briefly and used to illustrate the challenges posed by characterization of margin in a probabilistic way. It is additionally pointed out that consistency of evaluation of performance across different cladding types is not easy to assure; a process for achieving the needed consistency is described.

  19. Internal voltage control of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the feasibility of internal voltage regulation of fuel cell systems. Two methods were tested. In one, reactant partial pressure was used as the voltage control parameter and in the other reactant total pressure was used for control. Both techniques were breadboarded and tested on a single alkaline-electrolyte fuel cell. Both methods were found to be possible forms of regulation, however, of the two the total pressure technique would be more efficient, simpler to apply and would provide better transient characteristics.

  20. Economic Study of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Reprocessing Practices in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    C. E. Singer; G. H. Miley

    1997-10-01

    This report describes a study of nuclear power economics in Russia. It addresses political and institutional background factors which constrain Russia's energy choices in the short and intermediate run. In the approach developed here, political and institutional factors might dominate short-term decisions, but the comparative costs of Russia's fuel-cycle options are likely to constrain her long-term energy strategy. To this end, the authors have also formulated a set of policy questions which should be addressed using a quantitative decision modeling which analyzes economic costs for all major components of different fuel cycle options, including the evolution of uranium prices.

  1. The national Fire and Fire Surrogate study: Effects of fuel reduction methods on forest vegetation structure and fuels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwilk, D.W.; Keeley, J.E.; Knapp, E.E.; Mciver, J.; Bailey, J.D.; Fettig, C.J.; Fiedler, C.E.; Harrod, R.J.; Moghaddas, J.J.; Outcalt, K.W.; Skinner, C.N.; Stephens, S.L.; Waldrop, T.A.; Yaussy, D.A.; Youngblood, A.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in vegetation and fuels were evaluated from measurements taken before and after fuel reduction treatments (prescribed fire, mechanical treatments, and the combination of the two) at 12 Fire and Fire Surrogate (FFS) sites located in forests with a surface fire regime across the conterminous United States. To test the relative effectiveness of fuel reduction treatments and their effect on ecological parameters we used an informationtheoretic approach on a suite of 12 variables representing the overstory (basal area and live tree, sapling, and snag density), the understory (seedling density, shrub cover, and native and alien herbaceous species richness), and the most relevant fuel parameters for wildfire damage (height to live crown, total fuel bed mass, forest floor mass, and woody fuel mass). In the short term (one year after treatment), mechanical treatments were more effective at reducing overstory tree density and basal area and at increasing quadratic mean tree diameter. Prescribed fire treatments were more effective at creating snags, killing seedlings, elevating height to live crown, and reducing surface woody fuels. Overall, the response to fuel reduction treatments of the ecological variables presented in this paper was generally maximized by the combined mechanical plus burning treatment. If the management goal is to quickly produce stands with fewer and larger diameter trees, less surface fuel mass, and greater herbaceous species richness, the combined treatment gave the most desirable results. However, because mechanical plus burning treatments also favored alien species invasion at some sites, monitoring and control need to be part of the prescription when using this treatment. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Application of spent fuel characterization and leaching studies for validating alteration models

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, Javier; Iglesias, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Nieves; Cobos Sabate, Joaquin; Martinez-Esparza, Aurora

    2007-07-01

    From the Spanish point of view, one of the key issues related to the HLW performance assessment is knowing and predicting, or modelling, the behaviour of spent fuel under geological repository conditions. Taking into account this objective, several experiments have been performed in order to split and determine the influence of different variables on the final stability of the spent fuel matrix in the geological repository. This paper presents some of the leaching results obtained with spent fuel and chemical analogues (UO{sub 2}, alpha doped-UO{sub 2}, SIMFUEL,) their application to extrapolate the corrosion behaviour for a long period of time and compare with corresponding data obtained using models. This procedure allows pointing out some of the uncertainties whose minimization is necessary to improve the models useful for performance assessment studies. (authors)

  3. Studies on the initial behaviours of the molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ye-Ro; Kim, In-Goo; Chung, Gui-Yung; Lee, Choong-Gon; Lim, Hee-Chun; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Nam, Suk-Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn

    Mathematical modelling of the unsteady-state of a unit molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) has been made. The behaviour of the fuel cell at the beginning of the operation is observed. The effects of the molar flow rates of gases and the utilization of fuel gas are studied. The current density decreases with time and reaches a steady-state value of 0.14 A cm -2 at 0.58 s for the chosen reference conditions. As the inlet gas-flow rates or the hydrogen utilization are increased, the time required to reach a steady-state decreases. With increased flow rates of the anode and cathode gases, the average current density is high and the total concentration is low. The current density increases with increasing utilization of hydrogen.

  4. A numerical study of candidate transverse fuel injector configurations in the Langley scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program has been developed that numerically solves the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes and species equations near one or more transverse hydrogen fuel injectors in a scramjet engine. The program currently computes the turbulent mixing and reaction of hydrogen fuel and air, and allows the study of separated regions of the flow immediately preceding and following the injectors. The complex shock-expansion structure produced by the injectors in this region of the engine can also be represented. Results are presented that describe the flow field near two opposing transverse fuel injectors and two opposing staged (multiple) injectors, and comparisons between the two configurations are made to assess their mixing and flameholding qualities.

  5. Phase 1 feasibility study of an integrated hydrogen PEM fuel cell system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luczak, F.

    1998-03-01

    Evaluated in the report is the use of hydrogen fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells for devices requiring less than 15 kW. Metal hydrides were specifically analyzed as a method of storing hydrogen. There is a business and technical part to the study that were developed with feedback from each other. The business potential of a small PEM product is reviewed by examining the markets, projected sales, and required investment. The major technical and cost hurdles to a product are also reviewed including: the membrane and electrode assembly (M and EA), water transport plate (WTP), and the metal hydrides. It was concluded that the best potential stationary market for hydrogen PEM fuel cell less than 15 kW is for backup power use in telecommunications applications.

  6. A study of the effect of fabrication variables on the void content and quality of fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.

    1986-10-01

    The control of void content and quality of dispersion type fuel plates fabricated for research and test reactors are issues of concern to plate fabricators. These two variables were studied by examining the data for various geometries of fuel plates fabricated at ANL. It was found that the porosity of a fuel plate can be increased by: (1) decreasing the fuel particle size, (2) increasing the fuel particle surface roughness, (3) increasing the matrix strength, (4) decreasing the rolling temperature, (5) decreasing the final fuel zone thickness, and (6) increasing the volume percentage of the fuel. Porosity formation is controlled by bulk movement and deformation and/or fracture of particles. The most important factor is the flow stress of the matrix material. Lowering the flow stress will decrease the plate porosity. The percentage of plates with fuel-out-of-zone is a function of the fuel material and the loading. The highest percentage of plates with fuel-out-of-zone were those with U3Si2 which is at this time the most commonly used silicide fuel.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF POTENTIAL EMISSIONS FROM FUEL CONVERSION FACILITIES. A SMOG CHAMBER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric chemistry of chemical species that may be emitted from fuel conversion facilities were studied in smog chambers. Of 17 compounds assessed for ozone-forming potential, 6 compounds were selected along with a control species, propylene, for testing in the presence of...

  8. Impact of fuel and nitrogen prices on profitability of selected crops: A case study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing prices for fuel and nitrogen (N) fertilizer affect crop production decisions and profitability. Nitrogen response functions were estimated for corn (Zea mays L.), sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.), dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and malt barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) using data from studie...

  9. Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-01

    This case study describes how Verizon's Central Office in Garden City, NY, installed a 1.4-MW phosphoric acid fuel cell system as an alternative solution to bolster electric reliability, optimize the company's energy use, and reduce costs in an environmentally responsible manner.

  10. Study of unsteady flow conditions for slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past three years, transport characteristics of coal-water mixtures (CWMs) have been studied at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. The effort has concentrated predominantly on studying flow conditions in straight horizontal and vertical sections, and to a lesser extent on studying the flow patterns around elbows of a one-inch-diameter loop and a two-inch-diameter loop. Steady-state flow was characterized for in-house prepared slurries and commercially prepared slurries. For lower concentrated slurries (55 wt % to 60 wt %) and coarse particle size distributions (50% finer than 75 microns), nonhomogeneous flow conditions were encountered across horizontal test sections. Since nonhomogeneous conditions existed in straight sections during steady-state flow, it was decided to further investigate flow conditions during changes in velocity (magnitude and direction). This paper concentrates on nonuniform flow conditions of two types. The first nonuniform flow condition arises from sudden increases in the magnitude of the flow velocity. Pressure measurements recorded at a fixed position in the vertical section of the two-inch-diameter loop during sudden changes in velocity can be analyzed via classic control theory to evaluate the dynamic properties of the CWM. The second nonuniform flow condition occurs as the CWM passes through a bend. Both long-radius bends and 90-degree elbows made of glass and steel have been studied. Pressure-loss data around the long-radius bends and elbows were analyzed with a modified version of the model developed by Ito for single-phase flow around bends. Flow patterns around glass bends and elbows were observed for slurries prepared of vinyl coating powder and water. They are described in an effort to increase understanding of the pressure-loss data. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Surface science studies on titania for solar fuel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadsell, Courtney Sara Mathews

    Titanium dioxide (titania) is a well-studied material for various applications including but not limited to, paint, sunscreen, pharmaceuticals and solar cell applications (photocatalysis.) It can be found in three main crystal forms; rutile, anatase, and brookite and this work will focus on the anatase form which has been heavily studied for its potential in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs.) I propose that aqueous and photo dye stability can be improved by taking special care to the exposed surface of anatase. Additionally, the theoretical maximum open circuit voltage of a DSSC is dependent upon which surface is exposed to the electrolyte. Previous works in this area have not been rigorous with respect to the surface and morphology of titania being used. Standard synthesis techniques of anatase lead to a crystal that generally has 94% of the titania (101) surface exposed, and the other 6% is the higher energy (001) surface. The (101) surface has 5 & 6-fold coordinated titania whereas the (001) surface only has 5-fold (under) coordinated titania. This under-coordination leads to enhanced reactivity of the (001) surface which has been demonstrated by dissassociative adsorption of water, and catalysis applications. Much theoretical work has focused on the minority (001) surface because up until recently synthesizing anatase with enhanced exposure of the (001) surface has been difficult. The initial materials for this study will be multilayer titania nanotubes (TiNTs) and nanosheets (TiNS) which have been previously characterized by my predecessor. The TiNTs and TiNS have 100% exposed (001)-like surface. Both of these materials show enhanced stability of phosphonated dye binding as compared to the current standard of anatase nanoparticles (NPs) however, due to their limited thermal stability the potential of incorporating the TiNTs and TiNSs into devices has been eliminated in this study. To overcome the device limitations I will synthesis a novel titania nanotile

  12. A neutronic feasibility study of the AP1000 design loaded with fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic feasibility study is performed to evaluate the utilization of fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel in the AP1000 reactor design. The widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP is employed to perform the full core analysis at the beginning of cycle (BOC). Both the original AP1000 design and the modified design with the replacement of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with FCM fuel compacts are modeled and simulated for comparison. To retain the original excess reactivity, ranges of fuel particle packing fraction and fuel enrichment in the FCM fuel design are first determined. Within the determined ranges, the reactor control mechanism employed by the original design is directly used in the modified design and the utilization feasibility is evaluated. The worth of control of each type of fuel burnable absorber (discrete/integral fuel burnable absorbers and soluble boron in primary coolant) is calculated for each design and significant differences between the two designs are observed. Those differences are interpreted by the fundamental difference of the fuel form used in each design. Due to the usage of silicon carbide as the matrix material and the fuel particles fuel form in FCM fuel design, neutron slowing down capability is increased in the new design, leading to a much higher thermal spectrum than the original design. This results in different reactivity and fission power density distributions in each design. We conclude that a direct replacement of fuel pellets by the FCM fuel in the AP1000 cannot retain the original optimum reactor core performance. Necessary modifications of the core design should be done and the original control mechanism needs to be re-designed. (authors)

  13. TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Jeffrey James

    2011-11-30

    This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated

  14. Feasibility study for Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel dry storage facility in Ukraine. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This document reports the results of a Feasibility Study sponsored by a TDA grant to Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP) in Ukraine to study the construction of storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. It provides pertinent information to U.S. companies interested in marketing spent fuel storage technology and related business to countries of the former Soviet Union or Eastern Europe.

  15. Study of the Physical and Energy Properties of Fuel Granules Based on a Thermomodified Wood Raw Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safin, R. R.; Khasanshin, R. R.; Timerbaeva, A. L.; Safina, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The authors present the results of experimental studies of the basic properties of fuel granules that have been produced from wood raw material treated in different temperature regimes. The authors have established the influence of the temperature of pretreatment of the raw material on the hygroscopicity, swelling, flame-maintenance efficiency, and heat of combustion of fuel granules. A comparative analysis of the energy efficiency of torrefacted pellets and regular fuel granules has been made.

  16. Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

  17. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  18. Flame tube parametric studies for control of fuel bound nitrogen using rich-lean two-stage combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.; Wolfbrandt, G.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental parametric study of rich-lean two-stage combustion in a flame tube is described and approaches for minimizing the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to nitrogen oxides in a premixed, homogeneous combustion system are evaluated. Air at 672 K and 0.48 MPa was premixed with fuel blends of propane, toluene, and pyridine at primary equivalence ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 and secondary equivalence ratios of 0.5 to 0.7. Distillates of SRC-II, a coal syncrude, were also tested. The blended fuels were proportioned to vary fuel hydrogen composition from 9.0 to 18.3 weight percent and fuel nitrogen composition from zero to 1.5 weight percent. Rich-lean combustion proved effective in reducing fuel nitrogen to NO sub x conversion; conversion rates up to 10 times lower than those normally produced by single-stage combustion were achieved. The optimum primary equivalence ratio, where the least NO sub x was produced and combustion efficiency was acceptable, shifted between 1.4 and 1.7 with changes in fuel nitrogen content and fuel hydrogen content. Increasing levels of fuel nitrogen content lowered the conversion rate, but not enough to avoid higher NO sub x emissions as fuel nitrogen increased.

  19. Study of Miller timing on exhaust emissions of a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO)-fueled diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Juha; Happonen, Matti; Murtonen, Timo; Lehto, Kalle; Sarjovaara, Teemu; Larmi, Martti; Keskinen, Jorma; Virtanen, Annele

    2012-11-01

    The effect of intake valve closure (IVC) timing by utilizing Miller cycle and start of injection (SOI) on particulate matter (PM), particle number and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions was studied with a hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO)-fueled nonroad diesel engine. HVO-fueled engine emissions, including aldehyde and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions, were also compared with those emitted with fossil EN590 diesel fuel. At the engine standard settings, particle number and NOx emissions decreased at all the studied load points (50%, 75%, and 100%) when the fuel was changed from EN590 to HVO. Adjusting IVC timing enabled a substantial decrease in NOx emission and combined with SOI timing adjustment somewhat smaller decrease in both NOx and particle emissions at IVC -50 and -70 degrees CA points. The HVO fuel decreased PAH emissions mainly due to the absence of aromatics. Aldehyde emissions were lower with the HVO fuel with medium (50%) load. At higher loads (75% and 100%), aldehyde emissions were slightly higher with the HVO fuel. However, the aldehyde emission levels were quite low, so no clear conclusions on the effect of fuel can be made. Overall, the study indicates that paraffinic HVO fuels are suitable for emission reduction with valve and injection timing adjustment and thus provide possibilities for engine manufacturers to meet the strictening emission limits. PMID:23210222

  20. Physical and chemical comparison of soot in hydrocarbon and biodiesel fuel diffusion flames: A study of model and commercial fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matti Maricq, M.

    2011-01-15

    Data are presented to compare soot formation in both surrogate and practical fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel and petroleum fuel diffusion flames. The approach here uses differential mobility analysis to follow the size distributions and electrical charge of soot particles as they evolve in the flame, and laser ablation particle mass spectrometry to elucidate their composition. Qualitatively, these soot properties exhibit a remarkably similar development along the flames. The size distributions begin as a single mode of precursor nanoparticles, evolve through a bimodal phase marking the onset of aggregate formation, and end in a self preserving mode of fractal-like particles. Both biodiesel and hydrocarbon fuels yield a common soot composition dominated by C{sub x}H{sub y}{sup +} ions, stabilomer PAHs, and fullerenes in the positive ion mass spectrum, and C{sub x}{sup -} and C{sub 2x}H{sup -} in the negative ion spectrum. These ion intensities initially grow with height in the diffusion flames, but then decline during later stages, consistent with soot carbonization. There are important quantitative differences between fuels. The surrogate biodiesel fuel methyl butanoate substantially reduces soot levels, but soot formation and evolution in this flame are delayed relative to both soy and petroleum fuels. In contrast, soots from soy and hexadecane flames exhibit nearly quantitative agreement in their size distribution and composition profiles with height, suggesting similar soot precursor chemistry. (author)

  1. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  2. Study on Gaseous Effluent Treatment for Dissolution Step of Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Iizuka, M.; Fujisaki, S.; Hotoku, S.; Asakura, T.; Uchiyama, G.

    2002-02-27

    Behavior of radioiodine and carbon-14 during spent fuel dissolution was studied in a bench-scale reprocessing test rig where 29 and 44 GWdt-1 spent fuels were respectively dissolved. Decontamination factor of AGS (silica-gel impregnated with silver nitrate) column for iodine-129 removal was measured to be more than 36,000. The measurement of iodine-129 profile in the adsorption column showed that the nuclide was effectively trapped by the adsorbent. Measurement of iodine-129 in the dissolver solution after the iodine-stripping operation using NO2 gas at 363 K, revealed that less than 0.57% of total iodine-129 generated, which was estimated by ORIGEN II calculation, was remained in the dissolver solution. Also, measurement of iodine-129 by an iodine-stripping operation from the dissolver solution using potassium iodate showed that another 2.72% of total iodine-129 precipitated as iodide. In addition, about 70 % of total iodine generated was measured in the AGS columns. Rest of iodine-129 was supposed to adsorb to a HEPA filter and the inner surface of dissolver off-gas lines. Those results on iodine-129 distribution were found to be almost identical to the results obtained in the study using iodine-131 as tracer and the results reported by other works. It was demonstrated that the two-steps iodine-stripping method using potassium iodate could expel additional iodine from the solution, more effectively than iodine-stripping operation using NO2 gas. Iodine-131 was also detected on the AGS columns at the spent fuel dissolution. Increasing burnup showed larger amount of iodine-131 since amount of curium-244 contained in the spent fuel increased with the burnup. Release of carbon-14 as carbon dioxide during dissolution was found to occur when the release of krypton-85. From the 14CO2 measurement, initial nitrogen-14 concentration in the fuel was estimated to be about several ppm, which was within the range reported.

  3. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Davila, Jesus; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides 232Th, 238U and 237Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  4. Quantitative study of ruthenium cross-over in direct methanol fuel cells during early operation hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoekel, A.; Melke, J.; Bruns, M.; Wippermann, K.; Kuppler, F.; Roth, C.

    2016-01-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), ruthenium cross-over is an important degradation phenomenon. The loss of ruthenium from the anode, its transport through the membrane and its deposition onto the cathode are detrimental to the fuel cell performance and limit the fuel cell's lifetime. Here we present a quantitative study on the fraction of ruthenium being transferred from the anode to the cathode during early operation hours (0-100 h) of a DMFC. Already during fabrication of the MEA ruthenium is transferred to the cathode. In our pristine MEAs about 0.024 wt% Ru could be found in the cathode catalyst. The cell potential during operation seems to have only a minor influence on the dissolution process. In contrast, the operation time appears to be much more important. Our data hint at two dissolution processes: a fast process dominating the first hours of operation and a slower process, which is responsible for the ongoing ruthenium transfer during the fuel cell lifetime. After 2 h held at open circuit conditions the Ru content of the cathode side was 10 times higher than in the pristine MEA. In contrast, the slower process increased that amount only by a factor of two over the course of another 100 h.

  5. Study of minimum-weight highway transporters for spent nuclear fuel casks: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoess, J.A.; Drago, V.J.

    1989-05-01

    There are federal and state limits on the maximum tractor-trailer- payload combination and individual axle loads permissible on US highways. These can generally be considered as two sets, i.e., legal-weight and overweight limits. The number of individual shipments required will decrease as the capacity of the spent nuclear fuel cask increases. Thus, there is an incentive for identifying readily available minimum-weight tractors and trailers capable of safely and reliably transporting as large a cask as possible without exceeding the legal gross combination weight (GCW) of 80,000 lb or selected overweight GCW limit of 110,000 lb. This study identifies options for commercially available heavy-duty on-highway tractors and trailers for transporting proposed future loaded spent nuclear fuel casks. Loaded cask weights of 56,000 and 80,000 lb were selected as reference design points for the legal-weight and overweight transporters, respectively. The technical data on tractor and trailer characteristics obtained indicate that it is possible to develop a tractor-trailer combination, tailored for spent nuclear fuel transportation service, utilizing existing technology and commercially available components, capable of safely and reliably transporting 56,000 and 80,000-lb spent nuclear fuel casks without exceeding GCWs of 80,000 and 10,000 lb, respectively. 4 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Experimental studies of laser-ablated zirconium carbide plasma plumes: Fuel corrosion diagnostic development

    SciTech Connect

    Wantuck, P.J.; Butt, D.P.; Sappey, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel materials, such as refractory carbides, in a high temperature hydrogen environment is critical for several proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. Monitoring the fuel corrosion products is important not only for understanding corrosion characteristics, but to assess the performance of an actual, operating nuclear propulsion system as well. In this paper, we describe an experimental study initiated to develop, test, and subsequently utilize non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics to characterize the gaseous product species which are expected to evolve during the exposure of representative fuel samples to hydrogen. Laser ablation is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from solid solution, uranium-free, zirconium carbide (ZrC) forms for probing by other laser diagnostic methods; predominantly laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, as well as the use of planar LIF to image both the ZrC plumes and actual NTP fuel corrosion constituents.

  7. Polar studies of the sphericity degree of V/HTR nuclear fuel particles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Inacio, F. . E-mail: frederique.robert@isen.fr; Boschet, C.; Charollais, F.

    2006-06-15

    Advanced nuclear power reactor designs such as (Very) High Temperature Reactors (V/HTR) employ TRISO fuel particles that typically have a sub-millimetre U-based fuel kernel coated with three isotropic ceramic layers-a layer of silicon carbide sandwiched between pyrocarbon layers of different density. Evaluation of the ceramic layer thickness and of the degree of sphericity of these typical nuclear fuel particles is required at each step of the fabrication, in order to estimate future fuel performance under irradiation conditions. This study is based on the image processing of polished cross-sections, realized near the equatorial plane. From these 2D images, some measurements are carried out, giving an estimation of the diameter values for a sample of particles at each step of the coating process. These values are then statistically extended to the third dimension in order to obtain the thickness of each layer and the degree of sphericity of each particle. A representation of diameter and layer thickness in polar coordinates enables one to identify steps for which the coating process is defective or deviating from nominal objectives.

  8. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trianti, N.; Su'ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with 231Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of 233U to 231Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of 231Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 ˜ 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  9. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Trianti, N.; Su'ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S.

    2012-06-06

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with {sup 231}Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of {sup 233}U to {sup 231}Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of {sup 231}Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 {approx} 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  10. Feasibility study of utilization of degummed soybean oil as a substitute for diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the economic and technological feasibility of producing a diesel oil substitute or extender from soybean oil. Existing technology was reviewed, to determine the minimum modification necessary for production of an acceptable fuel product. Current methods of oil extraction and refining were considered, as well as the products of those processes. The information developed indicated that the degummed soybean oil produced by existing processing plants is theoretically suitable for use as a diesel fuel extender. No modification of process design or equipment is required. This situation is very favorable to early commercialization of degummed soybean oil as a diesel fuel extender during the 1980's. Moreover, a large energy gain is realized when the soybean oil is utilized as fuel. Its heat of combustion is reported as 16,920 Btu per pound, or 130,000 Btu per gallon. Production of soybean oil consumes between 3000 and 5000 Btu per pound or 23,000 and 39,000 Btu per gallon. A resource availability study disclosed that the southeastern region of the United States produces approximately 260 million bushels of soybeans per year. In the same general area, fourteen extraction plants are operating, with a combined annual capacity of approximately 200 million bushels. Thus, regional production is sufficient to support the extraction capacity. Using an average figure of 1.5 gallons of oil per bushel of soybeans gives annual regional oil production of approximately 300 million gallons.